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Sample records for lysergyl peptide synthetase

  1. D-Lysergyl peptide synthetase from the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, B; Han, M; Keller, U

    1996-11-01

    The ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea produces the medically important ergopeptines, which consist of a cyclol-structured tripeptide and D-lysergic acid linked by an amide bond. An enzyme activity capable of non-ribosomal synthesis of D-lysergyl-L-alanyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-proline lactam, the non-cyclol precursor of the ergopeptine ergotamine, has been purified about 18-fold from the ergotamine-producing C. purpurea strain D1. Analysis of radioactively labeled enzyme-substrate complexes revealed a 370-kDa lysergyl peptide synthetase 1 (LPS 1) carrying the amino acid activation domains for alanine, phenylalanine, and proline. The activation of D-lysergic acid is catalyzed by a 140-kDa peptide synthetase (LPS 2) copurifying with LPS 1. LPS 1 and LPS 2 contain 4'-phosphopantetheine and bind their substrates covalently by thioester linkage. Kinetic analysis of the synthesis reaction revealed a Km of approximately 1.4 microM for both D-lysergic acid and its structural homolog dihydrolysergic acid, which is one to two orders of magnitude lower than the Km values for the other amino acids involved. The Km values for the amino acids reflect their relative concentrations in the cellular pool of C. purpurea. This may indicate that in in vivo conditions D-lysergyl peptide formation is limited by the D-lysergic acid concentration in the cell. In vitro, the multienzyme preparation catalyzes the formation of several different D-lysergyl peptide lactams according to the amino acids supplied. Specific antiserum was used to detect LPS 1 in various C. purpurea strains. In C. purpurea wild type, the enzyme was expressed at all stages of cultivation and in different media, suggesting that it is produced constitutively.

  2. Dissecting and Exploiting Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Tao SHEN; Xiu-Lan CHEN; Cai-Yun SUN; Yu-Zhong ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    A large number of therapeutically useful cyclic and linear peptides of bacteria or fungal origin are synthesized via a template-directed, nucleic-acid-independent nonribosomal mechanism. This process is carried out by mega-enzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). NRPSs contain repeated coordinated groups of active sites called modules, and each module is composed of several domains with different catalytic activities. The familiarity to these domains lays base for the future genetic engineering of NRPSs to generate entirely "unnature" Products. The details about NRPSs domain structures and the exploitation of NRPSs are described in this review.

  3. Substrate specificity of hybrid modules from peptide synthetases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsner, A; Engert, H; Saenger, W; Hamoen, L; Venema, G; Bernhard, F

    1997-01-01

    Homologous modules from two different peptide synthetases were analyzed for functionally equivalent regions. Hybrids between the coding regions of the phenylalanine-activating module of tyrocidine synthetase and the valine activating module of surfactin synthetase were constructed by combining the t

  4. Portability of oxidase domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tanya L; Walsh, Christopher T

    2004-12-21

    Oxazole and thiazole rings are present in numerous nonribosomal peptide natural products. Oxidase domains are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of thiazolines and oxazolines to yield fully aromatic heterocycles. Unlike most domains, the placement of oxidase domains within assembly line modules varies. Noting this tolerance, we investigated the portability of an oxidase domain to a heterologous assembly line. The epimerase domain of PchE, involved in pyochelin biosynthesis, was replaced with the oxidase domain from MtaD, involved in myxothiazol biosynthesis. The chimeric module was expressed in soluble form as a flavin mononucleotide-containing flavoprotein. The functionality of the inserted oxidase domain was assayed within PchE and in transfer of the growing siderophore acyl chain from PchE to the next downstream module. While pyochelin-like product release was not observed downstream, the robust activity of the transplanted oxidase domain and the ability of the chimeric module to produce an advanced intermediate bound to the synthetase underscore the possibility of future engineering within nonribosomal peptide synthetase pathways using oxidase domains.

  5. SCREENING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND GENES CODING POLYKETIDE SYNTHETASE AND NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASE OF ACTINOMYCETE ISOLATES

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    Silvia Kovácsová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe antimicrobial activity using agar plate diffusion method and screening genes coding polyketide synthetase (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS from actinomycetes. A total of 105 actinomycete strains were isolated from arable soil. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated at 54 strains against at least 1 of total 12 indicator organisms. Antifungal properties were recorded more often than antibacterial properties. The presence of PKS-I and NRPS genes were founded at 61 of total 105 strains. The number of strains with mentioned biosynthetic enzyme gene fragments matching the anticipated length were 19 (18% and 50 (47% respectively. Overall, five actinomycete strains carried all the biosynthetical genes, yet no antimicrobial activity was found against any of tested pathogens. On the other hand, twenty-one strains showed antimicrobial activity even though we were not able to amplify any of the PKS or NRPS genes from them. Combination of the two methods showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes isolated from arable soil, which indicate that actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds.

  6. Kinetics profiling of gramicidin S synthetase A, a member of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xun; Li, Hao; Alfermann, Jonas; Mootz, Henning D; Yang, Haw

    2014-12-23

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) incorporate assorted amino acid substrates into complex natural products. The substrate is activated via the formation of a reactive aminoacyl adenylate and is subsequently attached to the protein template via a thioester bond. The reactive nature of such intermediates, however, leads to side reactions that also break down the high-energy anhydride bond. The off-pathway kinetics or their relative weights compared to that of the on-pathway counterpart remains generally elusive. Here, we introduce multiplatform kinetics profiling to quantify the relative weights of on- and off-pathway reactions. Using the well-defined stoichiometry of thioester formation, we integrate a mass spectrometry (MS) kinetics assay, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay, and an ATP-pyrophosphate (PPi) exchange assay to map out a highly efficient on-pathway kinetics profile of the substrate activation and intermediate uploading (>98% relative weight) for wide-type gramicidin S synthetase A (GrsA) and a 87% rate profile for a cysteine-free GrsA mutant. Our kinetics profiling approach complements the existing enzyme-coupled byproduct-release assays, unraveling new mechanistic insights of substrate activation/channeling in NRPS enzymes.

  7. Common peptides study of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

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    Assaf Gottlieb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs constitute an essential enzyme super-family, providing fidelity of the translation process of mRNA to proteins in living cells. They are common to all kingdoms and are of utmost importance to all organisms. It is thus of great interest to understand the evolutionary relationships among them and underline signature motifs defining their common domains. RESULTS: We utilized the Common Peptides (CPs framework, based on extracted deterministic motifs from all aaRSs, to study family-specific properties. We identified novel aaRS-class related signatures that may supplement the current classification methods and provide a basis for identifying functional regions specific to each aaRS class. We exploited the space spanned by the CPs in order to identify similarities between aaRS families that are not observed using sequence alignment methods, identifying different inter-aaRS associations across different kingdom of life. We explored the evolutionary history of the aaRS families and evolutionary origins of the mitochondrial aaRSs. Lastly, we showed that prevalent CPs significantly overlap known catalytic and binding sites, suggesting that they have meaningful functional roles, as well as identifying a motif shared between aaRSs and a the Biotin-[acetyl-CoA carboxylase] synthetase (birA enzyme overlapping binding sites in both families. CONCLUSIONS: The study presents the multitude of ways to exploit the CP framework in order to extract meaningful patterns from the aaRS super-family. Specific CPs, discovered in this study, may play important roles in the functionality of these enzymes. We explored the evolutionary patterns in each aaRS family and tracked remote evolutionary links between these families.

  8. β-Lactam formation by a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase during antibiotic biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudelli, Nicole M; Long, Darcie H; Townsend, Craig A

    2015-04-16

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases are giant enzymes composed of modules that house repeated sets of functional domains, which select, activate and couple amino acids drawn from a pool of nearly 500 potential building blocks. The structurally and stereochemically diverse peptides generated in this manner underlie the biosynthesis of a large sector of natural products. Many of their derived metabolites are bioactive such as the antibiotics vancomycin, bacitracin, daptomycin and the β-lactam-containing penicillins, cephalosporins and nocardicins. Penicillins and cephalosporins are synthesized from a classically derived non-ribosomal peptide synthetase tripeptide (from δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase). Here we report an unprecedented non-ribosomal peptide synthetase activity that both assembles a serine-containing peptide and mediates its cyclization to the critical β-lactam ring of the nocardicin family of antibiotics. A histidine-rich condensation domain, which typically performs peptide bond formation during product assembly, also synthesizes the embedded four-membered ring. We propose a mechanism, and describe supporting experiments, that is distinct from the pathways that have evolved to the three other β-lactam antibiotic families: penicillin/cephalosporins, clavams and carbapenems. These findings raise the possibility that β-lactam rings can be regio- and stereospecifically integrated into engineered peptides for application as, for example, targeted protease inactivators.

  9. Structural and mutational analysis of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase heterocyclization domain provides insight into catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloudoff, Kristjan; Fage, Christopher D; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Schmeing, T Martin

    2017-01-03

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are a family of multidomain, multimodule enzymes that synthesize structurally and functionally diverse peptides, many of which are of great therapeutic or commercial value. The central chemical step of peptide synthesis is amide bond formation, which is typically catalyzed by the condensation (C) domain. In many NRPS modules, the C domain is replaced by the heterocyclization (Cy) domain, a homologous domain that performs two consecutive reactions by using hitherto unknown catalytic mechanisms. It first catalyzes amide bond formation, and then the intramolecular cyclodehydration between a Cys, Ser, or Thr side chain and the backbone carbonyl carbon to form a thiazoline, oxazoline, or methyloxazoline ring. The rings are important for the form and function of the peptide product. We present the crystal structure of an NRPS Cy domain, Cy2 of bacillamide synthetase, at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Despite sharing the same fold, the active sites of C and Cy domains have important differences. The structure allowed us to probe the roles of active-site residues by using mutational analyses in a peptide synthesis assay with intact bacillamide synthetase. The drastically different effects of these mutants, interpreted by using our structural and bioinformatic results, provide insight into the catalytic mechanisms of the Cy domain and implicate a previously unexamined Asp-Thr dyad in catalysis of the cyclodehydration reaction.

  10. Immunotherapeutic potential of N-formylated peptides of ESAT-6 and glutamine synthetase in experimental tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Shabir Ahmad; Sharma, Sadhna

    2014-02-01

    Recent understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculosis allows the possible application of immunotherapy for the treatment of tuberculosis. Therapies that would upregulate the host anti mycobacterial innate and/or adaptive immune response have been supposed to be useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. Since N-formyl peptides are products of bacterial metabolism, and their binding to a specific phagocyte receptor (FPR) induces chemotaxis and activation of phagocytes that are critical effectors in our innate immune system, it is reasonable to assume that the interaction between these two counterparts (i.e. formylated peptides and FPR) is also important in host defence against M. tuberculosis. In the present study the direct immunotherapeutic potential of N-formylated peptides of two non-classically secreted proteins (early secreted antigenic target-6 and glutamine synthetase) of M. tuberculosis H37Rv was evaluated. Treatment of M. tuberculosis H37Rv infected mice with N-formylated peptides of early secreted antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6) and glutamine synthetase (GS) markedly reduced the bacilli load in their lungs (p < 0.001) and spleen (p < 0.01) as compared to the untreated mice. In addition, the histopathological changes were observed to be in correlation with the CFU data with minor areas of consolidation in the lung sections of N-formylated peptide treated infected mice as compared to those of the untreated mice. Further, these N-formylated peptides were able to confer an additional therapeutic effect when given in combination with the anti tuberculosis drugs and hence can be used as an adjunct to the conventional chemotherapy against tuberculosis.

  11. A genome-wide analysis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters and their peptides in a Planktothrix rubescens strain

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    Nederbragt Alexander J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria often produce several different oligopeptides, with unknown biological functions, by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS. Although some cyanobacterial NRPS gene cluster types are well described, the entire NRPS genomic content within a single cyanobacterial strain has never been investigated. Here we have combined a genome-wide analysis using massive parallel pyrosequencing ("454" and mass spectrometry screening of oligopeptides produced in the strain Planktothrix rubescens NIVA CYA 98 in order to identify all putative gene clusters for oligopeptides. Results Thirteen types of oligopeptides were uncovered by mass spectrometry (MS analyses. Microcystin, cyanopeptolin and aeruginosin synthetases, highly similar to already characterized NRPS, were present in the genome. Two novel NRPS gene clusters were associated with production of anabaenopeptins and microginins, respectively. Sequence-depth of the genome and real-time PCR data revealed three copies of the microginin gene cluster. Since NRPS gene cluster candidates for microviridin and oscillatorin synthesis could not be found, putative (gene encoded precursor peptide sequences to microviridin and oscillatorin were found in the genes mdnA and oscA, respectively. The genes flanking the microviridin and oscillatorin precursor genes encode putative modifying enzymes of the precursor oligopeptides. We therefore propose ribosomal pathways involving modifications and cyclisation for microviridin and oscillatorin. The microviridin, anabaenopeptin and cyanopeptolin gene clusters are situated in close proximity to each other, constituting an oligopeptide island. Conclusion Altogether seven nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene clusters and two gene clusters putatively encoding ribosomal oligopeptide biosynthetic pathways were revealed. Our results demonstrate that whole genome shotgun sequencing combined with MS-directed determination of oligopeptides successfully

  12. Chemical Probes Allow Structural Insight into the Condensation Reaction of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloudoff, Kristjan; Alonzo, Diego A; Schmeing, T Martin

    2016-03-17

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) synthesize a vast variety of small molecules, including antibiotics, antitumors, and immunosuppressants. The NRPS condensation (C) domain catalyzes amide bond formation, the central chemical step in nonribosomal peptide synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate determinants of the reaction are under debate. We developed chemical probes to structurally study the NRPS condensation reaction. These substrate analogs become covalently tethered to a cysteine introduced near the active site, to mimic covalent substrate delivery by carrier domains. They are competent substrates in the condensation reaction and behave similarly to native substrates. Co-crystal structures show C domain-substrate interactions, and suggest that the catalytic histidine's principle role is to position the α-amino group for nucleophilic attack. Structural insight provided by these co-complexes also allowed us to alter the substrate specificity profile of the reaction with a single point mutation.

  13. A polyketide synthase-peptide synthetase gene cluster from an uncultured bacterial symbiont of Paederus beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Jörn

    2002-10-29

    Many drug candidates from marine and terrestrial invertebrates are suspected metabolites of uncultured bacterial symbionts. The antitumor polyketides of the pederin family, isolated from beetles and sponges, are an example. Drug development from such sources is commonly hampered by low yields and the difficulty of sustaining invertebrate cultures. To obtain insight into the true producer and find alternative supplies of these rare drug candidates, the putative pederin biosynthesis genes were cloned from total DNA of Paederus fuscipes beetles, which use this compound for chemical defense. Sequence analysis of the gene cluster and adjacent regions revealed the presence of ORFs with typical bacterial architecture and homologies. The ped cluster, which is present only in beetle specimens with high pederin content, is located on a 54-kb region bordered by transposase pseudogenes and encodes a mixed modular polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Notably, none of the modules contains regions with homology to acyltransferase domains, but two copies of isolated monodomain acyltransferase genes were found at the upstream end of the cluster. In line with an involvement in pederin biosynthesis, the upstream cluster region perfectly mirrors pederin structure. The unexpected presence of additional polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules reveals surprising insights into the evolutionary relationship between pederin-type pathways in beetles and sponges.

  14. Molecular Cross-Talk between Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Carrier Proteins and Unstructured Linker Regions.

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    Harden, Bradley J; Frueh, Dominique P

    2017-01-24

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) employ multiple domains separated by linker regions to incorporate substrates into natural products. During synthesis, substrates are covalently tethered to carrier proteins that translocate between catalytic partner domains. The molecular parameters that govern translocation and associated linker remodeling remain unknown. Here, we used NMR to characterize the structure, dynamics, and invisible states of a peptidyl carrier protein flanked by its linkers. We showed that the N-terminal linker stabilizes and interacts with the protein core while modulating dynamics at specific sites involved in post-translational modifications and/or domain interactions. The results detail the molecular communication between peptidyl carrier proteins and their linkers and could guide efforts in engineering NRPSs to obtain new pharmaceuticals.

  15. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the Microbial Metagenomes of Marine Sponges

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    Ute Hentschel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  16. Argininosuccinate Synthetase Is a Functional Target for a Snake Venom Anti-hypertensive Peptide

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    Guerreiro, Juliano R.; Lameu, Claudiana; Oliveira, Eduardo F.; Klitzke, Clécio F.; Melo, Robson L.; Linares, Edlaine; Augusto, Ohara; Fox, Jay W.; Lebrun, Ivo; Serrano, Solange M. T.; Camargo, Antonio C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Bj-BPP-10c is a bioactive proline-rich decapeptide, part of the C-type natriuretic peptide precursor, expressed in the brain and in the venom gland of Bothrops jararaca. We recently showed that Bj-BPP-10c displays a strong, sustained anti-hypertensive effect in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR), without causing any effect in normotensive rats, by a pharmacological effect independent of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. Therefore, we hypothesized that another mechanism should be involved in the peptide activity. Here we used affinity chromatography to search for kidney cytosolic proteins with affinity for Bj-BPP-10c and demonstrate that argininosuccinate synthetase (AsS) is the major protein binding to the peptide. More importantly, this interaction activates the catalytic activity of AsS in a dose-de pend ent manner. AsS is recognized as an important player of the citrulline-NO cycle that represents a potential limiting step in NO synthesis. Accordingly, the functional interaction of Bj-BPP-10c and AsS was evidenced by the following effects promoted by the peptide: (i) increase of NO metabolite production in human umbilical vein endothelial cell culture and of arginine in human embryonic kidney cells and (ii) increase of arginine plasma concentration in SHR. Moreover, α-methyl-dl-aspartic acid, a specific AsS inhibitor, significantly reduced the anti-hypertensive activity of Bj-BPP-10c in SHR. Taken together, these results suggest that AsS plays a role in the anti-hypertensive action of Bj-BPP-10c. Therefore, we propose the activation of AsS as a new mechanism for the anti-hypertensive effect of Bj-BPP-10c in SHR and AsS as a novel target for the therapy of hypertension-related diseases. PMID:19491403

  17. The Role of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase in l-Lysine Lactamization During Capuramycin Biosynthesis.

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    Liu, Xiaodong; Jin, Yuanyuan; Cui, Zheng; Nonaka, Koichi; Baba, Satoshi; Funabashi, Masanori; Yang, Zhaoyong; Van Lanen, Steven G

    2016-05-03

    Capuramycins are one of several known classes of natural products that contain an l-Lys-derived l-α-amino-ɛ-caprolactam (l-ACL) unit. The α-amino group of l-ACL in a capuramycin is linked to an unsaturated hexuronic acid component through an amide bond that was previously shown to originate by an ATP-independent enzymatic route. With the aid of a combined in vivo and in vitro approach, a predicted tridomain nonribosomal peptide synthetase CapU is functionally characterized here as the ATP-dependent amide-bond-forming catalyst responsible for the biosynthesis of the remaining amide bond present in l-ACL. The results are consistent with the adenylation domain of CapU as the essential catalytic component for l-Lys activation and thioesterification of the adjacent thiolation domain. However, in contrast to expectations, lactamization does not require any additional domains or proteins and is likely a nonenzymatic event. The results set the stage for examining whether a similar NRPS-mediated mechanism is employed in the biosynthesis of other l-ACL-containing natural products and, just as intriguingly, how spontaneous lactamization is avoided in the numerous NRPS-derived peptides that contain an unmodified l-Lys residue.

  18. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene clusters and decoding the natural product

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANGAL SINGH; SANDEEP CHAUDHARY; DIPTI SAREEN

    2017-03-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are themajor multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically importantantibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an NRPS activates a different amino or aryl acid,followed by their condensation to synthesize a linear or cyclic natural product. The studies on NRPS domains, theknowledge of their gene cluster architecture and tailoring enzymes have helped in the in silico genetic screening of theever-expanding sequenced microbial genomic data for the identification of novel NRPS/PKS clusters and thusdeciphering novel non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs). Adenylation domain is an integral part of the NRPSs and is thesubstrate selecting unit for the final assembled NRP. In some cases, it also requires a small protein, the MbtHhomolog, for its optimum activity. The presence of putative adenylation domain and MbtH homologs in a sequencedgenome can help identify the novel secondary metabolite producers. The role of the adenylation domain in the NRPSgene clusters and its characterization as a tool for the discovery of novel cryptic NRPS gene clusters are discussed.

  19. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

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    Niran Roongsawang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipopeptide biosurfactants (LPBSs consist of a hydrophobic fatty acid portion linked to a hydrophilic peptide chain in the molecule. With their complex and diverse structures, LPBSs exhibit various biological activities including surface activity as well as anti-cellular and anti-enzymatic activities. LPBSs are also involved in multi-cellular behaviors such as swarming motility and biofilm formation. Among the bacterial genera, Bacillus (Gram-positive and Pseudomonas (Gram-negative have received the most attention because they produce a wide range of effective LPBSs that are potentially useful for agricultural, chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The biosynthetic mechanisms and gene regulation systems of LPBSs have been extensively analyzed over the last decade. LPBSs are generally synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner with megaenzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs. Production of active‑form NRPSs requires not only transcriptional induction and translation but also post‑translational modification and assemblage. The accumulated knowledge reveals the versatility and evolutionary lineage of the NRPSs system. This review provides an overview of the structural and functional diversity of LPBSs and their different biosynthetic mechanisms in Bacillus and Pseudomonas, including both typical and unique systems. Finally, successful genetic engineering of NRPSs for creating novel lipopeptides is also discussed.

  20. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes pesL and pes1 Are Essential for Fumigaclavine C Production in Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product...... of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production of fumitremorgins such as TR-2, fumitremorgin C and verruculogen, increased sensitivity to H2O2, and increased...... sensitivity to the antifungals, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. Deletion of pesL resulted in severely reduced virulence in an invertebrate infection model (P

  1. A non-canonical peptide synthetase adenylates 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid for auriculamide biosynthesis

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    Daniel Braga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Auriculamide is the first natural product known from the predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus. It is composed of three unusual building blocks, including the non-proteinogenic amino acid 3-chloro-L-tyrosine, the α-hydroxy acid L-isoleucic acid, and a methylmalonyl-CoA-derived ethane unit. A candidate genetic locus for auriculamide biosynthesis was identified and encodes four enzymes. Among them, the non-canonical 199 kDa four-domain nonribosomal peptide synthetase, AulA, is extraordinary in that it features two consecutive adenylation domains. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the recombinantly produced AulA. The observed activation of 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid by the enzyme supports the hypothesis that it participates in the biosynthesis of auriculamide. An artificially truncated version of AulA that lacks the first adenylation domain activated this substrate like the full-length enzyme which shows that the first adenylation domain is dispensable. Additionally, we provide evidence that the enzyme tolerates structural variation of the substrate. α-Carbon substituents significantly affected the substrate turnover. While all tested aliphatic α-keto acids were accepted by the enzyme and minor differences in chain size and branches did not interfere with the enzymatic activity, molecules with methylene α-carbons led to low turnover. Such enzymatic plasticity is an important attribute to help in the perpetual search for novel molecules and to access a greater structural diversity by mutasynthesis.

  2. The long-overlooked enzymology of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-independent pathway for virulence-conferring siderophore biosynthesis.

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    Oves-Costales, Daniel; Kadi, Nadia; Challis, Gregory L

    2009-11-21

    Siderophores are high-affinity ferric iron chelators biosynthesised and excreted by most microorganisms that play an important role in iron acquisition. Siderophore-mediated scavenging of ferric iron from hosts contributes significantly to the virulence of pathogenic microbes. As a consequence siderophore biosynthesis is an attractive target for chemotherapeutic intervention. Two main pathways for siderophore biosynthesis exist in microbes. One pathway involves nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) multienzymes while the other is NRPS-independent. The enzymology of NRPS-mediated siderophore biosynthesis has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In contrast, the enzymology of NRPS-independent siderophore (NIS) biosynthesis was overlooked for almost thirty years since the first genetic characterisation of the NIS biosynthetic pathway to aerobactin. However, the past three years have witnessed an explosion of interest in the enzymology of NIS synthetases, the key enzymes in the assembly of siderophores via the NIS pathway. The biochemical characterisation of ten purified recombinant synthetases has been reported since 2007, along with the first structural characterisation of a synthetase by X-ray crystallography in 2009. In this feature article we summarise the recent progress that has been made in understanding the long-overlooked enzymology of NRPS-independent siderophore biosynthesis, highlight important remaining questions, and suggest likely directions for future research.

  3. Peptide markers of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases facilitate taxa counting in metagenomic data

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    Persi Erez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxa counting is a major problem faced by analysis of metagenomic data. The most popular method relies on analysis of 16S rRNA sequences, but some studies employ also protein based analyses. It would be advantageous to have a method that is applicable directly to short sequences, of the kind extracted from samples in modern metagenomic research. This is achieved by the technique proposed here. Results We employ specific peptides, deduced from aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, as markers for the occurrence of single genes in data. Sequences carrying these markers are aligned and compared with each other to provide a lower limit for taxa counts in metagenomic data. The method is compared with 16S rRNA searches on a set of known genomes. The taxa counting problem is analyzed mathematically and a heuristic algorithm is proposed. When applied to genomic contigs of a recent human gut microbiome study, the taxa counting method provides information on numbers of different species and strains. We then apply our method to short read data and demonstrate how it can be calibrated to cope with errors. Comparison to known databases leads to estimates of the percentage of novelties, and the type of phyla involved. Conclusions A major advantage of our method is its simplicity: it relies on searching sequences for the occurrence of just 4000 specific peptides belonging to the S61 subgroup of aaRS enzymes. When compared to other methods, it provides additional insight into the taxonomic contents of metagenomic data. Furthermore, it can be directly applied to short read data, avoiding the need for genomic contig reconstruction, and taking into account short reads that are otherwise discarded as singletons. Hence it is very suitable for a fast analysis of next generation sequencing data.

  4. Predicted class-I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-like proteins in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis

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    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies point to a great diversity of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis systems with major roles in amino acid and co-factor biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and post-translational modifications of proteins by peptide tags. The least studied of these systems are those utilizing tRNAs or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AAtRS in non-ribosomal peptide ligation. Results Here we describe novel examples of AAtRS related proteins that are likely to be involved in the synthesis of widely distributed peptide-derived metabolites. Using sensitive sequence profile methods we show that the cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs are members of the HUP class of Rossmannoid domains and are likely to be highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domains. We also identify the first eukaryotic CDPSs in fungi and in animals; they might be involved in immune response in the latter organisms. We also identify a paralogous version of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase, which is widespread in bacteria, and present evidence using contextual information that it might function independently of protein synthesis as a peptide ligase in the formation of a peptide- derived secondary metabolite. This metabolite is likely to be heavily modified through multiple reactions catalyzed by a metal-binding cupin domain and a lysine N6 monooxygenase that are strictly associated with this paralogous methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MtRS. We further identify an analogous system wherein the MtRS has been replaced by more typical peptide ligases with the ATP-grasp or modular condensation-domains. Conclusions The prevalence of these predicted biosynthetic pathways in phylogenetically distant, pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria suggests that metabolites synthesized by them might participate in interactions with the host. More generally, these findings point to a complete spectrum of recruitment of AAtRS to various non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways, ranging from the

  5. Nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes pesL and pes1 are essential for Fumigaclavine C production in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus; Jöchl, Christoph; Kavanagh, Kevin; Larsen, Thomas O; Doyle, Sean

    2012-05-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production of fumitremorgins such as TR-2, fumitremorgin C and verruculogen, increased sensitivity to H(2)O(2), and increased sensitivity to the antifungals, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. Deletion of pesL resulted in severely reduced virulence in an invertebrate infection model (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that NRP synthesis plays an essential role in mediating the final prenylation step of the EA pathway, despite the apparent absence of NRP synthetases in the proposed EA biosynthetic cluster for A. fumigatus. Liquid chromatography/diode array detection/mass spectrometry analysis also revealed the presence of fumiquinazolines A to F in both A. fumigatus wild-type and ΔpesL strains. This observation suggests that alternative NRP synthetases can also function in fumiquinazoline biosynthesis, since PesL has been shown to mediate fumiquinazoline biosynthesis in vitro. Furthermore, we provide here the first direct link between EA biosynthesis and virulence, in agreement with the observed toxicity associated with EA exposure. Finally, we demonstrate a possible cluster cross-talk phenomenon, a theme which is beginning to emerge in the literature.

  6. Targeted Disruption of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase pes3 Augments the Virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Cairns, Timothy; Stack, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    that in contrast to other NRP synthetases, deletion of pes3 significantly increases the virulence of A. fumigatus, whereby the pes3 deletion strain (A. fumigatus Δpes3) exhibited heightened virulence (increased killing) in invertebrate (P corticosteroid model...... of murine pulmonary aspergillosis. Complementation restored the wild-type phenotype in the invertebrate model. Deletion of pes3 also resulted in increased susceptibility to the antifungal, voriconazole (P

  7. The Stress-responsive and Host-oriented Role of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases in an Entomopathogenic Fungus, Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hang; Xie, Linan; Wang, Jing; Guo, Qiannan; Yang, Shengnan; Liang, Pei; Wang, Chengshu; Lin, Min; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Liwen

    2016-11-14

    Beauveria bassiana infects numbers of pest species and is known to produce insecticidal substances, e.g., the nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) beauvericin and bassianolide. However, most NRPs and their biological roles in B. bassiana remain undiscovered. To identify NRPs that potentially contribute to pathogenesis, the 21 predicted NRP synthetases (NRPSs) or NRPS-like proteins of B. bassiana ARSEF2860 were primarily ranked into three functional groups: basic metabolism (7 NRPSs), pathogenicity (12 NRPSs) and unknown function (2 NRPSs). Based on the transcript levels during in vivo growth on diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella, Linnaeus), half of the Group II NRPSs were likely to be involved in infection. Given that the metabolites biosynthesized by these NRPSs remaining to determined, our result underlines the importance of NRPSome in fungal pathogenesis, and will serve as a guide for future genomic mining projects to discover functionally essential and structurally diverse NRPs in fungal genomes.

  8. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bradley R.; Drake, Eric J.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2016-09-05

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  9. The production of Multiple Small Peptaibol Families by Single 14-Module Peptide Synthetases in Trichoderma/Hypocrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Aghchehb, Razieh Karimi; Dieckmann, Ralf; Neuhof, Torsten; Baker, Scott E.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Brückner, Hans; von Dohren, Hans

    2012-03-01

    The most common peptaibibiotic structures are 11-residue peptaibols found widely distributed in the genus Trichoderma/Hypocrea. Frequently associated are 14-residue peptaibols sharing partial sequence identity. Genome sequencing projects of 3 Trichoderma strains of the major clades reveal the presence of up to 3 types of nonribosomal peptide synthetases with 7, 14, or 18-20 amino acid adding modules. We here provide evidence that the 14-module NRPS type found in T. virens, T. reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) and T. atroviride produces both 11- and 14- residue peptaibols based on the disruption of the respective NRPS gene of T. reesei, and bioinformatic analysis of their amino acid activating domains and modules. The structures of these peptides may be predicted from the gene structures and have been confirmed by analysis of families of 11- and 14-residue peptaibols from the strain 618, termed hypojecorins A (23 sequences determined, 4 new) and B (3 new sequences), and the recently established trichovirins A from T. virens. The distribution of 11- and 14-residue products is strain-specific and depends on growth conditions as well. Possible mechanisms of module skipping are discussed.

  10. Vibriobactin biosynthesis in Vibrio cholerae: VibH is an amide synthase homologous to nonribosomal peptide synthetase condensation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, T A; Marshall, C G; Walsh, C T

    2000-12-19

    The Vibrio cholerae siderophore vibriobactin is biosynthesized from three molecules of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB), two molecules of L-threonine, and one of norspermidine. Of the four genes positively implicated in vibriobactin biosynthesis, we have here expressed, purified, and assayed the products of three: vibE, vibB, and vibH. All three are homologous to nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) domains: VibE is a 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate-adenosyl monophosphate ligase, VibB is a bifunctional isochorismate lyase-aryl carrier protein (ArCP), and VibH is a novel amide synthase that represents a free-standing condensation (C) domain. VibE and VibB are homologous to EntE and EntB from Escherichia coli enterobactin synthetase; VibE activates DHB as the acyl adenylate and then transfers it to the free thiol of the phosphopantetheine arm of VibB's ArCP domain. VibH then condenses this DHB thioester (the donor) with the small molecule norspermidine (the acceptor), forming N(1)-(2, 3-dihydroxybenzoyl)norspermidine (DHB-NSPD) with a k(cat) of 600 min(-1) and a K(m) for acyl-VibB of 0.88 microM and for norspermidine of 1.5 mM. Exclusive monoacylation of a primary amine of norspermidine was observed. VibH also tolerates DHB-acylated EntB and 1,7-diaminoheptane, octylamine, and hexylamine as substrates, albeit at lowered catalytic efficiencies. DHB-NSPD possesses one of three acylations required for mature vibriobactin, and its formation confirms VibH's role in vibriobactin biosynthesis. VibH is a unique NRPS condensation domain that acts upon an upstream carrier-protein-bound donor and a downstream amine, turning over a soluble amide product, in contrast to an archetypal NRPS-embedded C domain that condenses two carrier protein thioesters.

  11. Insect-specific polyketide synthases (PKSs), potential PKS-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrids, and novel PKS clades in tropical fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Phonghanpot, Suranat; Sengpanich, Nattapong; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Tanticharoen, Morakot

    2009-06-01

    Polyketides draw much attention because of their potential use in pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. This study identifies an abundant pool of polyketide synthase (PKS) genes from local isolates of tropical fungi found in Thailand in three different ecological niches: insect pathogens, marine inhabitants, and lichen mutualists. We detected 149 PKS genes from 48 fungi using PCR with PKS-specific degenerate primers. We identified and classified 283 additional PKS genes from 13 fungal genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of all these PKS sequences the comprising ketosynthase (KS) conserved region and the KS-acyltransferase interdomain region yielded results very similar to those for phylogenies of the KS domain and suggested a number of remarkable points. (i) Twelve PKS genes amplified from 12 different insect-pathogenic fungi form a tight cluster, although along with two PKS genes extracted from genomes of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus, in reducing clade III. Some of these insect-specific fungal PKSs are nearly identical. (ii) We identified 38 new PKS-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid genes in reducing clade II. (iii) Four distinct clades were discovered with more than 75% bootstrap support. We propose to designate the novel clade D1 with 100% bootstrap support "reducing clade V." The newly cloned PKS genes from these tropical fungi should provide useful and diverse genetic resources for future research on the characterization of polyketide compounds synthesized by these enzymes.

  12. New Insight into the Ochratoxin A Biosynthetic Pathway through Deletion of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Gene in Aspergillus carbonarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, A.; Bruno, K. S.; Solfrizzo, M.; Perrone, G.; Mule, G.; Visconti, A.; Baker, S. E.

    2012-09-14

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, is composed of a dihydroisocoumarin ring linked to phenylalanine and its biosynthetic pathway has not yet been completely elucidated. Most of the knowledge regarding the genetic and enzymatic aspects of OTA biosynthesis has been obtained in Penicillium species. In Aspergillus species only pks genes involved in the initial steps of the pathway have been partially characterized. In our study, the inactivation of a gene encoding a nonribosomal peptide synthetase in OTA producing A. carbonarius ITEM 5010 has removed the ability of the fungus to produce OTA. This is the first report on the involvement of an nrps gene product in OTA biosynthetic pathway in Aspergillus species. The absence of OTA and ochratoxin α-the isocoumaric derivative of OTA, and the concomitant increase of ochratoxin β- the dechloro analog of ochratoxin α- were observed in the liquid culture of transformed strain. The data provide the first evidence that the enzymatic step adding phenylalanine to polyketide dihydroisocoumarin precedes the chlorination step to form OTA in A. carbonarius, and that ochratoxin α is a product of hydrolysis of OTA, giving an interesting new insight in the biosynthetic pathway of the toxin.

  13. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoris D. Amoutzias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering that 70% of our planet’s surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs and polyketides (PKs are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I, respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds.

  14. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoutzias, Grigoris D; Chaliotis, Anargyros; Mossialos, Dimitris

    2016-04-16

    Considering that 70% of our planet's surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs) are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes) and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I), respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds.

  15. Transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase that catalyzes the peptide bond formation between the substrate protein’s omega-site and the GPI lipid anchor’s phosphoethanolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Stephan; Kwang, Toh Yew; Grüber, Gerhard; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is predicted to be the enzyme that catalyzes the attachment of the glycosylphosphatidyl (GPI) lipid anchor to the carbonyl intermediate of the substrate protein at the ω-site. Its ~300-amino acid residue lumenal domain is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase with an α/β hydrolase fold, including a central 8-strand β-sheet and a single metal (most likely zinc) ion coordinated by 3 conserved polar residues. Phosphoethanolamine is used as an adaptor to make the non-peptide GPI lipid anchor look chemically similar to the N terminus of a peptide. PMID:24743167

  16. Transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase that catalyzes the peptide bond formation between the substrate protein's omega-site and the GPI lipid anchor's phosphoethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Stephan; Kwang, Toh Yew; Grüber, Gerhard; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is predicted to be the enzyme that catalyzes the attachment of the glycosylphosphatidyl (GPI) lipid anchor to the carbonyl intermediate of the substrate protein at the ω-site. Its ~300-amino acid residue lumenal domain is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase with an α/β hydrolase fold, including a central 8-strand β-sheet and a single metal (most likely zinc) ion coordinated by 3 conserved polar residues. Phosphoethanolamine is used as an adaptor to make the non-peptide GPI lipid anchor look chemically similar to the N terminus of a peptide.

  17. The crystal structure of BlmI as a model for nonribosomal peptide synthetase peptidyl carrier proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Jeremy R; Ma, Ming; Cuff, Marianne E; Bigelow, Lance; Bearden, Jessica; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N; Shen, Ben

    2014-07-01

    Carrier proteins (CPs) play a critical role in the biosynthesis of various natural products, especially in nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) enzymology, where the CPs are referred to as peptidyl-carrier proteins (PCPs) or acyl-carrier proteins (ACPs), respectively. CPs can either be a domain in large multifunctional polypeptides or standalone proteins, termed Type I and Type II, respectively. There have been many biochemical studies of the Type I PKS and NRPS CPs, and of Type II ACPs. However, recently a number of Type II PCPs have been found and biochemically characterized. In order to understand the possible interaction surfaces for combinatorial biosynthetic efforts we crystallized the first characterized and representative Type II PCP member, BlmI, from the bleomycin biosynthetic pathway from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC 15003. The structure is similar to CPs in general but most closely resembles PCPs. Comparisons with previously determined PCP structures in complex with catalytic domains reveals a common interaction surface. This surface is highly variable in charge and shape, which likely confers specificity for interactions. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of a prototypical Type I PCP excised from the multimodular context revealed three conformational states. Comparison of the states with the structure of BlmI and other PCPs reveals that only one of the NMR states is found in other studies, suggesting the other two states may not be relevant. The state represented by the BlmI crystal structure can therefore serve as a model for both Type I and Type II PCPs.

  18. The mycosubtilin synthetase of Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633 : A multifunctional hybrid between a peptide synthetase, an amino transferase, and a fatty acid synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duitman, EH; Hamoen, LW; Rembold, M; Venema, G; Seitz, H; Saenger, W; Bernhard, F; Reinhardt, R; Schmidt, M; Ullrich, C; Stein, T; Leenders, F; Vater, J

    1999-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain ATCC6633 has been identified as a producer of mycosubtilin, a potent antifungal peptide antibiotic. Mycosubtilin, which belongs to the iturin family of lipopeptide antibiotics, is characterized by a p-amino fatty acid moiety linked to the circular heptapeptide Asn-Tyr-Asn-Cl

  19. Molecular genetic analysis reveals that a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like (NRPS-like) gene in Aspergillus nidulans is responsible for microperfuranone biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi Ming; Entwistle, Ruth; Ahuja, Mammeet; Lee, Kuan-Han; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wu, Tung-Kung; Oakley, Berl R.; Wang, Clay C.

    2012-04-10

    Genome sequencing of Aspergillus species including A. nidulans has revealed that there are far more secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters than secondary metabolites isolated from these organisms. This implies that these organisms can produce additional secondary metabolites have not yet been elucidated. The A. nidulans genome contains twelve nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), one hybrid polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS), and fourteen NRPS-like genes. The only NRPS-like gene in A. nidulans with a known product is tdiA which is involved in terrequinone A biosynthesis. To attempt to identify the products of these NRPS-like genes, we replaced the native promoters of the NRPS-like genes with the inducible alcohol dehydrogenase (alcA) promoter. Our results demonstrated that induction of the single NRPS-like gene AN3396.4 led to the enhanced production of microperfuranone. Furthermore, heterologous expression of AN3396.4 in A. niger confirmed that only one NRPS-like gene, AN3396.4, is necessary for the production of microperfuranone.

  20. Identification of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase responsible for biosynthesis of the potential anti-cancer drug sansalvamide in Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romans-Fuertes, Patricia; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Sandmann, Manuela Ilse Helga; Wollenberg, Rasmus Dam; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Hansen, Frederik T; Giese, Henriette; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2016-11-01

    Sansalvamide is a cyclic pentadepsipeptide produced by Fusarium solani and has shown promising results as potential anti-cancer drug. The biosynthetic pathway has until now remained unidentified, but here we used an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) approach to generate knockout mutants of two candidate non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS29 and NRPS30). Comparative studies of secondary metabolites in the two deletion mutants and wild type confirmed the absence of sansalvamide in the NRPS30 deletion mutant, implicating this synthetase in the biosynthetic pathway for sansalvamide. Sansalvamide is structurally related to the cyclic hexadepsipeptide destruxin, which both contain an α-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) unit. A gene cluster responsible for destruxin production has previously been identified in Metarhizium robertsii together with a hypothetical biosynthetic pathway. Using comparative bioinformatic analyses of the catalytic domains in the destruxin and sansalvamide NRPSs, we were able to propose a model for sansalvamide biosynthesis. Orthologues of the gene clusters were also identified in species from several other genera including Acremonium chrysogenum and Trichoderma virens, which suggests that the ability to produce compounds related to destruxin and sansalvamide is widespread.

  1. Role of the C-terminal extension peptide of plastid located glutamine synthetase from Medicago truncatula: Crucial for enzyme activity and needless for protein import into the plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria João; Vale, Diogo; Cunha, Luis; Melo, Paula

    2017-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in plant nitrogen metabolism, is encoded by a small family of highly homologous nuclear genes that produce cytosolic (GS1) and plastidic (GS2) isoforms. Compared to GS1, GS2 proteins have two extension peptides, one at the N- and the other at the C-terminus, which show a high degree of conservation among plant species. It has long been known that the N-terminal peptide acts as a transit peptide, targeting the protein to the plastids however, the function of the C-terminal extension is still unknown. To investigate whether the C-terminal extension influences the activity of the enzyme, we produced a C-terminal truncated version of Medicago truncatula GS2a in Escherechia coli and studied its catalytic properties. The activity of the truncated protein was found to be lower than that of MtGS2a and with less affinity for glutamate. The importance of the C-terminal extension for the protein import into the chloroplast was also assessed by transient expression of fluorescently-tagged MtGS2a truncated at the C-terminus, which was correctly detected in the chloroplast. The results obtained in this work demonstrate that the C-terminal extension of M. truncatula GS2a is important for the activity of the enzyme and does not contain crucial information for the import process.

  2. Argininosuccinate synthetase is a functional target for a snake venom anti-hypertensive peptide: role in arginine and nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Juliano R; Lameu, Claudiana; Oliveira, Eduardo F; Klitzke, Clécio F; Melo, Robson L; Linares, Edlaine; Augusto, Ohara; Fox, Jay W; Lebrun, Ivo; Serrano, Solange M T; Camargo, Antonio C M

    2009-07-24

    Bj-BPP-10c is a bioactive proline-rich decapeptide, part of the C-type natriuretic peptide precursor, expressed in the brain and in the venom gland of Bothrops jararaca. We recently showed that Bj-BPP-10c displays a strong, sustained anti-hypertensive effect in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR), without causing any effect in normotensive rats, by a pharmacological effect independent of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. Therefore, we hypothesized that another mechanism should be involved in the peptide activity. Here we used affinity chromatography to search for kidney cytosolic proteins with affinity for Bj-BPP-10c and demonstrate that argininosuccinate synthetase (AsS) is the major protein binding to the peptide. More importantly, this interaction activates the catalytic activity of AsS in a dose-de pend ent manner. AsS is recognized as an important player of the citrulline-NO cycle that represents a potential limiting step in NO synthesis. Accordingly, the functional interaction of Bj-BPP-10c and AsS was evidenced by the following effects promoted by the peptide: (i) increase of NO metabolite production in human umbilical vein endothelial cell culture and of arginine in human embryonic kidney cells and (ii) increase of arginine plasma concentration in SHR. Moreover, alpha-methyl-dl-aspartic acid, a specific AsS inhibitor, significantly reduced the anti-hypertensive activity of Bj-BPP-10c in SHR. Taken together, these results suggest that AsS plays a role in the anti-hypertensive action of Bj-BPP-10c. Therefore, we propose the activation of AsS as a new mechanism for the anti-hypertensive effect of Bj-BPP-10c in SHR and AsS as a novel target for the therapy of hypertension-related diseases.

  3. A sensitive single-enzyme assay system using the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase BpsA for measurement of L-glutamine in biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alistair S.; Robins, Katherine J.; Ackerley, David F.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to rapidly, economically and accurately measure L-glutamine concentrations in biological samples is important for many areas of research, medicine or industry, however there is room for improvement on existing methods. We describe here how the enzyme BpsA, a single-module non-ribosomal peptide synthetase able to convert L-glutamine into the blue pigment indigoidine, can be used to accurately measure L-glutamine in biological samples. Although indigoidine has low solubility in aqueous solutions, meaning direct measurements of indigoidine synthesis do not reliably yield linear standard curves, we demonstrate that resolubilisation of the reaction end-products in DMSO overcomes this issue and that spontaneous reduction to colourless leuco-indigoidine occurs too slowly to interfere with assay accuracy. Our protocol is amenable to a 96-well microtitre format and can be used to measure L-glutamine in common bacterial and mammalian culture media, urine, and deproteinated plasma. We show that active BpsA can be prepared in high yield by expressing it in the apo-form to avoid the toxicity of indigoidine to Escherichia coli host cells, then activating it to the holo-form in cell lysates prior to purification; and that BpsA has a lengthy shelf-life, retaining >95% activity when stored at either −20 °C or 4 °C for 24 weeks. PMID:28139746

  4. Comparative analysis of oligonucleotide primers for high-throughput screening of genes encoding adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakal, Tomas; Goo, Kian-Sim; Najmanova, Lucie; Plhackova, Kamila; Kadlcik, Stanislav; Ulanova, Dana

    2015-11-01

    In the biosynthesis of diverse natural bioactive products the adenylation domains (ADs) of nonribosomal peptide synthetases select specific precursors from the cellular pool and activate them for further incorporation into the scaffold of the final compound. Therefore, the drug discovery programs employing PCR-based screening studies of microbial collections or metagenomic libraries often use AD-coding genes as markers of relevant biosynthetic gene clusters. However, due to significant sequence diversity of ADs, the conventional approach using only one primer pair in a single screening experiment could be insufficient for maximal coverage of AD abundance. In this study, the widely used primer pair A3F/A7R was compared with the newly designed aa194F/aa413R one by 454 pyrosequencing of two sets of actinomycete strains from highly dissimilar environments: subseafloor sediments and forest soil. Individually, none of the primer pairs was able to cover the overall diversity of ADs. However, due to slightly shifted specificity of the primer pairs, the total number and diversity of identified ADs were noticeably extended when both primer pairs were used in a single assay. Additionally, the efficiency of AD detection by different primer combinations was confirmed on the model of Salinispora tropica genomic DNA of known sequence.

  5. Molecular genetic analysis reveals that a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like (NRPS-like) gene in Aspergillus nidulans is responsible for microperfuranone biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Entwistle, Ruth; Ahuja, Manmeet; Lee, Kuan-Han; Bruno, Kenneth S; Wu, Tung-Kung; Oakley, Berl R; Wang, Clay C C

    2012-11-01

    Genome sequencing of Aspergillus species including Aspergillus nidulans has revealed that there are far more secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters than secondary metabolites isolated from these organisms. This implies that these organisms can produce additional secondary metabolites, which have not yet been elucidated. The A. nidulans genome contains 12 nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), one hybrid polyketide synthase/NRPS, and 14 NRPS-like genes. The only NRPS-like gene in A. nidulans with a known product is tdiA, which is involved in terrequinone A biosynthesis. To attempt to identify the products of these NRPS-like genes, we replaced the native promoters of the NRPS-like genes with the inducible alcohol dehydrogenase (alcA) promoter. Our results demonstrated that induction of the single NRPS-like gene AN3396.4 led to the enhanced production of microperfuranone. Furthermore, heterologous expression of AN3396.4 in Aspergillus niger confirmed that only one NRPS-like gene, AN3396.4, is necessary for the production of microperfuranone.

  6. Characterization and localization of a hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase gene from the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Legentil, Susanna; Song, Bongkeun; DeTure, Michael; Baden, Daniel G

    2010-02-01

    The toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, a causative agent of the red tides in Florida, produces a series of toxic compounds known as brevetoxins and their derivatives. Recently, several putative genes encoding polyketide synthase (PKS) were identified from K. brevis in an effort to elucidate the genetic systems involved in brevetoxin production. In this study, novel PKS sequences were isolated from three clones of K. brevis. Eighteen unique sequences were obtained for the PKS ketosynthase (KS) domain of K. brevis. Phylogenetic comparison with closely related PKS genes revealed that 16 grouped with cyanobacteria sequences, while the remaining two grouped with Apicomplexa and previously reported sequences for K. brevis. A fosmid library was also constructed to further characterize PKS genes detected in K. brevis Wilson clone. Several fosmid clones were positive for the presence of PKS genes, and one was fully sequenced to determine the full structure of the PKS cluster. A hybrid non ribosomal peptide synthetase and PKS (NRPS-PKS) gene cluster of 16,061 bp was isolated. In addition, we assessed whether the isolated gene was being actively expressed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and determined its localization at the cellular level by chloroplast isolation. RT-PCR analyses revealed that this gene was actively expressed in K. brevis cultures. The hybrid NRPS-PKS gene cluster was located in the chloroplast, suggesting that K. brevis acquired the ability to produce some of its secondary metabolites through endosymbiosis with ancestral cyanobacteria. Further work is needed to determine the compound produced by the NRPS-PKS hybrid, to find other PKS gene sequences, and to assess their role in K. brevis toxin biosynthetic pathway.

  7. Type I pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzymatic domains embedded within multimodular nonribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa; Paiardini, Alessandro; Grgurina, Ingeborg; Pascarella, Stefano

    2013-10-23

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes of fold type I, the most studied structural class of the PLP-dependent enzyme superfamily, are known to exist as stand-alone homodimers or homotetramers. These enzymes have been found also embedded in multimodular and multidomain assembly lines involved in the biosynthesis of polyketides (PKS) and nonribosomal peptides (NRPS). The aim of this work is to provide a proteome-wide view of the distribution and characteristics of type I domains covalently integrated in these assemblies in prokaryotes. An ad-hoc Hidden Markov profile was calculated using a sequence alignment derived from a multiple structural superposition of distantly related PLP-enzymes of fold type I. The profile was utilized to scan the sequence databank and to collect the proteins containing at least one type I domain linked to a component of an assembly line in bacterial genomes. The domains adjacent to a carrier protein were further investigated. Phylogenetic analysis suggested the presence of four PLP-dependent families: Aminotran_3, Beta_elim_lyase and Pyridoxal_deC, occurring mainly within mixed NRPS/PKS clusters, and Aminotran_1_2 found mainly in PKS clusters. Sequence similarity to the reference PLP enzymes with solved structures ranged from 24 to 42% identity. Homology models were built for each representative type I domain and molecular docking simulations with putative substrates were carried out. Prediction of the protein-protein interaction sites evidenced that the surface regions of the type I domains embedded within multienzyme assemblies were different from those of the self-standing enzymes; these structural features appear to be required for productive interactions with the adjacent domains in a multidomain context. This work provides a systematic view of the occurrence of type I domain within NRPS and PKS assembly lines and it predicts their structural characteristics using computational methods. Comparison with the corresponding stand

  8. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  9. A hybrid non-ribosomal peptide/polyketide synthetase containing fatty-acyl ligase (FAAL synthesizes the β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides puwainaphycins in the Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum alatosporum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mareš

    Full Text Available A putative operon encoding the biosynthetic pathway for the cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides puwainphycins was identified in Cylindrospermum alatosporum. Bioinformatics analysis enabled sequential prediction of puwainaphycin biosynthesis; this process is initiated by the activation of a fatty acid residue via fatty acyl-AMP ligase and continued by a multidomain non-ribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthetase. High-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements proved the production of puwainaphycin F/G congeners differing in FA chain length formed by either 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl dodecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahdoa or 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl tetradecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahtea. Because only one puwainaphycin operon was recovered in the genome, we suggest that the fatty acyl-AMP ligase and one of the amino acid adenylation domains (Asn/Gln show extended substrate specificity. Our results provide the first insight into the biosynthesis of frequently occurring β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides in cyanobacteria, which may facilitate analytical assessment and development of monitoring tools for cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides.

  10. Characterization of cereulide synthetase, a toxin-producing macromolecular machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego A Alonzo

    Full Text Available Cereulide synthetase is a two-protein nonribosomal peptide synthetase system that produces a potent emetic toxin in virulent strains of Bacillus cereus. The toxin cereulide is a depsipeptide, as it consists of alternating aminoacyl and hydroxyacyl residues. The hydroxyacyl residues are derived from keto acid substrates, which cereulide synthetase selects and stereospecifically reduces with imbedded ketoreductase domains before incorporating them into the growing depsipeptide chain. We present an in vitro biochemical characterization of cereulide synthetase. We investigate the kinetics and side chain specificity of α-keto acid selection, evaluate the requirement of an MbtH-like protein for adenylation domain activity, assay the effectiveness of vinylsulfonamide inhibitors on ester-adding modules, perform NADPH turnover experiments and evaluate in vitro depsipeptide biosynthesis. This work also provides biochemical insight into depsipeptide-synthesizing nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for other bioactive molecules such as valinomycin, antimycin and kutzneride.

  11. [Anti-synthetase syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Srdan

    2012-01-01

    Antysynthetase syndrome is considered as a group ofidiopathic inflammatory myositis with charcteristic serologic hallmark--antibodies which recognise the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetasses (ARS). Clinical picture of those patients contains myositis and/or intersticial lung disease (ILD) and/or arthritis and/or fever and/or Raynaud phenomenon and sometimes characteristic look of mechanic's hands. Myositis can be overt, sometimes even absent, while IBP is major cause of morbidity and determines the outcome of the disease. Untill now eight different any-synthetase autoantibodies are recognised, and most frequent are findings of anti-histidyl-tRNa synthetase antibodies. Patients with other ARS autoantibodies usually have severe ILD. Drug of choice are steroids in dosage of 1 mg/kg with immunosupresive agent (azatioprin or methotrexate) while in severe IBP cyclophosphamide is needed. Recently succsesful treatment with rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide is reported.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions glutathione synthetase deficiency glutathione synthetase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glutathione synthetase deficiency is a disorder that prevents the ...

  13. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies of Bacillomycin and Iturin synthetases with novel ligands for the production of therapeutic lipopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswari, Jujjavarapu Satya; Dhagat, Swasti; Kaser, Shubham; Tiwari, Anoop

    2017-08-15

    Lipopeptide synthetases play an important role in the production of lipopeptides. Lipopeptides are molecules made up of peptides and fatty acid moieties and have shown to have a broad range of antimicrobial activity. As infectious diseases have caused severe health problems mainly resulting from the development of antibiotic resistant strains of disease causing microorganisms there is a need of alternatives to antibiotics. The lipopeptide synthetase of the corresponding lipopeptides can be used as templates to design these as drugs using computational techniques. The objective of this study was homology modeling and molecular docking of two lipopeptide synthetases, bacillomycin D synthetase and iturin A synthetase, with their ligands as a means of drug design. Schrödinger software was used for homology modeling and molecular docking. After the identification of ligands, molecular docking of these ligands with the lipopeptide (bacillomycin and iturin) synthetases was performed. The docking was tested on the parameters of docking score and glide energy. 5 out of 21 ligands were found to dock with bacillomycin D synthetase whereas 8 out of 20 ligands docked with the iturin A synthetase. The knowledge of the docking sites and docking characteristics of the lipopeptide synthetases mentioned in the paper with the ligands can provide advantages of high speed and reliability, reduced costs on chemicals and experiments and the ethical issues concerned with the use of animal models for screening of drug toxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Recurrent adenylation domain replacement in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laakso Kati

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microcystins are small cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by a range of distantly related cyanobacteria. Microcystins are synthesized on large NRPS-PKS enzyme complexes. Many structural variants of microcystins are produced simulatenously. A recombination event between the first module of mcyB (mcyB1 and mcyC in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster is linked to the simultaneous production of microcystin variants in strains of the genus Microcystis. Results Here we undertook a phylogenetic study to investigate the order and timing of recombination between the mcyB1 and mcyC genes in a diverse selection of microcystin producing cyanobacteria. Our results provide support for complex evolutionary processes taking place at the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains which recognize and activate the amino acids found at X and Z positions. We find evidence for recent recombination between mcyB1 and mcyC in strains of the genera Anabaena, Microcystis, and Hapalosiphon. We also find clear evidence for independent adenylation domain conversion of mcyB1 by unrelated peptide synthetase modules in strains of the genera Nostoc and Microcystis. The recombination events replace only the adenylation domain in each case and the condensation domains of mcyB1 and mcyC are not transferred together with the adenylation domain. Our findings demonstrate that the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains are recombination hotspots in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster. Conclusion Recombination is thought to be one of the main mechanisms driving the diversification of NRPSs. However, there is very little information on how recombination takes place in nature. This study demonstrates that functional peptide synthetases are created in nature through transfer of adenylation domains without the concomitant transfer of condensation domains.

  15. Distribution of glutamine synthetase and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I in vertebrate liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D. D.; Campbell, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Mitochondrial glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) is the primary ammonia-detoxifying enzyme in avian liver and is therefore analogous in function to carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I (ammonia) (EC 6.3.4.16) in mammalian liver. In mammalian liver, glutamine synthetase is cytosolic and its distribution is restricted to a few hepatocytes around the terminal venules. These cells do not express carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I. Using immunocytochemistry, we show here that there is little or no zonati...

  16. Streptomyces hygroscopicus Has Two Glutamine Synthetase Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumada, Y.; Takano, E.; Nagaoka, Kozo; Thompson, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    Streptomyces hygroscopicus, which produces the glutamine synthetase inhibitor phosphinothricin, possesses at least two genes (glnA and glnB) encoding distinct glutamine synthetase isoforms (GSI and GSII). The glnB gene was cloned from S. hygroscopicus DNA by complementation in an Escherichia coli gl

  17. Covalent aspartylation of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Bakers' yeast by its cognat aspartyl adenylate: identification of the labeled residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejdoub, H.; Kern, D.; Giege, R.; Ebel, J.P.; Boulanger, Y.; Reinbolt, J.

    1987-04-07

    Aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from bakers' yeast gives an unstable complex with the cognate adenylate, which reacts after dissociation with amino acid side chains of the protein. This leads to a covalent incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-aspartic acid into aspartyl-tRNA synthetase via amide or ester bonds formed between the ..cap alpha..-carboxyl group of activated aspartic acid and accessible lysines, serines, and threonines. This property is used to label the peptides at the surface of the enzyme. The main labeled residues have been identified, and their location in the primary structure is discussed in relation to structural properties of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase.

  18. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie

    Improving crop nitrogen (N) utilization efficiency (NUE) is of major importance in modern agriculture in order to reduce the amount of N fertilizer used for crop production. There is a high demand for development of crops which are able to produce high yields but with a concomitantly lower N...... fertilizer requirement. The enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) has been a major topic in plant nitrogen research for decades due to its central role in plant N metabolism. The cytosolic version of this enzyme (GS1) plays an important role in relation to primary N assimilation as well as in relation to N...... and wildtype control. However, when grown to maturity the differences between transgenic lines and wildtype were highly dependent on the growth conditions applied. The transgenic lines had a higher N utilization efficiency (NUtE) than wildtype control, but only when exposed to a mild N stress following...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase superactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... synthetase superactivity ( PRS superactivity ) is characterized by the overproduction and accumulation of uric acid (a waste product ... chemical processes) in the blood and urine. The overproduction of uric acid can lead to gout, which ...

  20. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  1. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  2. Role of Motif III in Catalysis by Acetyl-CoA Synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Ingram-Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The acyl-adenylate-forming enzyme superfamily, consisting of acyl- and aryl-CoA synthetases, the adenylation domain of the nonribosomal peptide synthetases, and luciferase, has three signature motifs (I–III and ten conserved core motifs (A1–A10, some of which overlap the signature motifs. The consensus sequence for signature motif III (core motif A7 in acetyl-CoA synthetase is Y-X-S/T/A-G-D, with an invariant fifth position, highly conserved first and fourth positions, and variable second and third positions. Kinetic studies of enzyme variants revealed that an alteration at any position resulted in a strong decrease in the catalytic rate, although the most deleterious effects were observed when the first or fifth positions were changed. Structural modeling suggests that the highly conserved Tyr in the first position plays a key role in active site architecture through interaction with a highly conserved active-site Gln, and the invariant Asp in the fifth position plays a critical role in ATP binding and catalysis through interaction with the 2′- and 3′-OH groups of the ribose moiety. Interactions between these Asp and ATP are observed in all structures available for members of the superfamily, consistent with a critical role in substrate binding and catalysis for this invariant residue.

  3. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  4. Implementation of communication-mediating domains for non-ribosomal peptide production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, Verena; San-Bento, Rita; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has in several cases been proven to be a suitable host for the production of natural products and was recently exploited for the production of non-ribosomal peptides. Synthesis of non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) is mediated by NRP synthetases (NRPSs), modular enzymes, which...

  5. In vivo modification of Azotobacter chroococcum glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Centeno, M C; Cejudo, F J; Paneque, A

    1994-03-15

    A monospecific anti-(glutamine synthetase) antibody raised against glutamine synthetase of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 immunoreacted with glutamine synthetase from the N2-fixing heterotrophic bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum. In Western-blotting experiments this antibody recognized a single protein of a molecular mass of 59 kDa corresponding to glutamine synthetase subunit. This protein was in vivo-labelled in response to addition of ammonium, both [3H]adenine and H(3)32PO4 preincubation of the cells being equally effective. Nevertheless, the amount of glutamine synthetase present in A. chroococcum was independent of the available nitrogen source. Modified, inactive glutamine synthetase was re-activated by treatment with snake-venom phosphodiesterase but not by alkaline phosphatase. L-Methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented the enzyme from being covalently modified. We conclude that, in A. chroococcum, glutamine synthetase is adenylylated in response to ammonium and that for the modification to take place ammonium must be metabolized.

  6. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. The microsomal dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamecq, J; de Hoffmann, E; Van Hoof, F

    1985-09-15

    Dicarboxylic acids are products of the omega-oxidation of monocarboxylic acids. We demonstrate that in rat liver dicarboxylic acids (C5-C16) can be converted into their CoA esters by a dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase. During this activation ATP, which cannot be replaced by GTP, is converted into AMP and PPi, both acting as feedback inhibitors of the reaction. Thermolabile at 37 degrees C, and optimally active at pH 6.5, dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase displays the highest activity on dodecanedioic acid (2 micromol/min per g of liver). Cell-fractionation studies indicate that this enzyme belongs to the hepatic microsomal fraction. Investigations about the fate of dicarboxylyl-CoA esters disclosed the existence of an oxidase, which could be measured by monitoring the production of H2O2. In our assay conditions this H2O2 production is dependent on and closely follows the CoA consumption. It appears that the chain-length specificity of the handling of dicarboxylic acids by this catabolic pathway (activation to acyl-CoA and oxidation with H2O2 production) parallels the pattern of the degradation of exogenous dicarboxylic acids in vivo.

  8. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, M; Deniziak, M A; Barciszewski, J

    2001-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) are at the center of the question of the origin of life. They constitute a family of enzymes integrating the two levels of cellular organization: nucleic acids and proteins. AARSs arose early in evolution and are believed to be a group of ancient proteins. They are responsible for attaching amino acid residues to their cognate tRNA molecules, which is the first step in the protein synthesis. The role they play in a living cell is essential for the precise deciphering of the genetic code. The analysis of AARSs evolutionary history was not possible for a long time due to a lack of a sufficiently large number of their amino acid sequences. The emerging picture of synthetases' evolution is a result of recent achievements in genomics [Woese,C., Olsen,G.J., Ibba,M. and Söll,D. (2000) Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev., 64, 202-236]. In this paper we present a short introduction to the AARSs database. The updated database contains 1047 AARS primary structures from archaebacteria, eubacteria, mitochondria, chloroplasts and eukaryotic cells. It is the compilation of amino acid sequences of all AARSs known to date, which are available as separate entries via the WWW at http://biobases.ibch.poznan.pl/aars/.

  9. Glutamine Synthetase: Role in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Norenberg, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an ATP-dependent enzyme found in most species that synthesizes glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In brain, GS is exclusively located in astrocytes where it serves to maintain the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as nitrogen metabolism. Changes in the activity of GS, as well as its gene expression, along with excitotoxicity, have been identified in a number of neurological conditions. The literature describing alterations in the activation and gene expression of GS, as well as its involvement in different neurological disorders, however, is incomplete. This review summarizes changes in GS gene expression/activity and its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders, including hepatic encephalopathy, ischemia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and astroglial neoplasms. This review also explores the possibility of targeting GS in the therapy of these conditions.

  10. Mechanistic issues in asparagine synthetase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    1998-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of asparagine is an ATP-dependent process that utilizes the nitrogen atom derived from either glutamine or ammonia. Despite a long history of kinetic and mechanistic investigation, there is no universally accepted catalytic mechanism for this seemingly straightforward carboxyl group activating enzyme, especially as regards those steps immediately preceding amide bond formation. This chapter considers four issues dealing with the mechanism: (a) the structural organization of the active site(s) partaking in glutamine utilization and aspartate activation; (b) the relationship of asparagine synthetase to other amidotransferases; (c) the way in which ATP is used to activate the beta-carboxyl group; and (d) the detailed mechanism by which nitrogen is transferred.

  11. Primary structure of the succinyl-CoA synthetase of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, D; Spencer, M E; Guest, J R

    1985-10-22

    The primary structure of the succinyl-CoA synthetase of Escherichia coli has been deduced from the nucleotide sequence of a 2451-base-pair segment of DNA containing the corresponding sucC (beta subunit) and sucD (alpha subunit) genes. The genes are located at one end of a gene cluster that encodes several citric acid cycle enzymes: gltA-sdhCDAB-sucABCD; gltA, citrate synthase; sdh, succinate dehydrogenase; sucA and sucB, the dehydrogenase (E1) and succinyltransferase (E2) components of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. The sucC and sucD genes are separated from the sucA and sucB genes by a 273-base-pair segment containing four palindromic units, but they appear to be expressed from a sucABCD read-through transcript that extends from the suc promoter to a potential rho-independent terminator at the distal end of sucD. The stop codon of the sucC gene overlaps the sucD initiation codon by a single nucleotide, indicating close translational coupling of the sucC and sucD genes. The sucC gene comprises 1161 base pairs (388 codons, excluding the stop codon), and it encodes a polypeptide of Mr 41 390 corresponding to the beta subunit of succinyl-CoA synthetase. The sucD gene comprises 864 base pairs (288 codons, excluding the start and stop codons), and it encodes a product of Mr 29 644, corresponding to the alpha subunit of succinyl-CoA synthetase. The alpha subunit contains a 12-residue amino acid sequence that is identical with the histidine peptide previously isolated from the phosphoenzyme. This sequence forms part of one of the two potential nucleotide binding sites detected in the alpha subunit.

  12. The McbB component of microcin B17 synthetase is a zinc metalloprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamble, D B; McClure, C P; Penner-Hahn, J E; Walsh, C T

    2000-12-26

    The microcin B17 synthetase converts glycine, serine, and cysteine residues in a polypeptide precursor into oxazoles and thiazoles during the maturation of the Escherichia coli antibiotic Microcin B17. This multimeric enzyme is composed of three subunits (McbB, McbC, and McbD), and it employs both ATP and FMN as cofactors. The McbB subunit was purified as a fusion with the maltose-binding protein (MBP), and metal analysis revealed that this protein binds 0.91+/-0.17 zinc atoms. Upon incubation of MBP-McbB with excess zinc, the stoichiometry increased to two atoms of zinc bound, but metal binding to the second site resulted in a decrease in the heterocyclization activity when MBP-McbB was reconstituted with the other components of the synthetase. Apo-protein was prepared by using p-hydroxymercuriphenylsulfonic acid (PMPS), and loss of the metal caused a severe reduction in enzymatic activity. However, if dithiothreitol was added to the PMPS reactions within a few minutes, enzymatic activity was retained and MBP-McbB could be reconstituted with zinc. Spectroscopic analysis of the cobalt-containing protein and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the zinc-containing protein both provide evidence for a tetrathiolate coordination sphere. Site-directed mutants of MBP-McbB as well as the synthetase tagged with the calmodulin-binding peptide were constructed. Activity assays and metal analysis were used to determine which of the six cysteines in McbB are metal ligands. These results suggest that the zinc cofactor in McbB plays a structural role.

  13. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-01-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxi...

  14. PRS1 is a key member of the gene family encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Andrew T.; Beiche, Flora; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne;

    1997-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the metabolite phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate (PRPP) is required for purine, pyrimidine, tryptophan and histidine biosynthesis. Enzymes that can synthesize PRPP can be encoded by at least four genes. We have studied 5-phospho-ribosyl-1(α)-pyrophosphate synthetases (PRS......) genetically and biochemically. Each of the four genes, all of which are transcribed, has been disrupted in haploid yeast strains of each mating type and although all disruptants are able to grow on complete medium, differences in growth rate and enzyme activity suggest that disruption of PRS1 or PRS3 has...... a significant effect on cell metabolism, whereas disruption of PRS2 or PRS4 has little measurable effect. Using Western blot analysis with antisera raised against peptides derived from the non-homology region (NHR) and the N-terminal half of the PRS1 gene product it has been shown that the NHR is not removed...

  15. Glutamine Triggers Acetylation-Dependent Degradation of Glutamine Synthetase via the Thalidomide Receptor Cereblon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T Van; Lee, J Eugene; Sweredoski, Michael J; Yang, Seung-Joo; Jeon, Seung-Je; Harrison, Joseph S; Yim, Jung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang Ghil; Handa, Hiroshi; Kuhlman, Brian; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Reitsma, Justin M; Park, Chul-Seung; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-03-17

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor for the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase 4 (CRL4) complex, is a direct protein target for thalidomide teratogenicity and antitumor activity of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). Here we report that glutamine synthetase (GS) is an endogenous substrate of CRL4(CRBN). Upon exposing cells to high glutamine concentration, GS is acetylated at lysines 11 and 14, yielding a degron that is necessary and sufficient for binding and ubiquitylation by CRL4(CRBN) and degradation by the proteasome. Binding of acetylated degron peptides to CRBN depends on an intact thalidomide-binding pocket but is not competitive with IMiDs. These findings reveal a feedback loop involving CRL4(CRBN) that adjusts GS protein levels in response to glutamine and uncover a new function for lysine acetylation.

  16. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  17. Glutamine synthetase induced spinal seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Won; Yoon, Young Sul; Matsumoto, Masato; Huang, Wencheng; Ceraulo, Phil; Young, Wise

    2003-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the regulation of glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. It is responsible for converting glutamate to glutamine, consuming one ATP and NH3 in the process. Glutamate is neurotoxic when it accumulates in extracellular fluids. We investigated the effects of GS in both a spinal cord injury (SCI) model and normal rats. 0.1-ml of low (2- micro M) and high (55- micro M) concentrations of GS were applied, intrathecally, to the spinal cord of rats under pentobarbital anesthesia. Immediately after an intrathecal injection into the L1-L3 space, the rats developed convulsive movements. These movements initially consisted of myoclonic twitches of the paravertebral muscles close to the injection site, repeated tonic and clonic contractions and extensions of the hind limbs (hind limb seizures) that spread to the fore limbs, and finally rotational axial movements of the body. An EMG of the paravertebral muscles, fore and hind limbs, showed the extent of the muscle activities. GS (2- micro M) caused spinal seizures in the rats after the SCI, and GS (6- micro M) produced seizures in the uninjured anesthetized rats. Denatured GS (70 degrees C, 1 hour) also produced spinal seizures, although higher concentrations were required. We suggest that GS may be directly blocking the release of GABA, or the receptors, in the spinal cord.

  18. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cánovas Francisco M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1 and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2. Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types.

  19. Evolutionary divergence of chloroplast FAD synthetase proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arilla-Luna Sonia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetases (FADSs - a group of bifunctional enzymes that carry out the dual functions of riboflavin phosphorylation to produce flavin mononucleotide (FMN and its subsequent adenylation to generate FAD in most prokaryotes - were studied in plants in terms of sequence, structure and evolutionary history. Results Using a variety of bioinformatics methods we have found that FADS enzymes localized to the chloroplasts, which we term as plant-like FADS proteins, are distributed across a variety of green plant lineages and constitute a divergent protein family clearly of cyanobacterial origin. The C-terminal module of these enzymes does not contain the typical riboflavin kinase active site sequence, while the N-terminal module is broadly conserved. These results agree with a previous work reported by Sandoval et al. in 2008. Furthermore, our observations and preliminary experimental results indicate that the C-terminus of plant-like FADS proteins may contain a catalytic activity, but different to that of their prokaryotic counterparts. In fact, homology models predict that plant-specific conserved residues constitute a distinct active site in the C-terminus. Conclusions A structure-based sequence alignment and an in-depth evolutionary survey of FADS proteins, thought to be crucial in plant metabolism, are reported, which will be essential for the correct annotation of plant genomes and further structural and functional studies. This work is a contribution to our understanding of the evolutionary history of plant-like FADS enzymes, which constitute a new family of FADS proteins whose C-terminal module might be involved in a distinct catalytic activity.

  20. Structure of the adenylation-peptidyl carrier protein didomain of the Microcystis aeruginosa microcystin synthetase McyG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiao-Feng; Dai, Ya-Nan; Zhou, Kang; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Ren, Yan-Min; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Microcystins, which are the most common cause of hepatotoxicity associated with cyanobacterial water blooms, are assembled in vivo on a large multienzyme complex via a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthetase (NRPS/PKS). The biosynthesis of microcystin in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 starts with the enzyme McyG, which contains an adenylation-peptidyl carrier protein (A-PCP) didomain for loading the starter unit to assemble the side chain of an Adda residue. However, the catalytic mechanism remains unclear. Here, the 2.45 Å resolution crystal structure of the McyG A-PCP didomain complexed with the catalytic intermediate L-phenylalanyl-adenylate (L-Phe-AMP) is reported. Each asymmetric unit contains two protein molecules, one of which consists of the A-PCP didomain and the other of which comprises only the A domain. Structural analyses suggest that Val227 is likely to be critical for the selection of hydrophobic substrates. Moreover, two distinct interfaces demonstrating variable crosstalk between the PCP domain and the A domain were observed. A catalytic cycle for the adenylation and peptide transfer of the A-PCP didomain is proposed.

  1. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  2. Characterization of a Salmonella typhimurium mutant defective in phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochimsen, Bjarne; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Garber, Bruce B.;

    1985-01-01

    This study describes the isolation and characterization of a mutant (strain GP122) of Salmonella typhimurium with a partial deficiency of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase activity. This strain was isolated in a purE deoD gpt purine auxotroph by a procedure designed to select guanosine......-utilizing mutants. Strain GP122 had roughly 15% of the PRPP synthetase activity and 25% of the PRPP pool of its parent strain. The mutant exhibited many of the predicted consequences of a decreased PRPP pool and a defective PRPP synthetase enzyme, including: poor growth on purine bases; decreased accumulation of 5...... phosphoribosyltransferase, enzymes involved in the pyrimidine de novo biosynthetic pathway; growth stimulation by PRPP-sparing compounds (e.g. guanosine, histidine); poor growth in low phosphate medium; and increased heat lability of the defective enzyme. This mutant strain also had increased levels of guanosine 5...

  3. Recurrent Isolated Neonatal Hemolytic Anemia: Think About Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signolet, Isabelle; Chenouard, Rachel; Oca, Florine; Barth, Magalie; Reynier, Pascal; Denis, Marie-Christine; Simard, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) of the newborn should be considered in cases of rapidly developing, severe, or persistent hyperbilirubinemia. Several causes of corpuscular hemolysis have been described, among which red blood cell enzyme defects are of particular concern. We report a rare case of red blood cell enzyme defect in a male infant, who presented during his first months of life with recurrent and isolated neonatal hemolysis. All main causes were ruled out. At 6.5 months of age, the patient presented with gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization; fortuitously, urine organic acid chromatography revealed a large peak of 5-oxoproline. Before the association between HA and 5-oxoprolinuria was noted, glutathione synthetase deficiency was suspected and confirmed by a low glutathione synthetase concentration and a collapse of glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes. Moreover, molecular diagnosis revealed 2 mutations in the glutathione synthetase gene: a previously reported missense mutation (c.[656A>G]; p.[Asp219Gly]) and a mutation not yet described in the binding site of the enzyme (c.[902T>C]; p.[Leu301Pro]). However, 15 days later, a control sample revealed no signs of 5-oxoprolinuria and the clinical history discovered administration of acetaminophen in the 48 hours before hospitalization. Thus, in this patient, acetaminophen exposure allowed the diagnosis of a mild form of glutathione synthetase deficiency, characterized by isolated HA. Early diagnosis is important because treatment with bicarbonate, vitamins C and E, and elimination of trigger factors are recommended to improve long-term outcomes. Glutathione synthetase deficiency should be screened for in cases of unexplained newborn HA. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Leader Peptide Establishes Dehydration Order, Promotes Efficiency, and Ensures Fidelity During Lacticin 481 Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeaux, Christopher J; Wagoner, Joshua; Yu, Yi; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2016-05-25

    The mechanisms by which lanthipeptide synthetases control the order in which they catalyze multiple chemical processes are poorly understood. The lacticin 481 synthetase (LctM) cleaves eight chemical bonds and forms six new chemical bonds in a controlled and ordered process. Two general mechanisms have been suggested for the temporal and spatial control of these transformations. In the spatial positioning model, leader peptide binding promotes certain reactions by establishing the spatial orientation of the substrate peptide relative to the synthetase active sites. In the intermediate structure model, the LctM-catalyzed dehydration and cyclization reactions that occur in two distinct active sites orchestrate the overall process by imparting a specific structure into the maturing peptide that facilitates the ensuing reaction. Using isotopically labeled LctA analogues with engineered lacticin 481 biosynthetic machinery and mass spectrometry analysis, we show here that the LctA leader peptide plays critical roles in establishing the modification order and enhancing the catalytic efficiency and fidelity of the synthetase. The data are most consistent with a mechanistic model for LctM where both spatial positioning and intermediate structure contribute to efficient biosynthesis.

  5. Arsenic and mercury tolerance and cadmium sensitivity in Arabidopsis plants expressing bacterial gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujing; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Carreira, Laura; Balish, Rebecca S; Meagher, Richard B

    2005-06-01

    Cysteine sulfhydryl-rich peptide thiols are believed to play important roles in the detoxification of many heavy metals and metalloids such as arsenic, mercury, and cadmium in plants. The gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS) catalyzes the synthesis of the dipeptidethiol gamma-glu-cys (gamma-EC), the first step in the biosynthesis of phytochelatins (PCs). Arabidopsis thaliana, engineered to express the bacterial gamma-ECS gene under control of a strong constitutive actin regulatory sequence (A2), expressed gamma-ECS at levels approaching 0.1% of total protein. In response to arsenic, mercury, and cadmium stresses, the levels of gamma-EC and its derivatives, glutathione (GSH) and PCs, were increased in the A2::ECS transgenic plants to three- to 20-fold higher concentrations than the increases that occurred in wild-type (WT). Compared to cadmium and mercury treatments, arsenic treatment most significantly increased levels of gamma-EC and PCs in both the A2::ECS transgenic and WT plants. The A2::ECS transgenic plants were highly resistant to arsenic and weakly resistant to mercury. Although exposure to cadmium produced three- to fivefold increases in levels of gamma-EC-related peptides in the A2::ECS lines, these plants were significantly more sensitive to Cd(II) than WT and trace levels of Cd(II) blocked resistance to arsenic and mercury. A few possible mechanisms for gamma-ECS-enhanced arsenic and mercury resistance and cadmium hypersensitivity are discussed.

  6. Binding of divalent magnesium by Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates Mg x ATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-D-ribosyl (alpha-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, alpha,beta-methylene ATP ...

  7. Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency in Murine Astrocytes Results in Neonatal Death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. He; T.B.M. Hakvoort; J.L.M. Vermeulen; W.T. Labruyere; D.R. de Waart; W.S. van der Hel; J.M. Ruijter; H.B.M. Uylings; W.H. Lamers

    2010-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the "glutamine-glutamate cycle" between astrocytes and neurons, but its function in vivo was thus far tested only pharmacologically. Crossing GS(fl/lacZ) or GS(fl/f)l mice with hGFAP-Cre mice resulted in prenatal excision of the GS(fl) allele in astrocyte

  8. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L; Steitz, Thomas A; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-11-25

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNA(Pyl) have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate N(ε)-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNA(Pyl). Here, we examine an N(ε)-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids.

  9. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L.; Steitz, Thomas A.; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate Nε-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNAPyl. Here, we examine an Nε-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids. PMID:25385624

  10. Increased hepatic glycogen synthetase and decreased phosphorylase in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Saugmann, P; Richter, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Rats were either physically trained by a 12 wk swimming program or were freely eating or weight matched, sedentary controls. Trained rats had a higher relative liver weight and total hepatic glycogen synthetase (EC 2.4.1.11) activity and a lower phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) activity than the other...

  11. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  12. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Stéphanie M; Habash, Dimah Z

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  13. Evolution of cyclic peptide protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Travis S; Young, Douglas D; Ahmad, Insha; Louis, John M; Benkovic, Stephen J; Schultz, Peter G

    2011-07-05

    We report a bacterial system for the evolution of cyclic peptides that makes use of an expanded set of amino acid building blocks. Orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA(CUA) pairs, together with a split intein system were used to biosynthesize a library of ribosomal peptides containing amino acids with unique structures and reactivities. This peptide library was subsequently used to evolve an inhibitor of HIV protease using a selection based on cellular viability. Two of three cyclic peptides isolated after two rounds of selection contained the keto amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (pBzF). The most potent peptide (G12: GIXVSL; X=pBzF) inhibited HIV protease through the formation of a covalent Schiff base adduct of the pBzF residue with the ε-amino group of Lys 14 on the protease. This result suggests that an expanded genetic code can confer an evolutionary advantage in response to selective pressure. Moreover, the combination of natural evolutionary processes with chemically biased building blocks provides another strategy for the generation of biologically active peptides using microbial systems.

  14. Bioinformatics Tools for the Discovery of New Nonribosomal Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leclère, Valérie; Weber, Tilmann; Jacques, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    -dimensional structure of the peptides can be compared with the structural patterns of all known NRPs. The presented workflow leads to an efficient and rapid screening of genomic data generated by high throughput technologies. The exploration of such sequenced genomes may lead to the discovery of new drugs (i......This chapter helps in the use of bioinformatics tools relevant to the discovery of new nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) produced by microorganisms. The strategy described can be applied to draft or fully assembled genome sequences. It relies on the identification of the synthetase genes...

  15. Clone and functional analysis of Seryl-tRNA synthetase and Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingsheng; Tian, Jianghai; Li, Fanchi; Xue, Bin; Hu, Jiahuan; Cheng, Xiaoyu; Li, Jinxin; Shen, Weide; Li, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are the key enzymes for protein synthesis. Glycine, alanine, serine and tyrosine are the major amino acids composing fibroin of silkworm. Among them, the genes of alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) and glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) have been cloned. In this study, the seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) genes from silkworm were cloned. Their full length are 1709 bp and 1868 bp and contain open reading frame (ORF) of 1485 bp and 1575 bp, respectively. RT-PCR examination showed that the transcription levels of SerRS, TyrRS, AlaRS and GlyRS are significantly higher in silk gland than in other tissues. In addition, their transcription levels are much higher in middle and posterior silk gland than in anterior silk gland. Moreover, treatment of silkworms with phoxim, an inhibitor of silk protein synthesis, but not TiO2 NP, an enhancer of silk protein synthesis, significantly reduced the transcription levels of aaRS and content of free amino acids in posterior silk gland, therefore affecting silk protein synthesis, which may be the mechanism of phoxim-silking disorders. Furthermore, low concentration of TiO2 NPs showed no effect on the transcription of aaRS and content of free amino acids, suggesting that TiO2 NPs promotes silk protein synthesis possibly by increasing the activity of fibroin synthase in silkworm. PMID:28134300

  16. Expression of the pgsB encoding the poly-gamma-DL-glutamate synthetase of Bacillus subtilis (natto).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Keitarou; Tran, Lam-Son Phan; Do, Thi-Huyen; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2009-05-01

    An industrial strain of Bacillus subtilis (natto) was used to produce poly-gamma-DL-glutamate (gammaPGA), a polymer of DL-glutamate linked by a gamma-peptide bond. In spite of efforts to improve gammaPGA production by modifying the medium, little attention has been paid to the expression of the gammaPGA synthetase gene. In this study, we investigated the expression of the gammaPGA synthetic gene and the gammaPGA product under various conditions with the LacZ-fusion of the synthetic gene (pgsB-lacZ). The 5' upstream regulatory region of the pgsB gene was also investigated by constructing deletion mutations of lacZ-fusion. The pgsB-lacZ was clearly expressed in the early stationary phase and was abolished by degU gene disruption. The results showed that pgsB-lacZ expression was repressed in rich media, and that gammaPGA production was limited by the substrate supply rather than by the amount of synthetase. Adding D-glutamate to the medium reduced gammaPGA production and synthetic gene expression. The transcription start point was determined by primer extension, and it was found that up to -721 bp (translation start point = +1) of the 5' untranslated region (UTR) was required for optimal pgsB-lacZ fusion gene expression.

  17. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complexes in Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Havrylenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential enzymes for interpreting the genetic code. They are responsible for the proper pairing of codons on mRNA with amino acids. In addition to this canonical, translational function, they are also involved in the control of many cellular pathways essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Association of several of these enzymes within supramolecular assemblies is a key feature of organization of the translation apparatus in eukaryotes. It could be a means to control their oscillation between translational functions, when associated within a multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS, and nontranslational functions, after dissociation from the MARS and association with other partners. In this review, we summarize the composition of the different MARS described from archaea to mammals, the mode of assembly of these complexes, and their roles in maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  18. Glutathione production by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing bifunctional glutathione synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important bioactive substance applied widely in pharmaceutical and food industries. Due to the strong product inhibition in the GSH biosynthetic pathway, high levels of intracellular content, yield and productivity of GSH are difficult to achieve. Recently, a novel bifunctional GSH synthetase was identified to be less sensitive to GSH. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing gshF encoding the bifunctional glutathione synthetase of Streptococcus thermophilus was constructed for GSH production. In this study, efficient GSH production using this engineered strain was investigated. The cultivation process was optimized by controlling dissolved oxygen (DO), amino acid addition and glucose feeding. 36.8 mM (11.3 g/L) GSH were formed at a productivity of 2.06 mM/h when the amino acid precursors (75 mM each) were added and glucose was supplied as the sole carbon and energy source.

  19. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli, Identification of a mutant enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Nygaard, Per

    1982-01-01

    , stimulated the mutant enzyme. The activity of PRib-PP synthetase in crude extract was higher in the mutant than in the parent. When starved for purines an accumulation of PRib-PP was observed in the parent strain, while the pool decreased in the mutant. During pyrimidine starvation derepression of PRib....... Kinetic analysis of the mutant PRib-PP synthetase revealed an apparent Km for ATP and ribose 5-phosphate of 1.0 mM and 240 μM respectively, compared to 60 μM and 45 μM respectively for the wild-type enzyme. ADP, which inhibits the wild-type enzyme at a concentration of 0.5 mM ribose 5-phosphate...

  20. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months.

  1. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli, Identification of a mutant enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Nygaard, Per

    1982-01-01

    . Kinetic analysis of the mutant PRib-PP synthetase revealed an apparent Km for ATP and ribose 5-phosphate of 1.0 mM and 240 μM respectively, compared to 60 μM and 45 μM respectively for the wild-type enzyme. ADP, which inhibits the wild-type enzyme at a concentration of 0.5 mM ribose 5-phosphate......, stimulated the mutant enzyme. The activity of PRib-PP synthetase in crude extract was higher in the mutant than in the parent. When starved for purines an accumulation of PRib-PP was observed in the parent strain, while the pool decreased in the mutant. During pyrimidine starvation derepression of PRib...

  2. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: A good molecular clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesole, G.; Lanvave, C.; Saccone, C. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, Bari (Italy)); Bozzetti, M.P. (Univ. di Bari (Italy)); Preparata, G. (Univ. di Milano (Italy))

    1991-01-15

    Glutamine synthetase gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. The calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. The data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves.

  3. Reinvestigation of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase core complex by affinity purification-mass spectrometry reveals TARSL2 as a potential member of the complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyutae Kim

    Full Text Available Twenty different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs link each amino acid to their cognate tRNAs. Individual ARSs are also associated with various non-canonical activities involved in neuronal diseases, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Among them, eight ARSs (D, EP, I, K, L, M, Q and RARS, together with three ARS-interacting multifunctional proteins (AIMPs, are currently known to assemble the multi-synthetase complex (MSC. However, the cellular function and global topology of MSC remain unclear. In order to understand the complex interaction within MSC, we conducted affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS using each of AIMP1, AIMP2 and KARS as a bait protein. Mass spectrometric data were funneled into SAINT software to distinguish true interactions from background contaminants. A total of 40, 134, 101 proteins in each bait scored over 0.9 of SAINT probability in HEK 293T cells. Complex-forming ARSs, such as DARS, EPRS, IARS, Kars, LARS, MARS, QARS and RARS, were constantly found to interact with each bait. Variants such as, AIMP2-DX2 and AIMP1 isoform 2 were found with specific peptides in KARS precipitates. Relative enrichment analysis of the mass spectrometric data demonstrated that TARSL2 (threonyl-tRNA synthetase like-2 was highly enriched with the ARS-core complex. The interaction was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation of TARSL2 with other ARS core-complex components. We suggest TARSL2 as a new component of ARS core-complex.

  4. Glutamine synthetase localization in cortisol-induced chick embryo retinas

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    We report here for the first time, in chick retina, Muller cell localization of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity by an immunohistochemical technique, in agreement with previous reports of glial localization of this enzyme in rat brain and retina. Age- dependent changes in the endogenous enzyme activity as well as cortisol- induced changes in GS activity, both in ovo and in vitro, measured biochemically, reflect the changes observed by staining.

  5. Glutamine synthetase activity in the ruminal bacterium Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, J A; Hespell, R B

    1985-01-01

    Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens C18 was found to possess glutamine synthetase (GS), urease, glutamate dehydrogenase, and several other nitrogen assimilation enzymes. When grown in continuous culture under ammonia limitation, both GS and urease activities were high and glutamate dehydrogenase activity was low, but the opposite activity pattern was observed for growth in the presence of ample ammonia. The addition of high-level (15 mM) ammonium chloride to ammonia-limited cultures resulted in a r...

  6. Study of thymidylate synthetase-function by laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R K; Kisliuk, R L; Verma, S P; Wallach, D F

    1975-05-23

    The Laser-Raman spectra of thymidylate synthetase have been obtained with 488 nm excitation from an argon ion laser. Raman bands observed in the range 600-800 cm-minus-1 have been assigned to functional groups of constituent amino acids. The band positions and intensities in the Amide I (1600-1700 cm-minus-1) and Amide III (1200-1300 cm-minus-1) regions, suggest that the enzyme is a mixture of alpha-helical and unordered conformations. Low levels of beta-structure cannot be excluded. The spectra of the ternary complex formed by reacting thymidylate synthetase with (+)-L-methylenetetrahydrofolate and fluorodeoxyuridylate reveals a new band at 1618 cm-minus-1 assigned to the C=N stretching vibration. This band may be due to formation of dihydrofolate or an iminium ion. The overall secondary structure of thymidylate synthetase does not change on formation of the ternary complex. However, the spectrum of the complex indicates local changes in groups such as ionized carboxyl (1400 cm-minus-1), tryptophan (1003 cm-minus-1) and CH-3, CH-2 deformation modes (1440-1470 cm-minus-1).

  7. Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Svetlana; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) are essential in the process of transferring genetic information from mitochondrial DNA to the complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These synthetases perform an integral step in the initiation of mitochondrial protein synthesis by charging tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. All mtARSs are encoded by nuclear genes, nine of which have recently been described as disease genes for mitochondrial disorders. Unexpectedly, the clinical presentations of these diseases are highly specific to the affected synthetase. Encephalopathy is the most common manifestation but again with gene-specific outcomes. Other clinical presentations include myopathy with anemia, cardiomyopathy, tubulopathy and hearing loss with female ovarian dysgenesis. Here we review the described mutation types and the associated patient phenotypes. The identified mutation spectrum suggests that only mutation types that allow some residual tRNA-charging activity can result in the described mtARS diseases but the molecular mechanisms behind the selective tissue involvement are not currently understood.

  8. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  9. Identification of the glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase of Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dommelen, Anne; Spaepen, Stijn; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2009-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is strictly regulated. One means of regulation is the modulation of activity through adenylylation catalyzed by adenylyltransferases. Using PCR primers based on conserved sequences in glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferases, we amplified part of the glnE gene of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The complete glnE sequence of A. brasilense Sp245 was retrieved from the draft genome sequence of this organism (http://genomics.ornl.gov/research/azo/). Adenylyltransferase is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of an N-terminal domain responsible for deadenylylation activity and a C-terminal domain responsible for adenylylation activity. Both domains are partially homologous to each other. Residues important for catalytic activity were present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the A. brasilense Sp245 glnE sequence. A glnE mutant was constructed in A. brasilense Sp7 by inserting a kanamycin resistance cassette between the two active domains of the enzyme. The resulting mutant was unable to adenylylate the glutamine synthetase enzyme and was impaired in growth when shifted from nitrogen-poor to nitrogen-rich medium.

  10. Crystal structures of trypanosomal histidyl-tRNA synthetase illuminate differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic homologs

    OpenAIRE

    Merritt, Ethan A.; Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, J Robert; Larson, Eric T.; Kelley, Angela; Mueller, Natascha; Napuli, Alberto J.; Kim, Jessica; Li ZHANG; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Crystal structures of histidyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic parasites Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi provide a first structural view of a eukaryotic form of this enzyme, and reveal differences from bacterial homologs. Histidyl-tRNA synthetases in general contain an extra domain inserted between conserved motifs 2 and 3 of the Class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic core. The current structures show that the three dimensional topology of this domain is very different in b...

  11. Expression of glutamine synthetase in balloon cells: a basis of their antiepileptic role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Barba, Carmen; Giordano, Flavio; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Guerrini, Renzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is an enzyme involved in the clearance of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of glutamine synthetase in neocortical samples from 5 children who underwent surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy and a histological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia IIb. In all cases, balloon cells, but not dysmorphic neurons, were immunopositive for glutamine synthetase. This finding suggests that balloon cells can be involved in the neutralization of glutamate and play a protective anti-seizure role.

  12. Bioactive Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Banan-Mwine Daliri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  13. Bioactive Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  14. An update to polyketide synthase and non-ribosomal synthetase genes and nomenclature in Fusarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Frederik T; Gardiner, Donald M; Lysøe, Erik; Fuertes, Patricia Romans; Tudzynski, Bettina; Wiemann, Philipp; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Giese, Henriette; Brodersen, Ditlev E; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-02-01

    Members of the genus Fusarium produce a plethora of bioactive secondary metabolites, which can be harmful to humans and animals or have potential in drug development. In this study we have performed comparative analyses of polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) from ten different Fusarium species including F. graminearum (two strains), F. verticillioides, F. solani, F. culmorum, F. pseudograminearum, F. fujikuroi, F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, F. equiseti, and F. oxysporum (12 strains). This led to identification of 52 NRPS and 52 PKSs orthology groups, respectively, and although not all PKSs and NRPSs are assumed to be intact or functional, the analyses illustrate the huge secondary metabolite potential in Fusarium. In our analyses we identified a core collection of eight NRPSs (NRPS2-4, 6, 10-13) and two PKSs (PKS3 and PKS7) that are conserved in all strains analyzed in this study. The identified PKSs and NRPSs were named based on a previously developed classification system (www.FusariumNRPSPKS.dk). We suggest this system be used when PKSs and NRPSs have to be classified in future sequenced Fusarium strains. This system will facilitate identification of orthologous and non-orthologous NRPSs and PKSs from newly sequenced Fusarium genomes and will aid the scientific community by providing a common nomenclature for these two groups of genes/enzymes.

  15. Anthranilate-activating modules from fungal nonribosomal peptide assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Brian D; Walsh, Christopher T

    2010-04-20

    Fungal natural products containing benzodiazepinone- and quinazolinone-fused ring systems can be assembled by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) using the conformationally restricted beta-amino acid anthranilate as one of the key building blocks. We validated that the first module of the acetylaszonalenin synthetase of Neosartorya fischeri NRRL 181 activates anthranilate to anthranilyl-AMP. With this as a starting point, we then used bioinformatic predictions about fungal adenylation domain selectivities to identify and confirm an anthranilate-activating module in the fumiquinazoline A producer Aspergillus fumigatus Af293 as well as a second anthranilate-activating NRPS in N. fischeri. This establishes an anthranilate adenylation domain code for fungal NRPS and should facilitate detection and cloning of gene clusters for benzodiazepine- and quinazoline-containing polycyclic alkaloids with a wide range of biological activities.

  16. Regulation of glutamine synthetase, aspartokinase, and total protein turnover in Klebsiella aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1985-12-13

    When suspensions of Klebsiella aerogenes are incubated in a nitrogen-free medium there is a gradual decrease in the levels of acid-precipitable protein and of aspartokinase III (lysine-sensitive) and aspartokinase I (threonine-sensitive) activities. In contrast, the level of glutamine synthetase increases slightly and then remains constant. Under these conditions, the glutamine synthetase and other proteins continue to be synthesized as judged by the incorporation of [14C]leucine into the acid-precipitable protein fraction and into protein precipitated by anti-glutamine synthetase antibodies, by the fact that growth-inhibiting concentrations of chloramphenicol also inhibit the incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein and into protein precipitated by anti-glutamine synthetase antibody, and by the fact that chloramphenicol leads to acceleration in the loss of aspartokinases I and III and promotes a net decrease in the level of glutamine synthetase and its cross-reactive protein. The loss of aspartokinases I and III in cell suspensions is stimulated by glucose and is inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol. Glucose also stimulates the loss of aspartokinases and glutamine synthetase in the presence of chloramphenicol. Cell-free extracts of K. aerogenes catalyze rapid inactivation of endogenous glutamine synthetase as well as exogenously added pure glutamine synthetase. This loss of glutamine synthetase is not associated with a loss of protein that cross-reacts with anti-glutamine synthetase antibodies. The inactivation of glutamine synthetase in extracts is not due to adenylylation. It is partially prevented by sulfhydryl reagents, Mn2+, antimycin A, 2,4-dinitrophenol, EDTA, anaerobiosis and by dialysis. Following 18 h dialysis, the capacity of extracts to catalyze inactivation of glutamine synthetase is lost but can be restored by the addition of Fe2+ (or Ni2+) together with ATP (or other nucleoside di- and triphosphates. After 40-60 h dialysis Fe3+ together with NADH (but

  17. Unusual domain architecture of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and their paralogs from Leishmania major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowri V S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania major, a protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Due to the development of resistance against the currently available anti-leishmanial drugs, there is a growing need for specific inhibitors and novel drug targets. In this regards, aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, the linchpins of protein synthesis, have received recent attention among the kinetoplastid research community. This is the first comprehensive survey of the aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, their paralogs and other associated proteins from L. major. Results A total of 26 aminoacyl tRNA synthetases were identified using various computational and bioinformatics tools. Phylogenetic analysis and domain architectures of the L. major aminoacyl tRNA synthetases suggest a probable archaeal/eukaryotic origin. Presence of additional domains or N- or C-terminal extensions in 11 aminoacyl tRNA synthetases from L. major suggests possibilities such as additional tRNA binding or oligomerization or editing activity. Five freestanding editing domains were identified in L. major. Domain assignment revealed a novel asparagine tRNA synthetase paralog, asparagine synthetase A which has been so far reported from prokaryotes and archaea. Conclusions A comprehensive bioinformatic analysis revealed 26 aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and five freestanding editing domains in L. major. Identification of two EMAP (endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide II-like proteins similar to human EMAP II-like proteins suggests their participation in multisynthetase complex formation. While the phylogeny of tRNA synthetases suggests a probable archaeal/eukaryotic origin, phylogeny of asparagine synthetase A strongly suggests a bacterial origin. The unique features identified in this work provide rationale for designing inhibitors against parasite aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and their paralogs.

  18. Peptide identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  19. Peptide Bond Synthesis by a Mechanism Involving an Enzymatic Reaction and a Subsequent Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Zhuang, Ye; Ge, Yin; Kumano, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that an amide bond is unexpectedly formed by an acyl-CoA synthetase (which catalyzes the formation of a carbon-sulfur bond) when a suitable acid and l-cysteine are used as substrates. DltA, which is homologous to the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetase, belongs to the same superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which includes many kinds of enzymes, including the acyl-CoA synthetases. Here, we demonstrate that DltA synthesizes not only N-(d-alanyl)-l-cysteine (a dipeptide) but also various oligopeptides. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes peptide synthesis by the following unprecedented mechanism: (i) the formation of S-acyl-l-cysteine as an intermediate via its "enzymatic activity" and (ii) subsequent "chemical" S → N acyl transfer in the intermediate, resulting in peptide formation. Step ii is identical to the corresponding reaction in native chemical ligation, a method of chemical peptide synthesis, whereas step i is not. To the best of our knowledge, our discovery of this peptide synthesis mechanism involving an enzymatic reaction and a subsequent chemical reaction is the first such one to be reported. This new process yields peptides without the use of a thioesterified fragment, which is required in native chemical ligation. Together with these findings, the same mechanism-dependent formation of N-acyl compounds by other members of the above-mentioned superfamily demonstrated that all members most likely form peptide/amide compounds by using this novel mechanism. Each member enzyme acts on a specific substrate; thus, not only the corresponding peptides but also new types of amide compounds can be formed.

  20. Response of transgenic poplar overexpressing cytosolic glutamine synthetase to phosphinothricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, María Belén; Jing, Zhong Ping; Kirby, Edward G; Cánovas, Francisco M; Gallardo, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the main enzyme involved in ammonia assimilation in plants and is the target of phosphinothricin (PPT), an herbicide commonly used for weed control in agriculture. As a result of the inhibition of GS, PPT also blocks photorespiration, resulting in the depletion of leaf amino acid pools leading to the plant death. Hybrid transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba INRA clone 7171-B4) overexpressing cytosolic GS is characterized by enhanced vegetative growth [Gallardo, F., Fu, J., Cantón, F.R., García-Gutiérrez, A., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 1999. Expression of a conifer glutamine synthetase gene in transgenic poplar. Planta 210, 19-26; Fu, J., Sampalo, R., Gallardo, F., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 2003. Assembly of a cytosolic pine glutamine synthetase holoenzyme in leaves of transgenic poplar leads to enhanced vegetative growth in young plants. Plant Cell Environ. 26, 411-418; Jing, Z.P., Gallardo, F., Pascual, M.B., Sampalo, R., Romero, J., Torres de Navarra, A., Cánovas, F.M., 2004. Improved growth in a field trial of transgenic hybrid poplar overexpressing glutamine synthetase. New Phytol. 164, 137-145], increased photosynthetic and photorespiratory capacities [El-Khatib, R.T., Hamerlynck, E.P., Gallardo, F., Kirby, E.G., 2004. Transgenic poplar characterized by ectopic expression of a pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene exhibits enhanced tolerance to water stress. Tree Physiol. 24, 729-736], enhanced tolerance to water stress (El-Khatib et al., 2004), and enhanced nitrogen use efficiency [Man, H.-M., Boriel, R., El-Khatib, R.T., Kirby, E.G., 2005. Characterization of transgenic poplar with ectopic expression of pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase under conditions of varying nitrogen availability. New Phytol. 167, 31-39]. In vitro plantlets of GS transgenic poplar exhibited enhanced resistance to PPT when compared with non-transgenic controls. After 30 days exposure to PPT at an equivalent dose of 275 g ha(-1), growth

  1. Glutamine versus ammonia utilization in the NAD synthetase family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica De Ingeniis

    Full Text Available NAD is a ubiquitous and essential metabolic redox cofactor which also functions as a substrate in certain regulatory pathways. The last step of NAD synthesis is the ATP-dependent amidation of deamido-NAD by NAD synthetase (NADS. Members of the NADS family are present in nearly all species across the three kingdoms of Life. In eukaryotic NADS, the core synthetase domain is fused with a nitrilase-like glutaminase domain supplying ammonia for the reaction. This two-domain NADS arrangement enabling the utilization of glutamine as nitrogen donor is also present in various bacterial lineages. However, many other bacterial members of NADS family do not contain a glutaminase domain, and they can utilize only ammonia (but not glutamine in vitro. A single-domain NADS is also characteristic for nearly all Archaea, and its dependence on ammonia was demonstrated here for the representative enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschi. However, a question about the actual in vivo nitrogen donor for single-domain members of the NADS family remained open: Is it glutamine hydrolyzed by a committed (but yet unknown glutaminase subunit, as in most ATP-dependent amidotransferases, or free ammonia as in glutamine synthetase? Here we addressed this dilemma by combining evolutionary analysis of the NADS family with experimental characterization of two representative bacterial systems: a two-subunit NADS from Thermus thermophilus and a single-domain NADS from Salmonella typhimurium providing evidence that ammonia (and not glutamine is the physiological substrate of a typical single-domain NADS. The latter represents the most likely ancestral form of NADS. The ability to utilize glutamine appears to have evolved via recruitment of a glutaminase subunit followed by domain fusion in an early branch of Bacteria. Further evolution of the NADS family included lineage-specific loss of one of the two alternative forms and horizontal gene transfer events. Lastly, we identified NADS

  2. Inactivation of Glutamine Synthetase by Ammonia Shock in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, R; Synder, L; Kaplan, L

    1982-10-01

    In cultures of the gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces cattleya, a rapid inactivation of glutamine synthetase was seen after ammonia shock. pH activity curves for ammonia-shocked and control cultures are shown. A peak of glutamine synthetase activity was seen during fermentation for production of the antibiotic thienamycin.

  3. Inactivation of Glutamine Synthetase by Ammonia Shock in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Streptomyces cattleya

    OpenAIRE

    Wax, Richard; Synder, Linda; Kaplan, Louis

    1982-01-01

    In cultures of the gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces cattleya, a rapid inactivation of glutamine synthetase was seen after ammonia shock. pH activity curves for ammonia-shocked and control cultures are shown. A peak of glutamine synthetase activity was seen during fermentation for production of the antibiotic thienamycin.

  4. Roles of Long-chain Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetase in Absorption and Transport of Fatty Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Gao; Xue-feng Yang; Nian Fu; Yang Hu; Yan Ouyang; Kai Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Long-chain acyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACSL) is a member of the synthetase family encoded by a multigene family; it plays an important role in the absorption and transport of fatty acid. Here we review the roles of ACSL in the regulating absorption and transport of fatty acid, as well as the connection between ACSL and some metabolic diseases.

  5. Primer Dependent and Independent Forms of Soluble Starch Synthetase from Developing Barley Endosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreis, M.

    1980-01-01

    The activity of soluble starch synthetase (ADP-glucose: agr-1,4-glucan agr-4-glucosyltransferase) in the non-purified extract from 16 day-old Bomi barley endosperms (Hordeum vulgare L.) was low and the reaction was non-linear when plotted against protein concentration. Starch synthetase was purif...

  6. [The anti-synthetase syndrome: muscle disease and multisystem disorder at the same time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengstman, G.J.D.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2003-01-01

    In three women, aged 60, 45 and 38 years, who presented with exertional dyspnoea (due to lung fibrosis) and Raynaud's phenomenon, dermatomyopathy and Raynaud's phenomenon, and symmetrical arthralgia and myalgia, respectively, the anti-synthetase syndrome was diagnosed. The anti-synthetase syndrome c

  7. The Mitochondrial Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetases: Genes and Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodato, Daria; Ghezzi, Daniele; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases. This is because protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis and maintenance of mitochondria, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription, and translation, require nuclear-encoded genes. In the past decade, a growing number of syndromes associated with dysfunction of mtDNA translation have been reported. This paper reviews the current knowledge of mutations affecting mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNAs synthetases and their role in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the different clinical presentations.

  8. The Mitochondrial Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetases: Genes and Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Diodato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases. This is because protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis and maintenance of mitochondria, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication, transcription, and translation, require nuclear-encoded genes. In the past decade, a growing number of syndromes associated with dysfunction of mtDNA translation have been reported. This paper reviews the current knowledge of mutations affecting mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNAs synthetases and their role in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the different clinical presentations.

  9. Phosphorylation and Acetylation of Acyl-CoA Synthetase- I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frahm, Jennifer L; Li, Lei O; Grevengoed, Trisha J

    2011-01-01

    Long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) contributes 50 to 90% of total ACSL activity in liver, adipose tissue, and heart and appears to direct the use of long chain fatty acids for energy. Although the functional importance of ACSL1 is becoming clear, little is understood about its post...... and acetylated amino acids by mass spectrometry. We then compared these results to the post-translational modifications observed in vivo in liver and brown adipose tissue after mice were fasted or exposed to a cold environment. We identified universal N-terminal acetylation, 15 acetylated lysines, and 25...

  10. Structural pattern matching of nonribosomal peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclère Valérie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs, bioactive secondary metabolites produced by many microorganisms, show a broad range of important biological activities (e.g. antibiotics, immunosuppressants, antitumor agents. NRPs are mainly composed of amino acids but their primary structure is not always linear and can contain cycles or branchings. Furthermore, there are several hundred different monomers that can be incorporated into NRPs. The NORINE database, the first resource entirely dedicated to NRPs, currently stores more than 700 NRPs annotated with their monomeric peptide structure encoded by undirected labeled graphs. This opens a way to a systematic analysis of structural patterns occurring in NRPs. Such studies can investigate the functional role of some monomeric chains, or analyse NRPs that have been computationally predicted from the synthetase protein sequence. A basic operation in such analyses is the search for a given structural pattern in the database. Results We developed an efficient method that allows for a quick search for a structural pattern in the NORINE database. The method identifies all peptides containing a pattern substructure of a given size. This amounts to solving a variant of the maximum common subgraph problem on pattern and peptide graphs, which is done by computing cliques in an appropriate compatibility graph. Conclusion The method has been incorporated into the NORINE database, available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/norine. Less than one second is needed to search for a pattern in the entire database.

  11. Computational discovery of specificity-conferring sites in non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Michael; Søndergaard, Dan Ariel; Tofting-Olesen, Claus;

    2016-01-01

    .g.~antibiotics. There is thus an interest in predicting the compound synthesized by an NRPS from its primary structure (amino acid sequence) alone, as this would enable an in silico search of whole genomes for NRPS enzymes capable of synthesizing potentially useful compounds. Results: NRPS synthesis happens in a conveyor belt...

  12. A polyketide synthase-peptide synthetase gene cluster from an uncultured bacterial symbiont of Paederus beetles

    OpenAIRE

    Piel, Jörn

    2002-01-01

    Many drug candidates from marine and terrestrial invertebrates are suspected metabolites of uncultured bacterial symbionts. The antitumor polyketides of the pederin family, isolated from beetles and sponges, are an example. Drug development from such sources is commonly hampered by low yields and the difficulty of sustaining invertebrate cultures. To obtain insight into the true producer and find alternative supplies of these rare drug candidates, the putative pederin biosynthesis genes were ...

  13. Circumstantial evidence for a role of glutamine-synthetase in suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkman, Hans O

    2011-06-01

    Suicide occurs during depression, schizophrenia, diabetes and epilepsy. A common denominator of these disorders is the presence of inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines affect function and expression of the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase and post mortem studies indicate that brain glutamine synthetase function is suppressed in mood disorders and epilepsy. In a study of schizophrenia brains, the expression of glutamine synthetase was reduced in those cases where the cause of death was suicide. The glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibitor, lithium, which has a proven efficacy against suicide, increased in an animal experiment the expression of glutamine synthetase. Based on these data one could reason that suicide may be prevented by centrally acting GSK3 inhibitors. However, since inhibition of glutamine synthetase may lead to a deficit in glutamine and as consequence a GABA and glutamate deficit, even simple food supplementation with glutamine might help to reduce suicide.

  14. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka R. Donti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis.

  15. C-Peptide Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities C-peptide Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Insulin C-peptide; Connecting Peptide Insulin; Proinsulin C-peptide Formal ...

  16. Antenatal and postnatal radiologic diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandaralage, Sahan P.S. [Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Southport, Queensland (Australia); Griffith University, School of Medicine, Southport, Queensland (Australia); Farnaghi, Soheil [Caboolture Hospital, Caboolture, Queensland (Australia); Dulhunty, Joel M.; Kothari, Alka [Redcliffe Hospital, Redcliffe, Queensland (Australia); The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Herston, Queensland (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency results in impaired activation of enzymes implicated in glucose, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. Antenatal imaging and postnatal imaging are useful in making the diagnosis. Untreated holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is fatal, while antenatal and postnatal biotin supplementation is associated with good clinical outcomes. Although biochemical assays are required for definitive diagnosis, certain radiologic features assist in the diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. To review evidence regarding radiologic diagnostic features of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the antenatal and postnatal period. A systematic review of all published cases of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency identified by a search of Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science. A total of 75 patients with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency were identified from the systematic review, which screened 687 manuscripts. Most patients with imaging (19/22, 86%) had abnormal findings, the most common being subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly and intraventricular hemorrhage. Although the radiologic features of subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly, intraventricular hemorrhage and intrauterine growth restriction may be found in the setting of other pathologies, these findings should prompt consideration of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in at-risk children. (orig.)

  17. Effect of Liver Damage and Hyperbaric Oxygenation on Glutamine Synthetase of Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savilov, P N; Yakovlev, V N

    2016-01-01

    Activity of glutamine synthetase in the hepatocytes of healthy animals and animals with chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis was studied on white mature female rats after liver resection (15-20% of organ weight) and hyperbaric oxygenation (3 atm, 50 min, 3 times). Surgically operated left and non-operated middle lobes of the liver were analyzed on day 3 after liver resection and exposure to hyperbaric oxygenation. On day 65 of CCl4 poisoning, activity of glutamine synthetase decreased in both lobes and did not recover on day 3 after toxin cessation. Liver resection under conditions of CCl4-induced hepatitis restored reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in both liver lobes to the normal level. In healthy rats, the increase in glutamine synthetase activity after liver resection was found only in the middle lobe of the liver. Hyperbaric oxygenation enhanced the stimulatory effect of liver resection on glutamine synthetase activity in hepatocytes during chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis. In healthy animals with liver resection, activity of glutamine synthetase did not change after hyperbaric oxygenation, while normally oxygenation inhibited glutamine synthetase activity.

  18. Encapsulation of glutamine synthetase in mouse erythrocytes: a new procedure for ammonia detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosenko, Elena A; Venediktova, Natalia I; Kudryavtsev, Andrey A; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Kaminsky, Yury G; Felipo, Vicente; Montoliu, Carmina

    2008-12-01

    There are a number of pathological situations in which ammonia levels increase leading to hyperammonemia, which may cause neurological alterations and can lead to coma and death. Currently, there are no efficient treatments allowing rapid and sustained decrease of ammonia levels in these situations. A way to increase ammonia detoxification would be to increase its incorporation in glutamine by glutamine synthetase. The aim of this work was to develop a procedure to encapsulate glutamine synthetase in mouse erythrocytes and to assess whether administration of these erythrocytes containing glutamine synthetase (GS) reduce ammonia levels in hyperammonemic mice. The procedure developed allowed the encapsulation of 3 +/- 0.25 IU of GS / mL of erythrocytes with a 70% cell recovery. Most metabolites, including ATP, remained unaltered in glutamine synthetase-loaded erythrocytes (named ammocytes by us) compared with native erythrocytes. The glutamine synthetase-loaded ammocytes injected in mice survived and retained essentially all of their glutamine synthetase activity for at least 48 h in vivo. Injection of these ammocytes into hyperammonemic mice reduced ammonia levels in the blood by about 50%. The results reported indicate that ammocytes are able to keep their integrity, normal energy metabolism, the inserted glutamine synthetase activity, and can be useful to reduce ammonia levels in hyperammonemic situations.

  19. Solubilization, partial purification, and immunodetection of squalene synthetase from tobacco cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, K; Chappell, J

    1992-01-01

    Squalene synthetase, an integral membrane protein and the first committed enzyme for sterol biosynthesis, was solubilized and partially purified from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cell suspension cultures. Tobacco microsomes were prepared and the enzyme was solubilized from the lipid bilayer using a two-step procedure. Microsomes were initially treated with concentrations of octyl-beta-d-thioglucopyranoside and glycodeoxycholate below their critical micelle concentration, 4.5 and 1.1 millimolar, respectively, to remove loosely associated proteins. Complete solubilization of the squalene synthetase enzyme activity was achieved after a second treatment at detergent concentrations above or at their critical micelle concentration, 18 and 2.2 millimolar, respectively. The detergent-solubilized enzyme was further purified by a combination of ultrafiltration, gel permeation, and Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography anion exchange. A 60-fold purification and 20% recovery of the enzyme activity was achieved. The partially purified squalene synthetase protein was used to generate polyclonal antibodies from mice that efficiently inhibited synthetase activity in an in vitro assay. The apparent molecular mass of the squalene synthetase protein as determined by immunoblot analysis of the partially purified squalene synthetase protein separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was 47 kilodaltons. The partially purified squalene synthetase activity was optimal at pH 6.0, exhibited a K(m) for farnesyl diphosphate of 9.5 micromolar, and preferred NADPH as a reductant rather than NADH.

  20. Cytoplasmic methionyl-tRNA synthetase from Bakers' yeast. A monomer with a post-translationally modified N terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasiolo, F; Gibson, B W; Walter, P; Chatton, B; Biemann, K; Boulanger, Y

    1985-12-15

    Methionyl-tRNA synthetase has been purified from a yeast strain carrying the MES1 structural gene on a high copy number plasmid (pFL1). The purified enzyme is a monomer of Mr = 85,000 in contrast to its counterpart from Escherichia coli which is a dimer made up of identical subunits (Mr = 76,000; Dardel, F., Fayat, G., and Blanquet, S. (1984) J. Bacteriol. 160, 1115-1122). The yeast enzyme was not amenable to Edman's degradation indicating a blocked NH2 terminus. Its primary structure as derived from the DNA sequence (Walter, P., Gangloff, J., Bonnet, J., Boulanger, Y., Ebel, J.P., and Fasiolo, F. (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 80, 2437-2441) has been confirmed using the fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometric method. This method was applied to tryptic digests of the carboxymethylated enzyme and the corresponding data provided extensive coverage of the translated DNA sequence, thus confirming its correctness. The ambiguity concerning which of the three NH2-terminally located methionine codons is the initiation codon was easily resolved from peptides identified in this region. It was possible to show that the first methionine had been removed and that the new NH2 terminus, serine, had been acetylated. A comparison between the yeast and E. coli sequences shows that the former has an N-terminal extension of about 200 residues as compared to the latter. It also lacks the C-terminal domain which is responsible for the dimerization of the E. coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase.

  1. Seryl-tRNA Synthetases in Translation and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Močibob

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For a long time seryl-tRNA synthetases (SerRSs stood as an archetypal, canonical aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS, exhibiting only basic tRNA aminoacylation activity and with no moonlighting functions beyond protein biosynthesis. The picture has changed substantially in recent years after the discovery that SerRSs play an important role in antibiotic production and resistance and act as a regulatory factor in vascular development, as well as after the discovery of mitochondrial morphogenesis factor homologous to SerRS in insects. In this review we summarize the recent research results from our laboratory, which advance the understanding of seryl-tRNA synthetases and further paint the dynamic picture of unexpected SerRS activities. SerRS from archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus was shown to interact with the large ribosomal subunit and it was postulated to contribute to a more efficient translation by the"tRNA channeling" hypothesis. Discovery of the atypical SerRS in a small number of methanogenic archaea led to the discovery of a new family of enzymes in numerous bacteria - amino acid:[carrier protein] ligases (aa:CP ligases. These SerRS homologues resigned tRNA aminoacylation activity, and instead adopted carrier proteins as the acceptors of activated amino acids. The crystal structure of the aa:CP ligase complex with the carrier protein revealed that the interactions between two macromolecules are incomparable to tRNA binding by the aaRS and consequently represent a true evolutionary invention. Kinetic investigations of SerRSs and the accuracy of amino acid selection revealed that SerRSs possess pre-transfer proofreading activity, challenging the widely accepted presumption that hydrolytic proofreading activity must reside in an additional, separate editing domain, not present in SerRSs. Finally, the plant tRNA serylation system is discussed, which is particularly interesting due to the fact that protein biosynthesis takes place

  2. Critical Evaluation of the Changes in Glutamine Synthetase Activity in Models of Cerebral Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Battaile, Kevin; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2015-12-01

    The following article addresses some seemingly paradoxical observations concerning cerebral glutamine synthetase in ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the brain, this enzyme is predominantly found in astrocytes and catalyzes part of the glutamine-glutamate cycle. Glutamine synthetase is also thought to be especially sensitive to inactivation by the oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals generated during strokes. Despite this apparent sensitivity, glutamine synthetase specific activity is elevated in the affected tissues during reperfusion. Given the central role of the glutamine-glutamate cycle in the brain, we sought to resolve these conflicting observations with the view of providing an alternative perspective for therapeutic intervention in stroke.

  3. MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE II AND III IN THE CHROMALVEOLATES(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshroy, Sohini; Robertson, Deborah L

    2012-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is encoded by three distinct gene families (GSI, GSII, and GSIII) that are broadly distributed among the three domains of life. Previous studies established that GSII and GSIII isoenzymes were expressed in diatoms; however, less is known about the distribution and evolution of the gene families in other chromalveolate lineages. Thus, GSII cDNA sequences were isolated from three cryptophytes (Guillardia theta D. R. A. Hill et Wetherbee, Cryptomonas phaseolus Skuja, and Pyrenomonas helgolandii Santore), and GSIII was sequenced from G. theta. Red algal GSII sequences were obtained from Bangia atropurpurea (Mertens ex Roth) C. Agardh; Compsopogon caeruleus (Balbis ex C. Agardh) Mont.; Flintiella sanguinaria F. D. Ott and Porphyridium aerugineum Geitler; Rhodella violacea (Kornmann) Wehrmeyer and Dixoniella grisea (Geitler) J. L. Scott, S. T. Broadwater, B. D. Saunders, J. P. Thomas et P. W. Gabrielson; and Stylonema alsidii (Zanardini) K. M. Drew. In Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analyses, chromalveolate GSII sequences formed a weakly supported clade that nested among sequences from glaucophytes, red algae, green algae, and plants. Red algal GSII sequences formed two distinct clades. The largest clade contained representatives from the Cyanidiophytina and Rhodophytina and grouped with plants and green algae. The smaller clade (C. caeruleus, Porphyra yezoensis, and S. alsidii) nested within the chromalveolates, although its placement was unresolved. Chromalveolate GSIII sequences formed a well-supported clade in Bayesian and ML phylogenies, and mitochondrial transit peptides were identified in many of the sequences. There was strong support for a stramenopile-haptophyte-cryptophyte GSIII clade in which the cryptophyte sequence diverged from the deepest node. Overall, the evolutionary history of the GS gene families within the algae is complex with evidence for the presence of orthologous and paralogous sequences

  4. Oncogenic Myc Induces Expression of Glutamine Synthetase through Promoter Demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Alex J; Peng, I-Chen; Fan, Yongjun; Faubert, Brandon; Zhao, Lu; Li, Jinyu; Neidler, Sarah; Sun, Yu; Jaber, Nadia; Krokowski, Dawid; Lu, Wenyun; Pan, Ji-An; Powers, Scott; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Hatzoglou, Maria; Murphy, Daniel J; Jones, Russell; Wu, Song; Girnun, Geoffrey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2015-12-01

    c-Myc is known to promote glutamine usage by upregulating glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate that is catabolized in the TCA cycle. Here we report that in a number of human and murine cells and cancers, Myc induces elevated expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also termed glutamine synthetase (GS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. This is through upregulation of a Myc transcriptional target thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), which promotes active demethylation of the GS promoter and its increased expression. Elevated expression of GS promotes cell survival under glutamine limitation, while silencing of GS decreases cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth. Upon GS overexpression, increased glutamine enhances nucleotide synthesis and amino acid transport. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of Myc in inducing glutamine synthesis and suggest a molecular connection between DNA demethylation and glutamine metabolism in Myc-driven cancers.

  5. Astrocyte glutamine synthetase: pivotal in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Christopher F; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2013-12-01

    The multifunctional properties of astrocytes signify their importance in brain physiology and neurological function. In addition to defining the brain architecture, astrocytes are primary elements of brain ion, pH and neurotransmitter homoeostasis. GS (glutamine synthetase), which catalyses the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, is an enzyme particularly found in astrocytes. GS plays a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis, orchestrating astrocyte glutamate uptake/release and the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Furthermore, astrocytes bear the brunt of clearing ammonia in the brain, preventing neurotoxicity. The present review depicts the central function of astrocytes, concentrating on the importance of GS in glutamate/glutamine metabolism and ammonia detoxification in health and disease.

  6. Bisphosphonic acids as effective inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosikowska, Paulina; Bochno, Marta; Macegoniuk, Katarzyna; Forlani, Giuseppe; Kafarski, Paweł; Berlicki, Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS) is one of the most promising strategies for the discovery of novel drugs against tuberculosis. Forty-three bisphosphonic and bis-H-phosphinic acids of various scaffolds, bearing aromatic substituents, were screened against recombinant GS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Most of the studied compounds exhibited activities in micromolar range, with N-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-2-aminoethylidenebisphoshonic acid, N-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-2-aminoethylidene-bisphoshonic acid and N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-hydroxy-1,1-ethanebisphosphonic acid showing the highest potency with kinetic parameters similar to the reference compound - L-methionine-S-sulfoximine. Moreover, these inhibitors were found to be much more effective against pathogen enzyme than against the human ortholog. Thus, with the bone-targeting properties of the bisphosphonate compounds in mind, this activity/selectivity profile makes these compounds attractive agents for the treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  7. In Silico Discovery of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxue Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNA. They play a pivotal role in protein synthesis and are essential for cell growth and survival. The aaRSs are one of the leading targets for development of antibiotic agents. In this review, we mainly focused on aaRS inhibitor discovery and development using in silico methods including virtual screening and structure-based drug design. These computational methods are relatively fast and cheap, and are proving to be of great benefit for the rational development of more potent aaRS inhibitors and other pharmaceutical agents that may usher in a much needed generation of new antibiotics.

  8. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy/sup +/ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy/sup +/ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy/sup +/ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  9. Recent advances in engineering nonribosomal peptide assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, M; Fyans, J K; Zhuo, Y; Micklefield, J

    2016-02-01

    Nonribosomal peptides are amongst the most widespread and structurally diverse secondary metabolites in nature with many possessing bioactivity that can be exploited for therapeutic applications. Due to the major challenges associated with total- and semi-synthesis, bioengineering approaches have been developed to increase yields and generate modified peptides with improved physicochemical properties or altered bioactivity. Here we review the major advances that have been made over the last decade in engineering the biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptides. Structural diversity has been introduced by the modification of enzymes required for the supply of precursors or by heterologous expression of tailoring enzymes. The modularity of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) assembly lines further supports module or domain swapping methodologies to achieve changes in the amino acid sequence of nonribosomal peptides. We also review the new synthetic biology technologies promising to speed up the process, enabling the creation and optimisation of many more assembly lines for heterologous expression, offering new opportunities for engineering the biosynthesis of novel nonribosomal peptides.

  10. High cerebral guanidinoacetate and variable creatine concentrations in argininosuccinate synthetase and lyase deficiency : Implications for treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, F. J.; Reijngoud, D. J.; Verhoeven, N. M.; Soorani-Lunsing, R. J.; Jakobs, C.; Sijens, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral creatine and guanidinoacetate and blood and urine metabolites were studied in four patients with argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) or argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) deficiency receiving large doses of arginine. Urine and blood metabolites varied largely. Cerebral guanidinoacetate was

  11. 3-substituted anilines as scaffolds for the construction of glutamine synthetase and DXP-reductoisomerase inhibitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutorwa, M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available -1 Synthetic Communications Volume 39, Issue 15, 2009 3-Substituted Anilines as Scaffolds for the Construction of Glutamine Synthetase and DXP-Reductoisomerase Inhibitors Marius Mutorwaa, Sheriff Salisua, Gregory L. Blatchbc, Colin Kenyond & Perry T...

  12. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara; (Maryland)

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  13. High cerebral guanidinoacetate and variable creatine concentrations in argininosuccinate synthetase and lyase deficiency : Implications for treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, F. J.; Reijngoud, D. J.; Verhoeven, N. M.; Soorani-Lunsing, R. J.; Jakobs, C.; Sijens, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral creatine and guanidinoacetate and blood and urine metabolites were studied in four patients with argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) or argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) deficiency receiving large doses of arginine. Urine and blood metabolites varied largely. Cerebral guanidinoacetate was increa

  14. ATP/GTP hydrolysis is required for oxazole and thiazole biosynthesis in the peptide antibiotic microcin B17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, J C; Eliot, A C; Kelleher, N L; Walsh, C T

    1998-09-22

    In the maturation of the Escherichia coli antibiotic Microcin B17, the product of the mcbA gene is modified posttranslationally by the multimeric Microcin synthetase complex (composed of McbB, C, and D) to cyclize four Cys and four Ser residues to four thiazoles and four oxazoles, respectively. The purified synthetase shows an absolute requirement for ATP or GTP in peptide substrate heterocyclization, with GTP one-third as effective as ATP in initial rate studies. The ATPase/GTPase activity of the synthetase complex is conditional in that ADP or GDP formation requires the presence of substrate; noncyclizable versions of McbA bind to synthetase, but do not induce the NTPase activity. The stoichiometry of ATP hydrolysis and heterocycle formation is 5:1 for a substrate that contains two potential sites of modification. However, at high substrate concentrations (>50Km) heterocycle formation is inhibited, while ATPase activity occurs undiminished, consistent with uncoupling of NTP hydrolysis and heterocycle formation at high substrate concentrations. Sequence homology reveals that the McbD subunit has motifs reminiscent of the Walker B box in ATP utilizing enzymes and of motifs found in small G protein GTPases. Mutagenesis of three aspartates to alanine in these motifs (D132, D147, and D199) reduced Microcin B17 production in vivo and heterocycle formation in vitro, suggesting that the 45 kDa McbD has a regulated ATPase/GTPase domain in its N-terminal region necessary for peptide heterocyclization.

  15. Diffuse glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis in a β-catenin-activated hepatocellular adenoma: a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ryan S; Gullapalli, Rama R; Wu, Jin; Morris, Katherine; Hanson, Joshua A

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular adenomas have recently been classified into four subtypes based on molecular findings: hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) inactivated, inflammatory/telangiectatic, β-catenin activated, and unclassifiable. β-catenin-activated adenomas have the potential for malignant transformation and are thus important to recognize. Diffuse glutamine synthetase immunohistochemical positivity has been shown to be a reliable surrogate marker for β-catenin activation, though variations in staining patterns may be difficult to interpret. We report a case of a peliotic adenoma that was morphologically consistent with a β-catenin wild-type hepatocellular adenoma but harbored a β-catenin mutation by molecular analysis. The tumor lacked nuclear β-catenin positivity and demonstrated a hitherto undescribed pattern of glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis with mostly negative staining in non-peliotic areas. This pattern was initially interpreted as physiologic and may represent a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

  16. Peptide arrays for screening cancer specific peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sahar; Mathews, Anu Stella; Byeon, Nara; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we describe a novel method to screen peptides for specific recognition by cancer cells. Seventy peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane in an array format, and a direct method to study the peptide-whole cell interaction was developed. The relative binding affinity of the cells for different peptides with respect to a lead 12-mer p160 peptide, identified by phage display, was evaluated using the CyQUANT fluorescence of the bound cells. Screening allowed identification of at least five new peptides that displayed higher affinity (up to 3-fold) for MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7 human cancer cells compared to the p160 peptide. These peptides showed very little binding to the control (noncancerous) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Three of these peptides were synthesized separately and labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to study their uptake and interaction with the cancer and control cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. The results confirmed the high and specific affinity of an 11-mer peptide 11 (RGDPAYQGRFL) and a 10-mer peptide 18 (WXEAAYQRFL) for the cancer cells versus HUVECs. Peptide 11 binds different receptors on target cancer cells as its sequence contains multiple recognition motifs, whereas peptide 18 binds mainly to the putative p160 receptor. The peptide array-whole cell binding assay reported here is a complementary method to phage display for further screening and optimization of cancer targeting peptides for cancer therapy and diagnosis.

  17. Glutamine synthetase 2 is not essential for biosynthesis of compatible solutes in Halobacillus halophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Anna eShiyan; Melanie eThompson; Saskia eKöcher; Michaela eTausendschön; Helena eSantos; Inga eHänelt; Volker eMüller

    2014-01-01

    Halobacillus halophilus, a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from salt marshes, produces various compatible solutes to cope with osmotic stress. Glutamate and glutamine are dominant compatible solutes at mild salinities. Glutamine synthetase activity in cell suspensions of Halobacillus halophilus wild type was shown to be salt dependent and chloride modulated. A possible candidate to catalyze glutamine synthesis is glutamine synthetase A2, whose transcription is stimulated by chloride....

  18. The identification of new cytosolic glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and their expression during leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Ospina, Liliana; Marmagne, Anne; Talbotec, Joël; Krupinska, Karin; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase are two master enzymes involved in ammonium assimilation in plants. Their roles in nitrogen remobilization and nitrogen use efficiency have been proposed. In this report, the genes coding for the cytosolic glutamine synthetases (HvGS1) and asparagine synthetases (HvASN) in barley were identified. In addition to the three HvGS1 and two HvASN sequences previously reported, two prokaryotic-like HvGS1 and three HvASN cDNA sequences were identified. Gene structures were then characterized, obtaining full genomic sequences. The response of the five HvGS1 and five HvASN genes to leaf senescence was then studied. Developmental senescence was studied using primary and flag leaves. Dark-exposure or low-nitrate conditions were also used to trigger stress-induced senescence. Well-known senescence markers such as the chlorophyll and Rubisco contents were monitored in order to characterize senescence levels in the different leaves. The three eukaryotic-like HvGS1_1, HvGS1_2, and HvGS1_3 sequences showed the typical senescence-induced reduction in gene expression described in many plant species. By contrast, the two prokaryotic-like HvGS1_4 and HvGS1_5 sequences were repressed by leaf senescence, similar to the HvGS2 gene, which encodes the chloroplast glutamine synthetase isoenzyme. There was a greater contrast in the responses of the five HvASN and this suggested that these genes are needed for N remobilization in senescing leaves only when plants are well fertilized with nitrate. Responses of the HvASN sequences to dark-induced senescence showed that there are two categories of asparagine synthetases, one induced in the dark and the other repressed by the same conditions.

  19. Effect of heat shock on poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase and DNA repair in Drosophila cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolan, N.L.; Kidwell, W.R.

    1982-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, a chromatin-bound enzyme which attaches polyanionic chains of ADP-ribose to nuclear proteins, was found to be temperature sensitive in intact Drosophila melanogaster cells. The synthetase was completely inactivated by heat-shocking the cells at 37/sup 0/C for 5 min, a condition which had no appreciable effect on the subsequent growth of Drosophila cells at their physiological temperature. The heat-shock effect on synthetase was reversible; enzyme activity began to reappear about 2 hr post heat shock. During the 2-hr interval when poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase was absent, the cells were competent in repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA strand breaks as shown by DNA sedimentation studies on alkaline sucrose gradients. It is thus concluded that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is unnecessary for repair of DNA strand breaks introduced by irradiation. The same conclusion was reached from the fact that two inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase 3-aminobenzamide and 5-methylnicotinamide, failed to block repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA chain breaks even though both inhibitors reduced the amount of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized in cells by 50-75%. Although it was found that the repair of DNA strand breaks is independent of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis, irradiation does activate the synthetase in control cells, as shown by radioimmunoassay of poly(ADP-ribose) levels.

  20. Recurrent seizures and brain pathology after inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the hippocampus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Tore; Ghosh, Arko; Wang, Yue; Beckström, Henning; Zaveri, Hitten P; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Lai, James C K; Malthankar-Phatak, Gauri H; de Lanerolle, Nihal C

    2008-08-01

    An excess of extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus has been linked to the generation of recurrent seizures and brain pathology in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). However, the mechanism which results in glutamate excess in MTLE remains unknown. We recently reported that the glutamate-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase is deficient in the hippocampus in patients with MTLE, and we postulated that this deficiency is critically involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. To further explore the role of glutamine synthetase in MTLE we created a novel animal model of hippocampal glutamine synthetase deficiency by continuous (approximately 28 days) microinfusion of methionine sulfoximine (MSO: 0.625 to 2.5 microg/h) unilaterally into the hippocampus in rats. This treatment led to a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase activity by 82-97% versus saline. The majority (>95%) of the MSO-treated animals exhibited recurrent seizures that continued for several weeks. Some of the MSO-treated animals exhibited neuropathological features that were similar to mesial temporal sclerosis, such as hippocampal atrophy and patterned loss of hippocampal neurons. However, many MSO-treated animals displayed only minimal injury to the hippocampus, with no clear evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis. These findings support the hypothesis that a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase causes recurrent seizures, even in the absence of classical mesial temporal sclerosis, and that restoration of glutamine synthetase may represent a novel approach to therapeutic intervention in this disease.

  1. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in the Bacterial World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giegé, Richard; Springer, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are modular enzymes globally conserved in the three kingdoms of life. All catalyze the same two-step reaction, i.e., the attachment of a proteinogenic amino acid on their cognate tRNAs, thereby mediating the correct expression of the genetic code. In addition, some aaRSs acquired other functions beyond this key role in translation. Genomics and X-ray crystallography have revealed great structural diversity in aaRSs (e.g., in oligomery and modularity, in ranking into two distinct groups each subdivided in 3 subgroups, by additional domains appended on the catalytic modules). AaRSs show huge structural plasticity related to function and limited idiosyncrasies that are kingdom or even species specific (e.g., the presence in many Bacteria of non discriminating aaRSs compensating for the absence of one or two specific aaRSs, notably AsnRS and/or GlnRS). Diversity, as well, occurs in the mechanisms of aaRS gene regulation that are not conserved in evolution, notably between distant groups such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteria. The review focuses on bacterial aaRSs (and their paralogs) and covers their structure, function, regulation, and evolution. Structure/function relationships are emphasized, notably the enzymology of tRNA aminoacylation and the editing mechanisms for correction of activation and charging errors. The huge amount of genomic and structural data that accumulated in last two decades is reviewed, showing how the field moved from essentially reductionist biology towards more global and integrated approaches. Likewise, the alternative functions of aaRSs and those of aaRS paralogs (e.g., during cell wall biogenesis and other metabolic processes in or outside protein synthesis) are reviewed. Since aaRS phylogenies present promiscuous bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal features, similarities and differences in the properties of aaRSs from the three kingdoms of life are pinpointed throughout the review and

  2. Entomopathogenic bacteria use multiple mechanisms for bioactive peptide library design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaofeng; Nowak, Sarah; Wesche, Frank; Bischoff, Iris; Kaiser, Marcel; Fürst, Robert; Bode, Helge. B.

    2017-04-01

    The production of natural product compound libraries has been observed in nature for different organisms such as bacteria, fungi and plants; however, little is known about the mechanisms generating such chemically diverse libraries. Here we report mechanisms leading to the biosynthesis of the chemically diverse rhabdopeptide/xenortide peptides (RXPs). They are exclusively present in entomopathogenic bacteria of the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus that live in symbiosis with nematodes delivering them to insect prey, which is killed and utilized for nutrition by both nematodes and bacteria. Chemical diversity of the biologically active RXPs results from a combination of iterative and flexible use of monomodular nonribosomal peptide synthetases including substrate promiscuity, enzyme cross-talk and enzyme stoichiometry as shown by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Together, this highlights several of nature's methods for diversification, or evolution, of natural products and sheds light on the biosynthesis of the bioactive RXPs.

  3. Actinobacterial acyl coenzyme A synthetases involved in steroid side-chain catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M; Eltis, Lindsay D; Mohn, William W

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 10(5) ± 0.03 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2'-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 10(5) ± 0.1 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and 3.2 × 10(5) ± 0.3 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid

  4. Expression of glutamine synthetase in the mouse kidney: localization in multiple epithelial cell types and differential regulation by hypokalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlander, Jill W; Chu, Diana; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2013-09-01

    Renal glutamine synthetase catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ with glutamate, forming glutamine and decreasing the ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine glutamine synthetase's specific cellular expression in the mouse kidney and its regulation by hypokalemia, a common cause of altered renal ammonia metabolism. Glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein were present in the renal cortex and in both the outer and inner stripes of the outer medulla. Immunohistochemistry showed glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in nonproximal tubule cells. Double immunolabel with cell-specific markers demonstrated glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells, non-A, non-B intercalated cells, and distal convoluted tubule cells, but not in principal cells, type B intercalated cells, or connecting segment cells. Hypokalemia induced by feeding a nominally K+ -free diet for 12 days decreased glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in the distal convoluted tubule and simultaneously increased glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells in both the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct. We conclude that glutamine synthetase is widely and specifically expressed in renal epithelial cells and that the regulation of expression differs in specific cell populations. Glutamine synthetase is likely to mediate an important role in renal ammonia metabolism.

  5. Regulation of expression from the glnA promoter of Escherichia coli in the absence of glutamine synthetase.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothstein, D M; Pahel, G; Tyler, B.; Magasanik, B

    1980-01-01

    One of the suspected regulators of glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2] in enteric bacteria is glutamine synthetase itself. We isolated Escherichia coli strains carrying fusions of the beta-galactosidase structural gene to the promoter of the glutamine synthetase gene, with the aid of the Casadaban Mud1 (ApR, lac, cts62) phage. Some aspects of regulation were retained in haploid fusion strains despite the absence of glutamine synthetase, whereas other as...

  6. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman

    2004-01-01

    . Screening of antibodies from a hybridoma library led to the identification of an acyl-CoA synthetase 5-specific monoclonal antibody. Protein synthesis, mRNA expression, and the enzyme activity of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 were studied by several methods in human small intestinal tissues with Crohn's disease...... or coeliac disease, respectively. Acyl-CoA synthetase 5 mRNA and protein levels were substantially reduced in injured small intestinal mucosa. Moreover, impaired synthesis of the acyl-CoA synthetase 5 protein was reflected by a decrease in intramucosal enzyme activity. Subtle changes of the acyl...

  7. Cereulide synthetase gene cluster from emetic Bacillus cereus: Structure and location on a mega virulence plasmid related to Bacillus anthracis toxin plasmid pXO1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Martin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cereulide, a depsipeptide structurally related to valinomycin, is responsible for the emetic type of gastrointestinal disease caused by Bacillus cereus. Recently, it has been shown that this toxin is produced by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS, but its exact genetic organization and biochemical synthesis is unknown. Results The complete sequence of the cereulide synthetase (ces gene cluster, which encodes the enzymatic machinery required for the biosynthesis of cereulide, was dissected. The 24 kb ces gene cluster comprises 7 CDSs and includes, besides the typical NRPS genes like a phosphopantetheinyl transferase and two CDSs encoding enzyme modules for the activation and incorporation of monomers in the growing peptide chain, a CDS encoding a putative hydrolase in the upstream region and an ABC transporter in the downstream part. The enzyme modules responsible for incorporation of the hydroxyl acids showed an unusual structure while the modules responsible for the activation of the amino acids Ala and Val showed the typical domain organization of NRPS. The ces gene locus is flanked by genetic regions with high homology to virulence plasmids of B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis. PFGE and Southern hybridization showed that the ces genes are restricted to emetic B. cereus and indeed located on a 208 kb megaplasmid, which has high similarities to pXO1-like plasmids. Conclusion The ces gene cluster that is located on a pXO1-like virulence plasmid represents, beside the insecticidal and the anthrax toxins, a third type of B. cereus group toxins encoded on megaplasmids. The ces genes are restricted to emetic toxin producers, but pXO1-like plasmids are also present in emetic-like strains. These data might indicate the presence of an ancient plasmid in B. cereus which has acquired different virulence genes over time. Due to the unusual structure of the hydroxyl acid incorporating enzyme modules of Ces

  8. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  9. Cloning, expression, and purification of glutamine synthetase from Clostridum acetobutylicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usdin, K.P.; Zappe, H.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1986-09-01

    A glutamine synthetase (GS) gene, glnA, from the gram-positive obligate anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum was cloned on recombinant plasmid pHZ200 and enabled Escherichia coli glnA deletion mutants to utilize (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/ as a sole source of nitrogen. The cloned C. acetobutylicum gene was expressed from a regulatory region contained within the cloned DNA fragment. glnA expression was subject to nitrogen regulation in E. coli. This cloned glnA DNA did not enable an E. coli glnA ntrB ntrC deletion mutant to utilize arginine or low levels of glutamine as sole nitrogen sources, and failed to activate histidase activity in this strain which contained the Klebsiella aerogenes hut operon. The GS produced by pHZ200 was purified and had an apparent subunit molecular weight of approximately 59,000. There was no DNA or protein homology between the cloned C. acetobutylicum glnA gene and GS and the corresponding gene and GS from E. coli. The C. acetobutylicum GS was inhibited by Mg/sup 2 +/ in the ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase assay, but there was no evidence that the GS was adenylylated.

  10. Glutamine synthetase of Streptomyces cattleya: purification and regulation of synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paress, P S; Streicher, S L

    1985-08-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) from Streptomyces cattleya was purified using a single affinity-gel chromatography step, and some of its properties were determined. Levels of GS in S. cattleya cells varied by a factor of 8 depending upon the source of nitrogen in the growth medium. Of 24 nitrogen sources examined only glutamine or NH4Cl utilization resulted in very low GS activity. Addition of NH4Cl to a culture with high GS levels appeared to stop further synthesis and resulted in a progressive decrease in the specific activity of the enzyme. The GS inhibitor methionine sulphoximine (MSX) inhibited GS activity but had no effect on exponentially growing cells. The presence of MSX either lengthened or shortened the period between spore inoculation and initiation of exponential growth, depending on the source of nitrogen. In glutamine minimal medium MSX produced earlier and more efficient spore germination while in glutamate or nitrate minimal medium germination was delayed by its presence.

  11. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of /sup 3/H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei.

  12. Overexpression of glutamine synthetases confers transgenic rice herbicide resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Hui; Huang Qiman; Su Jin

    2005-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS, E.C.6.3.1.2) is a key enzyme involved in the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen in higher plants and gram-negative microorganisms. GS is the targeting enzyme of a herbicide phosphinothricin (PPT) or Basta. In order to generate PPT-resistant transgenic rice via overexpression of GS, we constructed a plant expression vector p2GS harboring two different isoenzymes GS1 and GS2 cDNAs under the control of constitutive promoters of rice Act1 and maize Ubiquitin(Ubi) genes. The p2GS was introduced into rice genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and confirmed by PCR and Southern blot hybridization. GS-transgene expression was first detected by Northern blot analyses. Results from Basta test indicated that GS-transgenic plants can tolerate as high as 0.3% Basta solution. In addition, our results also demonstrated that GS overexpression conferred transformed rice calli PPT resistance. Thus, GS cassette can serve as a selective marker gene instead of bar cassette for selection of PPT transformants.

  13. Prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors in the treatment of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monn, E

    1981-01-01

    Two boys with classical NDI have been treated with prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors. A boy, 7 years old, was treated with low solute-load diet and diuretics from his first year of life. His main complaint was nocturnal enuresis. He responded within one day to indomethacin 25 mg twice daily, and the urine volume was reduced from 4 1/2--6 litre/day to 2 1/2--3 litre/day. There is almost no enuresis. A boy, 7 months old, had a basal daily urine volume of 1.6--1.8 litre. A low solute-load diet and diuretics reduced urine volume to 1 litre, but he still needed gastric tube feeding. With the addition of acetylsalicylic acid, 75 mg three times daily, the urine volume was reduced to 600 ml, and he needed no more tube feeding. Both boys are doing well on the above-mentioned regimens, and no side effects have been observed after 1 year of treatment.

  14. The first report of Japanese patients with asparagine synthetase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Endo, Wakaba; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Kubota, Kazuo; Kawamoto, Norio; Inui, Takehiko; Imamura, Atsushi; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi; Shiina, Masaaki; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2017-03-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) deficiency was recently discovered as a metabolic disorder of non-essential amino acids, and presents as severe progressive microcephaly, intellectual disorder, dyskinetic quadriplegia, and intractable seizures. Two Japanese children with progressive microcephaly born to unrelated patients were analyzed by whole exome sequencing and novel ASNS mutations were identified. The effects of the ASNS mutations were analyzed by structural evaluation and in silico predictions. We describe the first known Japanese patients with ASNS deficiency. Their clinical manifestations were very similar to reported cases of ASNS deficiency. Progressive microcephaly was noted during the prenatal period in patient 1 but only after birth in patient 2. Both patients had novel ASNS mutations: patient 1 had p.L145S transmitted from his mother and p.L247W which was absent from his mother, while patient 2 carried p.V489D and p.W541Cfs*5, which were transmitted from his mother and father, respectively. Three of the four mutations were predicted to affect protein folding, and in silico analyses suggested that they would be pathogenic. We report the first two Japanese patients with ASNS deficiency. Disease severity appears to vary among patients, as is the case for other non-essential amino acid metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The plastidial folylpolyglutamate synthetase and root apical meristem maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Avinash C; Tang, Yuhong; Díaz de la Garza, Rocío I

    2011-01-01

    Folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) catalyzes the attachment of glutamate residues to the folate molecule in plants. Three isoforms of FPGS have been identified in Arabidopsis and these are localized in the plastid (AtDFB), mitochondria (AtDFC) and cytosol (AtDFD). We recently determined that mutants in the AtDFB (At5G05980) gene disrupt primary root development in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Transient expression of AtDFB-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion under the control of the native AtDFB promoter in Nicotiana tabacum leaf epidermal cells verified the plastid localization of AtDFB. Furthermore, low concentrations of methotrexate (MTX), a compound commonly used as a folate antagonist in plant and mammalian cells induced primary root defects in wild type seedlings that were similar to atdfb. In addition, atdfb seedlings were more sensitive to MTX when compared to wild type. Quantitative (q) RT-PCR showed lower transcript levels of the mitochondrial and cytosolic FPGS in roots of 7-day-old atdfb seedling suggesting feedback regulation of AtDFB on the expression of other FPGS isoforms during early seedling development. The primary root defects of atdfb, which can be traced in part to altered quiescent center (QC) identity, pave the way for future studies that could link cell type specific folate and FPGS isoform requirements to whole organ development. PMID:21502816

  16. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  17. Enzymatic Production of Glutathione by Bifunctional γ-Glutamylcysteine Synthetase/Glutathione Synthetase Coupled with In Vitro Acetate Kinase-Based ATP Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Tao, Rongsheng; Shen, Zhengquan; Sun, Liangdong; Zhu, Fuyun; Yang, Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Glutathione (γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinylglycine, GSH) is a pharmaceutical compound often used in food additives and the cosmetics industry. GSH can be produced biologically from L-glutamic acid, L-cysteine, and glycine through an enzymatic process traditionally involving two sequential adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent reactions catalyzed by γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS or GSHI, EC 6.3.2.2) and GSH synthetase (GS or GSHII, EC 6.3.2.3). Here, we report the enzymatic production of GSH by recombinant cell-free bifunctional γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase/glutathione synthetase (γ-GCS-GS or GshF) coupled with in vitro acetate kinase-based ATP generation. GSH production by an acetate kinase-integrated Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3) mutant expressing Streptococcus thermophilus GshF reached 18.3 ± 0.1 g l(-1) (59.5 ± 0.3 mM) within 3 h, with a molar yield of 0.75 ± 0.00 mol mol(-1) added cysteine and a productivity of 6.1 ± 0.0 g l(-1) h(-1). This is the highest GSH titer reported to date. This newly developed biocatalytic process offers a promising approach for meeting the industrial requirements for GSH production.

  18. Enhancing Nonribosomal Peptide Biosynthesis in Filamentous Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Alexandra A; Keller, Nancy P; Wiemann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are historically known as rich sources for production of biologically active natural products, so-called secondary metabolites. One particularly pharmaceutically relevant chemical group of secondary metabolites is the nonribosomal peptides synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). As most of the fungal NRPS gene clusters leading to production of the desired molecules are not expressed under laboratory conditions, efforts to overcome this impediment are crucial to unlock the full chemical potential of each fungal species. One way to activate these silent clusters is by overexpressing and deleting global regulators of secondary metabolism. The conserved fungal-specific regulator of secondary metabolism, LaeA, was shown to be a valuable target for sleuthing of novel gene clusters and metabolites. Additionally, modulation of chromatin structures by either chemical or genetic manipulation has been shown to activate cryptic metabolites. Furthermore, NRPS-derived molecules seem to be affected by cross talk between the specific gene clusters and some of these metabolites have a tissue- or developmental-specific regulation. This chapter summarizes how this knowledge of different tiers of regulation can be combined to increase production of NRPS-derived metabolites in fungal species.

  19. Enhancing Nonribosomal Peptide Biosynthesis in Filamentous Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Alexandra A.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wiemann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are historically known as rich sources for production of biologically active natural products, so-called secondary metabolites. One particularly pharmaceutically relevant chemical group of secondary metabolites is the nonribosomal peptides synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). As most of the fungal NRPS gene clusters leading to production of the desired molecules are not expressed under laboratory conditions, efforts to overcome this impediment are crucial to unlock the full chemical potential of each fungal species. One way to activate these silent clusters is by overexpressing and deleting global regulators of secondary metabolism. The conserved fungal-specific regulator of secondary metabolism, LaeA, was shown to be a valuable target for sleuthing of novel gene clusters and metabolites. Additionally, modulation of chromatin structures by either chemical or genetic manipulation has been shown to activate cryptic metabolites. Furthermore, NRPS-derived molecules seem to be affected by cross talk between the specific gene clusters and some of these metabolites have a tissue- or developmental-specific regulation. This chapter summarizes how this knowledge of different tiers of regulation can be combined to increase production of NRPS-derived metabolites in fungal species. PMID:26831707

  20. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A., E-mail: merritt@u.washington.edu [Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa, (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  1. Calcium regulates the expression of a Dictyostelium discoideum asparaginyl tRNA synthetase gene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyoti K Jaiswal; Vidyanand Nanjundiah

    2003-12-01

    In a screen for calcium-regulated gene expression during growth and development of Dictyostelium discoideum we have identified an asparaginyl tRNA synthetase (ddAsnRS) gene, the second tRNA synthetase gene identified in this organism. The ddAsnRS gene shows many unique features. One, it is repressed by lowering cellular calcium, making it the first known calcium-regulated tRNA synthetase. Two, despite the calcium-dependence, its expression is unaltered during the cell cycle, making this the first D. discoideum gene to show a calcium-dependent but cell cycle phase-independent expression. Finally, the N-terminal domain of the predicted ddAsnRS protein shows higher sequence similarity to Glutaminyl tRNA synthetases than to other Asn tRNA synthetases. These unique features of the AsnRS from this primitive eukaryote not only point to a novel mechanism regulating the components of translation machinery and gene expression by calcium, but also hint at a link between the evolution of GlnRS and AsnRS in eukaryotes.

  2. The yeast VAS1 gene encodes both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, B; Walter, P; Ebel, J P; Lacroute, F; Fasiolo, F

    1988-01-05

    S1 mapping on the VAS1 structural gene indicates the existence of two classes of transcripts initiating at distinct in-frame translation start codons. The longer class of VAS1 transcripts initiates upstream of both ATG codons located 138 base pairs away and the shorter class downstream of the first ATG. A mutation that destroys the first AUG on the long message results in respiratory deficiency but does not affect viability. Mutation of the ATG at position 139 leads to lethality because the initiating methionine codon of the essential cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetase has been destroyed. N-terminal protein sequence data further confirm translation initiation at ATG-139 for the cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetase. From these results, we conclude that the VAS1 single gene encodes both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetases. The presequence of the mitochondrial valyl-tRNA synthetase shows amino acid composition but not the amphiphilic character of imported mitochondrial proteins. From mutagenesis of the ATG-139 we conclude that the presequence specifically targets the cytoplasmically synthesized mitochondrial valyl-tRNA synthetase to the mitochondrial outer membrane and prevents binding of the enzyme core to cytoplasmic tRNAVal.

  3. The effect of glial glutamine synthetase inhibition on recognition and temporal memories in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Deepika; Tripathi, Shweta; Qureshi, Munazah F; Tripathi, Shweta; Pandey, Swati; Singh, Gunjan; Kumar, Tankesh; Mir, Fayaz A; Jha, Sushil K

    2014-02-07

    The glutamate neurotransmitter is intrinsically involved in learning and memory. Glial glutamine synthetase enzyme synthesizes glutamine, which helps maintain the optimal neuronal glutamate level. However, the role of glutamine synthetase in learning and memory remains unclear. Using associative trace learning task, we investigated the effects of methionine sulfoximine (MSO) (glutamine synthetase inhibitor) on recognition and temporal memories. MSO and vehicle were injected (i.p.) three hours before training in separate groups of male Wistar rats (n=11). Animals were trained to obtain fruit juice after following a set of sequential events. Initially, house-light was presented for 15s followed by 5s trace interval. Thereafter, juice was given for 20s followed by 20s inter-presentation interval. A total of 75 presentations were made over five sessions during the training and testing periods. The average number of head entries to obtain juice per session and during individual phases at different time intervals was accounted as an outcome measure of recognition and temporal memories. The total head entries in MSO and vehicle treated animals were comparable on training and testing days. However, it was 174.90% (p=0.08), 270.61% (pGlutamine synthetase inhibition did not induce recognition memory deficit, while temporal memory was altered, suggesting that glutamine synthetase modulates some aspects of mnemonic processes.

  4. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed.

  5. Homocysteine Editing, Thioester Chemistry, Coenzyme A, and the Origin of Coded Peptide Synthesis †.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2017-02-09

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) have evolved "quality control" mechanisms which prevent tRNA aminoacylation with non-protein amino acids, such as homocysteine, homoserine, and ornithine, and thus their access to the Genetic Code. Of the ten AARSs that possess editing function, five edit homocysteine: Class I MetRS, ValRS, IleRS, LeuRS, and Class II LysRS. Studies of their editing function reveal that catalytic modules of these AARSs have a thiol-binding site that confers the ability to catalyze the aminoacylation of coenzyme A, pantetheine, and other thiols. Other AARSs also catalyze aminoacyl-thioester synthesis. Amino acid selectivity of AARSs in the aminoacyl thioesters formation reaction is relaxed, characteristic of primitive amino acid activation systems that may have originated in the Thioester World. With homocysteine and cysteine as thiol substrates, AARSs support peptide bond synthesis. Evolutionary origin of these activities is revealed by genomic comparisons, which show that AARSs are structurally related to proteins involved in coenzyme A/sulfur metabolism and non-coded peptide bond synthesis. These findings suggest that the extant AARSs descended from ancestral forms that were involved in non-coded Thioester-dependent peptide synthesis, functionally similar to the present-day non-ribosomal peptide synthetases.

  6. Homocysteine Editing, Thioester Chemistry, Coenzyme A, and the Origin of Coded Peptide Synthesis †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieronim Jakubowski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs have evolved “quality control” mechanisms which prevent tRNA aminoacylation with non-protein amino acids, such as homocysteine, homoserine, and ornithine, and thus their access to the Genetic Code. Of the ten AARSs that possess editing function, five edit homocysteine: Class I MetRS, ValRS, IleRS, LeuRS, and Class II LysRS. Studies of their editing function reveal that catalytic modules of these AARSs have a thiol-binding site that confers the ability to catalyze the aminoacylation of coenzyme A, pantetheine, and other thiols. Other AARSs also catalyze aminoacyl-thioester synthesis. Amino acid selectivity of AARSs in the aminoacyl thioesters formation reaction is relaxed, characteristic of primitive amino acid activation systems that may have originated in the Thioester World. With homocysteine and cysteine as thiol substrates, AARSs support peptide bond synthesis. Evolutionary origin of these activities is revealed by genomic comparisons, which show that AARSs are structurally related to proteins involved in coenzyme A/sulfur metabolism and non-coded peptide bond synthesis. These findings suggest that the extant AARSs descended from ancestral forms that were involved in non-coded Thioester-dependent peptide synthesis, functionally similar to the present-day non-ribosomal peptide synthetases.

  7. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, wh...

  8. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen;

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2...

  9. Functional analysis of Leishmania cyclopropane fatty acid synthetase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel O Oyola

    Full Text Available The single gene encoding cyclopropane fatty acid synthetase (CFAS is present in Leishmania infantum, L. mexicana and L. braziliensis but absent from L. major, a causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In L. infantum, usually causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, the CFAS gene is transcribed in both insect (extracellular and host (intracellular stages of the parasite life cycle. Tagged CFAS protein is stably detected in intracellular L. infantum but only during the early log phase of extracellular growth, when it shows partial localisation to the endoplasmic reticulum. Lipid analyses of L. infantum wild type, CFAS null and complemented parasites detect a low abundance CFAS-dependent C19Δ fatty acid, characteristic of a cyclopropanated species, in wild type and add-back cells. Sub-cellular fractionation studies locate the C19Δ fatty acid to both ER and plasma membrane-enriched fractions. This fatty acid is not detectable in wild type L. major, although expression of the L. infantum CFAS gene in L. major generates cyclopropanated fatty acids, indicating that the substrate for this modification is present in L. major, despite the absence of the modifying enzyme. Loss of the L. infantum CFAS gene does not affect extracellular parasite growth, phagocytosis or early survival in macrophages. However, while endocytosis is also unaffected in the extracellular CFAS nulls, membrane transporter activity is defective and the null parasites are more resistant to oxidative stress. Following infection in vivo, L. infantum CFAS nulls exhibit lower parasite burdens in both the liver and spleen of susceptible hosts but it has not been possible to complement this phenotype, suggesting that loss of C19Δ fatty acid may lead to irreversible changes in cell physiology that cannot be rescued by re-expression. Aberrant cyclopropanation in L. major decreases parasite virulence but does not influence parasite tissue tropism.

  10. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [(14)C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS.

  11. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Erika M.; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. Results: GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Innovation: Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions: Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351–363. PMID:27758118

  12. Functional interactions between a glutamine synthetase promoter and MYB proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Maldonado, Josefa; Avila, Concepción; Torre, Fernando; Cañas, Rafael; Cánovas, Francisco M; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2004-08-01

    In Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), ammonium assimilation is catalysed by glutamine synthetase (GS) [EC 6.3.1.2], which is encoded by two genes, PsGS1a and PsGS1b. PsGS1b is expressed in the vascular tissue throughout the plant body, where it is believed to play a role in recycling ammonium released by various facets of metabolism. The mechanisms that may underpin the transcriptional regulation of PsGS1b were explored. The PsGS1b promoter contains a region that is enriched in previously characterized cis-acting elements, known as AC elements. Pine nuclear proteins bound these AC element-rich regions in a tissue-specific manner. As previous experiments had shown that R2R3-MYB transcription factors could interact with AC elements, the capacity of the AC elements in the PsGS1b promoter to interact with MYB proteins was examined. Two MYB proteins from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), PtMYB1 and PtMYB4, bound to the PsGS1b promoter were able to activate transcription from this promoter in yeast, arabidopsis and pine cells. Immunolocalization experiments revealed that the two MYB proteins were most abundant in cells previously shown to accumulate PsGS1b transcripts. Immunoprecipitation analysis and supershift electrophoretic mobility shift assays implicated these same two proteins in the formation of complexes between pine nuclear extracts and the PsGS1b promoter. Given that these MYB proteins were previously shown to have the capacity to activate gene expression related to lignin biosynthesis, we hypothesize that they may function to co-regulate lignification, a process that places significant demands on nitrogen recycling, and GS, the major enzyme involved in the nitrogen recycling pathway.

  13. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Erland J.F.; Nystrøm, Birthe T.

    2001-01-01

    acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes......acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes...

  14. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2015-10-20

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  15. Identification of autoantibodies to tyrosil-tRNA synthetase in heart disfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryabenko D. V.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the levels of specific autoantibodies against tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and its individual modules in the blood serum of people with heart failure caused by dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis and ischemic heart disease compared with healthy donors. Methods. Recombinant proteins were obtained using bacterial strains transformed with appropriate plasmid vectors and were purified by chromatography on Ni-NTA-agarose. The levels of specific autoantibodies were investigated by ELISA. Results. The increased levels of autoantibodies specific to tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, its N-terminal catalytic module and non-catalytic C-module, were found in the blood serum of patients, compared with healthy donors. Conclusions. The results obtained demonstrate the possible role of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in adaptive changes of the myocardium in response to stress factors.

  16. 19-Year Follow-up of A Patient With Severe Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Paldeep S.; Medina, Casey R.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Sutton, V. Reid

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting in low levels of glutathione and an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. Patients with glutathione synthetase deficiency typically present in the neonatal period with hemolytic anemia, metabolic acidosis and neurological impairment. Lifelong treatment with antioxidants has been recommended in an attempt to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with the disorder. Here we present a 19-year-old female who was diagnosed with glutathione synthetase deficiency shortly after birth and who has been closely followed in our metabolic clinic. Despite an initial severe presentation, she has had normal intellectual development and few complications of her disorder with a treatment regimen that includes polycitra (citric acid, potassium citrate and sodium citrate), vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium. PMID:26984560

  17. Transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Woyda, Kathrin; Ilinskaja, Olga; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-05-02

    The Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a dual role in cell metabolism by functioning as catalyst and regulator. GS catalyses the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonium. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, GS becomes feedback-inhibited by high intracellular glutamine levels and then binds transcription factors GlnR and TnrA, which control the genes of nitrogen assimilation. While GS-bound TnrA is no longer able to interact with DNA, GlnR-DNA binding is shown to be stimulated by GS complex formation. In this paper we show a new physiological feature of the interaction between glutamine synthetase and TnrA. The transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in vivo and in vitro, while the GlnR protein does not affect the activity of the enzyme.

  18. In vitro reactivation of in vivo ammonium-inactivated glutamine synthetase from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida, A; Candau, P; Florencio, F J

    1991-12-16

    Glutamine synthetase from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is inactivated by ammonium addition to cells growing with nitrate as the nitrogen source. The enzyme can be reactivated in vitro by different methods such as alkaline phosphatase treatment, but not phosphodiesterase, by raising the pH of the crude extract to values higher than 8, by increasing the ionic strength of the cell-free extract, or by preincubation with organic solvents, such as 2-propanol and ethanol. These results suggest that the loss of glutamine synthetase activity promoted by ammonium involves the non-covalent binding of a phosphorylated compound to the enzyme and support previous results that rule out the existence of an adenylylation/deadenylylation system functioning in the regulation of cyanobacterial glutamine synthetase.

  19. Archaeal RibL: a new FAD synthetase that is air sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Xu, Huimin; Grochowski, Laura L; White, Robert H

    2010-10-12

    FAD synthetases catalyze the transfer of the AMP portion of ATP to FMN to produce FAD and pyrophosphate (PP(i)). Monofunctional FAD synthetases exist in eukaryotes, while bacteria have bifunctional enzymes that catalyze both the phosphorylation of riboflavin and adenylation of FMN to produce FAD. Analyses of archaeal genomes did not reveal the presence of genes encoding either group, yet the archaea contain FAD. Our recent identification of a CTP-dependent archaeal riboflavin kinase strongly indicated the presence of a monofunctional FAD synthetase. Here we report the identification and characterization of an archaeal FAD synthetase. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii gene MJ1179 encodes a protein that is classified in the nucleotidyl transferase protein family and was previously annotated as glycerol-3-phosphate cytidylyltransferase (GCT). The MJ1179 gene was cloned and its protein product heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The resulting enzyme catalyzes the adenylation of FMN with ATP to produce FAD and PP(i). The MJ1179-derived protein has been designated RibL to indicate that it follows the riboflavin kinase (RibK) step in the archaeal FAD biosynthetic pathway. Aerobically isolated RibL is active only under reducing conditions. RibL was found to require divalent metals for activity, the best activity being observed with Co(2+), where the activity was 4 times greater than that with Mg(2+). Alkylation of the two conserved cysteines in the C-terminus of the protein resulted in complete inactivation. RibL was also found to catalyze cytidylation of FMN with CTP, making the modified FAD, flavin cytidine dinucleotide (FCD). Unlike other FAD synthetases, RibL does not catalyze the reverse reaction to produce FMN and ATP from FAD and PP(i). Also in contrast to other FAD synthetases, PP(i) inhibits the activity of RibL.

  20. Sequence determination and modeling of structural motifs for the smallest monomeric aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase.

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Y M; Shiba, K; Mottes, C; Schimmel, P.

    1991-01-01

    Polypeptide chains of 19 previously studied Escherichia coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are as large as 951 amino acids and, depending on the enzyme, have quaternary structures of alpha, alpha 2, alpha 2 beta 2, and alpha 4. These enzymes have been organized into two classes which are defined by sequence motifs that are associated with specific three-dimensional structures. We isolated, cloned, and sequenced the previously uncharacterized gene for E. coli cysteine-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.16...

  1. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli, Identification of a mutant enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Nygaard, Per

    1982-01-01

    From an Escherichia coli purine auxotroph a mutant defective in phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRib-PP) synthetase has been isolated and partially characterized. In contrast to the parental strain, the mutant was able to grow on nucleosides as purine source, whereas growth on purine bases was reduced......, stimulated the mutant enzyme. The activity of PRib-PP synthetase in crude extract was higher in the mutant than in the parent. When starved for purines an accumulation of PRib-PP was observed in the parent strain, while the pool decreased in the mutant. During pyrimidine starvation derepression of PRib...

  2. Reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in Rhodospirillum rubrum mutants lacking the adenylyltransferase GlnE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Anders; Nordlund, Stefan; Teixeira, Pedro Filipe

    2009-10-01

    In the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, the GlnE adenylyltransferase (encoded by glnE) catalyzes reversible adenylylation of glutamine synthetase, thereby regulating nitrogen assimilation. We have generated glnE mutant strains that are unable to adenylylate glutamine synthetase (GS). Surprisingly, the activity of GS was lower in the mutants than in the wild type, even when grown in nitrogen-fixing conditions. Our results support the proposal that R. rubrum can only cope with the absence of an adenylylation system in the presence of lowered GS expression or activity. In general terms, this report also provides further support for the central role of GS in bacterial metabolism.

  3. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D;

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translation...... in the catalytic efficiency of serine attachment to tRNA, but had no effect on the activity of MtArgRS. Further, the most pronounced improvements in the aminoacylation activity of MtSerRS induced by MtArgRS were observed under conditions of elevated temperature and osmolarity. These data indicate that formation...

  4. Truncated FAD synthetase for direct biocatalytic conversion of riboflavin and analogs to their corresponding flavin mononucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iamurri, Samantha M; Daugherty, Ashley B; Edmondson, Dale E; Lutz, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    The preparation of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and FMN analogs from their corresponding riboflavin precursors is traditionally performed in a two-step procedure. After initial enzymatic conversion of riboflavin to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) by a bifunctional FAD synthetase, the adenyl moiety of FAD is hydrolyzed with snake venom phosphodiesterase to yield FMN. To simplify the protocol, we have engineered the FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes by deleting its N-terminal adenylation domain. The newly created biocatalyst is stable and efficient for direct and quantitative phosphorylation of riboflavin and riboflavin analogs to their corresponding FMN cofactors at preparative-scale.

  5. Crystal structure of yeast FAD synthetase (Fad1) in complex with FAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leulliot, Nicolas; Blondeau, Karine; Keller, Jenny; Ulryck, Nathalie; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; van Tilbeurgh, Herman

    2010-05-21

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) synthetase is an essential enzyme responsible for the synthesis of FAD by adenylation of riboflavin monophosphate (FMN). We have solved the 1.9 A resolution structure of Fad1, the yeast FAD synthetase, in complex with the FAD product in the active site. The structure of Fad1 shows it to be a member of the PP-ATPase superfamily. Important conformational differences in the two motifs involved in binding the phosphate moieties of FAD compared to the Candida glabrata FMNT ortholog suggests that this loop is dynamic and undergoes substantial conformational changes during its catalytic cycle.

  6. Correlation of exon 3 β-catenin mutations with glutamine synthetase staining patterns in hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Gillian; Liu, Xinxin; Hu, Junjie; Xu, Zhong; Che, Li; Solomon, David; Tsokos, Christos; Shafizadeh, Nafis; Chen, Xin; Gill, Ryan; Kakar, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The current clinical practice is based on the assumption of strong correlation between diffuse glutamine synthetase expression and β-catenin activation in hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. This high correlation is based on limited data and may represent an oversimplification as glutamine synthetase staining patterns show wide variability in clinical practice. Standardized criteria for interpreting diverse glutamine synthetase patterns, and the association between each pattern and β-catenin mutations is not clearly established. This study examines the correlation between glutamine synthetase staining patterns and β-catenin mutations in 15 typical hepatocellular adenomas, 5 atypical hepatocellular neoplasms and 60 hepatocellular carcinomas. Glutamine synthetase staining was classified into one of the three patterns: (a) diffuse homogeneous: moderate-to-strong cytoplasmic staining in >90% of lesional cells, without a map-like pattern, (b) diffuse heterogeneous: moderate-to-strong staining in 50-90% of lesional cells, without a map-like pattern, and (c) patchy: moderate-to-strong staining in glutamine synthetase staining (homogeneous or heterogeneous), an exon 3 β-catenin mutation was detected in 33% (2/6) of typical hepatocellular adenoma, 75% (3/4) of atypical hepatocellular neoplasm and 17% (8/47) of hepatocellular carcinomas. An exon 3 mutation was also observed in 15% (2/13) of hepatocellular carcinomas with patchy glutamine synthetase staining. The results show a modest correlation between diffuse glutamine synthetase immunostaining and exon 3 β-catenin mutations in hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma with discrepancy rates >50% in both hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. The interpretation of β-catenin activation based on glutamine synthetase staining should be performed with caution, and the undetermined significance of various glutamine synthetase patterns should be highlighted in pathology reports.

  7. Hepatoprotective effects of rice-derived peptides against acetaminophen-induced damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kayoko; Moritani, Chie; Uraji, Misugi; Fujita, Akiko; Kawakami, Koji; Hatanaka, Tadashi; Suzaki, Etsuko; Tsuboi, Seiji

    2017-03-01

    Glutathione, the most abundant intracellular antioxidant, protects cells against reactive oxygen species induced oxidative stress and regulates intracellular redox status. We found that rice peptides increased intracellular glutathione levels in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic. However, an overdose of acetaminophen causes severe hepatotoxicity via depletion of hepatic glutathione. Here, we investigated the protective effects of rice peptides on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. ICR mice were orally administered rice peptides (0, 100 or 500 mg/kg) for seven days, followed by the induction of hepatotoxicity via intraperitoneal injection of acetaminophen (700 mg/kg). Pretreatment with rice peptides significantly prevented increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels and protected against hepatic glutathione depletion. The expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, a key regulatory enzyme in the synthesis of glutathione, was decreased by treatment with acetaminophen, albeit rice peptides treatment recovered its expression compared to that achieved treatment with acetaminophen. In addition, histopathological evaluation of the livers also revealed that rice peptides prevented acetaminophen-induced centrilobular necrosis. These results suggest that rice peptides increased intracellular glutathione levels and could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

  8. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  9. The PRPP Synthetase Spectrum: What Does it Demonstrate About Nucleotide Syndromes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duley, J.A.; Christodoulou, J.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de

    2011-01-01

    Defects in X-linked phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1) manifest as follows: (1) PRS-I enzyme "superactivity" (gain-of-function mutations affecting allosteric regions); (2) PRS-I overexpression (which may be linked to miRNA mutation); (3) severe PRS-I deficiency/Arts syndrome (missense

  10. Augmenting ureagenesis in patients with partial carbamyl phosphate synthetase 1deficiency with N-carbamylglutamate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah Mew, Nicholas; McCarter, Robert; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Lichter, Uta; Nissim, Ilana; Yudkoff, Marc; Tuchman, and Mendel

    2014-01-01

    Identical studies employing stable isotopes were performed before and after a 3-day trial of oral N-carbamylglutamate (NCG) in 5 subjects with late onset carbamyl phosphate synthetase deficiency. NCG augmented ureagenesis and decreased plasma ammonia in 4 of 5 subjects. There was marked improvement in nitrogen metabolism with long-term NCG administration in one subject. PMID:24880889

  11. Augmenting ureagenesis in patients with partial carbamyl phosphate synthetase 1deficiency with N-carbamylglutamate

    OpenAIRE

    Ah Mew, Nicholas; McCarter, Robert; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Lichter, Uta; Nissim, Ilana; Yudkoff, Marc; Tuchman, and Mendel

    2014-01-01

    Identical studies employing stable isotopes were performed before and after a 3-day trial of oral N-carbamylglutamate (NCG) in 5 subjects with late onset carbamyl phosphate synthetase deficiency. NCG augmented ureagenesis and decreased plasma ammonia in 4 of 5 subjects. There was marked improvement in nitrogen metabolism with long-term NCG administration in one subject.

  12. Studies towards the synthesis of ATP analogs as potential glutamine synthetase inhibitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salisu, S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available -1 Synthetic Communications, 41: 2216?2225 DOI: 10.1080/00397911.2010.501473 Studies Towards the Synthesis of ATP Analogs as Potential Glutamine Synthetase Inhibitors Sheriff Salisu a , Colin Kenyon b & Perry T. Kaye a a Department of Chemistry...

  13. Glutamine synthetase sequence evolution in the mycobacteria and their use as molecular markers for Actinobacteria speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiid Ian JF

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the gene encoding for glutamine synthetase (glnA is essential in several organisms, multiple glnA copies have been identified in bacterial genomes such as those of the phylum Actinobacteria, notably the mycobacterial species. Intriguingly, previous reports have shown that only one copy (glnA1 is essential for growth in M. tuberculosis, while the other copies (glnA2, glnA3 and glnA4 are not. Results In this report it is shown that the glnA1 and glnA2 encoded glutamine synthetase sequences were inherited from an Actinobacteria ancestor, while the glnA4 and glnA3 encoded GS sequences were sequentially acquired during Actinobacteria speciation. The glutamine synthetase sequences encoded by glnA4 and glnA3 are undergoing reductive evolution in the mycobacteria, whilst those encoded by glnA1 and glnA2 are more conserved. Conclusion Different selective pressures by the ecological niche that the organisms occupy may influence the sequence evolution of glnA1 and glnA2 and thereby affecting phylogenies based on the protein sequences they encode. The findings in this report may impact the use of similar sequences as molecular markers, as well as shed some light on the evolution of glutamine synthetase in the mycobacteria.

  14. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  15. Noncoding RNA of Glutamine Synthetase I Modulates Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    OpenAIRE

    D'Alia, Davide; Nieselt, Kay; Steigele, Stephan; Mueller, Jonas; Verburg, Ilse; Takano, Eriko; Alia, Davide D’; Müller, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Overexpression of antisense chromosomal cis-encoded noncoding RNAss (ncRNAs) in glutamine synthetase I resulted in a decrease in growth, protein synthesis, and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. In addition, we predicted 3,597 cis-encoded ncRNAs and validated 13 of them experimentally, including several ncRNAs that are differentially expressed in bacterial hormone-defective mutants.

  16. A novel therapeutic target for peripheral nerve injury-related diseases: aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Sun Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AminoARSs are essential enzymes that perform the first step of protein synthesis. Beyond their original roles, AminoARSs possess non-canonical functions, such as cell cycle regulation and signal transduction. Therefore, AminoARSs represent a powerful pharmaceutical target if their non-canonical functions can be controlled. Using AminoARSs-specific primers, we screened mRNA expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn of rats with peripheral nerve injury created by sciatic nerve axotomy. Of 20 AminoARSs, we found that phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase beta chain (FARSB, isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IARS and methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MARS mRNA expression was increased in spinal dorsal horn neurons on the injured side, but not in glial cells. These findings suggest the possibility that FARSB, IARS and MARS, as a neurotransmitter, may transfer abnormal sensory signals after peripheral nerve damage and become a new target for drug treatment.

  17. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RAT GENE FOR CARBAMOYLPHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENHOFF, MJB; VANDEZANDE, LPWGM; DINGEMANSE, MA; DAS, AT; LABRUYERE, W; MOORMAN, AFM; CHARLES, R; LAMERS, WH; Jacobus Mgn Van De Zande, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Carbamoylphosphate synthetase I (CbmPS) is first expressed in rat hepatocytes shortly before birth. After birth, expression of CbmPS gradually becomes confined to the hepatocytes surrounding the portal veins. To obtain insight into the spatiotemporal regulation of its expression, the rat CbmPS gene

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Five Novel Polyketide Synthetase-Containing Mouse Escherichia coli Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Anthony; Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Garcia, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    We report herein the draft genomes of five novel Escherichia coli strains isolated from surveillance and experimental mice housed at MIT and the Whitehead Institute and describe their genomic characteristics in context with the polyketide synthetase (PKS)-containing pathogenic E. coli strains NC101, IHE3034, and A192PP.

  19. Structure of the gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (prsA>) in Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Stanley G.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The Salmonella typhimurium gene prsA, which encodes phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase, has been cloned, and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The amino acid sequence derived from the S. typhimurium gene is 99% identical to the derived Escherichia coli sequence and 47% identical to...

  20. Effects of univalent cations on the activity of particulate starch synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsos, R E; Evans, H J

    1969-09-01

    An investigation was made to determine the univalent cation requirements of starch synthetase from a variety of plant species of economic importance. The particulate enzyme from sweet corn was shown to have an absolute requirement for potassium, with the optimum activation occurring at 0.05 M KCl. Rubidium, cesium, and ammonium were 80% as effective as potassium while sodium and lithium were respectively 21% and 8% as effective as potassium. The K(A) for potassium was determined to be 6 mM. In the case of the particulate starch synthetase from wheat, bush beans, field corn, soybeans, peas, or potatoes, considerable stimulation of enzyme activity was obtained by the addition of potassium to the reaction mixture. In these studies, low enzyme activity was observed in the absence of added potassium, but the content of endogenous univalent cations in the reactions may be sufficient to account for the activities observed. Anions of various types had no effect on starch synthetase activity. Divalent cations produced slight activation in the presence or absence of potassium. All efforts to show a potassium requirement for glycogen synthetase from rat liver have been negative.

  1. Changes in Activities of Glutamine Synthetase during Grain Filling and Their Relation to Rice Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Four japonica rice varieties differed in cooking and eating qualities were used in a pot experiment to study the relationship between the activities of glutamine synthetase during grain filling and rice quality. The activities of glutamine synthetase gradually increased and then declined as a single peak curve in the course of grain filling. The 15th day after heading was a turning point, before which the enzymatic activities in the inferior rice varieties with high protein content were higher than those in the superior rice varietie with low protein content, and after which it was converse. The activity of glutamine synthetase in grain was correlated with the taste meter value, peak viscosity and breakdown negatively at the early stage of grain filling whereas positively at the middle and late stages. Moreover, it was correlated with the protein content of rice grain and setback positively at the early stage and negatively at the middle and late stages. The correlation degree varied with the course of grain filling. From 15 days to 20 days after heading was a critical stage, in which the direction of correlation between the activity of glutamine synthetase and taste meter value and RVA properties of rice changed.

  2. 2'-phosphodiesterase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activities in the lowest metazoans, sponge [porifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saby, Emilie; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Justesen, Just;

    2009-01-01

    Sponges [porifera], the most ancient metazoans, contain modules related to the vertebrate immune system, including the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). The components of the antiviral 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2–5A) system (OAS, 2′-Phosphodiesterase (2′-PDE) and RNAse L) of vertebrates have...

  3. Purification and properties of phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthetase from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnvig, Kirsten; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PPRibP) synthetase from Bacillus subtiliis has been purified to near homogeneity from an Escherichia coli Δprs strain bearing the cloned B. subtilis prs gene, encoding PPRibP synthentase, on a plasmid. The Mr of the subunit (34,000) and its amino-terminal amino acid...

  4. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains...

  5. EFFECT OF UP-REGULATION OF S-ADOMET SYNTHETASE ON TAXOL-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN BREAST CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Lirong; Zheng Shu; Fan Weimin; Zhang Suzhan

    1998-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the gene regulation of taxolinduced apoptosis. Methods: Northern blot hybridization,enzyme activity assay of S-AdoMet synthetase and flow cytometry were performed in the investigation of expression in the Mrna level and biological action of SAdoMet synthetase in taxol-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cell line (Bcap 37). Results: Up-regulation of S-AdoMet synthetase expression was resulted by taxol treatment and the expression peaked at 48hours. Moreover,the up-regulation of S-AdoMet synthetase was associated with cytotoxicity of antimicrotubule agents including taxol and colchicine.Inhibition rate of S-AdoMet synthetase activity by 1%DMSO was 34% in taxol-treated cells and 14% in taxoluntreated cells compared to control groups, respectively.Posttreatment with 1% DMSO following pretreatment with individual antitumor agent for 3 hrs promoted apoptotic cell death of taxol-,colchicine-,and adriamycintreated Bcap37 cells. Conclusion : The induction of apoptosis enhanced by post-treatment with DMSO in taxol-treated cells is probably linked to its inhibition on enzyme activity of S-AdoMet synthetase ,suggesting that the increased expression of S-AdoMet synthetase possibly plays an important role in protecting cells from DNA fragmentation in taxol-induced apoptosis.

  6. The effect of portacaval anastomosis on the expression of glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in perivenous hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Robin; Levillain, Oliver; Brosnan, John T; Araneda, Silvia; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2013-05-01

    There is functional zonation of metabolism across the liver acinus, with glutamine synthetase restricted to a narrow band of cells around the terminal hepatic venules. Portacaval anastomosis, where there is a major rerouting of portal blood flow from the portal vein directly to the vena cava bypassing the liver, has been reported to result in a marked decrease in the activity of glutamine synthetase. It is not known whether this represents a loss of perivenous hepatocytes or whether there is a specific loss of glutamine synthetase. To answer this question, we have determined the activity of glutamine synthetase and another enzyme from the perivenous compartment, ornithine aminotransferase, as well as the immunochemical localization of both glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in rats with a portacaval shunt. The portacaval shunt caused a marked decrease in glutamine synthetase activity and an increase in ornithine aminotransferase activity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase proteins maintained their location in the perivenous cells. These results indicate that there is no generalized loss of perivenous hepatocytes, but rather, there is a significant alteration in the expression of these proteins and hence metabolism in this cell population.

  7. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of glutamine synthetase, a tegumental protein from Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chunhui; Hong, Yang; Cao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Fu, Zhiqiang; Shi, Yaojun; Wei, Meimei; Liu, Shengfa; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2012-12-01

    Glutamine synthetase catalyzes the synthesis of glutamine, providing nitrogen for the production of purines, pyrimidines, amino acids, and other compounds required in many pivotal cellular events. Herein, a full-length cDNA encoding Schistosoma japonicum glutamine synthetase (SjGS) was isolated from 21-day schistosomes. The entire open reading frame of SjGS contains a 1,095-bp coding region corresponding to 364 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 40.7 kDa. NCBIP blast shows that the putative amino acid of SjGS contains a classic β-grasp domain and a catalytic domain of glutamine synthetase. The relative mRNA expression of SjGS was evaluated in 7-, 13-, 21-, 28-, 35-, and 42-day worms of S. japonicum in the final host and higher expression at day 21, and 42 worms were observed. This protein was also detected in worm extracts using Western blot. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that the SjGS protein was mainly distributed on tegument and parenchyma in 28-day adult worms. The recombinant glutamine synthetase with a molecular weight of 45 kDa was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified in its active form. The enzyme activity of the recombinant protein was 3.30 ± 0.67 U.μg-1. The enzyme activity was highly stable over a wide range of pH (6-9) and temperature (25-40 °C) under physiological conditions. The transcription of SjGS was upregulated in praziquantel-treated worms at 2-, 4-, and 24-h posttreatment compared with the untreated control. As a first step towards the clarification of the role of glutamine synthetase in schistosome species, we have cloned and characterized cDNAs encoding SjGS in S. japonicum, and the data presented suggest that SjGS is an important molecule in the development of the schistosome.

  9. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara (SSRL); (Maryland)

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  10. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  11. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  12. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  15. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  16. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  17. Cloning, molecular characterization, and phylogeny of two evolutionary distinct glutamine synthetase isoforms in the green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, Diana L; Zarka, Aliza; Leu, Stefan; Boussiba, Sammy

    2016-12-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyta) is a widely used microalga of great economic potential, yet its molecular genetics and evolution are largely unknown. We present new detailed molecular and phylogenetic analysis of two glutamine synthetase (GS) enzymes and genes (gln) under the Astaxanthin-inducing conditions of light- and nitrogen-stress. Structure analysis identified key residues and confirmed two decameric GS2 holoenzymes, a cytoplasmic enzyme, termed GS2c , and a plastidic form, termed GS2p , due to chloroplast-transit peptides at its N-terminus. Gene expression analysis showed dissociation of mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels for both GS2 under different growth conditions, indicating the strong post-transcriptional regulation. Data-mining identified novel and specified published gln genes from Prasinophyceae, Chlorophyta, Trebouxiophyceae, Charophyceae, Bryophyta, Lycopodiophyta, Spermatophyta, and Rhodophyta. Phylogenetic analysis found homologues to the cytosolic GS2c of H. pluvialis in all other photo- and non-photosynthetic Eukaryota. The chloroplastic GS2p was restricted to Chlorophyta, Bryophyta, some Proteobacteria and Fungii; no homologues were identified in Spermatophyta or other Eukaryota. This indicates two independent prokaryotic donors for these two gln genes in H. pluvialis. Combined phylogenetic analysis of GS, chl-b synthase, elongation factor, and light harvesting complex homologues project a newly refined model of Viridiplantae evolution. Herein, a GS1 evolved into the cytosolic GS2c and was passed on to all Eukaryota. Later, the chloroplastic GS2p entered the Archaeplastida lineage via a horizontal gene transfer at the divergence of Chlorophyta and Rhodophyta lineages. GS2p persisted in Chlorophyta and Bryophyta, but was lost during Spermatophyta evolution. These data suggest the revision of GS classification and nomenclature, and extend our understanding of the photosynthetic Eukaryota evolution.

  18. Identification of critical amino acid residues of Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase: definition of the ATP site involved in carboxy-phosphate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W; Lim, A L; Powers-Lee, S G

    1997-08-15

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetases (CPSases) utilize two molecules of ATP at two homologous domains, B and C, with ATP(B) used to form the enzyme-bound intermediate carboxy-phosphate and ATP(C) used to phosphorylate the carbamate intermediate. To further define the role of one CPSase peptide suggested by affinity labeling studies to be near the ATP(B) site, we have carried out site-directed mutagenic analysis of peptide 234-242 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginine-specific CPSase. Mutants E234A, E234D, E236A, E236D and E238A were unable to complement the CPSase-deficient yeast strain LPL26 whereas mutants Y237A, E238D, R241K, R241E and R241P supported LPL26 growth as well as wild-type CPSase. Kinetic analysis of E234A and Y237A indicated impaired utilization of ATP(B) but not of ATP(C). D242A, a temperature-sensitive mutant, retained no detectable activity when assayed in vitro. These findings, together with the affinity labeling data and primary sequence analysis, strongly suggest that the yeast CPSase peptide 234-242 is located at the ATP(B) site and that some of its residues are important for functioning of the enzyme. D242 appears to occupy a critical structural position and E234, E236 and E238 appear to be critical for function, with the spatial arrangement of the carboxyl side chain also critical for E234 and E236.

  19. Preparation of the multienzyme system gramicidin S-synthetase 2 with an aqueous three-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, A; Simonis, M; von Döhren, H

    1987-06-19

    The distribution of gramicidin S-synthetase activity from disrupted cells suspended in aqueous two- and three-phase systems was investigated. An optimized three-phase system containing 5% dextran, 8% Ficoll, 11% PEG and 6.7% disrupted cells was found to be effective in extracting gramicidin S-synthetase activity. The activity yield achieved was higher in comparison to other preparation methods, and the subsequent purification steps were greatly facilitated. The time needed for the preparation of the labile gramicidin S-synthetase was considerably reduced. The combination of the aqueous phase extraction with chromatographic methods yielded 19 mg gramicidin S-synthetase 2 in essentially pure form from 30 g (wet weight) of cells.

  20. Molecular cloning and regulation of expression of the genes for initiation factor 3 and two aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elseviers, D; Gallagher, P; Hoffman, A; Weinberg, B; Schwartz, I

    1982-10-01

    A 22-kilobase fragment of the Escherichia coli chromosome which contains the genes for translation initiation factor 3, phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, and threonyl-tRNA synthetase was cloned into plasmid pACYC184. The hybrid plasmid (designated pID1) complements a temperature-sensitive pheS lesion in E. coli NP37. pID1-transformed NP37 overproduce initiation factor 3 and phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. Gene expression from pID1 was studied in vitro in a coupled transcription-translation system and in minicells. The results suggest that the genes for initiation factor 3 and phenylalanyl- and threonyl-tRNA synthetase are regulated by different mechanisms.

  1. Bacillus subtilis GlnR contains an autoinhibitory C-terminal domain required for the interaction with glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Lewis V; Fisher, Susan H

    2008-04-01

    The Bacillus subtilis GlnR transcription factor regulates gene expression in response to changes in nitrogen availability. Glutamine synthetase transmits the nitrogen regulatory signal to GlnR. The DNA-binding activity of GlnR is activated by a transient protein-protein interaction with feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase that stabilizes GlnR-DNA complexes. This signal transduction mechanism was analysed by creating mutant GlnR proteins with partial or complete truncations of their C-terminal domains. The truncated GlnR proteins were found to constitutively repress gene expression in vivo. This constitutive repression did not require glutamine synthetase. Purified mutant GlnR proteins bound DNA in vitro more tightly than wild-type GlnR protein and this binding was not activated by feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase. While full-length GlnR is monomeric, the truncated GlnR proteins contained significant levels of dimers. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of GlnR acts as an autoinhibitory domain that prevents GlnR dimerization and thus impedes DNA binding. The GlnR C-terminal domain is also required for the interaction between GlnR and feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase. Compared with the full-length GlnR protein, the truncated GlnR proteins were defective in their interaction with feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase in cross-linking experiments.

  2. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the AnticancerProducing Actinomycetes Isolated from Marine Sediment in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Camelia Herdini; Shinta Hartanto; Sofia Mubarika; Bambang Hariwiyanto; Nastiti Wijayanti; Akira Hosoyama; Atsushi Yamazoe; Hideaki Nojiri; Jaka Widada

    2016-01-01

    Marine actinomycetes is a group of bacteria that is highly potential in producing novel bioactive compound. It has unique characteristics and is different from other terrestrial ones. Extreme environmental condition is suspected to lead marine actinomycetes produce different types of bioactive compound found previously. The aim of this study was to explore the presence and diversity of NRPS genes in 14 anticancer-producing actinomycetes isolated from marine sediment in Indonesia. ...

  3. The cyclochlorotine mycotoxin is produced by the nonribosomal peptide synthetase CctN in Talaromyces islandicus (“Penicillium islandicum”)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schafhauser, Thomas; Kirchner, Norbert; Kulik, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces islandicus (“Penicillium islandicum”) is a widespread foodborne mold that produces numerous secondary metabolites, among them potent mycotoxins belonging to different chemical classes. A notable metabolite is the hepatotoxic and carcinogenic pentapeptide cyclochlorotine that contains...

  4. Natural aminoacyl tRNA synthetase fragment enhances cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E McCormick

    Full Text Available A naturally-occurring fragment of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS has been shown in higher eukaryotes to 'moonlight' as a pro-angiogenic cytokine in addition to its primary role in protein translation. Pro-angiogenic cytokines have previously been proposed to be promising therapeutic mechanisms for the treatment of myocardial infarction. Here, we show that systemic delivery of the natural fragment of TyRS, mini-TyrRS, improves heart function in mice after myocardial infarction. This improvement is associated with reduced formation of scar tissue, increased angiogenesis of cardiac capillaries, recruitment of c-kitpos cells and proliferation of myocardial fibroblasts. This work demonstrates that mini-TyrRS has beneficial effects on cardiac repair and regeneration and offers support for the notion that elucidation of the ever expanding repertoire of noncanonical functions of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases offers unique opportunities for development of novel therapeutics.

  5. Multistep modeling of protein structure: application towards refinement of tyr-tRNA synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, S.; Shibata, M.; Roychoudhury, M.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of multistep modeling (MSM) is expanding by adding a least-squares minimization step in the procedure to fit backbone reconstruction consistent with a set of C-alpha coordinates. The analytical solution of Phi and Psi angles, that fits a C-alpha x-ray coordinate is used for tyr-tRNA synthetase. Phi and Psi angles for the region where the above mentioned method fails, are obtained by minimizing the difference in C-alpha distances between the computed model and the crystal structure in a least-squares sense. We present a stepwise application of this part of MSM to the determination of the complete backbone geometry of the 321 N terminal residues of tyrosine tRNA synthetase to a root mean square deviation of 0.47 angstroms from the crystallographic C-alpha coordinates.

  6. Molecular analysis of intragenic recombination at the tryptophan synthetase locus in Neurospora crassa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Wiest; D. Barchers; M. Eaton; R. Henderson; R. Schnittker; K. Mccluskey

    2013-12-01

    Fifteen different classically generated and mapped mutations at the tryptophan synthetase locus in Neurospora crassa have been characterized to the level of the primary sequence of the gene. This sequence analysis has demonstrated that intragenic recombination is accurate to order mutations within one open reading frame. While classic genetic analysis correctly ordered the mutations, the position of mutations characterized by gene sequence analysis was more accurate. A leaky mutation was found to have a wild-type primary sequence. The presence of unique polymorphisms in the primary sequence of the trp-3 gene from strain 861 confirms that it has a unique history relative to the other strains studied. Most strains that were previously shown to be immunologically nonreactive with antibody preparations raised against tryptophan synthetase protein were shown to have nonsense mutations. This work defines 14 alleles of the N. crassa trp-3 gene.

  7. let-65 is cytoplasmic methionyl tRNA synthetase in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Z. Alriyami

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic methionyl tRNA synthetase (MetRS is one of more than 20 cytoplasmic aminoacyl tRNA synthetase enzymes (ARS. This family of enzymes catalyzes a process fundamental for protein translation. Using a combination of genetic mapping, oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, and phenotypic correlation, we show that mutations in the essential gene, let-65, reside within the predicted Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of MetRS, which we have named mars-1. We demonstrate that the lethality associated with alleles of let-65 is fully rescued by a transgenic array that spans the mars-1 genomic region. Furthermore, sequence analysis reveals that six let-65 alleles lead to the alteration of highly conserved amino acids.

  8. Structure of Human Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Synthetase at 2.3 Å Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoj, N.; Strauss, E.; Begley, T.P.; Ealick, S.E.

    2010-12-01

    The structure of human phosphopantothenoylcysteine (PPC) synthetase was determined at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. PPC synthetase is a dimer with identical monomers. Some features of the monomer fold resemble a group of NAD-dependent enzymes, while other features resemble the ribokinase fold. The ATP, phosphopantothenate, and cysteine binding sites were deduced from modeling studies. Highly conserved ATP binding residues include Gly43, Ser61, Gly63, Gly66, Phe230, and Asn258. Highly conserved phosphopantothenate binding residues include Asn59, Ala179, Ala180, and Asp183 from one monomer and Arg55 from the adjacent monomer. The structure predicts a ping pong mechanism with initial formation of an acyladenylate intermediate, followed by release of pyrophosphate and attack by cysteine to form the final products PPC and AMP.

  9. Mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase mutations underlie fatal infantile Alpers encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elo, Jenni M; Yadavalli, Srujana S; Euro, Liliya

    2012-01-01

    the mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase (mtPheRS) in two patients with fatal epileptic mitochondrial encephalopathy. The mutations affected highly conserved amino acids, p.I329T and p.D391V. Recently, a homozygous FARS2 variant p.Y144C was reported in a Saudi girl with mitochondrial...... was impaired. Our results imply that the three FARS2 mutations directly impair aminoacylation function and stability of mtPheRS, leading to a decrease in overall tRNA charging capacity. This study establishes a new genetic cause of infantile mitochondrial Alpers encephalopathy and reports a new mitochondrial......Next-generation sequencing has turned out to be a powerful tool to uncover genetic basis of childhood mitochondrial disorders. We utilized whole-exome analysis and discovered novel compound heterozygous mutations in FARS2 (mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA synthetase), encoding...

  10. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  11. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H.; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a ...

  12. Cylindrospermopsin and Saxitoxin Synthetase Genes in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii Strains from Brazilian Freshwater

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Hoff-Risseti; Felipe Augusto Dörr; Patricia Dayane Carvalho Schaker; Ernani Pinto; Vera Regina Werner; Marli Fatima Fiore

    2013-01-01

    The Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii population from Brazilian freshwater is known to produce saxitoxin derivatives (STX), while cylindrospermopsin (CYN), which is commonly detected in isolates from Australia and Asia continents, has thus far not been detected in South American strains. However, during the investigation for the presence of cyrA, cyrB, cyrC and cyrJ CYN synthetase genes in the genomes of four laboratory-cultured C. raciborskii Brazilian strains, the almost complete cyrA gene seq...

  13. A Phenotypic Based Target Screening Approach Delivers New Antitubercular CTP Synthetase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marta; Szadocka, Sára; Degiacomi, Giulia; Orena, Beatrice S; Mori, Giorgia; Piano, Valentina; Boldrin, Francesca; Zemanová, Júlia; Huszár, Stanislav; Barros, David; Ekins, Sean; Lelièvre, Joel; Manganelli, Riccardo; Mattevi, Andrea; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Ballell, Lluis; Mikušová, Katarína; Chiarelli, Laurent R

    2017-06-09

    Despite its great potential, the target-based approach has been mostly unsuccessful in tuberculosis drug discovery, while whole cell phenotypic screening has delivered several active compounds. However, for many of these hits, the cellular target has not yet been identified, thus preventing further target-based optimization of the compounds. In this context, the newly validated drug target CTP synthetase PyrG was exploited to assess a target-based approach of already known, but untargeted, antimycobacterial compounds. To this purpose the publically available GlaxoSmithKline antimycobacterial compound set was assayed, uncovering a series of 4-(pyridin-2-yl)thiazole derivatives which efficiently inhibit the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PyrG enzyme activity, one of them showing low activity against the human CTP synthetase. The three best compounds were ATP binding site competitive inhibitors, with Ki values ranging from 3 to 20 μM, but did not show any activity against a small panel of different prokaryotic and eukaryotic kinases, thus demonstrating specificity for the CTP synthetases. Metabolic labeling experiments demonstrated that the compounds directly interfere not only with CTP biosynthesis, but also with other CTP dependent biochemical pathways, such as lipid biosynthesis. Moreover, using a M. tuberculosis pyrG conditional knock-down strain, it was shown that the activity of two compounds is dependent on the intracellular concentration of the CTP synthetase. All these results strongly suggest a role of PyrG as a target of these compounds, thus strengthening the value of this kind of approach for the identification of new scaffolds for drug development.

  14. Localization and nucleotide specificity of Blastocystis succinyl-CoA synthetase

    OpenAIRE

    Hamblin, Karleigh; Standley, Daron M; Rogers, Matthew B; Stechmann, Alexandra; Andrew J. Roger; Maytum, Robin; Giezen, Mark van der

    2008-01-01

    The anaerobic lifestyle of the intestinal parasite Blastocystis raises questions about the biochemistry and function of its mitochondria-like organelles. We have characterized the Blastocystis succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS), a tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme that conserves energy by substrate-level phosphorylation. We show that SCS localizes to the enigmatic Blastocystis organelles, indicating that these organelles might play a similar role in energy metabolism as classic mitochondria. Althoug...

  15. Pancreatic cancer cell lines deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase

    OpenAIRE

    Bowles, Tawnya L.; Kim, Randie; Galante, Joseph; Parsons, Colin M.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bold, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells can synthesize the non-essential amino acid arginine from aspartate and citrulline using the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). It has been observed that ASS is under-expressed in various types of cancers ASS, for which arginine become auxotrophic. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a prokaryotic enzyme that metabolizes arginine to citrulline and has been found to inhibit melanoma and hepatoma cancer cells deficient of ASS. We tested the hypothesis that pancreatic cancers ha...

  16. Glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is present in oligodendroglia of various regions of the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, F.; Eng, L. F.; Gibbs, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase immunoreactive oligodendrocytes were identified in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord. They were mostly confined to the gray matter, particularly close to neurons and processes. The white matter showed few immunoreactive oligodendroglia. It was suggested that some type of oligodendrocytes, specially those in perineuronal location, might fulfill a functional role more akin to astrocytes than to the normally myelinating oligodendroglia.

  17. Reassimilation of Photorespiratory Ammonium in Lotus japonicus Plants Deficient in Plastidic Glutamine Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; García-Calderón, Margarita; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the plastidic isoform of glutamine synthetase (GS2) is the enzyme in charge of photorespiratory ammonium reassimilation in plants. The metabolic events associated to photorespiratory NH4(+) accumulation were analyzed in a Lotus japonicus photorespiratory mutant lacking GS2. The mutant plants accumulated high levels of NH4(+) when photorespiration was active, followed by a sudden drop in the levels of this compound. In this paper it was examined the possible existence of enzymatic pathways alternative to GS2 that could account for this decline in the photorespiratory ammonium. Induction of genes encoding for cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and asparagine synthetase (ASN) was observed in the mutant in correspondence with the diminishment of NH4(+). Measurements of gene expression, polypeptide levels, enzyme activity and metabolite levels were carried out in leaf samples from WT and mutant plants after different periods of time under active photorespiratory conditions. In the case of asparagine synthetase it was not possible to determine enzyme activity and polypeptide content; however, an increased asparagine content in parallel with the induction of ASN gene expression was detected in the mutant plants. This increase in asparagine levels took place concomitantly with an increase in glutamine due to the induction of cytosolic GS1 in the mutant, thus revealing a major role of cytosolic GS1 in the reassimilation and detoxification of photorespiratory NH4(+) when the plastidic GS2 isoform is lacking. Moreover, a diminishment in glutamate levels was observed, that may be explained by the induction of NAD(H)-dependent GDH activity.

  18. Glutamine synthetase immunor present in oligodendroglia of regions of the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Fernando; Eng, Lawrence F.; Gibbs, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase immunoreactive oligodendrocytes were identified in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord. They were mostly confined to the gray matter, particularly close to neurons and processes. The white matter showed few immunoreactive oligodendroglia. It was suggested that some type of oligodendrocytes, specially those in perineuronal location, might fulfill a functional role more akin to astrocytes than to the normally myelinating oligodendroglia.

  19. Expression of glutamine synthetase and cell proliferation in human idiopathic epiretinal membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Kase, S; Saito, W; Yokoi, M; K. Yoshida; Furudate, N; Muramatsu, M; Saito, A.; Kase, M; Ohno, S

    2006-01-01

    Background/aim: The mechanisms of the cellular origin and cell proliferation in the idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) are unsolved. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of cell cycle related molecules and glutamine synthetase (GS), which is expressed in Müller cells and their processes, in ERM tissues. Methods: The ERMs were surgically removed using pars plana vitrectomy. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded ERM tissues were analysed by immunohistochemistry with anti-cycli...

  20. Thiol synthetases of legumes: immunogold localization and differential gene regulation by phytohormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Maria R; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Loscos, Jorge; James, Euan K; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Navascués, Joaquín; Gay, Marina; Becana, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    In plants and other organisms, glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis is catalysed sequentially by γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γECS) and glutathione synthetase (GSHS). In legumes, homoglutathione (hGSH) can replace GSH and is synthesized by γECS and a specific homoglutathione synthetase (hGSHS). The subcellular localization of the enzymes was examined by electron microscopy in several legumes and gene expression was analysed in Lotus japonicus plants treated for 1-48 h with 50 μM of hormones. Immunogold localization studies revealed that γECS is confined to chloroplasts and plastids, whereas hGSHS is also in the cytosol. Addition of hormones caused differential expression of thiol synthetases in roots. After 24-48 h, abscisic and salicylic acids downregulated GSHS whereas jasmonic acid upregulated it. Cytokinins and polyamines activated GSHS but not γECS or hGSHS. Jasmonic acid elicited a coordinated response of the three genes and auxin induced both hGSHS expression and activity. Results show that the thiol biosynthetic pathway is compartmentalized in legumes. Moreover, the similar response profiles of the GSH and hGSH contents in roots of non-nodulated and nodulated plants to the various hormonal treatments indicate that thiol homeostasis is independent of the nitrogen source of the plants. The differential regulation of the three mRNA levels, hGSHS activity, and thiol contents by hormones indicates a fine control of thiol biosynthesis at multiple levels and strongly suggests that GSH and hGSH play distinct roles in plant development and stress responses.

  1. [Isolation of tyrosyl-tRNA-synthetase from Thermus thermophilus HB-27].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaremchuk, A D; Tukalo, M A; Egorova, S P; Konovalenko, A V; Matsuka, G Kh

    1990-01-01

    A method for isolating tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus is described, including ammonium sulfate fractionation, chromatography on DEAE-sepharose, hydroxyapatite, heparin-sepharose and hydrophobic chromatography on Toyopearl HW-65. The yield of the purified enzyme was 1.6 mg per 1 kg of T. thermophilus cells. The enzyme is a dimer protein of the alpha 2 type with molecular weight of 100 kDa.

  2. Reassimilation of Photorespiratory Ammonium in Lotus japonicus Plants Deficient in Plastidic Glutamine Synthetase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen M Pérez-Delgado

    Full Text Available It is well established that the plastidic isoform of glutamine synthetase (GS2 is the enzyme in charge of photorespiratory ammonium reassimilation in plants. The metabolic events associated to photorespiratory NH4(+ accumulation were analyzed in a Lotus japonicus photorespiratory mutant lacking GS2. The mutant plants accumulated high levels of NH4(+ when photorespiration was active, followed by a sudden drop in the levels of this compound. In this paper it was examined the possible existence of enzymatic pathways alternative to GS2 that could account for this decline in the photorespiratory ammonium. Induction of genes encoding for cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and asparagine synthetase (ASN was observed in the mutant in correspondence with the diminishment of NH4(+. Measurements of gene expression, polypeptide levels, enzyme activity and metabolite levels were carried out in leaf samples from WT and mutant plants after different periods of time under active photorespiratory conditions. In the case of asparagine synthetase it was not possible to determine enzyme activity and polypeptide content; however, an increased asparagine content in parallel with the induction of ASN gene expression was detected in the mutant plants. This increase in asparagine levels took place concomitantly with an increase in glutamine due to the induction of cytosolic GS1 in the mutant, thus revealing a major role of cytosolic GS1 in the reassimilation and detoxification of photorespiratory NH4(+ when the plastidic GS2 isoform is lacking. Moreover, a diminishment in glutamate levels was observed, that may be explained by the induction of NAD(H-dependent GDH activity.

  3. Mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase mutations underlie fatal infantile Alpers encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, Jenni M; Yadavalli, Srujana S; Euro, Liliya; Isohanni, Pirjo; Götz, Alexandra; Carroll, Christopher J; Valanne, Leena; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Uusimaa, Johanna; Paetau, Anders; Caruso, Eric M; Pihko, Helena; Ibba, Michael; Tyynismaa, Henna; Suomalainen, Anu

    2012-10-15

    Next-generation sequencing has turned out to be a powerful tool to uncover genetic basis of childhood mitochondrial disorders. We utilized whole-exome analysis and discovered novel compound heterozygous mutations in FARS2 (mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA synthetase), encoding the mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase (mtPheRS) in two patients with fatal epileptic mitochondrial encephalopathy. The mutations affected highly conserved amino acids, p.I329T and p.D391V. Recently, a homozygous FARS2 variant p.Y144C was reported in a Saudi girl with mitochondrial encephalopathy, but the pathogenic role of the variant remained open. Clinical features, including postnatal onset, catastrophic epilepsy, lactic acidemia, early lethality and neuroimaging findings of the patients with FARS2 variants, resembled each other closely, and neuropathology was consistent with Alpers syndrome. Our structural analysis of mtPheRS predicted that p.I329T weakened ATP binding in the aminoacylation domain, and in vitro studies with recombinant mutant protein showed decreased affinity of this variant to ATP. Furthermore, p.D391V and p.Y144C were predicted to disrupt synthetase function by interrupting the rotation of the tRNA anticodon stem-binding domain from a closed to an open form. In vitro characterization indicated reduced affinity of p.D391V mutant protein to phenylalanine, whereas p.Y144C disrupted tRNA binding. The stability of p.I329T and p.D391V mutants in a refolding assay was impaired. Our results imply that the three FARS2 mutations directly impair aminoacylation function and stability of mtPheRS, leading to a decrease in overall tRNA charging capacity. This study establishes a new genetic cause of infantile mitochondrial Alpers encephalopathy and reports a new mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase as a cause of mitochondrial disease.

  4. Effect of post-silking drought on nitrogen partitioning and gene expression patterns of glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase in two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajun; Wang, Meiling; Zhang, Fengxia; Xu, Yadong; Chen, Xiaohong; Qin, Xiaoliang; Wen, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) and asparagine synthetase (AS) are proposed to have important function in plant nitrogen (N) remobilization, but their roles under drought stress are not well defined. In this study, the expression dynamics of GS and AS genes were analyzed in two maize varieties (ZD958 and NH101) in relation to post-silking drought stress induced nitrogen partitioning. ZD958 was a 'stay-green' variety with 5% nitrogen harvest index (NHI) lower than NH101. From silking to maturity, the amount of nitrogen remobilized from ear-leaves in ZD958 was evidently lower than NH101, and post-silking drought stress increased the nitrogen remobilization for both varieties. In ear-leaves, the expression of ZmGln1-3 was enhanced under drought stress. Three AS genes (ZmAS1, ZmAS2 and ZmAS3) were differentially regulated by post-silking drought treatment, of which the expression of ZmAS3 was stimulated at late stage of leaf senescence. In NH101, the expression level of ZmAS3 was markedly higher than that in ZD958. In developing grains, there were no significant differences in expression patterns of GS and AS genes between well water and drought treated plants. Drought stress altered maize N partitioning at the whole-plant level, and the up-regulation of GS and AS genes may contribute to the higher leaf nitrogen remobilization when exposed to drought treatments.

  5. Food safety: Structure and expression of the asparagine synthetase gene family of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Runhong; Curtis, Tanya Y; Powers, Stephen J; Xu, Hongwei; Huang, Jianhua; Halford, Nigel G

    2016-03-01

    Asparagine is an important nitrogen storage and transport molecule, but its accumulation as a free amino acid in crops has implications for food safety because free asparagine is a precursor for acrylamide formation during cooking and processing. Asparagine synthesis occurs by the amidation of aspartate, catalysed by asparagine synthetase, and this study concerned the expression of asparagine synthetase (TaASN) genes in wheat. The expression of three genes, TaASN1-3, was studied in different tissues and in response to nitrogen and sulphur supply. The expression of TaASN2 in the embryo and endosperm during mid to late grain development was the highest of any of the genes in any tissue. Both TaASN1 and TaASN2 increased in expression through grain development, and in the grain of field-grown plants during mid-development in response to sulphur deprivation. However, only TaASN1 was affected by nitrogen or sulphur supply in pot-based experiments, showing complex tissue-specific and developmentally-changing responses. A putative N-motif or GCN4-like regulatory motif was found in the promoter of TaASN1 genes from several cereal species. As the study was completed, a fourth gene, TaASN4, was identified from recently available genome data. Phylogenetic analysis showed that other cereal species have similar asparagine synthetase gene families to wheat.

  6. Brucella melitensis Methionyl-tRNA-Synthetase (MetRS), a Potential Drug Target for Brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Ranae M.; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Dranow, David M.; Myers, Janette B.; Choi, Ryan; Nakazawa Hewitt, Steve; Edwards, Thomas E.; Davies, Douglas R.; Lorimer, Donald; Boyle, Stephen M.; Barrett, Lynn K.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated Brucella melitensis methionyl-tRNA-synthetase (BmMetRS) with molecular, structural and phenotypic methods to learn if BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. Recombinant BmMetRS was expressed, purified from wild type Brucella melitensis biovar Abortus 2308 strain ATCC/CRP #DD-156 and screened by a thermal melt assay against a focused library of one hundred previously classified methionyl-tRNA-synthetase inhibitors of the blood stage form of Trypanosoma brucei. Three compounds showed appreciable shift of denaturation temperature and were selected for further studies on inhibition of the recombinant enzyme activity and cell viability against wild type B. melitensis strain 16M. BmMetRS protein complexed with these three inhibitors resolved into three-dimensional crystal structures and was analyzed. All three selected methionyl-tRNA-synthetase compounds inhibit recombinant BmMetRS enzymatic functions in an aminoacylation assay at varying concentrations. Furthermore, growth inhibition of B. melitensis strain 16M by the compounds was shown. Inhibitor-BmMetRS crystal structure models were used to illustrate the molecular basis of the enzyme inhibition. Our current data suggests that BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. However, further studies are needed to optimize lead compound potency, efficacy and safety as well as determine the pharmacokinetics, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment. PMID:27500735

  7. Oxidative modification of glutamine synthetase. I. Inactivation is due to loss of one histidine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R L

    1983-10-10

    Intracellular proteolytic degradation of glutamine synthetase occurs in two distinct steps in Escherichia coli (Levine, R. L., Oliver, C. N., Fulks, R. M., and Stadtman, E. R. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 2120-2124). In the first step, a mixed function oxidation modifies the glutamine synthetase. The modified enzyme, which is catalytically inactive, becomes susceptible to proteolytic attack. In the second step, a protease specific for the modified enzyme catalyzes the actual proteolytic degradation. The oxidatively modified glutamine synthetase was studied to determine the chemical differences between it and the native enzyme. Only a single alteration was found; one of sixteen histidine residues/subunit was altered by the oxidative modification. The modification introduced a carbonyl group into the protein, permitting isolation of a stable dinitrophenylhydrazone. No other differences were detected between the native and modified proteins. Specifically, the cysteine, methionine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan contents were not altered. A number of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes are also susceptible to oxidative modification. This covalent modification may be important in intracellular proteolysis, in mammalian host defense systems, in prevention of autolysis, in aging processes, and in oxygen toxicity.

  8. Plasmodium falciparum mitochondria import tRNAs along with an active phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arvind; Sharma, Amit

    2015-02-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum protein translation enzymes aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are an emergent family of drug targets. The aaRS ensemble catalyses transfer of amino acids to cognate tRNAs, thus providing charged tRNAs for ribosomal consumption. P. falciparum proteome expression relies on a total of 36 aaRSs for the three translationally independent compartments of cytoplasm, apicoplast and mitochondria. In the present study, we show that, of this set of 36, a single genomic copy of mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mFRS) is targeted to the parasite mitochondria, and that the mFRS gene is exclusive to malaria parasites within the apicomplexan phyla. Our protein cellular localization studies based on immunofluorescence data show that, along with mFRS, P. falciparum harbours two more phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (FRS) assemblies that are localized to its apicoplast and cytoplasm. The 'extra' mFRS is found in mitochondria of all asexual blood stage parasites and is competent in aminoacylation. We show further that the parasite mitochondria import tRNAs from the cytoplasmic tRNA pool. Hence drug targeting of FRSs presents a unique opportunity to potentially stall protein production in all three parasite translational compartments.

  9. Structural basis for the binding of succinate to succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ji; Fraser, Marie E

    2016-08-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase catalyzes the only step in the citric acid cycle that provides substrate-level phosphorylation. Although the binding sites for the substrates CoA, phosphate, and the nucleotides ADP and ATP or GDP and GTP have been identified, the binding site for succinate has not. To determine this binding site, pig GTP-specific succinyl-CoA synthetase was crystallized in the presence of succinate, magnesium ions and CoA, and the structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.2 Å resolution. Succinate binds in the carboxy-terminal domain of the β-subunit. The succinate-binding site is near both the active-site histidine residue that is phosphorylated in the reaction and the free thiol of CoA. The carboxy-terminal domain rearranges when succinate binds, burying this active site. However, succinate is not in position for transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphohistidine. Here, it is proposed that when the active-site histidine residue has been phosphorylated by GTP, the phosphohistidine displaces phosphate and triggers the movement of the carboxylate of succinate into position to be phosphorylated. The structure shows why succinyl-CoA synthetase is specific for succinate and does not react appreciably with citrate nor with the other C4-dicarboxylic acids of the citric acid cycle, fumarate and oxaloacetate, but shows some activity with L-malate.

  10. Structural Basis for Specific Inhibition of tRNA Synthetase by an ATP Competitive Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Pengfei; Han, Hongyan; Wang, Jing; Chen, Kaige; Chen, Xin; Guo, Min

    2015-06-18

    Pharmaceutical inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases demand high species and family specificity. The antimalarial ATP-mimetic cladosporin selectively inhibits Plasmodium falciparum LysRS (PfLysRS). How the binding to a universal ATP site achieves the specificity is unknown. Here we report three crystal structures of cladosporin with human LysRS, PfLysRS, and a Pf-like human LysRS mutant. In all three structures, cladosporin occupies the class defining ATP-binding pocket, replacing the adenosine portion of ATP. Three residues holding the methyltetrahydropyran moiety of cladosporin are critical for the specificity of cladosporin against LysRS over other class II tRNA synthetase families. The species-exclusive inhibition of PfLysRS is linked to a structural divergence beyond the active site that mounts a lysine-specific stabilizing response to binding cladosporin. These analyses reveal that inherent divergence of tRNA synthetase structural assembly may allow for highly specific inhibition even through the otherwise universal substrate binding pocket and highlight the potential for structure-driven drug development.

  11. (p)ppGpp synthetases regulate the pathogenesis of zoonotic Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiawen; Zhang, Tengfei; Su, Zhipeng; Li, Lu; Wang, Dong; Xiao, Ran; Teng, Muye; Tan, Meifang; Zhou, Rui

    2016-10-01

    (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is one of the main adaption mechanism in bacteria, and the ability to adapt to environment is linked to the pathogenesis of bacterial pathogens. In the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis, there are two (p)ppGpp synthetases, RelA and RelQ. To investigate the regulatory functions of (p)ppGpp/(p)ppGpp synthetases on the pathogenesis of S. suis, the phenotypes of the [(p)ppGpp(0)] mutant ΔrelAΔrelQ and its parental strain were compared. Light and electron microscopy observation showed that the mutant strain had a longer chain-length than its parental strain. Disruption of relA and relQ led to decreased adhesive and invasive ability to HEp-2 cells, and increased sensitivity to the blood killing and phagocytosis. Mouse infection experiments showed that the mutant strain was attenuated and easier to be cleaned up in vivo. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expressions of virulence related genes involving in morphology and virulence were down-regulated in the mutant strain. Our study demonstrated that the (p)ppGpp synthetases or (p)ppGpp can regulate the pathogenesis of this important zoonotic pathogen.

  12. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    peptides are similar in size and structure, but oppositely charged at physiological pH. Both peptides were acylated with linear acyl chains of systematically increasing length, where sCT was furthermore acylated at two different positions on the peptide backbone. For GLP-2, we found that increasing acyl...... stems from a synergy between the positive peptide charge and membrane-active acyl moiety, supported by its pH-dependency, whereby the effect increased with decreasing pH and concomitant charge increase. The extent of permeation enhancing effect was highly dependent on acylation chain length and position...

  13. Topical peptides as cosmeceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadraj Vasant Pai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are known to have diverse biological roles, most prominently as signaling/regulatory molecules in a broad variety of physiological processes including defense, immunity, stress, growth, homeostasis and reproduction. These aspects have been used in the field of dermatology and cosmetology to produce short, stable and synthetic peptides for extracellular matrix synthesis, pigmentation, innate immunity and inflammation. The evolution of peptides over the century, which started with the discovery of penicillin, has now extended to their usage as cosmeceuticals in recent years. Cosmeceutical peptides may act as signal modulators of the extracellular matrix component, as structural peptides, carrier peptides and neurotransmitter function modulators. Transdermal delivery of peptides can be made more effective by penetration enhancers, chemical modification or encapsulation of peptides. The advantages of using peptides as cosmeceuticals include their involvement in many physiological functions of the skin, their selectivity, their lack of immunogenicity and absence of premarket regulatory requirements for their use. However, there are disadvantages: clinical evidence for efficacy is often weak, absorption may be poor due to low lipophilicity, high molecular weight and binding to other ingredients, and prices can be quite high.

  14. Glutamine, insulin and glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase expression in C2C12 myotubes, Hep G2 hepatoma cells and 3T3 L1 adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yanxin; Watford, Malcolm

    2006-01-01

    The cell-specific regulation of glutamine synthetase expression was studied in three cell lines. In C2C12 myotubes, glucocorticoids increased the abundance of both glutamine synthetase protein and mRNA. Culture in the absence of glutamine also resulted in very high glutamine synthetase protein abundance but mRNA levels were unchanged. Glucocorticoids also increased the abundance of glutamine synthetase mRNA in Hep G2 hepatoma cells but this was not reflected in changes in protein abundance. C...

  15. Diversity of nature's assembly lines - recent discoveries in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Jennifer A E; Schoppet, Melanie; Hansen, Mathias Henning; Cryle, Max J

    2016-12-20

    The biosynthesis of complex natural products by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and the related polyketide synthases (PKSs) represents a major source of important bioactive compounds. These large, multi-domain machineries are able to produce a fascinating range of molecules due to the nature of their modular architectures, which allows natural products to be assembled and tailored in a modular, step-wise fashion. In recent years there has been significant progress in characterising the important domains and underlying mechanisms of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. More significantly, several studies have uncovered important examples of novel activity in many NRPS domains. These discoveries not only greatly increase the structural diversity of the possible products of NRPS machineries but - possibly more importantly - they improve our understanding of what is a highly important, yet complex, biosynthetic apparatus. In this review, several recent examples of novel NRPS function will be introduced, which highlight the range of previously uncharacterised activities that have now been detected in the biosynthesis of important natural products by these mega-enzyme synthetases.

  16. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  17. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.;

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields.......Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  19. Avian host defense peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, M.; van Dijk, A.; Haagsman, H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense

  20. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  1. APD: the Antimicrobial Peptide Database

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Guangshun

    2004-01-01

    An antimicrobial peptide database (APD) has been established based on an extensive literature search. It contains detailed information for 525 peptides (498 antibacterial, 155 antifungal, 28 antiviral and 18 antitumor). APD provides interactive interfaces for peptide query, prediction and design. It also provides statistical data for a select group of or all the peptides in the database. Peptide information can be searched using keywords such as peptide name, ID, length, net charge, hydrophob...

  2. The acetaminophen metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) inhibits glutathione synthetase in vitro; a clue to the mechanism of 5-oxoprolinuric acidosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Valerie; Mills, Graham A; Anderson, Mary E; Ingle, Brandall L; Jackson, John M; Moss, Charlotte L; Sharrod-Cole, Hayley; Skipp, Paul J

    2017-02-01

    1. Metabolic acidosis due to accumulation of l-5-oxoproline is a rare, poorly understood, disorder associated with acetaminophen treatment in malnourished patients with chronic morbidity. l-5-Oxoprolinuria signals abnormal functioning of the γ-glutamyl cycle, which recycles and synthesises glutathione. Inhibition of glutathione synthetase (GS) by N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) could contribute to 5-oxoprolinuric acidosis in such patients. We investigated the interaction of NAPQI with GS in vitro. 2. Peptide mapping of co-incubated NAPQI and GS using mass spectrometry demonstrated binding of NAPQI with cysteine-422 of GS, which is known to be essential for GS activity. Computational docking shows that NAPQI is properly positioned for covalent bonding with cysteine-422 via Michael addition and hence supports adduct formation. 3. Co-incubation of 0.77 μM of GS with NAPQI (25-400 μM) decreased enzyme activity by 16-89%. Inhibition correlated strongly with the concentration of NAPQI and was irreversible. 4. NAPQI binds covalently to GS causing irreversible enzyme inhibition in vitro. This is an important novel biochemical observation. It is the first indication that NAPQI may inhibit glutathione synthesis, which is pivotal in NAPQI detoxification. Further studies are required to investigate its biological significance and its role in 5-oxoprolinuric acidosis.

  3. Holocarboxylase synthetase is a chromatin protein and interacts directly with histone H3 to mediate biotinylation of K9 and K18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Baolong; Pestinger, Valerie; Hassan, Yousef I; Borgstahl, Gloria E O; Kolar, Carol; Zempleni, Janos

    2011-05-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) mediates the binding of biotin to lysine (K) residues in histones H2A, H3 and H4; HCS knockdown disturbs gene regulation and decreases stress resistance and lifespan in eukaryotes. We tested the hypothesis that HCS interacts physically with histone H3 for subsequent biotinylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments were conducted and provided evidence that HCS co-localizes with histone H3 in human cells; physical interactions between HCS and H3 were confirmed using limited proteolysis assays. Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) studies revealed that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains in HCS participate in H3 binding. Recombinant human HCS was produced and exhibited biological activity, as evidenced by biotinylation of its known substrate, recombinant p67. Recombinant histone H3.2 and synthetic H3-based peptides were also good targets for biotinylation by recombinant HCS (rHCS) in vitro, based on tracing histone-bound biotin with [(3)H]biotin, streptavidin and anti-biotin antibody. Biotinylation site-specific antibodies were generated and revealed that both K9 and K18 in H3 were biotinylated by HCS. Collectively, these studies provide conclusive evidence that HCS interacts directly with histone H3, causing biotinylation of K9 and K18. We speculate that the targeting of HCS to distinct regions in human chromatin is mediated by DNA sequence, biotin, RNA, epigenetic marks or chromatin proteins.

  4. Two novel cyclic peptides are key components of the antimicrobial activity of the Greenlandic isolate Pseudomonas sp. In5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian F.

    Pseudomonas sp. are a rich source of secondary metabolites including bioactive non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides. NRPs are synthesised in large assembly lines by multi-domain modular enzymes known as NRP-synthetases (NRPS). Nunamycin and nunapeptin are two cyclic NRPs synthesised...... by the Greenlandic isolate Pseudomonas sp. In5. Nunamycin shows antifungal activity against the basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani whereas the only partially structure elucidated nunapeptin appears most active against the ascomycete Fusarium graminearum and the oomycete Pythium aphanidermatum. Originally isolated from...

  5. Crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase and structure-based phylogenetic analysis suggest an archaeal origin of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xianchi; Zhou, Minyun; Zhong, Chen; Yang, Bei; Shen, Ning; Ding, Jianping

    2010-03-01

    The ancient and ubiquitous aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases constitute a valuable model system for studying early evolutionary events. So far, the evolutionary relationship of tryptophanyl- and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS and TyrRS) remains controversial. As TrpRS and TyrRS share low sequence homology but high structural similarity, a structure-based method would be advantageous for phylogenetic analysis of the enzymes. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an archaeal TrpRS, the structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii TrpRS (pTrpRS) in complex with tryptophanyl-5' AMP (TrpAMP) at 3.0 A resolution which demonstrates more similarities to its eukaryotic counterparts. With the pTrpRS structure, we perform a more complete structure-based phylogenetic study of TrpRS and TyrRS, which for the first time includes representatives from all three domains of life. Individually, each enzyme shows a similar evolutionary profile as observed in the sequence-based phylogenetic studies. However, TyrRSs from Archaea/Eucarya cluster with TrpRSs rather than their bacterial counterparts, and the root of TrpRS locates in the archaeal branch of TyrRS, indicating the archaeal origin of TrpRS. Moreover, the short distance between TrpRS and archaeal TyrRS and that between bacterial and archaeal TrpRS, together with the wide distribution of TrpRS, suggest that the emergence of TrpRS and subsequent acquisition by Bacteria occurred at early stages of evolution.

  6. Independent transcription of glutamine synthetase (glnA2) and glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase (glnE) in Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotter, Grant S; Mouat, Pania; Collins, Desmond M

    2008-09-01

    Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess four glutamine synthetase homologues, two of which, glnA1 and glnA2, are required for virulence and are located on the bacterial chromosome on either side of glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase (glnE). While glnA1 is encoded on the complementary strand, glnA2 is located 48bp upstream from glnE, raising the possibility that glnA2 and glnE may be co-transcribed. However, previous studies in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis have painted a contradictory picture of the (co)transcriptional status of glnA2 and glnE. Given the importance of the genes at the glnA1-glnE-glnA2 locus, we sought to clarify the transcriptional status of glnA2 and glnE in both M. bovis and M. tuberculosis. Reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that glnA2 and glnE were independently transcribed in all six M. bovis and M. tuberculosis strains examined. Northern analysis of the glnA2 transcript in M. bovis AF2122/97 and M. tuberculosis H37Rv showed that it was monocistronic. These results predicted the presence of a glnE transcriptional start site in the glnA2-glnE intergenic region. An identical start site was confirmed in M. bovis AF2122/97 and M. tuberculosis H37Rv using 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Typical mycobacterial -10 and -35 sequences are associated with this start site.

  7. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... examples of different peptide QSAR studies, this review highlights some of the missing links and illuminates some of the questions that would be interesting to challenge in a more systematic fashion. Expert opinion: Computer-aided peptide QSAR using molecular descriptors may provide the necessary edge...

  8. Cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxin synthetase genes in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii strains from Brazilian freshwater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hoff-Risseti

    Full Text Available The Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii population from Brazilian freshwater is known to produce saxitoxin derivatives (STX, while cylindrospermopsin (CYN, which is commonly detected in isolates from Australia and Asia continents, has thus far not been detected in South American strains. However, during the investigation for the presence of cyrA, cyrB, cyrC and cyrJ CYN synthetase genes in the genomes of four laboratory-cultured C. raciborskii Brazilian strains, the almost complete cyrA gene sequences were obtained for all strains, while cyrB and cyrC gene fragments were observed in two strains. These nucleotide sequences were translated into amino acids, and the predicted protein functions and domains confirmed their identity as CYN synthetase genes. Attempts to PCR amplify cyrJ gene fragments from the four strains were unsuccessful. Phylogenetic analysis grouped the nucleotide sequences together with their homologues found in known CYN synthetase clusters of C. raciborskii strains with high bootstrap support. In addition, fragments of sxtA, sxtB and sxtI genes involved in STX production were also obtained. Extensive LC-MS analyses were unable to detect CYN in the cultured strains, whereas the production of STX and its analogues was confirmed in CENA302, CENA305 and T3. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the presence of cyr genes in South American strains of C. raciborskii and the presence of sxt and cyr genes in a single C. raciborskii strain. This discovery suggests a shift in the type of cyanotoxin production over time of South American strains of C. raciborskii and contributes to the reconstruction of the evolutionary history and diversification of cyanobacterial toxins.

  9. Xylan synthetase activity in differentiated xylem cells of sycamore trees (Acer pseudoplatanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessandro, G; Northcote, D H

    1981-01-01

    Particulate enzymic preparations obtained from homogenates of differentiated xylem cells isolated from sycamore trees, catalyzed the formation of a radioactive xylan in the presence of UDP-D-[U-(14)C]xylose as substrate. The synthesized xylan was not dialyzable through Visking cellophane tubing. Successive extraction with cold water, hot water and 5% NaOH dissolved respectively 15, 5 and 80% of the radioactive polymer. Complete acid hydrolysis of the water-insoluble polysaccharide synthesized from UDP-D-[U-(14)C]xylose released all the radioactivity as xylose. β-1,4-Xylodextrins, degree of polymerization 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, were obtained by partial acid hydrolysis (fuming HCl or 0.1 M HCl) of radioactive xylan. The polymer was hydrolysed to xylose, xylobiose and xylotriose by Driselase which contains 1,4-β xylanase activities. Methylation and then hydrolysis of the xylan released two methylated sugars which were identified as di-O-methyl[(14)C]xylose and tri-O-methyl-[(14)C]xylose, suggesting a 1→4-linked polymer. The linkage was confirmed by periodate oxidation studies. The apparent Km value of the synthetase for UDP-D-xylose was 0.4 mM. Xylan synthetase activity was not potentiated in the presence of a detergent. The enzymic activity was stimulated by Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) ions, although EDTA in the range of concentrations between 0.01 and 1 mM did not affect the reaction rate. It appears that the xylan synthetase system associated with membranes obtained from differentiated xylem cells of sycamore trees may serve for catalyzing the in vivo synthesis of the xylan main chain during the biogenesis of the plant cell wall.

  10. Synthesis of Glu-tRNA(Gln) by engineered and natural aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Bhaskaran, Hari; Hadd, Andrew; Perona, John J

    2010-08-10

    A protein engineering approach to delineating which distinct elements of homologous tRNA synthetase architectures are responsible for divergent RNA-amino acid pairing specificities is described. Previously, we constructed a hybrid enzyme in which 23 amino acids from the catalytic domain of Escherichia coli glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) were replaced with the corresponding residues of human glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS). The engineered hybrid (GlnRS S1/L1/L2) synthesizes Glu-tRNA(Gln) more than 10(4)-fold more efficiently than GlnRS. Detailed comparison of kinetic parameters between GlnRS S1/L1/L2 and the naturally occurring Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus GluRS(ND), which is also capable of Glu-tRNA(Gln) synthesis, now shows that both k(cat) and K(m) for glutamate are recapitulated in the engineered enzyme, but that K(m) for tRNA is 200-fold higher. Thus, the simultaneous optimization of paired amino acid and tRNA binding sites found in a naturally occurring enzyme is not recapitulated in a hybrid that is successfully engineered for amino acid complementarity. We infer that the GlnRS architecture has differentiated to match only cognate amino acid-RNA pairs, and that the substrate selection functions do not operate independently of each other. Design and characterization of four additional hybrids identify further residues involved in improving complementarity for glutamate and in communicating between amino acid and tRNA binding sites. The robust catalytic function demonstrated in this engineered system offers a novel platform for exploring the stereochemical origins of coding as a property of the ancient Rossmann fold.

  11. delta-(L-alpha-Aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase, that mediates the first committed step in penicillin biosynthesis, is a cytosolic enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lende, T.R.; de Kamp, M.; den Berg, M.van; Sjollema, K.; Bovenberg, R.A.L.; Veenhuis, M; Konings, W.N; Driessen, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Penicillin biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum is a compartmentalized process. The first catalytic step is mediated by delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACV synthetase), a high molecular mass enzyme that condenses the amino acids L-alpha-aminoadipate, L-cysteme, and L-

  12. δ-(L-α-Aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase, that mediates the first committed step in penicillin biosynthesis, is a cytosolic enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lende, Ted R. van der; Kamp, Mart van de; Berg, Marco van den; Sjollema, Klaas; Bovenberg, Roel A.L.; Veenhuis, Marten; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Penicillin biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum is a compartmentalized process. The first catalytic step is mediated by δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACV synthetase), a high molecular mass enzyme that condenses the amino acids L-α-aminoadipate, L-cysteine, and L-valine into

  13. Phosphorolytic activity of Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase towards its cognate aminoacyl adenylate detected by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Led, Jens Jørgen; Switon, Werner K.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1983-01-01

    The catalytic activity of highly purified Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase has been studied by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography on poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose. It was found that this synthetase, besides the activation of its cognate amino acid and the syntheses...

  14. Distribution of immunoreactive glutamine synthetase in the adult human and mouse brain. Qualitative and quantitative observations with special emphasis on extra-astroglial protein localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bannier, Jana; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Steiner, Johann; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Walter, Martin; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, thus playing a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis. Despite a plethora of studies on this enzyme, knowledge about the regional and cellular distribution of this enzyme in human brain is still fragmentary. Therefore, we mapped fourteen post-mortem brains of psychically healthy individuals for the distribution of the glutamine synthetase immunoreactive protein. It was found that glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is expressed in multiple gray and white matter astrocytes, but also in oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and certain neurons. Since a possible extra-astrocytic expression of glutamine synthetase is highly controversial, we paid special attention to its appearance in oligodendrocytes and neurons. By double immunolabeling of mouse brain slices and cultured mouse brain cells for glutamine synthetase and cell-type-specific markers we provide evidence that besides astrocytes subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, microglial cells and neurons express glutamine synthetase. Moreover, we show that glutamine synthetase-immunopositive neurons are not randomly distributed throughout human and mouse brain, but represent a subpopulation of nitrergic (i.e. neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing) neurons. Possible functional implications of an extra-astrocytic localization of glutamine synthetase are discussed.

  15. Regulation of glutamine synthetase activity in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 by the nitrogen source: effect of ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida, A; Candau, P; Florencio, F J

    1991-07-01

    Glutamine synthetase activity from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is regulated as a function of the nitrogen source available in the medium. Addition of 0.25 mM NH4Cl to nitrate-grown cells promotes a clear short-term inactivation of glutamine synthetase, whose enzyme activity decreases to 5 to 10% of the initial value in 25 min. The intracellular levels of glutamine, determined under various conditions, taken together with the results obtained with azaserine (an inhibitor of transamidases), rule out the possibility that glutamine per se is responsible for glutamine synthetase inactivation. Nitrogen starvation attenuates the ammonium-mediated glutamine synthetase inactivation, indicating that glutamine synthetase regulation is modulated through the internal balance between carbon-nitrogen compounds and carbon compounds. The parallelism observed between the glutamine synthetase activity and the internal concentration of alpha-ketoglutarate suggests that this metabolite could play a role as a positive effector of glutamine synthetase activity in Synechocystis sp. Despite the similarities of this physiological system to that described for enterobacteria, the lack of in vivo 32P labeling of glutamine synthetase during the inactivation process excludes the existence of an adenylylation-deadenylylation system in this cyanobacterium.

  16. δ-(L-α-Aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase, that mediates the first committed step in penicillin biosynthesis, is a cytosolic enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lende, Ted R. van der; Kamp, Mart van de; Berg, Marco van den; Sjollema, Klaas; Bovenberg, Roel A.L.; Veenhuis, Marten; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Penicillin biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum is a compartmentalized process. The first catalytic step is mediated by δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACV synthetase), a high molecular mass enzyme that condenses the amino acids L-α-aminoadipate, L-cysteine, and L-valine into

  17. delta-(L-alpha-Aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase, that mediates the first committed step in penicillin biosynthesis, is a cytosolic enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lende, T.R.; de Kamp, M.; den Berg, M.van; Sjollema, K.; Bovenberg, R.A.L.; Veenhuis, M; Konings, W.N; Driessen, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Penicillin biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum is a compartmentalized process. The first catalytic step is mediated by delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACV synthetase), a high molecular mass enzyme that condenses the amino acids L-alpha-aminoadipate, L-cysteme, and

  18. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of DHNA synthetase from Geobacillus kaustophilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad; Ranjani, Chellamuthu Vasuki [Bioinformatics Centre (Centre of Excellence in Structural Biology and Biocomputing), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Baba, Seiki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Kuroishi, Chizu; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kuramitsu, Seiki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Shiro, Yoshitsugu [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Sekar, Kanagaraj, E-mail: sekar@serc.iisc.ernet.in [Bioinformatics Centre (Centre of Excellence in Structural Biology and Biocomputing), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Yokoyama, Shigeyuki, E-mail: sekar@serc.iisc.ernet.in [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Bioinformatics Centre (Centre of Excellence in Structural Biology and Biocomputing), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2007-02-01

    DHNA synthetase from G. kaustophilus has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The aerobic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus kaustophilus is a bacillus species that was isolated from deep-sea sediment from the Mariana Trench. 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoate (DHNA) synthetase plays a vital role in the biosynthesis of menaquinone (vitamin K{sub 2}) in this bacterium. DHNA synthetase from Geobacillus kaustophilus was crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 77.01, b = 130.66, c = 131.69 Å. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Preliminary studies and molecular-replacement calculations reveal the presence of three monomers in the asymmetric unit.

  19. Inhibition of human glutamine synthetase by L-methionine-S,R-sulfoximine-relevance to the treatment of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2014-12-01

    At high concentrations, the glutamine synthetase inhibitor L-methionine-S,R-sulfoximine (MSO) is a convulsant, especially in dogs. Nevertheless, sub-convulsive doses of MSO are neuroprotective in rodent models of hyperammonemia, acute liver disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and suggest MSO may be clinically useful. Previous work has also shown that much lower doses of MSO are required to produce convulsions in dogs than in primates. Evidence from the mid-20th century suggests that humans are also less sensitive. In the present work, the inhibition of recombinant human glutamine synthetase by MSO is shown to be biphasic-an initial reversible competitive inhibition (K i 1.19 mM) is followed by rapid irreversible inactivation. This K i value for the human enzyme accounts, in part, for relative insensitivity of primates to MSO and suggests that this inhibitor could be used to safely inhibit glutamine synthetase activity in humans.

  20. Isolation of mutants deficient in acetyl-CoA synthetase and a possible regulator of acetate induction in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealy-Lewis, H M; Fairhurst, V

    1998-07-01

    Acetate-non-utilizing mutants in Aspergillus niger were selected by resistance to 1.2% propionate in the presence of 0.1% glucose. Mutants showing normal morphology fell into two complementation groups. One class of mutant lacked acetyl-CoA synthetase but had high levels of isocitrate lyase, while the second class showed reduced levels of both acetyl-CoA synthetase and isocitrate lyase compared to the wild-type strain. By analogy with mutants selected by resistance to 1.2% propionate in Aspergillus nidulans, the properties of the mutants in A. niger suggest that the mutations are either in the structural gene for acetyl-CoA synthetase (acuA) or in a possible regulatory gene of acetate induction (acuB). A third class of mutant in a different complementation group was obtained which had abnormal morphology (yellow mycelium and few conidia); the specific lesion in these mutants has not been determined.

  1. A Tyrosine-Dependent Riboswitch Controls the Expression of a Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetase from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Bustamante

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Expression of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is regulated by a variety of mechanisms at the level of transcription or translation. A T-box dependent transcription termination / antitermination riboswitch system that responds to charged / uncharged tRNA regulates expression of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase genes in Gram-positive bacteria. TyrZ, the gene encoding tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, a Gram-negative acidophilic bacterium that participates in bioleaching of minerals, resembles the gene from Bacillus subtilis including the 5´-untranslated region encoding the riboswitch. Transcription of A. ferrooxidans tyrZ is induced by the presence of tyrosine by a mechanism involving antitermination of transcription. This mechanism is probably adapted to the low supply of amino acids of acidic environments of autotrophic bioleaching microorganisms. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  2. Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase single-nucleotide polymorphisms that lead to defects in refolding but not aminoacylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Rajat; Reynolds, Noah M; Yadavalli, Srujana S

    2011-01-01

    Defects in organellar translation are the underlying cause of a number of mitochondrial diseases, including diabetes, deafness, encephalopathy, and other mitochondrial myopathies. The most common causes of these diseases are mutations in mitochondria-encoded tRNAs. It has recently become apparent...... that mutations in nuclear-encoded components of the mitochondrial translation machinery, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), can also lead to disease. In some cases, mutations can be directly linked to losses in enzymatic activity; however, for many, their effect is unknown. To investigate how aa......RS mutations impact function without changing enzymatic activity, we chose nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) that encode residues distal from the active site of human mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. The phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase variants S57C and N280S both displayed wild...

  3. Diversity-oriented peptide stapling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thu Phuong; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    as a powerful method for peptide stapling. However, to date CuAAC stapling has not provided a simple method for obtaining peptides that are easily diversified further. In the present study, we report a new diversity-oriented peptide stapling (DOPS) methodology based on CuAAC chemistry. Stapling of peptides...

  4. Association of IDDM and attenuated response of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase to yellow fever vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnevie-Nielsen, V; Larsen, M L; Frifelt, J J

    1989-01-01

    Basal and yellow fever vaccination-induced 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2',5'A) activity was determined in blood mononuclear cells (peripheral blood lymphocytes [PBLs]) from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and matched control subjects. The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine...... represented a primary stimulus in all subjects. First, basal 2',5'A activity increased severalfold in response to yellow fever vaccination. In IDDM subjects, this increase was significantly lower (P = .025). Second, the 2',5'A activity increased proportionately to the higher basal 2',5'A activity in IDDM...

  5. A novel, enigmatic histone modification: biotinylation of histones by holocarboxylase synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Yousef I; Zempleni, Janos

    2008-12-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to histones in humans and other eukaryotes. Eleven biotinylation sites have been identified in histones H2A, H3, and H4. K12-biotinylated histone H4 is enriched in heterochromatin, repeat regions, and plays a role in gene repression. About 30% of the histone H4 molecules are biotinylated at K12 in histone H4 in human fibroblast telomeres. The abundance of biotinylated histones at distinct genomic loci depends on biotin availability. Decreased histone biotinylation decreases life span and stress resistance in Drosophila. Low enrichment of biotinylated histones at transposable elements impairs repression of these elements.

  6. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification.

  7. Redox status affects the catalytic activity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Assaf; Banerjee, Rajat; de Armas, Merly

    2010-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases (GluRS) provide Glu-tRNA for different processes including protein synthesis, glutamine transamidation and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. Many organisms contain multiple GluRSs, but whether these duplications solely broaden tRNA specificity or also play additional roles in t...... inactivation by hemin plus hydrogen peroxide. The sensitivity to oxidation of A. ferrooxidans GluRS1 might provide a means to regulate tetrapyrrole and protein biosynthesis in response to extreme changes in both the redox and heme status of the cell via a single enzyme....

  8. The implication of dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthetase gene mutations in modification of Plasmodium falciparum characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A-Elbasit, Ishraga E; Alifrangis, Michael; Khalil, Insaf F

    2007-01-01

    the effects of dhfr/dhps mutations on parasite characteristics other than SP resistance. METHOD: Parasite infections obtained from 153 Sudanese patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria treated with SP or SP + chloroquine, were successfully genotyped at nine codons in the dhfr/dhps genes by PCR......BACKGROUND: The Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS) are enzymes of central importance in parasite metabolism. The dhfr and dhps gene mutations are known to be associated with sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) resistance. OBJECTIVE: To investigate...

  9. Evolution of the 2'-5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase family in eukaryotes and bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Karina Hansen; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Reitamm, Tonu

    2009-01-01

    The 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) belongs to a nucleotidyl transferase family that includes poly(A) polymerases and CCA-adding enzymes. In mammals and birds, the OAS functions in the interferon system but it is also present in an active form in sponges, which are devoid of the interferon...... may have evolved from an ancestor of cartilaginous fishes, and that the OAS2 and the OAS3 genes evolved from a mammalian ancestor. OAS proteins function in the interferon system in mammals. This system is only found in jawed vertebrates. We therefore suggest that the original function of OAS may...

  10. Total glutamine synthetase levels in cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients are unchanged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, Nienke M; Herbert, Megan K; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2015-03-01

    Decreased cerebral protein and activity levels of glutamine synthetase (GS) have been reported for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using a recently established method, we quantified total GS levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD patients and control subjects. Furthermore, we investigated if total GS levels in CSF could differentiate AD from frontotemperal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies patients. As we found no significantly altered total GS levels in any of the patient groups compared with control subjects, we conclude that levels of total GS in CSF have no diagnostic value for AD, dementia with Lewy bodies, or frontotemperal dementia.

  11. A radiochemical method for carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I: application to rats fed a hyperproteic diet

    OpenAIRE

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Fernández López, José Antonio; Remesar Betlloch, Xavier; Alemany, Marià

    2012-01-01

    A method for the measurement of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I activity in animal tissues has been developed using the livers of rats under normal and hyperproteic diets. The method is based on the incorporation of 14C-ammonium bicarbonate to carbamoyl-phosphate in the presence of ATP-Mg and N-acetyl-glutamate. The reaction is stopped by chilling, lowering the pH and adding ethanol. Excess bicarbonate is flushed out under a gentle stream of cold CO2. The only label remaining in the medium w...

  12. Evolution of the 2'-5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase family in eukaryotes and bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Karina Hansen; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Reitamm, Tonu

    2009-01-01

    The 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) belongs to a nucleotidyl transferase family that includes poly(A) polymerases and CCA-adding enzymes. In mammals and birds, the OAS functions in the interferon system but it is also present in an active form in sponges, which are devoid of the interferon...... may have evolved from an ancestor of cartilaginous fishes, and that the OAS2 and the OAS3 genes evolved from a mammalian ancestor. OAS proteins function in the interferon system in mammals. This system is only found in jawed vertebrates. We therefore suggest that the original function of OAS may...

  13. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  14. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  15. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torreira, Eva [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Seabra, Ana Rita [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Llorca, Óscar [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Robinson, Carol V. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Carvalho, Helena G. [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides in Echinoderms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, C; Haug, T; K Stensvåg

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important immune effector molecules for invertebrates, including echinoderms, which lack a vertebrate-type adaptive immune system. Here we summarize the knowledge of such peptides in echinoderms. Strongylocins are a novel family of cysteine-rich AMPs, recently identified in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and S. purpuratus. Although these molecules present diverse amino acid sequences, they share an identical cysteine arrangement pattern, d...

  17. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Larché Mark

    2007-01-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT) is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cro...

  18. N-acetylglutamate synthetase deficiency: diagnosis, management and follow-up of a rare disorder of ammonia detoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubiger, G; Bachmann, C; Barben, P; Colombo, J P; Tönz, O; Schüpbach, D

    1991-03-01

    We report the 9-year follow-up of a patient suffering from N-acetylglutamate synthetase deficiency, an urea cycle disorder leading to severe neonatal hyperammonaemia. Hitherto two patients from two families with this inborn error of metabolism had been observed. Our management consisted mainly of a protein-restricted diet and oral treatment with N-carbamylglutamate, an activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase, together with arginine or citrulline. The somatic development was normal whereas a moderate psychomotor retardation was diagnosed. The patient died after an episode of coma and prolonged generalized convulsions at the age of 9.5 years.

  19. Activity of interferon-dependent 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase in rat lymphoid cells under transformed environment conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapchenko, L. I.; Mikhailik, I. V.; Prokopova, K. V.

    It is detected that interferon-dependent 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase is a sensitive index of immunocompetent cells functional state under transformed environment conditions. Microgravitation and ionising radiation induce increase of investigated enzyme activity in rat lymphocytes, which can be a result of lymphoid cells compensatory mechanisms starting in response to stress factors action. Administration of interferon inductors permits to stimulate the 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, which enables one to correct pathological changes in the cells and to intensify adaptive reactions of immune systems.

  20. Activation of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase by single-stranded and double-stranded RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, R; Norby, P L; Martensen, P M

    1998-01-01

    A number of small RNA molecules that are high affinity ligands for the 46-kDa form of human 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase have been identified by the SELEX method. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that these RNAs bind to the enzyme with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range......-stranded RNA, can also be activated by RNA ligands with little secondary structure. Since 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase possesses no homology to other known RNA-binding proteins, the development of small specific ligands by SELEX should facilitate studies of RNA-protein interactions and may reveal novel...

  1. Comparison of histidine recognition in human and trypanosomatid histidyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Wetzel, Allan B; de van der Schueren, Will J; Hol, Wim G J

    2014-11-01

    As part of a project aimed at obtaining selective inhibitors and drug-like compounds targeting tRNA synthetases from trypanosomatids, we have elucidated the crystal structure of human cytosolic histidyl-tRNA synthetase (Hs-cHisRS) in complex with histidine in order to be able to compare human and parasite enzymes. The resultant structure of Hs-cHisRS•His represents the substrate-bound state (H-state) of the enzyme. It provides an interesting opportunity to compare with ligand-free and imidazole-bound structures Hs-cHisRS published recently, both of which represent the ligand-free state (F-state) of the enzyme. The H-state Hs-cHisRS undergoes conformational changes in active site residues and several conserved motif of HisRS, compared to F-state structures. The histidine forms eight hydrogen bonds with HisRS of which six engage the amino and carboxylate groups of this amino acid. The availability of published imidazole-bound structure provides a unique opportunity to dissect the structural roles of individual chemical groups of histidine. The analysis revealed the importance of the amino and carboxylate groups, of the histidine in leading to these dramatic conformational changes of the H-state. Further, comparison with previously published trypanosomatid HisRS structures reveals a pocket in the F-state of the parasite enzyme that may provide opportunities for developing specific inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei HisRS.

  2. Purification and characterization of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum adenylosuccinate synthetase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalakshmi, R; Sumathy, K; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2002-06-01

    Most parasitic protozoa lack the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway and rely exclusively on the salvage pathway for their purine nucleotide requirements. Enzymes of the salvage pathway are, therefore, candidate drug targets. We have cloned the Plasmodium falciparum adenylosuccinate synthetase gene. In the parasite, adenylosuccinate synthetase is involved in the synthesis of AMP from IMP formed during the salvage of the purine base, hypoxanthine. The gene was shown to code for a functionally active protein by functional complementation in a purA mutant strain of Escherichia coli, H1238. This paper reports the conditions for hyperexpression of the recombinant protein in E. coli BL21(DE3) and purification of the protein to homogeneity. The enzyme was found to require the presence of dithiothreitol during the entire course of the purification for activity. Glycerol and EDTA were found to stabilize enzyme activity during storage. The specific activity of the purified protein was 1143.6 +/- 36.8 mUnits/mg. The K(M)s for the three substrates, GTP, IMP, and aspartate, were found to be 4.8 microM, 22.8 microM, and 1.4 mM, respectively. The enzyme was a dimer on gel filtration in buffers of low ionic strength but equilibrated between a monomer and a dimer in buffers of increased ionic strength.

  3. Crystal structures of trypanosomal histidyl-tRNA synthetase illuminate differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Ethan A; Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, J Robert; Larson, Eric T; Kelley, Angela; Mueller, Natascha; Napuli, Alberto J; Kim, Jessica; Zhang, Li; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Buckner, Frederick S; van Voorhis, Wesley C; Hol, Wim G J

    2010-03-26

    Crystal structures of histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS) from the eukaryotic parasites Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi provide a first structural view of a eukaryotic form of this enzyme and reveal differences from bacterial homologs. HisRSs in general contain an extra domain inserted between conserved motifs 2 and 3 of the Class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic core. The current structures show that the three-dimensional topology of this domain is very different in bacterial and archaeal/eukaryotic forms of the enzyme. Comparison of apo and histidine-bound trypanosomal structures indicates substantial active-site rearrangement upon histidine binding but relatively little subsequent rearrangement after reaction of histidine with ATP to form the enzyme's first reaction product, histidyladenylate. The specific residues involved in forming the binding pocket for the adenine moiety differ substantially both from the previously characterized binding site in bacterial structures and from the homologous residues in human HisRSs. The essentiality of the single HisRS gene in T. brucei is shown by a severe depression of parasite growth rate that results from even partial suppression of expression by RNA interference.

  4. Biosynthesis of branched-chain amino acids in Schizosaccharomyces pombe: properties of acetohydroxy acid synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, R A; Satyanarayana, T; Kaplan, J G

    1973-04-01

    The regulatory properties of acetohydroxy acid synthetase (AHAS), the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway to valine and the second in the isoleucine pathway, were investigated in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The enzyme was partially purified from crude extracts by protamine sulfate treatment, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and gel filtration through Sephadex G-25. AHAS from S. pombe is unique in that its activity shows a single peak around pH 6.5; high sensitivity to feedback inhibition by valine at this pH (K(i) = 0.1 mM) indicates that the enzyme is involved in valine biosynthesis. Pyruvate saturation kinetics of AHAS extracted from cells grown on glycerol as sole carbon and energy source were normal and hyperbolic. In contrast, the enzyme from glucose-grown cells exhibited sigmoidal saturation kinetics, an effect which disappeared when the synthetase from such cells was partially purified. This phenomenon was shown to be due to competition for pyruvate between AHAS and pyruvate decarboxylase; the latter enzyme is present in large amounts in cells fermenting glucose. Valine inhibition is noncompetitive in nature, and this effector exhibits homotropic cooperative effects; isoleucine is a less-potent inhibitor of AHAS activity. Mercurial treatment reversibly desensitized the enzyme to valine inhibition. On the basis of these data, the S. pombe AHAS appears to be an allosteric regulatory enzyme with the properties of a negative V system.

  5. Role of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase in inflammation and ischaemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, C; Dawson, V L

    1998-07-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress can trigger DNA strand breakage, which then activates the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS). This enzyme has also been termed poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) or poly(ADP-ribose) transferase (pADPRT). Rapid activation of the enzyme depletes the intracellular concentration of its substrate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, thus slowing the rate of glycolysis, electron transport and subsequently ATP formation. This process can result in cell dysfunction and cell death. In this article, Csaba Szabó and Valina Dawson overview the impact of pharmacological inhibition or genetic inactivation of PARS on the course of oxidant-induced cell death in vitro, and in inflammation and reperfusion injury in vivo. A major trigger for DNA damage in pathophysiological conditions is peroxynitrite, a cytotoxic oxidant formed by the reaction between the free radicals nitric oxide and superoxide. The pharmacological inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase is a novel approach for the experimental therapy of various forms of inflammation and shock, stroke, myocardial and intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion, and diabetes mellitus.

  6. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies.

  7. Minireview on Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency, an Ultra-Rare Inborn Error of Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Spodenkiewicz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is a cytosolic enzyme that produces glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in the human body. Glutamine is a major substrate for various metabolic pathways, and is thus an important factor for the functioning of many organs; therefore, deficiency of glutamine due to a defect in GS is incompatible with normal life. Mutations in the human GLUL gene (encoding for GS can cause an ultra-rare recessive inborn error of metabolism—congenital glutamine synthetase deficiency. This disease was reported until now in only three unrelated patients, all of whom suffered from neonatal onset severe epileptic encephalopathy. The hallmark of GS deficiency in these patients was decreased levels of glutamine in body fluids, associated with chronic hyperammonemia. This review aims at recapitulating the clinical history of the three known patients with congenital GS deficiency and summarizes the findings from studies done along with the work-up of these patients. It is the aim of this paper to convince the reader that (i this disorder is possibly underdiagnosed, since decreased concentrations of metabolites do not receive the attention they deserve; and (ii early detection of GS deficiency may help to improve the outcome of patients who could be treated early with metabolites that are lacking in this condition.

  8. Exploring the Catalytic Mechanism of Human Glutamine Synthetase by Computer Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issoglio, Federico M; Campolo, Nicolas; Zeida, Ari; Grune, Tilman; Radi, Rafael; Estrin, Dario A; Bartesaghi, Silvina

    2016-10-13

    Glutamine synthetase is an important enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In mammals, it plays a key role in preventing excitotoxicity in the brain and detoxifying ammonia in the liver. In plants and bacteria, it is fundamental for nitrogen metabolism, being critical for the survival of the organism. In this work, we show how the use of classical molecular dynamics simulations and multiscale quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations allowed us to examine the structural properties and dynamics of human glutamine synthetase (HsGS), as well as the reaction mechanisms involved in the catalytic process with atomic level detail. Our results suggest that glutamine formation proceeds through a two-step mechanism that includes a first step in which the γ-glutamyl phosphate intermediate forms, with a 5 kcal/mol free energy barrier and a -8 kcal/mol reaction free energy, and then a second rate-limiting step involving the ammonia nucleophilic attack, with a free energy barrier of 19 kcal/mol and a reaction free energy of almost zero. A detailed analysis of structural features within each step exposed the relevance of the acid-base equilibrium related to protein residues and substrates in the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions. These results provide a comprehensive study of HsGS dynamics and establish the groundwork for further analysis regarding changes in HsGS activity, as occur in natural variants and post-translational modifications.

  9. Minireview on Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency, an Ultra-Rare Inborn Error of Amino Acid Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodenkiewicz, Marta; Diez-Fernandez, Carmen; Rüfenacht, Véronique; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Häberle, Johannes

    2016-10-19

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a cytosolic enzyme that produces glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in the human body. Glutamine is a major substrate for various metabolic pathways, and is thus an important factor for the functioning of many organs; therefore, deficiency of glutamine due to a defect in GS is incompatible with normal life. Mutations in the human GLUL gene (encoding for GS) can cause an ultra-rare recessive inborn error of metabolism-congenital glutamine synthetase deficiency. This disease was reported until now in only three unrelated patients, all of whom suffered from neonatal onset severe epileptic encephalopathy. The hallmark of GS deficiency in these patients was decreased levels of glutamine in body fluids, associated with chronic hyperammonemia. This review aims at recapitulating the clinical history of the three known patients with congenital GS deficiency and summarizes the findings from studies done along with the work-up of these patients. It is the aim of this paper to convince the reader that (i) this disorder is possibly underdiagnosed, since decreased concentrations of metabolites do not receive the attention they deserve; and (ii) early detection of GS deficiency may help to improve the outcome of patients who could be treated early with metabolites that are lacking in this condition.

  10. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Seabra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine Synthetase (GS catalyses the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of glutamine synthetase isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  11. Glutamine synthetase 2 is not essential for biosynthesis of compatible solutes in Halobacillus halophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiyan, Anna; Thompson, Melanie; Köcher, Saskia; Tausendschön, Michaela; Santos, Helena; Hänelt, Inga; Müller, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Halobacillus halophilus, a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from salt marshes, produces various compatible solutes to cope with osmotic stress. Glutamate and glutamine are dominant compatible solutes at mild salinities. Glutamine synthetase activity in cell suspensions of Halobacillus halophilus wild type was shown to be salt dependent and chloride modulated. A possible candidate to catalyze glutamine synthesis is glutamine synthetase A2, whose transcription is stimulated by chloride. To address the role of GlnA2 in the biosynthesis of the osmolytes glutamate and glutamine, a deletion mutant (ΔglnA2) was generated and characterized in detail. We compared the pool of compatible solutes and performed transcriptional analyses of the principal genes controlling the solute production in the wild type strain and the deletion mutant. These measurements did not confirm the hypothesized role of GlnA2 in the osmolyte production. Most likely the presence of another, yet to be identified enzyme has the main contribution in the measured activity in crude extracts and probably determines the total chloride-modulated profile. The role of GlnA2 remains to be elucidated.

  12. Binding of Divalent Magnesium by Escherichia coli Phosphoribosyl Diphosphate Synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates MgATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-d-ribosyl a-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, a,ß-methylene ATP and (+)-1-a,2-a,3...... of substrates and products indicated a role of Mg2+ in preparing the active site of phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase for binding of the highly phosphorylated ligands MgATP and phosphoribosyl diphosphate, as evaluated by analysis of the effects of the inhibitors adenosine and ribose 1,5-bisphosphate....... Calcium ions, which inhibit the enzyme even in the presence of high concentrations of Mg2+, appeared to compete with free Mg2+ for binding to its activator site on the enzyme. Analysis of the inhibition of Mg2+ binding by MgADP indicated that MgADP binding to the allosteric site may occur in competition...

  13. H2S synthetase AtD-CDes involves in ethylene and drought regulated stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixia Hou; Dan Zhu; Qian Ma; Dandan Zhang; Xin Liu

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S),as a new gasotransmitter,participates in many plant physiological processes.In this study,we found that both ethylene and drought strongly induced H2S synthetase AtD-CDes gene expression and enzymatic activity.H2S synthesis inhibitors restrained the ethylene and drought induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis.The H2S synthetase mutant Atd-cdes was insensitive to ethylene and drought,and overexpression of AtD-CDes conferred the transgenic plants more sensitive to ethylene and drought.Sequence analysis of AtD-CDes promoter showed that it contained ethylene response cis element ERE,and abiotic stress responsive cis elements MBS,LTR,and ABRE.The AtDCDes promoter fused with GUS was transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana to get AtD-CDes promoter::GUS transgenic plants.When treated with ethylene and drought stress,the enzymatic activity of β-glucuronidase was higher in the leaves and stomata of transgenic Arabidopsis.Analyses of GUS activity from the transgenic plants harboring different fragments of the promoter shows that the key section of AtD-CDes promoter response to ethylene was from the-697 to-408 bp,and the key section response to drought stress was from-90 to-1 bp.These results suggested that the H2S produced from AtD-CDes may mediate ethylene and drought-induced stomatal movement.

  14. Catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of an oligomeric (p)ppGpp synthetase by an alarmone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinchen, Wieland; Schuhmacher, Jan S; Altegoer, Florian; Fage, Christopher D; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Linne, Uwe; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Bange, Gert

    2015-10-27

    Nucleotide-based second messengers serve in the response of living organisms to environmental changes. In bacteria and plant chloroplasts, guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) [collectively named "(p)ppGpp"] act as alarmones that globally reprogram cellular physiology during various stress conditions. Enzymes of the RelA/SpoT homology (RSH) family synthesize (p)ppGpp by transferring pyrophosphate from ATP to GDP or GTP. Little is known about the catalytic mechanism and regulation of alarmone synthesis. It also is unclear whether ppGpp and pppGpp execute different functions. Here, we unravel the mechanism and allosteric regulation of the highly cooperative alarmone synthetase small alarmone synthetase 1 (SAS1) from Bacillus subtilis. We determine that the catalytic pathway of (p)ppGpp synthesis involves a sequentially ordered substrate binding, activation of ATP in a strained conformation, and transfer of pyrophosphate through a nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction. We show that pppGpp-but not ppGpp-positively regulates SAS1 at an allosteric site. Although the physiological significance remains to be elucidated, we establish the structural and mechanistic basis for a biological activity in which ppGpp and pppGpp execute different functional roles.

  15. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.W. Rutten (Joost)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the f

  16. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Joost

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the fi rst natriuretic peptide to be discovered and in humans ANP is predominantly formed in the cardiomyocytes of the atria.2 B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) was fi rst discovered in porcine brain hen...

  17. Electron transfer in peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  18. Characterization of two members among the five ADP-forming acyl coenzyme A (Acyl-CoA) synthetases reveals the presence of a 2-(Imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase in Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awano, Tomotsugu; Wilming, Anja; Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Fukui, Toshiaki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Thermococcus kodakarensis, along with those of most Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species, harbors five paralogous genes encoding putative α subunits of nucleoside diphosphate (NDP)-forming acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases. The substrate specificities of the protein products for three of these paralogs have been clarified through studies on the individual enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus and T. kodakarensis. Here we have examined the biochemical properties of the remaining two acyl-CoA synthetase proteins from T. kodakarensis. The TK0944 and TK2127 genes encoding the two α subunits were each coexpressed with the β subunit-encoding TK0943 gene. In both cases, soluble proteins with an α2β2 structure were obtained and their activities toward various acids in the ADP-forming reaction were examined. The purified TK0944/TK0943 protein (ACS IIITk) accommodated a broad range of acids that corresponded to those generated in the oxidative metabolism of Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Met, Phe, and Cys. In contrast, the TK2127/TK0943 protein exhibited relevant levels of activity only toward 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate, a metabolite of His degradation, and was thus designated 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase (ICSTk), a novel enzyme. Kinetic analyses were performed on both proteins with their respective substrates. In T. kodakarensis, we found that the addition of histidine to the medium led to increases in intracellular ADP-forming 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase activity, and 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate was detected in the culture medium, suggesting that ICSTk participates in histidine catabolism. The results presented here, together with those of previous studies, have clarified the substrate specificities of all five known NDP-forming acyl-CoA synthetase proteins in the Thermococcales.

  19. Molecular cloning of rat acss3 and characterization of mammalian propionyl-CoA synthetase in the liver mitochondrial matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Maruta, Hitomi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-12-21

    Among the three acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family members (ACSS), ACSS3 is poorly characterized. To characterize ACSS3, we performed molecular cloning and protein expression of rat acss3 and determined its intracellular localization, tissue distribution, and substrate specificity. Transient expression of rat ACSS3 in HeLa cells resulted in a 10-fold increase of acetyl-CoA synthetase activity compared with that in control cells. The acss3 transcripts are expressed in a wide range of tissues, with the highest levels observed in liver tissue followed by kidney tissue. Subcellular fractionation using liver tissue showed that ACSS3 is localized into the mitochondrial matrix. Among the short-chain fatty acids examined, recombinant ACSS3, purified from Escherichia coli cells transformed with the plasmid containing rat acss3, preferentially utilized propionate with a KM value of 0.19 mM. Knockdown of acss3 in HepG2 cells resulted in a significant decrease of ACSS3 expression level and propionyl-CoA synthetase activity in cell lysates. Levels of ACSS3 in the liver and the activity of propionyl-CoA synthetase in the mitochondria were significantly increased by fasting. These results suggested that ACSS3 is a liver mitochondrial matrix enzyme with high affinity to propionic acid, and its expression level is upregulated under ketogenic conditions.

  20. Novel expression pattern of cytosolic gln synthetase in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of the actinorhizal host, Datisca glomerata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berry, A.M.; Murphy, T.M.; Okubara, P.A.; Jacobsen, K.R.; Swensen, S.M.; Pawlowski, K.

    2004-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme of primary ammonia assimilation in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes and actinorhizal (Frankia-nodulated) plants. In root nodules of Datisca glomerata (Datiscaceae), transcripts hybridizing to a conserved coding region of the abundant nodule isoform, DgGS1

  1. Activation of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase by single-stranded and double-stranded RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, R; Norby, P L; Martensen, P M

    1998-01-01

    A number of small RNA molecules that are high affinity ligands for the 46-kDa form of human 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase have been identified by the SELEX method. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that these RNAs bind to the enzyme with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range...

  2. Cloning, molecular characterization, and phylogeny of two evolutionary distinct glutamine synthetase isoforms in the green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinecke, Diana L.; Zarka, Aliza; Leu, Stefan; Boussiba, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyta) is a widely used microalga of great economic potential, yet its molecular genetics and evolution are largely unknown. We present new detailed molecular and phylogenetic analysis of two glutamine synthetase (GS) enzymes and genes (gln) under the Astaxanthin-induc

  3. The function of the three phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase (Prs) genes in hyphal growth and conidiation in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ping; Wei, Wen-Fan; Zhong, Guo-Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Gang; Qiao, Wei-Ran; Fisher, Reinhard; Lu, Ling

    2017-02-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase, which is encoded by the Prs gene, catalyses the reaction of ribose-5-phosphate and adenine ribonucleotide triphosphate (ATP) and has central importance in cellular metabolism. However, knowledge about how Prs family members function and contribute to total 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase activity is limited. In this study, we identified that the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans genome contains three PRPP synthase-homologous genes (AnprsA, AnprsB and AnprsC), among which AnprsB and AnprsC but not AnprsA are auxotrophic genes. Transcriptional expression profiles revealed that the mRNA levels of AnprsA, AnprsB and AnprsC are dynamic during germination, hyphal growth and sporulation and that they all showed abundant expression during the vigorous hyphal growth time point. Inhibiting the expression of AnprsB or AnprsC in conditional strains produced more effects on the total PRPP synthetase activity than did inhibiting AnprsA, thus indicating that different AnPrs proteins are unequal in their contributions to Prs enzyme activity. In addition, the constitutive overexpression of AnprsA or AnprsC could significantly rescue the defective phenotype of the AnprsB-absent strain, suggesting that the function of AnprsB is not a specific consequence of this auxotrophic gene but instead comes from the contribution of Prs proteins to PRPP synthetase activity.

  4. The function of the three phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate synthetase (Prs) genes in hyphal growth and conidiation in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ping; Wei, Wen-Fan; Zhong, Guo-Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Gang; Qiao, Wei-Ran; Lu, Ling

    2017-01-12

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase, which is encoded by the Prs gene, catalyzes the reaction of ribose-5-phosphate and adenine ribonucleotide triphosphate (ATP) and has central importance in cellular metabolism. However, knowledge about how Prs family members function and contribute to total PRPP synthetase activity is limited. In this study, we identified that the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans genome contains three 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) synthase-homologous genes (AnprsA, B, and C), among which AnprsB and AnprsC but not AnprsA are auxotrophic genes. Transcriptional expression profiles revealed that the mRNA levels of AnprsA, B and C are dynamic during germination, hyphal growth and sporulation and that they all showed abundant expression during the vigorous hyphal growth time-point. Inhibiting the expression of AnprsB or AnprsC in conditional strains produced more effects on the total PRPP synthetase activity than did inhibiting AnprsA, thus indicating that different AnPrs proteins are unequal in their contributions to Prs enzyme activity. In addition, the constitutive overexpression of AnprsA or AnprsC could significantly rescue the defective phenotype of the AnprsB-absent strain, suggesting that the function of AnprsB is not a specific consequence of this auxotrophic gene but instead comes from the contribution of Prs proteins to PRPP synthetase activity.

  5. Structure of the gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (prsA) in Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Stanley G.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    in a 416-base-pair 5' untranslated leader in the prsA transcript, which was shown by deletion to be necessary for maximal synthesis of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase. The S. typhimurium leader contains a 115-base-pair insert relative to the E. coli leader. The insert appears to have no functional...... significance....

  6. Nitrogen Control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa : Mutants Affected in the Synthesis of Glutamine Synthetase, Urease, and NADP-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Habets, Winand J.A.; Marugg, Joey T.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Mutants were isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were impaired in the utilization of a number of nitrogen sources. In contrast to the wild-type strain, these mutants appeared to be unable to derepress the formation of glutamine synthetase and urease under nitrogen-limited growth conditions, wh

  7. Purification and Properties of a Prokaryote Type Glutamine Synthetase from the Bialaphos Producer Streptomyces hygroscopicus SF1293

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumada, Yoichi; Takano, Eriko; Nagaoka, Kozo

    1990-01-01

    A prokaryote type glutamine synthetase (GS) was purified from a bialaphos (BA)-producing organism, Streptomyces hygroscopicus SF1293 (SF1293). The GS (GS I) consisted of a 55,000 dalton subunit, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was similar to that of S. coelicolor GS. GS I was highly sensitive

  8. Noncoding RNA of Glutamine Synthetase I Modulates Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)▿ ‡

    OpenAIRE

    D'Alia, Davide; Nieselt, Kay; Steigele, Stephan; Müller, Jonas; Verburg, Ilse; Takano, Eriko

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of antisense chromosomal cis-encoded noncoding RNAss (ncRNAs) in glutamine synthetase I resulted in a decrease in growth, protein synthesis, and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. In addition, we predicted 3,597 cis-encoded ncRNAs and validated 13 of them experimentally, including several ncRNAs that are differentially expressed in bacterial hormone-defective mutants.

  9. Novel expression pattern of cytosolic gln synthetase in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of the actinorhizal host, Datisca glomerata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berry, A.M.; Murphy, T.M.; Okubara, P.A.; Jacobsen, K.R.; Swensen, S.M.; Pawlowski, K.

    2004-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme of primary ammonia assimilation in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes and actinorhizal (Frankia-nodulated) plants. In root nodules of Datisca glomerata (Datiscaceae), transcripts hybridizing to a conserved coding region of the abundant nodule isoform,

  10. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, G.D.; Gur, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Pines, O.; Vardimon, L.

    2010-01-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS

  11. Ricinus communis contains and acyl-CoA synthetase that preferentially activates ricinoleate to its CoA thioester

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of our effort to identify enzymes that are critical for producing large amounts of ricinoleate in castor oil, we have isolated three cDNAs encoding acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) in the castor plant. Analysis of the cDNA sequences reveals that two of them, designated RcACS 2 and RcACS 4, contain...

  12. Purification and Properties of a Prokaryote Type Glutamine Synthetase from the Bialaphos Producer Streptomyces hygroscopicus SF1293

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumada, Yoichi; Takano, Eriko; Nagaoka, Kozo

    1990-01-01

    A prokaryote type glutamine synthetase (GS) was purified from a bialaphos (BA)-producing organism, Streptomyces hygroscopicus SF1293 (SF1293). The GS (GS I) consisted of a 55,000 dalton subunit, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was similar to that of S. coelicolor GS. GS I was highly sensitive

  13. Evidence that the mitochondrial leucyl tRNA synthetase (LARS2) gene represents a novel type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    hart, Leen M; Hansen, Torben; Rietveld, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that a mutation in the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene is associated with type 2 diabetes. One of the consequences of this mutation is a reduced aminoacylation of tRNA(Leu(UUR)). In this study, we have examined whether variants in the leucyl tRNA synthetase...

  14. The tRNA synthetase paralog PoxA modifies elongation factor-P with (R)-ß-lysine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Hervé; Zou, S Betty; Bullwinkle, Tammy J

    2011-01-01

    The lysyl-tRNA synthetase paralog PoxA modifies elongation factor P (EF-P) with a-lysine at low efficiency. Cell-free extracts containing non-a-lysine substrates of PoxA modified EF-P with a change in mass consistent with addition of ß-lysine, a substrate also predicted by genomic analyses. EF-P ...

  15. Glutamine, insulin and glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase expression in C2C12 myotubes, Hep G2 hepatoma cells and 3T3 L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanxin; Watford, Malcolm

    2007-04-01

    The cell-specific regulation of glutamine synthetase expression was studied in three cell lines. In C2C12 myotubes, glucocorticoids increased the abundance of both glutamine synthetase protein and mRNA. Culture in the absence of glutamine also resulted in very high glutamine synthetase protein abundance but mRNA levels were unchanged. Glucocorticoids also increased the abundance of glutamine synthetase mRNA in Hep G2 hepatoma cells but this was not reflected in changes in protein abundance. Culture of Hep G2 cells without glutamine resulted in very high levels of protein, again with no change in mRNA abundance. Insulin was without effect in both C2C12 and Hep G2 cells. In 3T3 L1 adipocytes glucocorticoids increased the abundance of both glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein, insulin added alone had no effect but in the presence of glucocorticoids resulted in lower mRNA levels than seen with glucocorticoids alone, although protein levels remained high under such conditions. In contrast to the other cell lines glutamine synthetase protein levels were relatively unchanged by culture in the absence of glutamine. The results support the hypothesis that in myocytes, and hepatomas, but not in adipocytes, glutamine acts to moderate glutamine synthetase induction by glucocorticoids.

  16. Dicyclopropylmethyl peptide backbone protectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Louis A; Nasr, Khaled; Abdel-Maksoud, Adel Ali; El-Faham, Ayman; Ionescu, Dumitru; Henklein, Peter; Wenschuh, Holger; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Bienert, Michael

    2009-08-20

    The N-dicyclopropylmethyl (Dcpm) residue, introduced into amino acids via reaction of dicyclopropylmethanimine hydrochloride with an amino acid ester followed by sodium cyanoborohydride or triacetoxyborohydride reduction, can be used as an amide bond protectant for peptide synthesis. Examples which demonstrate the amelioration of aggregation effects include syntheses of the alanine decapeptide and the prion peptide (106-126). Avoidance of cyclization to the aminosuccinimide followed substitution of Fmoc-(Dcpm)Gly-OH for Fmoc-Gly-OH in the assembly of sequences containing the sensitive Asp-Gly unit.

  17. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  18. β-PEPTIDES CYCLOBUTANIQUES

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of β-amino acids, structural analogues of?-Amino acids, is an issue essential in the development of oligopeptides. A lot of work has been conducted on the behavior of β-peptide (sequence of β-amino acids) as well as peptides mixed (mixed β-and β- amino acids). As a result, the conformational preference of β-amino acids will induce the appearance of a three-dimensional structure of the oligopeptide ordered. Thus, several types of helices, sheets and elbows were observed in β-olig...

  19. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larché Mark

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cross link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils, due to lack of tertiary structure. Murine pre-clinical studies have established the feasibility of this approach and clinical studies are currently in progress in both allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  20. Invertebrate FMRFamide related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajniak, Kevin G

    2013-06-01

    In 1977 the neuropeptide FMRFamide was isolated from the clam, Macrocallista nimbosa. Since then several hundred FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) have been isolated from invertebrate animals. Precursors to the FaRPs likely arose in the cnidarians. With the transition to a bilateral body plan FaRPs became a fixture in the invertebrate phyla. They have come to play a critical role as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. FaRPs regulate a variety of body functions including, feeding, digestion, circulation, reproduction, movement. The evolution of the molecular form and function of these omnipresent peptides will be considered.

  1. Recognition of tRNAs with a long variable arm by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukalo M. A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotic cells three tRNA species, tRNASer, tRNALeu and tRNATyr, possess a long variable arm of 11–20 nucleotides (type 2 tRNA rather than usual 4 or 5 nucleotides (type 1 tRNA. In this review we have summarized the results of our research on the structural basis for recognition and discrimination of type 2 tRNAs by Thermus thermophilus seryl-, tyrosyl- and leucyl-tRNA synthetases (SerRS, TyrRS and LeuRS obtained by X-ray crystallography and chemical probing tRNA in solution. Crystal structures are now known of all three aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases complexed with type 2 tRNAs and the different modes of tRNA recognition represented by these structures will be discussed. In particular, emphasis will be given to the results on recognition of characteristic shape of type 2 tRNAs by cognate synthetases. In tRNASer, tRNATyr and tRNALeu the orientation of the long variable arm with respect to the body of the tRNA is different and is controlled by different packing of the core. In the case of SerRS the N-terminal domain and in the case of TyrRS, the C-terminal domain, bind to the characteristic long variable arm of the cognate RNA, thus recognizing the unique shape of the tRNA. The core of T. thermophilus tRNALeu has several layers of unusual base-pairs, which are revealed by the crystal structure of tRNALeu complexed with T. thermophilus LeuRS and by probing a ligand-free tRNA by specific chemical reagents in solution. In the crystal structure of the LeuRS-tRNALeu complex the unique D-stem structure is recognized by the C-terminal domain of LeuRS and these data are in good agreement with those obtained in solution. LeuRS has canonical class I mode of tRNA recognition, approaching the tRNA acceptor stem from the D-stem and minor groove of the acceptor stem side. SerRS also has canonical class II mode of tRNA recognition and approaches tRNASer from opposite, variable stem and major groove of acceptor stem site. And finally, TyrRS in strong

  2. Structural modeling of tissue-specific mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS2 defects predicts differential effects on aminoacylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliya eEuro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of mitochondrial protein synthesis is dependent on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs and the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNAs. The recent advances in whole-exome sequencing have revealed the importance of the mtARS proteins for mitochondrial pathophysiology since nearly every nuclear gene for mtARS (out of 19 is now recognized as a disease gene for mitochondrial disease. Typically, defects in each mtARS have been identified in one tissue-specific disease, most commonly affecting the brain, or in one syndrome. However, mutations in the AARS2 gene for mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS have been reported both in patients with infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and in patients with childhood to adulthood-onset leukoencephalopathy. We present here an investigation of the effects of the described mutations on the structure of the synthetase, in an effort to understand the tissue-specific outcomes of the different mutations.The mtAlaRS differs from the other mtARSs because in addition to the aminoacylation domain, it has a conserved editing domain for deacylating tRNAs that have been mischarged with incorrect amino acids. We show that the cardiomyopathy phenotype results from a single allele, causing an amino acid change p.R592W in the editing domain of AARS2, whereas the leukodystrophy mutations are located in other domains of the synthetase. Nevertheless, our structural analysis predicts that all mutations reduce the aminoacylation activity of the synthetase, because all mtAlaRS domains contribute to tRNA binding for aminoacylation. According to our model, the cardiomyopathy mutations severely compromise aminoacylation whereas partial activity is retained by the mutation combinations found in the leukodystrophy patients. These predictions provide a hypothesis for the molecular basis of the distinct tissue-specific phenotypic outcomes.

  3. Rational design of a bimodular model system for the investigation of heterocyclization in nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerfahrt, Thomas; Eppelmann, Katrin; Müller, Rolf; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2004-02-01

    Cyclization (Cy) domains in NRPS catalyze the heterocyclization of cysteine and serine/threonine to thiazoline and oxazoline rings. A model system consisting of the first two modules of bacitracin synthetase A fused to the thioesterase (Te) domain of tyrocidine synthetase was constructed (BacA1-2-Te) and shown to be active in production of the heterocyclic IleCys(thiazoline). Based on this model system, the feasibility of Cy domain module fusions was investigated by replacing the BacA2 Cy-A-PCP-module with modules of MbtB and MtaD from the biosynthesis systems of mycobactin and myxothiazol, revealing the formation of novel heterocyclic dipeptides. To dissect the reaction sequence of the Cy domain in peptide bond formation and heterocyclization, several residues of the BacA1-2-Te Cy domain were analyzed by mutagenesis. Two mutants exhibited formation of the noncyclic dipeptide, providing clear evidence for the independence of condensation and cyclization.

  4. Crystal structures at 2.5 Angstrom resolution of seryl-tRNA synthetase complexed with two analogs of seryl adenylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belrhali, H.; Yaremchuk, A.; Tukalo, M.;

    1994-01-01

    Crystal structures of seryl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus complexed with two different analogs of seryl adenylate have been determined at 2.5 Angstrom resolution. The first complex is between the enzyme and seryl-hydroxamate-AMP (adenosine monophosphate), produced enzymatically...... in a deep hydrophilic cleft formed by the antiparallel beta sheet and surrounding loops of the synthetase catalytic domain. Four regions in the primary sequence are involved in the interactions, including the motif 2 and 3 regions of class 2 synthetases. Apart from the specific recognition of the serine...

  5. The CP2 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase is crucial for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Zhu, Bin; Wang, En-Duo

    2008-12-26

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has an insertion domain, called connective peptide 2 (CP2), either directly preceding or following the editing domain (CP1 domain), depending on the species. The global structures of the CP2 domains from all LeuRSs are similar. Although the CP1 domain has been extensively explored to be responsible for hydrolysis of mischarged tRNALeu, the role of the CP2 domain remains undefined. In the present work, deletion of the CP2 domain of Giardia lamblia LeuRS (GlLeuRS) showed that the CP2 domain is indispensable for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing and that it contributes to LeuRS-tRNALeu binding affinity. In addition, its functions are conserved in both eukaryotic/archaeal and prokaryotic LeuRSs from G. lamblia, Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhLeuRS), and Escherichia coli (EcLeuRS). Alanine scanning and site-directed mutagenesis assays of the CP2 domain identified several residues that are crucial for its various functions. Data from the chimeric mutants, which replaced the CP2 domain of GlLeuRS with either PhLeuRS or EcLeuRS, showed that the CP2 domain of PhLeuRS but not that of EcLeuRS can partially restore amino acid activation and post-transfer editing functions, suggesting that the functions of the CP2 domain are dependent on its location in the primary sequence of LeuRS.

  6. Molecular polygamy: The promiscuity of l-phenylalanyl-tRNA-synthetase triggers misincorporation of meta- and ortho-tyrosine in monoclonal antibodies expressed by Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Oliver; Larraillet, Vincent; Kettenberger, Hubert; Gorr, Ingo H; Hilger, Maximiliane; Lipsmeier, Florian; Zeck, Anne; Beaucamp, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    In-depth analytical characterization of biotherapeutics originating from different production batches is mandatory to ensure product safety and consistent molecule efficacy. Previously, we have shown unintended incorporation of tyrosine (Tyr) and leucine/isoleucine (Leu/Ile) at phenylalanine (Phe) positions in a recombinant produced monoclonal antibody (mAb) using an orthogonal MASCOT/SIEVE based approach for mass spectrometry data analysis. The misincorporation could be avoided by sufficient supply of phenylalanine throughout the process. Several non-annotated signals in the primarily chromatographic peptide separation step for apparently single Phe→Tyr sequence variants (SVs) suggest a role for isobar tyrosine isoforms. Meta- and ortho-Tyr are spontaneously generated during aerobic fed-batch production processes using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Process induced meta- and ortho-Tyr but not proteinogenic para-Tyr are incorporated at Phe locations in Phe-starved CHO cultures expressing a recombinant mAb. Furthermore, meta- and ortho-Tyr are preferably misincorporated over Leu. Structural modeling of the l-phenylalanyl-tRNA-synthetase (PheRS) substrate activation site indicates a possible fit of non-cognate ortho-Tyr and meta-Tyr substrates. Dose-dependent misincorporations of Tyr isoforms support the hypothesis that meta- and ortho-Tyr are competing, alternative substrates for PheRS in CHO processes. Finally, easily accessible at-line surrogate markers for Phe→Tyr SV formation in biotherapeutic production were defined by the calculation of critical ratios for meta-Tyr/Phe and ortho-Tyr/Phe to support early prediction of SV probability, and finally, to allow for immediate process controlled Phe→Tyr SV prevention. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Distribution of glutamine synthetase in the chick forebrain: implications for passive avoidance memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dowd, B S; Ng, K T; Robinson, S R

    1997-01-01

    The glial enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) converts glutamate to glutamine; the latter is used by neurons for the resynthesis of glutamate and GABA. We have used a monoclonal antibody to GS to examine the regional distribution of this enzyme in the forebrains of day-old chicks. GS was detected in glia throughout the rostral and caudal regions of the forebrain and was particularly intense in the hippocampus, area parahippocampus and parts of the hyperstriatal and paleostriatal complex, regions widely considered to be involved in memory formation. Thus, our data provide an anatomical framework for the conclusion that neurons require the support of glia in order to restock their glutamate and/or GABA transmitter supplies during memory processing.

  8. Plant growth is influenced by glutamine synthetase-catalyzed nitrogen metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.

    1991-06-11

    Ammonia assimilation has been implicated as participating in regulation of nitrogen fixation in free-living bacteria. In fact, these simple organisms utilize an integrated regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; we except to observe an integration of nitrogen and carbon fixation in plants; how could these complex systems grow efficiently and compete in the ecosystem without coordinating these two crucial activities We have been investigating the role of ammonia assimilation regulating the complex symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes. Just as is observed in the simple bacterial systems, perturbation of ammonia assimilation in legumes results in increased overall nitrogen fixation. The perturbed plants have increased growth and total nitrogen fixation capability. Because we have targeted the first enyzme in ammonia assimilation, glutamine synthetase, this provides a marker that could be used to assist selection or screening for increased biomass yield. 45 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Regulation of glutamine synthetase activity by adenylylation in the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, S L; Tyler, B

    1981-01-01

    The enzymatic activity of glutamine synthetase [GS; L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2] from the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces cattleya is regulated by covalent modification. In whole cells containing high levels of GS the addition of ammonium chloride leads to a rapid decline in GS activity. Crude extracts prepared from such ammonia-shocked cells had very low levels of GS activity as measured by biosynthetic and gamma-glutamyltransferase assays. Incubation of the crude extracts with snake venom phosphodiesterase restored GS activity. In cell extracts, GS was also inactivated by an ATP- and glutamine-dependent reaction. Radioactive labeling studies demonstrated the incorporation of an AmP moiety into GS protein upon modification. Our results suggest a covalent modification of GS in a Gram-positive bacterium. This modification appears to be adenylylation of the GS subunit similar to that found in the Gram-negative bacteria.

  10. Prokaryotic Expression and Preparation of Polyantibody of Human Histydyl-tRNA Synthetase Related Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟宪芳; 施静; 刘晓春; 陈金中

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to express and purify human histydyl-tRNA synthetase related gene and to prepare its polyantibody. The open reading frame was amplified by PCR, and then recombined into prokaryoticexpression vector pQE30 and transformed into E. coli M15 for expression. The expressed products were induced by IPTG after the reconstructed pQE30 was transferred into M15. Afterpurified by Ni affinity chromatography, the product was identified to be a single band by SDS-PAGE. The rabbits were inoculated with purified products. High-titer polyantibody was successfully prepared. Highly-purified expression product and prepared polyantibody may provide a good basis for further study.

  11. Distinct states of methionyl-tRNA synthetase indicate inhibitor binding by conformational selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Kim, Jessica E; Shibata, Sayaka; Ranade, Ranae M; Yu, Mingyan; Liu, Jiyun; Gillespie, J Robert; Buckner, Frederick S; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G J

    2012-10-10

    To guide development of new drugs targeting methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis, crystal structure determinations of Trypanosoma brucei MetRS in complex with its substrate methionine and its intermediate product methionyl-adenylate were followed by those of the enzyme in complex with high-affinity aminoquinolone inhibitors via soaking experiments. Drastic changes in conformation of one of the two enzymes in the asymmetric unit allowed these inhibitors to occupy an enlarged methionine pocket and a new so-called auxiliary pocket. Interestingly, a small low-affinity compound caused the same conformational changes, removed the methionine without occupying the methionine pocket, and occupied the previously not existing auxiliary pocket. Analysis of these structures indicates that the binding of the inhibitors is the result of conformational selection, not induced fit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural and functional characterization of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase from Pichia ciferrii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangyoung; Lee, Wonkyu; Kim, Minsoo; Kim, T Doohun; Ryu, Yeonwoo

    2012-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAM-s) catalyzes the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is essential for methylation, transcription, proliferation, and production of secondary metabolites. Here SAM-s from Pichia ciferrii were selectively cloned using RNA CapFishing and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The putative full-length cDNA of SAM-s encoded a 383 amino acid protein (42.6 kDa), which has highly conserved metal binding sites, a phosphate-binding site, and functionally important motifs. The corresponding enzyme was over-expressed in a heterologous host of Pichia pastoris, and then purified to a homogenous form. Enzyme kinetics, immunoblotting, circular dichroism (CD), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and molecular modeling were conducted to characterize the SAM-s from P. ciferrii. Structural and functional studies of SAM-s will provide important insights for industrial applications.

  13. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase: a target for improvement of crop nitrogen use efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Hanne C; Eriksson, Dennis; Møller, Inge S; Schjoerring, Jan K

    2014-10-01

    Overexpression of the cytosolic enzyme glutamine synthetase 1 (GS1) has been investigated in numerous cases with the goal of improving crop nitrogen use efficiency. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent. Here, we review possible reasons underlying the lack of success and conclude that GS1 activity may be downregulated via a chain of processes elicited by metabolic imbalances and environmental constraints. We suggest that a pivotal role of GS1 may be related to the maintenance of essential nitrogen (N) flows and internal N sensing during critical stages of plant development. A number of more refined overexpression strategies exploiting gene stacking combined with tissue and cell specific targeting to overcome metabolic bottlenecks are considered along with their potential in relation to new N management strategies.

  14. Glutamine synthetase desensitizes differentiated adipocytes to proinflammatory stimuli by raising intracellular glutamine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Erika Mariana; Spera, Iolanda; Menga, Alessio; Infantino, Vittoria; Iacobazzi, Vito; Castegna, Alessandra

    2014-12-20

    The role of glutamine synthetase (GS) during adipocyte differentiation is unclear. Here, we assess the impact of GS on the adipocytic response to a proinflammatory challenge at different differentiation stages. GS expression at the late stages of differentiation desensitized mature adipocytes to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by increasing intracellular glutamine levels. Furthermore, LPS-activated mature adipocytes were unable to produce inflammatory mediators; LPS sensitivity was rescued following GS inhibition and the associated drop in intracellular glutamine levels. The ability of adipocytes to differentially respond to LPS during differentiation negatively correlates to GS expression and intracellular glutamine levels. Hence, modulation of intracellular glutamine levels by GS expression represents an endogenous mechanism through which mature adipocytes control the inflammatory response.

  15. p97/VCP promotes degradation of CRBN substrate glutamine synthetase and neosubstrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thang Van; Li, Jing; Lu, Chin-Chun Jean; Mamrosh, Jennifer L; Lu, Gang; Cathers, Brian E; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2017-03-20

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an essential role in metabolism by catalyzing the synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. Our recent study showed that CRBN, a direct protein target for the teratogenic and antitumor activities of immunomodulatory drugs such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide, recognizes an acetyl degron of GS, resulting in ubiquitylation and degradation of GS in response to glutamine. Here, we report that valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 promotes the degradation of ubiquitylated GS, resulting in its accumulation in cells with compromised p97 function. Notably, p97 is also required for the degradation of all four known CRBN neo-substrates [Ikaros family zinc finger proteins 1 (IKZF1) and 3 (IKZF3), casein kinase 1α (CK1α), and the translation termination factor GSPT1] whose ubiquitylation is induced by immunomodulatory drugs. Together, these data point to an unexpectedly intimate relationship between the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4(CRBN) and p97 pathways.

  16. Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase: A Potential Drug Target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L. Mowbray

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Globally, tuberculosis is second only to AIDS in mortality and the disease is responsible for over 1.3 million deaths each year. The impractically long treatment schedules (generally 6–9 months and unpleasant side effects of the current drugs often lead to poor patient compliance, which in turn has resulted in the emergence of multi-, extensively- and totally-drug resistant strains. The development of new classes of anti-tuberculosis drugs and new drug targets is of global importance, since attacking the bacterium using multiple strategies provides the best means to prevent resistance. This review presents an overview of the various strategies and compounds utilized to inhibit glutamine synthetase, a promising target for the development of drugs for TB therapy.

  17. ADP-ribosylation of glutamine synthetase in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, N J; Carr, N G; Mann, N H

    1995-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) inactivation was observed in crude cell extracts and in the high-speed supernatant fraction from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 following the addition of ammonium ions, glutamine, or glutamate. Dialysis of the high-speed supernatant resulted in loss of inactivation activity, but this could be restored by the addition of NADH, NADPH, or NADP+ and, to a lesser extent, NAD+, suggesting that inactivation of GS involved ADP-ribosylation. This form of modification was confirmed both by labelling experiments using [32P]NAD+ and by chemical analysis of the hydrolyzed enzyme. Three different forms of GS, exhibiting no activity, biosynthetic activity only, or transferase activity only, could be resolved by chromatography, and the differences in activity were correlated with the extent of the modification. Both biosynthetic and transferase activities were restored to the completely inactive form of GS by treatment with phosphodiesterase.

  18. Glutamine Synthetase in Legumes: Recent Advances in Enzyme Structure and Functional Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Betti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is the key enzyme involved in the assimilation of ammonia derived either from nitrate reduction, N2 fixation, photorespiration or asparagine breakdown. A small gene family is encoding for different cytosolic (GS1 or plastidic (GS2 isoforms in legumes. We summarize here the recent advances carried out concerning the quaternary structure of GS, as well as the functional relationship existing between GS2 and processes such as nodulation, photorespiration and water stress, in this latter case by means of proline production. Functional genomic analysis using GS2-minus mutant reveals the key role of GS2 in the metabolic control of the plants and, more particularly, in carbon metabolism.

  19. 2'-phosphodiesterase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activities in the lowest metazoans, sponge [porifera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saby, Emilie; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike; Uriz, Maria Jesus

    2009-01-01

    Sponges [porifera], the most ancient metazoans, contain modules related to the vertebrate immune system, including the 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). The components of the antiviral 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) system (OAS, 2'-Phosphodiesterase (2'-PDE) and RNAse L) of vertebrates have not all been identified in sponges. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that in addition to the OAS activity, sponges possess a 2'-PDE activity, which highlights the probable existence of a premature 2-5A system. Indeed, Suberites domuncula and Crella elegans exhibited this 2-5A degrading activity. Upon this finding, two out of three elements forming the 2-5A system have been found in sponges, only a endoribonuclease, RNAse L or similar, has to be found. We suspect the existence of a complex immune system in sponges, besides the self/non-self recognition system and the use of phagocytosis and secondary metabolites against pathogens.

  20. Association of a multi-synthetase complex with translating ribosomes in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raina, Medha; Elgamal, Sara; Santangelo, Thomas J;

    2012-01-01

    that components of the archaeal protein synthesis machinery associate into macromolecular assemblies in vivo and provide the potential to increase translation efficiency by limiting substrate diffusion away from the ribosome, thus facilitating rapid recycling of tRNAs. STRUCTURED SUMMARY OF PROTEIN INTERACTIONS...... with several other factors involved in protein synthesis, suggesting that MSCs may interact directly with translating ribosomes. In support of this hypothesis, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) activities of the MSC were enriched in isolated T. kodakarensis polysome fractions. These data indicate......)-triphosphatase 205, thiamine monophosphate kinase 179, pyruvate formate lyase family activating protein 298, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (mevanolate), N(2), N(2)-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 145, N2, N2-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 170, putative 5-methylcytosine restriction...

  1. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    . An inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  2. Effects of GSH1 and GSH2 Gene Mutation on Glutathione Synthetases Activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Jia, Haiyan; Zhang, Longmei; Wang, Haiyan; Tang, Hui; Zhang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, three mutants from wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae HBU2.558, called U2.558, UN2.558, and UNA2.558, were screened by UV, sodium nitrite, Atmospheric and room temperature plasma, respectively. Glutathione production of the three mutants increased by 41.86, 72.09 and 56.76%, respectively. We detected the activity of glutathione synthetases and found that its activity was improved. Amino acid sequences of three mutant colonies were compared with HBU2.558. Four mutants: Leu51→Pro51 (L51P), Glu62→Val62 (E62V), Ala332→Glu332 (A332E) and Ser653→Gly653 (S653G) were found in the analysis of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase. L51 is located adjacently to the two active sites of GCL/E/Mg(2+)/ADP complex in the overall GCL structure. L51P mutant spread distortion on the β-sheet due to the fact that the φ was changed from -50.4° to -40.2°. A mutant Leu54→Pro54 (L54P) was found in the analysis of glutathione synthetase, and L54 was an amino acid located between an α-helix and a β-sheet. The results confirm that introduction of proline located at the middle of the β-sheet or at the N- or C-terminal between α-helix and β-sheet or, i.e., L51P and L54P, changed the φ, rigidity, hydrophobicity and conformational entropy, thus increased protein stability and improved the enzyme activity.

  3. Ancient origin of the divergent forms of leucyl-tRNA synthetases in the Halobacteriales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andam Cheryl P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT has greatly impacted the genealogical history of many lineages, particularly for prokaryotes, with genes frequently moving in and out of a line of descent. Many genes that were acquired by a lineage in the past likely originated from ancestral relatives that have since gone extinct. During the course of evolution, HGT has played an essential role in the origin and dissemination of genetic and metabolic novelty. Results Three divergent forms of leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS exist in the archaeal order Halobacteriales, commonly known as haloarchaea. Few haloarchaeal genomes have the typical archaeal form of this enzyme and phylogenetic analysis indicates it clusters within the Euryarchaeota as expected. The majority of sequenced halobacterial genomes possess a bacterial form of LeuRS. Phylogenetic reconstruction puts this larger group of haloarchaea at the base of the bacterial domain. The most parsimonious explanation is that an ancient transfer of LeuRS took place from an organism related to the ancestor of the bacterial domain to the haloarchaea. The bacterial form of LeuRS further underwent gene duplications and/or gene transfers within the haloarchaea, with some genomes possessing two distinct types of bacterial LeuRS. The cognate tRNALeu also reveals two distinct clusters for the haloarchaea; however, these tRNALeu clusters do not coincide with the groupings found in the LeuRS tree, revealing that LeuRS evolved independently of its cognate tRNA. Conclusions The study of leucyl-tRNA synthetase in haloarchaea illustrates the importance of gene transfer originating in lineages that went extinct since the transfer occurred. The haloarchaeal LeuRS and tRNALeu did not co-evolve.

  4. Proximal Tubule Glutamine Synthetase Expression is Necessary for the Normal Response to Dietary Protein Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2017-03-22

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during changes in dietary protein intake. Dietary protein restriction decreases endogenous acid production and ¬decreases urinary ammonia excretion, a major component of net acid excretion. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ and glutamate, which regenerates the essential amino acid glutamine and decreases net ammonia generation. Because renal proximal tubule GS expression increases during dietary protein restriction, this could contribute to the decreased ammonia excretion. The current study's purpose was to determine proximal tubule GS's role in the renal response to protein restriction. We generated mice with proximal tubule-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Cre-negative (Control) and PT-GS-KO mice in metabolic cages were provided 20% protein diet for 2 days and were then changed to low protein (6%) diet for the next 7 days. Additional PT-GS-KO mice were maintained on 20% protein diet. Dietary protein restriction caused a rapid decrease in urinary ammonia excretion in both genotypes, but PT-GS-KO blunted this adaptive response significantly. This occurred despite no significant genotype-dependent differences in urinary pH or in serum electrolytes. There were no significant differences between Control and PT-GS-KO mice in expression of multiple other proteins involved in renal ammonia handling. We conclude that proximal tubule glutamine synthetase expression is necessary for the appropriate decrease in ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction.

  5. Succinyl-CoA Synthetase: New Antigen Candidate of Bartonella bacilliformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cláudia; Palma, Noemí; Pons, Maria J.; Magallón-Tejada, Ariel; Sandoval, Isabel; Tinco-Valdez, Carmen; Gutarra, Carlos; del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim; Matsuoka, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Bartonella bacilliformis is the causative agent of Carrion’s disease, a neglected illness with mortality rates of 40–85% in the absence of treatment. The lack of a diagnostic technique to overcome misdiagnosis and treat asymptomatic carriers is of note. This study aimed to identify new B. bacilliformis antigenic candidates that could lead to a new diagnostic tool able to be implemented in endemic rural areas. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood (n = 198) and serum (n = 177) samples were collected in northern Peru. Clinical data were recorded. Specific 16S rRNA amplification by RT-PCR, IFA and ELISA for IgM/IgG with whole cells as antigens was done. Western blot analysis and N-terminal amino acid sequencing detected seroreactive proteins. ELISAs for IgM/IgG for the antigenic candidates were performed. Of the population 33.3% reported at least one symptom compatible with Carrion’s disease; 25.4% (IFA), 27.1% (ELISA-IgG), 33.9% (ELISA-IgM) and 38.9% (RT-PCR) of samples were positive. Four proteins were considered potential antigenic candidates, including two new antigenic candidates, succinyl-CoA synthetase subunit α (SCS-α) and succinyl-CoA synthetase subunit β (SCS-β). On Western blot both Pap31 and SCS-α interacted with IgM, while GroEL and SCS-β interacted with IgG. The presence of specific antibodies against the antigenic candidates varied from 34.5% (IgG against SCS-α) to 97.2% (IgM against Pap31). Conclusions/Significance RT-PCR and the high levels of positivity for specific ELISAs demonstrate high levels of B. bacilliformis exposure and asymptomatic carriers among inhabitants. The new antigens identified might be used as a new rapid diagnostic tool to diagnose acute Carrion’s disease and identify asymptomatic carriers. PMID:27627803

  6. Molecular cloning, sequencing and expression in Escherichia coli cells Thermus thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko O. P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Cloning and sequencing of the T. thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRSTT followed by the creation of genetically engineered construct for protein expression in E.coli cells and its purification. Methods. Searching for the LeuRSTT gene was performed by Southern blot hybridization with chromosomal DNA, where digoxigenin-labeled PCR fragments of DNA were used as probes. Results. The gene of T. thermophilus HB27 leucyl-tRNA synthetase was cloned and sequenced. The open reading frame encodes a polypeptide chain of 878 amino acid residues in length (molecular mass 101 kDa. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of T. thermophilus LeuRS with that of the enzymes from other organisms showed that LeuRSTT was a part of the group of similar enzymes of prokaryotes, formed by the proteins of protobacteriae, rickettsia and mitochondria of eukaryotes. The resulting phylogenetic tree of LeuRSs reveals dichotomous branching into two lines: prokaryotic/eukaryotic mitochondrial and arhaeal/eukaryotic cytosolic proteins. Differences between prokaryotic and arhaeal branches of the LeuRSs phylogenetic tree are primarily due to the structure of two domains of the enzyme – the editing and the C-terminal. T. thermophilus LeuRS was expressed in E. coli cells by cloning the corresponding gene into pET29b vector. Conclusions. The cloned T. thermophilus leuS gene and expressed recombinant protein will be used for structural and functional studies on LeuRSTT, including X-ray analysis of the enzyme and its mutant forms in complex with different substrates

  7. Peptide vectors for gene delivery: from single peptides to multifunctional peptide nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Markus de; Teunissen, Erik A; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic use of nucleic acids relies on the availability of sophisticated delivery systems for targeted and intracellular delivery of these molecules. Such a gene delivery should possess essential characteristics to overcome several extracellular and intracellular barriers. Peptides offer an attractive platform for nonviral gene delivery, as several functional peptide classes exist capable of overcoming these barriers. However, none of these functional peptide classes contain all the essential characteristics required to overcome all of the barriers associated with successful gene delivery. Combining functional peptides into multifunctional peptide vectors will be pivotal for improving peptide-based gene delivery systems. By using combinatorial strategies and high-throughput screening, the identification of multifunctional peptide vectors will accelerate the optimization of peptide-based gene delivery systems.

  8. Nunamycin and Nunapeptin: Two novel cyclic peptides are key components of the antimicrobial activity of the Greenlandic isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens In5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian F.

    Pseudomonas spp. are a rich source of secondary metabolites including bioactive non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides. NRPs are synthesised in large assembly lines by multi-domain modular enzymes known as NRP-synthetases (NRPS). Nunamycin and nunapeptin are two cyclic NRPs synthesised...... by the Greenlandic isolate P. fluorescens In5. Nunamycin shows antifungal activity against the basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani whereas the only partially structure elucidated nunapeptin appears most active against the ascomycete Fusarium graminearum and the oomycete Pythium aphanidermatum. Originally isolated from...

  9. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  10. The crystal structure of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus and its complexes with ATP and asparaginyl-adenylate: the mechanism of discrimination between asparagine and aspartic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthet-Colominas, C; Seignovert, L; Härtlein, M; Grotli, M; Cusack, S; Leberman, R

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structure of Thermus thermophilus asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase has been solved by multiple isomorphous replacement and refined at 2.6 A resolution. This is the last of the three class IIb aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase structures to be determined. As expected from primary sequence comparisons, there are remarkable similarities between the tertiary structures of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase and aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, and most of the active site residues are identical except for three key differences. The structure at 2.65 A of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase complexed with a non-hydrolysable analogue of asparaginyl-adenylate permits a detailed explanation of how these three differences allow each enzyme to discriminate between their respective and very similar amino acid substrates, asparagine and aspartic acid. In addition, a structure of the complex of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase with ATP shows exactly the same configuration of three divalent cations as previously observed in the seryl-tRNA synthetase-ATP complex, showing that this a general feature of class II synthetases. The structural similarity of asparaginyl- and aspartyl-tRNA synthetases as well as that of both enzymes to the ammonia-dependent asparagine synthetase suggests that these three enzymes have evolved relatively recently from a common ancestor. PMID:9582288

  11. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli. Properties of the purified enzyme and primary structure of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Harlow, Kenneth W.; King, Cheryl J.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (P-Rib-PP) synthetase of Escherichia coli has been purified to near homogeneity from a strain harboring the prs gene, encoding P-Rib-PP synthetase, on a multicopy plasmid. Analysis of the enzyme showed that it required inorganic phosphate for activity and for stability....... Magnesium ions were required both as a complex with the substrate ATP and as a free cation. P-Rib-PP synthetase activity was inhibited strongly by ADP. Kinetic analysis indicated multiple sites of action of ADP. In addition apparent substrate inhibition was exerted by ribose 5-phosphate in the presence...... of ADP. The nucleotide sequence of the E. coli prs gene has been determined and the coding segment established. The deduced amino acid sequence of P-Rib-PP synthetase contained 314 amino acid residues and the molecular weight was calculated as 34,060. The initiation site of transcription was determined...

  12. A novel mechanism of glutamine synthetase inactivation by ammonium in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Involvement of an inactivating protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    1995-06-19

    The glutamine synthetase of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 can be inactivated in vivo by ammonium addition by a new mechanism that involves the binding to the enzyme of an inactivating factor. This binding provokes a different mobility of the inactive enzyme with respect to the active form in non-denaturing PAGE, but not in SDS-PAGE. This modification of glutamine synthetase is for the first time visualized by Western blot analysis of the active and inactive forms. Cross-linking experiments using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) demonstrate the existence of two main complexes of 56 kDa and 67 kDa between the inactivating factor and the glutamine synthetase subunit (53 kDa) in the inactive but not in the active form of glutamine synthetase.

  13. APD: the Antimicrobial Peptide Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Guangshun

    2004-01-01

    An antimicrobial peptide database (APD) has been established based on an extensive literature search. It contains detailed information for 525 peptides (498 antibacterial, 155 antifungal, 28 antiviral and 18 antitumor). APD provides interactive interfaces for peptide query, prediction and design. It also provides statistical data for a select group of or all the peptides in the database. Peptide information can be searched using keywords such as peptide name, ID, length, net charge, hydrophobic percentage, key residue, unique sequence motif, structure and activity. APD is a useful tool for studying the structure-function relationship of antimicrobial peptides. The database can be accessed via a web-based browser at the URL: http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.html.

  14. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  15. Glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase and other enzyme activities related to the pyrimidine pathway in spleen of Squalus acanthias (spiny dogfish).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P M

    1989-07-15

    The first two steps of urea synthesis in liver of marine elasmobranchs involve formation of glutamine from ammonia and of carbamoyl phosphate from glutamine, catalysed by glutamine synthetase and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, respectively [Anderson & Casey (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 456-462]; both of these enzymes are localized exclusively in the mitochondrial matrix. The objective of this study was to establish the enzymology of carbamoyl phosphate formation and utilization for pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis in Squalus acanthias (spiny dogfish), a representative elasmobranch. Aspartate carbamoyltransferase could not be detected in liver of dogfish. Spleen extracts, however, had glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate carbamoyltransferase, dihydro-orotase, and glutamine synthetase activities, all localized in the cytosol; dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine-5'-decarboxylase activities were also present. Except for glutamine synthetase, the levels of all activities were very low. The carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity is inhibited by UTP and is activated by 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate. The first three enzyme activities of the pyrimidine pathway were eluted in distinctly different positions during gel filtration chromatography under a number of different conditions; although complete proteolysis of inter-domain regions of a multifunctional complex during extraction cannot be excluded, the evidence suggests that in dogfish, in contrast to mammalian species, these three enzymes of the pyrimidine pathway exist as individual polypeptide chains. These results: (1) establish that dogfish express two different glutamine-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activities, (2) confirm the report [Smith, Ritter & Campbell (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 198-202] that dogfish express two different glutamine synthetases, and (3) provide indirect evidence that glutamine may not be available in liver for

  16. A proteomic survey of nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthesis in actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunqiu; Ntai, Ioanna; Ju, Kou-San; Unger, Michelle; Zamdborg, Leonid; Robinson, Sarah J; Doroghazi, James R; Labeda, David P; Metcalf, William W; Kelleher, Neil L

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria such as streptomycetes are renowned for their ability to produce bioactive natural products including nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs). The advent of genome sequencing has revealed an even larger genetic repertoire for secondary metabolism with most of the small molecule products of these gene clusters still unknown. Here, we employed a "protein-first" method called PrISM (Proteomic Investigation of Secondary Metabolism) to screen 26 unsequenced actinomycetes using mass spectrometry-based proteomics for the targeted detection of expressed nonribosomal peptide synthetases or polyketide synthases. Improvements to the original PrISM screening approach (Nat. Biotechnol. 2009, 27, 951-956), for example, improved de novo peptide sequencing, have enabled the discovery of 10 NRPS/PKS gene clusters from 6 strains. Taking advantage of the concurrence of biosynthetic enzymes and the secondary metabolites they generate, two natural products were associated with their previously "orphan" gene clusters. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of a proteomics-based strategy for use in screening for NRP/PK production in actinomycetes (often >8 Mbp, high GC genomes) versus the bacilli (2-4 Mbp genomes) used previously.

  17. Avian host defense peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  18. Antimicrobial peptides in Echinoderms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Li

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are important immune effector molecules for invertebrates, including echinoderms, which lack a vertebrate-type adaptive immune system. Here we summarize the knowledge of such peptides in echinoderms. Strongylocins are a novel family of cysteine-rich AMPs, recently identified in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and S. purpuratus. Although these molecules present diverse amino acid sequences, they share an identical cysteine arrangement pattern, dissimilar to other known AMPs. A family of heterodimeric AMPs, named centrocins, are also present in S. droebachiensis. Lysozymes and fragments of larger proteins, such as beta-thymocins, actin, histone 2A and filamin A have also been shown to display antimicrobial activities in echinoderms. Future studies on AMPs should be aimed in revealing how echinoderms use these AMPs in the immune response against microbial pathogens.

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  20. Peptides and Food Intake

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Sobrino Crespo; Aranzazu Perianes Cachero; Lilian Puebla Jiménez; Vicente eBarrios; Eduardo eArilla

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the r...

  1. Loss of (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase activity by production of antisense RNA results in lack of protection by interferon from viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Benedetti, A.; Pytel, B.A.; Baglioni, C.

    1987-02-01

    An expression vector was constructed that carries part of the human BK papovavirus with 0.5 kilobases of (2'-5')oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase cDNA inserted in inverted orientation downstream from the virion proteins (VP) promoter and the neomycin-resistance gene neo under the control of a simian virus 40 promoter. Cells transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418 synthesized RNA complementary to 2-5A synthetase mRNA. These cells lacked 2-5A synthetase activity, and the enzyme was not inducible by interferon. In contrast, 2-5A synthetase was induced in cells transfected with a control vector without the cDNA insert. Such cells were protected by interferon from RNA viruses, whereas cells lacking 2-5A synthetase were not protected from encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sindbis virus but were fully protected from influenza virus. These findings show that a high level of 2-5A synthetase is required for interferon-induced protection from the cytoplasmic RNA viruses tested.

  2. Loss of (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase activity by production of antisense RNA results in lack of protection by interferon from viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedetti, A; Pytel, B A; Baglioni, C

    1987-01-01

    An expression vector was constructed that carries part of the human BK papovavirus with 0.5 kilobases of (2'-5')oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase cDNA inserted in inverted orientation downstream from the virion proteins (VP) promoter and the neomycin-resistance gene neo under the control of a simian virus 40 promoter. Cells transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418 synthesized RNA complementary to 2-5A synthetase mRNA. These cells lacked 2-5A synthetase activity, and the enzyme was not inducible by interferon. In contrast, 2-5A synthetase was induced in cells transfected with a control vector without the cDNA insert. Such cells were protected by interferon from RNA viruses, whereas cells lacking 2-5A synthetase were not protected from encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sindbis virus but were fully protected from influenza virus. These findings show that a high level of 2-5A synthetase is required for interferon-induced protection from the cytoplasmic RNA viruses tested. Images PMID:2433688

  3. Interferon titer and the 2',5'-oligoadenylate-synthetase activity in rat thymus lymphocytes in conditions of Omeprazol-caused hypergastrinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kompanets I. V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the determination of rat thymocytes response to hypergastrinemia evoked by hypoacidity and multiprobiotic «Symbiter® acidophilic concentrated» (symbiter treatment via the estimation of the interferon (IFN titer and 2', 5'-oligoadenylate (OA-synthetase activity in lymphocytes. 2', 5'-OA-synthetase is the IFN-induced enzyme. Methods. The micromethod of IFN titer determination by antiviral activity, spectrophotometrical method of 2', 5'-OA-synthetase activity determination. Results. It was shown that the IFN production by cultivated thymocytes is amplified while the 2', 5'-OA-synthetase activity decreases in these cells in conditions of hypoacidity caused by the 28-days omeprazol treatment. The treatment of animals by symbiter against a background of hypoacidity causes the augmentation of IFN production by thymocytes, but does not stimulate the 2', 5'-OA-synthetase activity. The IFN production by thymocytes in response to IFN inducers (PHA and cycloferone in vitro is intensified comparatively to the control at hypoacidity and symbiter treatment. Conclusions. The multiprobiotic symbiter exhibits interferonogenic properties. The IFN synthesis in response to induction in vitro is intensified in comparison with healthy animals at both hypoacidity and symbiter treatment while the 2', 5'-OA-synthetase acivity in thymocytes decreases.

  4. Rheb Protein Binds CAD (Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase 2, Aspartate Transcarbamoylase, and Dihydroorotase) Protein in a GTP- and Effector Domain-dependent Manner and Influences Its Cellular Localization and Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase (CPSase) Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-01

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. PMID:25422319

  5. Rheb protein binds CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase) protein in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner and influences its cellular localization and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-09

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Prediction of monomer isomery in Florine: a workflow dedicated to nonribosomal peptide discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Caradec

    Full Text Available Nonribosomal peptides represent a large variety of natural active compounds produced by microorganisms. Due to their specific biosynthesis pathway through large assembly lines called NonRibosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPSs, they often display complex structures with cycles and branches. Moreover they often contain non proteogenic or modified monomers, such as the D-monomers produced by epimerization. We investigate here some sequence specificities of the condensation (C and epimerization (E domains of NRPS that can be used to predict the possible isomeric state (D or L of each monomer in a putative peptide. We show that C- and E- domains can be divided into 2 sub-regions called Up-Seq and Down-Seq. The Up-Seq region corresponds to an InterPro domain (IPR001242 and is shared by C- and E-domains. The Down-Seq region is specific to the enzymatic activity of the domain. Amino-acid signatures (represented as sequence logos previously described for complete C-and E-domains have been restricted to the Down-Seq region and amplified thanks to additional sequences. Moreover a new Down-Seq signature has been found for Ct-domains found in fungi and responsible for terminal cyclization of the peptides. The identification of these signatures has been included in a workflow named Florine, aimed to predict nonribosomal peptides from NRPS sequence analyses. In some cases, the prediction of isomery is guided by genus-specific rules. Florine was used on a Pseudomonas genome to allow the determination of the type of pyoverdin produced, the update of syringafactin structure and the identification of novel putative products.

  7. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osberger, Thomas J.; Rogness, Donald C.; Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Stepan, Antonia F.; White, M. Christina

    2016-09-01

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases display diverse and complex topologies and possess a range of biological activities. Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails pre- and post-assembly oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis. However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized in the laboratory. Here we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C-H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-centre chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C-H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four ‘chiral pool’ amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C-H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different unnatural amino acids. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C-H oxidation to one containing a linear unnatural amino acid.

  8. Three-dimensional structure of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. coli at 2.71 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru, E-mail: tostars@mail.ru, E-mail: ugama@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Abramchik, Yu. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Zhukhlistova, N. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli was cloned, purified, and crystallized. Single crystals of the enzyme were grown under microgravity. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility and used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme by the molecular-replacement method at 2.71 Å resolution. The active and regulatory sites in the molecule of E. coli phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase were revealed by comparison with the homologous protein from Bacillus subtilis, the structure of which was determined in a complex with functional ligands. The conformations of polypeptide-chain fragments surrounding and composing the active and regulatory sites were shown to be identical in both proteins.

  9. Investigating the mechanism of ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl P; Khan, Kirin; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl

    2017-02-01

    ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACD) catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetate. The related succinyl-CoA synthetase follows a three-step mechanism involving a single phosphoenzyme, but a novel four-step mechanism with two phosphoenzyme intermediates was proposed for Pyrococcus ACD. Characterization of enzyme variants of Entamoeba ACD in which the two proposed phosphorylated His residues were individually altered revealed that only His252 is essential for enzymatic activity. Analysis of variants altered at two residues proposed to interact with the phosphohistidine loop that swings between distinct parts of the active site are consistent with a mechanism involving a single phosphoenzyme intermediate. Our results suggest ACDs with different subunit structures may employ slightly different mechanisms to bridge the span between active sites I and II. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Three-dimensional structure of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. coli at 2.71 Å resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli was cloned, purified, and crystallized. Single crystals of the enzyme were grown under microgravity. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility and used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme by the molecular-replacement method at 2.71 Å resolution. The active and regulatory sites in the molecule of E. coli phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase were revealed by comparison with the homologous protein from Bacillus subtilis, the structure of which was determined in a complex with functional ligands. The conformations of polypeptide-chain fragments surrounding and composing the active and regulatory sites were shown to be identical in both proteins.

  11. Altered alpha subunits in phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases from p-fluorophenylalanine-resistant strains of Escherichis coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennecke, H; Böck, A

    1975-07-01

    Three different phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases have been purified to near homogeneity, one from a wild-type strain of Escherichia coli and the others from two independently isolated p-fluorophenyalanine-resistant strains. The mutant enzymes were not able to use p-fluorophenylalanine as a substrate for activation and attachment to tRNA. They proved to be indistinguishable from the wild-type enzyme by several electrophoretic and immunological criteria. The alpha and beta subunits of all three enzymes have been prepared by a method described in this paper. The isolated subunits per se did not reveal any significant enzyme activity, but combined they were able to form active phenylalanyl tRNA synthetase after a defined reconstitution process. Mixed reconstitution experiments between wild-type and mutant subunits indicate that the mutant alpha subunit is responsible for p-fluorophenylalanine resistance and therefore seems to carry the phenylalanine-binding site or to participate in its formation.

  12. [C-peptide physiological effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, A O; Granstrem, O K

    2013-02-01

    In the recent years there were numerous evidences that C-peptide, which was previously considered as a product of insulin biosynthesis, is one of the key regulators of physiological processes. C-peptide via heterotrimeric G(i/o) protein-coupled receptors activates a wide range of intracellular effector proteins and transcription factors and, thus, controls the inflammatory and neurotrophic processes, pain sensitivity, cognitive function, macro- and microcirculation, glomerular filtration. These effects of C-peptide are mainly expressed in its absolute or relative deficiency occurred in type 1 diabetes mellitus and they are less pronounced when the level of C-peptide is close to normal. Replacement therapy with C-peptide prevents many complications of type 1 diabetes, such as atherosclerosis, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and nephropathy. C-peptide interacts with the insulin hexamer complexes and induces their dissociation and, as a result, regulates the functional activity of the insulin signaling system. At the same time, C-peptide at the concentrations above physiological may demonstrate pro-inflammatory effects on the endothelial cells and cause atherosclerotic changes in the vessels, which should be considered in the study of pathogenic mechanisms of complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus, where the level of C peptide is increased, as well as in the development of approaches for C-peptide application in clinic. This review is devoted contemporary achievements and unsolved problems in the study of C-peptide, as an important regulator of physiological and biochemical processes.

  13. Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase as a Novel Antibiotic Strategy against Tuberculosis: Demonstration of Efficacy In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of humankind's greatest killers, and new therapeutic strategies are needed to combat the causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is rapidly developing resistance to conventional antibiotics. Using the highly demanding guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis, we have investigated the feasibility of inhibiting M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (GS), an enzyme that plays a key role in both nitrogen metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis, as a novel antibi...

  14. [Effect of reproduction of the LPP-3 cyanophage on glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase activity in the cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendzhul, M I; Koltukova, N V; Lysenko, T G; Shainskaia, O A; Perepelitsa, S I

    1995-01-01

    The effect of cyanophage LPP-3 reproduction on glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase (GS) in P boryanum cells have been studied. It was determined that the both reactions are intensified by 135% and 220%, accordingly. Isoenzymes of GS were purified from native and infected cell of cyanobacteria. Their physical-and-chemical properties are different. The cyanophage development probably causes specific modification of the cell enzymes.

  15. Structural and functional characterization of the 5' upstream region of a glutamine synthetase gene from Scots pine

    OpenAIRE

    Avila, Concepción; Cantón, Francisco; Barnestein, Pilar; Suárez, María-Fernanda; Marraccini, Pierre; Rey, Manuel; Humara, Jaime; Ordás, Ricardo; Cánovas, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    International audience; We report here the isolation and characterization of a genomic clone encoding Scots pine (P. sylvestris) cytosolic glutamine synthetase GS1a. The clone contains the 5' half of the gene including part of the coding region organized in seven exons, interrupted by 6 introns and 980 bp upstream of the translation initiation codon. Earlier experiments carried out in our lab have shown that the GS1a gene is expressed in a light dependent fashion during the initial stages of ...

  16. DNA Polymerases and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Shared Mechanisms for Ensuring the Fidelity of Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Francklyn, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    DNA polymerases and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) represent large enzyme families with critical roles in the transformation of genetic information from DNA to RNA to protein. DNA polymerases carry out replication and collaborate in the repair of the genome, while ARSs provide aminoacylated tRNA precursors for protein synthesis. Enzymes of both families face the common challenge of selecting their cognate small molecule substrates from a pool of chemically related molecules, achieving high...

  17. Fatty acid biosynthesis VII. Substrate control of chain-length of products synthesised by rat liver fatty acid synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Carey, E.M.; Dils, R.

    1970-01-01

    - 1. Gas-liquid and paper chromatography have been used to determine the chain-lengths of fatty acids synthesised by purified rat liver fatty acid synthetase from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA, [1,3-14C2]malonyl-CoA and from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA plus partially purified rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase. - 2. A w...

  18. Nanomolar inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase 1: synthesis, biological evaluation and X-ray crystallographic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Cédric; Silve, Sandra; Morales, Renaud; Pessegue, Bernard; Llopart, Sylvie; Nair, Anil; Bauer, Armin; Scheiper, Bodo; Pöverlein, Christoph; Ganzhorn, Axel; Lagrange, Sophie; Bacqué, Eric

    2015-04-01

    A series of imidazo[1,2-a]indeno[1,2-e]pyrazin-4-ones that potently inhibit M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (GlnA1) has been identified by high throughput screening. Exploration of this series was performed owing to a short chemistry program. Despite possibly nanomolar inhibitions, none of these compounds was active on whole cell Mtb, suggesting that GlnA1 may not be a suitable target to find new anti-tubercular drugs.

  19. Use of Genomics To Identify Bacterial Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthetase: Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of the Essential uppS Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Apfel, Christian M.; Takács, Béla; Fountoulakis, Michael; Stieger, Martin; Keck, Wolfgang

    1999-01-01

    The prenyltransferase undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase (di-trans,poly-cis-decaprenylcistransferase; EC 2.5.1.31) was purified from the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli by TSK-DEAE, ceramic hydroxyapatite, TSK-ether, Superdex 200, and heparin-Actigel chromatography. The protein was labeled with the photolabile analogue of the farnesyl pyrophosphate analogue (E,E)-[1-3H]-(2-diazo-3-trifluoropropionyloxy)geranyl diphos-phate and was detected on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide ge...

  20. pH-sensitive CDP-diglyceride synthetase mutants of Escherichia coli: phenotypic suppression by mutations at a second site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, B R; Raetz, C R

    1983-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, mutations which lower the level of CDP-diglyceride synthetase are designated cds and map at min 4. The cds-8 mutation resulted in strikingly defective enzyme activity and also rendered cells pH sensitive for growth. Both the inhibition of growth and the massive accumulation of phosphatidic acid which occur in a cds-8 mutant at pH 8 were suppressed by mutations at a second locus, designated cdsS, which mapped between argG and gltB near min 68. The cdsS3 mutation by itself did not affect CDP-diglyceride synthetase activity in wild-type cells, but it caused a twofold stimulation of the residual activity present in strains harboring cds-8. Both the insensitivity to pH and the twofold stimulation of residual activity were lost by introduction of an F' strain carrying cdsS+ into a recA1 cds-8 cdsS3 host. When a culture of a cds-8 cdsS+ strain was shifted to pH 8, the residual specific activity of synthetase dropped by 75% within 100 min. In a cds-8 cdsS3 double mutant under the same conditions, the activity declined appreciably less, about to the level found in the cds-8 cdsS+ strain under permissive conditions (pH 6). Thus, it appears that mutations in the cdsS gene suppress the pH sensitivity of cds mutants by inhibiting the decay of residual CDP-diglyceride synthetase activity at the nonpermissive pH. The cdsS locus appears to be distinct from any known nonsense or missense suppressor. PMID:6296051

  1. Biochemical analyses of ppGpp effect on adenylosuccinate synthetases, key enzymes in purine biosynthesis in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yuhta; Nozawa, Akira; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    The ppGpp-signaling system functions in plant chloroplasts. In bacteria, a negative effect of ppGpp on adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS) has been suggested. Our biochemical analysis also revealed rice AdSS homologs are apparently sensitive to ppGpp. However, further investigation clarified that this phenomenon is cancelled by the high substrate affinity to the enzymes, leading to a limited effect of ppGpp on adenylosuccinate synthesis.

  2. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzhong Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes.

  3. Dexamethasone enhances glutamine synthetase activity and reduces N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotoxicity in mixed cultures of neurons and astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Debroas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are claimed to protect neurons against excitotoxicity by clearing glutamate from the extracellular space and rapidly converting it into glutamine. Glutamine, is then released into the extracellular medium, taken up by neurons and transformed back into glutamate which is then stored into synaptic vesicles. Glutamine synthetase (GS, the key enzyme that governs this glutamate/glutamine cycle, is known to be upregulated by glucocorticoids. In the present work we have thus studied in parallel the effects of dexamethasone on glutamine synthetase activity and NMDA-induced neuronal death in cultures derived from the brain cortex of murine embryos. We showed that dexamethasone was able to markedly enhance GS activity in cultures of astrocytes but not in near pure neuronal cultures. The pharmacological characteristics of the dexamethasone action strongly suggest that it corresponds to a typical receptor-mediated effect. We also observed that long lasting incubation (72 h of mixed astrocyte-neuron cultures in the presence of 100 nM dexamethasone significantly reduced the toxicity of NMDA treatment. Furthermore we demonstrated that methionine sulfoximine, a selective inhibitor of GS, abolished the dexamethasone-induced increase in GS activity and also markedly potentiated NMDA toxicity. Altogether these results suggest that dexamethasone may promote neuroprotection through a stimulation of astrocyte glutamine synthetase.

  4. The pimeloyl-CoA synthetase BioW defines a new fold for adenylate-forming enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, Paola; Manandhar, Miglena; Dong, Shi-Hui; Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Agarwal, Vinayak; Cronan, John E.; Nair, Satish K.

    2017-04-17

    Reactions that activate carboxylates through acyl-adenylate intermediates are found throughout biology and include acyl- and aryl-CoA synthetases and tRNA synthetases. Here we describe the characterization of Aquifex aeolicus BioW, which represents a new protein fold within the superfamily of adenylating enzymes. Substrate-bound structures identified the enzyme active site and elucidated the mechanistic strategy for conjugating CoA to the seven-carbon α,ω-dicarboxylate pimelate, a biotin precursor. Proper position of reactive groups for the two half-reactions is achieved solely through movements of active site residues, as confirmed by site-directed mutational analysis. The ability of BioW to hydrolyze adenylates of noncognate substrates is reminiscent of pre-transfer proofreading observed in some tRNA synthetases, and we show that this activity can be abolished by mutation of a single residue. These studies illustrate how BioW can carry out three different biologically prevalent chemical reactions (adenylation, thioesterification, and proofreading) in the context of a new protein fold.

  5. Characterization of an L-phosphinothricin resistant glutamine synthetase from Exiguobacterium sp. and its improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaowei; Han, Yingkun; Kumar, Ashok; Gao, Haofeng; Liu, Ziduo; Hu, Nan

    2017-02-07

    A glutamine synthetase (GS; 1341 bp) gene with potent L-phosphinothricin (PPT) resistance was isolated and characterized from a marine bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. Molecular docking analysis indicated that the substitution of residues Glu60 and Arg64 may lead to significant changes in binding pocket. To enhance the enzymatic property of GS, variants E60A and R64G were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. The results revealed a noteworthy change in the thermostability and activity in comparison to the wild type (WT). WT exhibited optimum activity at 35 °C, while E60A and R64G exhibited optimum activity at 45 and 40 °C, respectively. The mutant R64G was 4.3 times more stable at 70 °C in comparison to WT, while E60A was 5.7 times more stable. Kinetic analysis revealed that the k cat value of R64G mutant was 8.10-, 7.25- and 7.63-fold that of WT for ADP, glutamine and hydroxylamine, respectively. The kinetic inhibition (K i, 4.91 ± 0.42 mM) of R64G was 2.02-fold that of WT (2.43 ± 0.14 mM) for L-phosphinothricin. The analysis of structure and function relationship showed that the binding pocket underwent dramatic changes when Arg site of 64 was substituted by Gly, thus promoting the rapid capture of substrates and leading to increase in activity and PPT-resistance of mutant R64G. The rearrangements of the residues at the molecular level formed new hydrogen bonds around the active site, which contributed to the increase of thermostability of enzymes. This study provides new insights into substrate binding mechanism of glutamine synthetase and the improved GS gene also has a potential for application in transgenic crops with L-phosphinothricin tolerance.

  6. Glutamic acid gamma-monohydroxamate and hydroxylamine are alternate substrates for Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehlein, S K; Schuster, S M; Richards, N G

    1996-03-01

    Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B (AS-B) catalyzes the synthesis of asparagine from aspartic acid and glutamine in an ATP-dependent reaction. The ability of this enzyme to employ hydroxylamine and L-glutamic acid gamma-monohydroxamate (LGH) as alternative substrates in place of ammonia and L-glutamine, respectively, has been investigated. The enzyme is able to function as an amidohydrolase, liberating hydroxylamine from LGH with high catalytic efficiency, as measured by k(cat)/K(M). In addition, the kinetic parameters determined for hydroxylamine in AS-B synthetase activity are very similar to those of ammonia. Nitrogen transfer from LGH to yield aspartic acid beta-monohydroxamate is also catalyzed by AS-B. While such an observation has been made for a few members of the trpG amidotransferase family, our results appear to be the first demonstration that nitrogen transfer can occur from glutamine analogs in a purF amidotransferase. However, k(cat)/K(M) for the ATP-dependent transfer of hydroxylamine from LGH to aspartic acid is reduced 3-fold relative to that for glutamine-dependent asparagine synthesis. Further, the AS-B mutant in which asparagine is replaced by alanine (N74A) can also use hydroxylamine as an alternate substrate to ammonia and catalyze the hydrolysis of LGH. The catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(M)) of nitrogen transfer from LGH and L-glutamine to beta-aspartyl-AMP are almost identical for the N74A AS-B mutant. These observations support the proposal that Asn-74 plays a role in catalyzing glutamine-dependent nitrogen transfer. We interpret our kinetic data as further evidence against ammonia-mediated nitrogen transfer from glutamine in the purF amidotransferase AS-B. These results are consistent with two alternate chemical mechanisms that have been proposed for this reaction [Boehlein, S. K., Richards, N. G. J., Walworth, E. S., & Schuster, S. M. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 26789-26795].

  7. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  8. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  9. The Pig PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius; Sun, Zhi;

    2016-01-01

    underrepresented in existing repositories. We here present a significantly improved build of the Pig PeptideAtlas, which includes pig proteome data from 25 tissues and three body fluid types mapped to 7139 canonical proteins. The content of the Pig PeptideAtlas reflects actively ongoing research within...... the veterinary proteomics domain, and this article demonstrates how the expression of isoform-unique peptides can be observed across distinct tissues and body fluids. The Pig PeptideAtlas is a unique resource for use in animal proteome research, particularly biomarker discovery and for preliminary design of SRM...

  10. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  11. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  12. Solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective.......This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective....

  13. Peptides and Food Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  14. Anticancer peptides from bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz M. Karpiński

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world. The rapid development of medicine and pharmacology allows to create new and effective anticancer drugs. Among modern anticancer drugs are bacterial proteins. Until now has been shown anticancer activity among others azurin and exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pep27anal2 from Streptococcus pneumoniae, diphtheria toxin from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and recently discovered Entap from Enterococcus sp. The study presents the current data regarding the properties, action and anticancer activity of listed peptides.

  15. Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Glutamine Synthetase in Avocado Fruit during Development and Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loulakakis, K. A.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, K. A.; Kanellis, A. K.

    1994-09-01

    The activity, protein, and isoenzymic profiles of glutamate de-hydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were studied during development and ripening of avocado (Percea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit. During fruit development, the activity and protein content of both GDH and GS remained relatively constant. In contrast, considerable changes in these enzymes were observed during ripening of avocado fruit. The specific activity of GDH increased about 4-fold, coincident with a similar increase in GDH protein content and mRNA levels. On the other hand, GS specific activity showed a decline at the end of the ripening process. On the isoenzymic profile of GDH, changes in the prevalence of the seven isoenzymes were found, with a predominance of the more cathodal isoenzymes in the unripe and of the most anodal isoenzymes in the ripe fruit. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that avocado fruit GDH consists of two subunits whose association gives rise to seven isoenzymes. The results support the view that the predominance of the more anodal isoenzymes in the overripe fruit was due to the accumulation of the [alpha]-polypeptide.

  16. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiraju, Anila K; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-14

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism.

  17. Evolutionary history of Arabidopsis thaliana aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dual-targeted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Marcelo M; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases (aaRS) are key players in translation and act early in protein synthesis by mediating the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNA molecules. In plants, protein synthesis may occur in three subcellular compartments (cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplasts), which requires multiple versions of the protein to be correctly delivered to its proper destination. The organellar aaRS are nuclear encoded and equipped with targeting information at the N-terminal sequence, which enables them to be specifically translocated to their final location. Most of the aaRS families present organellar proteins that are dual targeted to mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here, we examine the dual targeting behavior of aaRS from an evolutionary perspective. Our results show that Arabidopsis thaliana aaRS sequences are a result of a horizontal gene transfer event from bacteria. However, there is no evident bias indicating one single ancestor (Cyanobacteria or Proteobacteria). The dual-targeted aaRS phylogenetic relationship was characterized into two different categories (paralogs and homologs) depending on the state recovered for both dual-targeted and cytosolic proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that the dual-targeted condition is a gain-of-function derived from gene duplication. Selection may have maintained the original function in at least one of the copies as the additional copies diverged.

  18. Molecular Evolution of Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetase Proteins in the Early History of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Gregory P.; Andam, Cheryl P.; Alm, Eric J.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2011-12-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) consist of several families of functionally conserved proteins essential for translation and protein synthesis. Like nearly all components of the translation machinery, most aaRS families are universally distributed across cellular life, being inherited from the time of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). However, unlike the rest of the translation machinery, aaRS have undergone numerous ancient horizontal gene transfers, with several independent events detected between domains, and some possibly involving lineages diverging before the time of LUCA. These transfers reveal the complexity of molecular evolution at this early time, and the chimeric nature of genomes within cells that gave rise to the major domains. Additionally, given the role of these protein families in defining the amino acids used for protein synthesis, sequence reconstruction of their pre-LUCA ancestors can reveal the evolutionary processes at work in the origin of the genetic code. In particular, sequence reconstructions of the paralog ancestors of isoleucyl- and valyl- RS provide strong empirical evidence that at least for this divergence, the genetic code did not co-evolve with the aaRSs; rather, both amino acids were already part of the genetic code before their cognate aaRSs diverged from their common ancestor. The implications of this observation for the early evolution of RNA-directed protein biosynthesis are discussed.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru; Abramchik, Yu. A., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru; Zhukhlistova, N. E., E-mail: ugama@yandex.ru; Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  20. An Arabidopsis embryonic lethal mutant with reduced expression of alanyl—t RNA synthetase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNJIANGE; XIAOLIYAO; 等

    1998-01-01

    In present paper,one of the T-DNA insertional embryonic lethal mutant of Arabidopsis is identified and designated as acd mutant.The embryo developmant of this mutant is arrested in globular stage,The cell division pattern is abnormal during early embryogenesis and results in distubed cellular differentiation.Most of mutant embryos are finally degenerated and aborted in globular stage,However,a few of them still can germinate in agar palte and produce seedlings with shoter hypoctyl and distorted shoot meristem.To understand the molecular basis of the phenotype of this mutant,the joint fragment of T-DNA/plant DNA is isolated by plasmid rescue and Dig-labeled as probe for cDNA library screening.According to the sequence analysis and similarity searching,a 936 bp cDNA sequence(EMBL accession #:Y12555)from selectoed positive clone shows a 99.8%(923/925bp) sequence homolgy with Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase(AlaRS) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana.Furthermore,the data of in situ hybridization experiment indicate that the expression of Ala RS gene is weak in early embryogenesis and declines along with globular embryodevelopment in this mutant Accordingly,the reduced expression of Ala RS gene may be closely related to the morphological changes in early embryogenesis of this lethal mutant.

  1. Large-scale filament formation inhibits the activity of CTP synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Rachael M; Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Lorestani, Alexander; Charles, Emeric J; Habrian, Chris H; Hansen, Jesse M; Li, Hsin-Jung; Baldwin, Enoch P; Wingreen, Ned S; Kollman, Justin M; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-07-16

    CTP Synthetase (CtpS) is a universally conserved and essential metabolic enzyme. While many enzymes form small oligomers, CtpS forms large-scale filamentous structures of unknown function in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. By simultaneously monitoring CtpS polymerization and enzymatic activity, we show that polymerization inhibits activity, and CtpS's product, CTP, induces assembly. To understand how assembly inhibits activity, we used electron microscopy to define the structure of CtpS polymers. This structure suggests that polymerization sterically hinders a conformational change necessary for CtpS activity. Structure-guided mutagenesis and mathematical modeling further indicate that coupling activity to polymerization promotes cooperative catalytic regulation. This previously uncharacterized regulatory mechanism is important for cellular function since a mutant that disrupts CtpS polymerization disrupts E. coli growth and metabolic regulation without reducing CTP levels. We propose that regulation by large-scale polymerization enables ultrasensitive control of enzymatic activity while storing an enzyme subpopulation in a conformationally restricted form that is readily activatable.

  2. Role of tRNAPro in pretransfer editing of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyarshin K. S.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To characterize the process of tRNA-dependent pretransfer edi- ting of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase of bacteria Enterococcus faecalis (ProRSEf. Methods. Velocity of the editing processes in vitro was determined by ATP hydrolysis by ProRSEf. Pretransfer and posttransfer editing were experimentally separated by site-directed mutagenesis. Results. tRNA-dependent pretransfer editing is characterized by three-fold larger velocity then tRNA-independent editing. Effectivity of the process depends on the presence of 2'-hydroxyle group of A76 tRNAPro. In the absence of tRNAPro selective release of alanyl-AMP occurs simultaneously with tRNA-independent pretransfer editing. Released alanyl-AMP can be re-bound and hydrolyzed. Conclusions. tRNA-dependent pretransfer editing of alanine by ProRSEf is the catalytic mechanism, mediated by 2'-hydroxyl group of A76 tRNAPro. In the absence of tRNAPro tRNA-independent pretransfer editing and selective release of alanyl-AMP occur.

  3. Structural characterization of Helicobacter pylori dethiobiotin synthetase reveals differences between family members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Klimecka, Maria; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Nicholls, Robert A.; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Cuff, Marianne E.; Xu, Xiaohui; Cymborowski, Marcin; Murshudov, Garib N.; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek (MCSG); (UV); (MRC)

    2012-07-11

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) is involved in the biosynthesis of biotin in bacteria, fungi, and plants. As humans lack this pathway, DTBS is a promising antimicrobial drug target. We determined structures of DTBS from Helicobacter pylori (hpDTBS) bound with cofactors and a substrate analog, and described its unique characteristics relative to other DTBS proteins. Comparison with bacterial DTBS orthologs revealed considerable structural differences in nucleotide recognition. The C-terminal region of DTBS proteins, which contains two nucleotide-recognition motifs, differs greatly among DTBS proteins from different species. The structure of hpDTBS revealed that this protein is unique and does not contain a C-terminal region containing one of the motifs. The single nucleotide-binding motif in hpDTBS is similar to its counterpart in GTPases; however, isothermal titration calorimetry binding studies showed that hpDTBS has a strong preference for ATP. The structural determinants of ATP specificity were assessed with X-ray crystallographic studies of hpDTBS-ATP and hpDTBS-GTP complexes. The unique mode of nucleotide recognition in hpDTBS makes this protein a good target for H. pylori-specific inhibitors of the biotin synthesis pathway.

  4. Cancer association study of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase signaling network in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Wan Kim

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs and ARS-interacting multifunctional proteins (AIMPs exhibit remarkable functional versatility beyond their catalytic activities in protein synthesis. Their non-canonical functions have been pathologically linked to cancers. Here we described our integrative genome-wide analysis of ARSs to show cancer-associated activities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor. We first selected 23 ARS/AIMPs (together referred to as ARSN, 124 cancer-associated druggable target genes (DTGs and 404 protein-protein interactors (PPIs of ARSs using NCI's cancer gene index. 254 GBM affymetrix microarray data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA were used to identify the probe sets whose expression were most strongly correlated with survival (Kaplan-Meier plots versus survival times, log-rank t-test <0.05. The analysis identified 122 probe sets as survival signatures, including 5 of ARSN (VARS, QARS, CARS, NARS, FARS, and 115 of DTGs and PPIs (PARD3, RXRB, ATP5C1, HSP90AA1, CD44, THRA, TRAF2, KRT10, MED12, etc. Of note, 61 survival-related probes were differentially expressed in three different prognosis subgroups in GBM patients and showed correlation with established prognosis markers such as age and phenotypic molecular signatures. CARS and FARS also showed significantly higher association with different molecular networks in GBM patients. Taken together, our findings demonstrate evidence for an ARSN biology-dominant contribution in the biology of GBM.

  5. Impaired novelty acquisition and synaptic plasticity in congenital hyperammonemia caused by hepatic glutamine synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepkova, Aisa N.; Sergeeva, Olga A.; Görg, Boris; Haas, Helmut L.; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Häussinger, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Genetic defects in ammonia metabolism can produce irreversible damage of the developing CNS causing an impairment of cognitive and motor functions. We investigated alterations in behavior, synaptic plasticity and gene expression in the hippocampus and dorsal striatum of transgenic mice with systemic hyperammonemia resulting from conditional knockout of hepatic glutamine synthetase (LGS-ko). These mice showed reduced exploratory activity and delayed habituation to a novel environment. Field potential recordings from LGS-ko brain slices revealed significantly reduced magnitude of electrically-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in both CA3-CA1 hippocampal and corticostriatal synaptic transmission. Corticostriatal but not hippocampal slices from LGS-ko brains demonstrated also significant alterations in long-lasting effects evoked by pharmacological activation of glutamate receptors. Real-time RT-PCR revealed distinct patterns of dysregulated gene expression in the hippocampus and striatum of LGS-ko mice: LGS-ko hippocampus showed significantly modified expression of mRNAs for mGluR1, GluN2B subunit of NMDAR, and A1 adenosine receptors while altered expression of mRNAs for D1 dopamine receptors, the M1 cholinoreceptor and the acetylcholine-synthetizing enzyme choline-acetyltransferase was observed in LGS-ko striatum. Thus, inborn systemic hyperammonemia resulted in significant deficits in novelty acquisition and disturbed synaptic plasticity in corticostriatal and hippocampal pathways involved in learning and goal-directed behavior. PMID:28067279

  6. The Overproduction of Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase in E. coli and Its Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Wang, En-Duo; Wang, Ying-Lai

    1997-01-01

    The 3.2 kb gene (leuS) encoding for leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has been cloned from E.coli K-12, and overexpressed 35 times more than that in the host strain TG1. In order to further increase the production of LeuRS, two types of leuS with different length of the 3' flanking region: leuS1 has an additional 130 bp over that of leuS2 were ligated into pKK-233-2 and pTrc-99B, respectively. In E. coli TG1 transformant harboring the recombination plasmid pTrc-99B with leuS2, the yield of LeuRS was 135 times that in TG1 strain. The purified enzyme that showed one band on SDS-PAGE was obtained after two steps of column chromatography. During the construction of plasmid, a substitute of G for C was introduced at position of base 4 in the coding region of leuS, so that Gln2 of LeuRS was changed to Glu. This enzyme was designated LeuRS2E. The kinetic constants of LeuRS2E showed that the substitution has no effect on the enzyme activity and could be used in the studies of LeuRS as the native enzyme.

  7. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M. R. K.; Freund, Yvonne R.; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2016-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNALeu in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents. PMID:27431220

  8. Chitin synthetases in Candida albicans: a review on their subcellular distribution and biological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, J P; Gozalbo, D

    1994-09-01

    In the light of recent genetic advances, some results regarding chitin biosynthetic activities are reviewed in this paper. Genes coding for distinct enzymes displaying chitin synthetase activities have been characterized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as in other fungal species including Candida albicans. Several activities seem to exist in the cells: (i) one zymogenic, located in cytoplasmic vesicles called chitosomes, although the presence of other types of vesicles with zymogenic activity cannot be completely discarded, and (ii) plasma membrane associated activities (the active enzyme and probably two distinct pools of zymogenic activity). Possible relationships between these activities, if any, remain to be determined. These multiplicity of enzymes is not surprising taking into account that chitin biosynthesis is required during very well defined temporal and spatial events of the cell cycle. A general repair function for one of the chitin biosynthetic activities is proposed as a possible salvage mechanism to warrant cell survival after wall damage has been caused, since chitin appears to be the most suitable polymer to carry out this function due to its particular physico-chemical properties.

  9. A novel molecular mechanism to explain biotin-unresponsive holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayende, Lungisa; Swift, Rachel D; Bailey, Lisa M; Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Wallace, John C; Booker, Grant W; Polyak, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Biotin (vitamins H and B7) is an important micronutrient as defects in its availability, metabolism or adsorption can cause serious illnesses, especially in the young. A key molecule in the biotin cycle is holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS), which attaches biotin onto the biotin-dependent enzymes. Patients with congenital HLCS deficiency are prescribed oral biotin supplements that, in most cases, reverse the clinical symptoms. However, some patients respond poorly to biotin therapy and have an extremely poor long-term prognosis. Whilst a small number of mutations in the HLCS gene have been implicated, the molecular mechanisms that lead to the biotin-unresponsive phenotype are not understood. To improve our understanding of HLCS, limited proteolysis was performed together with yeast two-hybrid analysis. A structured domain within the N-terminal region that contained two missense mutations was identified in patients who were refractory to biotin therapy, namely p.L216R and p.L237P. Genetic studies demonstrated that the interaction between the enzyme and the protein substrate was disrupted by mutation. Further dissection of the binding mechanism using surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that the mutations reduced affinity for the substrate through a >15-fold increase in dissociation rate. Together, these data provide the first molecular explanation for HLCS-deficient patients that do not respond to biotin therapy.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6322 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  11. Formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene diversity in the guts of higher termites with different diets and lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, Elizabeth A; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we examine gene diversity for formyl-tetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS), a key enzyme in homoacetogenesis, recovered from the gut microbiota of six species of higher termites. The "higher" termites (family Termitidae), which represent the majority of extant termite species and genera, engage in a broader diversity of feeding and nesting styles than the "lower" termites. Previous studies of termite gut homoacetogenesis have focused on wood-feeding lower termites, from which the preponderance of FTHFS sequences recovered were related to those from acetogenic treponemes. While sequences belonging to this group were present in the guts of all six higher termites examined, treponeme-like FTHFS sequences represented the majority of recovered sequences in only two species (a wood-feeding Nasutitermes sp. and a palm-feeding Microcerotermes sp.). The remaining four termite species analyzed (a Gnathamitermes sp. and two Amitermes spp. that were recovered from subterranean nests with indeterminate feeding strategies and a litter-feeding Rhynchotermes sp.) yielded novel FTHFS clades not observed in lower termites. These termites yielded two distinct clusters of probable purinolytic Firmicutes and a large group of potential homoacetogens related to sequences previously recovered from the guts of omnivorous cockroaches. These findings suggest that the gut environments of different higher termite species may select for different groups of homoacetogens, with some species hosting treponeme-dominated homoacetogen populations similar to those of wood-feeding, lower termites while others host Firmicutes-dominated communities more similar to those of omnivorous cockroaches.

  12. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia.

  13. Lanthionine Synthetase C-Like 2 Modulates Immune Responses to Influenza Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Andrew; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Tubau-Juni, Nuria; Zoccoli-Rodriguez, Victoria; Lu, Pinyi; Godfrey, Victoria; Kale, Shiv; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Broad-based, host-targeted therapeutics have the potential to ameliorate viral infections without inducing antiviral resistance. We identified lanthionine synthetase C-like 2 (LANCL2) as a new therapeutic target for immunoinflammatory diseases. To examine the therapeutic efficacy of oral NSC61610 administration on influenza, we infected C57BL/6 mice with influenza A H1N1pdm virus and evaluated influenza-related mortality, lung inflammatory profiles, and pulmonary histopathology. Oral treatment with NSC61610 ameliorates influenza virus infection by down-modulating pulmonary inflammation through the downregulation of TNF-α and MCP-1 and reduction in the infiltration of neutrophils. NSC61610 treatment increases IL10-producing CD8+ T cells and macrophages in the lungs during the resolution phase of disease. The loss of LANCL2 or neutralization of IL-10 in mice infected with influenza virus abrogates the ability of NSC61610 to accelerate recovery and induce IL-10-mediated regulatory responses. These studies validate that oral treatment with NSC61610 ameliorates morbidity and mortality and accelerates recovery during influenza virus infection through a mechanism mediated by activation of LANCL2 and subsequent induction of IL-10 responses by CD8+ T cells and macrophages in the lungs.

  14. Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthetase, Ornithine Transcarbamylase, and Aspartate Transcarbamylase Activities in the Pea Ovary 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-España, Antonio; Carbonell, Juan; Rubio, Vicente

    1989-01-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS), ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC), and aspartate transcarbamylase (ATC) were assayed in extracts from unpollinated ovaries of Pisum sativum L. CPS and OTC activities were, per milligram protein, the highest reported in a plant tissue, representing an estimated 0.1% of the protein in the ovary. The OTC/CPS and ATC/CPS ratios were about 100 and 0.5, respectively, indicating that most of the carbamoyl phosphate is used for arginine synthesis. The weight, protein content, and CPS, OTC, and ATC activities per ovary were determined during the senescence of the ovary and also during fruit set induced by treatment with gibberellic acid (GA3). In the nontreated ovary the weight and the protein first increased and then decreased dramatically, but the decrease in protein took place much earlier. In the GA3-treated ovaries the increase in weight was considerably greater than the increase in the protein. Whether or not the ovaries were treated with GA3, CPS, OTC, and ATC activities closely followed the changes in protein, and thus their ratios and specific activities remained essentially constant. It appears that treatment with GA3 increases the amount of protein and enzymic activities by preventing a large increase in the rate of protein degradation. In addition, the effects of acetylglutamate, ornithine, and UMP on CPS activity were studied. The pea enzyme exhibits regulatory properties intermediate between those of Escherichia coli and the ureotelic liver enzymes. PMID:16666966

  15. Discovery of potent anti-tuberculosis agents targeting leucyl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudzera, Olga I; Golub, Andriy G; Bdzhola, Volodymyr G; Volynets, Galyna P; Lukashov, Sergiy S; Kovalenko, Oksana P; Kriklivyi, Ivan A; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Starosyla, Sergiy A; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M; Tukalo, Michail A

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a serious infectious disease caused by human pathogen bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial drug resistance is a very significant medical problem nowadays and development of novel antibiotics with different mechanisms of action is an important goal of modern medical science. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has been recently clinically validated as antimicrobial target. Here we report the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of M. tuberculosis LeuRS. Using receptor-based virtual screening we have identified six inhibitors of M. tuberculosis LeuRS from two different chemical classes. The most active compound 4-{[4-(4-Bromo-phenyl)-thiazol-2-yl]hydrazonomethyl}-2-methoxy-6-nitro-phenol (1) inhibits LeuRS with IC50 of 6μM. A series of derivatives has been synthesized and evaluated in vitro toward M. tuberculosis LeuRS. It was revealed that the most active compound 2,6-Dibromo-4-{[4-(4-nitro-phenyl)-thiazol-2-yl]-hydrazonomethyl}-phenol inhibits LeuRS with IC50 of 2.27μM. All active compounds were tested for antimicrobial effect against M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The compound 1 seems to have the best cell permeability and inhibits growth of pathogenic bacteria with IC50=10.01μM and IC90=13.53μM.

  16. Overexpression of a glutamine synthetase gene affects growth and development in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urriola, Jazmina; Rathore, Keerti S

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen is a primary macronutrient in plants, and nitrogen fertilizers play a critical role in crop production and yield. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a glutamine synthetase (GS) gene on nitrogen metabolism, and plant growth and development in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L., Moench). GS catalyzes the ATP dependent reaction between ammonia and glutamate to produce glutamine. A 1,071 bp long coding sequence of a sorghum cytosolic GS gene (Gln1) under the control of the maize ubiquitin (Ubq) promoter was introduced into sorghum immature embryos by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Progeny of the transformants exhibited higher accumulation of the Gln1 transcripts and up to 2.2-fold higher GS activity compared to the non-transgenic controls. When grown under optimal nitrogen conditions, these Gln1 transgenic lines showed greater tillering and up to 2.1-fold increase in shoot vegetative biomass. Interestingly, even under greenhouse conditions, we observed a seasonal component to both these parameters and the grain yield. Our results, showing that the growth and development of sorghum Gln1 transformants are also affected by N availability and other environmental factors, suggest complexity of the relationship between GS activity and plant growth and development. A better understanding of other control points and the ability to manipulate these will be needed to utilize the transgenic technology to improve nitrogen use efficiency of crop plants.

  17. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Lamers, Wouter H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2016-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na(+)-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression.

  18. Glutamine synthetase in Durum Wheat: Genotypic Variation and Relationship with Grain Protein Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Domenica; Fortunato, Stefania; Giove, Stefania L; Paradiso, Annalisa; Gu, Yong Q; Blanco, Antonio; de Pinto, Maria C; Gadaleta, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Grain protein content (GPC), is one of the most important trait in wheat and its characterized by a very complex genetic control. The identification of wheat varieties with high GPC (HGPC), as well as the characterization of central enzymes involved in these processes, are important for more sustainable agricultural practices. In this study, we focused on Glutamine synthetase (GS) as a candidate to study GPC in wheat. We analyzed GS expression and its enzymatic activity in different tissues and phenological stages in 10 durum wheat genotypes with different GPC. Although each genotype performed quite differently from the others, both because their genetic variability and their adaptability to specific environmental conditions, the highest GS activity and expression were found in genotypes with HGPC and vice versa the lowest ones in genotypes with low GPC (LGPC). Moreover, in genotypes contrasting in GPC bred at different nitrogen regimes (0, 60, 140 N Unit/ha) GS behaved differently in diverse organs. Nitrogen supplement increased GS expression and activity in roots of all genotypes, highlighting the key role of this enzyme in nitrogen assimilation and ammonium detoxification in roots. Otherwise, nitrogen treatments decreased GS expression and activity in the leaves of HGPC genotypes and did not affect GS in the leaves of LGPC genotypes. Finally, no changes in GS and soluble protein content occurred at the filling stage in the caryopses of all analyzed genotypes.

  19. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Calderón, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrázova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilková, Mária; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; Vega, José M; Eliášová, Adriana; Repčák, Miroslav; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress.

  20. Carnosine modulates glutamine synthetase expression in senescent astrocytes exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaojie; Wang, Bingyu; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Jingjing; Huang, Yuyan; Cao, Pei; Shen, Yao; Lyu, Jianxin

    2017-01-20

    Carnosine is believed to be neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia. However, few reports concern its function on senescent astrocytes during cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carnosine on cell damage and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in D-galactose-induced senescent astrocytes exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/recovery (OGD/R). The results showed that OGD/R caused massive cell damage and a significant decrease in GS expression both in the young and senescent astrocytes. The GS expression level was partly recovered whereas it continued to decline in the recovery stage in the young and senescent astrocytes, respectively. Decreased GS expression significantly inhibited glutamate uptake and glutamine production and release. Carnosine prevented the cell damage, rescued the expression of GS and reversed the glutamate uptake activity and glutamine production in the senescent astrocytes exposed to OGD/R. The modulatory effect of carnosine on GS expression was partly antagonized by pyrilamine, a selective histamine H1 receptors antagonist, but not bestatin. Bisindolylmaleimide II, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of PKC could also reverse the action of carnosine on GS expression. Thus, histamine H1 receptors and PKC pathway may be involved in the modulatory action of carnosine in GS expression in the senescent astrocytes exposed to OGD/R.

  1. Influence of different host associations on glutamine synthetase activity and ammonium transporter in Santalumalbum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, P; Yusuf, A

    2016-07-01

    The present study was aimed at understanding the role of different hosts in ammonium transporter1;2 expressions and glutamine synthetase(GS) activity and their effects on the growth parameters in the sandal. Sandal plant associated with leguminous host expressed better growth parameters. GS activity of leguminous hosts alone and in host associated sandals was analyzed using GS transferase assay. Highest GS activity was expressed in Mimosa pudica-sandal association compared to other leguminous and non-leguminous host associations. The association of N2 fixing host with sandal enhanced C and N levels in order to maintain the C/N value. The role of ammonium transporters in N nutrition of sandal-host association was elucidated by cloning AMT1;2 from the leaves, haustoria and roots of host associated sandal and quantifying the relative expression by the [Formula: see text] method. SaAMT1;2 was strongly up-regulated in leaves, roots and haustoria of leguminous host associated sandal compared to non-leguminous host associations. The relative increase in SaAMT1;2 expressions and up-regulated GS activity positively affected the growth parameters in sandal when associated with leguminous hosts.

  2. The role of glutamine synthetase in energy production and glutamine metabolism during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldarini, Nohaiah; Alhasawi, Azhar A; Thomas, Sean C; Appanna, Vasu D

    2017-01-17

    Oxidative stress is known to severely impede aerobic adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. However, the metabolically-versatile Pseudomonas fluorescens survives this challenge by invoking alternative ATP-generating networks. When grown in a medium with glutamine as the sole organic nutrient in the presence of H2O2, the microbe utilizes glutamine synthetase (GS) to modulate its energy budget. The activity of this enzyme that mediates the release of energy stored in glutamine was sharply increased in the stressed cells compared to the controls. The enhanced activities of such enzymes as acetate kinase, adenylate kinase and nucleotide diphosphate kinase ensured the efficacy of this ATP producing-machine by transferring the high energy phosphate. The elevated amounts of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase recorded in the H2O2 exposed cells provided another route to ATP independent of the reduction of O2. This is the first demonstration of a metabolic pathway involving GS dedicated to ATP synthesis. The phospho-transfer network that is pivotal to the survival of the microorganism under oxidative stress may reveal therapeutic targets against infectious microbes reliant on glutamine for their proliferation.

  3. Assessment of glutamine synthetase activity by [13N]ammonia uptake in living rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momosaki, Sotaro; Ito, Miwa; Tonomura, Misato; Abe, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an important role in glutamate neurotransmission or neurological disorder in the brain. [(13) N]Ammonia blood flow tracer has been reported to be metabolically trapped in the brain via the glutamate-glutamine pathway. The present study investigated the effect of an inhibitor of GS on [(13) N]ammonia uptake in order to clarify the feasibility of measuring GS activity in the living brain. l-Methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a selective GS inhibitor was microinjected into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. [(13) N]Ammonia uptake was quantified by autoradiography method as well as small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The GS activity of the brain homogenate was assayed from the γ-glutamyl transferase reaction. Autoradiograms showed a decrease of [(13) N]ammonia radioactivity on the MSO-injected side compared with the saline-injected side of the striatum. This reduction could be detected with a small animal PET scanner. MSO had no effect on cerebral blood flow measured by uptake of [(15) O]H2 O. The reduction of [(13) N]ammonia uptake was closely related to the results of GS activity assay. These results indicated that [(13) N]ammonia may enable measurement of GS activity in the living brain.

  4. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Ana R; Carvalho, Helena G

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of GS isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  5. Effect of bromochloromethane and fumarate on phylogenetic diversity of the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene in bovine rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Matsui, Hiroki; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Shinkai, Takumi; Takenaka, Akio; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Effect of the methane inhibitor, bromochloromethane (BCM) and dietary substrate, fumarate, on microbial community structure of acetogen bacteria in the bovine rumen was investigated through analysis of the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene (fhs). The fhs sequences obtained from BCM-untreated, BCM-treated, fumarate-untreated and fumarate-treated bovine rumen were categorized into homoacetogens and nonhomoacetogenic bacteria by homoacetogen similarity scores. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that most of the fhs sequences categorized into homoacetogens were divided into nine clusters, which were in close agreement with a result shown in a self-organizing map. The diversity of the fhs sequences from the BCM-treated rumen was significantly different from those from BCM-non-treated rumen. Principal component analysis also showed that addition of BCM to the rumen altered the population structure of acetogenic bacteria significantly but the effect of fumarate was comparatively minor. These results indicate that BCM affects diversity of actogens in the bovine rumen, and changes in acetogenic community structure in response to methane inhibitors may be caused by different mechanisms.

  6. The Relationship of Arginine Deprivation, Argininosuccinate Synthetase and Cell Death in Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niramol Savaraj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that melanoma cells do not express argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS and therefore are unable to synthesize arginine from citrulline. Depleting arginine using pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20 results in cell death in melanoma but not normal cells. This concept was translated into clinical trial and responses were seen. However, induction of ASS expression does occur which results in resistance to ADI -PEG20. We have used 4 melanoma cell lines to study factors which may govern ASS expression. Although these 4 melanoma cell lines do not express ASS protein or mRNA as detected by both immunoblot and northernblot analysis, ASS protein can be induced after these cells are grown in the presence of ADI-PEG20, but again repressed after replenishing arginine in the media. The levels of induction are different and one cell line could not be induced. Interestingly, a melanoma cell line with the highest level of induction could also be made resistant to ADI-PEG20. This resistant line possesses high levels of ASS mRNA and protein expression which cannot be repressed with arginine. Our study indicates that ASS expression in melanoma cells is complex and governed by biochemical parameters which are different among melanoma cells.

  7. Electron Transport Controls Glutamine Synthetase Activity in the Facultative Heterotrophic Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J. C.; Crespo, J. L.; Garcia-Dominguez, M.; Florencio, F. J.

    1995-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was inactivated in vivo by transferring cells from light to darkness or by incubation with the photosynthetic inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea but not with 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone. Addition of glucose prevented both dark and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea GS inactivation. In a Synechocystis psbE-psbF mutant (T1297) lacking photosystem II, glucose was required to maintain active GS, even in the light. However, in nitrogen-starved T1297 cells the removal of glucose did not affect GS activity. The fact that dark-inactivated GS was reactivated in vitro by the same treatments that reactivate the ammonium-inactivated GS points out that both nitrogen metabolism and redox state of the cells lead to the same molecular regulatory mechanism in the control of GS activity. Using GS antibodies we detected that dark-inactivated GS displayed a different electrophoretic migration with respect to the active form in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis but not in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The possible pathway to modulate GS activity by the electron transport flow in Synechocystis cells is discussed.

  8. 2'-phosphodiesterase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activities in the lowest metazoans, sponge [porifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saby, Emilie; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Justesen, Just

    2009-01-01

    Sponges [porifera], the most ancient metazoans, contain modules related to the vertebrate immune system, including the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). The components of the antiviral 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2–5A) system (OAS, 2′-Phosphodiesterase (2′-PDE) and RNAse L) of vertebrates have...... not all been identified in sponges. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that in addition to the OAS activity, sponges possess a 2′-PDE activity, which highlights the probable existence of a premature 2–5A system. Indeed, Suberites domuncula and Crella elegans exhibited this 2–5A degrading activity....... Upon this finding, two out of three elements forming the 2–5A system have been found in sponges, only a endoribonuclease, RNAse L or similar, has to be found. We suspect the existence of a complex immune system in sponges, besides the self/non-self recognition system and the use of phagocytosis...

  9. Integrative Molecular Profiling Reveals Asparagine Synthetase Is a Target in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Kanishka; Huang, Heng; Hu, Limei; Cogdell, David; Dhillon, Jasreman; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Efstathiou, Eleni; Koumakpayi, Ismaël H.; Saad, Fred; Luo, Dijun; Bismar, Tarek A.; Aparicio, Ana; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The identification of new and effective therapeutic targets for the lethal, castration-resistant stage of prostate cancer (CRPC) has been challenging because of both the paucity of adequate frozen tissues and a lack of integrated molecular analysis. Therefore, in this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number alterations from 34 unique surgical CRPC specimens and 5 xenografts, with matched transcriptomic profiling of 25 specimens. An integrated analysis of these data revealed that the asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene showed a gain in copy number and was overexpressed at the transcript level. The overexpression of ASNS was validated by analyzing other public CRPC data sets. ASNS protein expression, as detected by reverse-phase protein lysate array, was tightly correlated with gene copy number. In addition, ASNS protein expression, as determined by IHC analysis, was associated with progression to a therapy-resistant disease state in TMAs that included 77 castration-resistant and 40 untreated prostate cancer patient samples. Knockdown of ASNS by small-interfering RNAs in asparagine-deprived media led to growth inhibition in both androgen-responsive (ie, LNCaP) and castration-resistant (ie, C4-2B) prostate cancer cell lines and in cells isolated from a CRPC xenograft (ie, MDA PCa 180-30). Together, our results suggest that ASNS is up-regulated in cases of CRPC and that depletion of asparagine using ASNS inhibitors will be a novel strategy for targeting CRPC cells. PMID:22245216

  10. Human selenophosphate synthetase 1 has five splice variants with unique interactions, subcellular localizations and expression patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Young [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Genomics, School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwang Hee [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Genomics, School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Myoung Sup; Shin, Hyein [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Genomics, School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Xu, Xue-Ming; Carlson, Bradley A.; Hatfield, Dolph L. [Laboratory of Cancer Prevention, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Lee, Byeong Jae, E-mail: imbglmg@snu.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Genomics, School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-18

    Selenophosphate synthetase 1 (SPS1) is an essential cellular gene in higher eukaryotes. Five alternative splice variants of human SPS1 (major type, {Delta}E2, {Delta}E8, +E9, +E9a) were identified wherein +E9 and +E9a make the same protein. The major type was localized in both the nuclear and plasma membranes, and the others in the cytoplasm. All variants form homodimers, and in addition, the major type forms a heterodimer with {Delta}E2, and {Delta}E8 with +E9. The level of expression of each splice variant was different in various cell lines. The expression of each alternative splice variant was regulated during the cell cycle. The levels of the major type and {Delta}E8 were gradually increased until G2/M phase and then gradually decreased. {Delta}E2 expression peaked at mid-S phase and then gradually decreased. However, +E9/+E9a expression decreased gradually after cell cycle arrest. The possible involvement of SPS1 splice variants in cell cycle regulation is discussed.

  11. Glutamine synthetase stabilizes the binding of GlnR to nitrogen fixation gene operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Gabriela de C; Hauf, Ksenia; Sant'Anna, Fernando H; Forchhammer, Karl; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2017-03-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a high energy demanding process carried out by diazotrophic microorganisms that supply combined nitrogen to the biosphere. The genes related to BNF are strictly regulated, but these mechanisms are poorly understood in gram-positive bacteria. The transcription factor GlnR was proposed to regulate nitrogen fixation-related genes based on Paenibacillus comparative genomics. In order to validate this proposal, we investigated BNF regulatory sequences in Paenibacillus riograndensis SBR5(T) genome. We identified GlnR-binding sites flanking σ(A) -binding sites upstream from BNF-related genes. GlnR binding to these sites was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. GlnR-DNA affinity is greatly enhanced when GlnR is in complex with feedback-inhibited (glutamine-occupied) glutamine synthetase (GS). GlnR-GS complex formation is also modulated by ATP and AMP. Thereby, gene repression exerted by the GlnR-GS complex is coupled with nitrogen (glutamine levels) and energetic status (ATP and AMP). Finally, we propose a DNA-looping model based on multiple operator sites that represents a strong and strict regulation for these genes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Glutamine synthetase activity and glutamate uptake in hippocampus and frontal cortex in portal hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriela Beatriz Acosta; María Alejandra Fernández; Diego Martín Roselló; María Luján Tomaro; Karina Balestrasse; Abraham Lemberg

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and glutamate uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex (FC) from rats with prehepatic portal vein hypertension. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into shamoperated group and a portal hypertension (PH) group with a regulated stricture of the portal vein. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation 14 d after portal vein stricture. GS activity was determined in the hippocampus and FC. Specific uptake of radiolabeled L-glutamate was studied using synaptosome-enriched fractions that were freshly prepared from both brain areas. RESULTS: We observed that the activity of GS increased in the hippocampus of PH rats, as compared to control animals, and decreased in the FC. A significant decrease in glutamate uptake was found in both brain areas, and was more marked in the hippocampus. The decrease in glutamate uptake might have been caused by a deficient transport function, significantly and persistent increase in this excitatory neurotransmitter activity. CONCLUSION: The presence of moderate ammonia blood levels may add to the toxicity of excitotoxic glutamate in the brain, which causes alterations in brain function. Portal vein stricture that causes portal hypertension modifies the normal function in some brain regions.

  13. Glutamine synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L; Hock, Andreas K; Barnett, Susan C; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-12-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance the carbon and nitrogen requirements of tissues. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle, and that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect cell proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by glutamine synthetase (GS; cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, (13)C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA-cycle-derived carbons. Finally, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is contributed only marginally by the circulation, and is mainly either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes.

  14. In vitro characterization of the NAD+ synthetase NadE1 from Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskoski, Kerly; Santos, Adrian R S; Bonatto, Ana C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase enzyme (NadE) catalyzes the amination of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) to form NAD(+). This reaction represents the last step in the majority of the NAD(+) biosynthetic routes described to date. NadE enzymes typically use either glutamine or ammonium as amine nitrogen donor, and the reaction is energetically driven by ATP hydrolysis. Given the key role of NAD(+) in bacterial metabolism, NadE has attracted considerable interest as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. The plant-associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae encodes two putative NadE, namely nadE1 and nadE2. The nadE1 gene is linked to glnB encoding the signal transduction protein GlnB. Here we report the purification and in vitro characterization of H. seropedicae NadE1. Gel filtration chromatography analysis suggests that NadE1 is an octamer. The NadE1 activity was assayed in vitro, and the Michaelis-Menten constants for substrates NaAD, ATP, glutamine and ammonium were determined. Enzyme kinetic and in vitro substrate competition assays indicate that H. seropedicae NadE1 uses glutamine as a preferential nitrogen donor.

  15. Identification of a phosphinothricin-resistant mutant of rice glutamine synthetase using DNA shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Xiao-Juan; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2015-10-23

    To date, only bar/pat gene derived from Streptomyces has been used to generate the commercial PPT-resistant crops currently available in the market. The limited source of bar/pat gene is probably what has caused the decrease in PPT-tolerance, which has become the main concern of those involved in field management programs. Although glutamine synthetase (GS) is the target enzyme of PPT, little study has been reported about engineering PPT-resistant plants with GS gene. Then, the plant-optimized GS gene from Oryza sativa (OsGS1S) was chemically synthesized in the present study by PTDS to identify a GS gene for developing PPT-tolerant plants. However, OsGS1S cannot be directly used for developing PPT-tolerant plants because of its poor PPT-resistance. Thus, we performed DNA shuffling on OsGS1S, and one highly PPT-resistant mutant with mutations in four amino acids (A63E, V193A, T293A and R295K) was isolated after three rounds of DNA shuffling and screening. Among the four amino acids substitutions, only R295K was identified as essential in altering PPT resistance. The R295K mutation has also never been previously reported as an important residue for PPT resistance. Furthermore, the mutant gene has been transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis to confirm its potential in developing PPT-resistant crops.

  16. Leishmania infantum Asparagine Synthetase A Is Dispensable for Parasites Survival and Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Joana; Loureiro, Inês; Santarém, Nuno; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Tavares, Joana; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    A growing interest in asparagine (Asn) metabolism has currently been observed in cancer and infection fields. Asparagine synthetase (AS) is responsible for the conversion of aspartate into Asn in an ATP-dependent manner, using ammonia or glutamine as a nitrogen source. There are two structurally distinct AS: the strictly ammonia dependent, type A, and the type B, which preferably uses glutamine. Absent in humans and present in trypanosomatids, AS-A was worthy of exploring as a potential drug target candidate. Appealingly, it was reported that AS-A was essential in Leishmania donovani, making it a promising drug target. In the work herein we demonstrate that Leishmania infantum AS-A, similarly to Trypanosoma spp. and L. donovani, is able to use both ammonia and glutamine as nitrogen donors. Moreover, we have successfully generated LiASA null mutants by targeted gene replacement in L. infantum, and these parasites do not display any significant growth or infectivity defect. Indeed, a severe impairment of in vitro growth was only observed when null mutants were cultured in asparagine limiting conditions. Altogether our results demonstrate that despite being important under asparagine limitation, LiAS-A is not essential for parasite survival, growth or infectivity in normal in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore we exclude AS-A as a suitable drug target against L. infantum parasites.

  17. Seryl-tRNA Synthetases from Methanogenic Archaea: Suppression of Bacterial Amber Mutation and Heterologous Toxicity

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    Drasko Boko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic archaea possess unusual seryl-tRNA synthetases (SerRS, evolutionarily distinct from the SerRSs found in other archaea, eucaryotes and bacteria. Our recent X-ray structural analysis of Methanosarcina barkeri SerRS revealed an idiosyncratic N-terminal domain and catalytic zinc ion in the active site. To shed further light on substrate discrimination by methanogenic-type SerRS, we set up to explore in vivo the interaction of methanogenic-type SerRSs with their cognate tRNAs in Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of various methanogenic-type SerRSs was toxic for E. coli, resulting in the synthesis of erroneous proteins, as revealed by β-galactosidase stability assay. Although SerRSs from methanogenic archaea recognize tRNAsSer from all three domains of life in vitro, the toxicity presumably precluded the complementation of endogenous SerRS function in both, E. coli and S. cerevisiae. However, despite the observed toxicity, coexpression of methanogenic-type SerRS with its cognate tRNA suppressed bacterial amber mutation.

  18. Evolution of selenophosphate synthetases: emergence and relocation of function through independent duplications and recurrent subfunctionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Marco; Santesmasses, Didac; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Mateo, Andrea; Arnan, Carme; Johnson, Rory; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat; Gabaldón, Toni; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-09-01

    Selenoproteins are proteins that incorporate selenocysteine (Sec), a nonstandard amino acid encoded by UGA, normally a stop codon. Sec synthesis requires the enzyme Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS or SelD), conserved in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes encoding selenoproteins. Here, we study the evolutionary history of SPS genes, providing a map of selenoprotein function spanning the whole tree of life. SPS is itself a selenoprotein in many species, although functionally equivalent homologs that replace the Sec site with cysteine (Cys) are common. Many metazoans, however, possess SPS genes with substitutions other than Sec or Cys (collectively referred to as SPS1). Using complementation assays in fly mutants, we show that these genes share a common function, which appears to be distinct from the synthesis of selenophosphate carried out by the Sec- and Cys- SPS genes (termed SPS2), and unrelated to Sec synthesis. We show here that SPS1 genes originated through a number of independent gene duplications from an ancestral metazoan selenoprotein SPS2 gene that most likely already carried the SPS1 function. Thus, in SPS genes, parallel duplications and subsequent convergent subfunctionalization have resulted in the segregation to different loci of functions initially carried by a single gene. This evolutionary history constitutes a remarkable example of emergence and evolution of gene function, which we have been able to trace thanks to the singular features of SPS genes, wherein the amino acid at a single site determines unequivocally protein function and is intertwined to the evolutionary fate of the entire selenoproteome.

  19. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

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    Margarita eGarcía-Calderón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2 in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L .japonicus plants in response to stress.

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of "dihydrobiopterin synthetase" deficiency, a variant form of phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederwieser, A; Shintaku, H; Hasler, T; Curtius, H C; Lehmann, H; Guardamagna, O; Schmidt, H

    1986-08-01

    Amniocentesis was performed at 19 weeks gestation in a mother who had previously delivered a boy with "dihydrobiopterin synthetase" (DHBS) deficiency. The amniotic fluid contained neopterin in high (136 nmol/l) and biopterin in very low concentrations (1.8 nmol/l). The activity of the phosphate-eliminating enzyme (PEE, also called 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase, substrate: 7,8-dihydroneopterin triphosphate) which is present in liver and erythrocytes and defective in DHBS deficiency, was measured in the erythrocytes of the family members. The fetal sample showed only 2% of the activity of healthy adult controls and was comparable with that of the affected sibling. Obligate heterozygotes had activities around 20% of the controls. Two fetal control samples showed even higher activities than adult erythrocytes, Sepiapterin reductase activities wer normal in all cases. At autopsy, PEE deficiency was confirmed in the liver of the fetus. We concluded that DHBS deficiency (and most probably also GTP cyclohydrolase I deficiency) can be diagnosed by metabolite measurements in amniotic fluid. PEE activity is measurable in erythrocytes, although the assay needs to be improved. Since maternal tetrahydrobiopterin does not cross the placenta, treatment of a tetrahydrobiopterin-deficient fetus with tetrahydrobiopterin in utero is not possible.

  1. Cyclitols protect glutamine synthetase and malate dehydrogenase against heat induced deactivation and thermal denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaindl, Martina; Popp, Marianne

    2006-06-30

    The accumulation of cyclitols in plants is a widespread response that provides protection against various environmental stresses. The capacity of myo-Inositol, pinitol, quercitol, and other compatible solutes (i.e., sorbitol, proline, and glycinebetaine) to protect proteins against thermally induced denaturation and deactivation was examined. Enzymatic activity measurements of L-glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli and Hordeum vulgare showed that the presence of cyclitols during heat treatment resulted in a significantly higher percentage of residual activity. CD spectroscopy experiments were used to study thermal stabilities of protein secondary structures upon the addition of myo-Inositol, pinitol, and glucose. 0.4 M myo-Inositol was observed to raise the melting temperature (Tm) of GS from E. coli by 3.9 degrees C and MDH from pig heart by 3.4 degrees C, respectively. Pinitol showed an increase in Tm of MDH by 3.8 degrees C, whereas glucose was not effective. Our results show a great potential of stabilizing proteins by the addition of cyclitols.

  2. Exploring Protein-Peptide Binding Specificity through Computational Peptide Screening.

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    Arnab Bhattacherjee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The binding of short disordered peptide stretches to globular protein domains is important for a wide range of cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein transport, and immune response. The often promiscuous nature of these interactions and the conformational flexibility of the peptide chain, sometimes even when bound, make the binding specificity of this type of protein interaction a challenge to understand. Here we develop and test a Monte Carlo-based procedure for calculating protein-peptide binding thermodynamics for many sequences in a single run. The method explores both peptide sequence and conformational space simultaneously by simulating a joint probability distribution which, in particular, makes searching through peptide sequence space computationally efficient. To test our method, we apply it to 3 different peptide-binding protein domains and test its ability to capture the experimentally determined specificity profiles. Insight into the molecular underpinnings of the observed specificities is obtained by analyzing the peptide conformational ensembles of a large number of binding-competent sequences. We also explore the possibility of using our method to discover new peptide-binding pockets on protein structures.

  3. Expression of the plastid-located glutamine synthetase of Medicago truncatula. Accumulation of the precursor in root nodules reveals an in vivo control at the level of protein import into plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Paula M; Lima, Lígia M; Santos, Isabel M; Carvalho, Helena G; Cullimore, Julie V

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we report the cloning and characterization of the plastid-located glutamine synthetase (GS) of Medicago truncatula Gaertn (MtGS2). A cDNA was isolated encoding a GS2 precursor polypeptide of 428 amino acids composing an N-terminal transit peptide of 49 amino acids. Expression analysis, by Westerns and by northern hybridization, revealed that MtGS2 is expressed in both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organs. Both transcripts and proteins of MtGS2 were detected in substantial amounts in root nodules, suggesting that the enzyme might be performing some important role in this organ. Surprisingly, about 40% of the plastid GS in nodules occurred in the non-processed precursor form (preGS2). This precursor was not detected in any other organ studied and moreover was not observed in non-fixing nodules. Cellular fractionation of nodule extracts revealed that preGS2 is associated with the plastids and that it is catalytically inactive. Immunogold electron microscopy revealed a frequent coincidence of GS with the plastid envelope. Taken together, these results suggest a nodule-specific accumulation of the GS2 precursor at the surface of the plastids in nitrogen-fixing nodules. These results may reflect a regulation of GS2 activity in relation to nitrogen fixation at the level of protein import into nodule plastids.

  4. Endogenous opioid peptides and epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Haffmans (Judith)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years a large number of pept:ides, many of which were originall.y characterized in non-neural tissues, have been reported to be present in the central nervous system ( CNS) . The detection of these peptides within the CNS has raised many questions regarding their source and mec

  5. Endocrine cells producing regulatory peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solcia, E; Usellini, L; Buffa, R; Rindi, G; Villani, L; Zampatti, C; Silini, E

    1987-07-15

    Recent data on the immunolocalization of regulatory peptides and related propeptide sequences in endocrine cells and tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, lung, thyroid, pituitary (ACTH and opioids), adrenals and paraganglia have been revised and discussed. Gastrin, xenopsin, cholecystokinin (CCK), somatostatin, motilin, secretin, GIP (gastric inhibitory polypeptide), neurotensin, glicentin/glucagon-37 and PYY (peptide tyrosine tyrosine) are the main products of gastrointestinal endocrine cells; glucagon, CRF (corticotropin releasing factor), somatostatin, PP (pancreatic polypeptide) and GRF (growth hormone releasing factor), in addition to insulin, are produced in pancreatic islet cells; bombesin-related peptides are the main markers of pulmonary endocrine cells; calcitonin and CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) occur in thyroid and extrathyroid C cells; ACTH and endorphins in anterior and intermediate lobe pituitary cells, alpha-MSH and CLIP (corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide) in intermediate lobe cells; met- and leu-enkephalins and related peptides in adrenal medullary and paraganglionic cells as well as in some gut (enterochromaffin) cells; NPY (neuropeptide Y) in adrenaline-type adrenal medullary cells, etc.. Both tissue-appropriate and tissue-inappropriate regulatory peptides are produced by endocrine tumours, with inappropriate peptides mostly produced by malignant tumours.

  6. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  7. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...

  8. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the uni

  9. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...

  10. Molecular, chemical and biological screening of soil actinomycete isolates in seeking bioactive peptide metabolites

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    Javad Hamedi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Due to the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains, screening of natural resources, especially actinomycetes, for new therapeutic agents discovery has become the interests of researchers. In this study, molecular, chemical and biological screening of soil actinomycetes was carried out in order to search for peptide-producing actinomycetes.Materials and Methods: 60 actinomycetes were isolated from soils of Iran. The isolates were subjected to molecular screening for detection NRPS (non-ribosomal peptide synthetases gene. Phylogenic identification of NRPS containing isolates was performed. Chemical screening of the crude extracts was performed using chlorine o-dianisidine as peptide detector reagent and bioactivity of peptide producing strains was determined by antimicrobial bioassay. High pressure liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS with UV-visible spectroscopy was performed for detection of the metabolite diversity in selected strain.Results: Amplified NRPS adenylation gene (700 bp was detected among 30 strains. Phylogenic identification of these isolates showed presence of rare actinomycetes genera among the isolates and 10 out of 30 strains were subjected to chemical screening. Nocardia sp. UTMC 751 showed antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal test pathogens. HPLC-MSand UV-visible spectroscopy results from the crude extract showed that this strain has probably the ability to produce new metabolites.Conclusion: By application of a combined approach, including molecular, chemical and bioactivity analysis, a promising strain of Nocardia sp. UTMC 751 was obtained. This strain had significant activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Strain Nocardia sp. UTMC 751 produce five unknown and most probably new metabolites with molecular weights of 274.2, 390.3, 415.3, 598.4 and 772.5. This strain had showed 99% similarity to Nocardia ignorata DSM 44496 T.

  11. Purification and use of E. coli peptide deformylase for peptide deprotection in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia; Sonke, Theo; Quaedflieg, Peter J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide deformylases (PDFs) catalyze the removal of the formyl group from the N-terminal methionine residue in nascent polypeptide chains in prokaryotes. Its deformylation activity makes PDF an attractive candidate for the biocatalytic deprotection of formylated peptides that are used in chemoenzyma

  12. Metabolic indicators of drought stress tolerance in wheat: glutamine synthetase isoenzymes and Rubisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltán; Németh, Edit; Guóth, Adrienn; Bona, Lajos; Wodala, Barnabás; Pécsváradi, Attila

    2013-06-01

    Drought stress has a considerable impact on the ecosystem and agriculture. Continuous water deficit induces early leaf senescence in plants. During this process, chloroplasts are degraded and photosynthesis drastically drops. The objective of this investigation was to look into the regulation of nitrogen and carbon metabolism during water deficit. Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; EC 4.1.1.39) and the total protein contents inform us of the sink-source relation in plants. Glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) isoenzymes are good markers of plastid status (GS2) and the nitrogen metabolism (GS1). Tolerant and sensitive wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes were tested, which are widely used in agriculture. The amount of protein, Rubisco and GS isoforms in leaves were measured during the grain filling period, as indicative traits that ultimately determine the onset and stage of senescence. The symptoms of senescence first appeared on the oldest and finally on the youngest leaves. Drought stress disrupted the sequentiality of senescence in the sensitive varieties. An untimely senescence appeared in flag leaves, earlier than in the older leaves. Total protein and Rubisco contents decreased and the GS2 isoenzyme declined considerably in the youngest leaves. In the tolerant varieties, however, these physiological parameters did not change under drought, only the sequential senescence of leaf levels accelerated in some cases compared to the control, well-watered plants. Our results revealed that GS is a good indicator of drought stress, which can be applied for the characterization of wheat cultivars in terms of drought stress tolerance.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase: biochemical features of a crucial enzyme for mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis.

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    Anna P Lucarelli

    Full Text Available The selection and soaring spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant strains (XDR-TB is a severe public health problem. Currently, there is an urgent need for new drugs for tuberculosis treatment, with novel mechanisms of action and, moreover, the necessity to identify new drug targets. Mycobacterial phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (MtbPRPPase is a crucial enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of decaprenylphosphoryl-arabinose, an essential precursor for the mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Moreover, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate, which is the product of the PRPPase catalyzed reaction, is the precursor for the biosynthesis of nucleotides and of some amino acids such as histidine and tryptophan. In this context, the elucidation of the molecular and functional features of MtbPRPPase is mandatory. MtbPRPPase was obtained as a recombinant form, purified to homogeneity and characterized. According to its hexameric form, substrate specificity and requirement of phosphate for activity, the enzyme proved to belong to the class I of PRPPases. Although the sulfate mimicked the phosphate, it was less effective and required higher concentrations for the enzyme activation. MtbPRPPase showed hyperbolic response to ribose 5-phosphate, but sigmoidal behaviour towards Mg-ATP. The enzyme resulted to be allosterically activated by Mg(2+ or Mn(2+ and inhibited by Ca(2+ and Cu(2+ but, differently from other characterized PRPPases, it showed a better affinity for the Mn(2+ and Cu(2+ ions, indicating a different cation binding site geometry. Moreover, the enzyme from M. tuberculosis was allosterically inhibited by ADP, but less sensitive to inhibition by GDP. The characterization of M. tuberculosis PRPPase provides the starting point for the development of inhibitors for antitubercular drug design.

  14. Three promoters regulate the transcriptional activity of the human holocarboxylase synthetase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mengna; Malkaram, Sridhar A; Zempleni, Janos

    2013-11-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) is the only protein biotin ligase in the human proteome. HLCS-dependent biotinylation of carboxylases plays crucial roles in macronutrient metabolism. HLCS appears to be an essential part of multiprotein complexes in the chromatin that cause gene repression and contribute toward genome stability. Consistent with these essential functions, HLCS knockdown causes strong phenotypes including shortened life span and low stress resistance in Drosophila melanogaster, and de-repression of long-terminal repeats in humans, other mammalian cell lines and Drosophila. Despite previous observations that the expression of HLCS depends on biotin status in rats and in human cell lines, little is known about the regulation of HLCS expression. The goal of this study was to identify promoters that regulate the expression of the human HLCS gene. Initially, the human HLCS locus was interrogated in silico using predictors of promoters including sequences of HLCS mRNA and expressed sequence tags, CpG islands, histone marks denoting transcriptionally poised chromatin, transcription factor binding sites and DNaseI hypersensitive regions. Our predictions revealed three putative HLCS promoters, denoted P1, P2 and P3. Promoters lacked a TATA box, which is typical for housekeeping genes. When the three promoters were cloned into a luciferase reporter plasmid, reporter gene activity was at least three times background noise in human breast, colon and kidney cell lines; activities consistently followed the pattern P1>P3>P2. Promoter activity depended on the concentration of biotin in culture media, but the effect was moderate. We conclude that we have identified promoters in the human HLCS gene.

  15. Glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase ammonium-assimilating pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perysinakis, A; Kinghorn, J R; Drainas, C

    1995-06-01

    Kinetic parameters of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (glutamine-oxoglutarate aminotransferase) (GOGAT) activities, including initial velocity, pH, and temperature optima, as well as Km values, were estimated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe crude cell-free extracts. Five glutamine auxotrophic mutants of S. pombe were isolated following MNNG treatment. These were designated gln1-1,2,3,4,5, and their growth could be repaired only by glutamine. Mutants gln1-1,2,3,4,5 were found to lack GS activity, but retained wild-type levels of NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), NAD-GDH, and GOGAT. One further glutamine auxotrophic mutant, gln1-6, was isolated and found to lack both GS and GOGAT but retained wild-type levels of NADP-GDH and NAD-GDH activities. Fortuitously, this isolate was found to harbor an unlinked second mutation (designated gog1-1), which resulted in complete loss of GOGAT activity but retained wild-type GS activity. The growth phenotype of mutant gog1-1 (in the absence of the gln1-6 mutation) was found to be indistinguishable from the wild type on various nitrogen sources, including ammonium as a sole nitrogen source. Double-mutant strains containing gog1-1 and gdh1-1 or gdh2-1 (mutations that result specifically in the abolition of NADP-GDH activity) result in a complete lack of growth on ammonium as sole nitrogen source in contrast to gdh or gog mutants alone.

  16. Protein tyrosine nitration of mitochondrial carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 and its functional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakusa, Hideo; Mohar, Isaac; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Kelly, Edward J; Kaspera, Rüdiger; Nelson, Sidney D

    2012-03-30

    Mitochondria are the primary locus for the generation of reactive nitrogen species including peroxynitrite and subsequent protein tyrosine nitration. Protein tyrosine nitration may have important functional and biological consequences such as alteration of enzyme catalytic activity. In the present study, mouse liver mitochondria were incubated with peroxynitrite, and the mitochondrial proteins were separated by 1D and 2D gel electrophoresis. Nitrotyrosinylated proteins were detected with an anti-nitrotyrosine antibody. One of the major proteins nitrated by peroxynitrite was carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) as identified by LC-MS protein analysis and Western blotting. The band intensity of nitration normalized to CPS1 was increased in a peroxynitrite concentration-dependent manner. In addition, CPS1 activity was decreased by treatment with peroxynitrite in a peroxynitrite concentration- and time-dependent manner. The decreased CPS1 activity was not recovered by treatment with reduced glutathione, suggesting that the decrease of the CPS1 activity is due to tyrosine nitration rather than cysteine oxidation. LC-MS analysis of in-gel digested samples, and a Popitam-based modification search located 5 out of 36 tyrosine residues in CPS1 that were nitrated. Taken together with previous findings regarding CPS1 structure and function, homology modeling of mouse CPS1 suggested that nitration at Y1450 in an α-helix of allosteric domain prevents activation of CPS1 by its activator, N-acetyl-l-glutamate. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the tyrosine nitration of CPS1 by peroxynitrite and its functional consequence. Since CPS1 is responsible for ammonia removal in the urea cycle, nitration of CPS1 with attenuated function might be involved in some diseases and drug-induced toxicities associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Selenophosphate Synthetase 1 is an Essential Protein with Roles in Regulation of Redox Homeostasis in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobe, Ryuta; Carlson, Bradley A.; Huh, Jang Hoe; Castro, Nadia P.; Xu, Xue-Ming; Tsuji, Petra A.; Lee, Sang-Goo; Bang, Jeyoung; Na, Ji-Woon; Kong, Young-Yun; Beaglehole, Daniel; Southon, Eileen; Seifried, Harold; Tessarollo, Lino; Salomon, David S.; Schweizer, Ulrich; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae

    2016-01-01

    Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS) was initially detected in bacteria and was shown to synthesize selenophosphate, the active selenium donor. However, mammals have two SPS paralogs, which are designated SPS1 and SPS2. Although it is known that SPS2 catalyzes the synthesis of selenophosphate, the function of SPS1 remains largely unclear. To examine the role of SPS1 in mammals, we generated a Sps1 knockout mouse and found that systemic SPS1 deficiency led to embryos that were clearly underdeveloped by E8.5 and virtually resorbed by E14.5. The knockout of Sps1 in the liver preserved viability, but significantly affected the expression of a large number of mRNAs involved in cancer, embryonic development, and the glutathione system. Particularly notable was the extreme deficiency of glutaredoxin 1 (GLRX1) and glutathione-S-transferase omega 1. To assess these phenotypes at the cellular level, we targeted the removal of SPS1 in F9 cells, a mouse embryonal carcinoma cell line, which affected the glutathione system proteins and accordingly led to the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in the cell. Further, we found that several malignant characteristics of SPS1-deficient F9 cells were reversed, suggesting that SPS1 played a role in supporting and/or sustaining cancer. In addition, the overexpression of mouse or human GLRX1 led to a reversal of observed increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the F9 SPS1/GLRX1-deficient cells and resulted in levels that were similar to those in F9 SPS1-sufficient cells. The results suggested that SPS1 is an essential mammalian enzyme with roles in regulating redox homeostasis and controlling cell growth. PMID:27208177

  18. Functional role of C-terminal domain of Thermus thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukalo M. A.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study a role of C-terminal domain of T. thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRSTT in the reactions of aminoacylation and editing. Methods. A mutant of LeuRSTT without C- terminal domain (ΔС was obtained by the method of mutagenesis. The kinetic constants in aminoacylation reaction catalyzed by LeuRS and its mutant (ΔС were determined by the methods of equilibrium enzyme kinetics. To evaluate the contribution of C-terminal domain to interaction of the enzyme with tRNALeu, Kd of a complex between tRNA and LeuRSTT and its mutant ΔС was determined by fluorescence titration. Results. The C-terminal domain is shown to play a significant role in the aminoacylation and editing reactions of LeuRSTT and not essential for the activity in the reaction of amino acid activation. The kinetic parameters of aminoacylation of tRNALeu and tRNATyr by LeuRS and ΔС mutant were also determined, their analysis suggests that the C-domain is not critical for the manifestation of specificity of the enzyme in the recognition of homologous RNAs. At the same time a significant influence of the C-terminal domain on the value of catalytic constant was shown. At the domain deletion the kcat value is lower by 152-fold. Conclusion. The C-terminal domain of LeuRSTT is evolutionarily acquired to enhance the rate of catalysis in the aminoacylation and editing reactions, and makes no significant contribution to the specificity of the enzyme in the recognition of tRNA.

  19. Ammonia-regulated expression of a soybean gene encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase in transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, G H; Hirel, B; Marsolier, M C; Ridge, R W; Verma, D P

    1991-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS), expressed in roots and root nodules of soybean, was isolated by direct complementation of an Escherichia coli gln A- mutant. This sequence is induced in roots by the availability of ammonia. A 3.5-kilobase promoter fragment of a genomic clone (lambda GS15) corresponding to this cDNA was isolated and fused with a reporter [beta-glucuronidase (GUS)] gene. The GS-GUS fusion was introduced into a legume (Lotus corniculatus) and a nonlegume (tobacco) plant by way of Agrobacterium-mediated transformations. This chimeric gene was found to be expressed in a root-specific manner in both tobacco and L. corniculatus, the expression being restricted to the growing root apices and the vascular bundles of the mature root. Treatment with ammonia increased the expression of this chimeric gene in the legume background (i.e., L. corniculatus); however, no induction was observed in tobacco roots. Histochemical localization of GUS activity in ammonia-treated transgenic L. corniculatus roots showed a uniform distribution across all cell types. These data suggest that the tissue specificity of the soybean cytosolic GS gene is conserved in both tobacco and L. corniculatus; however, in the latter case, this gene is ammonia inducible. Furthermore, the ammonia-enhanced GS gene expression in L. corniculatus is due to an increase in transcription. That this gene is directly regulated by externally supplied or symbiotically fixed nitrogen is also evident from the expression of GS-GUS in the infection zone, including the uninfected cells, and the inner cortex of transgenic L. corniculatus nodules, where a flux of ammonia is encountered by this tissue. The lack of expression of GS-GUS in the outer cortex of the nodules suggests that ammonia may not be able to diffuse outside the endodermis.

  20. Arabidopsis plastidial folylpolyglutamate synthetase is required for seed reserve accumulation and seedling establishment in darkness.

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    Hongyan Meng

    Full Text Available Interactions among metabolic pathways are important in plant biology. At present, not much is known about how folate metabolism affects other metabolic pathways in plants. Here we report a T-DNA insertion mutant (atdfb-3 of the plastidial folylpolyglutamate synthetase gene (AtDFB was defective in seed reserves and skotomorphogenesis. Lower carbon (C and higher nitrogen (N content in the mutant seeds than that of the wild type were indicative of an altered C and N partitioning capacity. Higher levels of organic acids and sugars were detected in the mutant seeds compared with the wild type. Further analysis revealed that atdfb-3 seeds contained less total amino acids and individual Asn and Glu as well as NO3-. These results indicate significant changes in seed storage in the mutant. Defects in hypocotyl elongation were observed in atdfb-3 in darkness under sufficient NO3- conditions, and further enhanced under NO3- limited conditions. The strong expression of AtDFB in cotyledons and hypocotyl during early developmental stage was consistent with the mutant sensitivity to limited NO3- during a narrow developmental window. Exogenous 5-formyl-tetrahydrofolate completely restored the hypocotyl length in atdfb-3 seedlings with NO3- as the sole N source. Further study demonstrated that folate profiling and N metabolism were perturbed in atdfb-3 etiolated seedlings. The activity of enzymes involved in N reduction and assimilation was altered in atdfb-3. Taken together, these results indicate that AtDFB is required for seed reserves, hypocotyl elongation and N metabolism in darkness, providing novel insights into potential associations of folate metabolism with seed reserve accumulation, N metabolism and hypocotyl development in Arabidopsis.