WorldWideScience

Sample records for lysekil research site

  1. Wave Energy from the North Sea: Experiences from the Lysekil Research Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijon, Mats; Boström, Cecilia; Danielsson, Oskar; Gustafsson, Stefan; Haikonen, Kalle; Langhamer, Olivia; Strömstedt, Erland; Stålberg, Magnus; Sundberg, Jan; Svensson, Olle; Tyrberg, Simon; Waters, Rafael

    2008-05-01

    This paper provides a status update on the development of the Swedish wave energy research area located close to Lysekil on the Swedish West coast. The Lysekil project is run by the Centre for Renewable Electric Energy Conversion at Uppsala University. The project was started in 2004 and currently has permission to run until the end of 2013. During this time period 10 grid-connected wave energy converters, 30 buoys for studies on environmental impact, and a surveillance tower for monitoring the interaction between waves and converters will be installed and studied. To date the research area holds one complete wave energy converter connected to a measuring station on shore via a sea cable, a Wave Rider™ buoy for wave measurements, 25 buoys for studies on environmental impact, and a surveillance tower. The wave energy converter is based on a linear synchronous generator which is placed on the sea bed and driven by a heaving point absorber at the ocean surface. The converter is directly driven, i.e. it has no gearbox or other mechanical or hydraulic conversion system. This results in a simple and robust mechanical system, but also in a somewhat more complicated electrical system.

  2. Characteristics of the Operational Noise from Full Scale Wave Energy Converters in the Lysekil Project: Estimation of Potential Environmental Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Leijon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wave energy conversion is a clean electric power production technology. During operation there are no emissions in the form of harmful gases. However there are unsolved issues considering environmental impacts such as: electromagnetism; the artificial reef effect and underwater noise. Anthropogenic noise is increasing in the oceans worldwide and wave power will contribute to this sound pollution in the oceans; but to what extent? The main purpose of this study was to examine the noise emitted by a full scale operating Wave Energy Converter (WEC in the Lysekil project at Uppsala University in Sweden. A minor review of the hearing capabilities of fish and marine mammals is presented to aid in the conclusions of impact from anthropogenic sound. A hydrophone was deployed to the seabed in the Lysekil research site park at distance of 20 and 40 m away from two operational WECs. The measurements were performed in the spring of 2011. The results showed that the main noise was a transient noise with most of its energy in frequencies below 1 kHz. These results indicate that several marine organisms (fish and mammals will be able to hear the operating WECs of a distance of at least 20 m.

  3. Deployment and Maintenance of Wave Energy Converters at the Lysekil Research Site: A Comparative Study on the Use of Divers and Remotely-Operated Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore Rémouit

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocean renewable technologies have been rapidly developing over the past years. However, current high installation, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning costs are hindering these offshore technologies to reach a commercialization stage. In this paper we focus on the use of divers and remotely-operated vehicles during the installation and monitoring phase of wave energy converters. Methods and results are based on the wave energy converter system developed by Uppsala University, and our experience in offshore deployments obtained during the past eleven years. The complexity of underwater operations, carried out by either divers or remotely-operated vehicles, is emphasized. Three methods for the deployment of wave energy converters are economically and technically analyzed and compared: one using divers alone, a fully-automated approach using remotely-operated vehicles, and an intermediate approach, involving both divers and underwater vehicles. The monitoring of wave energy converters by robots is also studied, both in terms of costs and technical challenges. The results show that choosing an autonomous deployment method is more advantageous than a diver-assisted method in terms of operational time, but that numerous factors prevent the wide application of robotized operations. Technical solutions are presented to enable the use of remotely-operated vehicles instead of divers in ocean renewable technology operations. Economically, it is more efficient to use divers than autonomous vehicles for the deployment of six or fewer wave energy converters. From seven devices, remotely-operated vehicles become advantageous.

  4. Hydroacoustic measurements of the radiated noise from Wave Energy Converters in the Lysekil project and project WESA

    OpenAIRE

    Haikonen, Kalle; Sundberg, Jan; Leijon, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Field measurements of the hydroacoustic noise from Wave Energy Converters (WECs) in the Lysekil project at Uppsala University and the Project WESA (joint effort between Uppsala University (Lead Partner), Ålands Teknikkluster r.f. and University of Turku) are presented. Anthropogenic noise is increasing in the oceans world wide and wave energy conversion may contribute to this noise, but to what extent? The main objective in this study is to examine the noise from full scale operating WECs in ...

  5. Siting of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop criteria for siting and the site-related design basis for research reactors. The concepts presented in this document are intended as recommendations for new reactors and are not suggested for backfitting purposes for facilities already in existence. In siting research reactors serious consideration is given to minimizing the effects of the site on the reactor and the reactor on the site and the potential impact of the reactor on the environment. In this document guidance is first provided on the evaluation of the radiological impact of the installation under normal reactor operation and accident conditions. A classification of research reactors in groups is then proposed, together with a different approach for each group, to take into account the relevant safety problems associated with facilities of different characteristics. Guidance is also provided for both extreme natural events and for man-induced external events which could affect the safe operation of the reactor. Extreme natural events include earthquakes, flooding for river or coastal sites and extreme meteorological phenomena. The feasibility of emergency planning is finally considered for each group of reactors

  6. Fusion research at Culham site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolonen, P.; Toppila, T.

    1998-01-01

    One of the many targets on the Finnish Nuclear Society (ATS) excursion to England was the Culham fusion research site. The site has divided into two parts. One of them is UKAEA Fusion with small scale fusion reactors and 200 employees. UKAEA has 3 fusion reactors at Culham site. One of is the START (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak) which was operational since 1991 but is today already out of operation. UKAEA has been operating a JET-like tokamak fusion reactor COMPASS-D since 1989. The latest of three reactors is MAST (Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak), which is still under construction. The first plasma will take place in the end of 1998. Another part of Culham site is JET (Joint European Torus), an all-European fusion undertaking with 350 employees. 150 of them are from various European countries and the rest 200 are employed by UKAEA. JET is the biggest fusion reactor ever and it represents the latest step in world wide fusion programme. In October 1997 JET achieved a world record in fusion power and energy. JET produced 16,1 MW power for 1 s and totally 21,7 MJ energy. This is the closest attempt to achieve break-even conditions. The next step in world wide fusion programme will be international ITER-reactor. This undertaking has some financial problems, since United States has taken distance to magnetic fusion research and moved closer to inertial fusion with funding of US Department of Defence. The planned reactor, however, is physically twice as big as JET. The step after this phase will be DEMO, which is purposed to produce fusion energy. According to our hosts in Culham this phase is 40 years ahead. (author)

  7. Bio-Research: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home · Journals · Bio-Research · About · Log In · Register · Advanced Search · By Author · By Title. Issues. Current Issue · Archives · Open Journal Systems · Help. ISSN: 1596-7409. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  8. Colloid research for the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, E.A.

    1992-05-01

    Research is needed to understand the role of particulates in the migration of radionuclides away from the sites of nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. The process of testing itself may produce a reservoir of particles to serve as vectors for the transport of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater. Exploratory experiments indicate the presence of numerous particulates in the vicinity of the Cambric test but a much lower loading in a nearby well that has been pumped continuously for 15 years. Recent groundwater colloid research is briefly reviewed to identify sampling and characterization methods that may be applicable at the Nevada Test Site

  9. Remediation of Site of Decommissioning Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilovich, A.S.; Ivanov, O.P.; Lemus, A.V.; Pavlenko, V.I.; Potapov, V.N.; Semenov, S.G.; Shisha, A.D.; Chesnokov, A.V. [National Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    In the world the most widespread method of soil decontamination consists of removing the contaminated upper layer and sending it for long-term controlled storage. However, implementation of this soil cleanup method for remediation of large contaminated areas would involve high material and financial expenditures, because it produces large amounts of radioactive waste demanding removal to special storage sites. Contaminated soil extraction and cleanup performed right on the spot of remediation activities represents a more advanced and economically acceptable method. Radiological separation of the radioactive soil allows reducing of amount of radwaste. Studies performed during the liquidation of the Chernobyl accident consequences revealed that a considerable fraction of radioactivity is accumulated in minute soil grains. So, the separation of contaminated soil by size fractions makes it possible to extract and concentrate the major share of radioactivity in the fine fraction. Based on these researches water gravity separation technology was proposed by Bochvar Institute. The method extracts the fine fraction from contaminated soil. Studies carried out by Bochvar Institute experts showed that, together with the fine fraction (amounting to 10-20% of the initial soil), this technology can remove up to 85-90% of contaminating radionuclides. The resulting 'dirty' soil fraction could be packaged into containers and removed as radwaste, and decontaminated fractions returned back to their extraction site. Use of radiological and water gravity separations consequently increases the productivity of decontamination facility. Efficiency of this technology applied for contaminated soil cleanup was confirmed in the course of remediation of the contaminated territories near decommissioning research reactor in the Kurchatov Institute. For soil cleaning purposes, a special facility implementing the technology of water gravity separation and radiometric monitoring of soil

  10. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  13. Radionuclide metrology research for nuclear site decommissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, S. M.; Regan, P. H.

    2017-11-01

    The safe and cost-effective decommissioning of legacy nuclear sites relies on accurate measurement of the radioactivity content of the waste materials, so that the waste can be assigned to the most appropriate disposal route. Such measurements are a new challenge for the science of radionuclide metrology which was established largely to support routine measurements on operating nuclear sites and other applications such as nuclear medicine. In this paper, we provide a brief summary of the international measurement system that is established to enable nuclear site operators to demonstrate that measurements are accurate, independent and fit for purpose, and highlight some of the projects that are underway to adapt the measurement system to meet the changing demands from the industry.

  14. Surface barrier research at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, G.W.; Ward, A.L.; Fayer, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    At the DOE Hanford Site, a field-scale prototype surface barrier was constructed in 1994 over an existing waste site as a part of a CERCLA treatability test. The above-grade barrier consists of a fine-soil layer overlying coarse layers of sands, gravels, basalt rock (riprap), and a low permeability asphalt layer. Two sideslope configurations, clean-fill gravel on a 10:1 slope and basalt riprap on a 2:1 slope, were built and are being tested. Design considerations included: constructability; drainage and water balance monitoring, wind and water erosion control and monitoring; surface revegetation and biotic intrusion; subsidence and sideslope stability, and durability of the asphalt layer. The barrier is currently in the final year of a three-year test designed to answer specific questions related to stability and long-term performance. One half of the barrier is irrigated such that the total water applied, including precipitation, is 480 mm/yr (three times the long-term annual average). Each year for the past two years, an extreme precipitation event (71 mm in 8 hr) representing a 1,000-yr return storm was applied in late March, when soil water storage was at a maximum. While the protective sideslopes have drained significant amounts of water, the soil cover (2-m of silt-loam soil overlying coarse sand and rock) has never drained. During the past year there was no measurable surface runoff or wind erosion. This is attributed to extensive revegetation of the surface. In addition, the barrier elevation has shown a small increase of 2 to 3 cm that is attributed to a combination of root proliferation and freeze/thaw activity. Testing will continue through September 1997. Performance data from the prototype barrier will be used by DOE in site-closure decisions at Hanford

  15. Faulting in mudrocks: the selection of potential research sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.

    1990-01-01

    The British Geological Survey, in cooperation with Ismes of Italy, has carried out a research programme into faults through clay formations. The research programme commenced in April 1986 and work started at the Down Ampney site in February 1987

  16. Academic Social Networking Sites: Improves Research Visibility and Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2017-01-01

    Researchers needs to remove many traditional obstacles to disseminate and outreach their research outputs. Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications, and get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are ResearchGate and Academia.edu. These sites offer an instant technique to monitor wh...

  17. Academic Conferences: Representative and Resistant Sites for Higher Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Emily F.

    2015-01-01

    The overarching argument made in this article is twofold. Firstly, academic conferences are posited as sites for higher education research. Secondly, the well-recognised emotional and social processes of conferences are used to make space at the boundaries of higher education research for psychosocial analysis. The article theorises conferences in…

  18. Data-Driven Research and Site-Based Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr-Kidwell, PJ; Beauchamp, Deanna

    This paper reports on a field research project designed to provide staff members of one particular Texas middle school the knowledge and ability to affect student attendance. The purpose of the field research was to identify effective strategies, led by site-based management teams, to enhance student attendance. Data were collected from a review…

  19. Multi-Sited Ethnography and the Field of Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierides, Dean

    2010-01-01

    This paper responds to the challenge of how educational research might be practised in a contemporary world that is no longer necessarily organised by nearness and unity. Focusing on ethnography, it argues for what a multi-sited imaginary contributes to research in the field of education. By giving prominence to the notion of multi-sited…

  20. Shared worlds: multi-sited ethnography and nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Luke; Walker, Kim; Lakeman, Richard

    2017-03-22

    Background Ethnography, originally developed for the study of supposedly small-scale societies, is now faced with an increasingly mobile, changing and globalised world. Cultural identities can exist without reference to a specific location and extend beyond regional and national boundaries. It is therefore no longer imperative that the sole object of the ethnographer's practice should be a geographically bounded site. Aim To present a critical methodological review of multi-sited ethnography. Discussion Understanding that it can no longer be taken with any certainty that location alone determines culture, multi-sited ethnography provides a method of contextualising multi-sited social phenomena. The method enables researchers to examine social phenomena that are simultaneously produced in different locations. It has been used to undertake cultural analysis of diverse areas such as organ trafficking, global organisations, technologies and anorexia. Conclusion The authors contend that multi-sited ethnography is particularly suited to nursing research as it provides researchers with an ethnographic method that is more relevant to the interconnected world of health and healthcare services. Implications for practice Multi-sited ethnography provides nurse researchers with an approach to cultural analysis in areas such as the social determinants of health, healthcare services and the effects of health policies across multiple locations.

  1. The Swedish Research Infrastructure for Ecosystem Science - SITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, A.; Ahlström, M.; Augner, M.; Erefur, C.; Jansson, G.; Steen Jensen, E.; Klemedtsson, L.; Langenheder, S.; Rosqvist, G. N.; Viklund, J.

    2017-12-01

    The vision of SITES is to promote long-term field-based ecosystem research at a world class level by offering an infrastructure with excellent technical and scientific support and services attracting both national and international researchers. In addition, SITES will make data freely and easily available through an advanced data portal which will add value to the research. During the first funding period, three innovative joint integrating facilities were established through a researcher-driven procedure: SITES Water, SITES Spectral, and SITES AquaNet. These new facilities make it possible to study terrestrial and limnic ecosystem processes across a range of ecosystem types and climatic gradients, with common protocols and similar equipment. In addition, user-driven development at the nine individual stations has resulted in e.g. design of a long-term agricultural systems experiment, and installation of weather stations, flux systems, etc. at various stations. SITES, with its integrative approach and broad coverage of climate and ecosystem types across Sweden, constitutes an excellent platform for state-of-the-art research projects. SITES' support the development of: A better understanding of the way in which key ecosystems function and interact with each other at the landscape level and with the climate system in terms of mass and energy exchanges. A better understanding of the role of different organisms in controlling different processes and ultimately the functioning of ecosystems. New strategies for forest management to better meet the many and varied requirements from nature conservation, climate and wood, fibre, and energy supply points of view. Agricultural systems that better utilize resources and minimize adverse impacts on the environment. Collaboration with other similar infrastructures and networks is a high priority for SITES. This will enable us to make use of each others' experiences, harmonize metadata for easier exchange of data, and support each

  2. Historical research in the Hanford site waste cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, Michele S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will acquaint the audience with role of historical research in the Hanford Site waste cleanup - the largest waste cleanup endeavor ever undertaken in human history. There were no comparable predecessors to this massive waste remediation effort, but the Hanford historical record can provide a partial road map and guide. It can be, and is, a useful tool in meeting the goal of a successful, cost-effective, safe and technologically exemplary waste cleanup. The Hanford historical record is rich and complex. Yet, it poses difficult challenges, in that no central and complete repository or data base exists, records contain obscure code words and code numbers, and the measurement systems and terminology used in the records change many times over the years. Still, these records are useful to the current waste cleanup in technical ways, and in ways that extend beyond a strictly scientific aspect. Study and presentations of Hanford Site history contribute to the huge educational and outreach tasks of helping the Site's work force deal with 'culture change' and become motivated for the cleanup work that is ahead, and of helping the public and the regulators to place the events at Hanford in the context of WWII and the Cold War. This paper traces historical waste practices and policies as they changed over the years at the Hanford Site, and acquaints the audience with the generation of the major waste streams of concern in Hanford Site cleanup today. It presents original, primary-source research into the waste history of the Hanford Site. The earliest, 1940s knowledge base, assumptions and calculations about radioactive and chemical discharges, as discussed in the memos, correspondence and reports of the original Hanford Site (then Hanford Engineer Works) builders and operators, are reviewed. The growth of knowledge, research efforts, and subsequent changes in Site waste disposal policies and practices are traced. Examples of the strengths and limitations of the

  3. Research from Afar: Considerations for Conducting an Off-Site Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Reg Arthur; Hagerty, Bonnie M.; Hoyle, Kenneth; Yousha, Steven M.; Abdoo, Yvonne; Andersen, Curt; Engler, Dorothy

    1999-01-01

    Critical elements in the success of off-site research projects include the following: negotiation, attention to personnel issues, communication, participation of research subjects, data management, and concern for privacy issues. (SK)

  4. Decontamination of soil from the research reactor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, H. Z.; Kim, K. N.; Choi, W. K.; Jeong, J. H.; Oh, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    The two research reactors (TRIGA MARK II and III) in Korea are to be decommissioned in the near future. When the reactors are completely dismantled, the site may remain contaminated due to the long period of operation. We assume that the site is radioactively contaminated by Co-60. Soils gathered from the research reactor site were artificially contaminated with Co 2+ ion. The desorption characteristics of Co 2+ ion from the soil surface by citric acid solution were investigated. Decontamination performances of citric acid and EDTA on soil stored in the radioactive waste drums was examined. The feasibility test of recycling the citric acid was also performed. We concluded that the radioactive waste volume could be reduced significantly by soil washing with a citric acid solution

  5. Big GABA: Edited MR spectroscopy at 24 research sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Mark; Barker, Peter B; Bhattacharyya, Pallab K; Brix, Maiken K; Buur, Pieter F; Cecil, Kim M; Chan, Kimberly L; Chen, David Y-T; Craven, Alexander R; Cuypers, Koen; Dacko, Michael; Duncan, Niall W; Dydak, Ulrike; Edmondson, David A; Ende, Gabriele; Ersland, Lars; Gao, Fei; Greenhouse, Ian; Harris, Ashley D; He, Naying; Heba, Stefanie; Hoggard, Nigel; Hsu, Tun-Wei; Jansen, Jacobus F A; Kangarlu, Alayar; Lange, Thomas; Lebel, R Marc; Li, Yan; Lin, Chien-Yuan E; Liou, Jy-Kang; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Liu, Feng; Ma, Ruoyun; Maes, Celine; Moreno-Ortega, Marta; Murray, Scott O; Noah, Sean; Noeske, Ralph; Noseworthy, Michael D; Oeltzschner, Georg; Prisciandaro, James J; Puts, Nicolaas A J; Roberts, Timothy P L; Sack, Markus; Sailasuta, Napapon; Saleh, Muhammad G; Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Simard, Nicholas; Swinnen, Stephan P; Tegenthoff, Martin; Truong, Peter; Wang, Guangbin; Wilkinson, Iain D; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Xu, Hongmin; Yan, Fuhua; Zhang, Chencheng; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Zöllner, Helge J; Edden, Richard A E

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is the only biomedical imaging method that can noninvasively detect endogenous signals from the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the human brain. Its increasing popularity has been aided by improvements in scanner hardware and acquisition methodology, as well as by broader access to pulse sequences that can selectively detect GABA, in particular J-difference spectral editing sequences. Nevertheless, implementations of GABA-edited MRS remain diverse across research sites, making comparisons between studies challenging. This large-scale multi-vendor, multi-site study seeks to better understand the factors that impact measurement outcomes of GABA-edited MRS. An international consortium of 24 research sites was formed. Data from 272 healthy adults were acquired on scanners from the three major MRI vendors and analyzed using the Gannet processing pipeline. MRS data were acquired in the medial parietal lobe with standard GABA+ and macromolecule- (MM-) suppressed GABA editing. The coefficient of variation across the entire cohort was 12% for GABA+ measurements and 28% for MM-suppressed GABA measurements. A multilevel analysis revealed that most of the variance (72%) in the GABA+ data was accounted for by differences between participants within-site, while site-level differences accounted for comparatively more variance (20%) than vendor-level differences (8%). For MM-suppressed GABA data, the variance was distributed equally between site- (50%) and participant-level (50%) differences. The findings show that GABA+ measurements exhibit strong agreement when implemented with a standard protocol. There is, however, increased variability for MM-suppressed GABA measurements that is attributed in part to differences in site-to-site data acquisition. This study's protocol establishes a framework for future methodological standardization of GABA-edited MRS, while the results provide valuable benchmarks for the MRS community

  6. Self-reflection on privacy research in social networking sites

    OpenAIRE

    De Wolf, Ralf; Vanderhoven, Ellen; Berendt, Bettina; Pierson, Jo; Schellens, Tammy

    2017-01-01

    The increasing popularity of social networking sites has been a source of many privacy concerns. To mitigate these concerns and empower users, different forms of educational and technological solutions have been developed. Developing and evaluating such solutions, however, cannot be considered a neutral process. Instead, it is socially bound and interwoven with norms and values of the researchers. In this contribution, we aim to make the research process and development of privacy solutions m...

  7. Researchers' attitudes towards the use of social networking sites

    OpenAIRE

    Greifeneder, E.; Pontis, S.; Blandford, A. E.; Attalla, H.; Neal, D.; Schlebbe, K.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to better understand why many researchers do not have a profile on social networking sites (SNS), and whether this is the result of conscious decisions. / Design/methodology/approach: Thematic analysis was conducted on a large qualitative data set from researchers across three levels of seniority, four countries and four disciplines to explore their attitudes toward and experiences with SNS. / Findings: The study found much greater scepticism toward adopt...

  8. Current Research Status of KHNP for Site Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyemin; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Bahng, Ki-In; Na, Jang-Hwan [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In Korea, by the geographical characteristics, many Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) have been constructed and operated at a single site. This is above average level or number of plants per site in the world. For this reason, the public concerns for the safety of nuclear facilities increased after Fukushima Daiichi accident. As a result, comprehensive risk assessment and management for the site which have multi-unit NPPs were strongly asked. Currently, to solve it, many researches and projects has carried out by various Korean companies, research centers, and regulatory authorities. In this paper, R and D plans of KHNP for multi-unit risk were summarized. Firstly, the needs of multi-unit PSA were reviewed. R and D activities and plans of KHNP were summarized in the last part. In this paper, we summarized the R and D plans of KHNP for assessing the multi-unit risk. Currently, multi-unit risk or multi-unit PSA are important and practical issues in both nuclear industry and national energy policy. After Fukushima accident, several countries stopped the construction and the operation of NPPs, other countries which is maintaining the NPPs are being strongly asked to assess the risk for multi-unit NPPs at the same site. Because of Korean geographical characteristics, the number of NPPs which are above average level or number of plants per site in the world is being constructed and operated at a single site. The population density nearby each site is considered to be higher than that of other countries.

  9. Current Research Status of KHNP for Site Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kyemin; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Bahng, Ki-In; Na, Jang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    In Korea, by the geographical characteristics, many Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) have been constructed and operated at a single site. This is above average level or number of plants per site in the world. For this reason, the public concerns for the safety of nuclear facilities increased after Fukushima Daiichi accident. As a result, comprehensive risk assessment and management for the site which have multi-unit NPPs were strongly asked. Currently, to solve it, many researches and projects has carried out by various Korean companies, research centers, and regulatory authorities. In this paper, R and D plans of KHNP for multi-unit risk were summarized. Firstly, the needs of multi-unit PSA were reviewed. R and D activities and plans of KHNP were summarized in the last part. In this paper, we summarized the R and D plans of KHNP for assessing the multi-unit risk. Currently, multi-unit risk or multi-unit PSA are important and practical issues in both nuclear industry and national energy policy. After Fukushima accident, several countries stopped the construction and the operation of NPPs, other countries which is maintaining the NPPs are being strongly asked to assess the risk for multi-unit NPPs at the same site. Because of Korean geographical characteristics, the number of NPPs which are above average level or number of plants per site in the world is being constructed and operated at a single site. The population density nearby each site is considered to be higher than that of other countries

  10. The role of social networking sites in medical genetics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaves, Allison Cook; Bianchi, Diana W

    2013-05-01

    Social networking sites (SNS) have potential value in the field of medical genetics as a means of research subject recruitment and source of data. This article examines the current role of SNS in medical genetics research and potential applications for these sites in future studies. Facebook is the primary SNS considered, given the prevalence of its use in the United States and role in a small but growing number of studies. To date, utilization of SNS in medical genetics research has been primarily limited to three studies that recruited subjects from populations of Facebook users [McGuire et al. (2009); Am J Bioeth 9: 3-10; Janvier et al. (2012); Pediatrics 130: 293-298; Leighton et al. (2012); Public Health Genomics 15: 11-21]. These studies and a number of other medical and public health studies that have used Facebook as a context for recruiting research subjects are discussed. Approaches for Facebook-based subject recruitment are identified, including paid Facebook advertising, snowball sampling, targeted searching and posting. The use of these methods in medical genetics research has the potential to facilitate cost-effective research on both large, heterogeneous populations and small, hard-to-access sub-populations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, Monica D.; Brusseau, Mark L.; Artiola, Janick F.; Maier, Raina M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2014-01-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation, and decision-making and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with environmental contamination sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites. PMID:25173762

  12. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Maier, R. M.; Gandolfi, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation and decision-making, and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with contaminated sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites.

  13. Nevada National Security Site: Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Howard A. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States). Site-Directed Research and Development Program

    2016-04-01

    This report presents results of multiple research projects, new and ongoing, funded under the Site-Directed Research and Development Program for the Nevada National Security Site during federal fiscal year 2015. The Site's legacy capabilities in remote sensing combined with new paradigms for emergency response and consequence management help drive the need to develop advanced aerial sensor platforms. Likewise, dynamic materials science is a critical area of scientific research for which basic physics issues are still unresolved. New methods of characterizing materials in extreme states are vitally needed, and these efforts are paving the way with new knowledge. Projects selected in FY 2015 for the Exploratory Research portfolio exhibit a strong balance of NNSS mission relevance. Geoscience, seismology, and techniques for detecting underground nuclear events are still essential focus areas. Many of the project reports in the second major section of this annual report are ongoing continuations in multi-year lifecycles. Diagnostic techniques for stockpile and nuclear security science figured prominently as well, with a few key efforts coming to fruition, such as phase transition detection. In other areas, modeling efforts toward better understanding plasma focus physics has also started to pay dividends for major program needs.

  14. FY 2016 Site-Directed Research & Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Howard [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2017-04-01

    As the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) continues to evolve and transition its mission to a broader scope, significant challenges lie ahead that present unique opportunities for our research and development (R&D) enterprise. At the juncture, we are poised to create a different future investment strategy. Our decisions at the beginning of a new tri-decade span must be guided as expertly as possible given the greater complexity and multifaceted nature of our work.

  15. The local groundwater regime at the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.; Holmes, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    Three deep and two shallow boreholes have been drilled at the Harwell Research Site as part of a national research programme into the feasibility of disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes to geologic formations. Various hydrogeological and geochemical techniques have been employed in these boreholes, each of which samples a separate formation of interest, to determine the pattern of groundwater movement under the research site. Significant vertical hydraulic gradients have been identified which produce vertically downwards groundwater movement from the surface to a depth of 200 m (Corallian aquifer). Groundwater moves vertically upwards, from greater depths, through the Oxford Clay to the Corallian aquifer. However,the apparently very low hydraulic conductivity of the Oxford Clay results in extremely low flow velocities and long transit times. Groundwaters from the Corallian formation possess higher salinities than those of the characteristic regional groundwaters, and preliminary isotopic data suggest that some groundwater mixing with connate waters has occurred. The chemical nature of groundwaters from the Great Oolite Group, suggest that contamination due to the drilling and completion procedure has taken place. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity in this formation clearance of contaminants will require the implementation of a long-term abstraction programme. (author)

  16. Guide to effective research-management collaboration at long-term environmental research sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick J. Swanson; Steve Eubanks; Mary Beth Adams; John C. Brissette

    2010-01-01

    The Forest Service system of experimental forests and ranges (EFRs) and other sites of long-term silvicultural, watershed, and ecological research have contributed to science and natural resource management for more than a century. An important aspect of the success of EFR programs is strong collaboration between the research and land manager communities. This guide...

  17. On-site and off-site emergency planning at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyberk, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    An emergency plan was prepared for minimizing the consequences of any unforeseen radiation accident in Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre (CNAEM) in Istanbul, Turkey. CNAEM is situated near Kucukcekmece Lake, which is about 30 km to the west of Istanbul. It includes two pool-type research reactors of 1 MW(th) and 5 MW(th). The population in the nearest inhabited areas varies from 1000 to 50,000. Accidents are classified, according to their severity, into three categories at CNAEM: (a) local emergency, (b) on-site emergency, (c) off-site emergency. During local emergency situations evacuation is not necessary. An on-site emergency situation requires the evacuation of personnel from the plant. Personnel hearing the emergency alarm should move directly to the preselected place as soon as possible. An off-site emergency is any accident that leads to widespread contamination outside the boundary. In this situation the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority and governmental authorities are notified immediately. The emergency organization group consists of: (a) Plant Superintendent, (b) Emergency Director, (c) Reactor Supervisor, (d) Senior Health Physicist, (e) Reactor Shift Operator, (f) Health Physicists. The administration building will be used as the Emergency Control Centre. The emergency teams working under the direction of the Emergency Director consist of: (a) Health Physics, (b) Fire and Rescue, (c) First Aid and Decontamination, (d) Transportation, (e) Security and Patrol. The emergency situation is evaluated in three phases at CNAEM. The first phase is the first few hours after the beginning of the accident. The second phase is between 8-10 hours or more following the first phase. The third phase is the recovery phase. The integrated doses over periods of two hours and two days are calculated according to the situation of the core, i.e. total or partial melting, and weather conditions. The results of the calculated parameters can be adapted to possible

  18. Guidelines for Educational Research in Biochemistry on Internet Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Lima

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has been used to support research in different areas, such as practical and educational  research  in  medical  and  biomedical  research.  There  are  several recommended  sites  for  carrying  biomedical  and  medical  research  (BERGER,  2003. Nevertheless,  few  studies  report  on  the  use  of  the  Internet  in  the  teaching  of Biochemistry. Considering the fact that there is no specific legislation for the use of the Internet  in  Brazil,  it  is  necessary  to  stimulate  self-regulation  of  the  sector  in  order  to establish  minimum  quality  standards,  safety,  and  reliability  of  sites  containing information  in  the  educational  area.  This  study  establishes  some  parameters  to  help guiding research for educational purposes on the internet. The following aspects should be  checked:  if  the  site  has  an  editorial  board  responsible  for  content  selection,  and whether  it  is  made  up  of  experts  in  the  area  of  expertise;  if  the  site  releases  updated scientific materials, and provides pedagogical content that fosters teaching and learning such  as  images  that  contribute  to  the  understanding  of  the  content,  educational software,  and  animation;  if  the  site  is  recommended  by  universities,  public  and  private qualified  institutions.  In  addition,  educational  sites  should  present  other  aspects, including transparency (regarding their educational purpose, quality (scientifically based information,  privacy  (related  to  the  user’s  personal  data,  responsibility  and  reliable sources.  Such  procedures  are  necessary  to  guarantee  that  searching  for  educational objectives will provide access to theoretical and pedagogical information quality.

  19. THE NEED OF DASHBOARD IN SOCIAL RESEARCH NETWORK SITES FOR RESEARCHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hawa Apandi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, dashboard has been widely used by organizations to display information based on their objectives such as monitoring business performance or checking the current trend in the niche market. There is a need to investigate whether the researchers also need the dashboard in assisting their research works. There are some issues facing by researchers while using Social Research Network Sites (SRNS since they could not noticed with information related to research field that they might be interested in because they are huge amounts of information in the SRNS. The inclusion of dashboard in the SRNS has to be explored to understand its relevancy in supporting the researchers work. We review previous works regarding dashboard usage to find the purposes of having dashboard and find researcher needs by reviewing researchers use scenario in the social networking sites. Then, we analyze whether the dashboard purposes can satisfy the researcher needs. From the analysis, we found out that the dashboard is a significant tool in assisting the researchers on: measuring their own research performance, monitoring research trends and alerting them with upcoming events.

  20. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Will Lewis, Compiler

    2006-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R and D projects, as presented in this report

  1. Wind erosion research at an uranium mill tailings site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1977-07-01

    A uranium mill tailings pile at Grants, New Mexico, was selected for wind erosion research since the configuration provides flat area containing fine sand and made up of larger particles. The wind erosion experiment is discussed. Experimental equipment consists of meteorological instrumentation to automatically activate air samplers as a function of wind speed increments and direction, particle cascade impactors to measure airborne respirable concentrations as a function of particle size, inertial impaction devices to measure nonrespirable fluxes of airborne particles, a virtual particle cascade impactor to measure airborne concentrations of toxic trace elements, and soil depth gauges to measure changes in surface soil elevations as a function of time. Both radioactive particles as well as toxic trace element concentrations are measured. Radioactive particles are measured with both particle cascade impactors as well as high-volume air samplers. In contrast, toxic trace element airborne concentrations are measured only with a two-stage virtual particle cascade impactor. Fluxes of nonrespirable airborne particles are measured with inertial impaction devices. At particle cascade impactor sites, a rotating cyclone preseparator collects nonrespirable particles. In addition at all sites, fluxes of nonrespirable particles are measured using an open cavity inertial impaction device

  2. Nevada National Security Site. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R and D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R and D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  3. Site Characteristics Influencing the Translation of Clinical Research Into Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Investigative sites participating in clinical trials play an instrumental role in aiding market adoption. Site experiences in clinical research help physician investigators and research professionals gain familiarity with and exposure to investigational treatments. This knowledge may be passed...

  4. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2014 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, H. A. [Nevada Test Site/National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)

    2015-04-22

    The reports contained herein are for project activities that occurred from October 2013 through September 2014. Project life cycle is indicated under the title as well as the original proposal number (in the following format: site abbreviation--ID #--originating fiscal year; e.g., STL-03-14). Each of the reports describes in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our principal investigators. As SDRD, by definition, invests in “high-risk” and hopefully “high-payoff” research, the element of uncertainty is inherent. While many of our efforts are “successful” and result in positive outcomes or technology utilization, some fall short of expectations, but cannot be construed as “failure” in the negative sense. The latter is a natural and valid part of the process of advanced research and often leads to unforeseen new pathways to future discovery. Regardless, either result advances our knowledge base and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or avoid costly and unwarranted paths for future challenges. In summary, the SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation that returns multifold to our customers, to national security, and to the general public. The program is a vibrant R&D innovation engine, benefited by its discretionary pedigree, enhanced mission spectrum, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum taxpayer benefit. The 25 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security. Further SDRD performance metrics can be found in the appendix at the end of this report.

  5. Earthquake research for the safer siting of critical facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cluff, J.L. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    The task of providing the necessities for living, such as adequate electrical power, water, and fuel, is becoming more complicated with time. Some of the facilities that provide these necessities would present potential hazards to the population if serious damage were to occur to them during earthquakes. Other facilities must remain operable immediately after an earthquake to provide life-support services to people who have been affected. The purpose of this report is to recommend research that will improve the information available to those who must decide where to site these critical facilities, and thereby mitigate the effects of the earthquake hazard. The term critical facility is used in this report to describe facilities that could seriously affect the public well-being through loss of life, large financial loss, or degradation of the environment if they were to fail. The term critical facility also is used to refer to facilities that, although they pose a limited hazard to the public, are considered critical because they must continue to function in the event of a disaster so that they can provide vital services.

  6. Current Research at the Endeavour Ridge 2000 Integrated Studies Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Ridge 2000 Community, R.

    2004-12-01

    Integrated geophysical, geological, chemical, and biological studies are being conducted on the Endeavour segment with primary support from NSF, the W.M. Keck Foundation, and NSERC (Canada). The research includes a seismic network, physical and chemical sensors, high-precision mapping and time-series sampling. Several research expeditions have taken place at the Endeavour ISS in the past year. In June 2003, an NSF-sponsored cruise with R.V. al T.G.Thompson/ROV al Jason2 installed microbial incubators in drill-holes in the sides of active sulfide chimneys and sampled rocks, fluids, and microbes in the Mothra and Main Endeavour Field (MEF). In July 2003, with al Thompson/Jason2, an NSF-LEXEN project at Baby Bare on Endeavour east flank conducted sampling through seafloor-penetrating probes, plus time-series sampling of fluids, microbes, and rocks at the MEF. In September 2003, with al Thompson/ROV al ROPOS, the Keck Proto-Neptune project installed a seismic network consisting of 1 broadband and 7 short-period seismometers, installation of chemical/physical sensors and time-series samplers for chemistry and microbiology in the MEF and Clam Bed sites, collection of rocks, fluids, animals, and microbes. In May/June 2004, an NSF-sponsored al Atlantis/Alvin cruise recovered sulfide incubators installed in 2003, redeployed a sulfide incubator, mapped MEF and Mothra vent fields with high-resolution Imagenix sonar, sampled fluids from MEF, Mothra, and Clam Bed, recovered year-long time-series fluid and microbial samplers from MEF and Clam Bed, recovered and installed hot vent temperature-resistivity monitors, cleaned up the MEF and deployed new markers at major sulfide structures. In August 2004, there were two MBARI/Keck-sponsored cruises with R.V. al Western Flyer/ROV al Tiburon. The first cruise completed the seismic network with addition of two more broadband seismometers and serviced all 7 short-period seismometers. al Tiburon then performed microbial and chemical

  7. Using local research sites to engage undergraduates in environmental science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    For the first time in their undergraduate experience, students in the University of New Hampshire's Techniques in Environmental Science course are immersed in learning approaches to scientific investigation that they can implement as part of their senior capstone research experience or other REU type programs. The course begins with an understanding of the value of note taking in the field and working collaboratively in groups. The students then embark upon a series of field experiences that include using both simple and complex tools for mapping elevation, species composition and above ground biomass estimates in a forest and wetland, carbon cycling through measurement of greenhouse gas exchange at both a wetland and at an organic dairy farm, assessing hydrology and water quality through both ground and surface water measurements at locations on campus, and finally analysis of atmospheric chemistry data collected locally. Over the course of a semester the students learn how to describe their methodology and the importance of their work concisely. Eventually the students are given instrumentation and a field site and learn to ask their own research question and develop their approach to answering it. This course model provides a foundation for students to pursue their capstone research experiences but also for understanding complex environmental questions such as the impact of land use change on water and air quality and carbon cycling and its role in our climate system. Students are provided a unique opportunity to address questions at field sites that are local and are part of larger research programs which allows for a larger context to place their work. This course has also been a framework for the NSF funded REU program- Northern Ecosystems Research for Undergraduates (EAR#1063037). Sallie's Fen, a wetland research site, is used as an initial field setting for students to learn techniques, build their ability to ask research questions and to plan research

  8. Site characterization plan overview: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Consultation Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The consultation draft of the site characterization plan is a lengthy document that describes in considerable detail the program that will be conducted to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and other conditions relevant to the suitability of the site for a repository. The overview presented here consists of brief summaries of important topics covered in the consultation draft of the site-characterization plan; it is not a substitute for the site-characterization plan. The arrangement of the overview is similar to that of the plan itself, with brief descriptions of the disposal system -- the site, the repository, and the waste package -- preceding the discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Yucca Mountain site. It is intended primarily for the management staff of organizations involved in the DOE's repository program -- staff who might wish to understand the general scope of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed rather than the technical details of site characterization. 22 figs., 1 tab

  9. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 9, Index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules.

  10. Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site: Control Volume/Test Cell and Community Research Asset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrash, W.; Bradford, J.; Malama, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) is a research wellfield or field-scale test facility developed in a shallow, coarse, fluvial aquifer with the objectives of supporting: (a) development of cost- effective, non- or minimally-invasive quantitative characterization and imaging methods in heterogeneous aquifers using hydrologic and geophysical techniques; (b) examination of fundamental relationships and processes at multiple scales; (c) testing theories and models for groundwater flow and solute transport; and (d) educating and training of students in multidisciplinary subsurface science and engineering. The design of the wells and the wellfield support modular use and reoccupation of wells for a wide range of single-well, cross-hole, multiwell and multilevel hydrologic, geophysical, and combined hydrologic-geophysical experiments. Efforts to date by Boise State researchers and collaborators have been largely focused on: (a) establishing the 3D distributions of geologic, hydrologic, and geophysical parameters which can then be used as the basis for jointly inverting hard and soft data to return the 3D K distribution and (b) developing subsurface measurement and imaging methods including tomographic characterization and imaging methods. At this point the hydrostratigraphic framework of the BHRS is known to be a hierarchical multi-scale system which includes layers and lenses that are recognized with geologic, hydrologic, radar, seismic, and EM methods; details are now emerging which may allow 3D deterministic characterization of zones and/or material variations at the meter scale in the central wellfield. Also the site design and subsurface framework have supported a variety of testing configurations for joint hydrologic and geophysical experiments. Going forward we recognize the opportunity to increase the R&D returns from use of the BHRS with additional infrastructure (especially for monitoring the vadose zone and surface water-groundwater interactions

  11. Federated Search and the Library Web Site: A Study of Association of Research Libraries Member Web Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how federated search engines are incorporated into the Web sites of libraries in the Association of Research Libraries. In 2009, information was gathered for each library in the Association of Research Libraries with a federated search engine. This included the name of the federated search service and…

  12. Hanford National Environmental Research Park (NERP): a descriptive summary of the site and site-related research programs, 1952--1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, B.E.; Rickard, W.H.

    1977-11-01

    The Hanford National Environmental Research Park site is described in general terms and major plant communities and special habitats are discussed. Important bird, mammal, and fish populations are listed. Current research programs on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and radioecology are reviewed briefly. A list is included of some 100 publications that report results of research studies in detail

  13. Forest decline research in Northrhine-Westphalia at the regional research site Eggegebirge/Velmerstot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinz, B.; Koeth, I.; Krause, G.H.M.; Thiele, V.

    1989-01-01

    In 1984 Northrhine Westfalia established a research program 'Air Pollution and Forest Decline'. Results of various experiments, carried out on the level of 1. epidemiological observations, 2. semi-controlled experiments in open-to-chambers as well as 3. controlled fumigation experiments are presented as an overview. Emphasis is put on field experiments at the regional research site Eggegebirge/Velmerstot, where the Landesanstalt fuer Immissionsschutz analysed among others yearly nutrient cycling and leaching phenomena of injured and healthy spruce trees (type: montanious yellowing). Deposition measurements were carried on a horizontal and vertical trajectory outside and inside a young spruce stand. Preliminary results showed that atmospheric acidic deposition accounts only for 1/3 of the acidification of the soil within the stand, where acidification processes are most prevalent. (orig.) [de

  14. Improving Public Relations Web Sites through Usability Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallahan, Kirk

    2001-01-01

    Argues that usability research has particular relevance for enhancing the effectiveness of websites. Examines the nature and value of usability research, and the elements of an effective website based on usability principles. (SR)

  15. Usability Evaluation of a Research Repository and Collaboration Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Maron, Deborah J.; Charles, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports results from an empirical usability evaluation of Human-Animal Bond Research Initiative Central as part of the effort to develop an open access research repository and collaboration platform for human-animal bond researchers. By repurposing and altering key features of the original HUBzero system, Human-Animal Bond Research…

  16. Site characterization plan overview: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    To help the public better understand both the SCP and the site characterization program, the DOE has prepared this overview and the SCP Public Handbook. The overview presents summaries of selected topics covered in the SCP; it is not a substitute for the SCP. The organization of the overview is similar to that of the SCP itself, with brief descriptions of the Yucca Mountain site, the repository, and the containers in which the waste would be packaged, followed by a discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Yucca Mountain site. This overview is intended primarily for those persons who want to understand the general scope and basis of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed without spending the time necessary to become familiar with all of the technical details presented in the SCP. For the readers of the SCP, the overview will be useful as a general guide to the plan. The SCP Public Handbook is a short document that contains brief descriptions of the SCP process and the contents of the SCP. It also explains how the public can submit comments on the SCP and lists the libraries and reading rooms at which the SCP is available. 9 refs., 18 tabs.

  17. Schools as Sites for Recruiting Participants and Implementing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Robin; Wright, Tiffany; Olarinde, Tia; Holmes, Tara; Beamon, Emily R; Wallace, Debra

    2017-01-01

    Schools can be a valuable resource for recruitment of participants for research involving children, adolescents, and parents. Awareness of the benefits and challenges of working with schools can assist researchers in developing effective school partnerships. This article discusses the advantages of conducting research within the school system as well as the challenges that may also arise. Such challenges include developing key contacts, building relationships, logistical arrangements, and facilitating trust in the research topic and team. Suggestions for strategies to forge successful collaborative relationships with schools are provided.

  18. Biological field stations: research legacies and sites for serendipity

    Science.gov (United States)

    William K. Michener; Keith L. Bildstein; Arthur McKee; Robert R. Parmenter; William W. Hargrove; Deedra McClearn; Mark Stromberg

    2009-01-01

    Biological field stations are distributed throughout North America, capturing much of the ecological variability present at the continental scale and encompassing many unique habitats. In addition to their role in supporting research and education, field stations offer legacies of data, specimens, and accumulated knowledge. Such legacies often provide the only...

  19. Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration project: Cross-site evaluation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD) project links public health and primary care interventions in three projects described in detail in accompanying articles in this issue of Childhood Obesity. This article describes a comprehensive evaluation plan to determine the extent to which th...

  20. Health Care Communication: A Problematic Site for Applied Linguistics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candlin, Christopher N.; Candlin, Sally

    2003-01-01

    Addresses how applied linguists and those concerned with discourse analysis in particular have recently approached the study of health care communication, especially in intercultural contexts, and relates these approaches to studies undertaken by researchers in other academic disciplines, such as the sociology of medicine and by health care…

  1. Network cyberinfrastructure as a shared platform to support multi-site research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-site research across the Long-term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) network requires access to data and information. We present some existing examples where you can get data from across the network and summarize the rich inventory of measurements taken across LTAR sites. But data management suppo...

  2. The Researcher's Journey: Scholarly Navigation of an Academic Library Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Steve; Ravas, Tammy; Zoellner, Kate

    2010-01-01

    A qualitative study of the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library's Web site identified the ways in which students and faculty of the University of Montana used the site for research purposes. This study employed open-ended interview questions and observations to spontaneously capture a user's experience in researching topics in which they…

  3. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Physics of Cancer Metabolism This application seeks to put together a multidiscipline team of experts in various institutions in USA to assemble and...of this project is to build a research cohort of engaged volunteers that reflects the racial , ethnic, and socioeconomic diversity of New York City...assessed in a randomized, phase III clinical trial. Conflict of interest: Advisory Board: Joe O’Sullivan holds consulting/ advisory roles with Bayer

  4. Seismic tomography investigation of the Down Ampney fault research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.D.; Greenwood, P.G.; Raines, M.G.; Rainsbury, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    High resolution tomographic cross-hole seismic surveys have been designed and undertaken for fault characterisation in mudrocks at a higher resolution than is currently used in site investigations. Compressional waves were generated at a frequency of 1.04 kHz and a wavelength of 1.6 m in the formation, and were used to tomographically image a normally faulted clay sequence (Oxford Clay and Kellaways Beds) overlying limestone. The fault plane and lithologies are clearly visible in the tomograms, a 10% difference in velocity between the Oxford Clay and Kellaways Beds, being particularly prominent. A zone of 5% lower ''tomographic - velocity'' was observed to correspond with the fault zone within the Oxford Clay (as predicted from the geological logging of the core) which indicates substantial alteration that could be fluid affected. Geological constraints were found to be a crucial imput to the tomographic inversion, and examples show erroneous results that can arise. Seismic attenuation was very low (reflection observed from 80 m depth) and larger ranges could have been used to investigate larger scale geological structures. (author)

  5. Fieldwork and Fashion: Gendered and Classed Performances in Research Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Lisiak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Researchers' performances in the field are gendered, classed, and ethnicized. We are watched and judged by our respondents based on how we look, what we say, and how we say it. Our appearance in the field may increase or decrease our chances of creating rapport, it may encourage respondents to talk to us or discourage them entirely from taking part in our research. Whereas we have no absolute control over all the factors determining how we present ourselves in the field, we do have some power over our dress. Although the act of getting dressed for fieldwork may appear inconspicuous and mundane, I argue in this article that its implications are most relevant for our thinking about how we design and perform fieldwork. Particularly the assumptions regarding our respondents' and our own class, gender, and ethnicity that we make before entering the field are worthy of careful consideration as they display our thought processes and, as such, are part of academic analysis. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1502146

  6. Carbon Fluxes at the AmazonFACE Research Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, R.; De Araujo, A. C.; Cordeiro, A. L.; Fleischer, K.; Fuchslueger, L.; Garcia, S.; Hofhansl, F.; Garcia, M. N.; Grandis, A.; Oblitas, E.; Pereira, I.; Pieres, N. M.; Schaap, K.; Valverde-Barrantes, O.

    2017-12-01

    The free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment to be implemented in the Amazon rain forest requires strong pretreatment characterization so that eventual responses to elevated CO2 can be detected against a background of substantial species diversity and spatial heterogeneity. Two 30-m diameter plots have been laid out for initial characterization in a 30-m tall, old-growth, terra firme forest. Intensive measurements have been made of aboveground tree growth, leaf area, litter production, and fine-root production; these data sets together support initial estimates of plot-scale net primary productivity (NPP). Leaf-level measurements of photosynthesis throughout the canopy and over a daily time course in both the wet and dry season, coupled with meterological monitoring, support an initial estimate of gross primary productivity (GPP) and carbon-use efficiency (CUE = NPP/GPP). Monthly monitoring of CO2 efflux from the soil, partitioned into autotrophic and heterotrophic components, supports an estimate of net ecosystem production (NEP). Our estimate of NPP in the two plots (1.2 and 1.4 kg C m-2 yr-1) is 16-38% greater than previously reported for the site, primarily due to our more complete documentation of fine-root production, including root production deeper than 30 cm. The estimate of CUE of the ecosystem (0.52) is greater than most others in Amazonia; this discrepancy reflects large uncertainty in GPP, which derived from just two days of measurement, or to underestimates of the fine-root component of NPP in previous studies. Estimates of NEP (0 and 0.14 kg C m-2 yr-1) are generally consistent with a landscape-level estimate from flux tower data. Our C flux estimates, albeit very preliminary, provide initial benchmarks for a 12-model a priori evaluation of this forest. The model means of GPP, NPP, and NEP are mostly consistent with our field measurements. Predictions of C flux responses to elevated CO2 from the models become hypotheses to be tested in the FACE

  7. Marketing Research of Construction Sites based on ABC-XYZ Analysis and Relational Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konikov Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ABC-XYZ analysis is well known in marketing. It allows identifying sites that yield maximum profits when sold, sites that enjoy stable demand, or sites have both qualities specified above. However, the methods are quite abstract and are not designed to study specific factors that impact the results of ABC-XYZ analysis. Meanwhile, for some applications, particularly for marketing research of construction sites, it is critical not only to identify high-profit and stable sites but also to find out what combination of technical parameters, factors related to their location, transport accessibility, etc. are typical of them. This work suggests an approach to address the issue.

  8. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    2013-04-01

    The reports included in this report are for project activities that occurred from October 2011 through September 2012. These reports describe in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our talented and enthusiastic principal investigators (PIs). Many of the reports describe R&D efforts that were “successful” in their pursuits and resulted in a positive outcome or technology realization. As we’ve stated before, and continue to stress, in some cases the result is a “negative” finding, for instance a technology is currently impractical or out of reach. This can often be viewed erroneously as a “failure,” but is actually a valid outcome in the pursuit of high-risk research, which often leads to unforeseen new paths of discovery. Either result advances our knowledge and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or likewise avoid costly paths not appropriate for the challenges presented. The SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation and development that returns multifold to the NNSS mission. Overall the program is a strong R&D innovation engine, benefited by an enhanced mission, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum benefit. The 23 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security.

  9. The promise and peril of intensive-site-based ecological research: insights from the Hubbard Brook ecosystem study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy J. Fahey; Pamela H. Templer; Bruce T. Anderson; John J. Battles; John L. Campbell; Charles T. Driscoll; Anthony R. Fusco; Mark B. Green; Karim-Aly S. Kassam; Nicholas L. Rodenhouse; Lindsey Rustad; Paul G. Schaberg; Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur

    2015-01-01

    Ecological research is increasingly concentrated at particular locations or sites. This trend reflects a variety of advantages of intensive, site-based research, but also raises important questions about the nature of such spatially delimited research: how well does site based research represent broader areas, and does it constrain scientific discovery? We provide an...

  10. [Research advances in control of N2O emission from municipal solid waste landfill sites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chuan-Yu; Li, Bo; Lü, Hao-Hao; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2012-05-01

    Landfill is one of the main approaches for municipal solid waste treatment, and landfill site is a main emission source of greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4). As a high-efficient trace greenhouse gas, N2O has a very high warming potential, with a warming capacity 296 times of CO2, and has a long-term stability in atmosphere, giving greater damage to the ozone layer. Aiming at the researches in the control of N2O emission from municipal solid waste landfill sites, this paper summarized the characteristics and related affecting factors of the N2O emission from the landfill sites, and put forward a series of the measures adaptable to the N2O emission control of present municipal solid waste landfill sites in China. Some further research focuses on the control of N2O emission from the landfill sites were also presented.

  11. Contemporary social network sites: Relevance in anesthesiology teaching, training, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Kaushal, Ashutosh; Samanta, Sukhen; Ambesh, Paurush; Srivastava, Shashi; Singh, Prabhat K

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenal popularity of social networking sites has been used globally by medical professionals to boost professional associations and scientific developments. They have tremendous potential to forge professional liaisons, generate employment,upgrading skills and publicizing scientific achievements. We highlight the role of social networking mediums in influencing teaching, training and research in anaesthesiology. The growth of social networking sites have been prompted by the limitations of previous facilities in terms of ease of data and interface sharing and the amalgamation of audio visual aids on common platforms in the newer facilities. Contemporary social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr,Linkedn etc and their respective features based on anaesthesiology training or practice have been discussed. A host of advantages which these sites confer are also discussed. Likewise the potential pitfalls and drawbacks of these facilities have also been addressed. Social networking sites have immense potential for development of training and research in Anaesthesiology. However responsible and cautious utilization is advocated.

  12. STC synthesis of research results for water quality management at construction sites : research project capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The RAC Region II has initiated a collaborative research program consortium through the : Transportation Pooled Fund (TPF) Program. The research program is called the Southeast : Transportation Consortium (STC) and is intended to encourage coordinati...

  13. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    Chapter six describes the basis for facility design, the completed facility conceptual design, the completed analytical work relating to the resolution of design issues, and future design-related work. The basis for design and the conceptual design information presented in this chapter meet the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, for a conceptual repository design that takes into account site-specific requirements. This information is presented to permit a critical evaluation of planned site characterization activities. Chapter seven describes waste package components, emplacement environment, design, and status of research and development that support the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project. The site characterization plan (SCP) discussion of waste package components is contained entirely within this chapter. The discussion of emplacement environment in this chapter is limited to considerations of the environment that influence, or which may influence, if perturbed, the waste packages and their performance (particularly hydrogeology, geochemistry, and borehole stability). The basis for conceptual waste package design as well as a description of the design is included in this chapter. The complete design will be reported in the advanced conceptual design (ACD) report and is not duplicated in the SCP. 367 refs., 173 figs., 68 tabs.

  14. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Chapter six describes the basis for facility design, the completed facility conceptual design, the completed analytical work relating to the resolution of design issues, and future design-related work. The basis for design and the conceptual design information presented in this chapter meet the requiremenrs of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, for a conceptual repository design that takes into account site-specific requirements. This information is presented to permit a critical evaluation of planned site characterization activities. Chapter seven describes waste package components, emplacement environment, design, and status of research and development that support the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project. The site characterization plan (SCP) discussion of waste package components is contained entirely within this chapter. The discussion of emplacement environment in this chapter is limited to considerations of the environment that influence, or which may influence, if perturbed, the waste packages and their performance (particularly hydrogeology, geochemistry, and borehole stability). The basis for conceptual waste package design as well as a description of the design is included in this chapter. The complete design will be reported in the advanced conceptual design (ACD) report and is not duplicated in the SCP. 367 refs., 173 figs., 68 tabs

  15. Research on Channel Strategies of Modern Agricultural Engineering Demonstration Sites in Guangzhou

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-guang Liang; Chun Xie; Qian-qian Pang

    2015-01-01

    The research discusses the channel structure of modern agricultural engineering demonstration sites in Guangzhou. It analyzes the strategies of channel competition, personnel combination, transportation combination and terminal network construction. Enterprises adapt different marketing channel strategies on the basis of the type of the market. The research has made certain achievement and has certain guiding significance.

  16. Discussion about design basis flood of site of research reactors by river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Feng; Zhao Jianjun; Du Qiaomin; Zhang Lingyan

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the well-defined standard in relation to design the basis flood of the sites of research reactors by river. It is based on the concept of some relational standards, analysis of hydrological calculation technology and methods, and analysis of accident dangerous degrees of research reactor, as well as in combination with the engineering practices. The flood preventing standard for research reactors with higher power should be the same with that of the nuclear power plants. (authors)

  17. Contemporary social network sites: Relevance in anesthesiology teaching, training, and research

    OpenAIRE

    Rudrashish Haldar; Ashutosh Kaushal; Sukhen Samanta; Paurush Ambesh; Shashi Srivastava; Prabhat K Singh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The phenomenal popularity of social networking sites has been used globally by medical professionals to boost professional associations and scientific developments. They have tremendous potential to forge professional liaisons, generate employment,upgrading skills and publicizing scientific achievements. We highlight the role of social networking mediums in influencing teaching, training and research in anaesthesiology. Background: The growth of social networking sites have been pr...

  18. Research on Social Networking Sites and Social Support from 2004 to 2015: A Narrative Review and Directions for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingbo; Martinez, Lourdes; Holmstrom, Amanda; Chung, Minwoong; Cox, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a narrative review of scholarship on social support through social networking sites (SNSs) published from 2004 to 2015. By searching keywords related to social support and SNSs in major databases for social sciences, we identified and content analyzed directly relevant articles (N = 88). The article summarizes the prevalence of theory usage; the function of theory usage (e.g., testing a theory, developing a theory); major theories referenced; and methodologies, including research designs, measurement, and the roles of social support and SNS examined in this literature. It also reports four themes identified across the studies, indicating the trends in the current research. Based on the review, the article presents a discussion about study sites, conceptualization of social support, theoretical coherence, the role of social networks, and the dynamic relationships between SNS use and social support, which points out potential avenues for shaping a future research agenda.

  19. A Comparison of Online versus On-site Training in Health Research Methodology: A Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchanaraksa Sukon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distance learning may be useful for building health research capacity. However, evidence that it can improve knowledge and skills in health research, particularly in resource-poor settings, is limited. We compared the impact and acceptability of teaching two distinct content areas, Biostatistics and Research Ethics, through either on-line distance learning format or traditional on-site training, in a randomized study in India. Our objective was to determine whether on-line courses in Biostatistics and Research Ethics could achieve similar improvements in knowledge, as traditional on-site, classroom-based courses. Methods Subjects: Volunteer Indian scientists were randomly assigned to one of two arms. Intervention: Students in Arm 1 attended a 3.5-day on-site course in Biostatistics and completed a 3.5-week on-line course in Research Ethics. Students in Arm 2 attended a 3.5-week on-line course in Biostatistics and 3.5-day on-site course in Research Ethics. For the two course formats, learning objectives, course contents and knowledge tests were identical. Main Outcome Measures: Improvement in knowledge immediately and 3-months after course completion, compared to baseline. Results Baseline characteristics were similar in both arms (n = 29 each. Median knowledge score for Biostatistics increased from a baseline of 49% to 64% (p Conclusion On-line and on-site training formats led to marked and similar improvements of knowledge in Biostatistics and Research Ethics. This, combined with logistical and cost advantages of on-line training, may make on-line courses particularly useful for expanding health research capacity in resource-limited settings.

  20. DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

    1997-08-31

    Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.

  1. An Analysis of NSF Geosciences Research Experience for Undergraduate Site Programs from 2009 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, E. L.; Patino, L. C.; Weiler, S.; Sanchez, S. C.; Colon, Y.; Antell, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) provides U.S. undergraduate students from any college or university the opportunity to conduct research at a different institution and gain a better understanding of research career pathways. The Geosciences REU Sites foster research opportunities in areas closely aligned with geoscience programs, particularly those related to earth, atmospheric and ocean sciences. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the Geosciences REU Site programs run in 2009 through 2011. A survey requesting information on recruitment methods, student demographics, enrichment activities, and fields of research was sent to the Principal Investigators of each of the active REU Sites. Over 70% of the surveys were returned with the requested information from about 50 to 60 sites each year. The internet is the most widely used mechanism to recruit participants, with personal communication as the second most important recruiting tool. The admissions rate for REU Sites in Geosciences varies from less than 10% to 50%, with the majority of participants being rising seniors and juniors. Many of the participants come from non-PhD granting institutions. Among the participants, gender distribution varies by discipline, with ocean sciences having a large majority of women and earth sciences having a majority of men. Regarding ethnic diversity, the REU Sites reflect the difficulty of attracting diverse students into Geosciences as a discipline; a large majority of participants are Caucasian and Asian students. Furthermore, participants from minority-serving institutions and community colleges constitute a small percentage of those taking part in these research experiences. The enrichment activities are very similar across the REU Sites, and mimic activities common to the scientific community, including intellectual exchange of ideas (lab meetings, seminars, and professional meetings

  2. The 'over-researched community': An ethics analysis of stakeholder views at two South African HIV prevention research sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, Jennifer; Wassenaar, Douglas; Mamotte, Nicole

    2017-12-01

    Health research in resource-limited, multi-cultural contexts raises complex ethical concerns. The term 'over-researched community' (ORC) has been raised as an ethical concern and potential barrier to community participation in research. However, the term lacks conceptual clarity and is absent from established ethics guidelines and academic literature. In light of the concern being raised in relation to research in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), a critical and empirical exploration of the meaning of ORC was undertaken. Guided by Emanuel et al.'s (2004) eight principles for ethically sound research in LMICs, this study examines the relevance and meaning of the terms 'over-research' and 'over-researched community' through an analysis of key stakeholder perspectives at two South African research sites. Data were collected between August 2007 and October 2008. 'Over-research' was found to represent a conglomeration of ethical concerns often used as a proxy for standard research ethics concepts. 'Over-research' seemed fundamentally linked to disparate positions and perspectives between different stakeholders in the research interaction, arising from challenges in inter-stakeholder relationships. 'Over-research' might be interpreted to mean exploitation. However, exploitation itself could mean different things. Using the term may lead to obscured understanding of real or perceived ethical concerns, making it difficult to identify and address the underlying concerns. It is recommended that the term be carefully and critically interrogated for clarity when used in research ethics discourse. Because it represents other legitimate concerns, it should not be dismissed without careful exploration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing Educational Materials about Risks on Social Network Sites: A Design Based Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhoven, Ellen; Schellens, Tammy; Vanderlinde, Ruben; Valcke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all of today's Western teenagers have a profile on a social network site (SNS). As many risks have been reported, researchers and governments have emphasized the role of school education to teach teenagers how to deal safely with SNSs. However, little is known about the specific characteristics which would make interventions effective.…

  4. University-affiliated schools as sites for research learning in pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    University-affiliated schools as sites for research learning in pre-service teacher education ... they can also learn from good example, in well-functioning schools, where they can also get .... school can offer in terms of signs and tools to achieve.

  5. DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site's total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside

  6. Lessons learned from bacterial transport research at the South Oyster Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibe, T.; Hubbard, S.S.; Onstott, T.C.; DeFlaun, M.F.

    2011-04-01

    This paper provides a review of bacterial transport experiments conducted by a multi-investigator, multi-institution, multi-disciplinary team of researchers under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The experiments were conducted during the time period 1999-2001 at a field site near the town of Oyster, Virginia known as the South Oyster Site, and included four major experimental campaigns aimed at understanding and quantifying bacterial transport in the subsurface environment. Several key elements of the research are discussed here: (1) quantification of bacterial transport in physically, chemically and biologically heterogeneous aquifers, (2) evaluation of the efficacy of conventional colloid filtration theory, (3) scale effects in bacterial transport, (4) development of new methods for microbial enumeration and screening for low adhesion strains, (5) application of novel hydrogeophysical techniques for aquifer characterization, and (6) experiences regarding management of a large field research effort. Lessons learned are summarized in each of these areas. The body of literature resulting from South Oyster Site research has been widely cited and continues to influence research into the controls exerted by aquifer heterogeneity on reactive transport (including microbial transport). It also served as a model (and provided valuable experience) for subsequent and ongoing highly-instrumented field research efforts conducted by DOE-sponsored investigators.

  7. Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-11-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines were derived for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Environmental Restoration (ER) site in Davis, California. The guideline derivation was based on a dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. The US Department of Energy (DOE) residual radioactive material guideline computer code was used in this evaluation. This code implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three potential site utilization scenarios were considered with the assumption that following ER action, the site will be used without radiological restrictions. The defined scenarios vary with regard to use of the site, time spent at the site, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded, provided that the soil concentrations of these radionuclides at the LEHR site do not exceed the scenario-specific values calculated by this study. Except for the extent of the contaminated zone (which is very conservative), assumptions used are as site-specific as possible, given available information. The derived guidelines are single- radionuclide guidelines and are linearly proportional to the dose limit used in the calculations. In setting the actual residual soil contamination guides for the LEHR site, DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors such as whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate, as well as using site-specific inputs to computer models based on data not yet fully determined

  8. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

  9. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs

  10. "A Virtual Canvas"—Designing a Blog Site to Research Young Muslims' Friendships & Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla McGarry

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on research among a group of Muslim youth living in the west of Ireland as part of a study on "social belonging" and identity. One part of the research involved designing a youth centered, participatory research method, in the form of a blog site, to investigate what young people say and do when they are asked to talk about themselves and their relationships, with minimal researcher involvement. Participants were presented with a "blank virtual canvas" where they determined what became discussed. Twenty-two teenaged Muslims—comprising close friends as well as fellow students of the same school and living in the same West of Ireland town—contributed to a time limited, closed blog site over a four month period. The blog site offers interesting snippets of Muslim identification, and how they choose to present themselves to others. In the process of contributing to this exercise, we can also observe subtle means through which inclusion and exclusion co-exist online, refracting young people's offline worlds. The blog affords an opportunity to consciously "do" friendship by presenting to each other images, symbols and statements of friendship that invoke both cohesion and closure. The research unravels certain gendered patterns in online performances. In demonstrating this evidence, we argue that the study of online interactions of youth can provide an alternative window in exploring relationships, identification and social positioning. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs130115

  11. 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, Mark D.

    2008-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

  12. Preliminary Geological Survey on the Proposed Sites for the New Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, In Cheol; Ha, J. J.; Oh, K. B.

    2010-12-01

    · Performing the preliminary geological survey on the proposed sites for the new research reactor through the technical service · Ordering a technical service from The Geological Society of Korea · Contents of the geological survey - Confirmation of active fault - Confirmation of a large-scale fracture zone or weak zone - Confirmation of inappropriate items related to the underground water - Confirmation of historical seismicity and instrumental earthquakes data · Synthesized analysis and holding a report meeting · Results of the geological survey - Confirmation of the geological characteristics of the sites and drawing the requirements for the precise geological survey in the future

  13. Effects of wave energy converters on the surrounding soft-bottom macrofauna (west coast of Sweden).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhamer, O

    2010-06-01

    Offshore wave energy conversion is expected to develop, thus contributing to an increase in submerged constructions on the seabed. An essential concern related to the deployment of wave energy converters (WECs) is their possible impact on the surrounding soft-bottom habitats. In this study, the macrofaunal assemblages in the seabed around the wave energy converters in the Lysekil research site on the Swedish west coast and a neighbouring reference site were examined yearly during a period of 5 years (2004-2008). Macrobenthic communities living in the WECs' surrounding seabed were mainly composed by organisms typical for the area and depth off the Swedish west coast. At both sites the number of individuals, number of species and biodiversity were low, and were mostly small, juvenile organisms. The species assemblages during the first years of sampling were significantly different between the Lysekil research site and the nearby reference site with higher species abundance in the research site. The high contribution to dissimilarities was mostly due to polychaetes. Sparse macrofaunal densities can be explained by strong hydrodynamic forces and/or earlier trawling. WECs may alter the surrounding seabed with an accumulation of organic matter inside the research area. This indicates that the deployment of WECs in the Lysekil research site tends to have rather minor direct ecological impacts on the surrounding benthic community relative to the natural high variances.

  14. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed

  15. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package; and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstate the suitability of the site for a repository, to desin the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next; it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed

  16. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended by the Secretary of Energy and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the requirements of the Nulcear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of the site characterization plan are oulined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed

  17. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  18. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  19. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package; and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstate the suitability of the site for a repository, to desin the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next; it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  20. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended by the Secretary of Energy and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the requirements of the Nulcear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of the site characterization plan are oulined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  1. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

  2. Overview of research and networking with ground based remote sensing for atmospheric profiling at the Cabauw experimental site for atmospheric research (Cesar) - the Netherlandse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apituley, A.; Russchenberg, H.; Marel, van der H.; Bosveld, F.; Boers, R.; Brink, ten H.; Leeuw, de G.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Abresser-Rastburg, B.; Röckmann, T.

    2008-01-01

    CESAR, the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research, is the Dutch focal point for collaboration on climate monitoring and atmospheric research and is situated on the KNMI meteorological research site near Cabauw in the Netherlands (Cabauw, 51.97 N, 4.93 E). CESAR addresses challenging

  3. The Rossendorf research site. The Rossendorf Research Center (FZR). The Rossendorf Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik (VKTA). The Rossendorf Foerderverein fuer Wissenschaft, Forschung und Technologie (ROTECH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The illustrated brochure presents the Rossendorf research site at a glance. There are two major new establishments, the Rossendorf Research Center and the Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf (VKTA), whose main activities cover basic research and tasks in the field of nuclear facilities decommissioning and radwaste management on site. (DG) [de

  4. PS1-29: Resources to Facilitate Multi-site Collaboration: the PRIMER Research Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Sarah; Thompson, Ella; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Neale, Anne Victoria; Dolor, Rowena

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims: The national research enterprise has typically functioned in a decentralized fashion, resulting in duplicative or undocumented processes, impeding not only the pace of research, but diffusion of established best practices. To remedy this, many long-standing networks have begun capturing and documenting proven strategies to streamline and standardize various aspects of the research process. The project, “Partnership-driven Resources to IMprove and Enhance Research” (PRIMER), was funded through the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) initiative to leverage the collective expertise from two networks: the HMO Research Network and Practice Based Research Networks (PBRNs). Each network has a shared goal of propagating research resources and best practices. Methods: We created and distributed an online survey to 92 CTSA and PBRN representatives in March, 2009 to define critical needs and existing resources that could inform a resource repository. The survey identified barriers and benefits to forming research partnerships, and assessed the perceived utility of various tools that could accelerate the research process. The study team identified, reviewed and organized tools based on the typical research trajectory from design to dissemination. Results: Fifty-five of 92 invitees (59%) completed the survey. Respondents rated the ability to conduct community-relevant research through true academic-community partnerships as the top-rated benefit of multi-site research, followed by the opportunity to accelerate translation of research into practice. The top two perceived barriers to multi-site research were ‘funding opportunities are not adequate (e.g., too few, not enough to support true collaborations), and ‘lack of research infrastructure to support [all] partners (e.g., no IT support, IRB, dedicated research staff). Respondents’ ratings of the utility of various tools and templates was used to guide development of an online

  5. Researching for sustained translation from site cluster permeability into building courtyard and interior atrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teddy Badai Samodra, FX; Defiana, Ima; Setyawan, Wahyu

    2018-03-01

    Many previous types of research have discussed the permeability of site cluster. Because of interaction and interconnected attribute, it will be better that there is its translation into lower context such as building and interior scale. In this paper, the sustainability design performance of both similar designs of courtyard and atrium are investigated continuing the recommendation of site space permeability. By researching related literature review and study through Ecotect Analysis and Ansys Fluent simulations, the pattern transformation and optimum courtyard and atrium design could comply the requirement. The results highlighted that the air movement from the site could be translated at the minimum of 50% higher to the building and indoor environment. Thus, it has potency for energy efficiency when grid, loop, and cul-de-sac site clusters, with 25% of ground coverage, have connectivity with building courtyard compared to the atrium. Energy saving is higher when using low thermal transmittance of transparent material and its lower area percentages for the courtyard walls. In general, it was more energy efficient option as part of a low rise building, while the courtyard building performed better with increasing irregular building height more than 90% of the difference.

  6. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2011-04-04

    This annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program represents the highly significant R&D accomplishments conducted during fiscal year 2010. This year was noteworthy historically, as the Nevada Test Site was renamed to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This change not only recognizes how the site's mission has evolved, but also heralds a future of new challenges and opportunities for the NNSS. In many ways, since its inception in 2002, the SDRD program has helped shape that evolving mission. As we approach 2012, SDRD will also mark a milestone, having completed its first full decade of innovative R&D in support of the site and national security. The program continues to fund advanced science and technology development across traditional Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear security areas such as stockpile stewardship and non-proliferation while also supporting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) needs, and specialized work for government agencies like the Department of Defense (DoD) and others. The NNSS will also contribute technologies in the areas of treaty verification and monitoring, two areas of increasing importance to national security. Keyed to the NNSS's broadened scope, the SDRD program will continue to anticipate and advance R&D projects that will help the NNSS meet forthcoming challenges.

  7. Nevada Natonal Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2010 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Howard

    2011-01-01

    This annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program represents the highly significant R and D accomplishments conducted during fiscal year 2010. This year was noteworthy historically, as the Nevada Test Site was renamed to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This change not only recognizes how the site's mission has evolved, but also heralds a future of new challenges and opportunities for the NNSS. In many ways, since its inception in 2002, the SDRD program has helped shape that evolving mission. As we approach 2012, SDRD will also mark a milestone, having completed its first full decade of innovative R and D in support of the site and national security. The program continues to fund advanced science and technology development across traditional Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear security areas such as stockpile stewardship and non-proliferation while also supporting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) needs, and specialized work for government agencies like the Department of Defense (DoD) and others. The NNSS will also contribute technologies in the areas of treaty verification and monitoring, two areas of increasing importance to national security. Keyed to the NNSS's broadened scope, the SDRD program will continue to anticipate and advance R and D projects that will help the NNSS meet forthcoming challenges.

  8. Hydrogeological measurements and modelling of the Down Ampney Fault Research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightman, M.A.; Sen, M.A.; Abbott, M.A.W.

    1991-01-01

    The British Geological Survey, in cooperation with ISMES of Italy, is carrying out a research programme into the properties of faults cutting clay formations. The programme has two major aims; firstly, to develop geophysical techniques to locate and measure the geophysical properties of a fault in clay; secondly, to measure the hydrogeological properties of the fault and its effect on the groundwater flow pattern through a sequence of clays and aquifers. Analysis of pulse tests performed in the clays at the Down Ampney Research site gave values of hydraulic conductivity ranging from 5 x 10 -12 to 2 x 10 -8 ms -1 . Numerical modelling of the effects of groundwater abstraction from nearby wells on the site was performed using the finite element code FEMWATER. The results are discussed. (Author)

  9. Follow the link: Digital Tracings of a Multi-Sited Space of Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    The paper discusses the use of digital methods as an alternative way of generating what George Marcus calls 'posited logics of association' for use in multi-sited fieldwork. I draw on cases from an ongoing research project on the new nordic food movement and its on- and off-line assemblages. I do...... doing so I demonstrate how methods which are native to the digital domain - such as the link or the like as a valuation metric - may be re-appropriated as strategies in more ethnographic styles of work.......The paper discusses the use of digital methods as an alternative way of generating what George Marcus calls 'posited logics of association' for use in multi-sited fieldwork. I draw on cases from an ongoing research project on the new nordic food movement and its on- and off-line assemblages. I...

  10. Research plan for integrated ecosystem and pollutant monitoring at remote wilderness study sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, D.A.; Wiersma, G.B.

    1988-03-01

    This research plan outlines an approach to the measurement of pollutants and ecosystem parameters at remote, high-elevation, wilderness study sites. A multimedia, systems approach to environmental monitoring is emphasized. The primary purpose of the research is to apply and field test a technical report entitled ''Guidelines for measuring the physical, chemical, and biological condition of wilderness ecosystems.'' This document intended to provide Federal Land Managers with information to establish environmental monitoring programs in wilderness areas. To date, this monitoring document has yet to be evaluated under rigorous field conditions at a remote, high-elevation Rocky Mountain site. For the purpose of field testing approaches to monitoring of pollutants and ecosystems in remote, wilderness areas, evaluation criteria were developed. These include useability, cost-effectiveness, data variability, alternative approaches, ecosystems conceptual approach, and quality assurance. Both the Forest Service and INEL environmental monitoring techniques will be evaluated with these criteria. Another objective of this research plan is to obtain an integrated data base on pollutants and ecosystem structure and function at a remote study site. The methods tested in this project will be used to acquire these data from a systems approach. This includes multimedia monitoring of air and water quality, soils, and forest, stream, and lake ecosystems. 71 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs

  11. Research in Support of Remediation Activities at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaman, J.C.; B.B. Looney and M.K. Harris

    2007-01-01

    The USDOE Savannah River Site (SRS), an 803-km 2 (310-mile 2 ) facility located south of Aiken, SC on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain and bounded to the west by the Savannah River, was established in the 1950s for the production and refinement of nuclear materials. To fulfill this mission during the past 50 years SRS has operated five nuclear reactors, two large chemical separation areas, waste disposal facilities (landfills, waste ponds, waste tanks, and waste stabilization), and a large number of research and logistics support facilities. Contaminants of concern (COC) resulting from site operations include chlorinated solvents, radionuclides, metals, and metalloids, often found as complex mixtures that greatly complicate remediation efforts when compared with civilian industries. The objective of this article is to provide a description of the lithology and hydrostratigraphy of the SRS, as well as a brief history of site operations and research activities as a preface to the current special section of Vadose Zone Journal (VZJ) dedicated to SRS, focusing mainly on issues that are unique to the USDOE complex. Contributions to the special section reflect a diverse range of topics, from hydrologic tracer experiments conducted both within the vadose and saturated zones to studies specifically aimed at identifying geochemical processes controlling the migration and partitioning of specific contaminants (e.g., TCE, 137 Cs, U, and Pu) in SRS subsurface environments. Addressing the diverse environmental challenges of the SRS provides a unique opportunity to conduct both fundamental and applied research across a range of experimental scales. Hence, the SRS has been a pioneering force in several areas of environmental research and remediation, often through active interdisciplinary collaboration with researchers from other USDOE facilities, academic and federal institutions, and commercial entities

  12. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 3, Part A: Chapters 6 and 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE's Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 218 figs., 50 tabs

  13. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 1, Part A: Chapters 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE's Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 750 refs., 123 figs., 42 tabs

  14. Site Characterization Plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 3, Part A: Chapters 6 and 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 218 figs., 50 tabs.

  15. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 1, Part A: Chapters 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 750 refs., 123 figs., 42 tabs.

  16. Enhancing Hispanic participation in mental health clinical research: development of a Spanish-speaking depression research site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte-Rivera, Vivianne; Dunlop, Boadie W; Ramirez, Cynthia; Kelley, Mary E; Schneider, Rebecca; Blastos, Beatriz; Larson, Jacqueline; Mercado, Flavia; Mayberg, Helen; Craighead, W Edward

    2014-03-01

    Hispanics, particularly those with limited English proficiency, are underrepresented in psychiatric clinical research studies. We developed a bilingual and bicultural research clinic dedicated to the recruitment and treatment of Spanish-speaking subjects in the Predictors of Remission in Depression to Individual and Combined Treatments (PReDICT) study, a large clinical trial of treatment-naïve subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Demographic and clinical data derived from screening evaluations of the first 1,174 subjects presenting for participation were compared between the Spanish-speaking site (N = 275) and the primary English-speaking site (N = 899). Reasons for ineligibility (N = 888) for the PReDICT study were tallied for each site. Compared to English speakers, Spanish speakers had a lower level of education and were more likely to be female, uninsured, and have uncontrolled medical conditions. Clinically, Spanish speakers demonstrated greater depression severity, with higher mean symptom severity scores, and a greater number of previous suicide attempts. Among the subjects who were not randomized into the PReDICT study, Spanish-speaking subjects were more likely to have an uncontrolled medical condition or refuse participation, whereas English-speaking subjects were more likely to have bipolar disorder or a non-MDD depressive disorder. Recruitment of Hispanic subjects with MDD is feasible and may enhance efforts at signal detection, given the higher severity of depression among Spanish-speaking participants presenting for clinical trials. Specific approaches for the recruitment and retention of Spanish-speaking participants are required. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Wave Energy Converters : An experimental approach to onshore testing, deployments and offshore monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Ulvgård, Liselotte

    2017-01-01

    The wave energy converter (WEC) concept developed at Uppsala University consists of a point absorbing buoy, directly connected to a permanent magnet linear generator. Since 2006, over a dozen full scale WECs have been deployed at the Lysekil Research Site, on the west coast of Sweden. Beyond the development of the WEC concept itself, the full scale approach enables, and requires, experimental and multidisciplinary research within several peripheral areas, such as instrumentation, offshore ope...

  18. Research on definition of hard rock shear wave velocity of site for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhenkun; Xia Zufeng

    2013-01-01

    Background: The definition of hard rock shear wave velocity is one of the most critical issues in the work of site selection. Purpose: To make a definition of hard rock site on which the model can be assumed as fixed-base condition, a series of research had been done. Several possible hard rock site soil models were developed. Methods: Shear wave velocity of hard rock had been assumed from 1100 m/s to 3200 m/s. For each case, free field analysis and soil structure analysis had been performed. And responses in soil and key nodes of structure were compared. Results: In free field analysis, responses of models that shear wave velocity below 2400 m/s decreased a lot. In SSI analysis, structure responses didn't change much when shear wave velocity was above 2400 m/s. Conclusions: 2400 m/s was the lowest shear wave velocity for hard rock site for fixed-base assumption. (authors)

  19. Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

  20. Multiple Comorbidities and Interest in Research Participation Among Clients of a Nonprofit Food Distribution Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Robin T; Craddock Lee, Simon J; Leonard, Tammy; Cuate, Erica L; Cole, Jay; Pruitt, Sandi L

    2015-10-01

    Persons accessing food from nonprofit distribution sites face numerous challenges and typically have significant unmet health needs. However, given limited and intermittent healthcare system engagement, this vulnerable population is underrepresented in clinical research. We sought to better understand the health needs of a nonclinical population to inform future research and interventions. Focus groups were conducted in English (n = 4) and Spanish (n = 4) with clients of Crossroads Community Services (CCS), the largest distributor of North Texas Food Bank. Discussions probed participants' health status, healthcare utilization, understanding and utilization of mammography, and attitudes toward participation in research. Participants included 42 CCS clients, primarily Hispanic or African American women. Participants reported multiple comorbid conditions among household members, yet utilization of health services was often limited by cost. The majority expressed interest in participating in research to communicate their health concerns and obtain emotional support. CCS clients represent a high-need, under-reached population willing to engage in health-related research that affords them opportunity to connect with peers in group settings and obtain information to improve management of daily life challenges. The Community Assistance Research (CARe) Initiative, a community-academic collaboration, establishes a much-needed opportunity for ongoing clinical research and intervention among this underserved population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Web-based recruiting for health research using a social networking site: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Yeshe; Garland, Suzanne M; Moore, Elya E; Jayasinghe, Yasmin; Fletcher, Ashley; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Gunasekaran, Bharathy; Wark, John D

    2012-02-01

    Recruitment of young people for health research by traditional methods has become more expensive and challenging over recent decades. The Internet presents an opportunity for innovative recruitment modalities. To assess the feasibility of recruiting young females using targeted advertising on the social networking site Facebook. We placed an advertisement on Facebook from May to September 2010, inviting 16- to 25-year-old females from Victoria, Australia, to participate in a health study. Those who clicked on the advertisement were redirected to the study website and were able to express interest by submitting their contact details online. They were contacted by a researcher who assessed eligibility and invited them to complete a health-related survey, which they could do confidentially and securely either at the study site or remotely online. A total of 551 females responded to the advertisement, of whom 426 agreed to participate, with 278 completing the survey (139 at the study site and 139 remotely). Respondents' age distribution was representative of the target population, while 18- to 25-year-olds were more likely to be enrolled in the study and complete the survey than 16- to 17-year-olds (prevalence ratio=1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.78, P=.02). The broad geographic distribution (major city, inner regional, and outer regional/remote) and socioeconomic profile of participants matched the target population. Predictors of participation were older age, higher education level, and higher body mass index. Average cost in advertising fees per compliant participant was US $20, making this highly cost effective. Results demonstrate the potential of using modern information and communication technologies to engage young women in health research and penetrate into nonurban communities. The success of this method has implications for future medical and population research in this and other demographics.

  2. Web-Based Recruiting for Health Research Using a Social Networking Site: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Yeshe; Garland, Suzanne M; Moore, Elya E; Jayasinghe, Yasmin; Fletcher, Ashley; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Gunasekaran, Bharathy

    2012-01-01

    Background Recruitment of young people for health research by traditional methods has become more expensive and challenging over recent decades. The Internet presents an opportunity for innovative recruitment modalities. Objective To assess the feasibility of recruiting young females using targeted advertising on the social networking site Facebook. Methods We placed an advertisement on Facebook from May to September 2010, inviting 16- to 25-year-old females from Victoria, Australia, to participate in a health study. Those who clicked on the advertisement were redirected to the study website and were able to express interest by submitting their contact details online. They were contacted by a researcher who assessed eligibility and invited them to complete a health-related survey, which they could do confidentially and securely either at the study site or remotely online. Results A total of 551 females responded to the advertisement, of whom 426 agreed to participate, with 278 completing the survey (139 at the study site and 139 remotely). Respondents’ age distribution was representative of the target population, while 18- to 25-year-olds were more likely to be enrolled in the study and complete the survey than 16- to 17-year-olds (prevalence ratio = 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.05–1.78, P = .02). The broad geographic distribution (major city, inner regional, and outer regional/remote) and socioeconomic profile of participants matched the target population. Predictors of participation were older age, higher education level, and higher body mass index. Average cost in advertising fees per compliant participant was US $20, making this highly cost effective. Conclusions Results demonstrate the potential of using modern information and communication technologies to engage young women in health research and penetrate into nonurban communities. The success of this method has implications for future medical and population research in this and other demographics

  3. Web Site of King Faysal for Researches and Islamic Studies :Evaluative Case Study . 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Badi Aly al-Badi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study makes evaluation to the website of King Faisal Islamic Study & Research Center (KFISRC in relation to its site, advanced design, services rendered, public users and easy-to-search including its discharged duties; content, form and scope.The study aims to evaluate the website of KFISRC published in the Internet as well as the volume of its sample users, and to determine the motivations of use.The study was conducted on the Second Semester in 1426H. / 2005G. The researcher has relied in the evaluation case study on "on-line access" in the Internet; a matter which was imposed by the nature and objectives of the study and followed by an evaluation-analysis methodology based on the measures derived from Website & Information Resources Measures in the Internet. The information were gathered using the questionnaire forms which were distributed to a random sample of 15% of the society slide subject of the study totaling 1755 of post-graduate female students; i.e. Master degree; enrolled in Library & Information, Arabic Language and History Departments of Faculty of Arts & Humanities , King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah; and post-graduate female students; i.e. Master degree; enrolled in Faculty of Da'wa & Fundamentals of Religion, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah Al-Mukarramah, including male and female staff of KFISRC. The study has reached to the number of findings, mainly as follows:The volume of the users has reached to 40.7% of the sampling. One of the reasons of the decreasing percentage in the number of the site users of KFISRC is that 32.4% did not know about the existence of the site in the Internet; whereas, 24.1% of the sampling whose most important motivation to use the site is to know whether the resources searched by them would be available in the data-bases of the KFISRC or not

  4. Web Site of King Faysal for Researches and Islamic Studies :Evaluative Case Study . 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Badi Aly al-Badi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This study makes evaluation to the website of King Faisal Islamic Study & Research Center (KFISRC in relation to its site, advanced design, services rendered, public users and easy-to-search including its discharged duties; content, form and scope.The study aims to evaluate the website of KFISRC published in the Internet as well as the volume of its sample users, and to determine the motivations of use.The study was conducted on the Second Semester in 1426H. / 2005G. The researcher has relied in the evaluation case study on "on-line access" in the Internet; a matter which was imposed by the nature and objectives of the study and followed by an evaluation-analysis methodology based on the measures derived from Website & Information Resources Measures in the Internet. The information were gathered using the questionnaire forms which were distributed to a random sample of 15% of the society slide subject of the study totaling 1755 of post-graduate female students; i.e. Master degree; enrolled in Library & Information, Arabic Language and History Departments of Faculty of Arts & Humanities , King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah; and post-graduate female students; i.e. Master degree; enrolled in Faculty of Da'wa & Fundamentals of Religion, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah Al-Mukarramah, including male and female staff of KFISRC. The study has reached to the number of findings, mainly as follows:The volume of the users has reached to 40.7% of the sampling. One of the reasons of the decreasing percentage in the number of the site users of KFISRC is that 32.4% did not know about the existence of the site in the Internet; whereas, 24.1% of the sampling whose most important motivation to use the site is to know whether the resources searched by them would be available in the data-bases of the KFISRC or not

  5. Climate change research methods and its significance in the study of choosing candidate site in nuclear waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yong; Zhang Zhanshi

    2008-01-01

    A high-level nuclear waste is the inevitable product accompanies the development of the nuclear power station. How to dispose it properly has become focused by all over the world. Some of the important progresses have been achieved in the fields of site setting, performance assessment and underground laboratory recently. Palaeoclimate patter and the tendency of climate change are very important aspects for the site setting This paper discussed some of the important progresses on the disposal of unclear wastes, the influence of the climate change on the site setting and main methods such as lake sediments, marine sediment, loess, ancient soil and ice core deal with palaeoclimate and palaeo environment study. (authors)

  6. Restoration of the former site of the institute for nuclear physics research in Amsterdam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louwrier, Pieter W.F.; Bakker, C.N.M.; Peperkamp, J.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    In 1946 the Institute for Nuclear Physics Research (IKO) started operations on the site of an old gas factory made available by the City of Amsterdam. In 1997 IKO became part of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics and High-Energy Physics (NIKHEF). In 1996 NIKHEF left the laboratory site after 50 years of occupation. The City of Amsterdam, being the owner of the area, decided that in view of the plants for development of the area, the buildings should be demolished and the area made suitable for public use. The site was used as a nuclear research laboratory since 1946, housing a synchrocyclotron from 1947 to 1977 and a linear electron accelerator from 1968 to 1977. Several nuclear chemistry laboratories were in operation from 1946 to 1984. During the 50-year period the original buildings were modified and enlarged, and new buildings were added. Before the responsibility for the area could be transferred to the City and the operating licence could be adjusted to the new situation the Dutch authorities required that a site restoration project be executed. The site restoration project was planned in stages, each of which was supervised and evaluated by the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment, and the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment. Special interest groups such as Greenpeace, LAKA Foundation (a non-profit organisation acting as a consultant for the neighbouring population), the City of Amsterdam and the local City-Boards were following the process closely. The project encompassed the following stages: Set-up of a plan for the clearance of the building structures, including the criteria for release, in consultation with the ministries involved. Radiation protection was an integral part of the plan. Investigation of possible radioactive contamination of the evacuated buildings. Six undocumented contaminations and one documented contamination were identified. Supervised removal of contaminated building structures by a

  7. Social Networking Site Usage Among Childhood Cancer Survivors - A Potential Tool for Research Recruitment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Erica D.; Stolley, Melinda R.; Mensah, Edward K.; Sharp, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The recent and rapid growth of social networking site (SNS) use presents a unique public health opportunity to develop effective strategies for the recruitment of hard-to-reach participants for cancer research studies. This survey investigated childhood cancer survivors’ reported use of SNS such as facebook or MySpace and their perceptions of using SNS, for recruitment into survivorship research. Methods Sixty White, Black and Hispanic, adult childhood cancer survivors (range 18 – 48 years of age) that were randomly selected from a larger childhood cancer study, the Chicago Healthy Living Study (CHLS), participated in this pilot survey. Telephone surveys were conducted to understand current SNS activity and attitudes towards using SNS as a cancer research recruitment tool. Results Seventy percent of participants reported SNS usage of which 80% were at least weekly users and 79 % reported positive attitudes towards the use of SNS as a recruitment tool for survivorship research. Conclusions and implications for cancer survivors The results of this pilot study revealed that SNS use was high and regular among the childhood cancer survivors sampled. Most had positive attitudes towards using SNS for recruitment of research. The results of this pilot survey suggest that SNS may offer an alternative approach for recruitment of childhood cancer survivors into research. PMID:24532046

  8. Social networking site usage among childhood cancer survivors--a potential tool for research recruitment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Erica D; Stolley, Melinda R; Mensah, Edward K; Sharp, Lisa K

    2014-09-01

    The recent and rapid growth of social networking site (SNS) use presents a unique public health opportunity to develop effective strategies for the recruitment of hard-to-reach participants for cancer research studies. This survey investigated childhood cancer survivors' reported use of SNS such as Facebook or MySpace and their perceptions of using SNS, for recruitment into survivorship research. Sixty White, Black, and Hispanic adult childhood cancer survivors (range 18-48 years of age) that were randomly selected from a larger childhood cancer study, the Chicago Healthy Living Study, participated in this pilot survey. Telephone surveys were conducted to understand current SNS activity and attitudes towards using SNS as a cancer research recruitment tool. Seventy percent of participants reported SNS usage of which 80 % were at least weekly users and 79 % reported positive attitudes towards the use of SNS as a recruitment tool for survivorship research. The results of this pilot study revealed that SNS use was high and regular among the childhood cancer survivors sampled. Most had positive attitudes towards using SNS for recruitment of research. The results of this pilot survey suggest that SNS may offer an alternative approach for recruitment of childhood cancer survivors into research.

  9. Field tracer transport experiments at the site of Canada's underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, L.H.; Davison, C.C.; Vandergraaf, T.T.; Scheier, N.W.; Kozak, E.T.

    1997-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the processes affecting solute transport in fractured crystalline rock, groundwater tracer experiments are being performed within natural fracture domains and excavation damage zones at various scales at the site of AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The main objective of these experiments is to develop and demonstrate methods for characterizing the solute transport properties within fractured crystalline rock. Estimates of these properties are in turn being used in AECL's conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow and solute transport through the geosphere surrounding a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. (author)

  10. Bure's underground research laboratory: general framework, objectives, siting process and schedule of the URL project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussen, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Bure URL project is one of the components of the French research program dedicated to the study of HLLLW (High Level Long Lived Radioactive Waste) disposal in geologic repository within the framework of the 1991 Radioactive Waste Act. Pursuant to the said act, the objective of the URL project is to participate in the ''evaluation of options for retrievable or non- retrievable disposal in deep geologic formations''. More precisely, the goal of this URL, which is situated 300 km East of Paris, is to gain a better knowledge of a site capable of hosting a geologic repository. (author)

  11. Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE's preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site's MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years

  12. Hydrogeological characterization, modelling and monitoring of the site of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C.C.; Guvanasen, V.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is constructing an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) to a depth of 250 m in a previously undisturbed granitic pluton located near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, as one of the major research projects within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. This paper discusses the hydrogeological characterization of the URL site, the modelling approach used to represent this information, the hydrogeological monitoring system installed to monitor the actual drawdown conditions that develop in response to the excavation, and the procedures employed to calibrate the numerical model. Comparisons between the drawdown predictions made by the model prior to any excavation and the actual drawdowns that have been measured since shaft excavation began in May 1984 are also discussed

  13. Natural science research of the Bulgar fortified settlement site (preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golyeva Alexandra A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the first results of the comprehensive scientific research conducted on the Bulgar fortified settlement site in 2011. Samples for analysis were selected in the form of series of vertical columns from excavation walls. The species of trees used in the construction, the composition of the mud bricks and the bonding mortar, as well as the genesis of individual cultural layers have been identified. It has been found out that the settlement development and functioning had been reciprocating in nature: periods of intense habitation of its individual sections were followed by short stages of desolation. In all investigated soil columns with the cultural layers there are streaks consisting solely of phytoliths and cuticle casts. A possible explanation of the phenomenon may be that the plot was covered with layers of manure of significant length and capacity. This conclusion is debatable and requires further research.

  14. An international research project on Armenian archaeological sites: fission-track dating of obsidians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badalian, R.; Bigazzi, G. E-mail: g.bigazzi@iggi.pi.cnr.it; Cauvin, M.-C.; Chataigner, C.; Jrbashyan, R.; Karapetyan, S.G.; Oddone, M.; Poidevin, J.-L

    2001-06-01

    In the Mediterranean and adjacent regions, the Caucasus is one of the less studied areas in relation to provenance studies of prehistoric obsidian artefacts. In the frame of an international INTAS research project, an extensive surveying and sampling campaign was carried out in the numerous obsidian bearing volcanic complexes of Armenia. 33 obsidian samples were analysed using the fission-track dating method in order to characterise the potential sources of the numerous artefacts found in prehistoric sites. Ages cluster into five groups--Upper Neopleistocene Q{sub III}, Middle Neopleistocene Q{sub II}, Lower Neopleistocene Q{sub I}, Lower Eopleistocene Q{sub EI} and Lower Pliocene N{sub 3}{sup 1} groups. This research represents a significant contribution to a better knowledge of chronology of Armenian volcanism for which only few data were available. The resulting data-set appears to be a solid base for future provenance studies.

  15. Ongoing research experiments at the former Soviet nuclear test site in eastern Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, William S.; Kluchko, Luke J.; Konovalov, Vladimir; Vouille, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    Degelen mountain, located in EasternKazakhstan near the city of Semipalatinsk, was once the Soviets most active underground nuclear test site. Two hundred fifteen nuclear tests were conducted in 181 tunnels driven horizontally into its many ridges--almost twice the number of tests as at any other Soviet underground nuclear test site. It was also the site of the first Soviet underground nuclear test--a 1-kiloton device detonated on October 11, 1961. Until recently, the details of testing at Degelen were kept secret and have been the subject of considerable speculation. However, in 1991, the Semipalatinsk test site became part of the newly independent Republic of Kazakhstan; and in 1995, the Kazakhstani government concluded an agreement with the U.S. Department of Defense to eliminate the nuclear testing infrastructure in Kazakhstan. This agreement, which calls for the "demilitarization of the infrastructure directly associated with the nuclear weapons test tunnels," has been implemented as the "Degelen Mountain Tunnel Closure Program." The U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, in partnership with the Department of Energy, has permitted the use of the tunnel closure project at the former nuclear test site as a foundation on which to support cost-effective, research-and-development-funded experiments. These experiments are principally designed to improve U.S. capabilities to monitor and verify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), but have provided a new source of information on the effects of nuclear and chemical explosions on hard, fractured rock environments. These new data extends and confirms the results of recent Russian publications on the rock environment at the site and the mechanical effects of large-scale chemical and nuclear testing. In 1998, a large-scale tunnel closure experiment, Omega-1, was conducted in Tunnel 214 at Degelen mountain. In this experiment, a 100-ton chemical explosive blast was used to test technologies for monitoring the

  16. The Research Site Vrchslatina – an experimental design and the main aims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konôpka Bohdan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The research site “Vrchslatina” was established in the spring of 2009 with the aim of studying production processes and the structure of net primary productivity in young forest stands. The beech and spruce stands grown at the site were selected because they originated from natural regeneration and are nearly of the same age. In 2009, we established 5 research plots in each stand with the aim of measuring basic tree characteristics. Moreover, we excavated entire trees to construct allometric relations for the specific tree compartments. In the consecutive years (2010, 2011 and 2012, we also included grass communities dominated by Calamagrostis epigejos in our studies. Besides studying production processes of all tree compartments (i.e. for trees: foliages, branches, stem, coarse and fine roots, for grasses and herbs: below- and above-ground parts, we monitored several atmospheric characteristics, followed by soil characteristics and eventually added a measurement of soil respiration. The results indicated that forest stands (even though they were in their initial growth stages sequestrated much more carbon than the grass communities. Moreover, we proved the considerable influence of climatic conditions (especially the sum of precipitation in the particular years for net primary productivity.

  17. The Skogaryd Research Site - Integration of terrestrial and freshwater greenhouse gas sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemedtsson, L.

    2012-04-01

    Forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, and management as well as climate can cause major effects on the balance of C between the atmosphere and the plant/soil system. With regard to our commitments to the Kyoto and post-Kyoto actions on climate change, we need reliable predictions on how this balance is affected by management and climate. In 2006 the Skogaryd Research Forest was established in the southwest of Sweden (58°23'N, 12°09'E). The overall goal is to quantify net greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes from drained spruce forest soils, by determining the individual fluxes and pools of C and nitrogen and elucidating their connection to site fertility, drainage status and abiotic parameters. The generated data will be used in GHG models, for model validations and ultimately emissions predictions. During 2006-2009 the research has focused on two sites, mineral and organic soils, both dominated by Norway spruce (Picea abies). Both sites are drained fertile soils but with different land-use history that have affected their physical properties. Measurements include: net ecosystem exchange of CO2, shoot photosynthesis and respiration at different locations within the canopy, stem respiration, emissions of N2O and CH4 using manual chambers, soil respiration with automatic chambers including a trenching experiment where root, ectomycorrhizal, and heterotrophic respiration are separated, fine root production using minirhizotrons, and ectomycorrhizal mycelia production. The organic site also includes a wood ash fertilization experiment. From 2010 the research has been expanded by the project Landscape Greenhouse Gas Exchange (LAGGE) to the whole watershed, from the pristine mire system via streams, riparian zones, forests, to lakes and the subsequent exchange between the atmosphere and surface waters. The current accounting of forests as carbon sinks has relied on measurements of vertical carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange between vegetation and the

  18. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid Scoring Record No. 906 (Sky Research, Inc.)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McClung, J. S; Burch, William; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Lombardo, Leonardo; McDonnell, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Blind Grid. This Scoring Record was coordinated by William Burch and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  19. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field Scoring Record Number 673 (Naval Research Laboratories)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field. Scoring Records have been coordinate by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  20. The Use of Social Networking Sites for Public Health Practice and Research: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Kate; Echavarría, Maria I; Joe, Jonathan; Neogi, Tina; Turner, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    Background Social networking sites (SNSs) have the potential to increase the reach and efficiency of essential public health services, such as surveillance, research, and communication. Objective The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic literature review to identify the use of SNSs for public health research and practice and to identify existing knowledge gaps. Methods We performed a systematic literature review of articles related to public health and SNSs using PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL to search for peer-reviewed publications describing the use of SNSs for public health research and practice. We also conducted manual searches of relevant publications. Each publication was independently reviewed by 2 researchers for inclusion and extracted relevant study data. Results A total of 73 articles met our inclusion criteria. Most articles (n=50) were published in the final 2 years covered by our search. In all, 58 articles were in the domain of public health research and 15 were in public health practice. Only 1 study was conducted in a low-income country. Most articles (63/73, 86%) described observational studies involving users or usages of SNSs; only 5 studies involved randomized controlled trials. A large proportion (43/73, 59%) of the identified studies included populations considered hard to reach, such as young individuals, adolescents, and individuals at risk of sexually transmitted diseases or alcohol and substance abuse. Few articles (2/73, 3%) described using the multidirectional communication potential of SNSs to engage study populations. Conclusions The number of publications about public health uses for SNSs has been steadily increasing in the past 5 years. With few exceptions, the literature largely consists of observational studies describing users and usages of SNSs regarding topics of public health interest. More studies that fully exploit the communication tools embedded in SNSs and study their potential to produce significant effects

  1. The use of social networking sites for public health practice and research: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurro, Daniel; Cole, Kate; Echavarría, Maria I; Joe, Jonathan; Neogi, Tina; Turner, Anne M

    2014-03-14

    Social networking sites (SNSs) have the potential to increase the reach and efficiency of essential public health services, such as surveillance, research, and communication. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic literature review to identify the use of SNSs for public health research and practice and to identify existing knowledge gaps. We performed a systematic literature review of articles related to public health and SNSs using PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL to search for peer-reviewed publications describing the use of SNSs for public health research and practice. We also conducted manual searches of relevant publications. Each publication was independently reviewed by 2 researchers for inclusion and extracted relevant study data. A total of 73 articles met our inclusion criteria. Most articles (n=50) were published in the final 2 years covered by our search. In all, 58 articles were in the domain of public health research and 15 were in public health practice. Only 1 study was conducted in a low-income country. Most articles (63/73, 86%) described observational studies involving users or usages of SNSs; only 5 studies involved randomized controlled trials. A large proportion (43/73, 59%) of the identified studies included populations considered hard to reach, such as young individuals, adolescents, and individuals at risk of sexually transmitted diseases or alcohol and substance abuse. Few articles (2/73, 3%) described using the multidirectional communication potential of SNSs to engage study populations. The number of publications about public health uses for SNSs has been steadily increasing in the past 5 years. With few exceptions, the literature largely consists of observational studies describing users and usages of SNSs regarding topics of public health interest. More studies that fully exploit the communication tools embedded in SNSs and study their potential to produce significant effects in the overall population's health are needed.

  2. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development: FY 2006 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2007-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed its fifth successful year of research and development activities in FY 2006. Forty new projects were selected for funding this year, and ten FY 2005 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $6 million, for an average per-project cost of $120 thousand. Beginning in May, 2006 programmatic burden rates were applied to SDRD project costs. An external audit conducted in September 2006 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: the filing of 27 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2006 projects; programmatic adoption of four FY 2005 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2006 projects; and the successful completion of 50 R and D projects, as presented in this report

  3. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration. FY2005 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Will [comp.

    2006-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  4. Important considerations related to the construction of observation wells in radiation facilities sites: A review research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, S. A.; Salem, W. M.; Atta, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Observation wells in radiation facility sites are considered the main sources of the required subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic data. They are the most important means to detect the radioactive and/or chemical contaminants within the ground water. Also, they are used to observe the groundwater level fluctuations and perform the different aquifer tests to understand the hydraulic properties of aquifers and the behavior of contaminants transportation. This research reviews the necessary considerations and available techniques for constructing the observation wells properly. The review process depends on the international guidelines presented in the literature and the field experience. The proper well completion is essential for the well efficiency and longevity. Three main important topics are considered and discussed briefly in this review. They are the preliminary considerations, the drilling program and the well protection procedures. The preliminary considerations included are the collection of the available geologic and hydrogeologic data and information, selection of drilling method and the legal requirements. The drilling program comprises the site preparation, drilling processes, sampling, well logging, well design, casing components and materials, gravel pack and well development. The well protection procedures include well grout, concrete slab and others requirements. Observation wells should be constructed to a high standard and should be properly maintained and protected to ensure ongoing and reliable data collection

  5. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2012-04-25

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R&D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R&D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  6. Spatial distribution of an uranium-respiring betaproteobacterium at the Rifle, CO field research site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Koribanics

    Full Text Available The Department of Energy's Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFRC at Rifle, Colorado was created to address the gaps in knowledge on the mechanisms and rates of U(VI bioreduction in alluvial sediments. Previous studies at the Rifle IFRC have linked microbial processes to uranium immobilization during acetate amendment. Several key bacteria believed to be involved in radionuclide containment have been described; however, most of the evidence implicating uranium reduction with specific microbiota has been indirect. Here, we report on the cultivation of a microorganism from the Rifle IFRC that reduces uranium and appears to utilize it as a terminal electron acceptor for respiration with acetate as electron donor. Furthermore, this bacterium constitutes a significant proportion of the subsurface sediment community prior to biostimulation based on TRFLP profiling of 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that the microorganism is a betaproteobacterium with a high similarity to Burkholderia fungorum. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a betaproteobacterium capable of uranium respiration. Our results indicate that this microorganism occurs commonly in alluvial sediments located between 3-6 m below ground surface at Rifle and may play a role in the initial reduction of uranium at the site.

  7. ANALYSIS OF SITES USED AS A SOURCE OF RESEARCH IN HIGHER SCHOOL OF BIOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Chagas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The technological breakthrough noticed in the past few years, promoted an increase of the knowledge production within the use of the internet leading the population to the easy access to the information. Therefore, the control of quality of the information given in the internet is not able to check the all the information in it, which demands the users an extra expertise. This research has the aim to test the contents of the Biochemistry shown in the WEB sites simulating the way students search the internet about Bio subjects. About the sites studied (20, none of them was considered excellent, taking into consideration, confiability, adaptation from Carneiro and Henrique (2009, like: quality of information, objectivity, present time references and media resources. In the concern of accuracy of the information, many mistakes were detected, like: phospholipids, glycolipids found in the cell walls of human beings, fatty acids are straight chain of hydrocarbon ending in a carboxyl group and in a metil group in another extremety, the glycerolis a carbohydrates of three carbons, concerning those mistakes, teachers and students must be aware of advantages and disadvantages that internet can bring to the teaching learning process and together they can stabblish necessary aims so that favorable proposals don’t become anti productive to the process.

  8. SERDP/ESTCP Expert Panel Workshop on Research and Development Needs for Cleanup of Chlorinated Solvent Sites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    ...) perform its mission. These programs together conducted an expert panel workshop on August 6-7, 2001 to evaluate the needs for research and development in the general area of chlorinated solvent site cleanup...

  9. Environmental surveillance and research at the Nevada Test Site: The beginning and the rationale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elle, D.R.; Church, B.W.; Bingham, F.E.

    1990-01-01

    Concurrently with the first nuclear-weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in 1951, an environmental surveillance and monitoring program was established offsite. Initial emphasis was on tracking fallout clouds and measuring external radiation exposure rates. An environmental research program was also initiated. Establishment of comprehensive programs has facilitated the ability to address issues such as the inventory and distribution of radionuclides in surface soils, reconstruction of offsite population doses, and recognition of areas requiring additional information. We have learned that a successful environmental monitoring program must be flexible and responsive to change; must address public as well as technical and regulatory concerns; and results must be continuously interpreted to ensure that all pathways are considered and the programs are proactive in their approach

  10. Mineralogical and lithochemical studies of strata beneath the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, R.D.; Morgan, D.J.

    1982-11-01

    Determinations have been made of the mineralogy and lithochemistry of the principal lithological units of the Mesozoic and Palaeozoic rocks penetrated by boreholes at the Harwell Research Site. Samples were taken at approximately 9m intervals from the Upper Greensand to the Coal Measures, together with a number from the Chalk. Mineralogical analyses were carried out using X-ray diffraction, with thermal analysis and surface area measurements aiding quantification. Major and trace element determinations were made using direct electron excitation X-ray spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence respectively. Other chemical determinations included organic carbon, sulphate and 'exchangeable' cations. The mineralogical and lithochemical variations within and between the major litho-stratigraphic units are discussed and compared with published data for other localities. (author)

  11. Wind power research at Oregon State University. [for selecting windpowered machinery sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    There have been two primary thrusts of the research effort to date, along with several supplementary ones. One primary area has been an investigation of the wind fields along coastal areas of the Pacific Northwest, not only at the shoreline but also for a number of miles inland and offshore as well. Estimates have been made of the influence of the wind turbulence as measured at coastal sites in modifying the predicted dependence of power generated on the cube of the wind speed. Wind flow patterns in the Columbia River valley have also been studied. The second primary thrust has been to substantially modify and improve an existing wind tunnel to permit the build up of a boundary layer in which various model studies will be conducted. One of the secondary studies involved estimating the cost of building an aerogenerator.

  12. Prognostic simulation of reinjection-research project geothermal site Neustadt-Glewe/Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppei, J. [Geothermie Neubrandenburg GmbH (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    For the first time after political and economical changes in Germany a hydrothermal site was put into operation in December 1994. Due to prevailing conditions extraordinary in Central Europe (reservoir temperature 99{degrees}C; 220 g/l salinity) the project Neustadt-Glewe is supported by a comprehensive research program. The wells concerned (a doublet with an internal distance of 1.400 m) open the porous sandstone aquifer with an average thickness of about 53 m in a depth of 2.240m. One point of interest was the pressure and temperature behavior over a period of 10 years considering the fluid viscosity changes due to variable injection temperature. For means of reservoir simulation and prognosing the injection behavior and simulator code TOUGH2 was used.

  13. The Beishan underground research laboratory for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in China: Planning, site selection, site characterization and in situ tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Wang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of nuclear power in China, the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW has become an important issue for nuclear safety and environmental protection. Deep geological disposal is internationally accepted as a feasible and safe way to dispose of HLW, and underground research laboratories (URLs play an important and multi-faceted role in the development of HLW repositories. This paper introduces the overall planning and the latest progress for China's URL. On the basis of the proposed strategy to build an area-specific URL in combination with a comprehensive evaluation of the site selection results obtained during the last 33 years, the Xinchang site in the Beishan area, located in Gansu Province of northwestern China, has been selected as the final site for China's first URL built in granite. In the process of characterizing the Xinchang URL site, a series of investigations, including borehole drilling, geological mapping, geophysical surveying, hydraulic testing and in situ stress measurements, has been conducted. The investigation results indicate that the geological, hydrogeological, engineering geological and geochemical conditions of the Xinchang site are very suitable for URL construction. Meanwhile, to validate and develop construction technologies for the Beishan URL, the Beishan exploration tunnel (BET, which is a 50-m-deep facility in the Jiujing sub-area, has been constructed and several in situ tests, such as drill-and-blast tests, characterization of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ, and long-term deformation monitoring of surrounding rocks, have been performed in the BET. The methodologies and technologies established in the BET will serve for URL construction. According to the achievements of the characterization of the URL site, a preliminary design of the URL with a maximum depth of 560 m is proposed and necessary in situ tests in the URL are planned. Keywords: Beishan, Xinchang site, Granite

  14. Applying system engineering methods to site characterization research for nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear research and engineering projects can benefit from the use of system engineering methods. This paper is brief overview illustrating how system engineering methods could be applied in structuring a site characterization effort for a candidate nuclear waste repository. System engineering is simply an orderly process that has been widely used to transform a recognized need into a fully defined system. Such a system may be physical or abstract, natural or man-made, hardware or procedural, as is appropriate to the system's need or objective. It is a way of mentally visualizing all the constituent elements and their relationships necessary to fulfill a need, and doing so compliant with all constraining requirements attendant to that need. Such a system approach provides completeness, order, clarity, and direction. Admittedly, system engineering can be burdensome and inappropriate for those project objectives having simple and familiar solutions that are easily held and controlled mentally. However, some type of documented and structured approach is needed for those objectives that dictate extensive, unique, or complex programs, and/or creation of state-of-the-art machines and facilities. System engineering methods have been used extensively and successfully in these cases. The scientific methods has served well in ordering countless technical undertakings that address a specific question. Similarly, conventional construction and engineering job methods will continue to be quite adequate to organize routine building projects. Nuclear waste repository site characterization projects involve multiple complex research questions and regulatory requirements that interface with each other and with advanced engineering and subsurface construction techniques. There is little doubt that system engineering is an appropriate orchestrating process to structure such diverse elements into a cohesive, well defied project

  15. Environmental assessment overview, Yucca Mountain site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendations of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs

  16. FY94 site characterization and multilevel well installation at a west Bear Creek Valley research site on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moline, G.R.; Schreiber, M.E.

    1996-03-01

    The goals of this project are to collect data that will assist in determining what constitutes a representative groundwater sample in fractured shale typical of much of the geology underlying the ORR waste disposal sites, and to determine how monitoring-well construction and sampling methods impact the representativeness of the sample. This report details the FY94 field activities at a research site in west Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). These activities funded by the Energy Systems Groundwater Program Office through the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrologic and Geologic Studies (ORRHAGS) task, focus on developing appropriate sampling protocols for the type of fractured media that underlies many of the ORR waste disposal sites. Currently accepted protocols were developed for porous media and are likely to result in nonrepresentative samples in fractured systems

  17. Personalized neuromusculoskeletal modeling to improve treatment of mobility impairments: a perspective from European research sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fregly Benjamin J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mobility impairments due to injury or disease have a significant impact on quality of life. Consequently, development of effective treatments to restore or replace lost function is an important societal challenge. In current clinical practice, a treatment plan is often selected from a standard menu of options rather than customized to the unique characteristics of the patient. Furthermore, the treatment selection process is normally based on subjective clinical experience rather than objective prediction of post-treatment function. The net result is treatment methods that are less effective than desired at restoring lost function. This paper discusses the possible use of personalized neuromusculoskeletal computer models to improve customization, objectivity, and ultimately effectiveness of treatments for mobility impairments. The discussion is based on information gathered from academic and industrial research sites throughout Europe, and both clinical and technical aspects of personalized neuromusculoskeletal modeling are explored. On the clinical front, we discuss the purpose and process of personalized neuromusculoskeletal modeling, the application of personalized models to clinical problems, and gaps in clinical application. On the technical front, we discuss current capabilities of personalized neuromusculoskeletal models along with technical gaps that limit future clinical application. We conclude by summarizing recommendations for future research efforts that would allow personalized neuromusculoskeletal models to make the greatest impact possible on treatment design for mobility impairments.

  18. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2008-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2007. Twenty-nine new projects were selected for funding this year, and eight projects started in FY 2006 were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.67 million, for an average per-project cost of $153 thousand. An external audit conducted in September 2007 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: programmatic adoption of 8 SDRD-developed technologies; the filing of 9 invention disclosures for innovation evolving from SDRD projects; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD Symposium that was broadly attended by Nevada Test Site (NTS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), LDRD, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2007 projects; and the successful completion of 37 R and D projects, as presented in this report. In response to a company-wide call, authors throughout the NTS complex submitted 182 proposals for FY 2007 SDRD projects. The SDRD program has seen a dramatic increase in the yearly total of submitted proposals--from 69 in FY 2002 to 182 this year--while the number of projects funded has actually decreased from a program high of 57 in FY 2004. The overall effect of this trend has helped ensure an increasingly competitive program that benefited from a broader set of innovative ideas, making project selection both challenging and rewarding. Proposals were evaluated for technical merit, including such factors as innovation, probability of success, potential benefit, and mission applicability. Authors and reviewers benefited from the use of a shortfalls list entitled the 'NTS Technology Needs Assessment' that was compiled from NTS, National Weapons Laboratory (NWL

  19. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2008-02-20

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2007. Twenty-nine new projects were selected for funding this year, and eight projects started in FY 2006 were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.67 million, for an average per-project cost of $153 thousand. An external audit conducted in September 2007 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: programmatic adoption of 8 SDRD-developed technologies; the filing of 9 invention disclosures for innovation evolving from SDRD projects; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD Symposium that was broadly attended by Nevada Test Site (NTS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), LDRD, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2007 projects; and the successful completion of 37 R&D projects, as presented in this report. In response to a company-wide call, authors throughout the NTS complex submitted 182 proposals for FY 2007 SDRD projects. The SDRD program has seen a dramatic increase in the yearly total of submitted proposals--from 69 in FY 2002 to 182 this year--while the number of projects funded has actually decreased from a program high of 57 in FY 2004. The overall effect of this trend has helped ensure an increasingly competitive program that benefited from a broader set of innovative ideas, making project selection both challenging and rewarding. Proposals were evaluated for technical merit, including such factors as innovation, probability of success, potential benefit, and mission applicability. Authors and reviewers benefited from the use of a shortfalls list entitled the 'NTS Technology Needs Assessment' that was compiled from NTS, National Weapons Laboratory

  20. Grimsel test site. Research on safe geological disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    The Grimsel Test Site is located at an altitude of 1730 meters in the granitic formations of the Aare Massif. Some 300 million years ago, magmas solidified to form granitic rocks in the Grimsel area. New molten masses flowed into fissures of the cooling rock and formed dyke rocks. During the alpine orogeny around 40 million years ago, the rocks of the Aare Massif were passed over by the northwards-moving alpine layers and subsided by around 12 kilometres. The rocks were then overprinted under high temperature and pressure conditions and shear zones and fracture systems were formed. Uplift (0.5 to 0.8 mm/a) and erosion processes, which are still continuing today, brought the rocks of the Aare Massif to the surface once more. The mineral fractures for which the Grimsel area is famous, formed around 14 million years ago. Deep in the rock, the range of geological conditions found in the laboratory present ideal boundary conditions for investigating the functioning of both the geological and engineered barriers of deep repositories. Projects that look at the disposal concepts on a large scale are also an important aspect of the work at the Test Site. A radiation controlled zone allows radionuclides to be used under monitored conditions, giving a direct insight into the transport of radioactive substances in the rock. Around 25 partner organisations from various countries are involved in the projects at the Test Site. The European Union and the Swiss State Secretariat for Education and Research provide financial support to several experiments. In Switzerland, deep geological disposal is required by law for all types of radioactive waste. Field investigations for determining the suitability of potential disposal sites are an important component of a waste management programme. The field work is complemented by laboratory studies, investigations of relevant natural processes and research projects in underground rock laboratories; these provide a better understanding of the

  1. Grimsel test site. Research on safe geological disposal of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    The Grimsel Test Site is located at an altitude of 1730 meters in the granitic formations of the Aare Massif. Some 300 million years ago, magmas solidified to form granitic rocks in the Grimsel area. New molten masses flowed into fissures of the cooling rock and formed dyke rocks. During the alpine orogeny around 40 million years ago, the rocks of the Aare Massif were passed over by the northwards-moving alpine layers and subsided by around 12 kilometres. The rocks were then overprinted under high temperature and pressure conditions and shear zones and fracture systems were formed. Uplift (0.5 to 0.8 mm/a) and erosion processes, which are still continuing today, brought the rocks of the Aare Massif to the surface once more. The mineral fractures for which the Grimsel area is famous, formed around 14 million years ago. Deep in the rock, the range of geological conditions found in the laboratory present ideal boundary conditions for investigating the functioning of both the geological and engineered barriers of deep repositories. Projects that look at the disposal concepts on a large scale are also an important aspect of the work at the Test Site. A radiation controlled zone allows radionuclides to be used under monitored conditions, giving a direct insight into the transport of radioactive substances in the rock. Around 25 partner organisations from various countries are involved in the projects at the Test Site. The European Union and the Swiss State Secretariat for Education and Research provide financial support to several experiments. In Switzerland, deep geological disposal is required by law for all types of radioactive waste. Field investigations for determining the suitability of potential disposal sites are an important component of a waste management programme. The field work is complemented by laboratory studies, investigations of relevant natural processes and research projects in underground rock laboratories; these provide a better understanding of the

  2. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field Scoring Record No. 901 (Sky Research, Inc.)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McClung, J. S; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Burch, William; Lombardo, Leonardo; McDonnell, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field. This Scoring Record was coordinated by Stephen McClung and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  3. Field studies at the Apache Leap Research Site in support of alternative conceptual models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Davidson, G.R.; Theis, C. [eds.] [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is a final technical report for a project of the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-51) with the University of Arizona. The contract was an optional extension that was initiated on July 21, 1994 and that expired on May 31, 1995. The project manager was Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this contract were to examine hypotheses and conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. The results discussed here are products of specific tasks that address a broad spectrum of issues related to flow and transport through fractures. Each chapter in this final report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. The tasks include detection and characterization of historical rapid fluid flow through fractured rock and the relationship to perched water systems using environmental isotopic tracers of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C, fluid- and rock-derived {sup 2343}U/{sup 238}U measurements, and geophysical data. The water balance in a small watershed at the ALRS demonstrates the methods of acounting for ET, and estimating the quantity of water available for infiltration through fracture networks. Grain density measurements were made for core-sized samples using a newly designed gas pycnometer. The distribution and magnitude of air permeability measurements have been measured in a three-dimensional setting; the subsequent geostatistical analysis is presented. Electronic versions of the data presented here are available from authors; more detailed discussions and analyses are available in technical publications referenced herein, or soon to appear in the professional literature.

  4. Field studies at the Apache Leap Research Site in support of alternative conceptual models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Davidson, G.R.; Theis, C.

    1997-08-01

    This is a final technical report for a project of the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-51) with the University of Arizona. The contract was an optional extension that was initiated on July 21, 1994 and that expired on May 31, 1995. The project manager was Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this contract were to examine hypotheses and conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. The results discussed here are products of specific tasks that address a broad spectrum of issues related to flow and transport through fractures. Each chapter in this final report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. The tasks include detection and characterization of historical rapid fluid flow through fractured rock and the relationship to perched water systems using environmental isotopic tracers of 3 H and 14 C, fluid- and rock-derived 2343 U/ 238 U measurements, and geophysical data. The water balance in a small watershed at the ALRS demonstrates the methods of acounting for ET, and estimating the quantity of water available for infiltration through fracture networks. Grain density measurements were made for core-sized samples using a newly designed gas pycnometer. The distribution and magnitude of air permeability measurements have been measured in a three-dimensional setting; the subsequent geostatistical analysis is presented. Electronic versions of the data presented here are available from authors; more detailed discussions and analyses are available in technical publications referenced herein, or soon to appear in the professional literature

  5. Underground facility for geoenvironmental and geotechnical research at the SSC Site in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.F.; Myer, L.R.

    1994-01-01

    The subsurface environment is an important national resource that is utilized for construction, waste disposal and groundwater supply. Conflicting and unwise use has led to problems of groundwater contamination. Cleanup is often difficult and expensive, and perhaps not even possible in many cases. Construction projects often encounter unanticipated difficulties that increase expenses. Many of the difficulties of predicting mechanical behavior and fluid flow and transport behavior stem from problems in characterizing what cannot be seen. An underground research laboratory, such as can be developed in the nearly 14 miles of tunnel at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site, will provide a unique opportunity to advance scientific investigations of fluid flow, chemical transport, and mechanical behavior in situ in weak and fractured, porous rock on a scale relevant to civil and environmental engineering applications involving the subsurface down to a depth of 100 m. The unique element provided by underground studies at the SSC site is three-dimensional access to a range of fracture conditions in two rock types, chalk and shale. Detailed experimentation can be carried out in small sections of the SSC tunnel where different types of fractures and faults occur and where different rock types or contacts are exposed. The entire length of the tunnel can serve as an observatory for large scale mechanical and fluid flow testing. The most exciting opportunity is to mine back a volume of rock to conduct a post-experiment audit following injection of a number of reactive and conservative tracers. Flow paths and tracer distributions can be examined directly. The scientific goal is to test conceptual models and numerical predictions. In addition, mechanical and hydrological data may be of significant value in developing safe and effective methods for closing the tunnel itself

  6. Single-site community consultation for emergency research in a community hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Kyle L; Keck, Anna-Sigrid; Little, Charletta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate community member feedback from community consultation and public disclosure activities performed for a clinical investigation involving a device designed to treat traumatic brain injury in prehospital contexts. The clinical investigation of that device was to be performed under the federal regulations providing an exception from prospective informed consent requirements in emergency settings. Secondarily, we sought to assess the community consultation process by measuring the levels of outreach provided by the different communication methods used in these activities, with special attention to the effectiveness of social media for community outreach. The medical device investigation consists of a single-site pilot study based at a 345-bed community hospital in east central Illinois, which also serves as the area's only level I trauma center. Investigators, in collaboration with the local institutional review board, fulfilled community consultation and public disclosure requirements through four public town hall meetings, seven targeted focus groups, targeted mailings to 884 community leaders and researchers, a press conference and press release, internal and external websites, and multiple postings to the hospital's Facebook and Twitter accounts. Community members provided feedback by completing paper or electronic comment cards. A total of 428 community members attended the four town hall meetings and seven focus group sessions. Attendance at each meeting ranged from 4 to 20 attendees for the town hall meetings and 8 to 140 attendees for the focus groups. The investigation's external website received 626 unique visitors and the intranet website received 528 unique visits. Social media postings on Facebook and Twitter received six comments and eight "likes" to indicate that an individual read the posting. In total, attendees completed 175 comment cards to provide their feedback. Community member attitudes regarding the

  7. Pristine aquatic systems in a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site of the Brazilian Cerrado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Bárbara Medeiros; de Mendonça-Galvão, Luciana

    2014-12-01

    The maintenance of limnological monitoring programs in the Cerrado Domain is crucial as a provision of useful information about temporal variations in land use and their respective water quality responses, considering its importance as water source for different Brazilian hydrographic basins. The purpose of this research was to describe limnological variables of low-order lotic systems located in the Cerrado Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site (Environmental Protection Area (APA) Gama and Cabeça de Veado, Federal District of Brazil). Altogether, nine different streams were considered in this study. Samplings were conducted between 2010 and 2012, concentrated in the dry and rainy seasons. The sampling sites were generally characterized by low nutrient concentrations (e.g., medians, TP = 14.8 μg L(-1), TN = 20.0 μg L(-1), NO3 = 13.8 μg L(-1)) and slightly acidic waters (median, pH = 5.3), with quite low electrical conductivity values (median = 6.4 μS cm(-1)). However, water quality degradation as a response to diffuse pollution was reported in some sampling points (e.g., Onça and Gama streams), expressed by relatively higher N and P concentrations, which were probably highlighted by the good water quality of the data set as whole. Although there was a trend to higher values of nitrogen forms during the dry season, significant statistical differences between the seasonal periods were reported only for the variables temperature and dissolved silica, which were higher in the dry and rainy season, respectively. The streams located in the preserved areas inside the ecological stations of APA Gama and Cabeça de Veado can still be considered good examples of reference lotic systems in the Cerrado Domain; notwithstanding, this study reported incipient signs of water quality degradation which cannot be overlooked in future limnological monitoring.

  8. Large scale seismic test research at Hualien site in Taiwan. Results of site investigation and characterization of the foundation ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Toshiro; Kokusho, Takeharu; Nishi, Koichi

    1998-01-01

    An international joint research program called ''HLSST'' is under way. Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST) is to be conducted to investigate Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) during large earthquakes in the field in Hualien, a high seismic region in Taiwan. A 1/4-scale model building was constructed on the excavated gravelly ground, and the backfill material of crushed stones was placed around the model plant. The model building and the foundation ground were extensively instrumented to monitor structure and ground response. To accurately evaluate SSI during earthquakes, geotechnical investigation and forced vibration test were performed during construction process namely before/after the base excavation, after the structure construction and after the backfilling. Main results are as follows. (1) The distribution of the mechanical properties of the gravelly soil are measured by various techniques including penetration tests and PS-logging and it found that the shear wave velocities (Vs) change clearly and it depends on changing overburden pressures during the construction process. (2) Measuring Vs in the surrounding soils, it found that the Vs is smaller than that at almost same depth in the farther location. Discussion is made further on the numerical soil model for SSI analysis. (author)

  9. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  10. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guideline for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EA), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as of five sites suitable for characterization.

  11. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada; Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  12. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization

  13. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guideline for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EA), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as of five sites suitable for characterization

  14. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization

  15. Initiating a participatory action research process in the Agincourt health and socio-demographic surveillance site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wariri, Oghenebrume; D'Ambruoso, Lucia; Twine, Rhian; Ngobeni, Sizzy; van der Merwe, Maria; Spies, Barry; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen; Wagner, Ryan G; Byass, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Despite progressive health policy, disease burdens in South Africa remain patterned by deeply entrenched social inequalities. Accounting for the relationships between context, health and risk can provide important information for equitable service delivery. The aims of the research were to initiate a participatory research process with communities in a low income setting and produce evidence of practical relevance. We initiated a participatory action research (PAR) process in the Agincourt health and socio-demographic surveillance site (HDSS) in rural north-east South Africa. Three village-based discussion groups were convened and consulted about conditions to examine, one of which was under-5 mortality. A series of discussions followed in which routine HDSS data were presented and participants' subjective perspectives were elicited and systematized into collective forms of knowledge using ranking, diagramming and participatory photography. The process concluded with a priority setting exercise. Visual and narrative data were thematically analyzed to complement the participants' analysis. A range of social and structural root causes of under-5 mortality were identified: poverty, unemployment, inadequate housing, unsafe environments and shortages of clean water. Despite these constraints, single mothers were often viewed as negligent. A series of mid-level contributory factors in clinics were also identified: overcrowding, poor staffing, delays in treatment and shortages of medications. In a similar sense, pronounced blame and negativity were directed toward clinic nurses in spite of the systems constraints identified. Actions to address these issues were prioritized as: expanding clinics, improving accountability and responsiveness of health workers, improving employment, providing clean water, and expanding community engagement for health promotion. We initiated a PAR process to gain local knowledge and prioritize actions. The process was acceptable to those

  16. Yucca Mountain program summary of research, site monitoring and technical review activities (January 1987--June 1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    Although studies of orbital mechanics provide speculative notions of future climatic trends, they cannot predict how these trends will manifest themselves in the immediate area around Yucca Mountain. The generally accepted approach to this question is to consider the climatic variations that have occurred during the last 10,000 years, and use these as a guide to the likely range of future variation in climate. However, because climatic studies around the world indicate that we are potentially on the verge of another ice age, we should also consider the conditions that predominated during the Pleistocene. The specific aim of this project is to derive the climatic history of Yucca Mountain during the last 20,000 years from the vegetation history. By integrating data obtained from pollen records, woodrat dens (middens), and tree-ring sequences from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) area, a regional climatic record is being generated that can be correlated to data obtained at Yucca Mountain to formulate a local climatic sequence there. This will then be used to determine the magnitude and frequency of climatic variation that have occurred during that time at Yucca Mountain. These data can then be used by other researchers to provide estimates of rainfall, recharge and soil chemical changes for modeling the past hydrology of Yucca Mountain

  17. Radiation-related monitoring and environmental research at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Patton, S.E.; Shinn, J.H.; Black, S.C.; Costa, C.F.; Elle, D.R.; Essington, E.H.; Gilbert, R.O.; Gonzalez, D.A.; Hunter, R.B.; Medica, P.A.; McArthur, R.D.; Thompson, C.B.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Romney, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    Beginning with the first nuclear-weapons-related tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in 1951, a radiation-related monitoring program was established to determine the levels and distribution of radionuclides released. Primary methods involved survey-meter-equipped field-monitoring teams and placement of film badges and air-sampling devices at fixed locations. Beginning in the mid-1950s, more stringent standards, the results of this monitoring program, and the results of related research programs led to increased engineering efforts to reduce local fallout. With passage of the National Environmental Policy Act and increased concern about possible effects of radiation exposure, environmental activities related to the NTS increased. There is now an extensive monitoring program at the NTS to assess radiological conditions resulting from past tests and from continued testing of nuclear-weapons devices. In populated areas near NTS, there is also a monitoring effort that relies on assistance from local communities. Other efforts include reconstruction of radiation doses received by offsite residents during the 1950s and 1960s, determination of the current inventory and distribution of radionuclides in surface soil, and studies of the movement of radionuclides in the desert ecosystem

  18. High-resolution resistivity measurements at the Down Ampney research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallam, J.R.; Jackson, P.D.; Rainsbury, M.P.; Raines, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    Reconnaissance geophysical surveying in the earlier stages of the project had mapped a previously unknown fault across the Down Ampney site, using a conventional resistivity profiling technique. The Schlumberger array, optimized for the local geological sequence, revealed a distinctive fault signature, characterized by a marked peak and a very steep gradient in each apparent resistivity profile. The most precise indicator for the fault locations was taken to be the mid-point of this steep gradient, which could be located with a tolerance of about ± 5 m. Subsequent consideration of the data acquisition and presentation method used in the apparent resistivity profiling techniques led to the conclusion that these methods were smoothing the electrical field response and thereby limiting the potential accuracy of fault location. To overcome this limitation a novel technique has been devised in which the potential field generated by an electric current flow is profiled directly in terms of resistance. With a measurement of resistance at each electrode position, no averaging or smoothing effect is introduced. This work is carried out under contract with the Commission of the European Communities, in the framework of its Research programme Management and radioactive waste disposal. 6 refs., 16 figs

  19. Surrogate Indicators of Radionuclide Migration at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonestrom, D. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Baker, R. J.; Luo, W.; Michel, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Contaminant-transport processes are being investigated at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS), adjacent to the Nation's first commercial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste. Gases containing tritium and radiocarbon are migrating through a 110-m thick unsaturated zone from unlined trenches that received waste from 1962 to 1992. Information on plume dynamics comes from an array of shallow (Radiological analyses require ex-situ wet-chemical techniques, because in-situ sensors for the radionuclides of interest do not exist. As at other LLRW-disposal facilities, radionuclides at the ADRS are mixed with varying amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other substances. Halogenated-methanes, -ethanes, and -ethenes dominate the complex mixture of VOCs migrating from the disposal area. These compounds and their degradates provide a distinctive "fingerprint" of contamination originating from low-level radioactive waste. Carbon-dioxide and VOC anomalies provide indicator proxies for radionuclide contamination. Spatial and temporal patterns of co-disposed and byproduct constituents provide field-scale information about physical and biochemical processes involved in transport. Processes include reduction and biorespiration within trenches, and largely non-reactive, barometrically dispersed diffusion away from trenches.

  20. Reactivity of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) grout and various lithologies from the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.; George, I.A.; Bloodworth, A.J.; Robins, N.S.

    1985-08-01

    Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) has been used in the completion of boreholes on the Harwell Research Site, AERE, Oxfordshire. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of OPC and the alkaline pore fluids generated during its setting on the various lithological types encountered in the boreholes. To facilitate this, samples of core representing the various rock types were selected and cement-rock composites were prepared from these in the laboratory to simulate the borehole cements. After a curing period of 15 months the cores and associated cement plugs were examined for any signs of reactivity or bonding. The best cement-rock bonding was shown by naturally well-cemented sandstone and limestone lithologies. Although no significant chemical reaction was seen to have occurred between OPC and rock, the OPC appears able to bind onto the rock surface because of the rigidity of the rock surface. Therefore, the best cement rock bonding and seal with OPC may be expected in the limestones of the Great Oolite Group, Inferior Oolite Group and parts of the Corallian Beds. Because of the reactivity of OPC towards certain lithologies a better borehole seal in such a sedimentary sequence might be achieved using a bentonite backfill in those parts of the sequence which either react with or bond only weakly to OPC. (author)

  1. HPLC studies of aquatic humic compounds and complexes from the Drigg Research Site, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes an investigation into the applicability of high performance liquid chromatographic techniques for the separation of the complex mixtures of organic acids commonly found in groundwaters. This work has shown that reverse phase ion-pair chromatography using a large pore stationary phase can be successfully applied to humic material in both natural and concentrated groundwater from the Drigg Research Site. The methodology separates the organic species into a number of well resolved components the majority of which have a molecular weight of greater than 500 Dalton. Separations obtained have been qualitatively and quantitatively analysed using a Diode array spectrophotometer. The components in excess of 500 Dalton show UV absorption spectra similar to humic and fulvic acids where as the component with a molecular weight of less than 500 Dalton shows a sharp UV absorption cutoff at 230 nm. It was noted that this component was not removed by passage through DEAEA cellulose. Reverse phase HPLC was also investigated, and results were found to be consistent with a separation based on an ion-repulsion/size exclusion mechanism. It was concluded that any separation based on this mechanism is likely to suffer from poor inter run reproducibility and must therefore be discounted as a suitable method. Similarly, ion-suppression reverse phase was shown to be equally impracticable, requiring a mobile phase pH of less than 2 to obtain separation (this low pH renders a silica based stationary phase unstable). (author)

  2. Аrchaeological Sites with “Textile” Ceramics: results and outlooks of researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrushev Valery S.,

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Issues of investigation the Bronze Age and the early Iron Age population – bearers of the so called ‘textile’ ceramics (24th century BC – 4th century AD, which spread over a vast territory of Europe more than 700 km wide, from the Lower and Middle Volga in the east to the Eastern Sweden in the west are summarized in the article. Bearers of the culture with ‘textile’ pottery played an important role in development of Finnish-speaking peoples. The article emphasizes a few essential problems related to the bearers of ‘textile’ ceramics: 1 questions related to the origin of peoples with this pottery; 2 issues related to identification of the Finnish-speaking community and local bearers of ‘textile’ ceramics; 3 reconstruction of the technology of ‘textile’ imprints and verification of the terminology used to define them; development chronology and periodization of ‘textile’ ceramics; detection the ethno-cultural connections and further fate of the Finnish-speaking tribes-bearers of ‘textile’ ceramics. The most important objectives of the study of the Finnish-speaking peoples – bearers of ‘textile’ ceramics are emphasized by the author as following: to pursue further research of sites from southern regions by means of a common methodology; to define distinctive features of the local ceramics; to study the inventory related to this ware.

  3. Decommissioning the Jason Argonaut research reactor at a world heritage site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, R.J.S.; Beeley, P.A. [HMS Sultan, Gosport, Hampshire (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The Jason low power Argonaut type, water and graphite moderated reactor was located in King William Building, which is a Grade 1 listed building within the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, London. The College itself is a Scheduled Ancient Monument with World Heritage Site status and is situated about a mile from the Greenwich Dome. The decision to decommission Jason to International Atomic Energy Agency Stage 3 status (unrestricted site use) was taken in 1996. All physical decommissioning work was completed by October 1999, site radiological clearance was obtained in November 1999, the site license was withdrawn and the site was handed over for future unrestricted use on 9 December 1999. The Jason decommissioning project was safely completed to time, cost and quality by the Millennium [2] without any adverse effects on World Heritage aspects of the site. In this paper details are provided about the Jason fuel removal phase and an outline of the other phases of the project.

  4. Achieving the timely receipt of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brizes, C.M.; Clark, W.D; Thomas, J.; Andes, T.

    1998-01-01

    The May 1996 Record of Decision on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel states that the United States will accept spent nuclear fuel containing uranium of U.S.-origin from foreign research reactors through the year 2009. The best information available indicates that approximately 13,000 assemblies of Material Test Reactor (MTR) spent nuclear fuel from 29 countries are expected to be shipped to the Savannah River Site during the 13 years of the program. As of July 1998, 1,371 spent nuclear fuel assemblies from 12 foreign research reactors have been received at the SRS. That is, after more than two years of the FRR program (approximately 15 percent of the program time), 11 percent of the total assemblies have been received at SRS. Current projections show that most of the assemblies can be received by 2009, however if some of the eligible, non-participating countries decide to rejoin the program, a bottleneck would occur at the end of the program. Also adding to the potential for the bottleneck is a trend of shipments being moved out in the timeline. The Savannah River Site is working to be proactive in avoiding a bottleneck at the end of the program, but cooperation is required from all program participants to be successful. Activities currently in progress include inventory/information questionnaires, verifying fuel against cask(s) certificate of compliance (C. of C.), and collecting Appendix A information well in advance of shipping the SNF. The inventory/information sheets have been distributed to a select number of reactor facilities in the past, but work is in progress to refine the process. Information requested in the questionnaire includes inventory numbers, preferred shipping dates, and cask preferences. This information allows for improved shipment planning and helps to ensure that we are working to meet the needs of the reactor facilities. Current plans are to send the questionnaires to

  5. Civil Engineering Works Status of the Proton Accelerator Research Center in PEFP - Site and Access Road Earthwork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Jung Min; Jeon, G. P.; Min, Y. S.; Park, S. S.; Cho, J. S.; Mun, K. J.; Kim, J. Y.

    2010-01-01

    PEFP(Proton Engineering Frontier Project) was Launched in 2002 as one of the 21st Century Frontier R and D Programs of MOST(Ministry of Science and Technology). Gyeongju city was selected as the project host site in March, 2006, where 'Proton Accelerator Research Center' was going to be constructed. Since 2005, the Architectural and Civil design work has been performing. The Earthwork of the site was started in June, 2009. In this paper, we describe the status of the civil engineering works for the PEFP, focusing on the earthwork of the site and access road

  6. Research in the selection of very low level radioactive waste disposal site in southwest China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuo, Xianguo; Long, Qiong; Zhong, Hongmei; Xu, Zhengqi; Mu, Keliang; Gao, Lan

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of Chinese Radioactive Nuclear Waste Management and Disposal Security is that must use proper and optimized ways to manage radioactive waste and make sure human beings and the environment either at the present or in the future can be free from any unacceptable risks. According to the goal, this paper presents an overview of comprehensive site characterization work that comprises investigations of physical geography, climatology, geology and hydrogeology, as well as geological hazard on two candidate Very Low Level Radioactive Waste (VLLW) disposal sites (Site 1 and Site 2) which are both located in the south west of China. The results showed that there are many similarities in the regional extent of the two sites, but many distinct differences are found in terrain and topographic features, granule stratum, hydraulic gradient, and so on. On the whole, the two alternative sites are in line with the requirements for very low level radioactive waste disposal, and Site 1 is superior to Site 2. (author)

  7. Water Resources Research Program. Abatement of malodors at diked, dredged-material disposal sites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; Dravnieks, A.; Zussman, R.; Goltz, R.

    1976-06-01

    Samples of malodorous air and dredged material were collected at diked disposal sites at the following locations: Buffalo, NY; Milwaukee, WI; Mobile, AL; York Harbor, ME; Houston, TX; Detroit, MI; and Anacortes, WA; during the period July--October, 1975. Odorous compounds in the air samples were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, while the detection threshold, intensity, and character of the various odors were determined by experienced panelists using a dynamic, forced-choice-triangle olfactometer. Although significant problems with malodors were not observed beyond the disposal-area dikes during site visits, noteworthy odor episodes had occurred at some sites. An odor-abatement strategy is presented for handling the expected range of odor conditions at dredged-material disposal sites. Its aim is to reduce to an acceptable level the intensity of malodors in an affected community. The main steps in the strategy cover selection of the disposal site, site preparation, odor characterization of sediments to be dredged, malodor abatement during dredging and disposal operations, malodor abatement after filling of the disposal site, and the handling of malodor complaints.

  8. Site characterisation program at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, G.E.R.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental restoration is of importance. In Belgium, there is primarily a need for restoring radioactively contaminated sites and the need for assessing the radiological impact of waste disposal or discharges. Participation in international programmes is necessary for keeping in touch with important developments. SCK-CEN has been performing site characterisation for more than twenty years within the framework of its statutory mission, but also within the framework of international programmes aiming to improve the safety of contaminated sites and the environment in general. The paper presents the most important activities which has been performed in the following fields during the period covered by the RCM. (author)

  9. Work site health promotion research: to what extent can we generalize the results and what is needed to translate research to practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Sheana Salyers; Gillette, Cynthia; Glasgow, Russell E; Estabrooks, Paul

    2003-10-01

    Information on external validity of work site health promotion research is essential to translate research findings to practice. The authors provide a literature review of work site health behavior interventions. Using the RE-AIM framework, they summarize characteristics and results of these studies to document reporting of intervention reach, adoption, implementation, and maintenance. The authors reviewed a total of 24 publications from 11 leading health behavior journals. They found that participation rates among eligible employees were reported in 87.5% of studies; only 25% of studies reported on intervention adoption. Data on characteristics of participants versus nonparticipants were reported in fewer than 10% of studies. Implementation data were reported in 12.5% of the studies. Only 8% of studies reported any type of maintenance data. Stronger emphasis is needed on representativeness of employees, work site settings studied, and longer term results. Examples of how this can be done are provided.

  10. A data-driven analysis of energy balance closure across FLUXNET research sites: The role of landscape scale heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoy, Paul C.; Mauder, Matthias; Foken, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    approached 1. These results suggest that landscape-level heterogeneity in vegetation and topography cannot be ignored as a contributor to incomplete energy balance closure at the flux network level, although net radiation measurements, biological energy assimilation, unmeasured storage terms......The energy balance at most surface-atmosphere flux research sites remains unclosed. The mechanisms underlying the discrepancy between measured energy inputs and outputs across the global FLUXNET tower network are still under debate. Recent reviews have identified exchange processes and turbulent...... motions at large spatial and temporal scales in heterogeneous landscapes as the primary cause of the lack of energy balance closure at some intensively-researched sites, while unmeasured storage terms cannot be ruled out as a dominant contributor to the lack of energy balance closure at many other sites...

  11. Radiometric survey in the sites of Regional office in Fortaleza, research gallery and camp in Itataia, CE (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    The radiometric survey in Regional officer sites in Fortaleza, Brazil, research gallery and camp in Itataia is presented. The measurings to be done, the instrumentation used and results obtained are described as well as the conclusions and recommendations. (C.M.) [pt

  12. Refractory black carbon at the Whistler Peak High Elevation Research Site - Measurements and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Sarah J.; Xu, Jun-Wei; Schroder, Jason C.; Wang, Qiaoqiao; McMeeking, Gavin R.; Hayden, Katherine; Leaitch, W. Richard; Macdonald, AnneMarie; von Salzen, Knut; Martin, Randall V.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2018-05-01

    Measurements of black carbon at remote and high altitude locations provide an important constraint for models. Here we present six months of refractory black carbon (rBC) data collected in July-August of 2009, June-July of 2010, and April-May of 2012 using a single particle soot photometer (SP2) at the remote Whistler High Elevation Research Site in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia (50.06°N, 122.96°W, 2182 m a.m.s.l). In order to reduce regional boundary layer influences, only measurements collected during the night (2000-0800 PST) were considered. Times impacted by local biomass burning were removed from the data set, as were periods of in-cloud sampling. Back trajectories and back trajectory cluster analysis were used to classify the sampled air masses as Southern Pacific, Northern Pacific, Western Pacific/Asian, or Northern Canadian in origin. The largest rBC mass median diameter (182 nm) was seen for air masses in the Southern Pacific cluster, and the smallest (156 nm) was seen for air masses in the Western Pacific/Asian cluster. Considering all the clusters, the median mass concentration of rBC was 25.0 ± 7.6 ng/m3-STP. The Northern Pacific, Southern Pacific, Western Pacific/Asian, and Northern Canada clusters had median mass concentrations of 25.0 ± 7.6, 21.3 ± 6.9, 25.0 ± 7.9, and 40.6 ± 12.9 ng/m3-STP, respectively. We compared these measurements with simulations from the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. The default GEOS-Chem simulations overestimated the median rBC mass concentrations for the different clusters by a factor of 1.2-2.2. The largest difference was observed for the Northern Pacific cluster (factor of 2.2) and the smallest difference was observed for the Northern Canada cluster (factor of 1.2). A sensitivity simulation that excluded Vancouver emissions still overestimated the median rBC mass concentrations for the different clusters by a factor of 1.1-2.0. After implementation of a revised wet scavenging scheme, the

  13. Outline of center for research and development in Rokkasho reprocessing plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, S.; Kanatsugu, K.; Shakutsui, M.

    1998-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd.(JNFL) is now constructing a commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at Rokkasho Mura, introducing French Technology on the main processes of it. In October 1995 prior to the reprocessing plant operation, JNFL established the CENTER FOR RESEARCH and DEVELOPMENT (Center for R and D) inside the plant site to perform various tests which are intended to improve the safety, availability and reliability of the reprocessing plant. The test facility of the center was constructed from 1991 to 1995, and now many tests have been being performed in the center. A full-scale mock-up of the Head end process components based on French Technology, which consist of a tilting crane, shearing machine, dissolver, hull rinser, end piece rinser and maintenance equipment, was moved into a new building from the Head End Demonstration Test facility in Kobe (reported in RECOD '91). Functional tests and system performance tests are carried out under cold conditions (non radioactive). As equipment and piping layout in the cell and working area layout outside of the cell are simulated to the reprocessing plant design, it is possible to test remote maintainability and repairability under the same condition as the reprocessing plant except radioactive condition. A full-scale mock-up of the Centrifugal clarifier based on French Technology, which can clarify the dissolution solution is operated to confirm clarification performance under various cold conditions and is tested for the maintainability and the repairability. A sampling bench imported from France is the same one planed to be operated in the reprocessing plant which samples for various analysis from each process. The sampling bench is tested to confirm operability, maintainability and reliability. Also the sampling piping and pneumatic piping are going to be install to the sampling bench for a system test of sampling system. Two types of MERC (Mobile Equipment Replacement Cask), which replace worn parts remotely

  14. Site-Specific Research Conducted in Support of the Salton Sea Solar Pond Project - FY 1982 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. L.; Marsh, H. E.; Roschke, E. J.; Wu, Y. C.

    1984-01-01

    The design and operation of a salt-gradient solar pond power plant at the Salton Sea presents problems not encountered at small research ponds that were built in the United States. The specific characteristics of the Salton Sea site and the desire to construct the pond using the local clay as a sealant represent major deviations from previous solar pond experience. The site-specific research in support of the plant design is described. The research activity included validation of the spectrophotometric light transmission measurement technique, a search for options for clarifying the turbid and colored water of the Salton Sea, development of water clarification specifications in terms common to industry practice, quantification of gas production from microbiological reactions in the ground, a determination of the combined effects of temperature and salinity on the permeation of the local clays, and a preliminary evaluation of material corrosion.

  15. The JINR Tier1 Site Simulation for Research and Development Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korenkov V.

    2016-01-01

    A system for grid and cloud services simulation is developed at LIT (JINR, Dubna. This simulation system is focused on improving the effciency of the grid/cloud structures development by using the work quality indicators of some real system. The development of such kind of software is very important for making a new grid/cloud infrastructure for such big scientific experiments like the JINR Tier1 site for WLCG. The simulation of some processes of the Tier1 site is considered as an example of our application approach.

  16. Conversion, ecological and social aspects of the research on mineral resources at the Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukhvatulin, Sh.T.; Belyashova, N.N.; Nedbaev, I.N.

    2000-01-01

    Despite the history of the Semipalatinsk test site in nuclear weapons testing, this territory is of interest for geologic exploration and utilization of mineral resources. The prospect for minerals on this territory was already known before the beginning of tests. Nowadays several companies work on the territory. Positive experience of using Kara Zhira coal deposit, refinement of local gabbros and stone-cutting plant, and preparation of gold mining at Naimanzhal deposit, allow us to hope that these mineral and raw material resources of the Semipalatinsk test site can become an important economic factor for development of the Eastern Kazakhstan region. (author)

  17. A Framework for Assessing Feasibility of Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) Project Sites : Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This research answers the question: How can a transit agency choose among alternative TOD locations within a transit network? The ultimate objective of the research is to develop a decision support framework which can be used by transit agencies when...

  18. To use or not to use: guidelines for researchers using data from online social networking sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wynsberghe, Amy Louise; Been, Henry; van Keulen, Maurice

    The universal and ubiquitous use of computing technologies confronts us with new ethical dilemmas on a daily basis. In the current age of abundant information sharing and gathering, social networking sites (SNSs) are now thought of as incredible resources for collecting data on individuals. The

  19. THE DESIGN AND IMPLEMETATION OF THE RESEARCH CENTER FOR AERONAUTICS AND SPACE WEB SITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEHADUS Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some elements and principles commonly used in web design. It’s addressed to anyone with an interest in developing their skills as a visual communicator, anyone who wants to learn the basics of graphical design, so they can develop their artistic skills and make more powerful and effective web sites.

  20. Research in Model-Based Change Detection and Site Model Updating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nevatia, R

    1998-01-01

    .... Some of these techniques also are applicable to automatic site modeling and some of our change detection techniques may apply to detection of larger mobile objects, such as airplanes. We have implemented an interactive modeling system that works in conjunction with our automatic system to minimize the need for tedious interaction.

  1. Appendix B: Site Visit Reports. Assessment of Research Needs for Coal Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.

    1983-05-01

    This section contains edited copies of site-visit and other reports prepared by CCAWG members. Some of the hand-out materials prepared by DOE contractors and others are included (without explication) to permit readers the construction of a coherent picture of work in progress.

  2. Multiple Site Action Research Case Studies: Practical and Theoretical Benefits and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mary Delfin; Vallance, Roger

    2006-01-01

    A curriculum initiative project was implemented in four schools in Singapore over a span of five to six weeks during 2004. The project employed a number of different schools: girls only, boys only and co-educational schools; different levels of performance in a graded situation; multiple teachers and classes within each site; and control and…

  3. Using Action Research To Create a Computer-Assisted Homework Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Abbot L.; Holmes, Glen A.

    This paper investigates a collaboration between faculty and students in a college statistics course to develop a method of quickly getting homework graded with feedback indicated and returned to the students. Using a World Wide Web site to deliver this support was a possible solution. A survey was developed to gain student input in the process of…

  4. 40 CFR 230.54 - Parks, national and historical monuments, national seashores, wilderness areas, research sites...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b... Human Use Characteristics § 230.54 Parks, national and historical monuments, national seashores... -managed. Note: Possible actions to minimize adverse impacts regarding site or material characteristics can...

  5. Geologic setting of the proposed Fallon FORGE Site, Nevada: Suitability for EGS research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulds, James E.; Blankenship, Douglas; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Sabin, Andrew; Nordquist, Josh; Hickman, Stephen H.; Glen, Jonathan; Kennedy, Mack; Siler, Drew; Robinson-Tait, Ann; Williams, Colin F.; Drakos, Peter; Calvin, Wendy M.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed Fallon FORGE site lies within and adjacent to the Naval Air Station Fallon (NASF) directly southeast of the town of Fallon, Nevada, within the large basin of the Carson Sink in west-central Nevada. The site is located on two parcels that include land owned by the NASF and leased and owned by Ormat Nevada, Inc. The Carson Sink in the vicinity of the Fallon site is covered by Quaternary deposits, including alluvial fan, eolian, and lacustrine sediments. Four wells penetrate the entire Neogene section and bottom in Mesozoic basement. Late Miocene to Quaternary basin-fill sediments are 0.5 to >1 km thick and overlie Oligocene-Miocene volcanic and lesser sedimentary rocks. The volcanic section is 0.5 to 1.0 km thick and dominated by Miocene mafic lavas. The Neogene section rests nonconformably on heterogeneous Mesozoic basement, which consists of Triassic-Jurassic metamorphic rocks intruded by Cretaceous granitic plutons. The structural framework is dominated by a gently west-tilted half graben cut by moderately to steeply dipping N- to NNEstriking normal faults that dip both east and west. Quaternary faults have not been observed within the proposed FORGE site. Fallon was selected for a potential FORGE site due to its extensional tectonic setting, abundance of available data, existing infrastructure, and documented temperatures, permeability, and lithologic composition of potential reservoirs that fall within the ranges specified by DOE for FORGE. Since the early 1970s, more than 45 wells have been drilled for geothermal exploration within the area. Four exploration wells within the FORGE site are available for use in the project. Several additional wells are available for monitoring outside the central FORGE site within the NASF and Ormat lease area, including numerous temperature gradient holes. There is an existing, ten-station micro-seismic earthquake (MEQ) array that has been collecting data since 2001; the MEQ array can be expanded to encompass the

  6. Research on jet mixing of settled sludges in nuclear waste tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites: A historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, M.R.; Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.

    1997-09-01

    Jet mixer pumps will be used in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks to mobilize and mix the settled solids layer (sludge) with the tank supernatant liquid. Predicting the performance of the jet mixer pumps has been the subject of analysis and testing at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. One important aspect of mixer pump performance is sludge mobilization. The research that correlates mixer pump design and operation with the extent of sludge mobilization is the subject of this report. Sludge mobilization tests have been conducted in tanks ranging from 1/25-scale (3 ft-diameter) to full scale have been conducted at Hanford and other DOE sites over the past 20 years. These tests are described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. The computational modeling of sludge mobilization and mixing that has been performed at Hanford is discussed in Section 5.0.

  7. Research on jet mixing of settled sludges in nuclear waste tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites: A historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, M.R.; Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.

    1997-09-01

    Jet mixer pumps will be used in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks to mobilize and mix the settled solids layer (sludge) with the tank supernatant liquid. Predicting the performance of the jet mixer pumps has been the subject of analysis and testing at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. One important aspect of mixer pump performance is sludge mobilization. The research that correlates mixer pump design and operation with the extent of sludge mobilization is the subject of this report. Sludge mobilization tests have been conducted in tanks ranging from 1/25-scale (3 ft-diameter) to full scale have been conducted at Hanford and other DOE sites over the past 20 years. These tests are described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. The computational modeling of sludge mobilization and mixing that has been performed at Hanford is discussed in Section 5.0

  8. Activities related to site characterization in ENRESA's research and development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmo, C. del; Astudillo, J.; Bajos, C.; Hernan, P.

    1995-01-01

    Following a short introduction that summarizes the global strategy for high-level waste (HLW) disposal, an outline is given of the El Berrocal Project, with an emphasis on site characterization is given. The article focuses special attention on the technological developments achieved over the last few years within the framework of the ENRESA R and D Plans, both in global terms and within the El Berrocal project in particular, regarding the conception and construction of mobile hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical characterization units and the performance of tracer tests. These developments will make it possible to undertake, with slight modification and enhancements, the work required in the search for sites suitable for the definitive disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. A final section is devoted to presenting an overview of anticipated R and D actions for the five-year period 1995--1999

  9. Remediation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the site of Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikhov, E.P.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Volkov, V.G.

    2007-01-01

    One discusses the efforts to rehabilitate the radiation hazard installations and to remediate the contaminated territory of the Kurchatov Institute RSC undertaken in 2006-2007 in terms of the Remediation Project. The old radwaste storage facilities constructed at the site when the Institute was involved in activities to elaborate both war and civil nuclear technologies were the basic objects of the rehabilitation efforts. Paper describes the structure of the storage facilities covering the volume and the characteristics of the stored radwaste. Paper discusses the storage facility site layout parameters taken into consideration in the course of the remediation efforts. Paper describes the procedures, the sequence of the remediation efforts and the peculiar features of the planning and engineering approaches. Paper dwells upon the results of the rehabilitation and the remediation efforts [ru

  10. Social Network Sites (SNS): do they match ? Definitions and methods for social sciences and marketing research

    OpenAIRE

    Stenger, Thomas; Coutant, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    Social Networks Sites (SNS) such as Facebook, MySpace, Skyrock.com or Linkedin have become new fields of investigation for marketing. Even though the phenomenon has met with an amazing popular success, only a few scientific works have been published on this subject. This article proposes initially to evaluate the situation by a review of the experts' discourses and, then, a an analysis of the texts in core disciplines specialising in social networks analysis (mainly sociometry, anthropology a...

  11. French practice in the area of seismic hazard assessment on nuclear facility sites and related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadioun, B.

    1986-06-01

    The methodology put into practice in the analysis of seismic hazard on the site of a nuclear facility relies upon a deterministic approach and endeavors to account for the particularities of every site considered insofar as available data and techniques allow. The calculation of a seismic reference motion for use in the facilities' design calls upon two basic sets of data. Regional seismicity over the past millennium, from historical sources, revised while preparing the seismotectonic map of France, is fundamental to this analysis. It is completed by instrumental data from the last quarter century. A collection of strong-motion accelerograph data from seismic areas worldwide reflects a variety of source characteristics and site conditions. A critical overview of current practice in France and elsewhere highlights shortcomings and areas of particular need both in experimental data and in methodology, and namely the scarcity of near-field data, the predominance of California records, and inaccurate approaches to integrating soil effects into ground-motion calculations. 16 refs

  12. Geology of Reskajeage Farm Quarry (Nirex research site on Cornish slate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, P.L.; North, C.P.

    1989-08-01

    Convection with any water flow is the most likely way in which any radionuclides escaping from deep disposal of radioactive waste in hard fractured rock could return to the surface. Hence the interest in water flow and mass transport through fractures for establishing the safety of such disposal. Earlier work on this subject was carried out in granite at Troon in Cornwall. This work provided statistical data about individual fractures and helped with the development of realistic modelling of flow and transport (Bourke 1985 and 1988). Validation of this modelling was however impractical. Access was obtained to another site with a much smaller separation between fractures in slate to allow measurement of flow and transport through representative volumes of 10m dimensions. Individual fracture statistics are being determined so that modelling predictions can be theoretically made for experimental proving. The programme at the site was begun with a geological investigation. The main findings are that the somewhat heterogeneous hard rock consists mostly of siltstone with some sandstone layers, that it is not untypically broken by many fractures and that a comparatively major (3m wide) fault with slip of about a metre between its faces crossing part of the site. These findings are described in detail in the report. (author)

  13. Experience and related research and development in applying corrective measures at the major low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, R.R.; Mahathy, J.M.; Epler, J.S.; Boing, L.E.; Jacobs, D.G.

    1983-07-01

    A review was conducted of experience in responding to problems encountered in shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste and in research and development related to these problems. The operating histories of eleven major disposal facilities were examined. Based on the review, it was apparent that the most effective corrective measures administered were those developed from an understanding of the site conditions which caused the problems. Accordingly, the information in this document has been organized around the major conditions which have caused problems at existing sites. These include: (1) unstable trench cover, (2) permeable trench cover, (3) subsidence, (4) ground water entering trenches, (5) intrusion by deep-rooted plants, (6) intrusion by burrowing animals, and (7) chemical and physical conditions in trench. Because the burial sites are located in regions that differ in climatologic, geologic, hydrologic, and biologic characteristics, there is variation in the severity of problems among the sites and in the nature of information concerning corrective efforts. Conditions associated with water-related problems have received a great deal of attention. For these, corrective measures have ranged from the creation of diversion systems for reducing the contact of surface water with the trench cover to the installation of seals designed to prevent infiltration from reaching the buried waste. On the other hand, corrective measures for conditions of subsidence or of intrusion by burrowing animals have had limited application and are currently under evaluation or are subjects of research and development activities. 50 references, 20 figures, 10 tables

  14. Selected micrometeorological and soil-moisture data at Amargosa Desert Research Site, an arid site near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada, 1998-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Mayers, Charles J.; Andraski, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    Selected micrometeorological and soil-moisture data were collected at the Amargosa Desert Research Site adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste and hazardous chemical waste facility near Beatty, Nev., 1998-2000. Data were collected in support of ongoing research studies to improve the understanding of hydrologic and contaminant-transport processes in arid environments. Micrometeorological data include precipitation, air temperature, solar radiation, net radiation, relative humidity, ambient vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, soil temperature, and soil-heat flux. All micrometeorological data were collected using a 10-second sampling interval by data loggers that output daily mean, maximum, and minimum values, and hourly mean values. For precipitation, data output consisted of daily, hourly, and 5-minute totals. Soil-moisture data included periodic measurements of soil-water content at nine neutron-probe access tubes with measurable depths ranging from 5.25 to 29.75 meters. The computer data files included in this report contain the complete micrometeorological and soil-moisture data sets. The computer data consists of seven files with about 14 megabytes of information. The seven files are in tabular format: (1) one file lists daily mean, maximum, and minimum micrometeorological data and daily total precipitation; (2) three files list hourly mean micrometeorological data and hourly precipitation for each year (1998-2000); (3) one file lists 5-minute precipitation data; (4) one file lists mean soil-water content by date and depth at four experimental sites; and (5) one file lists soil-water content by date and depth for each neutron-probe access tube. This report highlights selected data contained in the computer data files using figures, tables, and brief discussions. Instrumentation used for data collection also is described. Water-content profiles are shown to demonstrate variability of water content with depth. Time-series data are

  15. Preliminary research on groundwater flow characteristics of the low- and Intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Young Kwon; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Geon Young; Ryu, Ji Hoon; Park, Kyung Woo; Ji, Sung Hoon; Kim, Kyung Su

    2009-08-01

    Preliminary site survey and candidate survey complements the purpose of the current site selection and disposal place selected for the study because of hydraulic to the geological survey done for the general idea was brought in the field of geochemistry survey was made. Therefore, this report hydraulic - the underlying structure of the model deterministic deformation zone model to focus on the configuration kept, according to data survey by hydraulic and hydraulic rock star pitcher trying to figure out the scope of the structure factors were hydraulic. Groundwater and related land place shares characteristics of the existing data and complementary research and laboratory research performed on the basis of geochemical data, based on the following major finding were present

  16. Early career researchers and PhD students from the social sciences use of Social Networking Sites (SNS) for science communication: an affordances approach

    OpenAIRE

    Manco Vega, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to understand the different practices and strategies early career researchers and PhD students from the social sciences have in Social Networking Sites (SNSs) for science communication in one particular country: Brazil. Following this purpose, the central research question is which are the motives and rationale of the researchers for using social networking sites for science communication. Two sub-questions arise from this general research question: How do practices and str...

  17. Challenges in the Use of Social Networking Sites to Trace Potential Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jackie; Bishop, Julia C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a number of challenges faced in tracing contributors to research projects that were originally conducted many decades previously. The need to trace contributors in this way arises in projects which focus on involving research participants in previous studies who have not been maintained on a database, or with whom the…

  18. Field astrobiology research instruments and methods in moon-mars analogue site.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foing, B.H.; Stoker, C.; Zavaleta, J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D.; Page, J.; Pletser, V.; Hendrikse, J.; Oliveira Lebre Direito, M.S.; Kotler, M.; Martins, Z.; Orzechowska, G.; Thiel, C.S.; Clarke, J.; Gross, J.; Wendt, L.; Borst, A.; Peters, S.; Wilhelm, M.-B.; Davies, G.R.; EuroGeoMars 2009 Team, ILEWG

    2011-01-01

    We describe the field demonstration of astrobiology instruments and research methods conducted in and from the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) in Utah during the EuroGeoMars campaign 2009 coordinated by ILEWG, ESA/ESTEC and NASA Ames, with the contribution of academic partners. We discuss the

  19. How we Ensured Rigor from a Multi-site, Multi-discipline, Multi-researcher Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ken Crawford

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative research has often been criticised for its lack of rigour. In order to overcome this, measures of trustworthiness, dependability and reliability have been suggested. A study of how pastoralists learn to incorporate sustainable farming systems in the tropical savannas of Australia employed multiple-researchers, working in three States and from a variety of disciplines. To ensure rigour a framework for the study was developed by the researchers prior to commencing interviews. This was followed by regular teleconferences to ensure that the framework was valid and to adjust for any problems encountered along the way. Every interview was analysed independently by all researchers before a workshop was conducted to bring the ideas together. Categories and ideas within the data were synthesised to create an overall understanding of the learning process within the confines of "landcare" in the Tropical Savannas. These processes were undertaken in consultation with the pastoralists and the process has been explicitly documented to enable readers to follow the research process easily. The rigour in this project is shown in the clear documentation of the research process carried out by individual researchers and by the team when it met. The understanding of pastoralists' learning processes is our interpretation; it is up to the reader to decide whether s/he agrees with that interpretation, but from the description of the process it is easy for the reader to see where and why her/his interpretation differs. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0001125

  20. Study on characteristics of sedimentary rock at the Horonobe site. Report of collaboration research between CRIEPI and JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiho, Kenzo; Oyama, Takahiro; Suzuki, Koichi; Nakata, Eiji; Tanaka, Shiro; Miyakawa, Kimio; Ishii, Eiichi; Takahashi, Kazuharu; Kunimaru, Takanori; Tsukui, Rota; Fukushima, Tatsuo; Seya, Masami; Hama, Katsuhiro; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    CRIEPI (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry) and JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) have been conducting a collaboration research to develop methodology for the characterization of geological environment since FY 2002. This report describes the results of the collaboration research in mainly FY 2003. As the collaboration research, the following research results were obtained. (1) Study on the diagenesis of the sedimentary rock of the Noegene Tertiary. The maximum burial depth of the formation can be estimated. (2) Study on the chemical weathering of the soft sedimentary rock. The acidic water can be caused by the chemical weathering of the rock in the Koetoi formation. (3) Study on the pore water extraction. The hydrochemical condition at the Horonobe site can be estimated by the results of the chemical analyses of extracted pore water, and the different pressure of the extraction results the different chloride contents of the pore water. (4) Study on exploration method considering the physical property of the rock. The depth profile of the mechanical properties can be estimated by the results of physical logging in the borehole. (5) Study on the applicability of the controlled drilling system to the Horonobe site. The controlled drilling system can be applicable to drill the directional borehole. (author)

  1. A meta-database comparison from various European Research and Monitoring Networks dedicated to forest sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danielewska, A.; Clarke, N.; Olejnik, Janusz; Hansen, K.; de Vries, W.; Lundin, L.; Tuovinen, J-P.; Fischer, R.; Urbaniak, M.; Paoletti, E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, JAN 2013 (2013), s. 1-9 ISSN 1971-7458 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Research and Monitoring Network * Meta- database * Forest * Monitoring Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.150, year: 2013

  2. Report of meteorological observations in site of Tokai Research Establishment in 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Covered are the meteorological observations from January to December 1971 in Tokai Research Establishment as monthly summaries, including daily and hourly mean wind speeds, frequencies of wind directions and atmospheric stability. (auth.)

  3. Early Avian Research at the Savannah River Site: Historical Highlights and Possibilities for the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, J.M.; Odum, E.P.

    2000-10-01

    Avian biology was a major component of early research and baseline surveys. The focus of research shifted and the SRS evolved from open fields to forest cover. In the early years avian species richness and abundance increased with successional age of the vegetation from old-field to forest. During the early years resident game birds increased. More recent studies will help to understand the role of habitat in local and regional extinctions. A variety of survey techniques is needed.

  4. A systematic review of social networking sites: innovative platforms for health research targeting adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bu Kyung; Calamaro, Christina

    2013-09-01

    To review the evidence to determine if social networking sites (SNS) are effective tools for health research in the adolescent and young adult populations. Systematic review of published research articles focused on use of SNS for youth health research. Seventeen articles were selected that met the following criteria: used SNS at any stage of study, participants between 13 and 25 years of age, English language, and both international and national studies. Reviewers categorized selected studies based on the way SNS were used. Utilization of SNS for effectively implementing research with adolescents and young adults include (a) recruitment, (b) intervention, and (c) measurement. Four findings about advantages of using SNS apparent in this review are (a) ease of access to youth, (b) cost effectiveness in recruitment, (c) ease of intervention, and (d) reliable screening venue of mental status and high-risk behaviors. Although this literature review showed relatively minimal research to date on the use of SNS for research targeting adolescents and young adults, the impact of using SNS for health research is of considerable importance for researchers as well as participants. With careful focus, SNS can become a valuable platform to access, recruit, and deliver health interventions in a cost-effective manner to youth populations as well as hard-to-reach minority or underserved populations. The evidence demonstrates the usefulness of SNS as innovative platforms for health promotion among adolescents and young adults. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Meeting the Challenge: The National Cancer Institute's Central Institutional Review Board for Multi-Site Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massett, Holly A; Hampp, Sharon L; Goldberg, Jacquelyn L; Mooney, Margaret; Parreco, Linda K; Minasian, Lori; Montello, Mike; Mishkin, Grace E; Davis, Catasha; Abrams, Jeffrey S

    2018-03-10

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a new policy that requires a single institutional review board (IRB) of record be used for all protocols funded by the NIH that are carried out at more than one site in the United States, effective January 2018. This policy affects several hundred clinical trials opened annually across the NIH. Limited data exist to compare the use of a single IRB to that of multiple local IRBs, so some institutions are resistant to or distrustful of single IRBs. Since 2001, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has funded a central IRB (CIRB) that provides human patient reviews for its extensive national cancer clinical trials program. This paper presents data to show the adoption, efficiencies gained, and satisfaction of the CIRB among NCI trial networks and reviews key lessons gleaned from 16 years of experience that may be informative for others charged with implementation of the new NIH single-IRB policy.

  6. Waste management facility remediation and decommissioning at a national nuclear research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, D.J.; Dolinar, G.M.; Killey, R.W.D.

    1994-01-01

    Historic waste management practices at eight locations on AECL's Chalk River site have resulted in the formation of contaminated groundwater plumes, some of which have surfaced and contaminated surface materials. A priority setting process has been used to establish a plan of attack that will lead to the eventual decommissioning of these facilities. In general terms, the preferred approach is to install impermeable covers to prevent further leaching of waste sources and to prevent escape of leachate to the biosphere, followed by cleanup of surface contamination and remediation of aquifers. Final disposal of the waste sources would be delayed for perhaps 20 years. Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of contaminated groundwater, with one field installation in place and another under development. This paper describes how the prioritization task was tackled to produce a long term plan of action and describes initial interventions that have been attempted and their results. 4 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  7. Preparatory research to develop an operational method to calibrate airborne sensor data using a network of ground calibration sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, E.J.; Smith, G.M.; Lawless, K.P.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the research is to develop an operational method to convert airborne spectral radiance data to reflectance using a number of well-characterized ground calibration sites located around the UK. The study is in three phases. First, a pilot study has been conducted at a disused airfield in southern England to test the feasibility of the open-quote empirical line close-quote method of sensor calibration. The second phase is developing methods to predict temporal changes in the bidirectional reflectance of ground calibration sites. The final phase of the project will look at methods to extend such calibrations spatially. This paper presents some results from the first phase of this study. The viability of the empirical line method of correction is shown to depend upon the use of ground targets whose in-band reflectance encompasses that of the targets of interest in the spectral band(s) concerned. The experimental design for the second phase of the study, in which methods to predict temporal trends in the bidirectional reflectance of these sites will be developed, is discussed. Finally, it is planned to develop an automated method of searching through Landsat TM data for the UK to identify a number of candidate ground calibration sites for which the model can be tested. 11 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Geologic setting of the proposed West Flank Forge Site, California: Suitability for EGS research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Andrew; Blake, Kelly; Lazaro, Mike; Blankenship, Douglas; Kennedy, Mack; McCullough, Jess; DeOreo, S.B.; Hickman, Stephen H.; Glen, Jonathan; Kaven, Joern; Williams, Colin F.; Phelps, Geoffrey; Faulds, James E.; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Siler, Drew; Robertson-Tait, Ann

    2017-01-01

    The proposed West Flank FORGE site is within the China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS), China Lake, CA. The West Flank is west of the Coso geothermal field, an area of China Lake NAWS dominated by the Quaternary Coso volcanic field largely comprised of rhyolite domes and their volcaniclastic and epiclastic horizons. The largest dome flow complex, Sugarloaf Mountain, marks the northwestern margin of the geothermal field. The West Flank is situated due west of Sugarloaf. The geologic setting of the West Flank was determined from one deep well (83-11) drilled as a potential production hole in 2009. The bottom-hole temperature (BHT) of well 83-11 approaches 600 oF (315˚C), but flow tests demonstrate very low, non-commercial permeabilities. With the exception of the upper 600 feet of volcaniclastic alluvium, well 83-11 is completed in granitic basement. The West Flank possesses the primary attributes of a FORGE site: non-commercial permeability (geothermal fieldThe Coso Mountains host the Coso volcanic field and are within a right-releasing stepover between the dextral Airport Lake (ALF) and Little Lake fault zones (LLFZ) and the Wild Horse Mesa and Owens Valley faults. Two distinct fault populations have been identified at Coso: WNW-trending and antithetical, NE-trending strike-slip faults and N- to NNE-trending normal faults. These faults are both high permeability drilling targets at depth within the main (productive) geothermal field and they locally segment the field into distinct hydrothermal regimes. The West Flank may be segmented from the rest of the field by one such northerly trending fault. The overall minimum principal stress orientation in the main geothermal field varies from 103˚ to 108˚; however, the minimum horizontal principal stress in 83-11 is rotated to 081˚.

  9. Study on characteristics of sedimentary rock at the Horonobe site (2). Report of collaboration research between CRIEPI and JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Takahiro; Kiho, Kenzo; Suzuki, Koichi; Nakata, Eiji; Tanaka, Shiro; Hasegawa, Takuma; Nakata, Kotaro; Nagaoka, Toru; Nakamura, Takamichi; Fukushima, Tatsuo; Ishii, Eiichi; Kunimaru; Takanori; Hama, Katsuhiro; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Sugita, Yutaka; Yabuuchi, Satoshi; Miyahara, Shigenori; Takahashi, Kazuharu

    2010-01-01

    CRIEPI (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry) and JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) have been conducting a collaboration research to develop methodology for the characterization of geological environment since FY 2002. This report describes the results of the collaboration research in mainly from FY 2004 to FY 2008. As the collaboration research, the following research results were obtained. (1) Study on the slaking property. We discovered the spherical silica (amorphous silica) in siliceous rock (Opalin chert) between the Koetoi and Wakkanai Formation. The permeability of this chert (10 -12 m/sec) decreases to compare with near depth diatomaceous mudstone (10 -10 m/sec). This diatomaceous mudstone dose not rapidly slakes. Excavated disturbed zone(EdZ) at -140 m tunnel was estimated with drilled cores and gas flows from the tunnel wall. (2) Study on the chemical weathering of the sedimentary rock. The weathering property was investigated of mudstone at an outcrop and east shaft. Weathering profile was divided oxidized, dissolved, transition and fresh zone. Oxidation was limited to the vicinity of surface. (3) Study on the pore water extraction methodology. Sample preparation under N 2 condition before porewater squeezing to prevent oxidation showed that the squeezed porewater chemistry was affected by the sample storage period before squeezing. (4) Study on exploration method considering the physical property of the rock. The depth profile of the mechanical and permeability properties can be estimated by the results of physical logging in the borehole and laboratory measurements of core samples. (5) Study on the applicability of the controlled drilling system to the Horonobe site. The controlled drilling system was applied to the Hokushin site and the Kami-horonobe site in the Horonobe town. At the Kami-horonobe site, the system was applied to drill the Omagari fault and characterize the hydro-geology around the fault. The controlled drilling was

  10. Swedish deep repository siting programme. Guide to the documentation of 25 years of geoscientific research (1976-2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milnes, Alan Geoffrey [GEA Consulting, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2002-03-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has been carrying out geoscientific research and feasibility studies aimed at identifying suitable sites for deep repositories in the Precambrian basement of the Baltic Shield. The documentation of this research effort forms an extensive body of material which is exceptionally wide-ranging and which is generally little known outside the Swedish nuclear waste community. This has now been compiled in the form of a 'documentation guide' in order to make the research results more easily accessible to the scientific community at large, and to show how they relate to their 'nearest surroundings', i.e. the relevant academic scientific literature and the documentation of similar research by other institutions, in Sweden and in other countries (Finland, Canada). The documentation covers the period 1976-2000 and contains ca. 850 citations, of which about half are technical reports published by SKB and its forerunners. In the main body of the guide (Chapters 2-9), the material is arranged thematically and the scope of the documentation in each theme is described and commented in short texts, showing the interrelationships between the individual reports and scientific papers, with appropriate cross-references. Early chapters (2-5, and 7) cover general themes: bedrock geology, fracturing, glaciation and crustal dynamics, deep groundwater, and geosphere transport, each subdivided into citation groups under headings which are of particular interest to the Swedish deep repository siting programme. Later chapters (6, and 8-9) include thumbnail sketches of the Swedish study sites (Finnsjoen, Fjaellveden, Gideaa, Kamlunge, Klipperaas, Sternoe), the underground laboratory sites of Stripa and Aespoe, and comparable sites in Finland and Canada, as well as the complete documentation to the feasibility studies carried out in eight Swedish municipalities between 1993 and 2000 (Storuman

  11. Swedish deep repository siting programme. Guide to the documentation of 25 years of geoscientific research (1976-2000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milnes, Alan Geoffrey

    2002-03-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has been carrying out geoscientific research and feasibility studies aimed at identifying suitable sites for deep repositories in the Precambrian basement of the Baltic Shield. The documentation of this research effort forms an extensive body of material which is exceptionally wide-ranging and which is generally little known outside the Swedish nuclear waste community. This has now been compiled in the form of a 'documentation guide' in order to make the research results more easily accessible to the scientific community at large, and to show how they relate to their 'nearest surroundings', i.e. the relevant academic scientific literature and the documentation of similar research by other institutions, in Sweden and in other countries (Finland, Canada). The documentation covers the period 1976-2000 and contains ca. 850 citations, of which about half are technical reports published by SKB and its forerunners. In the main body of the guide (Chapters 2-9), the material is arranged thematically and the scope of the documentation in each theme is described and commented in short texts, showing the interrelationships between the individual reports and scientific papers, with appropriate cross-references. Early chapters (2-5, and 7) cover general themes: bedrock geology, fracturing, glaciation and crustal dynamics, deep groundwater, and geosphere transport, each subdivided into citation groups under headings which are of particular interest to the Swedish deep repository siting programme. Later chapters (6, and 8-9) include thumbnail sketches of the Swedish study sites (Finnsjoen, Fjaellveden, Gideaa, Kamlunge, Klipperaas, Sternoe), the underground laboratory sites of Stripa and Aespoe, and comparable sites in Finland and Canada, as well as the complete documentation to the feasibility studies carried out in eight Swedish municipalities between 1993 and 2000 (Storuman, Malaa, Nykoeping

  12. Integrating geomatics in archaeological research at the site of Thorikos (Greece)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, C.; Docter, R.; van den Eijnde, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304835188

    2014-01-01

    Archaeological excavation is a destructive process, making accurate, fast and efficient 3D documentation of information essential. With this in mind, our research uses an integrated workflow of topographic measurements and image-based 3D modelling to generate highly accurate reconstructions of

  13. Accountability Issues for Instructional Leadership: Field Research, Site-Based Management, and a Campus Action Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, John M.; Karr-Kidwell, P. J.

    The purpose of this study was to use data collected from a field research project to enable teachers and instructional leaders to understand and overcome the problems associated with high-stakes testing, especially as they relate to the narrowing of the curriculum. In spring 2001, 27 of the 48 teachers at a middle school in Texas responded to a…

  14. Research priorities for conservation of metallophyte biodiversity and their potential for restoration and site remediation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whiting, S.N.; Reeves, R.D.; Richards, D.; Johnson, M.S.; Cooke, J.A.; Malaisse, F.; Paton, A.; Smith, J.A.C.; Angle, J.S.; Chaney, R.L.; Ginocchio, R.; Jaffre, T.; Johns, R.; McIntyre, T.; Purvis, O.W.; Salt, D.E.; Zhao, F.J.; Baker, A.J.M.; Schat, H.

    2004-01-01

    Plants that have evolved to survive on metal-rich soils-metallophytes-have key values that must drive research of their unique properties and ultimately their conservation. The ability of metallophytes to tolerate extreme metal concentrations commends them for revegetation of mines and

  15. Teaching Self-Disclosure through an Activity Exploring Disclosure Research and Online Dating Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nicole Marie; Hastings, Sally O.

    2013-01-01

    Most interpersonal communication course textbooks include a section or chapter on the topic of self-disclosure. Students are normally introduced to elements of self-disclosure, such as a definition, functions, or reasons for self-disclosure, risks of self-disclosure, and the role of self-disclosure in relationships. Historically, research on…

  16. A Tale of Two Sites: Cellphones, Participatory Video and Indigeneity in Community-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab-Cartas, Joshua; Mitchell, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    This polyvocal text is both a narrative and a dialogue between two scholar-activist researchers working in rural communities in distinct parts of the world--South Africa and Southern Mexico--sharing their experiences of using cellular phone and camcorders, while also exploring the potential sustainability of these technologies in the context of…

  17. Results of hydrologic research at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Barbara J.

    1989-01-01

    Ten years of hydrologic research have been conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey at a commercial low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Illinois. Research included studies of microclimate, evapotranspiration, and tritium release by plants; runoff and land modification; water movement through a trench cover; water and tritium movement in the unsaturated zone; gases in the unsaturated zone; water and tritium movement in the saturated zone; and water chemistry. Implications specific to each research topic and those based on overlapping research topics are summarized as to their potential effect on the selection, characterization, design, operation, and decommissioning processes of future low-level radioactive-waste disposal sites. Unconsolidated deposits at the site are diverse in lithologic character and are spatially and stratigraphically complex. Thickness of these Quaternary deposits ranges from 3 to 27 meters and averages 17 meters. The unconsolidated deposits overlay 140 meters of Pennsylvanian shale, mudstone, siltstone, and coal. Approximately 90,500 cubic meters of waste were buried from August 1967 through August 1978, in 21 trenches that were constructed in glacial materials by using a cut-and-fill process. Trenches generally were constructed below grade and ranged from 11 to 180 meters long, 2.4 to 21 meters wide, and 2.4 to about 7.9 meters deep. Research on microclimate and evapotranspiration at the site was conducted from July 1982 through June 1984. Continuous measurements were made of precipitation, incoming and reflected solar (shortwave) radiation, incoming and emitted terrestrial (longwave) radiation, horizontal windspeed and direction, wet- and dry-bulb air temperature, barometric pressure, soil-heat fluxes, and soil temperature. Soil-moisture content, for this research phase, was measured approximately biweekly. Evapotranspiration rates were estimated by using three techniques--energy budget, aerodynamic profile, and water

  18. Recruiting migrants for health research through social network sites: an online survey among chinese migrants in australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie; Wong, Kam Cheong; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2015-04-27

    Traditionally, postal surveys or face to face interviews are the main approaches for health researchers to obtain essential research data. However, with the prevalence of information technology and Internet, Web-based surveys are gaining popularity in health research. This study aims to report the process and outcomes of recruiting Chinese migrants through social network sites in Australia and to examine the sample characteristics of online recruitment by comparing the sample which was recruited by an online survey to a sample of Australian Chinese migrants collected by a postal survey. Descriptive analyses were performed to describe and compare the process and outcomes of online recruitment with postal survey questionnaires. Chi square tests and t tests were performed to assess the differences between the two samples for categorical and continuous variables respectively. In total, 473 Chinese migrants completed the online health survey from July to October 2013. Out of 426 participants recruited through the three Chinese social network sites in Australia, over 86.6% (369/426) were recruited within six weeks. Participants of the Web-based survey were younger, with a higher education level or had resided in Australia for less time compared to those recruited via a postal survey. However, there was no significant difference in gender, marital status, and professional occupation. The recruitment of Chinese migrants through social network sites in our online survey was feasible. Compared to a postal survey of Chinese migrants, the online survey attracted different group of Chinese migrants who may have diverse health needs and concerns. Our findings provided insightful information for researchers who are considering employing a Web-based approach to recruit migrants and ethnic minority participants.

  19. Landscape archaeological research and 3D modelling of the Neolithic site of Barcin Höyük, Northwest Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenhuijzen, Mark; Kluiving, Sjoerd; Gerritsen, Fokke

    2013-04-01

    Barcin Höyük is a dwelling mound in the Yenişehir valley in Northwest Turkey. It is found to be one of the oldest farming communities in the region, with an archaeological record stretching from the Neolithic up to the Roman period, with some finds dating to the Byzantine period. An earlier geoarchaeological study was performed in 2009, revealing interesting deposits from a marsh or lake, and two possible small rivers or streams. The current study forms a continuation of the previous research, aimed at improving our understanding of the interrelationship of the site and the landscape, especially around the early neolithisation process. The following research questions have been investigated: is it possible to bring more detail into the knowledge of the landscape around the site through denser and more detailed coring, can a manner of time-control on the sedimentation be found, and is a 3D-model a suitable tool for storing and analysing data to improve our understanding of the landscape and the site? Data was gathered from hand auger corings placed in the vicinity of the excavation site. Soil samples were systematically gathered from these corings, of which a selection was subjected to laboratory analyses. The methods used here are grain size analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and end-member analysis. Spatial analytical tools, such as ArcMap and ArcScene were used to store and analyse all data, more specifically in order to construct the 3D-subsurface model. The deepest sedimentary unit encountered in the corings can be ascribed to a lacustrine environment, inferring that a lake might have been present at the site location prior to the first Neolithic habitation of Barcin Höyük. Two subsequent layers of gravel and coarse sand are found within the lacustrine unit and can be correlated around the site. In the 3D-subsurface model constructed for the site, these layers show a distinct elevation with a relief of almost 2.5 metres. These results can be interpreted

  20. Summary of geoscience work at the AECL research site near Atikokan, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, D.

    1984-03-01

    Since 1979 June, geolgical, geophysical and hydro-geological investigations have been conducted at Research Area 4 north of Atikokan, Ontario as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Composition, shape and internal structure of the Eye-Dashwa pluton were the subjects of regional field studies. Detailed research concentrated on the detection and characterization of surface and subsurface fractures within a 400-m x 800-m grid area, where five boreholes were drilled to depths of between 200 m and 1100 m. Fracture zones in the area were readily detected by surface mapping, ground very low frequency electromagnetic (VLF-EM) surveys and borehole logging. Borehole logs, downhole tube-wave seismic surveys, and thermal and television logging were successful in detecting open fractures in boreholes

  1. Technology development and demonstration for TRIGA research reactor decontamination, decommissioning and site restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Ki Jung; Lee, Byung Jik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction to research reactor decommissioning plan at KAERI, the background of technology development and demonstration, and the current status of the system decontamination technology for TRIGA reactors, concrete decontamination and dust treatment technologies, wall ranging robot and graphic simulation of dismantling processes, soil decontamination and restoration technology, recycling or reuse technologies for radioactive metallic wastes, and incineration technology demonstration for combustible wastes. 9 figs

  2. Radionuclide migration study in the case of a geological disposal site. Bibliographic research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rio, Sophie

    1997-01-01

    The present bibliographic research deals with the study of radionuclide migration in the case of a geological disposal of spent fuel from PWR nuclear reactors. Bibliography was made with the DIALOG server on the following databases: INSPEC, NTIS, Ei Compendex Plus, SPIN, SciSearch, Pascal et Current Contents Search, and with the INIS and DocTheses CD-Roms. A synthesis based on a few documents is made in the second part of the report. (author) [fr

  3. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development: FY 2006 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2007-08-01

    The Nevada Test Site–Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed its fifth successful year of research and development activities in FY 2006. Forty new projects were selected for funding this year, and ten FY 2005 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $6 million, for an average per-project cost of $120 thousand. Beginning in May, 2006 programmatic burden rates were applied to SDRD project costs. An external audit conducted in September 2006 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: the filing of 27 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2006 projects; programmatic adoption of four FY 2005 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2006 projects; and the successful completion of 50 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  4. Use of a social networking web site for recruiting Canadian youth for medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jennifer L; Snider, Carolyn E

    2013-06-01

    The use of advertising on Facebook for medical research is not widely utilized, and we sought to describe the effectiveness of this tool in medical research recruitment. A survey study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in Canadian youth who were affected by violence. Participants were recruited from an advertisement on Facebook that targeted Canadian users aged 15 to 24 years and linked them to an online survey. This secondary analysis is a descriptive study of the effectiveness of the Facebook campaign. Over the course of the study, the advertisement was displayed 17.5 million times resulting in 3,440 clicks on the link to the survey (.020%). The overall cost worked out to $15.35 per final subject, totaling $1351.17. Facebook advertising is a cost-effective method of recruiting youth from a wide population. There are many potential uses for social networking in medical research. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. All-sky-imaging capabilities for ionospheric space weather research using geomagnetic conjugate point observing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinis, C.; Baumgardner, J.; Wroten, J.; Mendillo, M.

    2018-04-01

    Optical signatures of ionospheric disturbances exist at all latitudes on Earth-the most well known case being visible aurora at high latitudes. Sub-visual emissions occur equatorward of the auroral zones that also indicate periods and locations of severe Space Weather effects. These fall into three magnetic latitude domains in each hemisphere: (1) sub-auroral latitudes ∼40-60°, (2) mid-latitudes (20-40°) and (3) equatorial-to-low latitudes (0-20°). Boston University has established a network of all-sky-imagers (ASIs) with sites at opposite ends of the same geomagnetic field lines in each hemisphere-called geomagnetic conjugate points. Our ASIs are autonomous instruments that operate in mini-observatories situated at four conjugate pairs in North and South America, plus one pair linking Europe and South Africa. In this paper, we describe instrument design, data-taking protocols, data transfer and archiving issues, image processing, science objectives and early results for each latitude domain. This unique capability addresses how a single source of disturbance is transformed into similar or different effects based on the unique "receptor" conditions (seasonal effects) found in each hemisphere. Applying optical conjugate point observations to Space Weather problems offers a new diagnostic approach for understanding the global system response functions operating in the Earth's upper atmosphere.

  6. Data collection and field experiments at the Apache Leap research site. Annual report, May 1995--1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Bassett, R.L.; Neuman, S.P.; Chen, G.

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the research performed during the period May 1995-May 1996 for a project of the U.S. Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-051) by the University of Arizona. The project manager for this research in Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this research were to examine hypotheses and test alternative conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. Each chapter in this report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. Topics include: crosshole pneumatic and gaseous tracer field and modeling experiments designed to help validate the applicability of contiuum geostatistical and stochastic concepts, theories, models, and scaling relations relevant to unsaturated flow and transport in fractured porous tuffs; use of geochemistry and aquifer testing to evaluate fracture flow and perching mechanisms; investigations of 234 U/ 238 U fractionation to evaluate leaching selectivity; and transport and modeling of both conservative and non-conservative tracers

  7. Reactive bromine in the low troposphere of Antarctica. Estimations at two research sites

    OpenAIRE

    Prados-Roman, Cristina; Gómez-Martín, Laura; Puentedura, Olga; Navarro-Comas, Mónica; Iglesias, Javier; Mingo, José Ramón; Pérez, Manuel; Ochoa, Héctor; Barlasina, María Elena; Carbajal, Gerardo; Yela, Margarita

    2018-01-01

    For decades, reactive halogen species (RHS) have been subject of detailed scientific research due to their influence on the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere and on the climate. From the RHS, those containing bromine are of particular interest in the polar troposphere as a result of their link to ozone depletion events (ODEs) and to the perturbation of the cycle of e.g. the toxic mercury. Given its remoteness and related limited accessibility compared to the Arctic region, the RHS in the A...

  8. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavar, A.R.; Sarmani, S.B.; Wood, A.K.; Fadzil, S.M.; Radir, M.H.; Khoo, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f fast ) and fast neutron flux (φ fast ) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f fast and subsequently φ fast were determined using the absolute method. The f fast ranged from 48 to 155, and the φ fast was found in the range 1.03x10 10 -4.89x10 10 n cm -2 s -1 . These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  9. Plants used for making recreational tea in Europe: a review based on specific research sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sõukand, Renata; Quave, Cassandra L; Pieroni, Andrea; Pardo-de-Santayana, Manuel; Tardío, Javier; Kalle, Raivo; Łuczaj, Łukasz; Svanberg, Ingvar; Kolosova, Valeria; Aceituno-Mata, Laura; Menendez-Baceta, Gorka; Kołodziejska-Degórska, Iwona; Pirożnikow, Ewa; Petkevičius, Rolandas; Hajdari, Avni; Mustafa, Behxhet

    2013-08-13

    This paper is a review of local plants used in water infusions as aromatic and refreshing hot beverages (recreational tea) consumed in food-related settings in Europe, and not for specific medicinal purposes. The reviewed 29 areas are located across Europe, covering the post-Soviet countries, eastern and Mediterranean Europe. Altogether, 142 taxa belonging to 99 genera and 40 families were reported. The most important families for making herbal tea in all research areas were Lamiaceae and Asteraceae, while Rosaceae was popular only in eastern and central Europe. With regards to botanical genera, the dominant taxa included Mentha, Tilia, Thymus, Origanum, Rubus and Matricaria. The clear favorite was Origanum vulgare L., mentioned in 61% of the regions. Regionally, other important taxa included Rubus idaeus L. in eastern Europe, Chamaemelum nobile (L.) All. in southern Europe and Rosa canina L. in central Europe. Future research on the pharmacological, nutritional and chemical properties of the plants most frequently used in the tea-making process is essential to ensure their safety and appropriateness for daily consumption. Moreover, regional studies dedicated to the study of local plants used for making recreational tea are important to improve our understanding of their selection criteria, cultural importance and perceived properties in Europe and abroad.

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark, 3Center for Global Health, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000. Odense .... BHP is a Danish-Guinean Demographic Surveillance Site with a study-area .... variables such as age groups, previous military duty, history of.

  11. Mobile robots in research and development programs at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.P.; Byrd, J.S.; Fisher, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is developing mobile robots for deployment in nuclear applications at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Teleoperated mobile vehicles have been successfully used for several onsite applications. Development work using two research vehicles is underway to demonstrate semi-autonomous intelligent expert robot system operation in process areas. A description of the mechanical equipment, control systems, and operating modes of these vehicles is presented, including the integration of onboard sensors. A control hierarchy that uses modest computational methods is being developed at SRL to allow vehicles to autonomously navigate and perform tasks in known environments, without the need for large computer systems. Knowledge-based expert systems are being evaluated to simplify operator control, to assist in navigation functions, and to analyze sensory information

  12. Mobile robots in research and development programs at the Savannah River site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.P.; Byrd, J.S.; Fisher, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Mobile robots for deployment in nuclear applications at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) have been developed. Teleoperated mobile vehicles have been successfully used for several onsite applications. Development work using two research vehicles is underway to demonstrate semi-autonomous intelligent expert robot system operation in process areas. A description of the mechanical equipment, control systems, and operating modes of these vehicles is presented, including the integration of onboard sensors. A control hierarchy that uses modest computational methods is being developed at SRL to allow vehicles to autonomously navigate and perform tasks in known environments, without the need for large computer systems. Knowledge-based expert systems are being evaluated to simplify operator control, to assist in navigation functions, and to analyze sensory information

  13. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavar, A.R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sarmani, S.B. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Wood, A.K. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Fadzil, S.M. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Radir, M.H. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Khoo, K.S., E-mail: khoo@ukm.m [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-05-15

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f{sub fast}) and fast neutron flux ({phi}{sub fast}) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f{sub fast} and subsequently {phi}{sub fast} were determined using the absolute method. The f{sub fast} ranged from 48 to 155, and the {phi}{sub fast} was found in the range 1.03x10{sup 10}-4.89x10{sup 10} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  14. Environmental monitoring at major U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration contractor sites: calendar year 1976. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    The purpose of this compilation is to present, in a central reference document, all of the individual annual reports summarizing the results of the environmental monitoring programs conducted at each of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) sites having a potential for environmental impact or which release a significant quantity of radioactivity or nonradioactive pollutants. Data on the levels of radioactivity and nonradioactive pollutants in effluents and the environs at each site are given, and effluent and environmental measurements and sampling results are evaluated in relation to the appropriate standards for environmental protection, including estimates of potential radiation exposures offsite. It is noteworthy that, in most cases, the potential offsite exposures are so low they cannot be determined by direct measurement methods but must be estimated by calculational techniques. All potential offsite exposures to members of the public from routine effluent releases in 1976 were less than 5 mrem/yr (i.e., less than one percent of the established radiation protection guidelines for exposure of the public). Additionally, the estimated collective man-rem dose potential to all members of the public within an 80 Km radius at all ERDA sites is less than .02 percent of the estimated man-rem dose due to natural and background environmental radiation

  15. Environmental monitoring at major U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration contractor sites: calendar year 1976. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    The purpose of this compilation is to present, in a central reference document, all of the individual annual reports summarizing the results of the environmental monitoring programs conducted at each of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) sites having a potential for environmental impact or which release a significant quantity of radioactivity or nonradioactive pollutants. Data on the levels of radioactivity and nonradioactive pollutants in effluents and the environs at each site are given, and effluent and environmental measurements and sampling results are evaluated in relation to the appropriate standards for environmental protection, including estimates of potential radiation exposures offsite. It is noteworthy that, in most cases, the potential offsite exposures are so low they cannot be determined by direct measurement methods but must be estimated by calculational techniques. All potential offsite exposures to members of the public from routine effluent releases in 1976 were less than 5 mrem/yr (i.e., less than one percent of the established radiation protection guidelines for exposure of the public). Additionally, the estimated collective man-rem dose potential to all members of the public within an 80 Km radius at all ERDA sites is less than .02 percent of the estimated man-rem dose due to natural and background environmental radiation

  16. Determination of the Sites with Conservation Priority in Research Forests of Yasouj University Based on Physiographic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zolfaghari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Regarding high economic and conservative values of Zagros forests, and livelihood dependency of local people these recourses, determination of sites with higher conservation index can help us to maintain biodiversity of these forests more efficiently. Therefore, 49 plots with 450 m2 in area accompanied by 1, 10 and 45 m2 subplots were taken as systematic random design in research forests of Yasouj University. The number of species in each plot and subplot was recorded. The conservation values for different physiographic regions of forest were calculated using integrative parameters such as the number of species per plot, number of rare species per plot, number of tree species per plot, Jaccards similarity coefficient and slope of species-log(area. Comparing the conservation index in different physiographic sites revealed that the areas located in the north, hills and lower altitudes can be considered for in situ conservation due to higher number of trees, rare species and total plant species, species-log (area slope and lower amount of Jaccard similarity coefficient. But, vegetative sites located in lower slopes and south, because of lower conservation index, can be used for other multipurpose forestry activities. Using this index for different forest areas can be potentially conducted for better conservation and management of Zagros forests.

  17. The National Criticality Experiments Research Center at the Device Assembly Facility, Nevada National Security Site: Status and Capabilities, Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, S.; Bess, J.; Werner, J.

    2011-01-01

    The National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) was officially opened on August 29, 2011. Located within the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), the NCERC has become a consolidation facility within the United States for critical configuration testing, particularly those involving highly enriched uranium (HEU). The DAF is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that is operated by the National Nuclear Security Agency/Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). User laboratories include the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Personnel bring their home lab qualifications and procedures with them to the DAF, such that non-site specific training need not be repeated to conduct work at DAF. The NNSS Management and Operating contractor is National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and the NNSS Safeguards and Security contractor is Wackenhut Services. The complete report provides an overview and status of the available laboratories and test bays at NCERC, available test materials and test support configurations, and test requirements and limitations for performing sub-critical and critical tests. The current summary provides a brief summary of the facility status and the method by which experiments may be introduced to NCERC.

  18. Environmental monitoring at major U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration contractor sites: calendar year 1976. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-08-01

    The purpose of this compilation is to present, in a central reference document, all of the individual annual reports summarizing the results of the environmental monitoring programs conducted at each of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) sites having a potential for environmental impact or which release a significant quantity of radioactivity or nonradioactive pollutants. Data on the levels of radioactivity and nonradioactive pollutants in effluents and the environs at each site are given, and effluent and environmental measurements and sampling results are evaluated in relation to the appropriate standards for environmental protection, including estimates of potential radiation exposures offsite. It is noteworthy that, in most cases, the potential offsite exposures are so low they cannot be determined by direct measurement methods but must be estimated by calculational techniques. All potential offsite exposures to members of the public from routine effluent releases in 1976 were less than 5 mrem/yr (i.e., less than one percent of the established radiation protection guidelines for exposure of the public). Additionally, the estimated collective man-rem dose potential to all members of the public within an 80 Km radius at all ERDA sites is less than .02 percent of the estimated man-rem dose due to natural and background environmental radiation.

  19. Mont Terri rock laboratory, 20 years of research: introduction, site characteristics and overview of experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, P.; Bernier, F.; Birkholzer, J.

    2017-01-01

    Geologic repositories for radioactive waste are designed as multi-barrier disposal systems that perform a number of functions including the long-term isolation and containment of waste from the human environment, and the attenuation of radionuclides released to the subsurface. The rock laboratory at Mont Terri (canton Jura, Switzerland) in the Opalinus Clay plays an important role in the development of such repositories. The experimental results gained in the last 20 years are used to study the possible evolution of a repository and investigate processes closely related to the safety functions of a repository hosted in a clay rock. At the same time, these experiments have increased our general knowledge of the complex behaviour of argillaceous formations in response to coupled hydrological, mechanical, thermal, chemical, and biological processes. After presenting the geological setting in and around the Mont Terri rock laboratory and an overview of the mineralogy and key properties of the Opalinus Clay, we give a brief overview of the key experiments that are described in more detail in the following research papers to this Special Issue of the Swiss Journal of Geosciences. These experiments aim to characterise the Opalinus Clay and estimate safety-relevant parameters, test procedures, and technologies for repository construction and waste emplacement. Other aspects covered are: bentonite buffer emplacement, high-pH concrete-clay interaction experiments, anaerobic steel corrosion with hydrogen formation, depletion of hydrogen by microbial activity, and finally, release of radionuclides into the bentonite buffer and the Opalinus Clay barrier. In the case of a spent fuel/high-level waste repository, the time considered in performance assessment for repository evolution is generally 1 million years, starting with a transient phase over the first 10,000 years and followed by an equilibrium phase. Experiments dealing with initial conditions, construction, and waste

  20. Mont Terri rock laboratory, 20 years of research: introduction, site characteristics and overview of experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, P. [Swisstopo, Federal Office of Topography, Wabern (Switzerland); Bernier, F. [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control FANC, Brussels (Belgium); Birkholzer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley (United States); and others

    2017-04-15

    Geologic repositories for radioactive waste are designed as multi-barrier disposal systems that perform a number of functions including the long-term isolation and containment of waste from the human environment, and the attenuation of radionuclides released to the subsurface. The rock laboratory at Mont Terri (canton Jura, Switzerland) in the Opalinus Clay plays an important role in the development of such repositories. The experimental results gained in the last 20 years are used to study the possible evolution of a repository and investigate processes closely related to the safety functions of a repository hosted in a clay rock. At the same time, these experiments have increased our general knowledge of the complex behaviour of argillaceous formations in response to coupled hydrological, mechanical, thermal, chemical, and biological processes. After presenting the geological setting in and around the Mont Terri rock laboratory and an overview of the mineralogy and key properties of the Opalinus Clay, we give a brief overview of the key experiments that are described in more detail in the following research papers to this Special Issue of the Swiss Journal of Geosciences. These experiments aim to characterise the Opalinus Clay and estimate safety-relevant parameters, test procedures, and technologies for repository construction and waste emplacement. Other aspects covered are: bentonite buffer emplacement, high-pH concrete-clay interaction experiments, anaerobic steel corrosion with hydrogen formation, depletion of hydrogen by microbial activity, and finally, release of radionuclides into the bentonite buffer and the Opalinus Clay barrier. In the case of a spent fuel/high-level waste repository, the time considered in performance assessment for repository evolution is generally 1 million years, starting with a transient phase over the first 10,000 years and followed by an equilibrium phase. Experiments dealing with initial conditions, construction, and waste

  1. Climatic Characteristics of the Subtropical Mountainous Cloud Forest at the Yuanyang Lake Long-Term Ecological Research Site, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ling Lai

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the climatic characteristics in a subtropical mountainous cloud forest at the Yuanyang Lake long-term ecological research site, weather data collected from January 1994 to December 2004 were analyzed in the present study. The obvious seasonal changes in climatic factors were observed at this site. The annual mean air temperature was 12.7°C. The lowest temperature was recorded in February (monthly mean 5.9°C, and the highest one was taken in July (monthly mean 18.1°C. Winter featured light rain with a prolonged occurrence of fog, resulting in a large reduction of radiation. In summer, fog occurred once in the early morning and the other time from afternoon to evening. The latter one was associated with the wind direction changes and usually accompanied with short moderate to heavy convective rain. Consequently the photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD was high in the morning but reduced drastically in the afternoon. Typhoons occurred in the summer had contributed to 37% of the annual rainfall, usually resulting in torrential rain events and sharp increases in the water level of this lake. As a matter of fact, perhumid environment of this site was attributed to abundant rainfall (mean annual precipitation 3396 mm and high frequency (up to 40% of foggy time. Such conditions would reduce the intensity of solar radiation and PPFD. The average annual solar radiation at the site was 2475 MJ m-2, and annual PPFD was 5713 mol m-2. The average degree of reduction of PPFD under foggy condition was up to 88%. Such climatic characteristics are suggested to constrain the growth of plants and play an important role in competition among plant species in this cloud forest. It is considered that the distinct seasonal fluctuation in environmental factors, perhumid and dim light conditions are the most distinguished characteristics of this subtropical mountainous cloud forest ecosystem.

  2. Porewater and groundwater geochemistry at the Down Ampney fault research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, R.; Ross, C.A.M.; Cave, M.R.; Green, K.A.; Reeder, S.; Entwisle, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    This work is performed under contract with the Commission of the European Communities in the framework of its research programme on Management and Storage of Radioactive Wastes. The importance of faults in mudrocks as groundwater conduits, and as a control on solute transport, was assessed in a Jurassic mudrock, siltstone and limestone sequence at Down Ampney, Gloucestershire. Samples were taken from a borehole array crossing an east-west trending fault, of approximately 48 m northerly downthrow. Squeezing mudrock samples yielded 18.1 to 34.5% of total porewater, which was analyzed for major/trace elements and stable O/H isotope compositions. Fault-zone porewaters have greatly increased sulphate concentrations relative to those remote from the fault. Porewater cation concentrations are related to pH, which is correlated with sulphate concentrations, probably controlled by sulphide oxidation. Control of cation concentrations is largely by pH-dependent carbonate dissolution and cation exchange reactions. Porewater C1 and Br concentrations increase downwards, but at twice the rate away from the fault as near the fault, suggesting that although meteoric waters penetrate throughout the area, they are preferentially conducted by the fault. Comparisons are made between pore- and groundwater samples from each side of the fault, and from the fault zone. Pore- and groundwater compositions are not simply related, except in the case of sulphate which, in the fault zone, is more diluted in groundwaters. 14 refs. 20 figs., 17 tabs

  3. Hanford Site protective isolation surface barrier: Taking research and development to engineered application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.; Wing, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the Protective Isolation Surface Barrier has been an ongoing program since 1985. This development effort has focused on several technical areas. These technical areas include water infiltration, biointrusion, human intrusion, erosion/deposition, physical stability, barrier materials, computer modeling, long-term climate effects, natural analogs, and barrier design. This paper briefly reviews the results of the research and development in the technical areas and then explains how the results of this work have influenced the design features of the prototype barrier. A good example of this is to explain how the type and depth of the soil layer used in the barrier is related to water infiltration, biointrusion, modeling, climate, analogs, and barrier materials. Another good example is to explain the relationship of the barrier sideslopes (basalt riprap and native soil) with human intrusion, biointrusion, barrier materials, and barrier design. In general, the design features of the prototype barrier will be explained in terms of the results of the testing and development program. After the basis for prototype barrier design has been established, the paper will close by reviewing the construction of the prototype barrier, sharing the lessons learned during construction, and explaining the ongoing testing and monitoring program which will determine the success or failure of this barrier concept and the need for additional design modifications

  4. The application of isotopic technique to the hydrogeological condition research in a nuclear waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Feng; Wang Zhiming; Li Sen

    1995-01-01

    Through the research on chemical compositions of various kinds of ground water, hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes and radioactive isotopes in ground water in the study area, the shallow underground water (pore water) and the weathering fissure water in bedrock are distinguished. It is determined that the recharge area of ground water is the Paiyashan area. The main direction for the surface water and ground water runoff is SE-striking, in the meantime the lateral migration of ground water exists and recharges the shallow water and surface water in the form of springs. Based on the decay calculation of tritium and compared with the data from Hongkong observation station, the relative ages of water in the area have been established and they are divided into 3 age groups: (1) ground water with the shortest runoff time, having tritium concentration identical to that of recent meteoric water; (2) shallow ground water with the relative age of about 20 years; (3) low tritium water with the relative age of more than 30 years

  5. Subsurface multidisciplinary research results at ICTJA-CSIC downhole lab and test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Crespo, Jose; Salvany, Josep Maria; Teixidó, Teresa

    2017-04-01

    Two scientific boreholes, Almera-1 and Almera-2 were drilled in the Barcelona University campus area in 2011. The main purpose for this drilling was to create a new geophysical logging and downhole monitoring research facility and infrastructure. We present results obtained in the frame of multidisciplinary studies and experiments carried out since 2011 at the ICTJA "Borehole Geophysical Logging Lab - Scientific Boreholes Almera" downhole lab facilities. First results obtained from the scientific drilling, coring and logging allowed us to characterize the urban subsurface geology and hydrology adjacent to the Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera (ICTJA-CSIC) in Barcelona. The subsurface geology and structural picture has been completed with recent geophysical studies and monitoring results. The upper section of Almera-1 214m deep hole was cased with PVC after drilling and after the logging operations. An open hole interval was left from 112m to TD (Paleozoic section). Almera-2 drilling reached 46m and was cased also with PVC to 44m. Since completion of the drilling in 2011, both Almera-1 and Almera-2 have been extensively used for research purposes, tests, training, hydrological and geophysical monitoring. A complete set of geophysical logging measurements and borehole oriented images were acquired in open hole mode of the entire Almera-1 section. Open hole measurements included acoustic and optical imaging, spectral natural gamma ray, full wave acoustic logging, magnetic susceptibility, hydrochemical-temperature logs and fluid sampling. Through casing (PVC casing) measurements included spectral gamma ray logging, full wave sonic and acoustic televiewer. A Quaternary to Paleozoic section was characterized based on the geophysical logging and borehole images interpretation and also on the complete set of (wireline) cores of the entire section. Sample availability was intended for geological macro and micro-facies detailed characterization, mineralogical and

  6. From Site Characterization through Safe and Successful CO2 Injection Operation to Post-injection Monitoring and Site Closure - Closing the Full Life Cycle Research at the Ketzin Pilot Site, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Initiated in 2004, the Ketzin pilot site near Berlin, Germany, was the first European onshore storage project for research and development on geological CO2 storage. After comprehensive site characterization the site infrastructure was build comprising three deep wells and the injection facility including pumps and storage tanks. The operational CO2 injection period started in June 2008 and ended in August 2013 when the site entered the post-injection closure period. During these five years, a total amount of 67 kt of CO2 was safely injected into an Upper Triassic saline sandstone aquifer at a depth of 630 m - 650 m. In fall 2013, the first observation well was partially plugged in the reservoir section with CO2 resistant cement; full abandonment of this well finished in 2015 after roughly 2 years of cement plug monitoring. Abandonment of the remaining wells will be finished by summer 2017 and hand-over of liability to the competent authority is scheduled for end of 2017. The CO2 injected was mainly of food grade quality (purity > 99.9%). In addition, 1.5 kt of CO2 from the oxyfuel pilot capture facility "Schwarze Pumpe" (purity > 99.7%) was injected in 2011. The injection period terminated with a CO2-N2 co-injection experiment of 650 t of a 95% CO2/5% N2 mixture in summer 2013 to study the effects of impurities in the CO2 stream on the injection operation. During regular operation, the CO2 was pre-heated on-site to 40°C prior to injection to ensure a single-phase injection process and avoid any phase transition or transient states within the injection facility or the reservoir. Between March and July 2013, just prior to the CO2-N2 co-injection experiment, the injection temperature was stepwise decreased down to 10°C within a "cold-injection" experiment to study the effects of two-phase injection conditions. During injection operation, the combination of different geochemical and geophysical monitoring methods enabled detection and mapping of the spatial and

  7. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 2, Part A: Chapters 3, 4, and 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1--5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 575 refs., 84 figs., 68 tabs.

  8. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 4, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.0 through 8.3.1.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 74 figs., 32 tabs.

  9. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 2, Part A: Chapters 3, 4, and 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1--5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE's Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 575 refs., 84 figs., 68 tabs

  10. Proyecto Costa Escondida: Interdisciplinary Research at the Ancient Maya Port Site of Vista Alegre, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, J.; Rissolo, D.; Beddows, P. A.; Goodman, B.; Smith, D.

    2013-05-01

    shoreline and possible terrestrial features during some of the occupational phases of Vista Alegre are most likely drowned today. The isotope record indicates large changes in the proportion of freshwater and high evaporation rates have occurred throughout the site's history. Superposition of these seasonal cycles on the long-term rise in sea level means that water may have been much more readily accessible to the Maya that inhabited this site than it is today. By correlating the environmental data with the archaeological evidence from Vista Alegre, our research sheds light on the varying adaptive strategies employed by these coastal inhabitants. By carefully correlating changing paleoenvironmental data with broader sociopolitical changes, we are in a strong position to address the challenges faced, and opportunities pursued, by these coastal peoples in a holistic manner.

  11. Status of Activities on Rehabilitation Of Radioactively Contaminated Facilities and the Site of Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V. G.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Melkov, E. S; Ryazantsev, E. P.; Dikarev, V. S.; Gorodetsky, G. G.; Zverkov, Yu. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Kuznetsova, T. I.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the program, the status, and the course of activities on rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the territory of temporary radioactive waste (radwaste) disposal at the Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'' (RRC KI) in Moscow as performed in 2001-2002. The accumulation of significant amounts of radwaste at RRC KI territory is shown to be the inevitable result of Institute's activity performed in the days of former USSR nuclear weapons project and multiple initial nuclear power projects (performed from 1950's to early 1970's). A characterization of RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is given. Described is the system of radiation control and monitoring as implemented on this site. A potential hazard of adverse impacts on the environment and population of the nearby housing area is noted, which is due to possible spread of the radioactive plume by subsoil waters. A description of the concept and project of the RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is presented. Specific nature of the activities planned and performed stems from the nearness of housing area. This paper describes main stages of the planned activities for rehabilitation, their expected terms and sources of funding, as well as current status of the project advancement. Outlined are the problems faced in the performance and planning of works. The latter include: diagnostics of the concrete-grouted repositories, dust-suppression technologies, packaging of the fragmented ILW and HLW, soil clean-up, radioactive plume spread prevention, broad radiation monitoring of the work zone and environment in the performance of rehabilitation works. Noted is the intention of RRC KI to establish cooperation with foreign, first of all, the U.S. partners for the solution of problems mentioned above

  12. Transforming an Exposure trip to Botanical Expedition: Introducing Ecological Research thru Exposure Trip in an Eco-tourism Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo C. Lunar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available – Fieldtrips can be considered as one of the three avenues through which science can be taught - through formal classroom teaching, practical work and field trips. An exposure trip at Bangkong Kahoy Valley Field Study Center was arranged for a class of BS Biology and BS Education students enrolled in Ecology Course. This approach purposefully transformed the usual exposure trip from being a casual site visit into a focused and productive learning experience. This transformation from exposure trip to a botanical expedition has exceeded the initial activity goals. Rather than a day off from learning, the time spent at the study center has been a meaningful opportunity to engage students in an active ecological research project while delivering valuable science content. Employing the descriptive survey design, the learning gains of the students were assessed and students were directed to do a guided reflection writing using the ORID Model of Focused Conversation. The learning gains and reflections of the students confirmed that students can collaboratively develop focused research questions, make meaning from a variety of sources, carry out a vegetation analysis and conduct surveys on socio-economic status, plant resource utilization and ecotourism assessment of the host community. As students prepared for their trip and synthesized their learning afterward, they were able to come up with very impressive and scientifically sound research outputs.

  13. Assessing the potential for isotopic partitioning of soil respiration at research sites in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risk, D.; Kellman, L.; Black, M. [Saint Francis Xavier Univ., Antigonish, NS (Canada). Environmental Sciences Research Centre

    2005-07-01

    The stable isotope ratios of carbon and oxygen in different tree species were studied with respect to different tissues, at different points within the tree, through soil profiles and in carbon dioxide respired from laboratory incubations. Although isotopic methods of partitioning autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration have been used with some success, stable isotopic methods are complicated by the fact that carbon isotope fractionations are small in natural systems, and radiocarbon techniques are time and equipment intensive. Studies that use isotopic analysis opportunistically, such as in C3/C4 transitional systems, have proven to be the most successful. Previously unexploited opportunities have the potential to be used for stable isotope-based partitioning in natural systems if the autotrophic/heterotrophic process distribution in the profile is well understand and if there is good process resolution and concurrent analyses using physical partitioning methods such as trenches. This study explored the different paths of opportunity in terms of background isotopic characterization that is being carried out for an existing network of carbon flux research sites in eastern Nova Scotia and in western Newfoundland. The new continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS) at the Environmental Earth Sciences Laboratory at St. Francis Xavier University was used for the isotopic analyses. The isotopic information will be evaluated for potential partitioning opportunities, considering the combination of approaches that will give the best chances of success. Isotopic partitioning trials will take place at suitable sites.

  14. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Plant/site selection and data collection (Project I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.

    1981-07-01

    Project I of Phase I of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) comprised two parts: the selection of a representative nuclear power plant/site for study in Phase I and the collection of data needed by the other SSMRP projects. Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in Zion, Illinois, was selected for the SSMRP Phase I studies. Unit 1 of the Zion plant has been validated as a good choice for the Phase I study plant. Although no single nuclear power plant can represent all such plants equally well, selection criteria were developed to maximize the generic implications of Phase I of the SSMRP. On the basis of the selection criteria, the Zion plant and its site were found to be reasonably representative of operating and future plants with regard to its nuclear steam supply system; the type of containment structure (prestressed concrete); its electrical capacity (1100 MWe); its location (the Midwest); the peak seismic acceleration used for design (0.17g); and the properties of the underlying soil (the low-strain shear-wave velocity is 1650 ft/s in a 50- to 100-ft-thick layer of soil overlying sedimentary bedrock). (author)

  15. Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

    2013-07-01

    The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraqs Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing: A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues, recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, and descriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

  16. Contaminated Sites in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Sites contaminated by hazardous materials or wastes. These sites are those administered by the Contaminated Sites Section of Iowa DNR. Many are sites which are...

  17. Vertical fogwater flux measurements above an elevated forest canopy at the Lägeren research site, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, Reto; Bützberger, Patrick; Eugster, Werner

    During the winter of 2001/2002 wet and occult deposition measurements were performed at the Lägeren research site ( 690 m a.s.l.) in Switzerland. Two types of fog were observed: radiation fog (RF) and fog associated with atmospheric instabilities (FAI). The deposition measurements were performed above the forest canopy on a 45 m high tower. Occult deposition was measured by means of the eddy covariance method. Due to the large differences of microphysical properties of the two fog types, the liquid water fluxes were much higher (6.9 mg m -2 s-1) during RF than during FAI (0.57 mg m -2 s-1) . Fogwater concentrations were considerably enhanced during RF compared with FAI. The comparison of fog and rain revealed that fogwater nutrient concentrations were 3-66 times larger than concentrations in precipitation. The considerably larger water fluxes and nutrient concentrations of RF resulted in much higher nutrient deposition compared with FAI. In winter when RF was quite frequent, occult deposition was the dominant pathway for nitrate and ammonium deposition. Daily fluxes of total inorganic nitrogen were 1.89 mg m -2 d-1 by occult and 1.01 mg m -2 d-1 by wet deposition. The estimated contribution of occult deposition to total annual nitrogen input was 16.4% or 4.3 kg N ha -1 yr-1, and wet deposition contributed 26.5% ( 6.9 kg N ha -1 yr-1) . As a consequence, critical loads of annual N-input were exceeded, resulting in a significant over-fertilization at the Lägeren site.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Mobile Genetic Elements from Microbial Assemblages Obtained from the Field Research Center Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Sobecky; Cassie Hodges; Kerri Lafferty; Mike Humphreys; Melanie Raimondo; Kristin Tuttle; Tamar Barkay

    2004-03-17

    Considerable knowledge has been gained from the intensive study of a relatively limited group of bacterial plasmids. Recent efforts have begun to focus on the characterization of, at the molecular level, plasmid populations and associated mobile genetic elements (e.g., transposons, integrons) occurring in a wider range of aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Surprisingly, however, little information is available regarding the incidence and distribution of mobile genetic elements extant in contaminated subsurface environments. Such studies will provide greater knowledge on the ecology of plasmids and their contributions to the genetic plasticity (and adaptation) of naturally occurring subsurface microbial communities. We requested soil cores from the DOE NABIR Field Research Center (FRC) located on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The cores, received in February 2003, were sampled from four areas on the Oak Ridge Site: Area 1, Area 2, Area 3 (representing contaminated subsurface locales) and the background reference sites. The average core length (24 in) was subdivided into three profiles and soil pH and moisture content were determined. Uranium concentration was also determined in bulk samples. Replicate aliquots were fixed for total cell counts and for bacterial isolation. Four different isolation media were used to culture aerobic and facultative microbes from these four study areas. Colony forming units ranged from a minimum of 100 per gram soil to a maximum of 10,000 irrespective of media composition used. The vast majority of cultured subsurface isolates were gram-positive isolates and plasmid characterization was conducted per methods routinely used in the Sobecky laboratory. The percentage of plasmid incidence ranged from 10% to 60% of all isolates tested. This frequency appears to be somewhat higher than the incidence of plasmids we have observed in other habitats and we are increasing the number of isolates screened to confirm this observation. We are also

  19. Exploration of the impacts of distributed-site Research Experiences for Undergraduates using pre-/post- student interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, H.; Hubenthal, M.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The benefits for student participants of undergraduate research opportunities have been well documented. However, advancements in information and communications technologies (ICT) and cultural shifts around online education and virtual peer-to-peer interaction have lead to new models in which to structure such experiences. Currently, these ICT-enabled Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) programs connect geographically distributed interns in supportive e-learning communities while maintaining a traditional local mentoring arrangement. To document and explore the effects of distributed REU Sites in more depth, six interns from such a program, the Incorporated Research Institution for Seismology (IRIS) REU, were selected at random and asked to be interviewed about the REU experience. The primary targets of the interviews are to understand the mentor/mentee relationships, feeling of support and development and value of near-peer and far-peer relationships throughout their internship in a distributed REU program, and whether they receive the training necessary to gain confidence as a researcher. We also examine the various communication technologies as well as best practices and strategies that can increase intern connectedness. Pre-internship interviews were conducted in-person at the start of the centralized internship orientation week, while post-internship interviews were virtual (e.g. video chat with Skype or Google Hangout). These semi-structured interviews have full audio recordings and subsequent transcriptions. An additional, virtual follow-up interview will be conducted next spring after the interns have an opportunity to attend and present their research at a national conference (e.g., AGU). Interview material will be analyzed through a process of coding, sorting, local integration, and inclusive integration. Results will also be triangulated with pre- and post- survey data both from participants and other survey data from previous years of the IRIS

  20. Environmental Impacts of Petroleum Production: Initial Results from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research Sites, Osage County, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Otton, James K.

    2003-01-01

    Exploration for and production of petroleum have caused major detrimental impacts to soils, surface and ground waters, and the local ecosystems in the United States. These impacts arise primarily from the improper disposal of large volumes of saline water produced with oil and gas, from accidental hydrocarbon and produced water releases, and from abandoned oil wells that were not correctly sealed. It is important to understand the long-term and short-term effects of produced water and hydrocarbon releases from these sites in order to develop risk-based remediation plans. Remediation is particularly needed in aging and depleted fields where land use is changing from petroleum production to residential, agricultural or recreational uses. About 20 scientists from the USGS and other governmental agencies and academia are involved in a multidisciplinary investigation to study the transport, fate, and natural attenuation of inorganic salts, trace metals, organic compounds and radionuclides present in produced water, and their impacts at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) 'A' and 'B' sites, located on the Osage Reservation in Osage County, Oklahoma. Stakeholders in the project include the Osage Nation, which holds the mineral rights, the Bureau of Indian Affairs with trust responsibility, and the Army Corps of Engineers, which owns the surface rights at these sites and manages adjacent Skiatook Lake. The 4250-hectare Skiatook Lake provides drinking water to local Tulsa suburban communities and a rural water district, and offers recreational fishing and boating opportunities to tens of thousands of visitors each year. Approximately 1.5 and 1.0 hectare of land at the OSPER 'A' (depleted Lester lease) and 'B' (active Branstetter lease) sites, respectively, are affected by salt scarring, tree kills, soil salinization and brine and petroleum contamination due to the leakage of produced water and associated hydrocarbons from brine pits and accidental

  1. Draft environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received on the draft EA. The Yucca Mountain site is located in the Great Basin, one of five distinct geohydrologic settings that are being considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. Furthermore, having performed a comparative evaluation of the five sites proposed for nomination, the DOE has determined that the Yucca Mountain site is one of three sites preferred for site characterization

  2. Calculating buoy response for a wave energy converter—A comparison of two computational methods and experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Sjökvist

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available When designing a wave power plant, reliable and fast simulation tools are required. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD software provides high accuracy but with a very high computational cost, and in operational, moderate sea states, linear potential flow theories may be sufficient to model the hydrodynamics. In this paper, a model is built in COMSOL Multiphysics to solve for the hydrodynamic parameters of a point-absorbing wave energy device. The results are compared with a linear model where the hydrodynamical parameters are computed using WAMIT, and to experimental results from the Lysekil research site. The agreement with experimental data is good for both numerical models.

  3. The petrography of the Jurassic core from the Harwell research site. Part 1: Kimmeridge Clay, Corallian Beds and Oxford Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.

    1983-06-01

    Detailed examination by mineralogical and petrological techniques has enabled a detailed characterisation of the lithologies of the Oxford Clay, Corallian Beds and the Kimmeridge Clay beneath the Harwell Research Site. Information obtained has revealed the nature of the bulk mineralogy, pore-types, pore-surface mineralogy and post-depositional alteration of the rocks. Diagenesis has played an important part in determining the mineralogy, porosity and fabric of the rocks and has had the greatest variation of effects in the Corallian Beds, determining the phases now in contact with groundwater. It is these authigenic phases that are of key interest in assessing the behaviour of radionuclides which may be released into the local groundwater systems. The importance of the different pore-types characterised during this investigation and of the mineral phases lining these potential pathways for groundwater movement are discussed in detail at the end of this report. Diagenesis has reduced primary porosity in many of the Corallian rocks by calcite precipitation. In such rocks where a cohesive cement is present, groundwater flow must occur along large-scale fractures and more slowly along intercrystalline grain-boundary cracks. (author)

  4. Environmental monitoring at major U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration contractor sites: calendar year 1975. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring conducted during 1975 in the vicinity of the Beaver Valley Power Station and the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The environmental monitoring program consists of onsite sampling of water, gaseous, and air effluents, as well as offsite monitoring of water, air, soil, and radiation levels in the vicinity of the site. The report discusses releases of small quantities of radioactivity to the Ohio River from the Shippingport Atomic Power Station during 1975. The Beaver Valley Power Station was under construction during the report year, and therefore, made no radioactive releases. Additional analyses of the effluent from the reactor portion of Shippingport were performed to ensure that the water quality standards specified by Energy Research and Development Administration Manual Chapter 0510 and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania have been met. The results of environmental monitoring described by this report show that Shippingport operations and the pre-operational phase of the Beaver Valley Power Station have not adversely affected the surrounding environment

  5. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-21

    Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  6. Bibliography of publications related to Nevada-sponsored research of the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository site through 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.

    1994-12-01

    Since 1985, the State of Nevada has sponsored academic/private sector research into various health, safety, and environmental issues identified with the Yucca Mountain site. This research has been documented in scientific peer-reviewed literature, conferences, and workshops, as well as numerous state-sponsored University thesis and dissertation programs. This document is a bibliography of the scientific articles, manuscripts, theses, dissertations, conference symposium abstracts, and meeting presentations produced as a result of state-sponsored research

  7. State of Nevada comments on the US Department of Energy consultation draft site characterization plan, Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    The SCPCD has identified a number of key issues that need to be addressed for characterization of the Yucca Mountain site. A variety of complex experiments have been proposed in an attempt to address these issues. Although a lot of time, money and effort has been spent on characterizing the Yucca Mountain area to date, there are still many unresolved technical issues. Since many of the experiments proposed in the SCPCD have never been done in an unsaturated fractured media, it is impossible to tell if they will be successful. Results of these experiments may indicate that new test designs or data collection procedures are needed to address the issues. Our approach to reviewing the SCPCD has been to first identify key technical issues which have not been resolved and to make specific comments associated with the hydrologic experiments proposed

  8. A prospective 2-site parallel intervention trial of a research-based film to increase exercise amongst older hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Pia; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Miller, Karen-Lee; Brooks, Dina; Colobong, Romeo; Parsons, Trisha; Jassal, Sarbjit Vanita; Thomas, Alison; Binns, Malcolm; Naglie, Gary

    2017-01-26

    Evidence suggests that exercise training for hemodialysis patients positively improves morbidity and mortality outcomes, yet exercise programs remain rare and are not systematically incorporated into care. We developed a research-based film, Fit for Dialysis, designed to introduce, motivate, and sustain exercise for wellness amongst older hemodialysis patients, and exercise counseling and support by nephrologists, nurses, and family caregivers. The objective of this clinical trial is to determine whether and in what ways Fit for Dialysis improves outcomes and influences knowledge/attitudes regarding the importance of exercise for wellness in the context of end-stage renal disease. This 2-site parallel intervention trial will recruit 60 older hemodialysis patients from two urban hospitals. The trial will compare the film + a 16-week exercise program in one hospital, with a 16-week exercise-only program in another hospital. Physical fitness and activity measures will be performed at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks, and 12 weeks after the end of the program. These include the 2-min Walk Test, Grip Strength, Duke Activity Status Index, and the Timed Up-and-Go Test, as well as wearing a pedometer for one week. Throughout the 16-week exercise program, and at 12 weeks after, we will record patients' exercise using the Godin Leisure-time Exercise Questionnaire. Patients will also keep a diary of the exercise that they do at home on non-dialysis days. Qualitative interviews, conducted at baseline, 8, and 16 weeks, will explore the impact of Fit for Dialysis on the knowledge/attitudes of patients, family caregivers, and nephrology staff regarding exercise for wellness, and in what ways the film is effective in educating, motivating, or sustaining patient exercise during dialysis, at home, and in the community. This research will determine for whom Fit for Dialysis is effective, why, and under what conditions. If Fit for Dialysis is proven beneficial to patients, nephrology

  9. Site-directed subsurface environmental initiative: Five year summary and plan for fundamental research in subsoils and in groundwater, FY 1989-FY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The overall goal of this research initiative is to develop the necessary scientific basis for resolution of key technical obstacles to defining and remediating contamination at DOE and other waste sites. To accomplish this goal, the resouces of the national laboratories, universities, and DOE sites will be fully utilized to develop and demonstrate improved, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable techniques for predicting the behavior of contaminants and reducing their concentrations in ground water. This document is a preliminary plan to set general research directions for a program extending into the 1990s. The needs and milestones identified in this plan may change with additional guidance from DOE sites. Promising research opportunities will be identified as part of national laboratory submissions of preliminary proposals

  10. Economics of nuclear desalination: New developments and site specific studies. Final results of a coordinated research project 2002-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    Following successive General Conference Resolutions since the mid-eighties, the IAEA has continued to promote nuclear desalination and has been providing its Member States with the publication of guidebooks, technical documents and computer programs on nuclear desalination as well as the provision of technical assistance through the framework of technical cooperation programs. In 1997, the IAEA launched the International Nuclear Desalination Advisory Group (INDAG), with well known experts from 16 participating Member States. INDAG has not only been successful in its advisory role in all aspects dealing with nuclear desalination, but has also been extremely efficient in promoting exchange of information and creating contacts between technology providers and its end-users. A number of technical cooperation projects have assessed the feasibility of particular nuclear desalination projects. Under the IAEA inter-regional technical cooperation (TC) framework, several international collaboration activities were completed. For example: between China and Morocco; the Republic of Korea and Indonesia; France and Tunisia; and in Pakistan. TC national projects for the United Arab Emirates, Algeria and Jordan, for the techno-economic feasibility studies of nuclear desalination plants, are currently being considered. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP1) on Optimization of the Coupling of Nuclear Reactors and Desalination Systems was completed in 2003 with the participation of 11 Member States. The results of the CRP were published as IAEA-TECDOC-1444 (2005). Following recommendations from INDAG, a second CRP (CRP2) on Economic Research on, and Assessment of, Selected Nuclear Desalination Projects and Case Studies with the participation of ten Member States. It was started in 2002 and was completed in 2006. The scope of CRP2 was to enable the Member States to dispose of precise and well validated methods for desalination cost evaluations and to contribute to the IAEA's efforts

  11. Investigating effects of near fault rupture directivity on seismic hazard assessment of the site of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepanloo, Kamran; Saberi, Reza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alinejad, Majid [Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazarchi, Ehsan [Tabriz Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    It is estimated that the occurrence of a major-earthquake in Tehran, Iran, which is not far-fetched, would face the country with a huge amount of collapsed structures, economical losses and fatalities. The issue becomes more important while the site of interest is attributed to the nuclear facilities and any under-estimation in predicting the design ground motion may cause a real disaster. In this study, using calculations coded in MATLAB, PSHA was conducted for the site of TRR. It was concluded that most of the hazard for considered site in a 10000-year period comes from distances lower than 20 km and considering rupture directivity effects of the North Tehran fault, as the nearest seismicity source to considered site, using narrowband method affected the response spectrum significantly. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate the near fault rupture directivity effects into the higher levels of seismic hazard assessment attributed to important sites.

  12. Investigating effects of near fault rupture directivity on seismic hazard assessment of the site of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepanloo, Kamran; Saberi, Reza; Alinejad, Majid; Bazarchi, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    It is estimated that the occurrence of a major-earthquake in Tehran, Iran, which is not far-fetched, would face the country with a huge amount of collapsed structures, economical losses and fatalities. The issue becomes more important while the site of interest is attributed to the nuclear facilities and any under-estimation in predicting the design ground motion may cause a real disaster. In this study, using calculations coded in MATLAB, PSHA was conducted for the site of TRR. It was concluded that most of the hazard for considered site in a 10000-year period comes from distances lower than 20 km and considering rupture directivity effects of the North Tehran fault, as the nearest seismicity source to considered site, using narrowband method affected the response spectrum significantly. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate the near fault rupture directivity effects into the higher levels of seismic hazard assessment attributed to important sites.

  13. A role for INDEPTH Asian sites in translating research to action for non-communicable disease prevention and control: a case study from Ballabgarh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Anand; Nongkynrih, Baridalyne; Kapoor, Suresh Kumar; Pandav, Chandrakant

    2009-09-28

    The International Network of field sites with continuous Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health (INDEPTH) has 34 Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in 17 different low and middle-income countries. Of these, 23 sites are in Africa, 10 sites are in Asia, and one in Oceania. The INDEPTH HDSS sites in Asia identified chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as a neglected area of attention. As a first step, they conducted NCD risk factor surveys within nine sites in five countries. These sites are now looking to broaden the agenda of research on NCDs using the baseline data to inform policy and practice. A conceptual framework for translating research into action for NCDs at INDEPTH sites was developed. This had five steps - assess the problem, understand the nature of the problem, evaluate different interventions in research mode, implement evidence-based interventions in programme mode, and finally, share knowledge and provide leadership to communities and countries. Ballabgarh HDSS site in India has successfully adopted these steps and is used as a case study to demonstrate how this progress was achieved and what factors were responsible for a successful outcome. Most of the HDSS sites are in the second step of the process of translating research to action (understand the problem). The conduct of NCD risk factor surveys has enabled an assessment of the burden of NCD risk together with determinants in order to understand the burden at the population level. The experience from Ballabgarh HDSS exemplifies that the following steps - pilot testing the interventions, implementing activities in programme mode, and finally, share knowledge and provide leadership - are also possible in rural settings in low-income countries. The critical success factors identified were involvement of a premier medical institution, pre-existing links to policy makers and programme managers, strong commitment of the HDSS team and adequate human resource capacity

  14. Site characterization techniques used in environmental restoration activities. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this CRP was to promote the exchange of information on the practical experience gained by the Member States in characterization of radioactively contaminated sites. Special emphasis was placed on the development of methods and techniques for the optimization of radiological characterization. In particular, the scope included: definition of a strategy for site characterization; sampling and measurement techniques; data management, including statistical analysis and deterministic radionuclide migration modelling; and post-cleanup radiological surveys and assurance of compliance with release criteria

  15. Site characterization techniques used in environmental restoration activities. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this CRP was to promote the exchange of information on the practical experience gained by the Member States in characterization of radioactively contaminated sites. Special emphasis was placed on the development of methods and techniques for the optimization of radiological characterization. In particular, the scope included: definition of a strategy for site characterization; sampling and measurement techniques; data management, including statistical analysis and deterministic radionuclide migration modelling; and post-cleanup radiological surveys and assurance of compliance with release criteria.

  16. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

  17. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project

  18. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service 1996 annual report wetlands research related to the Pen Branch restoration effort on the Savannah River site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Kolka, R.K. [USDA Forest Service, Charleston, SC (United States); Trettin, C.C. [USDA Forest Service, Charleston, SC (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service and their collaborators (SRTC, SREL, and several universities) in wetlands monitoring and research on the Savannah River Site. This report describes the rationales, methods, and results (when available) of these studies and summarizes and integrates the available information through 1996.

  19. The site of embolization related to infarct size, oedema and clinical outcome in a rat stroke model - further translational stroke research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Karsten; Rasmussen, Rune S; Johansen, Flemming F

    2010-01-01

    Reliable models are essential for translational stroke research to study the pathophysiology of ischaemic stroke in an effort to find therapies that may ultimately reduce oedema, infarction and mortality in the clinic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between the site...

  20. Physico-chemical Status of Soil at the Site of UKM Research Centre, Tasik Chini, Pahang, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahibin Abdul Rahim; Wan Mohd Razi Idris; Zulfahmi Ali Rahman

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the physico-chemical properties, nutrient and heavy metal contents in soil within the UKM Tasik Chini Research Centre. Top-soil samples were collected from three sampling transect namely T1, T2 and T3. Two soil profiles from transect 1 (T1S1and T1S3) were observed and soil samples were collected from the profiles as well as top-soil for physico-chemical, nutrient and heavy metal determination. For topsoil samples, four top-soil sampling stations (S1, S2, S3, S4) were chosen along T1, two sampling stations (S1 and S2) along T2 and three sampling stations (S1, S2, S3) along T3. The soil physical properties determined were particle size and organic matter, whereas chemical properties determined were pH, electrical conductivity (EC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), available phosphorus, potassium and magnesium, soluble nutrient, and selected heavy metals. All physico-chemical, nutrient and heavy metal determinations follow the normal standard procedures. Results showed that the textures of the soil were dominated by clay size particle. Organic matter content was high in the top-soil and decreased with depth. The average soil pH in the studied profile and in the top-soil was very acidic with values from 3.66 to 4.73. The average range of electrical conductivity in soil profile and top-soil was between 2412 μScm -1 and 2742 μScm -1 . The average CEC was low with a range between 4.86 and 12.58 meq/ 100 g. The concentration of available phosphorus, magnesium and potassium was between 1.76 and 3.32 μg/ g, 16.80 and 122.23 μg/ g, and 20.09 and 30.50 μg/ g, respectively. The concentration of soluble sulphate, nitrate-nitrogen, ammonium-nitrogen and phosphorus was between 37.50 and 1350 μg/ g, 12.17 and 90.00 μg/ g, 12.17 to 53.17 μg/ g and 0.05 to 0.62 μg/ g, respectively. The concentration of iron and lead was very high in T1S1 and in the lower horizon of profile T1S3. In general the soil of the PPTC site was very acidic and

  1. Research and systematization of 'hot' particles in the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site soils - methodology and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorlachev, I.D.; Knyazev, B.B.; Kvochkina, T.N.; Lukashenko, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Sources of soil activity in Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) could be both 'hot' particles dimensions from tens microns to units millimeters and sub-microns particles determining a matrix activity of soil samples. The fractionating of radionuclides and formation of 'hot' particles radionuclide composition arose from temperature changes and complicated nuclear-physical and thermodynamics processes occurring in a fire ball and cloud of nuclear explosion. Knowledge of 'hot' particles physical-chemical properties is needed for evaluation of radioactive products migration in the environment and danger level of the people external and internal exposure. Moreover, minute information about the structure and compound of 'radioactive' particles can be useful for specification of processes occurring in a fiery sphere when conducting explosions of different phylum and also for specification of radioactive fallout forming mechanism. The main polluted spots of SNTS could be divided into the four the species depending on nuclear explosion phylum. Species of radionuclide and their distribution for the different nuclear explosions are able to differ considerably. Therefore, several most typical areas for the each phylum test were selected and twenty soil samples were collected to reveal their radionuclide pollution peculiarities. Collected soil samples were separated into the five granulometric fractions: 1 mm - 2 mm, 0.5 mm - 1 mm. 0.28 mm-0.5 mm, 0.112 mm - 0.28 mm and 1 mm), 210 'hot' particles of second fraction (1>f>0.5 mm) and 154 'hot' particles of third fraction (0.5>f>0.28 mm) have been selection from the twelve SNTS soil samples by the compelled fission and visual identification methods. Main sources of soil samples and 'hot' particles activities are 239+240 Pu, 241 Am, 137 Cs and 152 Eu isotopes.In addition to the described works the special sampling of large 'hot' particles (dimension more than 2 mm) was carried out in areas of the ground and air tests

  2. [Research on the application of in-situ biological stabilization solidification technology in chromium contaminated site management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-rong; Li, Juan; Xu, Wei

    2013-09-01

    In-situ biological stabilization solidification (SS) technology is an effective ground water risk control method for chromium contaminated sites. Through on-site engineering test, this paper has preliminarily validated the remediation effect of in-situ SS method on a southern chromium contaminated site. The engineering test site has an area of approximately 600 m2, and is located at the upstream of the contaminated area. Due to the severe contamination of chromium, the total chromium concentration reached up to 11,850 mg x kg(-1), while the hexavalent chromium concentration reached up to 349 mg x kg(-1), and the most severely contaminated soil had a depth of -0.5 - -2 m. Variations in hexavalent chromium and total chromium concentration in groundwater were observed through the injection of reducing agents and microbial regulators into the injection wells in the test site, and through the monitoring analysis at different time and different depth under the action of the injection agents. Results of the engineering test showed that the on-site SS technology significantly changed the chromium speciation in soil and then reduced the migration of chromium, thus the groundwater risk was reduced. The injected agents had a good effect of hexavalent chromium remediation in groundwater within the effective range of the injection wells, and the SS rate of hexavalent chromium into trivalent chromium reached 94%-99.9%, the SS rate of total chromium fixation reached 83.9%-99.8%. The test results are of significant reference value for the remediation of contaminated sites with features of shallow groundwater depth and soil mainly consisting of silty clay and sandy clay.

  3. The Use of Numerical Models in Support of Site Characterization and Performance Assessment Studies of Geological Repositories. Results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project 2005-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    The siting, development and operation of waste disposal facilities, and the related safety issues, have been described in many IAEA publications. The safe management and disposal of radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle remains a necessary condition for future development of nuclear energy. In particular, the disposal of high level waste and spent nuclear fuel in geological repositories, despite having been studied worldwide over the past several decades, still requires full scale demonstration through safe implementation, as planned at the national level in Finland and Sweden by 2020 and 2023, respectively, and in France by 2025. Safety assessment techniques are currently applicable to potential facility location and development through a quite large range of approaches and methodologies. By implementing research activities through coordinated research projects (CRPs), the IAEA enables research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on research topics of common interest. In response to requests by several Member States in different networks and platforms dealing with waste disposal, in 2005 a CRP on The Use of Numerical Models in Support of Site Characterization and Performance Assessment Studies of Geological Repositories was proposed and developed to transfer modelling expertise and numerical simulation technology to countries needing them for their national nuclear waste management programmes. All Member States involved in this CRP have acquired the scientific basis for, and expertise in, the site characterization process, including test design, data analysis, model calibration, model validation, predictive modelling, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation analysis. This expertise is documented in this publication, in which numerical modelling is used to address the pertinent issue of site characterization and its impact on safety, using data and information from a potential repository site

  4. Training courses on neutron detection systems on the ISIS research reactor: on-site and through internet training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lescop, B.; Badeau, G.; Ivanovic, S.; Foulon, F. [National Institute for Nuclear science and Technology French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA), Saclay Research Center, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-07-01

    Today, ISIS research reactor is an essential tool for Education and Training programs organized by the National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology (INSTN) from CEA. In the field of nuclear instrumentation, the INSTN offers both, theoretical courses and training courses on the use of neutron detection systems taking advantage of the ISIS research reactor for the supply of a wide range of neutron fluxes. This paper describes the content of the training carried out on the use of neutron detectors and detection systems, on-site or remote. The ISIS reactor is a 700 kW open core pool type reactor. The facility is very flexible since neutron detectors can be inserted into the core or its vicinity, and be used at different levels of power according to the needs of the course. Neutron fluxes, typically ranging from 1 to 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}.s, can be obtained for the characterisation of the neutron detectors and detection systems. For the monitoring of the neutron density at low level of power, the Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system of the reactor is equipped with two detection systems, named BN1 and BN2. Each way contains a fission chamber, type CFUL01, connected to an electronic system type SIREX.The system works in pulse mode and exhibits two outputs: the counting rate and the doubling time. For the high level of power, the I and C is equipped with two detection systems HN1 and HN2.Each way contain a boron ionization chamber (type CC52) connected to an electronics system type SIREX. The system works in current mode and has two outputs: the current and the doubling time. For each mode, the trainees can observe and measure the signal at the different stages of the electronic system, with an oscilloscope. They can understand the role of each component of the detection system: detector, cable and each electronic block. The limitation of the detection modes and their operating range can be established from the measured signal. The trainees can also

  5. Training courses on neutron detection systems on the ISIS research reactor: on-site and through internet training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescop, B.; Badeau, G.; Ivanovic, S.; Foulon, F.

    2015-01-01

    Today, ISIS research reactor is an essential tool for Education and Training programs organized by the National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology (INSTN) from CEA. In the field of nuclear instrumentation, the INSTN offers both, theoretical courses and training courses on the use of neutron detection systems taking advantage of the ISIS research reactor for the supply of a wide range of neutron fluxes. This paper describes the content of the training carried out on the use of neutron detectors and detection systems, on-site or remote. The ISIS reactor is a 700 kW open core pool type reactor. The facility is very flexible since neutron detectors can be inserted into the core or its vicinity, and be used at different levels of power according to the needs of the course. Neutron fluxes, typically ranging from 1 to 10 12 n/cm 2 .s, can be obtained for the characterisation of the neutron detectors and detection systems. For the monitoring of the neutron density at low level of power, the Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system of the reactor is equipped with two detection systems, named BN1 and BN2. Each way contains a fission chamber, type CFUL01, connected to an electronic system type SIREX.The system works in pulse mode and exhibits two outputs: the counting rate and the doubling time. For the high level of power, the I and C is equipped with two detection systems HN1 and HN2.Each way contain a boron ionization chamber (type CC52) connected to an electronics system type SIREX. The system works in current mode and has two outputs: the current and the doubling time. For each mode, the trainees can observe and measure the signal at the different stages of the electronic system, with an oscilloscope. They can understand the role of each component of the detection system: detector, cable and each electronic block. The limitation of the detection modes and their operating range can be established from the measured signal. The trainees can also modify the

  6. Research Trends in Social Network Sites' Educational Use: A Review of Publications in All SSCI Journals to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçayir, Gökçe; Akçayir, Murat

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, 247 articles dealing with the use of SNSs (social network sites) in education and published in Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) journals up to 2015 were analysed. The articles' demographic (year, learner type, used SNS, major contributing countries, and academic discipline) and topic trends were determined. As a result…

  7. Meaningful public participation in scientific research: How to build an effective site-based long-term education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, L.

    2013-12-01

    Many site-based educators (Wildlife Refuges, nature centers, Cooperative Extension Programs, schools, arboretums) struggle with developing and implementing cohesive long-term scientific monitoring projects into their existing outreach programming. Moreover, projects that are not meaningful to participants often have little or no sustainable long-term impact. Programs proven most effective are those which 1.) engage the participants in the study design and implementation process, 2.) answer a scientific question posed by site leaders; the data collected supports USA-NPN efforts as well as related site management and monitoring questions, 3.) are built into existing outreach and education programs, using phenology as a lens for understanding both natural and cultural history, and 4.) consistently share outcomes and results with the participants. The USA National Phenology Network's (USA-NPN) Education Program provides phenology curriculum and outreach to educators in formal, non-formal, and informal settings. Materials are designed to serve participants in grades 5-12, higher education, and adult learners. Phenology, used as a lens for place-based education, can inform science, environmental, and climate literacy, as well as other subject areas including cultural studies, art, and language arts. The USA-NPN offers consultation with site leaders on how to successfully engage site-based volunteers and students in long-term phenological studies using Nature's Notebook (NN), the professional and citizen science phenology monitoring program. USA-NPN education and educator instruction materials are designed and field-tested to demonstrate how to implement a long-term NN phenology-monitoring program at such sites. These curricula incorporate monitoring for public visitors, long-term volunteers, and school groups, while meeting the goals of USA-NPN and the site, and can be used as a model for other public participation in science programs interested in achieving similar

  8. Russian Olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia Removal in the Western United States: Multi-Site Findings and Considerations for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Gaddis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Elaeagnus angustifolia (Russian olive is an introduced tree that has become one of the dominant species in many watersheds in the American West. Although it is a target of restoration efforts, very little is known about vegetation response after removal of this exotic species. To address this gap we surveyed 25 sites in Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana where E. angustifolia was removed. We collected information regarding plant cover and richness, climate, soil characteristics, management history, and geography. We analyzed these data using regression tree modeling. Our results indicate that moisture and temperature are key environmental factors relating to restoration success as measured by abundance of native cover; lower temperatures and greater availability of water were generally associated with more native cover. These results have important implications for selection of restoration sites, and for understanding the consequences of removing this species.

  9. 2004 annual progress report: Stratton Sagebrush Hydrology Study Area: Establishment of a long-term research site in a high-elevation sagebrush steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenecker, Kate; Lange, Bob; Calton, Mike

    2005-01-01

    In 2004 the U.S. Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Rawlins Field Office (RFO), began a cooperative effort to reestablish the Stratton Sagebrush Hydrology Study Area (Stratton) as a research location, with the goal of making it a site for long-term research on sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecology. No other long-term research sites in high-elevation sagebrush habitat currently exist, and the Stratton area, with its 30+ year history of research and baseline data, was a logical location to restart investigations aimed at answering pertinent and timely questions about sagebrush ecology and sagebrush-obligate species. During the first year of the study, USGS scientists conducted an in-depth literature search to locate publications from research conducted at Stratton. We contacted previous researchers to acquire literature and unpublished reports of work conducted at Stratton. Collated papers and published manuscripts were presented in an annotated bibliography (Burgess and Schoenecker, 2004).

  10. A decade of monitoring at Swiss Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) sites: can we observe trends in atmospheric acid deposition and in soil solution acidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannatier, Elisabeth Graf; Thimonier, Anne; Schmitt, Maria; Walthert, Lorenz; Waldner, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Trends in atmospheric acid deposition and in soil solution acidity from 1995 or later until 2007 were investigated at several forest sites throughout Switzerland to assess the effects of air pollution abatements on deposition and the response of the soil solution chemistry. Deposition of the major elements was estimated from throughfall and bulk deposition measurements at nine sites of the Swiss Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research network (LWF) since 1995 or later. Soil solution was measured at seven plots at four soil depths since 1998 or later. Trends in the molar ratio of base cations to aluminum (BC/Al) in soil solutions and in concentrations and fluxes of inorganic N (NO(3)-N + NH(4)-N), sulfate (SO(4)-S), and base cations (BC) were used to detect changes in soil solution chemistry. Acid deposition significantly decreased at three out of the nine study sites due to a decrease in total N deposition. Total SO(4)-S deposition decreased at the nine sites, but due to the relatively low amount of SO(4)-S load compared to N deposition, it did not contribute to decrease acid deposition significantly. No trend in total BC deposition was detected. In the soil solution, no trend in concentrations and fluxes of BC, SO(4)-S, and inorganic N were found at most soil depths at five out of the seven sites. This suggests that the soil solution reacted very little to the changes in atmospheric deposition. A stronger reduction in base cations compared to aluminum was detected at two sites, which might indicate that acidification of the soil solution was proceeding faster at these sites.

  11. Small Reactors without On-site Refuelling: Neutronic Characteristics, Emergency Planning and Development Scenarios. Final Report of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    Small reactors without on-site refuelling have a capability to operate without reloading or shuffling of fuel in their cores for reasonably long periods of time consistent with plant economy and considerations of energy security, with no fresh or spent fuel being stored at the site during reactor operation. In 2009, more than 25 design concepts of such reactors were analyzed or developed in IAEA Member States, representing both developed and developing countries. Small reactors without on-site refuelling are being developed for several reactor lines, including water cooled reactors, sodium cooled fast reactors, lead and lead bismuth cooled reactors, and also include some non-conventional concepts. Most of the concepts of small reactors without on-site refuelling reactors are at early design stages. To make such reactors viable, further research and development (R and D) is necessary, inter alia, to validate long-life core operation, define and validate new robust types of fuel, justify an option of plant location in the proximity to its users, and examine possible niches that such reactors could fill in future energy systems. To further research and development (R and D) in the areas mentioned above and several others, and to facilitate progress in Member States in design and technology development for small reactors without on-site refueling, the IAEA has conducted a dedicated Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled 'Small Reactors without On-site Refuelling' (CRPi25001). The project started late in 2004 and, after a review in 2008, was extended for one more year to be ended in 2009. The project has created a network of 18 research institutions from 10 Member States, representing both developed and developing countries. Over the CRP period, collaborative results were achieved for many of the abovementioned research areas. Some studies highlighted new directions of research to be furthered after the CRP completion. Some studies remained the efforts of

  12. Site Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahedi, Haseebullah

    2016-01-01

    different practices in the construction phase. The research is based on an ethnographic study of a case in Denmark. The empirical data were collected through direct observations and semi-structured interviews with site managers, contract managers, foremen and craftsmen. Findings revealed...... that the construction phase comprises several communities and practices, leading to various uses of the drawings. The results indicated that the craftsmen used drawings to position themselves in the correct location, and that the site managers and contract managers used them as management tools and legal documents...

  13. An introduction to the composition of the Multi-Site University Study of Identity and Culture (MUSIC): a collaborative approach to research and mentorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskirch, Robert S; Zamboanga, Byron L; Ravert, Russell D; Whitbourne, Susan Krauss; Park, Irene J K; Lee, Richard M; Schwartz, Seth J

    2013-04-01

    The Multi-Site University Study of Identity and Culture (MUSIC) is the product of a research collaboration among faculty members from 30 colleges and universities from across the United States. Using Katz and Martin's (1997, p. 7) definition, the MUSIC research collaboration is "the working together of researchers to achieve the common goals of producing new scientific knowledge." The collaboration involved more than just coauthorship; it served "as a strategy to insert more energy, optimism, creativity and hope into the work of [researchers]" (Conoley & Conoley, 2010, p. 77). The philosophy underlying the MUSIC collaborative was intended to foster natural collaborations among researchers, to provide opportunities for scholarship and mentorship for early career and established researchers, and to support exploration of identity, cultural, and ethnic/racial research ideas by tapping the expertise and interests of the broad MUSIC network of collaborators. In this issue, five research articles present innovative findings from the MUSIC datasets. There are two themes across the articles. Research is emerging about broadening the constructs and measures of acculturation and ethnic identity and their relation to health risk behaviors and psychosocial and mental health outcomes. The second theme is about the relationship of perceived discrimination on behavioral and mental health outcomes among immigrant populations.

  14. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  15. Application of frequency- and time-domain electromagnetic surveys to characterize hydrostratigraphy and landfill construction at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Beatty, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Eric A.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Johnson, Carole D.; Lane, John W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 and 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), conducted frequency-domain electromagnetic (FDEM) surveys at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS), approximately 17 kilometers (km) south of Beatty, Nevada. The FDEM surveys were conducted within and adjacent to a closed low-level radioactive waste disposal site located at the ADRS. FDEM surveys were conducted on a grid of north-south and east-west profiles to assess the locations and boundaries of historically recorded waste-disposal trenches. In 2015, the USGS conducted time-domain (TDEM) soundings along a profile adjacent to the disposal site (landfill) in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), to assess the thickness and characteristics of the underlying deep unsaturated zone, and the hydrostratigraphy of the underlying saturated zone.FDEM survey results indicate the general location and extent of the waste-disposal trenches and reveal potential differences in material properties and the type and concentration of waste in several areas of the landfill. The TDEM surveys provide information on the underlying hydrostratigraphy and characteristics of the unsaturated zone that inform the site conceptual model and support an improved understanding of the hydrostratigraphic framework. Additional work is needed to interpret the TDEM results in the context of the local and regional structural geology.

  16. An inverse modeling approach to estimate groundwater flow and transport model parameters at a research site at Vandenberg AFB, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasa, E.; Foglia, L.; Mackay, D. M.; Ginn, T. R.; Scow, K. M.

    2009-12-01

    A numerical groundwater fate and transport model was developed for analyses of data from field experiments evaluating the impacts of ethanol on the natural attenuation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Site 60. We used the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) groundwater flow (MODFLOW2000) and transport (MT3DMS) models in conjunction with the USGS universal inverse modeling code (UCODE) to jointly determine flow and transport parameters using bromide tracer data from multiple experiments in the same location. The key flow and transport parameters include hydraulic conductivity of aquifer and aquitard layers, porosity, and transverse and longitudinal dispersivity. Aquifer and aquitard layers were assumed homogenous in this study. Therefore, the calibration parameters were not spatially variable within each layer. A total of 162 monitoring wells in seven transects perpendicular to the mean flow direction were monitored over the course of ten months, resulting in 1,766 bromide concentration data points and 149 head values used as observations for the inverse modeling. The results showed the significance of the concentration observation data in predicting the flow model parameters and indicated the sensitivity of the hydraulic conductivity of different zones in the aquifer including the excavated former contaminant zone. The model has already been used to evaluate alternative designs for further experiments on in situ bioremediation of the tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume remaining at the site. We describe the recent applications of the model and future work, including adding reaction submodels to the calibrated flow model.

  17. A study for the safety evaluation of geological disposal of TRU waste and influence on disposal site design by change of amount of TRU waste (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Makoto; Kondo, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Funabashi, Hideaki; Kawatsuma, Shinji; Kamei, Gento; Hirano, Fumio; Mihara, Morihiro; Ueda, Hiroyoshi; Ohi, Takao; Hyodo, Hideaki

    2011-02-01

    In the safety evaluation of the geological disposal of the TRU waste, it is extremely important to share the information with the Research and development organization (JAEA: that is also the waste generator) by the waste disposal entrepreneur (NUMO). In 2009, NUMO and JAEA set up a technical commission to investigate the reasonable TRU waste disposal following a cooperation agreement between these two organizations. In this report, the calculation result of radionuclide transport for a TRU waste geological disposal system was described, by using the Tiger code and the GoldSim code at identical terms. Tiger code is developed to calculate a more realistic performance assessment by JAEA. On the other hand, GoldSim code is the general simulation software that is used for the computation modeling of NUMO TRU disposal site. Comparing the calculation result, a big difference was not seen. Therefore, the reliability of both codes was able to be confirmed. Moreover, the influence on the disposal site design (Capacity: 19,000m 3 ) was examined when 10% of the amount of TRU waste increased. As a result, it was confirmed that the influence of the site design was very little based on the concept of the Second Progress Report on Research and Development for TRU Waste Disposal in Japan. (author)

  18. Implementing of action plans for risk communication on the uranium mining sites remedy at Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center (2) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabuta, Naohiro; Kawai, Jun; Hikawa, Tamae; Tokizawa, Takayuki; Sato, Kazuhiko; Koga, Osamu

    2008-11-01

    On the closure of uranium mine site at Ningyo-Toge Environmental Engineering Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, the action plans for risk communication with residence and local governments were developed and implemented. Under a practical program of the risk communication, an ethnographical research on Ningyo-Toge Environmental Engineering Center has been conducted by local high school students. The research was focused on several social groups such as engineers at the Center and residents around Ningyo-Toge and described their circumstances from the past to the present, since the discovery of the uranium outcrop 1955. In the second year of the program, the results of the research were presented at symposium and the students had opportunities to exchange their views with others from different high schools that held in similar programs. Through those activities, the importance of the program was rediscovered and some new issues were also identified. (author)

  19. Micrometeorological, evapotranspiration, and soil-moisture data at the Amargosa Desert Research site in Nye County near Beatty, Nevada, 2006-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Michael J.; Mayers, C. Justin; Andraski, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes micrometeorological, evapotranspiration, and soil-moisture data collected since 2006 at the Amargosa Desert Research Site adjacent to a low-level radio-active waste and hazardous chemical waste facility near Beatty, Nevada. Micrometeorological data include precipitation, solar radiation, net radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, saturated and ambient vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, near-surface soil temperature, soil-heat flux, and soil-water content. Evapotranspiration (ET) data include latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, net radiation, soil-heat flux, soil temperature, air temperature, vapor pressure, and other principal energy-budget data. Soil-moisture data include periodic measurements of volumetric water-content at experimental sites that represent vegetated native soil, devegetated native soil, and simulated waste disposal trenches - maximum measurement depths range from 5.25 to 29.25 meters. All data are compiled in electronic spreadsheets that are included with this report.

  20. Multidisciplinary Studies of the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in Ground Water at the U.S. Geological Survey Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Program Research Site, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, D. R.; Smith, R. L.; Kent, D. B.; Barber, L. B.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts multidisciplinary research on the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes affecting ground-water contaminants of global concern at its Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Program site in Massachusetts, USA. The work centers on a 6-kilometer-long plume of treated wastewater in a glacial sand and gravel aquifer. The plume is characterized by distinct geochemical zones caused by the biodegradation of organic materials in treated wastewater that was disposed to the aquifer by rapid infiltration during the period 1936-95. A core group of hydrogeologists, geochemists, microbiologists, and geophysicists has been involved in the research effort for more than two decades. The effort has been enhanced by stable funding, a readily accessible site, a relatively simple hydrologic setting, and logistical support from an adjacent military base. The research team uses a three-part approach to plan and conduct research at the site. First, detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of the plume since the late 1970s provides field evidence of important contaminant-transport processes and provides the basis for multidisciplinary, process-oriented studies. Second, ground-water tracer experiments are conducted in various geochemical zones in the plume to study factors that control the rate and extent of contaminant transport. Several arrays of multilevel sampling devices, including an array with more than 15,000 individual sampling points, are used to conduct these experiments. Plume-scale (kilometers) and tracer-test-scale (1- 100 meters) studies are complemented by laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling of flow and reactive transport. Third, results are applied to the treated-wastewater plume, other contaminant plumes at the military base, and other sites nationally to evaluate the applicability of the findings and to point toward further research. Examples of findings to date include that (1) macrodispersivity can be related to

  1. New research at Paisley Caves:applying new integrated analytical approaches to understanding stratigraphy, taphonomy, and site formation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Shillito, Lisa-Marie; Blong, John C; Jenkins, Dennis L; Stafford Jr, Thomas W; Whelton, Helen; McDonough, Katelyn; Bull, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Paisley Caves in Oregon has become well known due to early dates, and human presence in the form of coprolites, found to contain ancient human DNA. Questions remain over whether the coprolites themselves are human, or whether the DNA is mobile in the sediments. This brief introduces new research applying an integrated analytical approach combining sediment micromorphology and lipid biomarker analysis, which aims to resolve these problems.

  2. Compressed air energy storage: preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Final draft, Task 2: Volume 2 of 3. Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The characteristics of sites in Indiana and Illinois which are being investigated as potential sites for compressed air energy storage power plants are documented. These characteristics include geological considerations, economic factors, and environmental considerations. Extensive data are presented for 14 specific sites and a relative rating on the desirability of each site is derived. (LCL)

  3. Environmental impacts of oil production on soil, bedrock, and vegetation at the U.S. Geological Survey Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research site A, Osage County, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otton, J.K.; Zielinski, R.A.; Smith, B.D.; Abbott, M.M.; Keeland, B.D.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is investigating the impacts of oil and gas production on soils, groundwater, surface water, and ecosystems in the United States. Two sites in northeastern Oklahoma (sites A and B) are presently being investigated under the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research project. Oil wells on the lease surrounding site A in Osage County, Oklahoma, produced about 100,000 bbl of oil between 1913 ard 1981. Prominent production features on the 1.5-ha (3.7-ac) site A include a tank battery, an oil-filled trench, pipelines, storage pits for both produced water and oil, and an old power unit. Site activities and historic releases have left open areas in the local oak forest adjacent to these features and a deeply eroded salt scar downslope from the pits that extends to nearby Skiatook Lake. The site is underlain by surficial sediments comprised of very fine-grained eolian sand and colluvium as much as 1.4 m (4.6 ft) thick, which, in turn, overlie flat-lying, fractured bedrock comprised of sandstone, clayey sandstone, mudstone, and shale. A geophysical survey of ground conductance and concentration measurements of aqueous extracts (1:1 by weight) of core samples taken in the salt scar and adjacent areas indicate that unusual concentrations of NaCl-rich salt are present at depths to at least 8 m (26 ft) in the bedrock; however, little salt occurs in the eolian sand. Historic aerial photographs, anecdotal reports from oil-lease operators, and tree-ring records indicate that the surrounding oak forest was largely established after 1935 and thus postdates the majority of surface damage at the site. Blackjack oaks adjacent to the salt scar have anomalously elevated chloride (>400 ppm) in their leaves and record the presence of NaCl-rich salt or salty water in the shallow subsurface. The geophysical measurements also indicate moderately elevated conductance beneath the oak forest adjoining the salt scar. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-05-21

    May 21, 2015 ... Key words: Antenatal care, perception, choice of site, satisfaction, Cameroon ... However, the perspective is changing from one of not just needing ... consumer perceptions in relation to behavioral outcomes has been.

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2013-06-06

    Jun 6, 2013 ... modality. Sixty nine (46.6%) patients were enrolled in group A and managed surgically by ... odds ratio and logistic regression. Results ... sites that have reported reduction in variable costs after use of surgery as compared to.

  6. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-01-01

    Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions (coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)) over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the 'fines' fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  7. Changes in symptoms during urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome symptom flares: findings from one site of the MAPP Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Colditz, Graham A; Pakpahan, Ratna; Bradley, Catherine S; Goodman, Melody S; Andriole, Gerald L; Lai, H Henry

    2015-02-01

    To provide the first description and quantification of symptom changes during interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome symptom exacerbations ("flares"). Participants at one site of the Trans-Multidisciplinary Approaches to the study of chronic Pelvic Pain Epidemiology and Phenotyping Study completed two 10-day diaries over the 1-year study follow-up period, one at baseline and one during their first flare (if not at baseline). On each day of the diary, participants reported whether they were currently experiencing a flare, defined as "symptoms that are much worse than usual" for at least 1 day, and their levels of urination-related pain, pelvic pain, urgency, and frequency on a scale of 0-10. Linear mixed models were used to calculate mean changes in symptoms between non-flare and flare days from the same participant. Eighteen of 27 women and 9 of 29 men reported at least one flare during follow-up, for a total of 281 non-flare and 210 flare days. Of these participants, 44.4% reported one flare, 29.6% reported two flares, and 25.9% reported ≥ 3 flares over the combined 20-day diary observation period, with reported flares ranging in duration from 1 day to >2 weeks. During these flares, each of the main symptoms worsened significantly by a mean of at least two points and total symptoms worsened by a mean of 11 points for both sexes (all P ≤ 0.01). Flares are common and correspond to a global worsening of urologic and pelvic pain symptoms. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. TL dosimetry in the new Tandetron ion accelerator site of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdovinos A, M.; Gonzalez M, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) acquired a positive ions accelerator type Tandetron 2 MV of the dutch company High Voltage Engineering, Europe B.V., which was finished its installation this year (2000) in an already existing building in the Dr. Nabor Carrillo Flores Nuclear Centre, where it was prepared for the following purposes: the accelerator will be used to realize research through X-ray emission induced by charged particles, Rutherford backscattering analysis, nuclear reaction analysis, gamma ray emission induced by charged particles, resonant dispersion analysis, elastic backward detection analysis and by particle canalization analysis. The accelerator consists of an injection system with two ion sources, ion accelerator tank with voltage in terminal at 2 MV, recovery and recirculation system of charge interchange gas, iman selector analyzer system and with high energy focussing, control system through computer and management and recovery of isolator gas system. For the realization of operation tests of this accelerator, it was had the license authorizing by the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (CNSNS). During the test stage Tl dosemeters were arranged in the Tandetron accelerator area, and also in direction to the beam outlet. In this work, are presented the obtained results of the measurement of radiation levels, as in the area as in the beam outlet. (Author)

  9. EPRI's on-site soil-structure interaction research and its application to design/analysis verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepp, J C; Tang, H T [Seismic Center, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1988-07-01

    Soil structure, interaction (SSI) research at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is focused on validating modeling and computational procedures. A data base has been obtained with instrumented scale models of stiff structures founded both on unsaturated alluvial soils and on rock. Explosives were used to induce strong ground-motion for two experiments, one on rock and the other on alluvium. A third experiment, a one-fourth scale containment structure on saturated alluvium, relies on earthquakes as the energy source. Analysis of the explosion-induced SSI data shows a marked shift in the fundamental frequency of the soil-structure system to a lower frequency. The magnitude of the shift is a function of foundation conditions and level of excitation. Analytical simulation was found to require more sophisticated soil constitutive models and computer codes than are used in current practice. The current phase of the program concentrates on evaluating SSI models used in current design practice by comparing predicted with recorded data at points in the soil-structure system. (author)

  10. EPRI's on-site soil-structure interaction research and its application to design/analysis verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepp, J.C.; Tang, H.T.

    1988-01-01

    Soil structure, interaction (SSI) research at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is focused on validating modeling and computational procedures. A data base has been obtained with instrumented scale models of stiff structures founded both on unsaturated alluvial soils and on rock. Explosives were used to induce strong ground-motion for two experiments, one on rock and the other on alluvium. A third experiment, a one-fourth scale containment structure on saturated alluvium, relies on earthquakes as the energy source. Analysis of the explosion-induced SSI data shows a marked shift in the fundamental frequency of the soil-structure system to a lower frequency. The magnitude of the shift is a function of foundation conditions and level of excitation. Analytical simulation was found to require more sophisticated soil constitutive models and computer codes than are used in current practice. The current phase of the program concentrates on evaluating SSI models used in current design practice by comparing predicted with recorded data at points in the soil-structure system. (author)

  11. Research Implementation and Quality Assurance Project Plan: An Evaluation of Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Technologies for the Detection of Fugitive Contamination at Selected Superfund Hazardous Waste Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.

    2009-01-01

    This project is a research collaboration between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Inspector General (OIG) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC), for the purpose of evaluating the utility of hyperspectral remote sensing technology for post-closure monitoring of residual contamination at delisted and closed hazardous waste sites as defined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act [CERCLA (also known as 'Superfund')] of 1980 and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986.

  12. Attenuation-difference radar tomography: results of a multiple-plane experiment at the U.S. Geological Survey Fractured-Rock Research Site, Mirror Lake, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J.W.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Harris, J.M.; Haeni, F.P.; Gorelick, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    Attenuation-difference, borehole-radar tomography was used to monitor a series of sodium chloride tracer injection tests conducted within the FSE, wellfield at the U.S. Geological Survey Fractured-Rock Hydrology Research Site in Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA. Borehole-radar tomography surveys were conducted using the sequential-scanning and injection method in three boreholes that form a triangular prism of adjoining tomographic image planes. Results indicate that time-lapse tomography methods provide high-resolution images of tracer distribution in permeable zones.

  13. The search for a final disposal site as field of conflict. A proposition for a profile of a problem-oriented sociological repository research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocke, P.

    2005-01-01

    The search for a final disposal site for high-level nuclear waste in Germany is to characterize as an enduring and politicised conflict causing a blocked process of decision making. A social science based research on final disposals, reflecting this stalemate situation in Germany, did not take place since the middle of the 1980s. This ITAS paper presents a proposal, how - by the means of social science - the chances and risks for further decision making about nuclear waste could be articulated more precise. (orig.)

  14. Integrated programme of research into the behaviour of the clay engineered barrier: an example from Nagra's Grimsel test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggin, C.; Alexander, R.; Kickmaier, W.; McKinley, I.G.

    2003-01-01

    Many designs for the disposal of higher activity radioactive wastes include bentonite clay as part of the engineered barrier system (EBS). Generally, the EBS is characterised by the use of large quantities of rather simple, well-understood materials, leading to increased confidence in the predicted long-term behaviour of the EBS (see, for example, Alexander and McKinley, 1999). Despite this, several open questions remain and some of these are being examined at Nagra's Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in the central Swiss Alps as part of an integrated, international study programme (GTS Phase V: see www.grimsel.com for details). Three specific projects within GTS Phase V are currently investigating the performance assessment (PA) implications of the behaviour of bentonite in the EBS. In the first, demonstration of the overall practicability of the Spanish reference disposal concept (where canisters are placed horizontally in bentonite backfilled tunnels) for high level waste (HLW) is amongst the goals of ENRESA's Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment (FEBEX). In the second, RWMC are examining the potential effects of gas migration through a bentonite-sand mixture surrounding a concrete silo in the Japanese concept for intermediate level waste (ILW) in a large-scale EBS experiment (GMT, Gas Migration Test). Finally, Nagra, in the CRR (Colloid and Radionuclide Retardation) project, is investigating the effects of bentonite colloids on migration of radionuclides at the EBS / geosphere boundary, where bentonite colloids could be produced by erosion of the bentonite backfill. Although all three projects have produced significant advances in the understanding of the behaviour of the clay EBS under in situ conditions, they are based on first generation conceptual designs and so, in the planned Phase VI of the GTS, it is proposed to move on and consider more optimised EBS designs and emplacement techniques. To facilitate integration, the focus of Phase VI will be narrowed to

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Joseph Daniels1,&, Ruth Nduati1,2, James Kiarie1,3, Carey Farquhar1,4,5 .... or basic science research career (Socio-Behavioral Research, .... a research environment that supports knowledge sharing to develop research ...

  16. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : characterization of gases and liquids flared at battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multi year study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring, which is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. This report presents the results of one phase of the study which characterizes the nature and relative quantities of gases and liquids being flared at seven battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A sampling system was specially developed to collect and analyze both the gas and liquid component of the flare stream. The analysis was performed by an independent chemical analysis company. Results indicate that no liquids were collected or observed at any of the sites, dispelling the assumption that liquids are commonly found in flare streams. Analysis of the gas phase showed a wide variation in the volume fraction of fuel and inert components. No correlation was made to link the appearance of smoke at a flare site to the composition of the flare gases. The preliminary tests provide the foundation for recommendations for future work regarding sampling programs and issues of combustion efficiency tab., 4 figs., 1 appendix

  17. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : characterization of gases and liquids flared at battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostiuk, L.W.; Thomas, G. P.

    2004-01-01

    Flaring is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multiyear study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring. This report presents the results of one phase of the study which characterizes the nature and relative quantities of gases and liquids being flared at seven battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A sampling system was specially developed to collect and analyze both the gas and liquid component of the flare stream. The analysis was performed by an independent chemical analysis company. Results indicate that no liquids were collected or observed at any of the sites, dispelling the assumption that liquids are commonly found in flare streams. Analysis of the gas phase showed a wide variation in the volume fraction of fuel and inert components. No correlation was made to link the appearance of smoke at a flare site to the composition of the flare gases. The preliminary tests provide the foundation for recommendations for future work regarding sampling programs and issues of combustion efficiency. 1 tab., 4 figs., 1 appendix

  18. A multimedia comprehensive informatics system with decision support tools for a multi-site collaboration research of stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximing; Documet, Jorge; Garrison, Kathleen A.; Winstein, Carolee J.; Liu, Brent

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of adult disability. The Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (I-CARE) clinical trial aims to evaluate a therapy for arm rehabilitation after stroke. A primary outcome measure is correlative analysis between stroke lesion characteristics and standard measures of rehabilitation progress, from data collected at seven research facilities across the country. Sharing and communication of brain imaging and behavioral data is thus a challenge for collaboration. A solution is proposed as a web-based system with tools supporting imaging and informatics related data. In this system, users may upload anonymized brain images through a secure internet connection and the system will sort the imaging data for storage in a centralized database. Users may utilize an annotation tool to mark up images. In addition to imaging informatics, electronic data forms, for example, clinical data forms, are also integrated. Clinical information is processed and stored in the database to enable future data mining related development. Tele-consultation is facilitated through the development of a thin-client image viewing application. For convenience, the system supports access through desktop PC, laptops, and iPAD. Thus, clinicians may enter data directly into the system via iPAD while working with participants in the study. Overall, this comprehensive imaging informatics system enables users to collect, organize and analyze stroke cases efficiently.

  19. Point Source contamination approach for hydrological risk assessment of a major hypothetical accident from second research reactor at Inshas site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadek, M.A.; Tawfik, F.S.

    2002-01-01

    The point source contamination mechanism and the deterministic conservative approach have been implemented to demonstrate the hazards of hydrological pollution due to a major hypothetical accident in the second research reactor at Inshas. The radioactive inventory is assumed to be dissolved in 75% of the cooling water (25% are lost) and comes directly into contact with ground water and moved down gradient. Five radioisotopes(I-129, Sr-90, Ru-106, Cs-134 and Cs-137) of the entire inventory are found to be highly durable and represent vulnerability in the environment. Their downstream spread indices; C max : maximum concentration at the focus of the moving ellipse, delta: pollution duration at different distances, A:polluted area at different distances and X min : safety distance from the reactor, were calculated based on analytical solutions of the convection-dispersion partial differential equation for absorbable and decaying species. The largest downstream contamination range was found for Sr-90 and Ru-106 but still no potential. The geochemical and hydrological parameters of the water bearing formations play a great role in buffering and limiting the radiation effects. These reduce the retention time of the radioisotopes several order of magnitudes in the polluted distances. Sensitivity analysis of the computed pollution ranges shows low sensitivity to possible potential for variations activity of nuclide inventory, dispersivity and saturated thickness and high sensitivity for possible variations in groundwater velocity and retention factors

  20. The Muscle Sensor for on-site neuroscience lectures to pave the way for a better understanding of brain-machine-interface research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Amane; Nagata, Osamu; Togawa, Morio; Sazi, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience is an expanding field of science to investigate enigmas of brain and human body function. However, the majority of the public have never had the chance to learn the basics of neuroscience and new knowledge from advanced neuroscience research through hands-on experience. Here, we report that we produced the Muscle Sensor, a simplified electromyography, to promote educational understanding in neuroscience. The Muscle Sensor can detect myoelectric potentials which are filtered and processed as 3-V pulse signals to shine a light bulb and emit beep sounds. With this educational tool, we delivered "On-Site Neuroscience Lectures" in Japanese junior-high schools to facilitate hands-on experience of neuroscientific electrophysiology and to connect their text-book knowledge to advanced neuroscience researches. On-site neuroscience lectures with the Muscle Sensor pave the way for a better understanding of the basics of neuroscience and the latest topics such as how brain-machine-interface technology could help patients with disabilities such as spinal cord injuries. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive qualitative research design was used to determine whether participants ... simulation as a teaching method; a manikin offering effective learning; confidence ..... Tesch R. Qualitative Research: Analysis Types and Software Tools.

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research process, as part of which students must find and appraise evidence from research.[5] This highlights that teaching research methodology is inclined towards equipping students ... Students believed that evidence-based practice was vital, yet their understanding of the concept was restricted when compared with the.

  3. Implementing of action plans for risk communication on the uranium mining sites remedy at Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center (1) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabuta, Naohiro; Kawai, Jun; Hikawa, Tamae; Tokizawa, Takayuki; Sato, Kazuhiko; Koga, Osamu

    2008-11-01

    On the closure of uranium mine site at Ningyo-Toge Environmental Engineering Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, the action plans for risk communication with residence and local governments were developed and implemented. Under a practical program of the risk communication, an ethnographical research on Ningyo-Toge Environmental Engineering Center has been conducted by local high school students. The research was focused on several social groups such as engineers at the Center and residents around Ningyo-toge and described their circumstances from the past to the present, since the discovery of the uranium outcrop 1955. In addition, it should be noted that as a results, the research project led several effects listed below; 1) High school students understood significance of the uranium development projects implemented at Ningyo-toge, 2) Differences of standpoints between local residents and Ningyo-toge became clearer, 3) Foundation to communicate between local communities and Ningyo-toge was found out, and 4) The educational program on an ethnographical research was conducted autonomously by local high school students. (author)

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-04-15

    Apr 15, 2016 ... patients was recognized as an independent risk factor of the acquisition of A. baumannii infection [5]. Many authors have reported the predominance of Acinetobacter strains in broncho- pulmonary samples [7, 20, 27]. In this study, the main isolation site of these clinical isolates was also broncho-pulmonary ...

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-10-20

    Oct 20, 2015 ... counties. The area had 105 public and private health facilities [25]. There were three Comprehensive EmOC facilities, one public, and two private facilities, all located in Malindi town [12]. This study was conducted in six facilities from different sites, purposively selected with the assistance of the District ...

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    site location, as this may dictate whether an objective approach for student allocation may be necessary. In this study, we evaluated a decentralised training programme which was piloted at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. (UKZN) in 2013 on 4th-year undergraduate medical students as part of their Family Medicine block.

  7. Inventory of geochemical sensors available for monitoring an underground site of nuclear waste repository research pathways for new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiadis, I.; Gaucher, E.; Buschaert, S.

    2010-01-01

    methodologies and tools for these parameters indicate that today there are not suitable geochemical sensors for monitoring nuclear waste storing systems. On the basis of this report, we are led to propose some realistic pathways of research and development to be initiated or continue to mitigate the lack of geochemical sensors dedicated to the underground storage of nuclear waste. For that purpose, R and D pathways will be (i) the development of geophysical-electrochemical sensors and (ii) the development and manufacture of geochemical sensors made of robust and unalterable material (gold, platinum, glassy carbon). They must possess active principles everlasting, or protected or restored easily. Moreover, solid-state sensors fabricated with a few component of the argillaceous formations (pyrite, raw or purified argillite K119) or silicon semiconductor technology (such as ion sensitive field effect transistors, ISFETs) for measuring pH and interdigitated structures (IDS) for measuring conductivity and redox potential can be designed for use. Response characteristics of these sensors must be tested in aqueous samples with compositions similar to those present inside an underground repository and results were compared with those obtained with commercial electrodes obtaining a good agreement between commercial and the sensors. Electrochemical methods will be in the base of the sensors assessments. These approaches will be consisted in the continuous or semi-continuous analysis of large surface electrodes (pyrite, argillite, ) immersed in solutions with or without oxidant (nitrate, selenate and selenite) or reducer (sulfide, Fe 2+ ). The electrochemical behavior of these electrodes was compared to those of known inert and unattackable electrodes (Pt, Au, glassy carbon) positioned in the same operating conditions. Measurements realized by voltammetry (at open circuit potential and cyclic voltammetry), by Tafel polarization analysis and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS

  8. CCS site characterisation criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachu, S.; Hawkes, C.; Lawton, D.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Perkins, E.

    2009-12-15

    IEA GHG recently commissioned the Alberta Research Counil in Canada to conduct a review of storage site selection criteria and site characterisation methods in order to produce a synthesis report. This report reviews the literature on the subject on the site seleciton and characterisation since the publication of the IPCC Special Report on CCS, and provides a synthesis and classification of criteria. 161 refs.

  9. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ physical/chemical treatment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites: Applicability, developing status, and research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Gates, D.D.; West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Donaldson, T.L.; Webb, O.F.; Corder, S.L.; Dickerson, K.S.

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was established in June 1991 to facilitate the development and implementation of in situ remediation technologies for environmental restoration within the DOE complex. Within the ISR IP, four subareas of research have been identified: (1) in situ containment, (2) in situ physical/chemical treatment (ISPCT), (3) in situ bioremediation, and (4) subsurface manipulation/electrokinetics. Although set out as individual focus areas, these four are interrelated, and successful developments in one will often necessitate successful developments in another. In situ remediation technologies are increasingly being sought for environmental restoration due to the potential advantages that in situ technologies can offer as opposed to more traditional ex situ technologies. These advantages include limited site disruption, lower cost, reduced worker exposure, and treatment at depth under structures. While in situ remediation technologies can offer great advantages, many technology gaps exist in their application. This document presents an overview of ISPCT technologies and describes their applicability to DOE-complex needs, their development status, and relevant ongoing research. It also highlights research needs that the ISR IP should consider when making funding decisions

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-06

    May 6, 2014 ... facilitate and support articulation between the ECT mid-level worker qualification and the professional B EMC degree. Methods. The researchers used an exploratory, sequential mixed-method design, which is characterised by a qualitative phase of research followed by a quantitative phase. This design is ...

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    supports medical education and research at institutions in 12 ... (CBE). CapacityPlus, led by IntraHealth International, is the USAID-funded ... acquire public health, clinical, and/or research skills, usually through applied learning in a .... If students were evaluated, indicate the type of student (i.e. medical, dental, nursing, etc.) ...

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-01-24

    Jan 24, 2017 ... and the specific rotavirus VP4 (P-types) and VP7 (G-types) determined. Results: The .... Centre for Virus Research (CVR) of the Kenya Medical Research. Institute (KEMRI) ... rotavirus dsRNA was run on 10% polyacrylamide resolving gels using a large format .... What is known about this topic. •. Rotavirus is ...

  13. Empirical test of the influence of global warming and forest disturbance on ant fauna at the Gwangneung Forest Long Term Ecological Research site, South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Sung Kwon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of forest disturbance and climate change on the ant fauna at the Long Term Ecological Research site in Gwangneung Forest, Korea in 2003 and 2012. After forest disturbance, the occurrence and abundance of ants belonging to the functional groups of forest ground forager and soil and litter dweller are predicted to decrease, while the occurrence and abundance of ants belonging to the open land forager and forest vegetation forager functional groups are predicted to increase. In terms of the effects of climate change, if the optimum temperature of the ants is lower than the annual average temperature in the survey area, the occurrence and abundance of the ants are predicted to decrease and vice versa. Ant surveys were carried out using pitfall traps. Changes in the dominant species, occurrence, and abundance mostly corresponded to the predictions for forest disturbance, but did not match the prediction for an increase in temperature.

  14. Atmospheric trace elements and Pb isotopes at an offshore site, Ieodo Ocean Research Station, in the East China Sea from June to October 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Han, C.; Shin, D.; Hur, S. D.; Jun, S. J.; Kim, Y. T.; Hong, S.

    2016-12-01

    East Asia, especially China, has become a major anthropogenic source region of trace elements due to the rapid industrialization and urbanization in the past decades. Numerous studies reported that anthropogenic pollutants from East Asia are transported by westerly winds during winter to spring across the Pacific to North America and beyond. Here we report elemental concentrations and Pb isotope ratios in airborne particles from Ieodo Ocean Research Station (IORS) located in the middle of the East China Sea (32.07o N, 125.10o E). A total of 30 aerosol samples (PM2.5-10) were collected between 18 June and 30 October 2015 and analyzed for trace elements (Zn, As, Mo, Cd, Sb, Ba, Tl, and Pb) and Pb isotopes using ICP-SFMS and TIMS, respectively. The mean concentrations of trace elements ranged from 0.06 ng m-3 for Tl to 10.1 ng m-3 for Zn. These values are much lower (up to several orders) than those at unban sites in East Asia, confirming a low level of air pollution at IORS due to the remoteness of the site from major sources of anthropogenic pollutants. On the other hand, the mean crustal enrichment factors, calculated using Ba as a conservative crustal element, are much higher than unity (84 for Tl, 100 for Mo, 140 for Pb, 166 for Zn, 262 for As, 526 for Cd, and 570 for Sb, respectively), indicating that these elements are of anthropogenic origin. Combining the Pb isotope ratios and the HYSPLIT model 5-day backward trajectory analysis, we have identified episodic long-range transport of air pollutants from diverse source regions of China, Korea, Japan and Taiwan to the site in summer (June to August). By comparison, an increasing long-range transport of pollution from China was observed in autumn (September and October). Finally, our study shows that IORS is an ideal background site for monitoring levels of concentrations and source origins of atmospheric trace elements in East Asia.

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-10-25

    Oct 25, 2017 ... stigma and superstition are known to lead to frequent presentation .... The limited documented research on challenges to help-seeking behaviour for cancer ..... to touch your breast [16] that breast self-examination may cause.

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-10-02

    Oct 2, 2015 ... thought to prevent infection, but recent research has proven otherwise. In addition ... One patient had ophthalmalgia and was exposed to. Kaiy for one year and ... migraine, ear infections, tuberculosis, bone fractures, epilepsy,.

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-07-12

    Jul 12, 2016 ... multiple risk factors provides support for multiple-behavior interventions as ... consumption) with smoking therefore needs further research. As such this study .... restaurants, in bars, and on a statewide basis. They preferred to.

  18. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mini-clinical-evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) is a way of assessing the clinical ... Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Medical Health. Research ..... mini-CEX assessment and feedback session, the greater the likelihood of.

  19. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... Qualitative data, content analysis approach was used. Results: Overall 422 .... Study design: A mixed method cross-sectional design using both quantitative and qualitative research methods as described by. Hanson et al [33] ...

  20. Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. December 2017, Vol. 9, No. 4 AJHPE 171. During curriculum development, teachers ... Ideally, examiners need an educational method to determine ..... A major focus of this study was addressing the human resource gap when.

  2. Decommissioning of the Dragon High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Located at the Former United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Research Site at Winfrith - 13180

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Anthony A. [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    The Dragon Reactor was constructed at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Winfrith in Dorset through the late 1950's and into the early 1960's. It was a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) with helium gas coolant and graphite moderation. It operated as a fuel testing and demonstration reactor at up to 20 MW (Thermal) from 1964 until 1975, when international funding for this project was terminated. The fuel was removed from the core in 1976 and the reactor was put into Safestore. To meet the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) objective to 'drive hazard reduction' [1] it is necessary to decommission and remediate all the Research Sites Restoration Ltd (RSRL) facilities. This includes the Dragon Reactor where the activated core, pressure vessel and control rods and the contaminated primary circuit (including a {sup 90}Sr source) still remain. It is essential to remove these hazards at the appropriate time and return the area occupied by the reactor to a safe condition. (author)

  3. Sealing of exploratory boreholes in clay reactivity of ordinary portland cement (OPC) grouts and various lithologies from the Harwell research site. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.; George, I.A.; Bloodworth, A.J.; Robins, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    As part of a research programme on the disposal of radioactive wastes in clay, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) has been used in the completion of boreholes on the Harwell Research Site, AERE, Oxfordshire. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of OPC and the alkaline pore fluids generated during its setting on the various lithological types encountered in the boreholes. To facilitate this, samples of core representing the various rock types were selected and cement-rock composites were prepared from these in the laboratory to simulate the borehole cements. After a curing period of 15 months the cores and associated cement plugs were examined for any signs of reactivity or bonding. The best cement-rock bonding was shown by naturally well-cemented sandstone and limestone lithologies. Although no significant chemical reaction was seen to have occurred between OPC and rock, the OPC appears able to bind onto the rock surface because of the rigidity of the rock surface. Therefore, the best cement rock bonding and seal with OPC may be expected in the limestones of the Great Oolite Group, Inferior Oolite Group and parts of the Corallian beds. Because of the reactivity of OPC towards certain lithologies a better borehole seal in such a sedimentary sequence might be achieved using a bentonite backfill in those parts of the sequence which either react with or bond only weakly to OPC

  4. Ground penetrating radar for fracture mapping in underground hazardous waste disposal sites: A case study from an underground research tunnel, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Sep; Kwon, Jang-Soon; Um, Evan Schankee

    2017-06-01

    Secure disposal or storage of nuclear waste within stable geologic environments hinges on the effectiveness of artificial and natural radiation barriers. Fractures in the bedrock are viewed as the most likely passage for the transport of radioactive waste away from a disposal site. We utilize ground penetrating radar (GPR) to map fractures in the tunnel walls of an underground research tunnel at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). GPR experiments within the KAERI Underground Research Tunnel (KURT) were carried out by using 200 MHz, 500 MHz, and 1000 MHz antennas. By using the high-frequency antennas, we were able to identify small-scale fractures, which were previously unidentified during the tunnel excavation process. Then, through 3-D visualization of the grid survey data, we reconstructed the spatial distribution and interconnectivity of the multi-scale fractures within the wall. We found that a multi-frequency GPR approach provided more details of the complex fracture network, including deep structures. Furthermore, temporal changes in reflection polarity between the GPR surveys enabled us to infer the hydraulic characteristics of the discrete fracture network developed behind the surveyed wall. We hypothesized that the fractures exhibiting polarity change may be due to a combination of air-filled and mineralogical boundaries. Simulated GPR scans for the considered case were consistent with the observed GPR data. If our assumption is correct, the groundwater flow into these near-surface fractures may form the water-filled fractures along the existing air-filled ones and hence cause the changes in reflection polarity over the given time interval (i.e., 7 days). Our results show that the GPR survey is an efficient tool to determine fractures at various scales. Time-lapse GPR data may be essential to characterize the hydraulic behavior of discrete fracture networks in underground disposal facilities.

  5. Towards a More Competitive Italy in Clinical Research: The Survey of Attitudes towards Trial sites in Europe (The SAT-EU Study TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gehring

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available  BackgroundItaly is Europe’s third largest pharmaceutical market, yet it ranks only ninth in the number of NIH-registered clinical trials per capita. The aim of our study was to explore stakeholders’ perception of Italy as place to undertake clinical trials, and to estimate the potential economic impact of selected reforms in terms of incremental trial activity.MethodsThe Survey of Attitudes towards Trials in Europe (SAT-EU Study was an anonymous, web-based survey which systematically assessed factors impacting clinical trial site selection in Europe. Estimates of Italian economic impact were developed in collaboration with AICRO (Association of Italian Contract Research Organisations.ResultsResponses were obtained from 485 professionals in 34 countries (15% residing in Italy representing over 100 institutions, spanning BioPharma Clinical Research Organizations (CROs, and Academic Clinical Trial Units (CTUs. Italy ranked tenth of twelve in terms of accessibility and transparency of information required to run clinical trials, and last with respect to predictability and speed of Ethics Committees. Costs of running clinical trials were not considered critical, whereas, fragmented and slow approval process was. Streamlined centralized trial authorization would translate into an estimated 1.1 billion Euros of incremental trial investments over three years. ConclusionsClinical trial professionals consider Italy’s governance of clinical research suboptimal, among the worst in Europe, and indicate that much could be done to make Italy more attractive for clinical trial investments. The present study also provides evidence about stakeholders’ willingness to invest in trials and its economic consequences provided effective reforms are put in place. 

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-05-18

    May 18, 2017 ... available to populations of developing countries [2-5]. In 2013, in. Western and Central Europe and ..... initiation among the infected persons in the community. Addressing stigma and educating ... Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research (P30AI042853). Tables. Table 1: Baseline characteristics of ...

  7. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    15 févr. 2016 ... présentent un Indice de Masse Corporel (IMC) normal, les autres femmes sont soit ..... In The health belief model and personal health behavior, edited by MH ... Evaluation of the Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale. Research in.

  8. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-14

    Mar 14, 2017 ... R Ebrahim,1 MSc (Dent); H Julie,2 MPH, MCur, PhD. 1 Extended ... and research is applied to develop and sustain society.[5]. Methods .... service they want, not the service we want to give whether they want it or. Co math. G.

  9. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... Page number not for citation purposes. 1. Prevalence and determinants of common mental ..... illnesses were smoke cigarette in the last 3 months that make prevalence of tobacco use 38.2%. ..... Okasha A, Karam E.Mental health services and research in the. Arab world. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-04-21

    Apr 21, 2014 ... Prospective assessment of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea in ... Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of .... University Teaching Hospital Health Research Ethics Committee ... BANG, Berlin questionnaire and the American Society of .... The epidemiology of adult obstructive sleep.

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-06-24

    Jun 24, 2015 ... related immunosuppression, previous history of TB, and pause in treatment [6]. In Brazil, researchers .... treatment, use of traditional medicines or herbs, history of TB drug side effects and treatment delay). ..... therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in Lima Ciudad, Peru. International journal of tuberculosis and ...

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. May 2016, Vol. 8, No. 1 AJHPE 37. Students who enrol in occupational therapy (OT) at the. University of Kwa Zulu-Natal (UKZN), Durban, South Africa ... The latter may include becoming familiar with the disintegrating social systems in primary .... They also lacked the skills needed to adapt sessions and failed to ...

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-06-22

    Jun 22, 2015 ... collaboration with Makerere University, School of Public Health. We acknowledge The Family Health Research and Development Centre. (FHRDC) Uganda. Supported by Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for. Population & Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, ...

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, a focus on competence alone is inadequate to produce graduates who are capable of adapting to the changing needs of health systems. While knowledge and technical ... shared their responses to guided questions. There were three sessions; after each session the researcher aggregated participant responses ...

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... by Hazarika in a population-based study in India. The researcher noted that patients' preference to the private health facilities was due mainly to their dissatisfaction with the services in the public health facilities [11]. Furthermore, the quality of the services in the private health facilities could also be a major ...

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-20

    Mar 20, 2018 ... student health professionals in various institutions, both in South Africa. (SA) and internationally. ... field include dentists, dental therapists and oral hygienists in training, .... The College of Health Sciences at UKZN has four schools: clinical ..... Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy ...

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Abstract. Introduction: Medical and dental students are a high-risk group for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection which is an ... The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. ... Research ... in the College of Health Sciences and clinical students (years four to .... Hepatology International.2017 Jan; 11(1):.

  18. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-01-19

    Jan 19, 2015 ... One research assistant was available to assist the learners and to answer questions while they completed the questionnaires during a classroom period. ..... PubMed | Google Scholar. 4. Hall PA, Holmqvist M, Sherry SB. Risky adolescent sexual behaviour: A psychological perspective for primary care.

  19. Summary of air permeability data from single-hole injection tests in unsaturated fractured tuffs at the Apache Leap Research Site: Results of steady-state test interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, A.G.; Geddis, A.M.; Henrich, M.J.; Lohrstorfer, C.F.; Neuman, S.P.

    1996-03-01

    This document summarizes air permeability estimates obtained from single hole pneumatic injection tests in unsaturated fractured tuffs at the Covered Borehole Site (CBS) within the larger apache Leap Research Site (ALRS). Only permeability estimates obtained from a steady state interpretation of relatively stable pressure and flow rate data are included. Tests were conducted in five boreholes inclined at 45 degree to the horizontal, and one vertical borehole. Over 180 borehole segments were tested by setting the packers 1 m apart. Additional tests were conducted in segments of lengths 0.5, 2.0, and 3.0 m in one borehole, and 2.0 m in another borehole, bringing the total number of tests to over 270. Tests were conducted by maintaining a constant injection rate until air pressure became relatively stable and remained so for some time. The injection rate was then incremented by a constant value and the procedure repeated. The air injection rate, pressure, temperature, and relative humidity were recorded. For each relatively stable period of injection rate and pressure, air permeability was estimated by treating the rock around each test interval as a uniform, isotropic porous medium within which air flows as a single phase under steady state, in a pressure field exhibiting prolate spheroidal symmetry. For each permeability estimate the authors list the corresponding injection rate, pressure, temperature and relative humidity. They also present selected graphs which show how the latter quantities vary with time; logarithmic plots of pressure versus time which demonstrate the importance of borehole storage effects during the early transient portion of each incremental test period; and semilogarithmic plots of pressure versus recovery time at the end of each test sequence

  20. Impacts of petroleum production on ground and surface waters: Results from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research A site, Osage County Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Thordsen, J.J.; Kakouros, E.; Herkelrath, W.N.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary group of about 20 scientists, we are investigating the transport, fate, natural attenuation, and ecosystem impacts of inorganic salts and organic compounds present in releases of produced water and associated hydrocarbons at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) sites, located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Geochemical data collected from nearby oil wells show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (???150,000 mg/L total dissolved solids [TDS]), with relatively high concentrations of Mg, Sr, and NH4, but low SO4 and H2S. Results from the depleted OSPER A site show that the salts continue to be removed from the soil and surficial rocks, but degraded oil persists on the contaminated surface. Eventually, the bulk of inorganic salts and dissolved organics in the brine will reach the adjacent Skiatook Lake, a 4250-ha (10,501-ac) potable water reservoir. Repeated sampling of 44 wells show a plume of high-salinity water (2000-30,000 mg/L TDS) at intermediate depths that intersects Skiatook Lake and extends beyond the visibly impacted areas. No liquid petroleum was observed in this plume, but organic acid anions, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), and other volatile organic carbon (VOC) are present. The chemical composition of released brine is modified by sorption, mineral precipitation and dissolution, evapotranspiration, volatilization, and bacterially mediated oxidation-reduction reactions, in addition to mixing with percolating precipitation water, lake water, and pristine groundwater. Results show that only minor amounts of salt are removed by runoff, supporting the conclusion that significant amounts of salts from produced water and petroleum releases still remain in the soils and rocks of the impacted area after more than 65 yr of natural attenuation. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  1. Peculiarities of the High-Level Concrete-Encased Radwaste Repository Disposition at the Radwaste Disposal Site of the Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.G.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Gorodetsky, G.G.; Zverkov, Yu.A.; Ivanov, O.P.; Lemus, A.V.; Semenov, S.G.; Stepanov, V.E.; Chesnokov, A.V.; Shisha, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents peculiarities of organization and performance of activities on disposition of the old repository that contained high-level waste and located at the radwaste disposal site of the Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' in Moscow. The repository was constructed in the late 1950's. A large number of cases with high-level waste were placed in the repository along with low- and intermediate-level waste. When the repository was filled in 1973, the entire radwaste mass was encased in concrete matrix which caused difficulties with the radwaste extraction and made the work on the repository disposition highly hazardous in terms of radiation conditions. Based on results of the preliminary radiation survey of the repository, technologies and equipment to be used in disposition works were selected, and a decision on construction of external radiation shielding around the repository to maintain normal radiation conditions during these works was made. Specific features of the selected radiation shielding design constructed around the repository and of a technology used for the radwaste extraction from the repository are provided. According to the technology, conventional construction machines equipped with a hydraulic hammer or a clamshell were used for destruction of the concrete-encased radwaste mass and extraction of low-level waste. Intermediate- and high-level waste was extracted by remotely controlled robots operating inside the radiation shielding structure. Video cameras and a gamma imager were used for detection of high-level waste or fragments of such radwaste in the mass concrete being destroyed and for guiding remotely controlled robots. Peculiarities of rapid control of changes in radiation conditions in the working areas are presented. This control was performed using a gamma locator with on-line transmission of its data to a PC for their processing. With disposition of this not easily accessible repository, the stage of remediation of old

  2. Researching effective approaches to cleaning in hospitals: protocol of the REACH study, a multi-site stepped-wedge randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lisa; Farrington, Alison; Mitchell, Brett G; Barnett, Adrian G; Halton, Kate; Allen, Michelle; Page, Katie; Gardner, Anne; Havers, Sally; Bailey, Emily; Dancer, Stephanie J; Riley, Thomas V; Gericke, Christian A; Paterson, David L; Graves, Nicholas

    2016-03-24

    The Researching Effective Approaches to Cleaning in Hospitals (REACH) study will generate evidence about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a novel cleaning initiative that aims to improve the environmental cleanliness of hospitals. The initiative is an environmental cleaning bundle, with five interdependent, evidence-based components (training, technique, product, audit and communication) implemented with environmental services staff to enhance hospital cleaning practices. The REACH study will use a stepped-wedge randomised controlled design to test the study intervention, an environmental cleaning bundle, in 11 Australian hospitals. All trial hospitals will receive the intervention and act as their own control, with analysis undertaken of the change within each hospital based on data collected in the control and intervention periods. Each site will be randomised to one of the 11 intervention timings with staggered commencement dates in 2016 and an intervention period between 20 and 50 weeks. All sites complete the trial at the same time in 2017. The inclusion criteria allow for a purposive sample of both public and private hospitals that have higher-risk patient populations for healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The primary outcome (objective one) is the monthly number of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemias (SABs), Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) and vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) infections, per 10,000 bed days. Secondary outcomes for objective one include the thoroughness of hospital cleaning assessed using fluorescent marker technology, the bio-burden of frequent touch surfaces post cleaning and changes in staff knowledge and attitudes about environmental cleaning. A cost-effectiveness analysis will determine the second key outcome (objective two): the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio from implementation of the cleaning bundle. The study uses the integrated Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (i

  3. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 8, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.4 through 8.7; Glossary and Acronyms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Section 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE's Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 88 figs., 42 tabs

  4. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 6, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.3.2 through 8.3.4.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE's Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 35 figs., 70 tabs

  5. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 8, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.3.5 through 8.3.5.20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 68 figs., 102 tabs.

  6. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 5, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.3.1.5 through 8.3.1.17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the SOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules.

  7. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 5, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.3.1.5 through 8.3.1.17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the SOE's Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules

  8. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 8, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.3.5 through 8.3.5.20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE's Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 68 figs., 102 tabs

  9. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 8, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.4 through 8.7; Glossary and Acronyms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Section 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 88 figs., 42 tabs.

  10. Limnology of the Green Lakes Valley: Phytoplankton ecology and dissolved organic matter biogeochemistry at a long-term ecological research site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew P.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surface waters are the lowest points in the landscape, and therefore serve as excellent integrators and indicators of changes taking place in the surrounding terrestrial and atmospheric environment.Aims: Here we synthesise the findings of limnological studies conducted during the past 15 years in streams and lakes in the Green Lakes Valley, which is part of the Niwot Ridge Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) Site.Methods: The importance of these studies is discussed in the context of aquatic ecosystems as indicators, integrators, and regulators of environmental change. Specifically, investigations into climatic, hydrologic, and nutrient controls on present-day phytoplankton, and historical diatom, community composition in the alpine lake, Green Lake 4, are reviewed. In addition, studies of spatial and temporal patterns in dissolved organic matter (DOM) biogeochemistry and reactive transport modelling that have taken place in the Green Lakes Valley are highlighted.Results and conclusions: The findings of these studies identify specific shifts in algal community composition and DOM biogeochemistry that are indicative of changing environmental conditions and provide a framework for detecting future environmental change in the Green Lakes Valley and in other alpine watersheds. Moreover, the studies summarised here demonstrate the importance of long-term monitoring programmes such as the LTER programme.

  11. Small-scale variations of climate change in mountainous forested terrain - a regional study from H.J. Andrews Long Term Ecological Research site in Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honzakova, Katerina; Hoffmann, Peter; Jones, Julia; Thomas, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    There has been conflicting evidence as to whether high elevations are experiencing more pronounced climate warming than lower elevations in mountainous regions. In this study we analyze temperature records from H.J. Andrews Long Term Ecological Research, Oregon, USA and several nearby areas, comprising together 28 stations located in Cascade Mountains. The data, starting in 1958, are first checked for quality and homogenized using the Standard Normal Homogeneity Test. As a reference, composite climate time series based on the Global Historic Climate Network is created and together with cross-referencing against station records used to correct breaks and shifts in the data. In the next step, we investigate temperature patterns of the study site from 1958 to 2016 and compare them for valley and hill stations. In particular, we explore seasonality and inter-annual variability of the records and trends of the last day of frost. Additionally, 'cold' sums (positive and negative) are calculated to obtain a link between temperature and ecosystems' responses (such as budbreaks). So far, valley stations seem to be more prone to climate change than ridge or summit stations, contrary to current thinking. Building on previous knowledge, we attempt to provide physical explanations for the temperature records, focusing on wind patterns and associated phenomena such as cold air drainage and pooling. To aid this we analyze wind speed and direction data available for some of the stations since 1996, including seasonality and inter-annual variability of the observed flows.

  12. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  13. Report of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research Review Committee on the site-specific conceptual design of the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    After it was established in early 1989, the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) began to prepare a detailed site-specific SSC conceptual design, including cost and schedule estimates. As detailed in the SSC Site-Specific Conceptual Design Report (SCDR), this design builds upon the design in the March 1986 SSC Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and takes into account characteristics of the SSC site, results of continuing magnet R ampersand D, and advances in accelerator design

  14. Criminal Justice Web Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    Evaluates 15 criminal justice Web sites that have been selected according to the following criteria: authority, currency, purpose, objectivity, and potential usefulness to researchers. The sites provide narrative and statistical information concerning crime, law enforcement, the judicial system, and corrections. Searching techniques are also…

  15. Site decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicker, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the several DOE sites that have been radiologically decontaminated under the auspices of the Nevada Operations Office are three whose physical characteristics are unique. These are the Tatum Dome Test Site (TDTS) near Hattiesburg, Mississippi; a location of mountainous terrain (Pahute Mesa) on the Nevada Test Site; and the GNOME site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. In each case the contamination, the terrain, and the climate conditions were different. This presentation includes a brief description of each site, the methods used to perform radiological surveys, the logistics required to support the decontamination (including health physics and sample analysis), and the specific techniques used to reduce or remove the contamination

  16. The Jungfraujoch high-alpine research station (3454 m) as a background clean continental site for the measurement of aerosol parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyeki, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Jost, D.T.; Weingartner, E.; Colbeck, I.

    1997-01-01

    Aerosol physical parameter measurements are reported here for the first full annual set of data from the Jungfraujoch site. Comparison to NOAA background and regional stations indicate that the site may be designated as 'clean continental' during the free tropospheric influenced period 03:00 -09:00. (author) figs., tab., refs

  17. The Jungfraujoch high-alpine research station (3454 m) as a background clean continental site for the measurement of aerosol parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyeki, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Jost, D.T.; Weingartner, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Colbeck, I. [Essex Univ., Colchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01

    Aerosol physical parameter measurements are reported here for the first full annual set of data from the Jungfraujoch site. Comparison to NOAA background and regional stations indicate that the site may be designated as `clean continental` during the free tropospheric influenced period 03:00 -09:00. (author) figs., tab., refs.

  18. Seasonal variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations, new particle formation and atmospheric oxidation capacity at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. T. Nguyen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an analysis of the physical properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles measured at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord (VRS, northeast Greenland, between July 2010 and February 2013. The study focuses on particle number concentrations, particle number size distributions and the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF events and their seasonality in the high Arctic, where observations and characterization of such aerosol particle properties and corresponding events are rare and understanding of related processes is lacking.A clear accumulation mode was observed during the darker months from October until mid-May, which became considerably more pronounced during the prominent Arctic haze months from March to mid-May. In contrast, nucleation- and Aitken-mode particles were predominantly observed during the summer months. Analysis of wind direction and wind speed indicated possible contributions of marine sources from the easterly side of the station to the observed summertime particle number concentrations, while southwesterly to westerly winds dominated during the darker months. NPF events lasting from hours to days were mostly observed from June until August, with fewer events observed during the months with less sunlight, i.e., March, April, September and October. The results tend to indicate that ozone (O3 might be weakly anti-correlated with particle number concentrations of the nucleation-mode range (10–30 nm in almost half of the NPF events, while no positive correlation was observed. Calculations of air mass back trajectories using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model for the NPF event days suggested that the onset or interruption of events could possibly be explained by changes in air mass origin. A map of event occurrence probability was computed, indicating that southerly air masses from over the Greenland Sea were more likely linked to those

  19. Site organization and site arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissonnet, B.; Macqueron, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    The present paper deals with criteria for the choice of a production unit or power plant site, the organization and development of a site in terms of its particular characteristics and takes into account personnel considerations in site organizations as well as the problem of integrating the architecture into the environment. (RW) [de

  20. Selected micrometeorological, soil-moisture, and evapotranspiration data at Amargosa Desert Research Site in Nye County near Beatty, Nevada, 2001-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Mayers, C. Justin; Garcia, C. Amanda; Andraski, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    Selected micrometeorological and soil-moisture data were collected at the Amargosa Desert Research Site adjacent to a low-level radio-active waste and hazardous chemical waste facility near Beatty, Nevada, 2001-05. Evapotranspiration data were collected from February 2002 through the end of December 2005. Data were col-lected in support of ongoing research to improve the understanding of hydrologic and contaminant-transport processes in arid environments. Micrometeorological data include solar radiation, net radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, saturated and ambient vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, precipitation, near-surface soil temperature, soil-heat flux and soil-water content. All micrometeorological data were collected using a 10-second sampling interval by data loggers that output daily and hourly mean values. Daily maximum and minimum values are based on hourly mean values. Precipitation data output includes daily and hourly totals. Selected soil-moisture profiles at depth include periodic measurements of soil volumetric water-content measurements at nine neutron-probe access tubes to depths ranging from 5.25 to 29.25 meters. Evapotranspiration data include measurement of daily evapotranspiration and 15-minute fluxes of the four principal energy budget components of latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, soil-heat flux, and net radiation. Other data collected and used in equations to determine evapotranspiration include temperature and water content of soil, temperature and vapor pressure of air, and covariance values. Evapotranspiration and flux estimates during 15-minute intervals were calculated at a 0.1-second execution interval using the eddy covariance method. Data files included in this report contain the complete micrometeorological, soil-moisture, and evapotranspiration field data sets. These data files are presented in tabular Excel spreadsheet format. This report highlights selected data contained in the

  1. Research Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Library Search Site submit Contact Us | Remote Access Standards Theses/Dissertations Research Help Subject Guides Library Training Video Tutorials Alerts Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 Los

  2. Site operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, W.B.; Ebenhack, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    This chapter is a discussion of the management and operations practices used at the Barnwell Waste Management Facility in Barnwell, SC. The following topics are discussed: (1) Waste receiving and inspection, including manifest and certificates of compliance, radiological surveys, disposition of nonconforming items, and decontamination and disposition of secondary waste streams; (2) Waste disposal, including Title 10 CFR 61 requirements, disposal area evaluations, shipment offloading, container emplacement, and radiation protection; (3) Trench closure, including trench backfilling, trench capping, and permanent markers; (4) Site maintenance and stabilization, including trench maintenance, surface water management, and site closure activities; (5) Site monitoring programs, including operational monitoring, and environmental monitoring program; (6) Personnel training and qualifications, including basic training program, safety training program, special skills training, and physical qualifications; (7) Records management, including waste records, personnel training records, personnel dosimetry records, site monitoring records, trench qualification and construction records, and site drawings and stabilization records; (8) Site security; (9) Emergency response plans; and (10) Quality assurance

  3. Nuclear site selection studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharib, A.; Zohoorian Izadpanah, A.A.; Iranmanesh, H.

    2000-01-01

    It is of special importance, especially from the nuclear safety viewpoint, to select suitable sites for different nuclear structures with the considered future activities. Site selection sometimes involves high costs not necessarily for merely selecting of site but for some preliminary measures to be taken so as the site may have the necessary characteristics. The more suitable the natural characteristics of the site for the considered project, the more successful and efficient the project, the lower the project costs and the longer the project operation period. If so, the project will cause the growth of public culture and sustainable socioeconomic development. This paper is the result of the conclusion of numerous massive reports of this activity in the preliminary phase based on theories, practices and the related safety principles on this ground as well as the application of data and information of the past and a glance to the future. The conception of need for a site for medium structures and nuclear research projects and how to perform this process are presented step by step here with a scientific approach to its selection during the investigations. In this study, it is practically described how the site is selected, by determining and defining the characteristics of research and nuclear projects with medium structures and also its fitting to the optimum site. The discovered sites typically involve the best advantages in technical and economic aspects and no particular contrast with the concerned structures

  4. Studies on the possibility of seawater intrusion in and around central air conditioning plant site at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriraman, A.K.; Tirumalesh, K.; Shivanna, K.; Tyagi, A.K.; War, S.B.; Shetty, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    The central air conditioning plant (CAP) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) uses raw water from Mumbai Mahanagar Palika (MMP) for its condenser cooling purposes. The same raw water is also used for drinking purposes. In an effort to minimize the dependency of raw water from MMP the CAP authorities felt a need for locating an alternate source of usable raw water. In this context it was decided to use water from the nearby bore wells located within CAP premises near the coast. The CAP site is located [19 deg 30' N, 72 deg 6' E] on the slope between the lush green Trombay hills and Mumbai Harbor Bay (MHB), resulting in the outflow of the most of the rainwater into MHB. However, part of the rainfall seeps into the subsurface resulting in the availability of groundwater through the bore wells located on the coast. The location of the bore wells close to the sea coast (∼ 200 metres away from high tide line of the highly polluted MHB), in the middle of the lush green zone, raised a question on the possible intrusion of seawater into the groundwater and its adverse impact on the operational practices of CAP. In this connection there was a need to evaluate the water from three bore wells for their use as coolant water at CAP. This report reveals the detailed study carried out on the physico-chemical nature of the water from the bore wells, for two years and the implications of these findings on operational practices of CAP. In addition environmental isotope ( 2 H, 8 O and 3 H) study was also carried out to substantiate the findings of physico-chemical study. These studies revealed interesting features. Groundwater quality in this site is mainly influenced by precipitation and rock- water interaction. The minerals present in the Basalt rocks are the source materials for the dominant ions (Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ and HCO 3 - ) observed in the waters of bore well no 1 and 3, whereas high sodium in ground water from bore well no 2 may be due to ion exchange process. Characteristic

  5. Review of existing instrumentation and evaluation of possibilities for research and development of instrumentation to determine future levels of radon at a proposed building site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The rate at which radon enters houses from the soil depends on the pressure differential between the house and the soil, the resistance of the soil to gas movement, and the radon release rate of the soil near the house. The pressure differential between house and soil is caused by wind forces and temperature differences, which depend on the size of the building and the season, and are therefore almost independent of the site location. The soil resistance (permeability) and radon release rate are site specific, and a computer study of radon movement through the soil suggested that these parameters could be combined to give a Radon Index Number (RIN) for a site that would be proportional to the radon entry rate into a typical house. Regional RIN estimates would be produced using existing airborne gamma survey maps to estimate average soil radon release rate, plus agricultural soil classification maps to estimate permeability. Area RIN estimates would be produced using portable gamma spectroscopy equipment to estimate soil radon release rates over an area, plus simple soil grain size analysis techniques to estimate permeability. Site RIN estimates would be produced using laboratory techniques to measure both the radon release rate and the permeability of several undisturbed soil core samples taken at depths over the site. These would provide the most accurate value of RIN possible for a given site

  6. Validity of Torque-Data Collection at Multiple Sites: A Framework for Collaboration on Clinical-Outcomes Research in Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenze, Christopher; Eltouhky, Moataz; Thomas, Abbey; Sutherlin, Mark; Hart, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Collecting torque data using a multimode dynamometer is common in sports-medicine research. The error in torque measurements across multiple sites and dynamometers has not been established. To assess the validity of 2 calibration protocols across 3 dynamometers and the error associated with torque measurement for each system. Observational study. 3 university laboratories at separate institutions. 2 Biodex System 3 dynamometers and 1 Biodex System 4 dynamometer. System calibration was completed using the manufacturer-recommended single-weight method and an experimental calibration method using a series of progressive weights. Both calibration methods were compared with a manually calculated theoretical torque across a range of applied weights. Relative error, absolute error, and percent error were calculated at each weight. Each outcome variable was compared between systems using 95% confidence intervals across low (0-65 Nm), moderate (66-110 Nm), and high (111-165 Nm) torque categorizations. Calibration coefficients were established for each system using both calibration protocols. However, within each system the calibration coefficients generated using the single-weight (System 4 = 2.42 [0.90], System 3a = 1.37 [1.11], System 3b = -0.96 [1.45]) and experimental calibration protocols (System 4 = 3.95 [1.08], System 3a = -0.79 [1.23], System 3b = 2.31 [1.66]) were similar and displayed acceptable mean relative error compared with calculated theoretical torque values. Overall, percent error was greatest for all 3 systems in low-torque conditions (System 4 = 11.66% [6.39], System 3a = 6.82% [11.98], System 3b = 4.35% [9.49]). The System 4 significantly overestimated torque across all 3 weight increments, and the System 3b overestimated torque over the moderate-torque increment. Conversion of raw voltage to torque values using the single-calibration-weight method is valid and comparable to a more complex multiweight calibration process; however, it is clear that

  7. Superfund Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This layer represents active Superfund Sites published by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These data were extracted from the Superfund Enterprise...

  8. Site development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noack, J.

    1975-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a general view over all necessary considerations to develop the site after it has been chosen and before starting with the construction of a nuclear power plant. (orig./RW) [de

  9. Site selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, C.W.

    1983-07-01

    The conditions and criteria for selecting a site for a nuclear weapons test at the Nevada Test Site are summarized. Factors considered are: (1) scheduling of drill rigs, (2) scheduling of site preparation (dirt work, auger hole, surface casing, cementing), (3) schedule of event (when are drill hole data needed), (4) depth range of proposed W.P., (5) geologic structure (faults, Pz contact, etc.), (6) stratigraphy (alluvium, location of Grouse Canyon Tuff, etc.), (7) material properties (particularly montmorillonite and CO 2 content), (8) water table depth, (9) potential drilling problems (caving), (10) adjacent collapse craters and chimneys, (11) adjacent expended but uncollapsed sites, (12) adjacent post-shot or other small diameter holes, (13) adjacent stockpile emplacement holes, (14) adjacent planned events (including LANL), (15) projected needs of Test Program for various DOB's and operational separations, and (16) optimal use of NTS real estate

  10. Transfer of innovation on allergic rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity in the elderly (MACVIA-ARIA) - EIP on AHA Twinning Reference Site (GARD research demonstration project)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Agache, I; Aliberti, M R

    2018-01-01

    The overarching goals of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) are to enable European citizens to lead healthy, active and independent lives whilst ageing. The EIP on AHA includes 74 Reference Sites. The aim of this study was to transfer innovation from an ...

  11. Transfer of innovation on allergic rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity in the elderly (MACVIA-ARIA) - EIP on AHA Twinning Reference Site (GARD research demonstration project)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Agache, I.; Aliberti, M. R.; Angles, R.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Anto, J. M.; Arnavielhe, S.; Asayag, E.; Bacci, E.; Bedbrook, A.; Bachert, C.; Baroni, I.; Barreto, B. A.; Bedolla-Barajas, M.; Bergmann, K. C.; Bertorello, L.; Bewick, M.; Bieber, T.; Birov, S.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Blua, A.; Bochenska Marciniak, M.; Bogus-Buczynska, I.; Bosnic-Anticevich, S.; Bosse, I.; Bourret, R.; Bucca, C.; Buonaiuto, R.; Burguete Cabanas, M. T.; Caillaud, D.; Caimmi, D. P.; Caiazza, D.; Camargos, P.; Canfora, G.; Cardona, V.; Carriazo, A. M.; Cartier, C.; Castellano, G.; Chavannes, N. H.; Cecci, L.; Ciaravolo, M. M.; Cingi, C.; Ciceran, A.; Colas, L.; Colgan, E.; Coll, J.; Conforti, D.; Correia de Sousa, J.; Cortés-Grimaldo, R. M.; Corti, F.; Costa, E.; Courbis, A. L.; Cousein, E.; Cruz, A. A.; Custovic, A.; Cvetkovski, B.; Dario, C.; da Silva, J.; Dauvilliers, Y.; de Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; de Feo, G.; de Martino, B.; Demoly, P.; de Vries, G.; Di Capua Ercolano, S.; Di Carluccio, N.; Doulapsi, M.; Dray, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Eller, E.; Emuzyte, R.; Espinoza-Contreras, J. G.; Estrada-Cardona, A.; Farrell, J.; Farsi, A.; Ferrero, J.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Fontaine, J. F.; Forti, S.; Gálvez-Romero, J. L.; García-Cobas, C. I.; Garcia Cruz, M. H.; Gemicioğlu, B.; Gerth van Wijk, R.; Guidacci, M.; Gómez-Vera, J.; Guldemond, N. A.; Gutter, Z.; Haahtela, T.; Hajjam, J.; Hellings, P. W.; Hernández-Velázquez, L.; Illario, M.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jares, E.; Joos, G.; Just, J.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Karjalainen, J.; Keil, T.; Khaltaev, N.; Klimek, L.; Kritikos, V.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Kolek, V.; Krzych-Fałta, E.; Kupczyk, M.; Lacwik, P.; La Grutta, S.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Laune, D.; Lauri, D.; Lavrut, J.; Lessa, M.; Levato, G.; Lewis, L.; Lieten, I.; Lipiec, A.; Louis, R.; Luna-Pech, J. A.; Magnan, A.; Malva, J.; Maspero, J. F.; Matta-Campos, J. J.; Mayora, O.; Medina-Ávalos, M. A.; Melén, E.; Menditto, E.; Millot-Keurinck, J.; Moda, G.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Mösges, R.; Mota-Pinto, A.; Mullol, J.; Muraro, A.; Murray, R.; Noguès, M.; Nalin, M.; Napoli, L.; Neffen, H.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Onorato, G. L.; Palkonen, S.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Passalacqua, G.; Pépin, J. L.; Pereira, A. M.; Persico, M.; Pfaar, O.; Pozzi, A. C.; Prokopakis, E.; Pugin, B.; Raciborski, F.; Rimmer, J.; Rizzo, J. A.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rodríguez-González, M.; Rolla, G.; Roller-Wirnsberger, R. E.; Romano, A.; Romano, M.; Romano, M. R.; Salimäki, J.; Samolinski, B.; Serpa, F. S.; Shamai, S.; Sierra, M.; Sova, M.; Sorlini, M.; Stellato, C.; Stelmach, R.; Strandberg, T.; Stroetmann, V.; Stukas, R.; Szylling, A.; Tan, R.; Tibaldi, V.; Todo-Bom, A.; Toppila-Salmi, S.; Tomazic, P.; Trama, U.; Triggiani, M.; Valero, A.; Valovirta, E.; Valiulis, A.; van Eerd, M.; Vasankari, T.; Vatrella, A.; Ventura, M. T.; Verissimo, M. T.; Viart, F.; Williams, S.; Wagenmann, M.; Wanscher, C.; Westman, M.; Wickman, M.; Young, I.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Zernotti, E.; Zuberbier, T.; Zurkuhlen, A.; de Oliviera, B.; Senn, A.

    2018-01-01

    The overarching goals of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) are to enable European citizens to lead healthy, active and independent lives whilst ageing. The EIP on AHA includes 74 Reference Sites. The aim of this study was to transfer innovation from an app

  12. Transfer of innovation on allergic rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity in the elderly (MACVIA-ARIA) - EIP on AHA Twinning Reference Site (GARD research demonstration project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Agache, I; Aliberti, M R; Angles, R; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Asayag, E; Bacci, E; Bedbrook, A; Bachert, C; Baroni, I; Barreto, B A; Bedolla-Barajas, M; Bergmann, K C; Bertorello, L; Bewick, M; Bieber, T; Birov, S; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blua, A; Bochenska Marciniak, M; Bogus-Buczynska, I; Bosnic-Anticevich, S; Bosse, I; Bourret, R; Bucca, C; Buonaiuto, R; Burguete Cabanas, M T; Caillaud, D; Caimmi, D P; Caiazza, D; Camargos, P; Canfora, G; Cardona, V; Carriazo, A M; Cartier, C; Castellano, G; Chavannes, N H; Cecci, L; Ciaravolo, M M; Cingi, C; Ciceran, A; Colas, L; Colgan, E; Coll, J; Conforti, D; Correia de Sousa, J; Cortés-Grimaldo, R M; Corti, F; Costa, E; Courbis, A L; Cousein, E; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Cvetkovski, B; Dario, C; da Silva, J; Dauvilliers, Y; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; De Feo, G; De Martino, B; Demoly, P; De Vries, G; Di Capua Ercolano, S; Di Carluccio, N; Doulapsi, M; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Eller, E; Emuzyte, R; Espinoza-Contreras, J G; Estrada-Cardona, A; Farrell, J; Farsi, A; Ferrero, J; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Fontaine, J F; Forti, S; Gálvez-Romero, J L; García-Cobas, C I; Garcia Cruz, M H; Gemicioğlu, B; Gerth van Wijk, R; Guidacci, M; Gómez-Vera, J; Guldemond, N A; Gutter, Z; Haahtela, T; Hajjam, J; Hellings, P W; Hernández-Velázquez, L; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jares, E; Joos, G; Just, J; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Karjalainen, J; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Klimek, L; Kritikos, V; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Kolek, V; Krzych-Fałta, E; Kupczyk, M; Lacwik, P; La Grutta, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Lauri, D; Lavrut, J; Lessa, M; Levato, G; Lewis, L; Lieten, I; Lipiec, A; Louis, R; Luna-Pech, J A; Magnan, A; Malva, J; Maspero, J F; Matta-Campos, J J; Mayora, O; Medina-Ávalos, M A; Melén, E; Menditto, E; Millot-Keurinck, J; Moda, G; Morais-Almeida, M; Mösges, R; Mota-Pinto, A; Mullol, J; Muraro, A; Murray, R; Noguès, M; Nalin, M; Napoli, L; Neffen, H; O'Hehir, R E; Onorato, G L; Palkonen, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Passalacqua, G; Pépin, J L; Pereira, A M; Persico, M; Pfaar, O; Pozzi, A C; Prokopakis, E; Pugin, B; Raciborski, F; Rimmer, J; Rizzo, J A; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Rodríguez-González, M; Rolla, G; Roller-Wirnsberger, R E; Romano, A; Romano, M; Romano, M R; Salimäki, J; Samolinski, B; Serpa, F S; Shamai, S; Sierra, M; Sova, M; Sorlini, M; Stellato, C; Stelmach, R; Strandberg, T; Stroetmann, V; Stukas, R; Szylling, A; Tan, R; Tibaldi, V; Todo-Bom, A; Toppila-Salmi, S; Tomazic, P; Trama, U; Triggiani, M; Valero, A; Valovirta, E; Valiulis, A; van Eerd, M; Vasankari, T; Vatrella, A; Ventura, M T; Verissimo, M T; Viart, F; Williams, S; Wagenmann, M; Wanscher, C; Westman, M; Wickman, M; Young, I; Yorgancioglu, A; Zernotti, E; Zuberbier, T; Zurkuhlen, A; De Oliviera, B; Senn, A

    2018-01-01

    The overarching goals of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) are to enable European citizens to lead healthy, active and independent lives whilst ageing. The EIP on AHA includes 74 Reference Sites. The aim of this study was to transfer innovation from an app developed by the MACVIA-France EIP on AHA reference site (Allergy Diary) to other reference sites. The phenotypic characteristics of rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity in adults and the elderly will be compared using validated information and communication technology (ICT) tools (i.e. the Allergy Diary and CARAT: Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test) in 22 Reference Sites or regions across Europe. This will improve the understanding, assessment of burden, diagnosis and management of rhinitis in the elderly by comparison with an adult population. Specific objectives will be: (i) to assess the percentage of adults and elderly who are able to use the Allergy Diary, (ii) to study the phenotypic characteristics and treatment over a 1-year period of rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity at baseline (cross-sectional study) and (iii) to follow-up using visual analogue scale (VAS). This part of the study may provide some insight into the differences between the elderly and adults in terms of response to treatment and practice. Finally (iv) work productivity will be examined in adults. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  13. Leaking Underground Storage Tank Sites in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) sites where petroleum contamination has been found. There may be more than one LUST site per UST site.

  14. Sampling method of water sources at study site Taiping, Perak and Pulau Burung, Penang for research on pollutant movement in underground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Rifaie Mohd Murtadza; Mohd Tadza Abdul Rahman; Kamarudin Samuding; Roslanzairi Mostapa

    2005-01-01

    This paperwork explain the method of water sampling being used to take the water samples from the study sites in Taiping, Perak and Pulau Burung, Pulau Pinang. The sampling involve collecting of water samples for groundwater from boreholes and surface water from canal, river, pond, and ex-mining pond from several locations at the study sites. This study also elaborates the instruments and chemical used. The main purpose of this sampling are to obtain the important water quality parameters such as pH, conductivity, Total Dissolved Solid (TDS), heavy metals, anions, cations, and environmental isotopes delta values (d) for 18O, Deuterium dan Tritium. A correct sampling method according to standard is very important to ensure an accurate and precise results. With this, the data from the laboratory tests result can be fully utilized to make the interpretation of the pollutants movement. (Author)

  15. Fiscal 1999 research report. Survey on geothermal development sites (Survey on natural environment); 1999 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Shizen kankyo chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This report summarizes the result on selecting sites for large-caliber production wells, and landscape characteristic evaluation for simulation, based on the landscape survey on C candidate site for geothermal development. Field survey was made on landscape, plants and animals in the Kirishima Eboshidake area. It was clarified that this area has diverse flora including some rare species such as rein orchid and monkshood which are listed as endangered species. In addition, not a few epiphytes were identified. The zoological survey result showed that planted forests of evergreen coniferous trees which cover a wide range of the surveyed area, and peripheral grassland, scrub and natural forests provide good habitats for mammals such as sika deer and wild boars. On the other hand, no animal species in need of special protection were found. Geologically some traces of landslide occurrence in the past were detected in the northern part of the surveyed area relatively. As the survey result, some promising sites suitable for geothermal development were selected, which are judged to have a relatively small impact on natural environment and landscape. (NEDO)

  16. Site development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaynor, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a low-level radioactive waste land disposal facility is little different than any industrial development of similar scope. Consideration must be made for normal business and operations management, security, facility maintenance, traffic control and necessary amenities for personnel. The item specific to the low-level waste site is the handling of radioactive waste materials and the regulatory and environmental protection procedures that must be planned for and accomodated in the site design and development. Each of these elements and the facility as a whole must be designed to be compatible with local land use plans, available transportation and support services, and the social and economic goals of the local community. Plans should also be made for quality control and orderly construction. This chapter deals with those aspects of the facility, its design and construction which are integral parts to the overall performance of the site

  17. U.S.-GERMAN BILATERAL WORKING GROUP: International Research Cooperation to Develop and Evaluate Tools and Techniques for Revitalization of Potentially Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. German Bilateral Working Group originated in 1990 in order to share and transfer information, ideas, tools and techniques regarding environmental research. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/Office of Research and Development (ORD) and the German Federal Mini...

  18. Site selection

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1968-01-01

    To help resolve the problem of site selection for the proposed 300 GeV machine, the Council selected "three wise men" (left to right, J H Bannier of the Netherlands, A Chavanne of Switzerland and L K Boggild of Denmark).

  19. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2001-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations.

  20. Site Restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations

  1. Paleofaunal and Environmental Research on Miocene Fossil Sites TVOR SE and TVOR S on Fort Polk, Louisiana, with Continued Survey, Collection, Processing, and Documentation of other Miocene Localities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schiebout, Judith

    2004-01-01

    Focus of paleontological research on the Miocene of Fort Polk is currently the marine locality TVOR SE, which also has yielded large and small terrestrial Miocene vertebrates, and a single Cretaceous...

  2. The level and patterns of fertility among women in Kersa Demographic Surveillance and Health Research Center (KDS-HRC) Field site, Kersa District, East Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Zelalem, Desalew; Semahegn, Agumasie; Tesfaye, Gezahegn; Sileshi, Balewgize

    2015-01-01

    Background Fertility is one of the three principal components of population dynamics. High fertility and rapid population growth exert negative influences on economic and social development. This study was aimed to estimate the level and trends of fertility among (15?49 years) old women in kersa demographic surveillance and health research center, kersa district Eastern Ethiopia. Methods The study was conducted at kersa demographic surveillance and health research center in kersa district, Ea...

  3. Radionuclide distributions and migration mechanisms at shallow land burial sites. Annual report of research investigations on the distribution, migration and containment of radionuclides at Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, L.J.

    1982-07-01

    Subsurface waters at Maxey Flats are anoxic systems with high alkalinity and high concentrations of dissolved ferrous ion. Americium and cobalt in these trench waters are made more soluble by the presence of EDTA, while strontium and cesium are unaffected under the same conditions. EDTA is the major organic complexing component in waste trench 27 leachate, but other polar, water-soluble organics are also present. Evidence points to the migration of plutonium between waste trench 27 and inert atmosphere wells as an EDTA complex. Polar organic compounds may influence the migration of 90 Sr and 137 Cs. The primary pathway of water entry into the waste burial trenches is through the trench caps, but major increases in water level have occurred in an experimental trench by subsurface flow. The areal distribution of radionuclides at Maxey Flats has been influenced by surface runoff, deposition from the evaporator plume, subsurface flow and the actions of burrowing animals or deep-rooted trees. Vegetal and surface contamination on site and near site are quite low, and only 60 Co exceeds commonly observed fallout levels. Radionuclide concentrations in surface soil at Maxey Flats are comparable to concentrations resulting from normal fallout in other areas of high rainfall

  4. Wood Storks of the Birdsville Colony and swamps of the Savannah River Site: General overview of research findings, 1983--1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, M.C.

    1993-02-01

    The population of Wood Storks (Mycteria americana) that breeds in the United States has decreased from an estimated 20,000 breeding pairs in 1930 to just under 5,000 pairs in 1980. Since 1980, the number has remained relatively stable, fluctuating between 3,500 and 5,500 breeding pairs. The decline prompted the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to list the United States population of Wood Storks as endangered in 1984. When the US Department of Energy (USDOE) decided to restart L-Reactor on the Savannah River Site (SRS), there was concern that when the reactor was restarted, cooling water flowing into the Steel Creek Delta would raise the water level and the area would become too deep for foraging storks. The potential loss of this area to storks was important because storks had been observed foraging in the Steel Creek Delta. The USDOE began consultation with the USFWS in April, 1984, and the USDOE subsequently agreed to develop and maintain alternative foraging habitat to replace the potential loss. In order to design and manage the alternate foraging ponds as effectively as possible, it was necessary to understand aspects of the biology of the storks, the characteristics of their foraging sites and the patterns of their use of the SRSS. Results are described

  5. Research of mercury removal from sintering flue gas of iron and steel by the open metal site of Mil-101(Cr).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songjian; Mei, Jian; Xu, Haomiao; Liu, Wei; Qu, Zan; Cui, Yong; Yan, Naiqiang

    2018-06-05

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) adsorbent Mil-101(Cr) was introduced for the removal of elemental mercury from sintering flue gas. Physical and chemical characterization of the adsorbents showed that MIL-101(Cr) had the largest BET surface area, high thermal stability and oxidation capacity. Hg 0 removal performance analysis indicated that the Hg 0 removal efficiency of MIL-101(Cr) increased with the increasing temperature and oxygen content. Besides, MIL-101(Cr) had the highest Hg 0 removal performance compared with Cu-BTC, UiO-66 and activated carbon, which can reach about 88% at 250 °C. The XPS and Hg-TPD methods were used to analyze the Hg 0 removal mechanism; the results show that Hg 0 was first adsorbed on the surface of Mil-101(Cr), and then oxidized by the open metal site Cr 3+ . The generated Hg 2+ was then combined surface adsorbed oxygen of adsorbent to form HgO, and the open metal site Cr 2+ was oxidized to Cr 3+ by surface active oxygen again. Furthermore, MIL-101(Cr) had good chemical and thermal stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Researching research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pais, Alexandre; Valero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    We discuss contemporary theories in mathematics education in order to do research on research. Our strategy consists of analysing discursively and ideologically recent key publications addressing the role of theory in mathematics education research. We examine how the field fabricates its object...... of research by deploying Foucault’s notion of bio-politics - mainly to address the object “learning” - and Žižek’s ideology critique - to address the object “mathematics”. These theories, which have already been used in the field to research teaching and learning, have a great potential to contribute...... to a reflexivity of research on its discourses and effects. Furthermore, they enable us to present a clear distinction between what has been called the sociopolitical turn in mathematics education research and what we call a positioning of mathematics education (research) practices in the Political....

  7. SLAC site design aesthetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-10-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a single mission laboratory dedicated to basic research in high energy particle physics. SLAC site also houses Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) which is a multi-mission laboratory for research using beams of ultraviolet light and low energy photons as emitted tangentially from SLAC colliding beam facilities. This paper discusses various aspects of SLAC site design aesthetics under the following headings: (1) imposed footprint of SLAC, (2) description of selected site, (3) use of earth cover for radiation and sight screens, (4) use of landscaping for cosmetic purposes, (5) use of exterior paint colors to soften SLAC impact on neighbors, (6) relocation of SLAC main entrance, (7) relocation of SLAC collider arcs and experimental hall, (8) parking lots and storage yards, and (9) land use zoning at SLAC

  8. GLCF: Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global Land Cover Facility About GLCF Research Publications Data & Products Gallery Library Services Contact Site Map Go Research The Global Land Cover Facility is a research center focusing on the GLCF in developing forest change products. Past research efforts were directed at boreal forests in

  9. To what extent do site-based training, mentoring, and operational research improve district health system management and leadership in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belrhiti, Zakaria; Booth, Andrew; Marchal, Bruno; Verstraeten, Roosmarijn

    2016-04-27

    District health managers play a key role in the effectiveness of decentralized health systems in low- and middle-income countries. Inadequate management and leadership skills often hamper their ability to improve quality of care and effectiveness of health service delivery. Nevertheless, significant investments have been made in capacity-building programmes based on site-based training, mentoring, and operational research. This systematic review aims to review the effectiveness of site-based training, mentoring, and operational research (or action research) on the improvement of district health system management and leadership. Our secondary objectives are to assess whether variations in composition or intensity of the intervention influence its effectiveness and to identify enabling and constraining contexts and underlying mechanisms. We will search the following databases: MEDLINE, PsycInfo, Cochrane Library, CRD database (DARE), Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) group, ISI Web of Science, Health Evidence.org, PDQ-Evidence, ERIC, EMBASE, and TRIP. Complementary search will be performed (hand-searching journals and citation and reference tracking). Studies that meet the following PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome) criteria will be included: P: professionals working at district health management level; I: site-based training with or without mentoring, or operational research; C: normal institutional arrangements; and O: district health management functions. We will include cluster randomized controlled trials, controlled before-and-after studies, interrupted time series analysis, quasi-experimental designs, and cohort and longitudinal studies. Qualitative research will be included to contextualize findings and identify barriers and facilitators. Primary outcomes that will be reported are district health management and leadership functions. We will assess risk of bias with the Cochrane Collaboration's tools for randomized

  10. Mineralogical, chemical, organic and microbial properties of subsurface soil cores from Mars Desert Research Station (Utah, USA): Phyllosilicate and sulfate analogues to Mars mission landing sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoker, C.R.; Clarke, J.; Oliveira Lebre Direito, M.S.; Martin, K.; Zavaleta, J.; Blake, D.; Foing, B.H.

    2011-01-01

    We collected and analysed soil cores from four geologic units surrounding Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) Utah, USA, including Mancos Shale, Dakota Sandstone, Morrison formation (Brushy Basin member) and Summerville formation. The area is an important geochemical and morphological analogue to

  11. Gravettian occupation of the Beckov Gate in Western Slovakia as viewed from the interdisciplinary research of the Trencianske Bohuslavice-Pod Tureckom site

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlačiky, M.; Michalík, T.; Nývltová Fišáková, Miriam; Nývlt, D.; Moravcová, M.; Králik, M.; Kovanda, J.; Péková, K.; Přichystal, A.; Dohnalová, A.

    Apr., č. 294 (2013), s. 41-60 ISSN 1040-6182 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB800010701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80010507 Keywords : Gravettian * palaeonthology * isotopic studies Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 2.128, year: 2013

  12. Biotic, temporal and spatial variability of tritium concentrations in transpirate samples collected in the vicinity of a near-surface low-level nuclear waste disposal site and nearby research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, J R; Hughes, C E; Harrison, J J; Hankin, S; Crawford, J; Johansen, M; Dyer, L

    2011-06-01

    The results of a 21 month sampling program measuring tritium in tree transpirate with respect to local sources are reported. The aim was to assess the potential of tree transpirate to indicate the presence of sub-surface seepage plumes. Transpirate gathered from trees near low-level nuclear waste disposal trenches contained activity concentrations of (3)H that were significantly higher (up to ∼700 Bq L(-1)) than local background levels (0-10 Bq L(-1)). The effects of the waste source declined rapidly with distance to be at background levels within 10s of metres. A research reactor 1.6 km south of the site contributed significant (p nuclear waste site. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The hydrogeology of urbanization: The lost springs of Washington, D.C., late Tertiary and Quaternary sediments of D.C., and the Baltimore Long Term Ecological Research site (LTER): Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Aditi; Pavich, Milan J.; Sharp, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Urbanization is a major process now shaping the environment. This field trip looks at the hydrogeology of the general Washington, D.C., area and focuses on the city's lost springs. Until 150 years ago, springs and shallow dug wells were the main source of drinking water for residents of Washington, D.C. Celebrating the nation's bicentennial, Garnett P. Williams of the U.S. Geological Survey examined changes in water supply and water courses since 1776. He examined old newspaper files to determine the location of the city's springs. This field trip visits sites of some of these springs (few of which are now flowing), discusses the hydrologic impacts of urbanization and the general geological setting, and finishes with the Baltimore Long Term Ecological Research site at Dead Run and its findings. The field trip visits some familiar locations in the Washington, D.C., area, and gives insights into their often hidden hydrologic past and present.

  14. Cocaine treatment admissions at three sentinel sites in South Africa (1997–2006: findings and implications for policy, practice and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plüddemann Andreas

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate prevalence data on cocaine use, that points to where problems exist and the extent of these problems, is necessary to guide the formulation of effective substance abuse policy and practice. The purpose of this study was to provide surveillance information about the nature and extent of problematic cocaine use in South Africa. Methods Data were collected between January 1997 and December 2006 on admissions for drug abuse treatment through a regular monitoring system involving 56 drug treatment centres and programmes in Cape Town, Gauteng Province (Johannesburg and Pretoria and the Eastern Cape every six months as part of the South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (SACENDU. A one-page form was completed by treatment centre personnel to obtain demographic data, the patients' primary and secondary substances of abuse, the mode, frequency and age of first use of substance, and information on prior treatment. Results Treatment indicators point to a significant increase in cocaine related admissions over time in all sites, but with substantial inter-site variation, particularly in recent years. The data indicate high levels of crack cocaine use and high levels of daily usage among patients, most of whom were first time admissions. Patients with cocaine related problems continue to be predominantly male, with a mean age of around 30 years. Substantial changes in the racial profile of patients have occurred over time. Poly drug use is high with cocaine often used with alcohol, cannabis and other drugs. Conclusion These trends point to the possibility of cocaine use becoming a serious health and social issue in South Africa and demonstrate the utility of continued monitoring of cocaine treatment admissions in the future. They also highlight the need to address cocaine use in national and provincial policy planning and intervention efforts. In terms of treatment, the findings highlight the need to ensure that

  15. Unraveling hominin behavior at another anthropogenic site from Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania): new archaeological and taphonomic research at BK, Upper Bed II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Rodrigo, M; Mabulla, A; Bunn, H T; Barba, R; Diez-Martín, F; Egeland, C P; Espílez, E; Egeland, A; Yravedra, J; Sánchez, P

    2009-09-01

    New archaeological excavations and research at BK, Upper Bed II (Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania) have yielded a rich and unbiased collection of fossil bones. These new excavations show that BK is a stratified deposit formed in a riverine setting close to an alluvial plain. The present taphonomic study reveals the second-largest collection of hominin-modified bones from Olduvai, with abundant cut marks found on most of the anatomical areas preserved. Meat and marrow exploitation is reconstructed using the taphonomic signatures left on the bones by hominins. Highly cut-marked long limb shafts, especially those of upper limb bones, suggest that hominins at BK were actively engaged in acquiring small and middle-sized animals using strategies other than passive scavenging. The exploitation of large-sized game (Pelorovis) by Lower Pleistocene hominins, as suggested by previous researchers, is supported by the present study.

  16. Grasshopper populations inhabiting the B-C Cribs and REDOX Pond Sites, 200 Area Plateau, United States Energy Research and Development Administration's Hanford Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, J.K.; Rogers, L.E.

    1976-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the taxonomic composition, abundance, and food habits of grasshopper populations inhabiting the 200 Area plateau. Two sites were selected for detailed study, one near the B-C Cribs control zone and the other near the former REDOX Pond. A total of 14 grasshopper species were collected from the B-C Cribs study area and 16 species from the REDOX Pond area. Thirteen of these species occurred at both locations. Population density was low throughout most of the spring, increased in late May, and reached a peak of about 4 grasshoppers per square meter in early July. A dietary analysis showed that 7 of the 28 species of vascular plants recorded from the area were major components in grasshopper diets. These included needle-and-thread grass (Stipa comata), turpentine cymopterus (Cymopterus terebinthinus), Carey's balsamroot (Balsamorhiza careyana), western tansymustard (Descurainia pinnata), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissimum), big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and green rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus). The plant most heavily utilized was big sagebrush, followed by turpentine cymopterus, green rabbitbrush, and Carey's balsamroot. Other species were less frequently eaten. Several plants were present in the diet at a much higher frequency than they occurred in the environment, indicating that they were preferred food items.

  17. MARKETING RESEARCH REGARDING TOURISM BUSINESS READINESS FOR ECO-LABEL ACHIEVEMENT (CASE STUDY: NATURA 2000 CRIŞUL REPEDE GORGE-PĂDUREA CRAIULUI PASS SITE, ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Iuliana BAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is an approach that aims to preserve the environment and the culture of communities hosting tourists and at the same time to meet the needs of tourists and to maintain the growth of tourism industry. These objectives are more and more related to eco-labelling, which provides the certification based on a series of benchmarks developed and verified by a third party. The labelling of an organization as an ecotourism organization requires the compliance with certain criteria as those required by the European Ecotourism Labelling Standard. Natura 2000 Crişul Repede Gorge– Pădurea Craiului Pass site will have to prove that it is in compliance with the prerequisites to become an ecotourism destination. The objectives of this paper are: to identify the prerequisites that a destination must comply with in order to be labelled an ecotourism destination, focusing on the prerequisites related to the existence and behaviour of tourist reception structures; to identify the extent to which tour operators are open  and willing to support the labelling of the destination where they operate as being ecotourism.  

  18. PhosphoSiteAnalyzer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    an algorithm to retrieve kinase predictions from the public NetworKIN webpage in a semiautomated way and applies hereafter advanced statistics to facilitate a user-tailored in-depth analysis of the phosphoproteomic data sets. The interface of the software provides a high degree of analytical flexibility......Phosphoproteomic experiments are routinely conducted in laboratories worldwide, and because of the fast development of mass spectrometric techniques and efficient phosphopeptide enrichment methods, researchers frequently end up having lists with tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites...... and is designed to be intuitive for most users. PhosphoSiteAnalyzer is a freeware program available at http://phosphosite.sourceforge.net ....

  19. Application of Near-Surface Remote Sensing and computer algorithms in evaluating impacts of agroecosystem management on Zea mays (corn) phenological development in the Platte River - High Plains Aquifer Long Term Agroecosystem Research Network field sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okalebo, J. A.; Das Choudhury, S.; Awada, T.; Suyker, A.; LeBauer, D.; Newcomb, M.; Ward, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Long-term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) network is a USDA-ARS effort that focuses on conducting research that addresses current and emerging issues in agriculture related to sustainability and profitability of agroecosystems in the face of climate change and population growth. There are 18 sites across the USA covering key agricultural production regions. In Nebraska, a partnership between the University of Nebraska - Lincoln and ARD/USDA resulted in the establishment of the Platte River - High Plains Aquifer LTAR site in 2014. The site conducts research to sustain multiple ecosystem services focusing specifically on Nebraska's main agronomic production agroecosystems that comprise of abundant corn, soybeans, managed grasslands and beef production. As part of the national LTAR network, PR-HPA participates and contributes near-surface remotely sensed imagery of corn, soybean and grassland canopy phenology to the PhenoCam Network through high-resolution digital cameras. This poster highlights the application, advantages and usefulness of near-surface remotely sensed imagery in agroecosystem studies and management. It demonstrates how both Infrared and Red-Green-Blue imagery may be applied to monitor phenological events as well as crop abiotic stresses. Computer-based algorithms and analytic techniques proved very instrumental in revealing crop phenological changes such as green-up and tasseling in corn. This poster also reports the suitability and applicability of corn-derived computer based algorithms for evaluating phenological development of sorghum since both crops have similarities in their phenology; with sorghum panicles being similar to corn tassels. This later assessment was carried out using a sorghum dataset obtained from the Transportation Energy Resources from Renewable Agriculture Phenotyping Reference Platform project, Maricopa Agricultural Center, Arizona.

  20. My journey to the superheavy island with Szymanski, Nilsson, Nix, and Swiatecki from Lysekil to the present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the great theoretical insights on nuclear stability that emerged in the late 1960s, especially the realization that observable nuclei might include a superheavy island 20+ protons beyond uranium with 92 protons. However, we now realize that the early models were not sufficiently quantitative to yield definite conclusions. Further groundwork for such models was laid in the 1970s. Around 1980 more quantitative, global and universal models appeared and together with experimental advances the mapping of the superheavy island, or as it turns out now, continent started in earnest. We review these early developments and conclude with some examples of our current insights. In particular, 1) some theoretical models do have predictive capabilities for nuclear properties such as ground-state masses, shapes, and half-lives 10 or more neutrons and protons away from previously known regions and 2) the superheavy island may be a continent connected to the actinides by a narrow land bridge; the continent itself may extend from about proton number Z = 110 to Z = 120 or slightly beyond. (author)

  1. Characteristics of the Operational Noise from Full Scale Wave Energy Converters in the Lysekil Project : Estimation of Potential Environmental Impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Haikonen, Kalle; Sundberg, Jan; Leijon, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Wave energy conversion is a clean electric power production technology. During operation there are no emissions in the form of harmful gases. However there are unsolved issues considering environmental impacts such as: electromagnetism; the artificial reef effect and underwater noise. Anthropogenic noise is increasing in the oceans worldwide and wave power will contribute to this sound pollution in the oceans; but to what extent? The main purpose of this study was to examine the noise emitted...

  2. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2002-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of SCK-CEN's Site Restoration Department for 2001 are described. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and the management of spent fuel and the flow of dismantled materials and the recycling of materials from decommissioning activities based on the smelting of metallic materials in specialised foundries. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations and performs R and D on new techniques including processes for the treatment of various waste components including the reprocessing of spent fuel, the treatment of tritium, the treatment of liquid alkali metals into cabonates through oxidation, the treatment of radioactive organic waste and the reconditioning of bituminised waste products.

  3. Mochovce site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In Mochovce site the construction of four units of WWER 440 NPP with V-213 type of reactor is being carried out. The financing of Mochovce units completion was resolved in April 1996. The completion work commenced at the construction site under leadership of SKODA Prague, the general supplier. The completion work on building part and tests of constructional electric distributions and lightning constructors started. The revisions in technological part were finished, and final protocols from revisions are the basis for starting of completion work. The assembly of transport container anchorage,ventilation system in hermetic areas and hermetic coverage of pools for stored spent nuclear fuel is being carried out. The pre-completion tests of instrumentation and control of ventilation systems, individual dosimetric control in medical station, and tests of nuclear programme according to commissioning and assembling work schedule at the equipment for physical protection of the NPP area started. Inspection activities at Mochovce were performed in accordance with inspection plan for 1996. Evaluation of routine inspections was performed by means of quarterly protocols. Main findings from the inspections performed in Mochovce were in the following areas: (a) deficiencies in the knowledge of the respective regulation and conditions from the Resolution of the state regulatory body, concerning selected employees; (b) training of the selected employees; (c) aim of the measures imposes by inspectors is to eliminate deficiencies in preparation of programmes for pre-completion and completion testing. NRA SR assessment activities at Mochovce NPP were focused mainly on approving and inspecting of design modification to approving programmes for pre-completion and completion testing of system s and equipment and on approving quality assurance programmes. The suggestions of international missions, which reviewed Mochovce safety in the years, were taken into consideration in the programme

  4. A 20-year record (1998-2017) of permafrost, active layer and meteorological conditions at a high Arctic permafrost research site (Bayelva, Spitsbergen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boike, Julia; Juszak, Inge; Lange, Stephan; Chadburn, Sarah; Burke, Eleanor; Overduin, Pier Paul; Roth, Kurt; Ippisch, Olaf; Bornemann, Niko; Stern, Lielle; Gouttevin, Isabelle; Hauber, Ernst; Westermann, Sebastian

    2018-03-01

    Most permafrost is located in the Arctic, where frozen organic carbon makes it an important component of the global climate system. Despite the fact that the Arctic climate changes more rapidly than the rest of the globe, observational data density in the region is low. Permafrost thaw and carbon release to the atmosphere are a positive feedback mechanism that can exacerbate global warming. This positive feedback functions via changing land-atmosphere energy and mass exchanges. There is thus a great need to understand links between the energy balance, which can vary rapidly over hourly to annual timescales, and permafrost, which changes slowly over long time periods. This understanding thus mandates long-term observational data sets. Such a data set is available from the Bayelva site at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, where meteorology, energy balance components and subsurface observations have been made for the last 20 years. Additional data include a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) that can be used together with the snow physical information for snowpack modeling and a panchromatic image. This paper presents the data set produced so far, explains instrumentation, calibration, processing and data quality control, as well as the sources for various resulting data sets. The resulting data set is unique in the Arctic and serves as a baseline for future studies. The mean permafrost temperature is -2.8 °C, with a zero-amplitude depth at 5.5 m (2009-2017). Since the data provide observations of temporally variable parameters that mitigate energy fluxes between permafrost and atmosphere, such as snow depth and soil moisture content, they are suitable for use in integrating, calibrating and testing permafrost as a component in earth system models.The presented data are available in the Supplement for this paper (time series) and through the PANGAEA and Zenodo data portals: time series (https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.880120, https://zenodo.org/record/1139714) and

  5. A 20-year record (1998–2017 of permafrost, active layer and meteorological conditions at a high Arctic permafrost research site (Bayelva, Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boike

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Most permafrost is located in the Arctic, where frozen organic carbon makes it an important component of the global climate system. Despite the fact that the Arctic climate changes more rapidly than the rest of the globe, observational data density in the region is low. Permafrost thaw and carbon release to the atmosphere are a positive feedback mechanism that can exacerbate global warming. This positive feedback functions via changing land–atmosphere energy and mass exchanges. There is thus a great need to understand links between the energy balance, which can vary rapidly over hourly to annual timescales, and permafrost, which changes slowly over long time periods. This understanding thus mandates long-term observational data sets. Such a data set is available from the Bayelva site at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, where meteorology, energy balance components and subsurface observations have been made for the last 20 years. Additional data include a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM that can be used together with the snow physical information for snowpack modeling and a panchromatic image. This paper presents the data set produced so far, explains instrumentation, calibration, processing and data quality control, as well as the sources for various resulting data sets. The resulting data set is unique in the Arctic and serves as a baseline for future studies. The mean permafrost temperature is −2.8 °C, with a zero-amplitude depth at 5.5 m (2009–2017. Since the data provide observations of temporally variable parameters that mitigate energy fluxes between permafrost and atmosphere, such as snow depth and soil moisture content, they are suitable for use in integrating, calibrating and testing permafrost as a component in earth system models.The presented data are available in the Supplement for this paper (time series and through the PANGAEA and Zenodo data portals: time series (https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.880120, https

  6. Preliminary Site Characterization Report, Rulsion Site, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report is a summary of environmental information gathered during a review of the documents pertaining to Project Rulison and interviews with personnel who worked on the project. Project Rulison was part of Operation Plowshare (a program designed to explore peaceful uses for nuclear devices). The project consisted of detonating a 43-kiloton nuclear device on September 10, 1969, in western Colorado to stimulate natural gas production. Following the detonation, a reentry well was drilled and several gas production tests were conducted. The reentry well was shut-in after the last gas production test and was held in standby condition until the general cleanup was undertaken in 1972. A final cleanup was conducted after the emplacement and testing wells were plugged in 1976. However, some surface radiologic contamination resulted from decontamination of the drilling equipment and fallout from the gas flaring during drilling operations. With the exception of the drilling effluent pond, all surface contamination at the Rulison Site was removed during the cleanup operations. All mudpits and other excavations were backfilled, and both upper and lower drilling pads were leveled and dressed. This report provides information regarding known or suspected areas of contamination, previous cleanup activities, analytical results, a review of the regulatory status, the site`s physical environment, and future recommendations for Project Ruhson. Based on this research, several potential areas of contamination have been identified. These include the drilling effluent pond and mudpits used during drilling operations. In addition, contamination could migrate in the gas horizon.

  7. Search Our Site With Google

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search Our Site With Google. Journal Home > Search Our Site With Google. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  8. Site Management Guide (Blue Book)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Department's postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOE's postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site

  9. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  10. Challenges and opportunities from a combined research study and community groundwater testing program for residents living near hydraulic fracturing sites in Appalachian Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.

    2017-12-01

    People living in rural areas of the United States often depend on groundwater as the only domestic and agricultural water resource. Hydraulic fracturing (or "fracking") has led to widespread fears of groundwater contamination, and many people lack resources for monitoring their water. To help in this effort, I led a three-year free groundwater monitoring program for residents of parts of the Utica Shale drilling region of Ohio from early 2012 to early 2015. Our team took samples and made laboratory measurements of species meant to act as indicators of the presence of natural gas or fracking fluid in groundwater. All data were made available to participants, and all participation was voluntary. The project team also made several presentations about our findings at community meetings. In this presentation, I will discuss challenges associated with obtaining funding and communicating results with the media, the oil and gas industry, Congress, and my university. However, opportunities have arisen from this work as well, beyond the obvious opportunity for public service, including recruitment of undergraduate and graduate students to the project team; generation of scientific data in an emerging area of research; and a better understanding of policy needs for rural residents in Appalachia.

  11. Topical Day on Site Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenhove, H [ed.

    1996-09-18

    Ongoing activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre relating to site remediation and restoration are summarized. Special attention has been paid to the different phases of remediation including characterization, impact assessment, evaluation of remediation actions, and execution of remediation actions.

  12. Mineralogical, chemical, organic and microbial properties of subsurface soil cores from Mars Desert Research Station (Utah, USA): Phyllosilicate and sulfate analogues to Mars mission landing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Carol R.; Clarke, Jonathan; Direito, Susana O. L.; Blake, David; Martin, Kevin R.; Zavaleta, Jhony; Foing, Bernard

    2011-07-01

    We collected and analysed soil cores from four geologic units surrounding Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) Utah, USA, including Mancos Shale, Dakota Sandstone, Morrison formation (Brushy Basin member) and Summerville formation. The area is an important geochemical and morphological analogue to terrains on Mars. Soils were analysed for mineralogy by a Terra X-ray diffractometer (XRD), a field version of the CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission (2012 landing). Soluble ion chemistry, total organic content and identity and distribution of microbial populations were also determined. The Terra data reveal that Mancos and Morrison soils are rich in phyllosilicates similar to those observed on Mars from orbital measurements (montmorillonite, nontronite and illite). Evaporite minerals observed include gypsum, thenardite, polyhalite and calcite. Soil chemical analysis shows sulfate the dominant anion in all soils and SO4>>CO3, as on Mars. The cation pattern Na>Ca>Mg is seen in all soils except for the Summerville where Ca>Na. In all soils, SO4 correlates with Na, suggesting sodium sulfates are the dominant phase. Oxidizable organics are low in all soils and range from a high of 0.7% in the Mancos samples to undetectable at a detection limit of 0.1% in the Morrison soils. Minerals rich in chromium and vanadium were identified in Morrison soils that result from diagenetic replacement of organic compounds. Depositional environment, geologic history and mineralogy all affect the ability to preserve and detect organic compounds. Subsurface biosphere populations were revealed to contain organisms from all three domains (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya) with cell density between 3.0×106 and 1.8×107 cells ml-1 at the deepest depth. These measurements are analogous to data that could be obtained on future robotic or human Mars missions and results are relevant to the MSL mission that will investigate phyllosilicates on Mars.

  13. Progress Report: Stratton Ecological Research Site - An Experimental Approach to Assess Effects of Various Grazing Treatments on Vegetation and Wildlife Communities Across Managed Burns and Habitat Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Heidi J.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Hobbs, N. Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how management practices affect wildlife is fundamental to wise decisions for conservation of public lands. Prescribed fire and grazing timing are two management tools frequently used within publicly owned sagebrush ecosystems. We conducted a variety of surveys in order to assess the impacts of grazing timing strategies (early summer before peak green-up, mid-summer at peak green-up, and late summer after peak green-up) in conjunction with prescribed fire on avian and small mammal populations in a high-elevation sagebrush ecosystem. Avian surveys resulted in a large detection sample size for three bird species: Brewer's sparrow (Spizella breweri), horned lark (Eremophila alpestris), and vesper sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus). Brewer's sparrows had the lowest number of detections within the mid-summer grazing treatment compared to early and late summer grazing treatments, while horned larks and vesper sparrows had higher detection frequencies within the late summer grazing treatment. Summer and fall sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) pellet counts revealed that the greatest over-winter and over-summer use by sage-grouse occurred within the early summer grazing treatment with minimal use of burn treatment areas across all grazing treatments. Deer-mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) represented approximately 90 percent of small mammals captured and were most prevalent within the mid-summer grazing treatment. Sagebrush cover was greatest within the mid-summer grazing treatment. We monitored 50 and 103 nests in 2007 and 2008, respectively. The apparent success rate for shrub-obligate nesting species was 58 percent in 2007 and 63 percent in 2008. This research will support management of sagebrush ecosystems by providing public land managers with direct comparisons of wildlife response to management regimes.

  14. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 30, Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park natural areas and reference areas--Oak Ridge Reservation environmentally sensitive sites containing special plants, animals, and communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pounds, L.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US); Parr, P.D.; Ryon, M.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) that contain rare plant or animal species or are special habitats are protected through National Environmental Research Park Natural Area (NA) or Reference Area (RA) designations. The US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park program is responsible for identifying species of vascular plants that are endangered, threatened, or rare and, as much as possible, for conserving those areas in which such species grow. This report includes a listing of Research Park NAs and RAs with general habitat descriptions and a computer-generated map with the areas identified. These are the locations of rare plant or animal species or special habitats that are known at this time. As the Reservation continues to be surveyed, it is expected that additional sites will be designated as Research Park NAs or RAs. This document is a component of a larger effort to identify environmentally sensitive areas on ORR. This report identifies the currently known locations of rare plant species, rare animal species, and special biological communities. Floodplains, wetlands (except those in RAs or NAs), and cultural resources are not included in this report.

  15. Biotic, temporal and spatial variability of tritium concentrations in transpirate samples collected in the vicinity of a near-surface low-level nuclear waste disposal site and nearby research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twining, J.R., E-mail: jrt@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Hughes, C.E.; Harrison, J.J.; Hankin, S.; Crawford, J.; Johansen, M.; Dyer, L. [Institute for Environmental Research, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    The results of a 21 month sampling program measuring tritium in tree transpirate with respect to local sources are reported. The aim was to assess the potential of tree transpirate to indicate the presence of sub-surface seepage plumes. Transpirate gathered from trees near low-level nuclear waste disposal trenches contained activity concentrations of {sup 3}H that were significantly higher (up to {approx}700 Bq L{sup -1}) than local background levels (0-10 Bq L{sup -1}). The effects of the waste source declined rapidly with distance to be at background levels within 10s of metres. A research reactor 1.6 km south of the site contributed significant (p < 0.01) local fallout {sup 3}H but its influence did not reach as far as the disposal trenches. The elevated {sup 3}H levels in transpirate were, however, substantially lower than groundwater concentrations measured across the site (ranging from 0 to 91% with a median of 2%). Temporal patterns of tree transpirate {sup 3}H, together with local meteorological observations, indicate that soil water within the active root zones comprised a mixture of seepage and rainfall infiltration. The degree of mixing was variable given that the soil water activity concentrations were heterogeneous at a scale equivalent to the effective rooting volume of the trees. In addition, water taken up by roots was not well mixed within the trees. Based on correlation modelling, net rainfall less evaporation (a surrogate for infiltration) over a period of from 2 to 3 weeks prior to sampling seems to be the optimum predictor of transpirate {sup 3}H variability for any sampled tree at this site. The results demonstrate successful use of {sup 3}H in transpirate from trees to indicate the presence and general extent of sub-surface contamination at a low-level nuclear waste site. - Highlights: > Data on environmental tritium behaviour over 21 months related to a legacy waste site are presented. > The relative contributions of atmospheric and

  16. 1991 research and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Selected research and technology activities at Ames Research Center, including the Moffett Field site and the Dryden Flight Research Facility, are summarized. These activities exemplify the Center's varied and productive research efforts for 1991.

  17. AMF 1 Site Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Mark Alan [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-08-18

    This report documents progress on DOE Grant# DE-FG02-08ER64531 funded by the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Systems Research (ASR) program covering the period between its inception in 2008 and its conclusion in 2014. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mobile Facility #1 (AMF#1) is a collection of state-of-the art atmospheric sensing systems including remote and in situ instrumentation designed to characterize the atmospheric column above and in the immediate vicinity of the deployment location. The grant discussed in this report funded the activities of the AMF#1 Site Scientist Team. Broad responsibilities of this team included examining new deployment sites and recommending instrument deployment configurations; data quality control during the early stages of deployments and for certain instruments through the course of the deployment; scientific outreach in the host country or location (particularly international deployments); scientific research oriented toward basic questions about cloud physics and radiation transfer in the deployment region; and training of Ph.D. students to conduct future research relevant to the Atmospheric Systems Research (ASR) program.

  18. 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

  19. Site map | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Livestock Vaccine Innovation Fund · Open Data for Development · Safe and Inclusive Cities · Science Granting Councils Initiative in Sub-Saharan Africa · Think Tank Initiative · Funding · Graduate Student Awards · Grants · Subscribe to funding alerts · In their own words: IDRC awardees share their experiences · Resources.

  20. Geotechnical site assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunbridge, L.W.; Richards, L.R.

    1985-09-01

    A final report summarizing the research conducted on geotechnical site assessment methodology at the Carwynnen test mine in Cornwall. The geological setting of the test site in the Cornubian granite batholith is described. The effect of structure imposed by discontinuities on the engineering behaviour of rock masses is discussed and the scanline survey method of obtaining data on discontinuities in the rock mass is described. The applicability of some methods of statistical analysis for discontinuity data is reviewed. The requirement for remote geophysical methods of characterizing the mass is discussed and experiments using seismic and ultrasonic velocity measurements are reported. Methods of determining the in-situ stresses are described and the final results of a programme of in-situ stress measurements using the overcoring and hydrofracture methods are reported. (author)

  1. IOs as Social Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Susan M.; Vetterlein, Antje

    Norms research has made significant inroads into examining their emergence and influence in international relations, while recognizing international organizations (IOs) as key social sites for norms to be created and/or disseminated. This paper interrogates how IOs as “organizational platforms......” (Finnemore 1996) influence the norm building process. Going beyond state-centric approaches to norm construction, it argues that the process of taking up a norm by an IO does affect the norm’s power. A norm’s strength is determined by the extent to which it is uncontested and taken for granted as appropriate...... the norm building process in this way provides insight into the effect of IOs as social sites in strengthening a norm....

  2. Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Conversion Research at UNH: From Fundamental Studies of Hydrofoil Sections, to Moderate Reynolds Number Turbine Tests in a Tow Tank, to Open Water Deployments at Tidal Energy Test Sites (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.; Nedyalkov, I.; Rowell, M.; Dufresne, N.; Lyon, V.

    2013-12-01

    We report on research related to MHK turbines at the Center for Ocean Renewable Energy (CORE) at the University of New Hampshire (UNH). The research projects span varies scales, levels of complexity and environments - from fundamental studies of hydrofoil sections in a high speed water tunnel, to moderate Reynolds number turbine tests with inflow and wake studies in a large cross-section tow tank, to deployments of highly instrumented process models at tidal energy test sites in New England. A concerted effort over the past few years has brought significant new research infrastructure for marine hydrokinetic energy conversion online at UNH-CORE. It includes: a high-speed cavitation tunnel with independent control of velocity and pressure; a highly accurate tow mechanism, turbine test bed and wake traversing system for the 3.7m x 2.4m cross-section UNH tow tank; a 10.7m x 3.0m tidal energy test platform which can accommodate turbines up to 1.5m in diameter, for deployments at the UNH-CORE Tidal Energy Test Site in Great Bay Estuary, NH, a sheltered 'nursery site' suitable for intermediate scale tidal energy conversion device testing with peak currents typically above 2 m/s during each tidal cycle. Further, a large boundary layer wind tunnel, the new UNH Flow Physics Facility (W6.0m x H2.7m xL72m) is being used for detailed turbine wake studies, producing data and insight also applicable to MHK turbines in low Froude number deployments. Bi-directional hydrofoils, which perform equally well in either flow direction and could avoid the use of complex and maintenance-intensive yaw or blade pitch mechanisms, are being investigated theoretically, numerically and experimentally. For selected candidate shapes lift, drag, wake, and cavitation inception/desinence are measured. When combined with a cavitation inception model for MHK turbines, this information can be used to prescribe turbine design/operational parameters. Experiments were performed with a 1m diameter and 1m

  3. Controlled Archaeological Test Site (CATS) Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CATS facility is at the Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL), Champaign, IL. This 1-acre test site includes a variety of subsurface features carefully...

  4. Geotechnical site assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunbridge, L.W.; Richards, L.R.

    1985-09-01

    The reports comprising this volume concern the research conducted on geotechnical site assessment methodology at the Carwynnen test mine in granites in Cornwall, with particular reference to the effect of structures imposed by discontinuities on the engineering behaviour of rock masses. The topics covered are: in-situ stress measurements using (a) the hydraulic fracturing method, or (b) the US Bureau of Mines deformation probe; scanline discontinuity survey - coding form and instructions, and data; applicability of geostatistical estimation methods to scalar rock properties; comments on in-situ stress at the Carwynnen test mine and the state of stress in the British Isles. (U.K.)

  5. Introduction to the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report discusses the Site mission and provides general information about the site. The U.S. DOE has established a new mission for Hanford including: Management of stored wastes, environmental restoration, research and development, and development of new technologies. The Hanford Reservation is located in south central Washington State just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. The approximately 1,450 square kilometers which comprises the Hanford Site, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas within the site which have historically been used for the production of nuclear materials, radioactive waste storage, and radioactive waste disposal.

  6. Introduction to the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report discusses the Site mission and provides general information about the site. The U.S. DOE has established a new mission for Hanford including: Management of stored wastes, environmental restoration, research and development, and development of new technologies. The Hanford Reservation is located in south central Washington State just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. The approximately 1,450 square kilometers which comprises the Hanford Site, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas within the site which have historically been used for the production of nuclear materials, radioactive waste storage, and radioactive waste disposal

  7. Nuclear installations sites safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, P.; Candes, P.; Duclos, P.; Doumenc, A.; Faure, J.; Hugon, J.; Mohammadioun, B.

    1988-11-01

    This report is divided into ten parts bearing: 1 Safety analysis procedures for Basis Nuclear Installations sites (BNI) in France 2 Site safety for BNI in France 3 Industrial and transport activities risks for BNI in France 4 Demographic characteristics near BNI sites in France 5 Meteorologic characteristics of BNI sites in France 6 Geological aspects near the BNI sites in France 7 Seismic studies for BNI sites in France 8 Hydrogeological aspects near BNI sites in France 9 Hydrological aspects near BNI sites in France 10 Ecological and radioecological studies of BNI sites in France [fr

  8. Social Media Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Media Sites Site Registration Contact Us Search AF.mil: Home > AF Sites > Social Media Sites Social Media Welcome to the Air Force social media directory! The directory is a one-stop shop of official Air Force social media pages across various social media sites. Social media is all about

  9. Contaminant transport modeling studies of Russian sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    1993-01-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) established mechanisms that promoted cooperation between U.S. and Russian scientists in scientific research as well as environmental technology transfer. Using Russian experience and U.S technology, LBL developed approaches for field investigations, site evaluation, waste disposal, and remediation at Russian contaminated sites. LBL assessed a comprehensive database as well as an actual, large-scale contaminated site to evaluate existing knowledge of and test mathematical models used for the assessment of U.S. contaminated sites

  10. Report of JLC site study group

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, T; Yamashita, S

    2003-01-01

    This study group selected some good sites for construction of JLC (Electron-Positron Linear Collider) on the basis of investigation of data and field survey. The aims, activity, use of underground of private land, conditions of site, selection of site at present and future, summary and proposal are reported. 9 sites (Hidaka, Kitakami, Murayama, Abukuma, Kitaibaraki, Aichi and Gifu, Takamatsu, Hiroshima and Seburi range) are selected for the construction on the basis of firm ground and 4 sites (Okinawa, Harima, Tsukuba and Mutsuogawara) for development and researches. 9 sites area consists of plutonic rock or old strata of Paleozoic era. Many problems in each site are reported. There are three following proposals; 1) the self-governing communities of the sites have to understand JLC and start to construct it by information, 2) a site evaluation committee consists of specialist of civil engineering, building, social and natural environment and disaster prevention and 3) the vibration test should be carried out ...

  11. Estimation of groundwater flow at the site of Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory by the inversion of surface tilt during drainage, submergence and re-drainage in excavation of shafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narikawa, Tatsuya; Matsuki, Koji; Arai, Takashi; Ohyama, Takuya; Takeuchi, Ryuji; Takeuchi, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of the change in groundwater volume at the site of Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory in the Tono area, Japan, was estimated by the inverse method proposed by the authors, using tilt data measured with four tiltmeters at the surface during drainage, submergence and re-drainage in excavation of shafts. Furthermore, the reliability of the results was evaluated by a model analysis for groundwater flow in a single ellipsoidal field. The results showed that the hydrogeological structure for the region of 1000 m x 1000 m in area and 100 m to 180 m in depth is such that groundwater flow occurs mainly in a region between two impermeable faults with the center at 100 m to 150 m south of the Main shaft and this region tends to shrink toward north-west and be widened toward south to south-east. However, at the same time, the model analysis showed that areas north-west and south-east of the Main shaft in the corners of the region are vacua for estimation due to the aligned layout of the tiltmeters. (author)

  12. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 1. Data related to sites and plants: Paks NPP, Kozloduy NPP. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on data related to sites and NPPs Paks and Kozloduy

  13. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 1. Data related to sites and plants: Paks NPP, Kozloduy NPP. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on data related to sites and NPPs Paks and Kozloduy.

  14. Ocean Disposal Site Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is responsible for managing all designated ocean disposal sites. Surveys are conducted to identify appropriate locations for ocean disposal sites and to monitor the impacts of regulated dumping at the disposal sites.

  15. Promoting Your Web Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, Aggi

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of ways to promote sites on the World Wide Web focuses on how search engines work and how they retrieve and identify sites. Appropriate Web links for submitting new sites and for Internet marketing are included. (LRW)

  16. Particle Physics Education Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    back to home page Particle Physics Education Sites quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites - Physics Alliance - Accelerators at National Laboratories icon Particle Physics Education and Information sites: top

  17. Hanford Site Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  18. Hanford Site Development Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J.; Yancey, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs

  19. Research and technology, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Selected research and technology activities at Ames Research Center, including the Moffett Field site and the Dryden Flight Research Facility, are summarized. These activities exemplify the center's varied and productive research efforts for 1993. This year's report presents some of the challenging work recently accomplished in the areas of aerospace systems, flight operations and research, aerophysics, and space research.

  20. Uranium mining sites - Thematic sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    A first sheet proposes comments, data and key numbers about uranium extraction in France: general overview of uranium mining sites, status of waste rock and tailings after exploitation, site rehabilitation. The second sheet addresses the sources of exposure to ionizing radiations due to ancient uranium mining sites: discussion on the identification of these sources associated with these sites, properly due to mining activities or to tailings, or due to the transfer of radioactive substances towards water and to the contamination of sediments, description of the practice and assessment of radiological control of mining sites. A third sheet addresses the radiological exposure of public to waste rocks, and the dose assessment according to exposure scenarios: main exposure ways to be considered, studied exposure scenarios (passage on backfilled path and grounds, stay in buildings built on waste rocks, keeping mineralogical samples at home). The fourth sheet addresses research programmes of the IRSN on uranium and radon: epidemiological studies (performed on mine workers; on French and on European cohorts, French and European studies on the risk of lung cancer associated with radon in housing), study of the biological effects of chronic exposures. The last sheet addresses studies and expertises performed by the IRSN on ancient uranium mining sites in France: studies commissioned by public authorities, radioactivity control studies performed by the IRSN about mining sites, participation of the IRSN to actions to promote openness to civil society

  1. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) (Superfund) - NPL Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — National Priorities List (NPL) Sites - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access...

  2. Superfund Site Information - Site Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes Superfund site-specific sampling information including location of samples, types of samples, and analytical chemistry characteristics of...

  3. Site Closure Strategy Model for Creosote Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coll, F.R.; Gray, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    In conjunction with RCRA site corrective action at an active wood preserving facility, a risk-based site closure strategy was developed and incorporated the performance of a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source recovery remedy, a monitored natural attenuation (MNA) remedy for dissolved phase groundwater, and institutional controls. Innovative creosote DNAPL source recovery has been undertaken at the Site since 1998. Pooled creosote DNAPL is present 90 feet below ground within a transmissive sand and gravel aquifer with a saturated thickness of approximately 80 feet. The creosote DNAPL source is situated on the property boundary of the site and has generated a 1/2 mile off-site dissolved phase plume, creating significant NAPL management and remedial technology verification issues. To date, over 120,000 gallons of creosote DNAPL have been recovered from the subsurface utilizing a modified circulation well technology. A mass discharge flux protocol was developed to serve as a major performance metrics for the continuation of source removal efforts and to support the application of monitored natural attenuation as an associated remedial technology for groundwater. The mass removal success has supported the MNA remedy for dissolved phase groundwater and the associated development of institutional controls. The enacted site management strategy outlines the current and future risk management activities for the Site and represents an appropriate site closure strategy for the Site. (authors)

  4. The underground research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    This educational booklet is a general presentation of the selected sites for the installation of underground research laboratories devoted to the feasibility studies of deep repositories for long-life radioactive wastes. It describes the different type of wastes and their management, the management of long life radioactive wastes, the site selection and the 4 sites retained, the preliminary research studies, and the other researches carried out in deep disposal facilities worldwide. (J.S.)

  5. Site specific information in site selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeikaes, T.; Hautojaervi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The programme for the siting of a deep repository for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel was started already in 1983 and is carried out today by Posiva Oy which continues the work started by Teollisuuden Voima Oy. The programme aims at site selection by the end of the year 2000. The programme has progressed in successive interim stages with defined goals. After an early phase for site identification, five sites were selected in 1987 for preliminary site characterisation. Three of these were selected and judged to be best suited for the more detailed characterisation in 1992. An additional new site was included into the programme based on a separate feasibility study in the beginning of 1997. Since the year 1983 several safety assessments together with technical plans of the facility have been completed. When approaching the site selection the needs for more detailed consideration of the site specific properties in the safety assessment have been increased. The Finnish regulator STUK has published a proposal for general safety requirements for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland. This set of requirements has been projected to be used in conjunction of the decision making by the end 2000. Based on the site evaluation all sites can provide a stable environment and there is evidence that the requirements for the longevity of the canister can be fulfilled at each site. In this manner the four candidate sites do not differ too much from each other. The main difference between the sites is in the salinity of the deep groundwater. The significance of differences in the salinity for the long-term safety cannot be defined yet. The differences may contribute to the discussion of the longevity of the bentonite buffer and also to the modelling of the groundwater flow and transport. The use of the geosphere as a transport barrier is basically culminated on the questions about sparse but fast flow routes and 'how bad channeling can be'. To answer these questions

  6. Hanford Site Development Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hathaway, H.B.; Daly, K.S.; Rinne, C.A.; Seiler, S.W.

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (HSDP) provides an overview of land use, infrastructure, and facility requirements to support US Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site. The HSDP's primary purpose is to inform senior managers and interested parties of development activities and issues that require a commitment of resources to support the Hanford Site. The HSDP provides an existing and future land use plan for the Hanford Site. The HSDP is updated annually in accordance with DOE Order 4320.1B, Site Development Planning, to reflect the mission and overall site development process. Further details about Hanford Site development are defined in individual area development plans

  7. Preliminary Site Suitability Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. L. King

    2001-01-01

    Commercial electric power generation, nuclear weapons production, the operation of naval reactors, and research and development activities produce spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste have been accumulating at commercial reactor sites and storage facilities across the country since 1957. Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste have been accumulating at sites now managed by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) since the mid-1940s. The DOE has the statutory obligation to dispose of these wastes. The U.S. has studied methods for the safe storage and disposal of radioactive waste for more than 40 years. Many organizations and government agencies have participated in these studies. In the 1950s, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission requested the National Academy of Sciences to evaluate options for land disposal of radioactive waste. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agencies, the Energy Research and Development Administration and the DOE, continued to analyze radioactive waste management options throughout the 1960s and 1970s. In 1979, an Interagency Review Group that included representatives of 14 federal government entities provided findings and recommendations to the President. After analyzing a range of options, disposal in a geologic repository emerged as the preferred long-term environmental solution. This consensus is reflected in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). The NWPA and related statutes established the framework for addressing the issues of radioactive waste disposal and designated the roles and responsibilities of the federal government and the owners and generators of the waste

  8. Region 9 NPL Sites (Superfund Sites 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    NPL site POINT locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup under the Superfund program. Eligibility is determined by a scoring method called Hazard Ranking System. Sites with high scores are listed on the NPL. The majority of the locations are derived from polygon centroids of digitized site boundaries. The remaining locations were generated from address geocoding and digitizing. Area covered by this data set include Arizona, California, Nevada, Hawaii, Guam, American Samoa, Northern Marianas and Trust Territories. Attributes include NPL status codes, NPL industry type codes and environmental indicators. Related table, NPL_Contaminants contains information about contaminated media types and chemicals. This is a one-to-many relate and can be related to the feature class using the relationship classes under the Feature Data Set ENVIRO_CONTAMINANT.

  9. Researcher / Researched: Repositioning Research Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwald, Agnes May Lin

    2013-01-01

    "Researcher / Researched" calls for a complementary research methodology by proposing autoethnography as both a method and text that crosses the boundaries of conventional and alternative methodologies in higher education. Autoethnography rearticulates the researcher / researched positions by blurring the boundary between them. This…

  10. Potential energy center site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, W.F.

    1977-01-01

    Past studies by the AEC, NRC, NSF and others have indicated that energy centers have certain advantages over dispersed siting. There is the need, however, to investigate such areas as possible weather modifications due to major heat releases, possible changes in Federal/state/local laws and institutional arrangements to facilitate implementation of energy centers, and to assess methods of easing social and economic pressures on a surrounding community due to center construction. All of these areas are under study by ERDA, but there remains the major requirement for the study of a potential site to yield a true assessment of the energy center concept. In this regard the Division of Nuclear Research and Applications of ERDA is supporting studies by the Southern and Western Interstate Nuclear Boards to establish state and utility interest in the concept and to carry out screening studies of possible sites. After selection of a final site for center study , an analysis will be made of the center including technical areas such as heat dissipation methods, water resource management, transmission methods, construction methods and schedules, co-located fuel cycle facilities, possible mix of reactor types, etc. Additionally, studies of safeguards, the interaction of all effected entities in the siting, construction, licensing and regulation of a center, labor force considerations in terms of local impact, social and economic changes, and financing of a center will be conducted. It is estimated that the potential site study will require approximately two years

  11. Methodology of site studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caries, J.C.; Hugon, J.; Grauby, A.

    1980-01-01

    This methodology consists in an essentially dynamic, estimated and follow-up analysis of the impact of discharges on all the environment compartments, whether natural or not, that play a part in the protection of man and his environment. It applies at two levels, to wit: the choice of site, or the detailed study of the site selected. Two examples of its application will be developed, namely: at the choice of site level in the case of marine sites, and of the detailed study level of the chosen site in that of a riverside site [fr

  12. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] site evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    With this report, the SSC Site Task Force forwards to the Director, Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE), its evaluation of the technical criteria and life-cycle costs for the proposed SSC sites judged to be the best qualified. The criteria against which each site was evaluated are those set forth in the Invitation for Site Proposals for the Superconducting Super Collider (DOE/ER-0315) (Invitation) which was prepared by the Task Force and issued in April 1987. The methodology followed by the Task Force in this report and in all other phases of the proposal evaluation has been consistent with the SSC site selection process approved by DOE's Energy System Acquisition Advisory Board (ESAAB). The goal of the site selection process is to identify a site that will permit the highest level of research productivity and overall effectiveness of the SSC at a reasonable cost of construction and operation and with minimial impact on the environment. The Task Force acknowledges that all seven sites are, indeed, highly qualified locations for the construction and operation of the SSC on the basis of technical and cost considerations. In performing its evaluation, which is presented in this paper, the Task Force took an in-depth look at each site on the basis of site visits and extensive technical analyses. A consensus rating for each technical evaluation criterion and subcriterion was developed for each site

  13. Usage Analysis for the Identification of Research Trends in Digital Libraries; Keepers of the Crumbling Culture: What Digital Preservation Can Learn from Library History; Patterns of Journal Use by Scientists through Three Evolutionary Phases; Developing a Content Management System-Based Web Site; Exploring Charging Models for Digital Cultural Heritage in Europe; Visions: The Academic Library in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Johan; Vemulapalli, Soma Sekara; Xu, Weining; Luce, Rick; Marcum, Deanna; Friedlander, Amy; Tenopir, Carol; Grayson, Matt; Zhang, Yan; Ebuen, Mercy; King, Donald W.; Boyce, Peter; Rogers, Clare; Kirriemuir, John; Tanner, Simon; Deegan, Marilyn; Marcum, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Includes six articles that discuss use analysis and research trends in digital libraries; library history and digital preservation; journal use by scientists; a content management system-based Web site for higher education in the United Kingdom; cost studies for transitioning to digitized collections in European cultural institutions; and the…

  14. Application of Terrestrial Ecosystem Monitoring under the CAFF Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program: Designing and Implementing Terrestrial Monitoring to Establish the Canadian High Arctic Research Station as a Flagship Arctic Environmental Monitoring Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, D.; Kehler, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) is scheduled for completion in July 2017 and is the northern science component of Polar Knowledge Canada (POLAR). A mandated goal for POLAR is to establish the adjacent Experimental and Reference Area (ERA) as an Arctic Flagship monitoring site that will track change in Arctic terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. Situated in the community of Cambridge Bay, CHARS provides the opportunity to draw on the Indigenous Knowledge of local residents to help design and conduct the monitoring, and to operate 12 months a year. Monitoring at CHARS will be linked to networks nationally and internationally, and is being designed so that change in key indicators can be understood in terms of drivers and processes, modeled and scaled up regionally, and used to predict important changes in critical indicators. As a partner in the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP), the monitoring design for terrestrial ecosystems follows approaches outlined by the CBMP Terrestrial Expert Monitoring Group, who have listed key monitoring questions and identified a list of important Focal Ecosystem Components (FECs). To link drivers to FECs we are proposing a multi-scaled approach: 1) an Intensive Monitoring Area to establish replicated monitoring plots that track change in snow depth and condition, active layer depth, soil temperature, soil moisture, and soil solution chemistry that are spatially and temporally linked to changes in microbiological activity, CO2/CH4 net ecosystem flux, vegetation relative frequency, species composition, growth and foliar nutrient concentration, arthropod abundance, lemming abundance and health, and shorebird/songbird abundance and productivity. 2) These intensive observations are supported by watershed scale measures that will monitor, during the growing season, lemming winter nest abundance, songbird, shorebird and waterfowl staging and nesting, and other observations; in the winter we will

  15. NPL Site Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Priorities List (NPL) is a list published by EPA of Superfund sites. A site must be added to this list before remediation can begin under Superfund. The...

  16. Site Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of site boundaries from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  17. NPL Site Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Priorities List (NPL) is a list published by EPA of Superfund sites. A site must be added to this list before remediation can begin under Superfund. The...

  18. Drupal 7 Multilingual Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Pol, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    A practical book with plenty of screenshots to guide you through the many features of multilingual Drupal. A demo ecommerce site is provided if you want to practice on a sample site, although you can apply the techniques learnt in the book directly to your site too. Any Drupal users who know the basics of building a Drupal site and are familiar with the Drupal UI, will benefit from this book. No previous knowledge of localization or internationalization is required.

  19. The SARA REU Site Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M. A.; Oswalt, T. D.; SARA Collaboration

    2000-12-01

    We present an overview of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site Program hosted by the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) for the past 6 years. SARA is a consortium of the six universities: Florida Institute of Technology, East Tennessee State University, Florida International University, The University of Georgia, Valdosta State University, and Clemson University. We host 10-11 student interns per year out of an application pool of ~150-200. Recruiting flyers are sent to the ~3400 undergraduate institutions in the United States, and we use a web-based application form and review process. We are a distributed REU Site, but come together for group meetings at the beginning and end of the summer program and stay in contact in between using email list manager software. Interns complete a research project working one-on-one with a faculty mentor, and each intern travels to observe at the SARA Observatory at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Interns give both oral and display presentations of their results at the final group meeting. In addition, all interns write a paper for publication in the IAPPP Communications, an international amateur-professional journal, and several present at professional meetings and in refereed publications. We include in the group meetings a ``how-to'' session on giving talks and posters, an Ethics Session, and a session on Women in Astronomy. This work was supported by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site Program through grant AST 96169939 to The Florida Institute of Technology.

  20. Social Networking Sites: A premise on enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    MANINDERPAL SINGH SAINI; GYEWON MOON

    2013-01-01

    This article address five constructs that are paramount toward continued evolution of social networking sites (SNS`s) they include, - stabilisation, visual, language, security and flexibility. These constructs add to our proposed framework. Firmly grounded research on social networking sites and literature, we propose that user feedback, is the critical component that stimulates the development and growth of social networking sites online. We offer a framework that can aid new and current soc...