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Sample records for lyse target cells

  1. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  2. Cancer Patient T Cells Genetically Targeted to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Specifically Lyse Prostate Cancer Cells and Release Cytokines in Response to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Gong

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of immunoglobulin-based artificial receptors in normal T lymphocytes provides a means to target lymphocytes to cell surface antigens independently of major histocompatibility complex restriction. Such artificial receptors have been previously shown to confer antigen-specific tumoricidal properties in murine T cells. We constructed a novel ζ chain fusion receptor specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA termed Pz-1. PSMA is a cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on prostate cancer cells and the neovascular endothelium of multiple carcinomas. We show that primary T cells harvested from five of five patients with different stages of prostate cancer and transduced with the Pz-1 receptor readily lyse prostate cancer cells. Having established a culture system using fibroblasts that express PSMA, we next show that T cells expressing the Pz-1 receptor release cytokines in response to cell-bound PSMA. Furthermore, we show that the cytokine release is greatly augmented by B7.1-mediated costimulation. Thus, our findings support the feasibility of adoptive cell therapy by using genetically engineered T cells in prostate cancer patients and suggest that both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte functions can be synergistically targeted against tumor cells.

  3. Lyse theses; Lyse teser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjelsvik, Martin

    2012-07-01

    The energy sector is undergoing major changes: demand for energy is growing, especially outside Europe in the emerging economies. At the same time the energy production increases pollutants that harm the environment. Despite the construction of more renewable energy, fossil fuels play a dominant role in the years ahead. The owners and the board of Lyse Group has since its establishment in 1999 developed new business areas based on the Group's core competencies. Energy and telecommunications are currently the mainstays of the group, and a growing portion of its revenues from the telecom sector. The historical basis for Lyse has been hydropower production and distribution of electricity in the region - which still make up the bulk of the business. But industry drift has been great: Today Lyse is a major energy company with almost 300 000 paired fiber broadband customers throughout Norway. Lyse owners indicates a long-term industrial perspective, which has provided the opportunity for large investments: Lyse have in 2012 a power grid where 75% is in the ground, a gas network that can accommodate biogas, a district heating network that covers a large area of commercial space and a fiber network covering much of the Stavanger region. Lyse is working to develop new business models. The goal is to create smarter grids and smart home solutions through connection of business areas such as energy and telecommunications. The board of Lyse has asked IRIS develop a set of guiding principles that can provide a platform for strategy development in Lyse. The order from Lyse has not been a desire for the 'politically correct' or scenarios about the future. A thesis can on the contrary be considered as research-based assertion, based on what the research communities and experts believe is 'true' today. The report in its entirety will be available from the 8. of October 2012. (eb)

  4. Ultrasensitive detection of cell lysing in an microfabricated semiconductor laser cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, P.L.; French, T.; McDonald, A.E.; Shields, E.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gourley, M.F. [Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the authors report investigations of semiconductor laser microcavities for use in detecting changes of human blood cells during lysing. By studying the spectra before and during mixing of blood fluids with de-ionized water, they are able to quantify the cell shape and concentration of hemoglobin in real time during the dynamical process of lysing. The authors find that the spectra can detect subtle changes that are orders of magnitude smaller than can be observed by standard optical microscopy. Such sensitivity in observing cell structural changes has implications for measuring cell fragility, monitoring apoptotic events in real time, development of photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, and in-vitro cell micromanipulation techniques.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Targets the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) to Lyse Erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, András N.; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Badiou, Cédric; Cochet, Sylvie; Boguslawski, Kristina M.; Yoong, Pauline; Day, Christopher J.; Gosselaar-de Haas, Carla J C; van Kessel, Kok P M; Vandenesch, François; Jennings, Michael P.; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Colin, Yves; Van Strijp, Jos A G; Henry, Thomas; Torres, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    In order for Staphylococcus aureus to thrive inside the mammalian host, the bacterium has to overcome iron scarcity. S. aureus is thought to produce toxins that lyse erythrocytes, releasing hemoglobin, the most abundant iron source in mammals. Here we identify the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokin

  6. PENGARUH EKSTRAK JAMU TERHADAP AKTIVITAS SEL NATURAL KILLER DALAM MELISIS ALUR SEL LEUKIMIA (K-562 SECARA IN VITRO [The Effects of Commercial “Jamu” Extracts on Natural Killer Cell Activity in Lysing Leukemic Cell Line (K-562 in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Veronica D.C. 2

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell consitutes white blood cells which specifically functions in lysing tumor and virus invected cells. In this research, a commercial “Jamu” was tested to observe its effect on NK cells activity against leukemic cell lines (K562 in vitro. Jamu was extracted with hot water, diluted and added into cell cultures consisted of a mixture of human peripheric limphocyte cells, as the source of the effector NK cells, and K562 cell line i.e., the target cells which were cell line derived from human leukemia and had been labelled with H3-thymidine. The mixture of the cells were made by culturing the two cells at the ratio of 50:1 and 100 : 1, respectively. The results showed that lysing activity of NK cells in the presence of “Jamu” water extract measured as lysing percentage and lysing index increased only slightly, which were not statiscally significant. It should be considered that the test used in this research represents only a part of the lysing mechanism by NK cells against the target cells. An in vivo test for a period of time will be recessary to elucidate ffurther this NK cell activity.

  7. Extraction and fractionation of RNA and DNA from single cells using selective lysing and isotachophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Hirofumi; Santiago, Juan G.

    2015-03-01

    Single cell analyses of RNA and DNA are crucial to understanding the heterogeneity of cell populations. The numbers of approaches to single cells analyses are expanding, but sequence specific measurements of nucleic acids have been mostly limited to studies of either DNA or RNA, and not both. This remains a challenge as RNA and DNA have very similar physical and biochemical properties, and cross-contamination with each other can introduce false positive results. We present an electrokinetic technique which creates the opportunity to fractionate and deliver cytoplasmic RNA and genomic DNA to independent downstream analyses. Our technique uses an on-chip system that enables selective lysing of cytoplasmic membrane, extraction of RNA (away from genomic DNA and nucleus), focusing, absolute quantification of cytoplasmic RNA mass. The absolute RNA mass quantification is performed using fluorescence observation without enzymatic amplification in genomic DNA amount in the nucleus can be measured. We demonstrate the technique using single mouse B lymphocyte cells, for which we extracted an average of 14.1 pg total cytoplasmic RNA per cell. We also demonstrate correlation analysis between the absolute amount of cytoplasmic RNA and relative amount of genomic DNA, showing heterogeneity associated with cell cycle.

  8. A rapid chemical method for lysing Arabidopsis cells for protein analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takano Tetsuo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein extraction is a frequent procedure in biological research. For preparation of plant cell extracts, plant materials usually have to be ground and homogenized to physically break the robust cell wall, but this step is laborious and time-consuming when a large number of samples are handled at once. Results We developed a chemical method for lysing Arabidopsis cells without grinding. In this method, plants are boiled for just 10 minutes in a solution containing a Ca2+ chelator and detergent. Cell extracts prepared by this method were suitable for SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analysis. This method was also applicable to genomic DNA extraction for PCR analysis. Our method was applied to many other plant species, and worked well for some of them. Conclusions Our method is rapid and economical, and allows many samples to be prepared simultaneously for protein analysis. Our method is useful not only for Arabidopsis research but also research on certain other species.

  9. Experimental and theoretical study of hydrodynamic cell lysing of cancer cells in a high-throughput Circular Multi-Channel Microfiltration device

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, W.

    2013-04-01

    Microfiltration is an important microfluidic technique suitable for enrichment and isolation of cells. However, cell lysing could occur due to hydrodynamic damage that may be detrimental for medical diagnostics. Therefore, we conducted a systematic study of hydrodynamic cell lysing in a high-throughput Circular Multi-Channel Microfiltration (CMCM) device integrated with a polycarbonate membrane. HeLa cells (cervical cancer cells) were driven into the CMCM at different flow rates. The viability of the cells in the CMCM was examined by fluorescence microscopy using Acridine Orange (AO)/Ethidium Bromide (EB) as a marker for viable/dead cells. A simple analytical cell viability model was derived and a 3D numerical model was constructed to examine the correlation of between cell lysing and applied shear stress under varying flow rate and Reynolds number. The measured cell viability as a function of the shear stress was consistent with theoretical and numerical predictions when accounting for cell size distribution. © 2013 IEEE.

  10. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-03-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma.

  11. The Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3A lyses midgut epithelium cells of susceptible insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C G; Mullins, M A; Warren, G W; Koziel, M G; Estruch, J J

    1997-02-01

    The Vip3A protein is a member of a newly discovered class of vegetative insecticidal proteins with activity against a broad spectrum of lepidopteran insects. Histopathological observations indicate that Vip3A ingestion by susceptible insects such as the black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) causes gut paralysis at concentrations as low as 4 ng/cm2 of diet and complete lysis of gut epithelium cells resulting in larval death at concentrations above 40 ng/cm2. The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis), a nonsusceptible insect, does not develop any pathology upon ingesting Vip3A. While proteolytic processing of the Vip3A protein by midgut fluids obtained from susceptible and nonsusceptible insects is comparable, in vivo immunolocalization studies show that Vip3a binding is restricted to gut cells of susceptible insects. Therefore, the insect host range for Vip3A seems to be determined by its ability to bind gut cells. These results indicate that midgut epithelium cells of susceptible insects are the primary target for the Vip3A insecticidal protein and that their subsequent lysis is the primary mechanism of lethality. Disruption of gut cells appears to be the strategy adopted by the most effective insecticidal proteins.

  12. Process for inhibiting the growth of a culture of lactic acid bacteria, and optionally lysing the bacterial cells, and uses of the resulting lysed culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Arjen; Venema, Gerard; Kok, Jan; Ledeboer, Aat M.

    1995-01-01

    The invention provides a process for inhibiting the growth of a culture of lactic acid bacteria, or a product containing such culture e.g. a cheese product, in which in the cells of the lactic acid bacteria a holin obtainable from bacteriophages of Gram-positive bacteria, esp. from bacteriophages of

  13. A novel assay of biofilm antifungal activity reveals that amphotericin B and caspofungin lyse Candida albicans cells in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDone, Louis; Oga, Duana; Krysan, Damian J

    2011-08-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms is an important factor in its contribution to human disease. Assays to identify and characterize molecules with activity against fungal biofilms are crucial for the development of drugs with improved anti-biofilm activity. Here we report the application of an adenylate kinase (AK)-based cytotoxicity assay of fungal cell lysis to the characterization of agents active against C. albicans biofilms. We have developed three protocols for the AK assay. The first measures AK activity in the supernatants of biofilms treated with antifungal drugs and can be performed in parallel with a standard 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-caboxanilide-based biofilm susceptibility assay; a second, more sensitive protocol measures the AK activity present within the biofilm matrix; and a third procedure allows the direct visualization of lytic activity toward biofilms formed on catheter material. Amphotericin B and caspofungin, the two most effective anti-biofilm drugs currently used to treat fungal infections, both directly lyse planktonic C. albicans cells in vitro, leading to the release of AK into the culture medium. These studies serve to validate the AK-based lysis assay as a useful addition to the methods for the characterization of antifungal agents active toward biofilms and provide insights into the mode of action of amphotericin B and caspofungin against C. albicans biofilms. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Evidence for the formation of endothelin by lysed red blood cells from endogenous precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippler, B; Herbst, C; Simmet, T

    1994-12-12

    The release of endothelin from various blood cell fractions was investigated. Human as well as rat blood cell fractions homogenized by sonification were incubated in buffer for up to 60 min. Neither in platelet nor leukocyte homogenates from either species could immunoreactive endothelin be detected. In contrast, homogenates of red blood cells from both species showed a rapid and time-dependent rise of immunoreactive endothelin levels, reaching a peak at 15 min and decreasing thereafter. However, at time point 0 no immunoreactive endothelin could be detected. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography showed immunoreactive endothelin to consist of endothelin-1 as well as big endothelin-1. The release of immunoreactive endothelin in human and rat homogenates was concentration-dependently inhibited by the protease inhibitors, leupeptin, phosphoramidon, chymostatin and pepstatin A in order of increasing potency. Intact red blood cells did not incorporate [125I]endothelin-1 nor did they transform exogenous big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1. However, haemolysis of red blood cells with hypotonic saline (0.2%) or incubation with pore-forming staphylococcal alpha-toxin induced the release of immunoreactive endothelin into the buffer samples. Thus, apart from the indirect vasoconstrictor, haemoglobin, red blood cells can also liberate the direct vasoconstrictor, endothelin, a finding expected to be of considerable pathophysiological significance.

  15. The Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3A lyses midgut epithelium cells of susceptible insects.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, C G; Mullins, M A; Warren, G W; Koziel, M G; Estruch, J J

    1997-01-01

    The Vip3A protein is a member of a newly discovered class of vegetative insecticidal proteins with activity against a broad spectrum of lepidopteran insects. Histopathological observations indicate that Vip3A ingestion by susceptible insects such as the black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) causes gut paralysis at concentrations as low as 4 ng/cm2 of diet and complete lysis of gut epithelium cells resulting in larval death at concentrations above 40 ng/cm2....

  16. Cascade cell lyses and DNA extraction for identification of genes and microorganisms in kefir grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Magdalena; Kolakowski, Piotr; Radziwill-Bienkowska, Joanna M; Szmytkowska, Agnieszka; Bardowski, Jacek

    2012-02-01

    Kefir is a dairy product popular in many countries in Central Europe, especially in Poland and other countries of Eastern and Northern Europe. This type of fermented milk is produced by a complex population of symbiotic bacteria and yeasts. In this work, conditions for DNA extraction, involving disruption of kefir grains and a cascade of cell lysis treatments, were established. Extraction procedure of total microbial DNA was carried out directly from fresh kefir grains. Using different lysis stringency conditions, five DNA pools were obtained. Genetic diversity of DNA pools were validated by RAPD analysis, which showed differences in patterns of amplified DNA fragments, indicating diverse microbial composition of all the analysed samples. These DNA pools were used for construction of genomic DNA libraries for sequencing. As much as 50% of the analysed nucleotide sequences showed homology to sequences from bacteria belonging to the Lactobacillus genus. Several sequences were similar to sequences from bacteria representing Lactococcus, Oenococcus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus and Leuconostoc species. Among homologues of yeast proteins were those from Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, several sequences were found to be homologous to sequences from bacteriophages.

  17. Bacteriophage enzymes for the prevention and treatment of bacterial infections: Stability and stabilization of the enzyme lysing Streptococcus pyogenes cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klyachko, N. L.; Dmitrieva, N. F.; Eshchina, A. S.; Ignatenko, O. V.; Filatova, L. Y.; Rainina, Evguenia I.; Kazarov, A. K.; Levashov, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant, phage associated lytic enzyme Ply C capable to lyse streptococci of groups A and C was stabilized in the variety of the micelles containing compositions to improve the stability of the enzyme for further application in medicine. It was shown that, in the micellar polyelectrolyte composition M16, the enzyme retained its activity for 2 months; while in a buffer solution under the same conditions ((pH 6.3, room temperature), it completely lost its activity in 2 days

  18. Concerning the role of cell lysis-cryptic growth in anaerobic side-stream reactors: the single-cell analysis of viable, dead and lysed bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foladori, P; Velho, V F; Costa, R H R; Bruni, L; Quaranta, A; Andreottola, G

    2015-05-01

    In the Anaerobic Side-Stream Reactor (ASSR), part of the return sludge undergoes alternating aerobic and anaerobic conditions with the aim of reducing sludge production. In this paper, viability, enzymatic activity, death and lysis of bacterial cells exposed to aerobic and anaerobic conditions for 16 d were investigated at single-cell level by flow cytometry, with the objective of contributing to the understanding of the mechanisms of sludge reduction in the ASSR systems. Results indicated that total and viable bacteria did not decrease during the anaerobic phase, indicating that anaerobiosis at ambient temperature does not produce a significant cell lysis. Bacteria decay and lysis occurred principally under aerobic conditions. The aerobic decay rate of total bacteria (bTB) was considered as the rate of generation of lysed bacteria. Values of bTB of 0.07-0.11 d(-1) were measured in anaerobic + aerobic sequence. The enzymatic activity was not particularly affected by the transition from anaerobiosis to aerobiosis. Large solubilisation of COD and NH4(+) was observed only under anaerobic conditions, as a consequence of hydrolysis of organic matter, but not due to cell lysis. The observations supported the proposal of two independent mechanisms contributing equally to sludge reduction: (1) under anaerobic conditions: sludge hydrolysis of non-bacterial material, (2) under aerobic conditions: bacterial cell lysis and oxidation of released biodegradable compounds.

  19. TCR gamma delta cytotoxic T lymphocytes expressing the killer cell-inhibitory receptor p58.2 (CD158b) selectively lyse acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolstra, H; Fredrix, H; van der Meer, A; de Witte, T; Figdor, C; van de Wiel-van Kemenade, E

    2001-05-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are thought to play an important role in the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) response. Unfortunately, GVL reactivity is often associated with life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Characterization of CTL that selectively attack leukemic cells but not normal cells may lead to the development of adjuvant immunotherapy that separates GVL from GVHD. Here, we describe TCR gamma delta (V gamma 9/V delta 1) CTL, isolated from the peripheral blood of an AML patient after stem cell transplantation (SCT), that very efficiently lysed freshly isolated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and AML cell lines. Interestingly, HLA-matched non-malignant hematopoietic cells were not killed. We revealed that the killer cell-inhibitory receptor (KIR) p58.2 (CD158b) specific for group 2 HLA-C molecules negatively regulates the cytotoxic effector function displayed by these TCR gamma delta CTL. First, an antibody against HLA-C enhances lysis of non-malignant cells. Secondly, stable transfection of HLA-Cw*0304 into the class I-negative cell line 721.221 inhibited lysis. Finally, engagement of p58.2 by antibodies immobilized on Fc gamma R-expressing murine P815 cells inhibits CD3- and TCR gamma delta-directed lysis. Compared to non-malignant hematopoietic cells, AML cells express much lower levels of MHC class I molecules making them susceptible to lysis by p58.2(+) TCR gamma delta CTL. Such KIR-regulated CTL reactivity may have a role in the GVL response without affecting normal tissues of the host and leading to GVHD.

  20. Further characterization of particulate fractions from lysed cell envelopes of Halobacterium halobium and isolation of gas vacuole membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeckenius, W; Kunau, W H

    1968-08-01

    Lysates of cell envelopes from Halobacterium halobium have been separated into four fractions. A soluble, colorless fraction (I) containing protein, hexosamines, and no lipid is apparently derived from the cell wall. A red fraction (II), containing approximately 40 per cent lipid, 60 per cent protein, and a small amount of hexosamines consists of cell membrane disaggregated into fragments of small size. A third fraction (III) of purple color consists of large membrane sheets and has a very similar composition to II, containing the same classes of lipids but no hexosamines; its buoyant density is 1.18 g/ml. The fourth fraction (IV) has a buoyant density of 1.23 g/ml and contains the "intracytoplasmic membranes." These consist mainly of protein, and no lipid can be extracted with chloroform-methanol. Fractions I and II, which result from disaggregation of cell wall and cell membrane during lysis, contain a high proportion of dicarboxyl amino acids; this is in good agreement with the assumption that disruption of the cell envelope upon removal of salt is due to the high charge density. The intracytoplasmic membranes (IV) represent the gas vacuole membranes in the collapsed state. In a number of mutants that have lost the ability to form gas vacuoles, no vacuole membranes or any structure that could be related to them has been found.

  1. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clones, established by stimulation with the HLA-A2 binding p5365-73 wild type peptide loaded on dendritic cells In vitro, specifically recognize and lyse HLA-A2 tumour cells overexpressing the p53 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Annette Malene; Petersen, T R; Kirkin, A F;

    2000-01-01

    to carry identical T-cell receptors. The CTL clone, 2D9, was shown to specifically lyse the HLA-A*0201+ squamous carcinoma cell line SCC9 and the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468. Our data demonstrate that human peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal healthy individuals comprise T cells capable...... of recognizing p53 derived wild type (self) peptides. Furthermore, the capacity of R9V specific T cell clones to exert HLA restricted cytotoxicity, argues that the R9V peptide is naturally presented on certain cancer cells. This supports the view that p53 derived wild type peptides might serve as candidate...... target antigens for the immunotherapeutic treatment of cancer....

  2. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells with Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Jesus I; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Murphy, William J; Canter, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Standard cytoreductive cancer therapy, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, are frequently resisted by a small portion of cancer cells with 'stem-cell' like properties including quiescence and repopulation. Immunotherapy represents a breakthrough modality for improving oncologic outcomes in cancer patients. Since the success of immunotherapy is not contingent on target cell proliferation, it may also be uniquely suited to address the problem of resistance and repopulation exerted by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Areas covered: Natural killer (NK) cells have long been known for their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells, and there are increasing data demonstrating that NK cells can selectively identify and lyse CSCs. The authors review the current knowledge of CSCs and NK cells and highlight recent studies that support the concept that NK cells are capable of targeting CSC in solid tumors, especially in the context of combination therapy simultaneously targeting non-CSCs and CSCs. Expert opinion: Unlike cytotoxic cancer treatments, NK cells can target and eliminate quiescent/non-proliferating cells such as CSCs, and these enigmatic cells are an important source of relapse and metastasis. NK targeting of CSCs represents a novel and potentially high impact method to capitalize on the intrinsic therapeutic potential of NK cells.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes that lyse in the macrophage cytosol trigger AIM2-mediated pyroptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, John-Demian; Witte, Chelsea E.; Zemansky, Jason; Hanson, Bill; Lauer, Peter; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary To gain insight into the mechanisms by which host cells detect cytosolic invasion by intracellular pathogens, a genetic screen was performed to identify Listeria monocytogenes mutants that induced altered levels of host cell death. A mutation in lmo2473 resulted in hyper-stimulation of host cell death and IL-1β secretion (pyroptosis) following bacteriolysis in the macrophage cytosol. In addition, strains engineered to lyse in the cytosol by expression of both bacteriophage holin and lysin or induced to lyse by treatment with ampicillin stimulated pyroptosis. Pyroptosis was independent of the Nlrp3 and Nlrc4 receptors, but dependent on ASC and AIM2. Importantly, wild type L. monocytogenes were also found to lyse, albeit at low levels, and trigger AIM2-dependent pyroptosis. Since AIM2 is activated by DNA, these data suggested that pyroptosis is triggered by bacterial DNA released during lysis. PMID:20417169

  4. Immunologic targeting of FOXP3 in inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Nair

    Full Text Available The forkhead transcription factor FOXP3 is necessary for induction of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs and their immunosuppressive function. We have previously demonstrated that targeting Tregs by vaccination of mice with murine FOXP3 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells (DCs elicits FOXP3-specific T cell responses and enhances tumor immunity. It is clear that FOXP3 expression is not restricted to T-cell lineage and herein, using RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and western immunoblot we demonstrate for the first time that FOXP3 is expressed in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC cells, SUM149 (triple negative, ErbB1-activated and SUM190 (ErbB2-overexpressing. Importantly, FOXP3-specific T cells generated in vitro using human FOXP3 RNA-transfected DCs as stimulators efficiently lyse SUM149 cells. Interestingly, an isogenic model (rSUM149 derived from SUM149 with an enhanced anti-apoptotic phenotype was resistant to FOXP3-specific T cell mediated lysis. The MHC class I cellular processing mechanism was intact in both cell lines at the protein and transcription levels suggesting that the resistance to cytolysis by rSUM149 cells was not related to MHC class I expression or to the MHC class I antigen processing machinery in these cells. Our data suggest that FOXP3 may be an effective tumor target in IBC cells however increased anti-apoptotic signaling can lead to immune evasion.

  5. Targeting Notch to target cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannuti, Antonio; Foreman, Kimberly; Rizzo, Paola; Osipo, Clodia; Golde, Todd; Osborne, Barbara; Miele, Lucio

    2010-06-15

    The cellular heterogeneity of neoplasms has been at the center of considerable interest since the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", originally formulated for hematologic malignancies, was extended to solid tumors. The origins of cancer "stem" cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells (TIC; henceforth referred to as CSCs) and the methods to identify them are hotly debated topics. Nevertheless, the existence of subpopulations of tumor cells with stem-like characteristics has significant therapeutic implications. The stem-like phenotype includes indefinite self-replication, pluripotency, and, importantly, resistance to chemotherapeutics. Thus, it is plausible that CSCs, regardless of their origin, may escape standard therapies and cause disease recurrences and/or metastasis after apparently complete remissions. Consequently, the idea of selectively targeting CSCs with novel therapeutics is gaining considerable interest. The Notch pathway is one of the most intensively studied putative therapeutic targets in CSC, and several investigational Notch inhibitors are being developed. However, successful targeting of Notch signaling in CSC will require a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to prove safe and effective. Additionally, to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with Notch-targeting therapeutics, reliable biomarkers to measure pathway activity in CSC from specific tumors will have to be identified and validated. This article summarizes the most recent developments in the field of Notch-targeted cancer therapeutics, with emphasis on CSC.

  6. Lytic Characteristics and Identification of Two Alga-lysing Bacterial Strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Haiyan; HU Wenrong

    2006-01-01

    All previously reported bacterial species which are capable of lysing harmful algae have been isolated from coastal environments in which harmful algae blooms have occurred. Due to the low concentration of alga-lysing bacteria in an algal bloom, it is difficult to isolate the alga-lysing bacteria by existing methods. In this paper, two algae-lysing bacterial strains,P01 and P03, have been isolated from a biosystem immobilized on a sponge that was highly effective in removing algae and microcystins. Their lysing modes and effects on Microcystis aeruginosa have been studied. The results show that the degradation processes of these two strains for M. aeruginosa accorded with a first-order reaction model when the chlorophylla concentration was in the range from 0 to 1000 μg L-1. The degradation rate constants were 0.106 7, 0.127 4 and 0.279 2 for P01and0.0683, 0.0744 and 0.02897 for P03, when the bacterial densities were 8.6 × 105, 8.6 × 106 and 8.6 × 107cells mL 1, respectively. Moreover, the two bacterial strains had favourable lytic effects not only on M. aeruginosa, but also on Chlorella and Scene-desmus. Their lytic effect on M. aeruginosa did not require physical cell to cell contact, but proceeded by the production of an extracellular product. The bacterial strains were identified as Bacillus species by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, BLAST analysis, and comparison with sequences in the GenBank nucleotide database.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes that lyse in the macrophage cytosol trigger AIM2-mediated pyroptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, John-Demian; Witte, Chelsea E.; Zemansky, Jason; Hanson, Bill; Lauer, Peter; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms by which host cells detect cytosolic invasion by intracellular pathogens, a genetic screen was performed to identify Listeria monocytogenes mutants that induced altered levels of host cell death. A mutation in lmo2473 resulted in hyper-stimulation of host cell death and IL-1β secretion (pyroptosis) following bacteriolysis in the macrophage cytosol. In addition, strains engineered to lyse in the cytosol by expression of both bacteriophage holin and lysin or ...

  8. Listeria monocytogenes that lyse in the macrophage cytosol trigger AIM2-mediated pyroptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, John-Demian; Witte, Chelsea E.; Zemansky, Jason; Hanson, Bill; Lauer, Peter; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms by which host cells detect cytosolic invasion by intracellular pathogens, a genetic screen was performed to identify Listeria monocytogenes mutants that induced altered levels of host cell death. A mutation in lmo2473 resulted in hyper-stimulation of host cell death and IL-1β secretion (pyroptosis) following bacteriolysis in the macrophage cytosol. In addition, strains engineered to lyse in the cytosol by expression of both bacteriophage holin and lysin or ...

  9. Killing cells by targeting mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchado, E; Guillamot, M; Malumbres, M

    2012-03-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is a common feature of human cancer. Tumor cells accumulate mutations that result in unscheduled proliferation, genomic instability and chromosomal instability. Several therapeutic strategies have been proposed for targeting the cell division cycle in cancer. Whereas inhibiting the initial phases of the cell cycle is likely to generate viable quiescent cells, targeting mitosis offers several possibilities for killing cancer cells. Microtubule poisons have proved efficacy in the clinic against a broad range of malignancies, and novel targeted strategies are now evaluating the inhibition of critical activities, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 1, Aurora or Polo kinases or spindle kinesins. Abrogation of the mitotic checkpoint or targeting the energetic or proteotoxic stress of aneuploid or chromosomally instable cells may also provide further benefits by inducing lethal levels of instability. Although cancer cells may display different responses to these treatments, recent data suggest that targeting mitotic exit by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex generates metaphase cells that invariably die in mitosis. As the efficacy of cell-cycle targeting approaches has been limited so far, further understanding of the molecular pathways modulating mitotic cell death will be required to move forward these new proposals to the clinic.

  10. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Cassandra C.; McMichael, Elizabeth L.; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C.; Abrams, Zachary B.; Lee, Robert J.; Carson, William E.

    2016-01-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is over-expressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis, using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and negative control, respectively. FR-positive and negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G (C-IgG) in the presence or absence of cytokines in order to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells enhanced following treatment with F-IgG, as compared to C-IgG at all effector:target (E:T) ratios (p<0.01). This trend was further enhanced by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12). NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) were also significantly increased in response to co-stimulation with IL-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells, as compared to controls (p<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells which can be further enhanced by the addition of cytokines. PMID:27035691

  11. Thaw-and-use target cells pre-labeled with calcein AM for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shan; Nguyen, Van; Lin, Yuwen Linda; Kamen, Lynn; Song, An

    2017-08-01

    In vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays are routinely performed to support the research and development of therapeutic antibodies. In ADCC assays, target cells bound by the antibodies are lysed by activated effector cells following interactions between the Fc region of the bound antibody and Fcγ receptors on effector cells. Target cell lysis is typically measured by quantification of released endogenous enzymes, e.g., lactate dehydrogenase, or measurement of released exogenous labels, e.g., (51)Cr, europium or calcein. ADCC assays based on the detection of exogenous labels released from lysed target cells generally show higher sensitivity and require shorter incubation times. However, target cells are usually labeled immediately prior to assay, which inadvertently introduces additional assay variations due to differences in target cell conditions and labeling/handling processes. In this report, we describe the use of thaw-and-use pre-labeled target cells for ADCC assays. Thaw-and-use target cells in our experiments were pre-labeled with the fluorescent dye calcein AM, cryopreserved in single-use aliquots and used directly in assays after thawing. Upon thaw, the pre-labeled cells displayed viability and label retention comparable to freshly labeled cells, responded to ADCC mediated by both peripheral blood mononuclear cells and engineered natural killer cells, performed stably for at least 3 years and provided favorable precision and accuracy to ADCC assays. Implementation of thaw-and-use pre-labeled target cells in ADCC assays can help to alleviate both cell culture and dye labeling derived variability, increase the flexibility of assay scheduling and improve assay consistency and robustness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation and algae-lysing characteristics of the algicidal bacterium B5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Water blooms have become a worldwide environmental problem. Recently, algicidal bacteria have attracted wide attention as possible agents for inhibiting algal water blooms. In this study, one strain of algicidal bacterium B5 was isolated from activated sludge. On the basis of analysis of its physiological characteristics and 16S rDNA gene sequence, it was identified as Bacillus fusiformis. Its algae-lysing characteristics on Microcystis aeruginosa, Chlorella and Scenedesmus were tested. The results showed that: (1) the algicidal bacterium B5 is a Gram-negative bacterium. The 16S rDNA nucleotide sequence homology of strain B5 with 2 strains of B. fusiformis reached 99.86%, so B5 was identified as B. fusiformis; (2) the algal-lysing effects of the algicidal bacterium B5 on M. aeruginosa, Chlorella and Scenedesmus were pronounced. The initial bacterial and algal cell densities strongly influence the removal rates of chlorophyll-a. The greater the initial bacterial cell density, the faster the degradation of chlorophyll-a. The greater the initial algal cell density, the slower the degradation of chlorophyll-a. When the bacterial cell density was 3.6 × 107 cells/ml, nearly 90% of chlorophyll-a was removed. When the chlorophyll-a concentration was less than 550 μg/L, about 70 % was removed; (3) the strain B5 lysed algae not directly but by secreting metabolites and these metabolites could bear heat treatment.

  13. Targeting tumour Cell Plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth D. WILLIAMS

    2009-01-01

    @@ Her research is focused on understanding the mechanisms of tumour progression and metastasis, particularly in uro-logical carcinomas (bladder and prostate). Tumour cell plasticity, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a cen-tral theme in Dr Williams' work.

  14. Attachment of an anti-receptor antibody to non-target cells renders them susceptible to lysis by a clone of cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, D M; Tonegawa, S; Eisen, H N

    1984-12-01

    The molecular basis for the dependence of antigen recognition by T cells on products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is unknown, and the antigenic structures that are actually bound by T-cell receptors are ill-defined. In this study, we asked whether a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that reacts with the T-cell receptor of a clone of murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and not with the receptors of other CTL clones can substitute for that clone's natural ligand in specific cytolytic reactions. To answer the question, a mAb (1B2) to the receptor of a CTL clone (2C) was attached covalently to 51Cr-labeled cells that were not otherwise susceptible to lysis by clone 2C, and the cells thus modified were then tested as targets for clone 2C and other CTL clones of similar specificity. All labeled cells modified in this way, including a murine cell line that expresses no cell-surface MHC class I molecules and a human cell line, were lysed by clone 2C but not by other CTL clones. If, however, instead of attaching the mAb to the receptor of clone 2C, the cells were modified by attaching to them mAbs to other surface antigens on CTL [lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1), Thy-1.2], they were not lysed. In cytolytic titrations, the cells that had been converted by attachment of mAb 1B2 into specific targets for clone 2C were just as susceptible to lysis by that clone as the clone's natural H-2d targets (e.g., P815 cells). However, some accessory surface molecules (LFA-1, Lyt-2) that are required for clone 2C to lyse its natural H-2d targets seemed not to be required for this clone to lyse the mAb-converted target cells. By demonstrating that a variety of different cell types can be thus converted into target cells for CTL, the approach described in this study may provide opportunities to analyze further the mechanisms by which CTL destroy target cells.

  15. An alternative bactericidal mechanism of action for lantibiotic peptides that target lipid II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasper, Hester E.; Kramer, Naomi E.; Smith, James L.; Hillman, J. D.; Zachariah, Cherian; Kuipers, Oscar P.; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2006-01-01

    Lantibiotics are polycyclic peptides containing unusual amino acids, which have binding specificity for bacterial cells, targeting the bacterial cell wall component lipid II to form pores and thereby lyse the cells. Yet several members of these lipid II - targeted lantibiotics are too short to be ab

  16. Innovative T Cell-Targeted Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A. Tabilio. 2009. Activated autologous T cells exert an anti-B-cell chronic lymphatic leukemia effect in vitro and in vivo. Cytotherapy 11:86-96... leukemia . Sci Transl Med 2011; 3(95): 95ra73. 15. Porter DL, Levine BL, Kalos M, Bagg A, June CH. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells in chronic ...malignancies. Kasumi 3 is a CD33þ CD34þ undifferentiated leukemia cell line that was lysed at intermediate levels by gd T cells. Chronic myelogenous leukemia

  17. Alga-lysing bioreactor and the dominant bacteria strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Hai-yan; HU Wen-rong; MU Rui-min; LI Xiao-cai

    2007-01-01

    Alga-lysing bacteria have been paid much attention to in recent years. In this study, the alga-lysing strain P05 which was isolated from an immobilizing biosystem was immobilized by coke and elastic filler, forming two biological reactors. The removal efficiencies of algae, NH3-N and organic matter using the two reactors were studied. The results showed that strain P05 was an ideal algal-lysing bacteria strain because it was easy to be immobilized by coke and elastic filler which are of cheap, low biodegradability and the simple immobilization procedure. After 7 d filming, the biological film could be formed and the reactors were used to treat the eutrophic water. These two reactors were of stability and high effect with low cost and easy operation. The optimal hydraulic retention time (HRT) of each reactor was 4 h. The algae removal rates were 80.38% and 82.1% (in term of Chl-a) of coke reactor and filler reactor, respectively. And that of NH3-N were 52.3% and 52.7%. The removal rates of CODMn were 39.03% and 39.64%. The strain P05 was identified as Bacillus sp. by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, BLAST analysis, and comparison with sequences in the GenBank nucleotide database.

  18. Myeloid leukemic progenitor cells can be specifically targeted by minor histocompatibility antigen LRH-1-reactive cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norde, Wieger J; Overes, Ingrid M; Maas, Frans; Fredrix, Hanny; Vos, Johanna C M; Kester, Michel G D; van der Voort, Robbert; Jedema, Inge; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Schattenberg, Anton V; de Witte, Theo M; Dolstra, Harry

    2009-03-05

    CD8(+) T cells recognizing minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHAs) on leukemic stem and progenitor cells play a pivotal role in effective graft-versus-leukemia reactivity after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Previously, we identified a hematopoiesis-restricted MiHA, designated LRH-1, which is presented by HLA-B7 and encoded by the P2X5 purinergic receptor gene. We found that P2X5 is significantly expressed in CD34(+) leukemic subpopulations from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Here, we demonstrate that LRH-1-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses are frequently induced in myeloid leukemia patients following donor lymphocyte infusions. Patients with high percentages of circulating LRH-1-specific CD8(+) T cells had no or only mild graft-versus-host disease. Functional analysis showed that LRH-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) isolated from 2 different patients efficiently target LRH-1-positive leukemic CD34(+) progenitor cells from both CML and AML patients, whereas mature CML cells are only marginally lysed due to down-regulation of P2X5. Furthermore, we observed that relative resistance to LRH-1 CTL-mediated cell death due to elevated levels of antiapoptotic XIAP could be overcome by IFN-gamma prestimulation and increased CTL-target ratios. These findings provide a rationale for use of LRH-1 as immunotherapeutic target antigen to treat residual or persisting myeloid malignancies after allogeneic SCT.

  19. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC...... are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug...... delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC....

  20. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen presenting cells (APC) with a remarkable ability to take up antigens and stimulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted specific immune responses. Recent discoveries have shown that their role in initiating primary immune responses seems to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC.

  1. Lake viruses lyse cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, enhances filamentous-host dispersal in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Peter C.; Young, Loretta M.

    2010-01-01

    Globally, cyanobacterial blooms are increasing along with observations of the controlling influence of viruses. Our aim here was to test whether viruses from an Australian freshwater lake could lyse the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Woloszynska) Seenaya and Subba Raju. C. raciborskii was selectively isolated from Lake Samsonvale southeast Queensland Australia using a Modified Jaworski Medium (without any form of inorganic nitrogen). Microscopy confirmed the resulting culture of a single cyanobacterial species. Natural viral-like particles (VLPs) were incubated with C. raciborskii cells, the host abundance decreased by 86% in 5 days, while the number of VLPs increased stepwise. As a cell lysed, the filaments of cells split into smaller, but viable, fragments. This process may help disperse the cyanobacterium in the wild. Hence the use of this virus to control blooms may inadvertently encourage the dispersal of toxic filamentous cyanobacteria. The cyanophage (virus infecting cyanobacteria) replication time was 21 h, with an average burst size of 64 viruses cell -1. Transmission Electron Microscopy showed this cyanophage for C. raciborskii, with its long, non-contractile tail and a capsid diameter of 70 nm, belongs to the Siphoviridae family of viruses. This cyanophage can affect the abundance and distribution of the cyanobacterium C. raciborskii in this Australian freshwater lake.

  2. A novel method for producing target cells and assessing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in outbred hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendinelli Mauro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytotoxic T lymphocytes play a crucial role in the immunological control of microbial infections and in the design of vaccines and immunotherapies. Measurement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity requires that the test antigen is presented by target cells having the same or compatible class I major hystocompatibility complex antigens as the effector cells. Conventional assays use target cells labeled with 51chromium and infer cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity by measuring the isotope released by the target cells lysed following incubation with antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This assay is sensitive but needs manipulation and disposal of hazardous radioactive reagents and provides a bulk estimate of the reporter released, which may be influenced by spontaneous release of the label and other poorly controllable variables. Here we describe a novel method for producing target in outbred hosts and assessing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity by flow cytometry. Results The method consists of culturing skin fibroblasts, immortalizing them with a replication defective clone of simian virus 40, and finally transducing them with a bicistronic vector encoding the target antigen and the reporter green fluorescent protein. When used in a flow cytometry-based assay, the target cells obtained with this method proved valuable for assessing the viral envelope protein specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in domestic cats acutely or chronically infected with feline immunodeficiency virus, a lentivirus similar to human immunodeficiency virus and used as animal model for AIDS studies. Conclusion Given the versatility of the bicistronic vector used, its ability to deliver multiple and large transgenes in target cells, and its extremely wide cell specificity when pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope protein, the method is potentially exploitable in many animal species.

  3. A novel murine T-cell receptor targeting NY-ESO-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Shannon F; Parkhurst, Maria R; Hong, Young; Zheng, Zhili; Feldman, Steven A; Rao, Mahadev; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Beard, Rachel E; Xu, Hui; Black, Mary A; Robbins, Paul F; Schrump, David A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    Cancer testis antigens, such as NY-ESO-1, are expressed in a variety of prevalent tumors and represent potential targets for T-cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy. DNA encoding a murine anti-NY-ESO-1 TCR gene (mTCR) was isolated from immunized HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice and inserted into a γ-retroviral vector. Two mTCR vectors were produced and used to transduce human PBL. Transduced cells were cocultured with tumor target cell lines and T2 cells pulsed with the NY-ESO-1 peptide, and assayed for cytokine release and cell lysis activity. The most active TCR construct was selected for production of a master cell bank for clinical use. mTCR-transduced PBL maintained TCR expression in short-term and long-term culture, ranging from 50% to 90% efficiency 7-11 days after stimulation and 46%-82% 10-20 days after restimulation. High levels of interferon-γ secretion were observed (1000-12000 pg/mL), in tumor coculture assays and recognition of peptide-pulsed cells was observed at 0.1 ng/mL, suggesting that the new mTCR had high avidity for antigen recognition. mTCR-transduced T cells also specifically lysed human tumor targets. In all assays, the mTCR was equivalent or better than the comparable human TCR. As the functional activity of TCR-transduced cells may be affected by the formation of mixed dimers, mTCRs, which are less likely to form mixed dimers with endogenous hTCRs, may be more effective in vivo. This new mTCR targeted to NY-ESO-1 represents a novel potential therapeutic option for adoptive cell-transfer therapy for a variety of malignancies.

  4. Attenuating l-lysine production by deletion of ddh and lysE and their effect on l-threonine and l-isoleucine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xunyan; Zhao, Yue; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-11-01

    The fermentative production of l-threonine and l-isoleucine with Corynebacterium glutamicum is usually accompanied by the by-production of l-lysine, which shares partial biosynthesis pathway with l-threonine and l-isoleucine. Since the direct precursor for l-lysine synthesis, diaminopimelate, is a component of peptidoglycan and thus essential for cell wall synthesis, reducing l-lysine by-production could be troublesome. Here, a basal strain with eliminated l-lysine production was constructed from the wild type C. glutamicum ATCC13869 by deleting the chromosomal ddh and lysE. Furthermore, the basal strain as well as the ddh single mutant strain was engineered for l-threonine production by over-expressing lysC1, hom1 and thrB, and for l-isoleucine production by over-expressing lysC1, hom1, thrB and ilvA1. Fermentation experiments with the engineered strains showed that (i) deletion of ddh improved l-threonine production by 17%, and additional deletion of lysE further improved l-threonine production by 28%; (ii) deletion of ddh improved l-isoleucine production by 8% and improved cell growth by 21%, whereas additional deletion of lysE had no further influence on both l-isoleucine production and cell growth; (iii) l-lysine by-production was reduced by 95% and 86% in l-threonine and l-isoleucine production, respectively, by deletion of ddh and lysE. This is the first report on improving l-threonine and l-isoleucine production by deleting ddh and lysE in C. glutamicum. The results demonstrate deletion of ddh and lysE as an effective strategy to reduce l-lysine by-production without surrendering the cell growth of C. glutamicum.

  5. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  6. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC....

  7. An IL12-IL2-antibody fusion protein targeting Hodgkin's lymphoma cells potentiates activation of NK and T cells for an anti-tumor attack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Jahn

    Full Text Available Successful immunotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is so far hampered by the striking unresponsiveness of lymphoma infiltrating immune cells. To mobilize both adoptive and innate immune cells for an anti-tumor attack we fused the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL2 and IL12 to an anti-CD30 scFv antibody in a dual cytokine fusion protein to accumulate both cytokines at the malignant CD30(+ Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in the lymphoma lesion. The tumor-targeted IL12-IL2 fusion protein was superior in activating resting T cells to amplify and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to targeted IL2 or IL12 alone. NK cells were also activated by the dual cytokine protein to secrete IFN-γ and to lyse target cells. The tumor-targeted IL12-IL2, when applied by i.v. injection to immune-competent mice with established antigen-positive tumors, accumulated at the tumor site and induced tumor regression. Data demonstrate that simultaneous targeting of two cytokines in a spatial and temporal simultaneous fashion to pre-defined tissues is feasible by a dual-cytokine antibody fusion protein. In the case of IL12 and IL2, this produced superior anti-tumor efficacy implying the strategy to muster a broader immune cell response in the combat against cancer.

  8. Targeting influenza virosomes to ovarian carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrobattista, E; Schoen, P; Wilschut, J; Crommelin, DJA; Storm, G

    2001-01-01

    Reconstituted influenza virus envelopes (virosomes) containing the viral hemagglutinin (HA) have attracted attention as delivery vesicles for cytosolic drug delivery as they possess membrane fusion activity. Here, we show that influenza virosomes can be targeted towards ovarian carcinoma cells (OVCA

  9. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Sarah B.; Arrildt, Kathryn T.; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the “immune privileged” CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout ...

  10. Targeted destruction of HIV-positive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti R Sharma

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV/AIDS is now a global epidemic that has become the leading infectious killer of adults worldwide. Although antiretroviral (ARV therapy has dramatically improved the quality of life and increased the life expectancy of those infected with HIV but frequency of dosing and drug toxicity as well as the development of viral resistance pose additional limitations. The rapidly expanding field of nanotechnology has vast potential to radically advance the treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS. Nanoparticles can provide improved drug delivery, by virtue of their small size, robustness, safety, multimodality or multifunctionality. Aims and objectives: Since HIV primarily infects CD4+ cells; we aim to use CD4 as a selectable target to deliver a pro-apoptotic protein to HIV-infected cells using nanoparticles as carriers. The aim of study was to develop a nanotechnology-based death inducing delivery system for the destruction of CD4+HIV infected cells through the activation of caspase-3. Methodology: A modified caspase-3 protein (Mut-3 was engineered, which is cleavable only by HIV-1 protease. Mut-3 can activate apoptosis in the presence of HIV-1 protease, consequently killing HIV-positive cells. Mut-3 protein was conjugated to gold nanoparticles together with a CD4-targeting peptide. The efficacy of the gold nanoparticles was tested on CHO cells that were genetically engineered to express GFP labelled CD4 and HIV-1 protease. Results: Mut-3 was expressed in bacterial cells and purified. CHO cells that stably over express CD4-GFP and HIV-1 protease were selected using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting. Dose response cell culture experiments showed that gold nanoparticles without Mut-3 and CD4-targeting peptide did not induce cell death in CHO cells, while gold nanoparticles that was conjugated with Mut-3 and the CD4-targeting peptide rapidly induced cell death in CHO cells. Conclusions: Our results suggest that gold nanoparticles conjugated

  11. Rationale for B cell targeting in SLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Iñaki

    2014-01-01

    B cells are central pathogenic players in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and multiple other autoinmune diseases through antibody production as well as antibody independent functiona. At the same time, B cells are known to play important regulatory functions that may protect against autoimmune manifestations. Yet, the functional role of different B cell populations and their contribution to disease remain to be understood. The advent of agents that specifically target B cells, in particular anti-CD20 and ant-BLyS antibodies, have demonstrated the efficacy of this approach for the treatment of human autoimmunity. The analysis of patients treated with these and other B cell agents provide a unique opportunity to understand the correlates of clinical response and the significance of different B cell subsets. Here we discuss this information and how it could be used to better understand SLE and improve the rational design of B cell directed therapies in this disease. PMID:24763533

  12. Cost targets for domestic fuel cell CHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffell, I.; Green, R.; Kendall, K.

    Fuel cells have the potential to reduce domestic energy bills by providing both heat and power at the point of use, generating high value electricity from a low cost fuel. However, the cost of installing the fuel cell must be sufficiently low to be recovered by the savings made over its lifetime. A computer simulation is used to estimate the savings and cost targets for fuel cell CHP systems. Two pitfalls of this kind of simulation are addressed: the selection of representative performance figures for fuel cells, and the range of houses from which energy demand data was taken. A meta-study of the current state of the art is presented, and used with 102 house-years of demand to simulate the range of economic performance expected from four fuel cell technologies within the UK domestic CHP market. Annual savings relative to a condensing boiler are estimated at €170-300 for a 1 kWe fuel cell, giving a target cost of €350-625 kW -1 for any fuel cell technology that can demonstrate a 2.5-year lifetime. Increasing lifetime and reducing fuel cell capacity are identified as routes to accelerated market entry. The importance of energy demand is seen to outweigh both economic and technical performance assumptions, while manufacture cost and system lifetime are highlighted as the only significant differences between the technologies considered. SOFC are considered to have the greatest potential, but uncertainty in the assumptions used precludes any clear-cut judgement.

  13. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  14. Therapeutic Approaches to Target Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Arlhee, E-mail: arlhee@cim.sld.cu; Leon, Kalet [Department of Systems Biology, Center of Molecular Immunology, 216 Street, PO Box 16040, Atabey, Havana 11600 (Cuba)

    2011-08-15

    The clinical relevance of cancer stem cells (CSC) remains a major challenge for current cancer therapies, but preliminary findings indicate that specific targeting may be possible. Recent studies have shown that these tumor subpopulations promote tumor angiogenesis through the increased production of VEGF, whereas the VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab specifically inhibits CSC growth. Moreover, nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with a potent antiangiogenic activity, has been shown by our group to reduce the frequency of CSC-like subpopulations in mouse models of brain tumors when combined with ionizing radiation. These studies and subsequent reports from other groups support the relevance of approaches based on molecular-targeted therapies to selectively attack CSC. This review discusses the relevance of targeting both the EGFR and angiogenic pathways as valid approaches to this aim. We discuss the relevance of identifying better molecular markers to develop drug screening strategies that selectively target CSC.

  15. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  16. Targeted silver nanoparticles for ratiometric cell phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmore, Anne-Mari A.; Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Toome, Kadri; Paiste, Päärn; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mölder, Tarmo; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Braun, Gary B.; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-04-01

    Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The binding and uptake of the peptide-functionalized AgNPs by cultured PPC-1 prostate cancer and M21 melanoma cells was dependent on the cell surface expression of the cognate peptide receptors. Barcoded peptide-functionalized AgNPs were synthesized from silver and palladium isotopes. The cells were incubated with a cocktail of the barcoded nanoparticles [RPARPAR (R), GKRK (K), and control], and cellular binding and internalization of each type of nanoparticle was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results of isotopic analysis were in agreement with data obtained using optical methods. Using ratiometric measurements, we were able to classify the PPC-1 cell line as mainly NRP-1-positive, with 75 +/- 5% R-AgNP uptake, and the M21 cell line as only p32-positive, with 89 +/- 9% K-AgNP uptake. The isotopically barcoded multiplexed AgNPs are useful as an in vitro ratiometric phenotyping tool and have potential uses in functional evaluation of the expression of accessible homing peptide receptors in vivo.Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The

  17. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  18. Genetically modified T cells targeting neovasculature efficiently destroy tumor blood vessels, shrink established solid tumors and increase nanoparticle delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinping; Rivera, Armando; Tao, Lihua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2013-11-15

    Converting T cells into tumor cell killers by grafting them with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has shown promise as a cancer immunotherapeutic. However, the inability of these cells to actively migrate and extravasate into tumor parenchyma has limited their effectiveness in vivo. Here we report the construction of a CAR containing an echistatin as its targeting moiety (eCAR). As echistatin has high binding affinity to αvβ3 integrin that is highly expressed on the surface of endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature, T cells engrafted with eCAR (T-eCAR) can efficiently lyse human umbilical vein endothelial cells and tumor cells that express αvβ3 integrin when tested in vitro. Systemic administration of T-eCAR led to extensive bleeding in tumor tissues with no evidence of damage to blood vessels in normal tissues. Destruction of tumor blood vessels by T-eCAR significantly inhibited the growth of established bulky tumors. Moreover, when T-eCAR was codelivered with nanoparticles in a strategically designed temporal order, it dramatically increased nanoparticle deposition in tumor tissues, pointing to the possibility that it may be used together with nanocarriers to increase their capability to selectively deliver antineoplastic drugs to tumor tissues.

  19. Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, George H

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are rich in proteases, which are the major proteins of intracellular granules and are released with histamine and heparin by activated cells. Most of these proteases are active in the granule as well as outside of the mast cell when secreted, and can cleave targets near degranulating mast cells and in adjoining tissue compartments. Some proteases released from mast cells reach the bloodstream and may have far-reaching actions. In terms of relative amounts, the major mast cell proteases include the tryptases, chymases, cathepsin G, carboxypeptidase A3, dipeptidylpeptidase I/cathepsin C, and cathepsins L and S. Some mast cells also produce granzyme B, plasminogen activators, and matrix metalloproteinases. Tryptases and chymases are almost entirely mast cell-specific, whereas other proteases, such as cathepsins G, C, and L are expressed by a variety of inflammatory cells. Carboxypeptidase A3 expression is a property shared by basophils and mast cells. Other proteases, such as mastins, are largely basophil-specific, although human basophils are protease-deficient compared with their murine counterparts. The major classes of mast cell proteases have been targeted for development of therapeutic inhibitors. Also, a human β-tryptase has been proposed as a potential drug itself, to inactivate of snake venins. Diseases linked to mast cell proteases include allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and anaphylaxis, but also include non-allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and scarring diseases of lungs and other organs. In some cases, studies performed in mouse models suggest protective or homeostatic roles for specific proteases (or groups of proteases) in infections by bacteria, worms and other parasites, and even in allergic inflammation. At the same time, a clearer picture has emerged of differences in the

  20. Generating Cell Targeting Aptamers for Nanotheranostics Using Cell-SELEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yifan; Chen, Guang; Shangguan, Dihua; Zhang, Liqin; Wan, Shuo; Wu, Yuan; Zhang, Hui; Duan, Lian; Liu, Chao; You, Mingxu; Wang, Jie; Tan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and understanding changes in cell conditions on the molecular level is of great importance for the accurate diagnosis and timely therapy of diseases. Cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment), a foundational technology used to generate highly-specific, cell-targeting aptamers, has been increasingly employed in studies of molecular medicine, including biomarker discovery and early diagnosis/targeting therapy of cancer. In this review, we begin with a mechanical description of the cell-SELEX process, covering aptamer selection, identification and identification, and aptamer characterization; following this introduction is a comprehensive discussion of the potential for aptamers as targeting moieties in the construction of various nanotheranostics. Challenges and prospects for cell-SELEX and aptamer-based nanotheranostic are also discussed.

  1. Novel cell-penetrating peptide targeting mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, Carmine Pasquale; Pirisinu, Marco; Vlachos, Efstathios Nikolaos; Langel, Ülo

    2015-11-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short, nontoxic peptides with cationic and/or amphipathic properties able to cross the cellular membrane. CPPs are used for the delivery of a wide variety of cargoes, such as proteins, oligonucleotides, and therapeutic molecules. The aim of the present study was to synthesize unusually small novel CPPs targeting mitochondria based on the Szeto-Schiller peptide (SS-31) to influence intramitochondrial processes and to improve the biologic effects. All the peptides used were synthesized manually using 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chemistry. In the first part of the study, HeLa 705, U87, and bEnd.3 cells were used as in vitro delivery model. Cells were incubated for 24 h at 37°C and 5% CO2 with different concentrations of our peptides. Cell proliferation assay was performed to evaluate cell viability. Biologic effects such as mitochondrial membrane potential and antioxidant activity were evaluated. H2O2 was used as positive control. Uptake studies were performed using peptides conjugated with 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (FAM). Fluorescent microscopy was used to determine presence and localization of peptides into the cells. Isolated mitochondria from pretreated cells and mitochondria treated after isolation were used to confirm the targeting ability of the peptide. Uptake of FAM alone was used as negative control. Microscopy studies confirmed the ability of peptides to penetrate cell. Localization analysis showed increase in uptake by 35% compared with SS-31. Mitochondrial CPP 1 (mtCPP-1) had no effect on mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented reactive oxygen species formation in bEnd.3 cells by 2-fold compared with SS-31. No cytotoxicity was observed even at high concentration (100 µM). These data suggest that mtCPP-1 is a mitochondrial CPP and protect mitochondria from oxidative damage due to its own antioxidant activities. © FASEB.

  2. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiman eAleem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia, and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219, pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638 as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed.

  3. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed.

  4. Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common type of solid bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. Many patients are not cured by the current osteosarcoma therapy consisting of combination chemotherapy along with surgery and thus new treatments are urgently needed. In the last decade, cancer stem cells have been identified in many tumors such as leukemia, brain, breast, head and neck, colon, skin, pancreatic, and prostate cancers and these cells are proposed to play major roles in drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown evidence that osteosarcoma also possesses cancer stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell including the methods used for its isolation, its properties, and its potential as a new target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  5. Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    which resemble normal stem cells, specifically in the ability to infinitely give rise to the bulk of a tumor as the “ seed ” of the cancer, account for...evolutionarily- conserved role in regulating the cell fate in both normal and neoplastic stem cell populations, which suggests that therapeutic targeting of this...specifically in the ability to infinitely give rise to the bulk of a tumor as the “ seed ” of the cancer, account for cancer initiation, progression

  6. Targeting the acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Alexandre; Luciana, M; Krause, Fontanari; Rego, Eduardo M

    2010-02-01

    The idea that within the bulk of leukemic cells there are immature progenitors which are intrinsically resistant to chemotherapy and able to repopulate the tumor after treatment is not recent. Nevertheless, the term leukemia stem cells (LSCs) has been adopted recently to describe these immature progenitors based on the fact that they share the most relevant features of the normal hematopoetic stem cells (HSCs), i.e. the self-renewal potential and quiescent status. LSCs differ from their normal counterparts and from the more differentiated leukemic cells regarding the default status of pathways regulating apoptosis, cell cycle, telomere maintenance and transport pumps activity. In addition, unique features regarding the interaction of these cells with the microenvironment have been characterized. Therapeutic strategies targeting these unique features are at different stages of development but the reported results are promising. The aim of this review is, by taking acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as a bona fide example, to discuss some of the mechanisms used by the LSCs to survive and the strategies which could be used to eradicate these cells.

  7. Therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jeong Kim; Elizabeth L Siegler; Natnaree Siriwon; Pin Wang

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic limitations of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs present a challenge for cancer therapy; these shortcomings are largely attributed to the ability of cancer cells to repopulate and metastasize after initial therapies. Compelling evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) have a crucial impact in current shortcomings of cancer therapy because they are largely responsible for tumor initiation, relapse, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Thus, a better understanding of the properties and mechanisms underlying CSC resistance to treatments is necessary to improve patient outcomes and survival rates. In this review, the authors characterize and compare different CSC-speciifc biomarkers that are present in various types of tumors. We further discuss multiple targeting approaches currently in preclinical or clinical testing that show great potential for targeting CSCs. This review discusses numerous strategies to eliminate CSCs by targeting surface biomarkers, regulating CSC-associated oncogenes and signaling pathways, inhibiting drug-eflfux pumps involved in drug resistance, modulating the tumor microenvironment and immune system, and applying drug combination therapy using nanomedicine.

  8. Targeting invasive properties of melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arozarena, Imanol; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2017-07-01

    Melanoma is a skin cancer notorious for its metastatic potential. As an initial step of the metastatic cascade, melanoma cells part from the primary tumour and invade the surrounding tissue, which is crucial for their dissemination and the formation of distant secondary tumours. Over the last two decades, our understanding of both, general and melanoma specific mechanisms of invasion has significantly improved, but to date no efficient therapeutic strategy tackling the invasive properties of melanoma cells has reached the clinic. In this review, we assess the major contributions towards the understanding of the molecular biology of melanoma cell invasion with a focus on melanoma specific traits. These traits are based on the neural crest origin of melanoma cells and explain their intrinsic invasive nature. A particular emphasis is given not only to lineage specific signalling mediated by TGFβ, and noncanonical and canonical WNT signalling, but also to the role of PDE5A and RHO-GTPases in modulating modes of melanoma cell invasion. We discuss existing caveats in the current understanding of the metastatic properties of melanoma cells, as well as the relevance of the 'phenotype switch' model and 'co-operativity' between different phenotypes in heterogeneous tumours. At the centre of these phenotypes is the lineage commitment factor microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, one of the most crucial regulators of the balance between de-differentiation (neural crest specific gene expression) and differentiation (melanocyte specific gene expression) that defines invasive and noninvasive melanoma cell phenotypes. Finally, we provide insight into the current evidence linking resistance to targeted therapies to invasive properties of melanoma cells. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Physicochemical characterization of Staphylococcus aureus-lysing LysK enzyme in complexes with polycationic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many serious visceral, skin, and respiratory diseases. About 90% of clinical strains are multi-drug resistant, but the use of bacteriophage lytic enzymes offers a viable alternative to antibiotic therapy. LysK, the phage K endolysin can lyse S. aureus when purified and ...

  10. THE EFFECTS OF OXIMES IN THE ASSAY OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN LYSED ERYTHROCYTES IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdollahi.

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus compounds are known to inhibit the esteratic site of acetylcholinesterase by phosphorylation. The phosphorylated esteratic site of acetylcholinesterase undergoes hydrolytic regeneration at a slow or negligible rate. Nucleophilic agents such as hydroxytamine, hydroxamic acids, and oximes reactivate the enzyme more erapidfy than does spontaneous hydrolysis. The red cell cholinesterose activity was assayed using dithio bis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB commonly known as Ellman's reagent. The principle of this assay method is the rate of hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine (substrate by a red celt suspension. Thiocholine that is produced, forms a yellow complex, when EUman's reagent (DTNB is used in the assay. This was tested in vitro in lysed erythrocyte samples of 35 healthy persons who had no known exposure to cholinesterose inhibitors, after the observation of immediate increase in absorption of light at 440 nm. All of data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and student t-test. A value of p<0.01 was considered. Results of this study show an increased absorbance in 440 nm, for pretreated samples with pratidoxime. This was observed by doses of (0.1, 0.5, 1,2 mmol, p<0.01. It was also a good dose dependent increase in absorbance at 440 nm for pralidoxime, (r=0.940, p<0.01. Also there is a significant increase in absorbance at 440 nm for samples pretreated by obidoxime at doses of (0.1, 0.5, 1,2 mmol. There is also a good correlation between absorbance at 440 nm and variou doses of obidoxime (r=0.946 , p<0.01. It is concluded that oximes can hydrofyzes the substrate, which then would be a source of error in determination of acetylcholinesterase activity and must be token into account.

  11. Cancer Stem Cells: A Moving Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Chandler, Julie; Lagasse, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Even though the number of anti-cancer drugs entering clinical trials and approved by the FDA has increased in recent years, many cancer patients still experience poor survival outcome. The main explanation for such a dismal prognosis is that current therapies might leave behind a population of cancer cells with the capacity for long-term self-renewal, so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), from which most tumors are believed to be derived and fueled. CSCs might favor local and distant recurrence even many years after initial treatment, thus representing a potential target for therapies aimed at improving clinical outcome. In this review, we will address the CSC hypothesis with a particular emphasis on its current paradigms and debates, and discuss several mechanisms of CSC resistance to conventional therapies.

  12. Bacteriocin protein BacL1 of Enterococcus faecalis targets cell division loci and specifically recognizes L-Ala2-cross-bridged peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurushima, Jun; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriocin 41 (Bac41) is produced from clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and consists of two extracellular proteins, BacL1 and BacA. We previously reported that BacL1 protein (595 amino acids, 64.5 kDa) is a bacteriolytic peptidoglycan D-isoglutamyl-L-lysine endopeptidase that induces cell lysis of E. faecalis when an accessory factor, BacA, is copresent. However, the target of BacL1 remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the targeting specificity of BacL1. Fluorescence microscopy analysis using fluorescent dye-conjugated recombinant protein demonstrated that BacL1 specifically localized at the cell division-associated site, including the equatorial ring, division septum, and nascent cell wall, on the cell surface of target E. faecalis cells. This specific targeting was dependent on the triple repeat of the SH3 domain located in the region from amino acid 329 to 590 of BacL1. Repression of cell growth due to the stationary state of the growth phase or to treatment with bacteriostatic antibiotics rescued bacteria from the bacteriolytic activity of BacL1 and BacA. The static growth state also abolished the binding and targeting of BacL1 to the cell division-associated site. Furthermore, the targeting of BacL1 was detectable among Gram-positive bacteria with an L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridging peptidoglycan, including E. faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, or Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not among bacteria with alternate peptidoglycan structures, such as Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Staphylococcus aureus, or Listeria monocytogenes. These data suggest that BacL1 specifically targets the L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridged peptidoglycan and potentially lyses the E. faecalis cells during cell division.

  13. Combination of driselase and lysing enzyme in one molar potassium chloride is effective for the production of protoplasts from germinated conidia of Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Vellaisamy; Govindaraj, Lavanya; Dhanasekaran, Madhumitha; Vetrivel, Sharmilee; Kumar, Krish K; Ebenezar, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Various cell wall degrading enzymes and the protoplasting media were evaluated for the production of protoplast in Fusarium verticillioides. Among the various enzymes tested, driselase at 12.5 mg/ml in 1 M KCl protoplasting medium produced the maximum number of protoplast. Next to driselase, lysing enzyme at 10 mg/ml in 1.2 M MgSO4 protoplasting medium was found to be the second best enzyme for the production of protoplast. More interestingly, the combined use of driselase @ 12.5 mg/ml and lysing enzyme @ 10 mg/ml in 1 M KCl exhibited the additive effect on protoplast formation. Germinated conidia of F. verticillioides are the most susceptible fungal material for protoplast production. The use of sucrose at 1.2 M in the regeneration medium supported the maximum regeneration of protoplast. From the present study, we recommend driselase (12.5 mg/ml) and lysing enzyme (10 mg/ml) in 1 M KCl protoplasting medium and germinated conidia of F. verticillioides for the maximum production of protoplasts and 1.2 M sucrose is the best osmoticum for the regeneration of protoplasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  15. Tumor's other immune targets: dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esche, C; Lokshin, A; Shurin, G V; Gastman, B R; Rabinowich, H; Watkins, S C; Lotze, M T; Shurin, M R

    1999-08-01

    The induction of apoptosis in T cells is one of several mechanisms by which tumors escape immune recognition. We have investigated whether tumors induce apoptosis in dendritic cells (DC) by co-culture of murine or human DC with different tumor cell lines for 4-48 h. Analysis of DC morphological features, JAM assay, TUNEL, caspase-3-like and transglutaminase activity, Annexin V binding, and DNA fragmentation assays revealed a time- and dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in DC by tumor-derived factors. This finding is both effector and target specific. The mechanism of tumor-induced DC apoptosis involved regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax expression. Double staining of both murine and human tumor tissues confirmed that tumor-associated DC undergo apoptotic death in vivo. DC isolated from tumor tissue showed significantly higher levels of apoptosis as determined by TUNEL assay when compared with DC isolated from spleen. These findings demonstrate that tumors induce apoptosis in DC and suggest a new mechanism of tumor escape from immune recognition. DC protection from apoptosis will lead to improvement of DC-based immunotherapies for cancer and other immune diseases.

  16. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy.

  17. Feces of feedlot cattle contain a diversity of bacteriophages that lyse non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaying; Niu, Yan D; Chen, Jinding; Anany, Hany; Ackermann, Hans-W; Johnson, Roger P; Ateba, Collins N; Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterize bacteriophages that lyse non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) from cattle feces. Of 37 non-O157 STEC-infecting phages isolated, those targeting O26 (AXO26A, AYO26A, AYO26B), O103 (AXO103A, AYO103A), O111 (AXO111A, AYO111A), O121 (AXO121A, AXO121B), and O145 (AYO145A, AYO145B) were further characterized. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the 11 isolates belonged to 3 families and 6 genera: the families Myoviridae (types rV5, T4, ViI, O1), Siphoviridae (type T5), and Podoviridae (type T7). Genome size of the phages as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis ranged from 38 to 177 kb. Excluding phages AXO26A, AYO103A, AYO145A, and AYO145B, all other phages were capable of lysing more than 1 clinically important strain from serogroups of O26, O91, O103, O111, O113, O121, and O128, but none exhibited infectivity across all serogroups. Moreover, phages AYO26A, AXO121A, and AXO121B were also able to lyse 4 common phage types of STEC O157:H7. Our findings show that a diversity of non-O157 STEC-infecting phages are harbored in bovine feces. Phages AYO26A, AYO26B, AXO103A, AXO111A, AYO111A, AXO121A, and AXO121B exhibited a broad host range against a number of serogroups of STEC and have potential for the biocontrol of STEC in the environment.

  18. Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV entry into target cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayan eChakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus infection of target cells is a complex process involving multiple host cell surface molecules (receptors and multiple viral envelope glycoproteins. Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV or HHV-8 infects a variety of in vivo target cells such as endothelial cells, B cells, monocytes, epithelial cells, and keratinocytes. KSHV also infects a diversity of in vitro target cells and establishes in vitro latency in many of these cell types. KSHV interactions with the host cell surface molecules and its mode of entry in the various target cells are critical for the understanding of KSHV pathogenesis. KSHV is the first herpesvirus shown to interact with adherent target cell integrins and this interaction initiates the host cell pre-existing signal pathways that are utilized for successful infection. This chapter discusses the various aspects of the early stage of KSHV infection of target cells, receptors used and issues that need to be clarified and future directions. The various signaling events triggered by KSHV infection and the potential role of signaling events in the different stages of infection are summarized providing the framework and starting point for further detailed studies essential to fully comprehend the pathogenesis of KSHV.

  19. M cell targeting by a Claudin 4 targeting peptide can enhance mucosal IgA responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo David D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosal immune surveillance is thought to be largely achieved through uptake by specialized epithelial M cells. We recently identified Claudin 4 as an M cell target receptor and developed a Claudin 4 targeting peptide (CPE that can mediate uptake of nanoparticles through Nasal Associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT M cells. Methods Recombinant influenza hemagglutinin (HA and a version with the CPE peptide at the C-terminal end was used to immunize mice by the intranasal route along with a single dose of cholera toxin as an adjuvant. Serum and mucosal IgG and IgA responses were tested for reactivity to HA. Results We found that the recombinant HA was immunogenic on intranasal administration, and inclusion of the CPE targeting peptide induced higher mucosal IgA responses. This mucosal administration also induced systemic serum IgG responses with Th2 skewing, but targeting did not enhance IgG responses, suggesting that the IgG response to mucosal immunization is independent of the effects of CPE M cell targeting. Conclusions M cell targeting mediated by a Claudin 4-specific targeting peptide can enhance mucosal IgA responses above the response to non-targeted mucosal antigen. Since Claudin 4 has also been found to be regulated in human Peyer's patch M cells, the CPE targeting peptide could be a reasonable platform delivery technology for mucosal vaccination.

  20. Gamma-H2AX biodosimetry for use in large scale radiation incidents: comparison of a rapid ‘96 well lyse/fix’ protocol with a routine method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne Moquet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Following a radiation incident, preliminary dose estimates made by γ-H2AX foci analysis can supplement the early triage of casualties based on clinical symptoms. Sample processing time is important when many individuals need to be rapidly assessed. A protocol was therefore developed for high sample throughput that requires less than 0.1 ml blood, thus potentially enabling finger prick sampling. The technique combines red blood cell lysis and leukocyte fixation in one step on a 96 well plate, in contrast to the routine protocol, where lymphocytes in larger blood volumes are typically separated by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation with subsequent washing and fixation steps. The rapid ‘96 well lyse/fix’ method reduced the estimated sample processing time for 96 samples to about 4 h compared to 15 h using the routine protocol. However, scoring 20 cells in 96 samples prepared by the rapid protocol took longer than for the routine method (3.1 versus 1.5 h at zero dose; 7.0 versus 6.1 h for irradiated samples. Similar foci yields were scored for both protocols and consistent dose estimates were obtained for samples exposed to 0, 0.2, 0.6, 1.1, 1.2, 2.1 and 4.3 Gy of 250 kVp X-rays at 0.5 Gy/min and incubated for 2 h. Linear regression coefficients were 0.87 ± 0.06 (R2 = 97.6% and 0.85 ± 0.05 (R2 = 98.3% for estimated versus actual doses for the routine and lyse/fix method, respectively. The lyse/fix protocol can therefore facilitate high throughput processing for γ-H2AX biodosimetry for use in large scale radiation incidents, at the cost of somewhat longer foci scoring times.

  1. Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0350 TITLE: Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy PRINCIPAL...30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... cancer . To eradicate chemoresistant tumor cells, it is important to identify the subset of tumor cells that can survive from chemotherapy and

  2. Enhanced Eradication of Lymphoma by Tumor-Specific Cytotoxic T-Cells Secreting an Engineered Tumor-Specific Immunotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    5% CO2. The level of proliferation was then assessed using an ATP assay (CellTiter-Glo G7570; Promega, Madison, WI). Phenotyping. Cell-surface...trypan blue or an ATP assay (Promega). Cytotoxicity assay. T cell cytotoxic activity was evaluated in a flow cytometry based assay. Target cells...ml PMA and 1µM ionomycin. Cells were collected and lysed, and the lysate analyzed for bioluminescent signal. This revealed that the promoter induced

  3. Cell-targeting aptamers act as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Chen, Yeng; Arshad, M K Md; Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Ruslinda, A R; Al-Douri, Yarub; Voon, C H; Hashim, Uda

    2016-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acids or peptides identified from a randomized combinatorial library through specific interaction with the target of interest. Targets can be of any size, from small molecules to whole cells, attesting to the versatility of aptamers for binding a wide range of targets. Aptamers show drug properties that are analogous to antibodies, with high specificity and affinity to their target molecules. Aptamers can penetrate disease-causing microbial and mammalian cells. Generated aptamers that target surface biomarkers act as cell-targeting agents and intracellular delivery vehicles. Within this context, the "cell-internalizing aptamers" are widely investigated via the process of cell uptake with selective binding during in vivo systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) or by cell-internalization SELEX, which targets cell surface antigens to be receptors. These internalizing aptamers are highly preferable for the localization and functional analyses of multiple targets. In this overview, we discuss the ways by which internalizing aptamers are generated and their successful applications. Furthermore, theranostic approaches featuring cell-internalized aptamers are discussed with the purpose of analyzing and diagnosing disease-causing pathogens.

  4. Lysing bloom-causing alga Phaeocystis globosa with microbial algicide: An efficient process that decreases the toxicity of algal exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guanjing; Yang, Xujun; Lai, Qiliang; Yu, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Lei, Xueqian; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2016-02-05

    Algicidal microbes could effectively remove the harmful algae from the waters. In this study, we were concerned with the ecological influence of an algicide extracted from Streptomyces alboflavus RPS, which could completely lyse the Phaeocystis globosa cells within two days. In microcosms, 4 μg/mL of the microbial algicide could efficiently remove P. globosa cells without suppressing other aquatic organisms. Bioluminescent assays confirmed that the toxicity of microbial algicide at this concentration was negligible. Interestingly, the toxicity of P. globosa exudates was also significantly reduced after being treated with the algicide. Further experiments revealed that the microbial algicide could instantly increase the permeability of the plasma membrane and disturb the photosynthetic system, followed by the deformation of organelles, vacuolization and increasing oxidative stress. The pre-incubation of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) verified that the rapid damages to the plasma membrane and photosynthetic system caused the algal death in the early phase, and the increasing oxidative stress killed the rest. The late accumulation and possible release of CAT also explained the decreasing toxicity of the algal culture. These results indicated that this microbial algicide has great potential in controlling the growth of P. globosa on site.

  5. An unconventional approach to impedance microbiology: detection of culture media conductivity variations due to bacteriophage generated lyses of host bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortari, Alessia; Adami, Andrea; Lorenzelli, Leandro

    2015-05-15

    A novel and unconventional approach to impedance microbiology has been under investigation. In our approach, solution conductivity variations are generated from bacteriophage lyses of infected host cells and the consequent release of conductive endoplasmic material. To sensitively detect the lysis, low conductive growth media have been developed. A microchip has been fabricated to perform the analysis. The microchip is made of two bare gold electrodes and PDMS microchamber of 36 nL volume. Escherichia coli and selective phages T4 have been used as case study. Proof-of-principle experiments are here presented and discussed. The method was characterised in a wide range between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL, where linear relation was found between conductivity variation and cell concentration in a log10 vs. log10 plot. The method is suited to integration with sample preparation based on phage-functionalised magnetic beads. It has a potential detection limit below 1 CFU/chamber and a total assay time of less than 1 h.

  6. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Joshua J.; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Parton, Robert G.; Kent, Stephen J.; de Rose, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells--an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  7. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  8. Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD_________________ (Leave blank) Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0350 TITLE: Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After...30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Innovative reporter gene systems are designed to mark quiescent or proliferating lung cancer cells (Aim 1) and then used to track and trace the dynamics of

  9. Visceral mobilization can lyse and prevent peritoneal adhesions in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Geoffrey M; Chapelle, Susan L

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions are almost ubiquitous following surgery. Peritoneal adhesions can lead to bowel obstruction, digestive problems, infertility, and pain, resulting in many hospital readmissions. Many approaches have been used to prevent or treat adhesions, but none offer reliable results. A method that consistently prevented or treated adhesions would benefit many patients. We hypothesized that an anatomically-based visceral mobilization, designed to promote normal mobility of the abdominal contents, could manually lyse and prevent surgically-induced adhesions. Cecal and abdominal wall abrasion was used to induce adhesions in 3 groups of 10 rats (Control, Lysis, and Preventive). All rats were evaluated 7 days following surgery. On postoperative day 7, unsedated rats in the Lysis group were treated using visceral mobilization, consisting of digital palpation, efforts to manually lyse restrictions, and mobilization of their abdominal walls and viscera. This was followed by immediate post-mortem adhesion evaluation. The rats in the Preventive group were treated daily in a similar fashion, starting the day after surgery. Adhesions in the Control rats were evaluated 7 days after surgery without any visceral mobilization. The therapist could palpate adhesions between the cecum and other viscera or the abdominal wall. Adhesion severity and number of adhesions were significantly lower in the Preventive group compared to other groups. In the Lysis and Preventive groups there were clear signs of disrupted adhesions. These initial observations support visceral mobilization may have a role in the prevention and treatment of post-operative adhesions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Double-strand breaks at the target locus stimulate gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smih, F; Rouet, P; Romanienko, P J; Jasin, M

    1995-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are recombinogenic lesions in chromosomal DNA in yeast, Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. Recent studies in mammalian cells utilizing the I-Scel endonuclease have demonstrated that in some immortalized cell lines DSBs in chromosomal DNA are also recombinogenic. We have now tested embryonic stem (ES) cells, a non-transformed mouse cell line frequently used in gene targeting studies. We find that a DSB introduced by I-Scel stimulates gene targeting at a selectable neo locus at least 50-fold. The enhanced level of targeting is achieved by transient expression of the I-Scel endonuclease. In 97% of targeted clones a single base pair polymorphism in the transfected homologous fragment was incorporated into the target locus. Analysis of the targeted locus demonstrated that most of the homologous recombination events were 'two-sided', in contrast to previous studies in 3T3 cells in which 'one-sided' homologous events predominated. Thus ES cells may be more faithful in incorporating homologous fragments into their genome than other cells in culture. Images PMID:8559659

  11. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Blaauwen, T.; Andreu, J.M.; Monasterio, O.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells targeting the GVHD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; ZHAO Robert ChunHua

    2009-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and is a reaction of donor immune cells against host tissues. About 35% -5% of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients will develop acute GVHD. It is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients who do not respond to primary therapy, which usually consists of glucocorticoids(steroids). Most of the available second-line and third-line treatments for sterold-refractory acute GVHD induce severe immunodeficiency, which is commonly accompanied by lethal infectious complications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to mediate immunomodulatory effects. The recently elucidated immunosuppreseive potential of mesenchymal stem cells has set the stage for their clinical testing as cellular immunosuppressants, MSCs have been used in patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD, and encouraging responses have been obtained in many studies. The utility of MSCs for the treatment of GVHD is becoming clear.

  13. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs. Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs, which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+ and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-, which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+ is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell

  14. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  15. Glial cells as drug targets : What does it take?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development time

  16. Modeling Natural Killer Cell Targeted Immunotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Di Santo, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Animal models have extensively contributed to our understanding of human immunobiology and to uncover the underlying pathological mechanisms occurring in the development of diseases. However, mouse models do not reproduce the genetic and molecular complexity inherent in human disease conditions. Human immune system (HIS) mouse models that are susceptible to human pathogens and can recapitulate human hematopoiesis and tumor immunobiology provide one means to bridge the interspecies gap. Natural killer cells are the founding member of the innate lymphoid cell family. They exert a rapid and strong immune response against tumor and pathogen-infected cells. Their antitumor features have long been exploited for therapeutic purposes in the context of cancer. In this review, we detail the development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains and the models currently used in cancer research. We summarize the latest improvements in adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapies and the development of novel NK cell sources. Finally, we discuss the advantages of HIS mice to study the interactions between human NK cells and human cancers and to develop new therapeutic strategies.

  17. Identification of novel Notch target genes in T cell leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrander Fiona

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulated Notch signalling is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of T cell leukaemia. At a cellular level, Notch signalling promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL cells. In this study we aimed to identify novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling in the T-ALL cell line, Jurkat. Results RNA was prepared from Jurkat cells retrovirally transduced with an empty vector (GFP-alone or vectors containing constitutively active forms of Notch (N1ΔE or N3ΔE, and used for Affymetrix microarray analysis. A subset of genes found to be regulated by Notch was chosen for real-time PCR validation and in some cases, validation at the protein level, using several Notch-transduced T-ALL and non-T-ALL leukaemic cell lines. As expected, several known transcriptional target of Notch, such as HES1 and Deltex, were found to be overexpressed in Notch-transduced cells, however, many novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling were identified using this approach. These included the T cell costimulatory molecule CD28, the anti-apoptotic protein GIMAP5, and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (1D1. Conclusion The identification of such downstream Notch target genes provides insights into the mechanisms of Notch function in T cell leukaemia, and may help identify novel therapeutic targets in this disease.

  18. Epitope distance to the target cell membrane and antigen size determine the potency of T cell-mediated lysis by BiTE antibodies specific for a large melanoma surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, Claudia; Hausmann, Susanne; Fluhr, Petra; Sriskandarajah, Mirnalini; Stallcup, William B; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Kufer, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP; also called CSPG4, NG2, HMW-MAA, MSK16, MCSPG, MEL-CSPG, or gp240) is a surface antigen frequently expressed on human melanoma cells, which is involved in cell adhesion, invasion and spreading, angiogenesis, complement inhibition, and signaling. MCSP has therefore been frequently selected as target antigen for development of antibody- and vaccine-based therapeutic approaches. We have here used a large panel of monoclonal antibodies against human MCSP for generation of single-chain MCSP/CD3-bispecific antibodies of the BiTE (for bispecific T cell engager) class. Despite similar binding affinity to MCSP, respective BiTE antibodies greatly differed in their potency of redirected lysis of CHO cells stably transfected with full-length human MCSP, or with various MCSP deletion mutants and fusion proteins. BiTE antibodies binding to the membrane proximal domain D3 of MCSP were more potent than those binding to more distal domains. This epitope distance effect was corroborated with EpCAM/CD3-bispecific BiTE antibody MT110 by testing various fusion proteins between MCSP and EpCAM as surface antigens. CHO cells expressing small surface target antigens were generally better lysed than those expressing larger target antigens, indicating that antigen size was also an important determinant for the potency of BiTE antibody. The present study for the first time relates the positioning of binding domains and size of surface antigens to the potency of target cell lysis by BiTE-redirected cytotoxic T cells. In case of the MCSP antigen, this provides the basis for selection of a maximally potent BiTE antibody candidate for development of a novel melanoma therapy.

  19. Coating nanoparticles with cell membranes for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery allows drug molecules to preferentially accumulate at the sites of action and thus holds great promise to improve therapeutic index. Among various drug-targeting approaches, nanoparticle-based delivery systems offer some unique strengths and have achieved exciting preclinical and clinical results. Herein, we aim to provide a review on the recent development of cell membrane-coated nanoparticle system, a new class of biomimetic nanoparticles that combine both the functionalities of cellular membranes and the engineering flexibility of synthetic nanomaterials for effective drug delivery and novel therapeutics. This review is particularly focused on novel designs of cell membrane-coated nanoparticles as well as their underlying principles that facilitate the purpose of drug targeting. Three specific areas are highlighted, including: (i) cell membrane coating to prolong nanoparticle circulation, (ii) cell membrane coating to achieve cell-specific targeting and (iii) cell membrane coating for immune system targeting. Overall, cell membrane-coated nanoparticles have emerged as a novel class of targeted nanotherapeutics with strong potentials to improve on drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy for treatment of various diseases.

  20. Targeting DNA vaccines to myeloid cells using a small peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein Ags to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, which results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able to prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient Ag presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WNV-neutralizing Abs that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses.

  1. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells targeting the GVHD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Robert; ChunHua

    2009-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease(GVHD) occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and is a reaction of donor immune cells against host tissues.About 35%-50% of hematopoietic stem cell transplant(HSCT) recipients will develop acute GVHD.It is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality,particularly in patients who do not respond to primary therapy,which usually consists of glucocorticoids(steroids).Most of the available second-line and third-line treatments for steroid-refractory acute GVHD induce severe immunodeficiency,which is commonly accompanied by lethal infectious complications.Mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) have been shown to mediate immunomodulatory effects.The recently elucidated immunosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stem cells has set the stage for their clinical testing as cellular immunosuppressants,MSCs have been used in patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD,and encouraging responses have been obtained in many studies.The utility of MSCs for the treatment of GVHD is becoming clear.

  3. Cell-to-cell transmission can overcome multiple donor and target cell barriers imposed on cell-free HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Peng; Agosto, Luis M; Ilinskaya, Anna; Dorjbal, Batsukh; Truong, Rosaline; Derse, David; Uchil, Pradeep D; Heidecker, Gisela; Mothes, Walther

    2013-01-01

    Virus transmission can occur either by a cell-free mode through the extracellular space or by cell-to-cell transmission involving direct cell-to-cell contact. The factors that determine whether a virus spreads by either pathway are poorly understood. Here, we assessed the relative contribution of cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission to the spreading of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We demonstrate that HIV can spread by a cell-free pathway if all the steps of the viral replication cycle are efficiently supported in highly permissive cells. However, when the cell-free path was systematically hindered at various steps, HIV transmission became contact-dependent. Cell-to-cell transmission overcame barriers introduced in the donor cell at the level of gene expression and surface retention by the restriction factor tetherin. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies that efficiently inhibit cell-free HIV were less effective against cell-to-cell transmitted virus. HIV cell-to-cell transmission also efficiently infected target T cells that were relatively poorly susceptible to cell-free HIV. Importantly, we demonstrate that the donor and target cell types influence critically the extent by which cell-to-cell transmission can overcome each barrier. Mechanistically, cell-to-cell transmission promoted HIV spread to more cells and infected target cells with a higher proviral content than observed for cell-free virus. Our data demonstrate that the frequently observed contact-dependent spread of HIV is the result of specific features in donor and target cell types, thus offering an explanation for conflicting reports on the extent of cell-to-cell transmission of HIV.

  4. Cell-to-cell transmission can overcome multiple donor and target cell barriers imposed on cell-free HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhong

    Full Text Available Virus transmission can occur either by a cell-free mode through the extracellular space or by cell-to-cell transmission involving direct cell-to-cell contact. The factors that determine whether a virus spreads by either pathway are poorly understood. Here, we assessed the relative contribution of cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission to the spreading of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. We demonstrate that HIV can spread by a cell-free pathway if all the steps of the viral replication cycle are efficiently supported in highly permissive cells. However, when the cell-free path was systematically hindered at various steps, HIV transmission became contact-dependent. Cell-to-cell transmission overcame barriers introduced in the donor cell at the level of gene expression and surface retention by the restriction factor tetherin. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies that efficiently inhibit cell-free HIV were less effective against cell-to-cell transmitted virus. HIV cell-to-cell transmission also efficiently infected target T cells that were relatively poorly susceptible to cell-free HIV. Importantly, we demonstrate that the donor and target cell types influence critically the extent by which cell-to-cell transmission can overcome each barrier. Mechanistically, cell-to-cell transmission promoted HIV spread to more cells and infected target cells with a higher proviral content than observed for cell-free virus. Our data demonstrate that the frequently observed contact-dependent spread of HIV is the result of specific features in donor and target cell types, thus offering an explanation for conflicting reports on the extent of cell-to-cell transmission of HIV.

  5. The most promising strategy targeted against cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhi-xiong; YANG Li-juan; ZHEN Shi-ming

    2011-01-01

    To the Editor:We read with great enthusiasm an interesting and exciting review article Targeting glioma stem cells:enough to terminate gliomagenesis? by Dong and Huang,1 who believed that single targeting therapy against glioma stem cells is unsuccessful and ameliorating the local tumor inducing/promoting microenvironment should be a reasonable strategy.Our group is enduringly engaged in the study of glioma,and we also put much concern upon the research of tumor microecosystem (TMES).In fact,the targeting therapy against cancer stem cells (CSCs) involves two aspects.One is the marked molecular target against CSCs.The other is how to deal with CSCs,by cytotoxic against CSCs,or inducing tumor stem cells to differentiate,or others?

  6. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.

    , substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells and affect their metabolism and consequently affect...... analysis, and thereby created the possibility to map population heterogeneity. A factorial design with pH, glucose concentration and oxygen level was performed in batch cultivations using the growth reporter strains to evaluate the effect of those environmental factors on heterogeneity level and amount...

  7. Targeting the bone marrow: applications in stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orchard, K. [Southampton University Hospital Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom). Department of Haematology; Cooper, M. [St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Pharmacy Department

    2004-12-01

    Therapeutic doses of radiation cab be selectively directed to the bone marrow either directly using vectors that bind to myeloid and/or lymphoid specific antigens or indirectly by targeting bone matrix. The combination of an accessible target tissue and relatively radiation sensitive malignant cells favours the use of targeted radiotherapy in the treatment of haematopoietic malignancies. Dose escalation of targeted radiation can increase tumour cell destruction and has led to the use of myelosuppressive and possibly myeloablative doses of targeted radiation. A natural development has been the use of targeted radiation in conditioning prior to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Several groups are actively exploring the use of targeted radiotherapy in the context of HSCT as treatment for haematological malignancies. Although no randomised trials using targeted radiotherapy in HSCT have been published, phase I and II trials have shown very encouraging results stimulating further clinical research in this field. After more than a decade of translational research the optimal combination of therapeutic radioisotope and vector has not been determined. This review summarises the clinical experience of targeted radiotherapy in HSCT and discusses the problems that still need to be solved to maximise the potential of this new treatment modality in HSCT.

  8. [Advances of molecular targeted therapy in squamous cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Shucai

    2013-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4)-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lung cancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  9. Advances of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li MA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lungadenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1 gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lungcancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  10. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W.; Latouche, Eduardo L.; Sano, Michael B.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-11-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1 μs) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors.

  11. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  12. Targeted Ablation of CML Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    the major active component in Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), an herbal medicine that has been used to treat migraine and rheumatoid arthritis for...glycerol for 15 minutes at room temperature. Protein/DNA complexes were resolved on a native polyacrylamide gel in 0.25 Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE...DNA complexes were resolved on a native polyacrylamide gel in 0.25X TBE. For immunoblots, cells were prepared and analyzed as previously described

  13. Targeting Breast Cancer Cells for Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    specificity for some homeodomains in correlation with base pair 4 of the binding site, especially when the residue is phenylalanine or arginine (13, 14...Lysyl Hydroxylase (PLOD) Gene Expres- sion: Implications for the Pathology of Rieger Syndrome, J. Cell Biol. 152, 545-552. 29. Espinoza, H. M., Cox, C...requirement for phenylalanine in position 20 is well demonstrated by its conservation across the homeodomain family and its presence in the conserved

  14. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease.

  15. Wind characterization for design and comparison with standards, an example from Lyse at the Swedish west coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganander, H. [Teknikgruppen AB, Sollentuna (Sweden); Carlen, I. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Div. of Building Technology; Bergstroem, H. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1996-12-01

    The Lyse site at the Swedish west coast is an area with an archipelago of rocky islands to the west and an equally rocky mainland to the east. In between there are some open sea areas. As being the responsible project manager for the erection and the operation of a turbine at a site like Lyse, the question arises about characterization of the wind for design or purchase of a wind turbine. Or in other words what wind turbine class has to be used for the design, according to existing standards like for example IEC-1400 ? 3 refs, 10 figs

  16. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem Cells with Alpha-Particle Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceder, Jens; Elgqvist, Jörgen

    2017-01-01

    Modern molecular and radiopharmaceutical development has brought the promise of tumor-selective delivery of antibody–drug conjugates to tumor cells for the diagnosis and treatment of primary and disseminated tumor disease. The classical mode of discourse regarding targeted therapy has been that the antigen targeted must be highly and homogenously expressed in the tumor cell population, and at the same time exhibit low expression in healthy tissue. However, there is increasing evidence that the reason cancer patients are not cured by current protocols is that there exist subpopulations of cancer cells that are resistant to conventional therapy including radioresistance and that these cells express other target antigens than the bulk of the tumor cells. These types of cells are often referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs). The CSCs are tumorigenic and have the ability to give rise to all types of cells found in a cancerous disease through the processes of self-renewal and differentiation. If the CSCs are not eradicated, the cancer is likely to recur after therapy. Due to some of the characteristics of alpha particles, such as short path length and high density of energy depositions per distance traveled in tissue, they are especially well suited for use in targeted therapies against microscopic cancerous disease. The characteristics of alpha particles further make it possible to minimize the irradiation of non-targeted surrounding healthy tissue, but most importantly, make it possible to deliver high-absorbed doses locally and therefore eradicating small tumor cell clusters on the submillimeter level, or even single tumor cells. When alpha particles pass through a cell, they cause severe damage to the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus, including double-strand breaks of DNA that are very difficult to repair for the cell. This means that very few hits to a cell by alpha particles are needed in order to cause cell death, enabling killing of cells, such as CSCs

  17. B cells as a target of immune modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawker Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available B cells have recently been identified as an integral component of the immune system; they play a part in autoimmunity through antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and complement activation. Animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS suggest that myelin destruction is partly mediated through B cell activation (and plasmablasts. MS patients with evidence of B cell involvement, as compared to those without, tend to have a worse prognosis. Finally, the significant decrease in new gadolinium-enhancing lesions, new T2 lesions, and relapses in MS patients treated with rituximab (a monoclonal antibody against CD20 on B cells leads us to the conclusion that B cells play an important role in MS and that immune modulation of these cells may ameliorate the disease. This article will explore the role of B cells in MS and the rationale for the development of B cell-targeted therapeutics. MS is an immune-mediated disease that affects over 2 million people worldwide and is the number one cause of disability in young patients. Most therapeutic targets have focused on T cells; however, recently, the focus has shifted to the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS and the potential of B cells as a therapeutic target.

  18. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  19. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Yinan; Ruis, Brian; Lin, Sherry; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-04-01

    Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair known as homologous recombination (HR). The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  20. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials.

  1. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  2. Mitochondria: An intriguing target for killing tumour-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing; Dong, Lanfeng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-initiating cells (TICs) play a pivotal role in cancer initiation, metastasis and recurrence, as well as in resistance to therapy. Therefore, development of drugs targeting TICs has become a focus of contemporary research. Mitochondria have emerged as a promising target of anti-cancer therapies due to their specific role in cancer metabolism and modulation of apoptotic pathways. Mitochondria of TICs possess special characteristics, some of which can be utilised to design drugs specifically targeting these cells. In this paper, we will review recent research on TICs and their mitochondria, and introduce drugs that kill these cells by way of mitochondrial targeting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Treating IgE-mediated diseases via targeting IgE-expressing B cells using an anti-CεmX antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liour, Sean S; Tom, Andrew; Chan, Yueh-Hsuan; Chang, Tse Wen

    2016-08-01

    Targeting the IgE pathway is a clinically validated strategy for treating IgE-mediated diseases. Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, which binds to free IgE and prevents the binding of IgE to FcεRI on mast cells and basophils has been approved for severe persistent allergic asthma and chronic spontaneous (idiopathic) urticaria. The therapeutic efficacy of anti-IgE has also been reported in allergic rhinitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, latex allergy, atopic dermatitis, allergic urticaria, anaphylaxis, and others. Anti-CεmX, which binds to membrane-bound IgE (mIgE) on IgE-switched B cells, lyses mIgE-expressing B lymphoblasts and prevents the allergen-induced generation of IgE-producing plasma cells, offers an alternative mechanism of intervening with the IgE inflammatory pathway. Because anti-CεmX does not bind to free IgE, it can modulate the IgE pathway regardless of the serum IgE levels in treated patients. These unique pharmacologic mechanisms potentially enable anti-CεmX to provide different clinical utilities from anti-IgE and serve as a therapeutic and a prophylactic in some IgE-mediated diseases, which are not adequately treated with current medicine.

  4. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-xiang Yuan; Jingxin Mo; Guixian Zhao; Gang Shu; Hua-lin Fu; Wei Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rati...

  5. Radioprotection of targeted and bystander cells by methylproamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Smith, Andrea; Lobachevsky, Pavel; Martin, Roger; Prise, Kevin M

    2015-03-01

    Radioprotective agents are of interest for application in radiotherapy for cancer and in public health medicine in the context of accidental radiation exposure. Methylproamine is the lead compound of a class of radioprotectors which act as DNA binding anti-oxidants, enabling the repair of transient radiation-induced oxidative DNA lesions. This study tested methylproamine for the radioprotection of both directly targeted and bystander cells. T98G glioma cells were treated with 15 μM methylproamine and exposed to (137)Cs γ-ray/X-ray irradiation and He(2+) microbeam irradiation. Radioprotection of directly targeted cells and bystander cells was measured by clonogenic survival or γH2AX assay. Radioprotection of directly targeted T98G cells by methylproamine was observed for (137)Cs γ-rays and X-rays but not for He(2+) charged particle irradiation. The effect of methylproamine on the bystander cell population was tested for both X-ray irradiation and He(2+) ion microbeam irradiation. The X-ray bystander experiments were carried out by medium transfer from irradiated to non-irradiated cultures and three experimental designs were tested. Radioprotection was only observed when recipient cells were pretreated with the drug prior to exposure to the conditioned medium. In microbeam bystander experiments targeted and nontargeted cells were co-cultured with continuous methylproamine treatment during irradiation and postradiation incubation; radioprotection of bystander cells was observed. Methylproamine protected targeted cells from DNA damage caused by γ-ray or X-ray radiation but not He(2+) ion radiation. Protection of bystander cells was independent of the type of radiation which the donor population received.

  6. Novel cAMP targets in cell proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiperij, Hinke Bertha

    2004-01-01

    cAMP is a second messenger that plays a role in a wide variety of biological processes, one of which is the regulation of cell proliferation. Adenylate cyclases generate cAMP in the cell upon activation, followed by binding to and activation of its direct targets, PKA and Epac. PKA is a protein kina

  7. Selective Induction of Cancer Cell Death by Targeted Granzyme B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Jabulowsky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential utility of immunotoxins for cancer therapy has convincingly been demonstrated in clinical studies. Nevertheless, the high immunogenicity of their bacterial toxin domain represents a critical limitation, and has prompted the evaluation of cell-death inducing proteins of human origin as a basis for less immunogenic immunotoxin-like molecules. In this review, we focus on the current status and future prospects of targeted fusion proteins for cancer therapy that employ granzyme B (GrB from cytotoxic lymphocytes as a cytotoxic moiety. Naturally, this serine protease plays a critical role in the immune defense by inducing apoptotic target cell death upon cleavage of intracellular substrates. Advances in understanding of the structure and function of GrB enabled the generation of chimeric fusion proteins that carry a heterologous cell binding domain for recognition of tumor-associated cell surface antigens. These hybrid molecules display high selectivity for cancer cells, with cell killing activities similar to that of corresponding recombinant toxins. Recent findings have helped to understand and circumvent intrinsic cell binding of GrB and susceptibility of the enzyme to inhibition by serpins. This now allows the rational design of optimized GrB derivatives that avoid sequestration by binding to non-target tissues, limit off-target effects, and overcome resistance mechanisms in tumor cells.

  8. Glypican-3 Targeting of Liver Cancer Cells Using Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O. Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging is essential in accurately detecting, staging, and treating primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC], one of the most prevalent and lethal malignancies. We developed a novel multifunctional nanoparticle (NP specifically targeting glypican-3 (GPC3, a proteoglycan implicated in promotion of cell growth that is overexpressed in most HCCs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the differential GPC3 expression in two human HCC cells, Hep G2 (high and HLF (negligible. These cells were treated with biotin-conjugated GPC3 monoclonal antibody (αGPC3 and subsequently targeted using superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs conjugated to streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 647. Flow cytometry demonstrated that only GPC3-expressing Hep G2 cells were specifically targeted using this αGPC3-NP conjugate (fourfold mean fluorescence over nontargeted NP, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI experiments showed similar findings (threefold R2 relaxivity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy localized the αGPC3 NPs only to the cell surface of GPC3-expressing Hep G2 cells. Further characterization of this construct demonstrated a negatively charged, monodisperse, 50 nm NP, ideally suited for tumor targeting. This GPC3-specific NP system, with dual-modality imaging capability, may enhance pretreatment MRI, enable refined intraoperative HCC visualization by near-infrared fluorescence, and be potentially used as a carrier for delivery of tumor-targeted therapies, improving patient outcomes.

  9. The quest for targets executing MYC-dependent cell transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eHartl

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MYC represents a transcription factor with oncogenic potential converting multiple cellular signals into a broad transcriptional response, thereby controlling the expression of numerous protein-coding and non-coding RNAs important for cell proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of MYC leads to neoplastic cell transformation, and deregulated MYC alleles are frequently observed in many human cancer cell types. Multiple approaches have been performed to isolate genes differentially expressed in cells containing aberrantly activated MYC proteins leading to the identification of thousands of putative targets. Functional analyses of genes differentially expressed in MYC-transformed cells had revealed that so far more than forty upregulated or downregulated MYC targets are actively involved in cell transformation or tumorigenesis. However, for determination which of the known, or yet unidentified targets are responsible for processing the oncogenic MYC program, further systematic and selective approaches are required. The search for critical targets in MYC-dependent tumor cells is exacerbated by the fact that during tumor development, cancer cells progressively evolve in a multistep process thereby acquiring their characteristic features in an additive manner. Functional expression cloning, combinatorial gene expression and appropriate in vivo tests could represent adequate tools for dissecting the complex scenario of MYC-specified cell transformation. In this context, the central goal is to identify a minimal set of targets that suffices to phenocopy oncogenic MYC. Recently developed genomic editing tools could be employed to confirm the requirement of crucial transformation-associated targets.Knowledge about essential MYC regulated genes is beneficial to expedite the development of specific inhibitors to interfere with growth and viability of human tumor cells in which MYC is aberrantly activated

  10. Targeting dendritic cells in vivo for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina eCaminschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that recognise cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumour immunity elicited using this immunisation strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialisation of DC-subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC-subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumour immunity. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress towards targeting human DC in vivo.

  11. Targeting cancer cell mitochondria as a therapeutic approach: recent updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qingbin; Wen, Shijun; Huang, Peng

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in ATP generation, redox homeostasis and regulation of apoptosis. Due to the essential role of mitochondria in metabolism and cell survival, targeting mitochondria in cancer cells is considered as an attractive therapeutic strategy. However, metabolic flexibility in cancer cells may enable the upregulation of compensatory pathways, such as glycolysis to support cancer cell survival when mitochondrial metabolism is inhibited. Thus, compounds capable of both targeting mitochondria and inhibiting glycolysis may be particularly useful to overcome such drug-resistant mechanism. This review provides an update on recent development in the field of targeting mitochondria and novel compounds that impact mitochondria, glycolysis or both. Key challenges in this research area and potential solutions are also discussed.

  12. Characterization of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 Kinase as a Novel Therapeutic Target for Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Immunoblots were performed using the Nupage System (Invitrogen) per the manufacturer’s protocol. Cells were lysed in 1% Nonidet P - 40 with protease (Roche...based on genetic lesions. J Clin Invest 2009;119:1727– 40 . 33. Du J, Bernasconi P , Clauser KR, Mani DR, Finn SP, Beroukhim R, et al. Bead-based...DDR2 mutations. DDR2 knockdown was associated with a decrease in both cell proliferation and in markers of DDR2 signaling including p -Src and p -STAT3

  13. Mitochondria as therapeutic targets for cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In Sung Song; Jeong Yu Jeong; Seung Hun Jeong; Hyoung Kyu Kim; Kyung Soo Ko; Byoung Doo Rhee; Nari Kim; Jin Han

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained by theirsomatic stem cells and are responsible for tumorinitiation, chemoresistance, and metastasis. Evidencefor the CSCs existence has been reported for a numberof human cancers. The CSC mitochondria have beenshown recently to be an important target for cancertreatment, but clinical significance of CSCs and theirmitochondria properties remain unclear. Mitochondriatargetedagents are considerably more effectivecompared to other agents in triggering apoptosis ofCSCs, as well as general cancer cells, via mitochondrialdysfunction. Mitochondrial metabolism is altered incancer cells because of their reliance on glycolyticintermediates, which are normally destined for oxidativephosphorylation. Therefore, inhibiting cancer-specificmodifications in mitochondrial metabolism, increasingreactive oxygen species production, or stimulatingmitochondrial permeabilization transition could bepromising new therapeutic strategies to activate celldeath in CSCs as well, as in general cancer cells. Thisreview analyzed mitochondrial function and its potentialas a therapeutic target to induce cell death in CSCs.Furthermore, combined treatment with mitochondriatargeteddrugs will be a promising strategy for thetreatment of relapsed and refractory cancer.

  14. Cell-SELEX-based selection of aptamers that recognize distinct targets on metastatic colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan-Ming; Bing, Tao; Wei, Jia-Yi; Chen, Zhe-Zhou; Shangguan, Di-Hua; Fang, Jin

    2014-08-01

    The development of diagnostic/therapeutic strategies against metastasis-related molecular targets is critical for improving the survival rate of cancer patients. Subtractive Cell-SELEX was performed using highly metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) LoVo cells and non-metastatic HCT-8 cells as the target and negative cells, respectively, for the selection of metastatic-specific aptamers. This process generated seven aptamers that displayed highly specific binding to the target cells with Kds in the nanomolar range. Based on the distinct chemical/biological properties of their individual cell surface targets, the aptamers were separately functionalized: the receptor-targeting aptamer W14 was used as a carrier for doxorubicin, resulting in the specific delivery of the drug to the target cells and a significant reduction of its cytotoxicity to non-target cells, and the non-receptor-binding aptamer W3 was used as a molecular probe conjugated to quantum dots for the targeted imaging of metastatic cancer cell lines, spontaneous lung metastasis murine tissue, and metastatic CRC patient tissues. In addition, these aptamers can be used in combination due to their lack of detectable mutual-binding interference. The study demonstrates that a panel of aptamers that recognize distinct features of target molecules can be obtained through single Cell-SELEX selection, and the selected aptamers may be individually functionalized for specific applications and/or utilized in combination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. PEG-templated mesoporous silica nanoparticles exclusively target cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Catia; Maris, Pamela; Sisci, Diego; Perrotta, Enrico; Brunelli, Elvira; Perrotta, Ida; Panno, Maria Luisa; Tagarelli, Antonio; Versace, Carlo; Casula, Maria Francesca; Testa, Flaviano; Andò, Sebastiano; Nagy, Janos B.; Pasqua, Luigi

    2011-08-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have been proposed as DNA and drug delivery carriers, as well as efficient tools for fluorescent cell tracking. The major limitation is that MSNs enter cells regardless of a target-specific functionalization. Here we show that non functionalized MSNs, synthesized using a PEG surfactant-based interfacial synthesis procedure, do not enter cells, while a highly specific, receptor mediated, cellular internalization of folic acid (FOL) grafted MSNs (MSN-FOL), occurs exclusively in folate receptor (FR) expressing cells. Neither the classical clathrin pathway nor macropinocytosis is involved in the MSN endocytic process, while fluorescent MSNs (MSN-FITC) enter cells through aspecific, caveolae-mediated, endocytosis. Moreover, internalized particles seem to be mostly exocytosed from cells within 96 h. Finally, cisplatin (Cp) loaded MSN-FOL were tested on cancerous FR-positive (HeLa) or normal FR-negative (HEK293) cells. A strong growth arrest was observed only in HeLa cells treated with MSN-FOL-Cp. The results presented here show that our mesoporous nanoparticles do not enter cells unless opportunely functionalized, suggesting that they could represent a promising vehicle for drug targeting applications.Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have been proposed as DNA and drug delivery carriers, as well as efficient tools for fluorescent cell tracking. The major limitation is that MSNs enter cells regardless of a target-specific functionalization. Here we show that non functionalized MSNs, synthesized using a PEG surfactant-based interfacial synthesis procedure, do not enter cells, while a highly specific, receptor mediated, cellular internalization of folic acid (FOL) grafted MSNs (MSN-FOL), occurs exclusively in folate receptor (FR) expressing cells. Neither the classical clathrin pathway nor macropinocytosis is involved in the MSN endocytic process, while fluorescent MSNs (MSN-FITC) enter cells through aspecific, caveolae

  16. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  17. Targeting B-cell maturation antigen in multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2015-01-01

    Novel effective immunotherapies are needed for patients with multiple myeloma (MM), since disease recurrence remains a major obstacle. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), a cell surface protein universally expressed on malignant plasma cells , has emerged as a very selective antigen to be targeted in novel treatments for MM. We here first review BCMA-related biology, and then highlight the recent clinical development of a novel afucosylated anti-BCMA monoclonal antibody conjugated with monomethyl auristatin F via noncleavable linker (GSK2857916). Chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cells targeting BCMA may also induce specific and durable anti-MM responses by patients’ own effector cells. Clinical trials testing these two approaches (NCT02064387, NCT02215967) are currently ongoing in relapsed and refractory MM patients. PMID:26370838

  18. The cell growth suppressor, mir-126, targets IRS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Du, Ying-ying; Lin, Yi-feng; Chen, Ya-ting; Yang, Lu; Wang, Hui-jun; Ma, Duan

    2008-12-05

    miRNAs are a family of approximately 22-nuleotide-long noncoding RNAs involved in the formation and progress of tumors. Since traditional methods for the detection of miRNAs expression have many disadvantages, we developed a simple method called polyA RT PCR. With this method, we detected a series of miRNAs and found that mir-126 is one of the miRNAs underexpressed in breast cancer cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed that mir-126 inhibited cell cycle progression from G1/G0 to S. Further studies revealed that mir-126 targeted IRS-1 at the translation level. Knocking down of IRS-1 suppresses cell growth in HEK293 and breast cancer cell MCF-7, which recapitulates the effects of mir-126. In conclusion, we developed a simple method for high-throughput screening of miRNAs and found that mir-126, a cell growth suppressor, targets IRS-1.

  19. Cellular factors targeting APCs to modulate adaptive T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visperas, Anabelle; Do, Jeongsu; Min, Booki

    2014-01-01

    The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity.

  20. Cellular Factors Targeting APCs to Modulate Adaptive T Cell Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabelle Visperas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity.

  1. Innovative T Cell-Targeted Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    9. Yap TA, Sandhu SK, Alam SM, de Bono JS. HGF/c-MET targeted therapeutics: novel strategies for cancer medicine. Curr Drug Targets 2011; 12(14...transmembrane (TM) domain , (v) co-stimulation domain (either CD28 (yellow) or CD137 (blue)), and CD3-zeta T cell signaling domains . ROR1- specific CARs...2- oxoquinoline derivatives. Bioorg Med Chem. 2011;19:5698-707. 30. Rabinovich BA, Ye Y, Etto T, Chen JQ, Levitsky HI, Overwijk WW , et al

  2. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  3. Stem cell guidance through the mechanistic target of rapamycin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth; Maiese

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells offer great promise for the treatment of multiple disorders throughout the body. Critical to this premise is the ability to govern stem cell pluripotency, proliferation, and differentiation. The mechanistic target of rapamycin(mT OR), 289-kD a serine/threonine protein kinase, that is a vital component of mT OR Complex 1 and mT OR Complex 2 represents a critical pathway for the oversight of stem cell maintenance. mT OR can control the programmed cell death pathways of autophagy andapoptosis that can yield variable outcomes in stem cell survival and be reliant upon proliferative pathways that include Wnt signaling, Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1(WISP1), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1(Saccharomyces cerevisiae)(SIRT1), and trophic factors. mT OR also is a necessary component for the early development and establishment of stem cells as well as having a significant impact in the regulation of the maturation of specific cell phenotypes. Yet, as a proliferative agent, mT OR can not only foster cancer stem cell development and tumorigenesis, but also mediate cell senescence under certain conditions to limit invasive cancer growth. mT OR offers an exciting target for the oversight of stem cell therapies but requires careful consideration of the diverse clinical outcomes that can be fueled by mT OR signaling pathways.

  4. Salinomycin inhibits osteosarcoma by targeting its tumor stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing-Lian; Zhao, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Jin-Chun; Liang, Yi; Yin, Jun-Qiang; Zou, Chang-Ye; Xie, Xian-Biao; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Shen, Jing-Nan; Kang, Tiebang; Wang, Jin

    2011-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in children and adolescents and is typically associated with a poor prognosis. Tumor stem cells (TSCs) are presumed to drive tumor initiation and tumor relapse or metastasis. Hence, the poor prognosis of osteosarcoma likely results from a failure to target the osteosarcoma stem cells. Here, we have utilized three different methods to enrich TSCs in osteosarcoma and further evaluated whether salinomycin could selectively target TSCs in osteosarcoma. Our results indicated that sarcosphere selection, chemotherapy selection and stem cell marker OCT4 or SOX2 over-expression are all effective in the enrichment of TSCs from osteosarcoma cell lines. Further investigation found that salinomycin inhibited osteosarcoma by selectively targeting its stem cells both in vitro and in vivo without severe side effects, and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in this inhibition of salinomycin. Taken together, we have identified that salinomycin is an effective inhibitor of osteosarcoma stem cells, supporting the use of salinomycin for elimination of osteosarcoma stem cells and implying a need for further clinical evaluation.

  5. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  6. Dendritic cell targeted vaccines: Recent progresses and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengfei; Liu, Xinsheng; Sun, Yuefeng; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Yongguang

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to be a set of morphology, structure and function of heterogeneous professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), as well as the strongest functional antigen presenting cells, which can absorb, process and present antigens. As the key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses, DCs are at the center of the immune system and capable of interacting with both B cells and T cells, thereby manipulating the humoral and cellular immune responses. DCs provide an essential link between the innate and adaptive immunity, and the strong immune activation function of DCs and their properties of natural adjuvants, make them a valuable target for antigen delivery. Targeting antigens to DC-specific endocytic receptors in combination with the relevant antibodies or ligands along with immunostimulatory adjuvants has been recently recognized as a promising strategy for designing an effective vaccine that elicits a strong and durable T cell response against intracellular pathogens and cancer. This opinion article provides a brief summary of the rationales, superiorities and challenges of existing DC-targeting approaches.

  7. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting natural killer T cell responses in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shissler, Susannah C; Bollino, Dominique R; Tiper, Irina V; Bates, Joshua P; Derakhshandeh, Roshanak; Webb, Tonya J

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells possess a classic αβ T cell receptor (TCR) that is able to recognize self and foreign glycolipid antigens presented by the nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, CD1d. Type I NKT cells (referred to as invariant NKT cells) express a semi-invariant Vα14Jα18 TCR in mice and Vα24Jα18 TCR in humans. Type II NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that express a more diverse set of TCR α chains. The two types of NKT cells often exert opposing effects especially in tumor immunity, where type II cells generally suppress tumor immunity while type I NKT cells can enhance anti-tumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on the role of NKT cells in cancer. We discuss their effector and suppressive functions, as well as describe preclinical and clinical studies utilizing therapeutic strategies focused on harnessing their potent anti-tumor effector functions, and conclude with a discussion on potential next steps for the utilization of NKT cell-targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer.

  8. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting Natural killer T cell responses in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shissler, Susannah C.; Bollino, Dominique R.; Tiper, Irina V.; Bates, Joshua; Derakhshandeh, Roshanak; Webb, Tonya J.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells possess a classic αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) that is able to recognize self and foreign glycolipid antigens presented by the nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, CD1d. Type I NKT cells (referred to as invariant NKT cells) express a semi-invariant Vα14Jα18 TCR in mice and Vα24Jα18 TCR in humans. Type II NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that express a more diverse set of TCR α chains. The two types of NKT cells often exert opposing effects especially in tumor immunity, where Type II cells generally suppress tumor immunity while Type I NKT cells can enhance antitumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on the role of NKT cells in cancer. We discuss their effector and suppressive functions, as well as describe preclinical and clinical studies utilizing therapeutic strategies focused on harnessing their potent anti-tumor effector functions, and conclude with a discussion on potential next steps for the utilization of NKT cell targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:27393665

  9. Targeted genome editing in human repopulating haematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Genovese (Pietro); G. Schiroli (Giulia); G. Escobar (Giulia); T. Di Tomaso (Tiziano); C. Firrito (Claudia); A. Calabria (Andrea); D. Moi (Davide); R. Mazzieri (Roberta); C. Bonini (Chiara); M.V. Holmes (Michael); P.D. Gregory (Philip); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); B. Gentner (Bernhard); E. Montini (Eugenio); A. Lombardo (Angelo); L. Naldini (Luigi)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTargeted genome editing by artificial nucleases has brought the goal of site-specific transgene integration and gene correction within the reach of gene therapy. However, its application to long-term repopulating haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has remained elusive. Here we show that po

  10. Cell-penetrating antimicrobial peptides - prospectives for targeting intracellular infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahnsen, Jesper S; Franzyk, Henrik; Sayers, Edward J;

    2015-01-01

    . TPk showed the highest antibacterial activity. SA-3 exhibited selective disruption of liposomes mimicking Gram-positive and Gram-negative membranes. CONCLUSION: PK-12-KKP is an unlikely candidate for targeting intracellular bacteria, as the eukaryotic cell-penetrating ability is poor. SA-3, affected...

  11. Multimodal imaging of nanovaccine carriers targeted to human dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, L.J.; Tacken, P.J.; Bonetto, F.J.; Buschow, S.I.; Croes, H.J.E.; Wijers-Rouw, M.J.P.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Figdor, C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in the initiation of adaptive immune responses and are currently exploited in immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. The targeted delivery of nanovaccine particles (NPs) to DCs in vivo is a promising strategy to enhance immune responses. Here, tar

  12. Human skin Langerhans cells are targets of dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, SJL; Grouard-Vogel, G; Mascola, [No Value; Brachtel, E; Putvatana, R; Louder, MK; Filgueira, L; Marovich, MA; Wong, HK; Blauvelt, A; Murphy, GS; Robb, ML; Innes, BL; Birx, DL; Hayes, CG; Frankel, SS

    2000-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV), an arthropod-borne flavivirus, causes a febrile illness for which there is no antiviral treatment and no vaccine(1,2). Macrophages are important in dengue pathogenesis; however, the initial target cell for DV infection remains unknown. As DV is introduced into human skin by mosqui

  13. Multiple personalities: synaptic target cells as introverts and extroverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzenthaler, S; Chiba, A

    2001-10-01

    The intricate process of wiring a neuronetwork requires a high degree of accuracy in the communication between pre- and post-synaptic cells. While presynaptic cells have been widely recognized for their dynamic role in synaptic matchmaking, post-synaptic cells have historically been overlooked as passive targets. Recent studies in the Drosophila embryonic neuromuscular system provide compelling evidence that post-synaptic cells participate actively in the synaptogenic process. Endocytosis allows them to quickly modify the array of molecular cues they provide on their surfaces and the extension of dynamic filopodia allows post-synaptic cells to engage in direct long-distance communication. By making use of familiar cellular mechanisms such as endocytosis and filopodia formation, post-synaptic cells may be able to communicate more effectively with potential synaptic partners.

  14. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Heyden, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  15. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  16. NK Cells Preferentially Target Tumor Cells with a Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Erik; Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Mac, Stephanie; Chen, Mingyi; Smith, Rachel C; Hagino, Takeshi; Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Sckisel, Gail D; Urayama, Shiro; Monjazeb, Arta M; Fragoso, Ruben C; Sayers, Thomas J; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-15

    Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are resistant to antiproliferative therapies, able to repopulate tumor bulk, and seed metastasis. NK cells are able to target stem cells as shown by their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells but not solid tissue grafts. Using multiple preclinical models, including NK coculture (autologous and allogeneic) with multiple human cancer cell lines and dissociated primary cancer specimens and NK transfer in NSG mice harboring orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts, we assessed CSC viability, CSC frequency, expression of death receptor ligands, and tumor burden. We demonstrate that activated NK cells are capable of preferentially killing CSCs identified by multiple CSC markers (CD24(+)/CD44(+), CD133(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase(bright)) from a wide variety of human cancer cell lines in vitro and dissociated primary cancer specimens ex vivo. We observed comparable effector function of allogeneic and autologous NK cells. We also observed preferential upregulation of NK activation ligands MICA/B, Fas, and DR5 on CSCs. Blocking studies further implicated an NKG2D-dependent mechanism for NK killing of CSCs. Treatment of orthotopic human pancreatic cancer tumor-bearing NSG mice with activated NK cells led to significant reductions in both intratumoral CSCs and tumor burden. Taken together, these data from multiple preclinical models, including a strong reliance on primary human cancer specimens, provide compelling preclinical evidence that activated NK cells preferentially target cancer cells with a CSC phenotype, highlighting the translational potential of NK immunotherapy as part of a combined modality approach for refractory solid malignancies.

  17. Polylactic Acid Nanoparticles Targeted to Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huafang; HU Yu; SUN Wangqiang; XIE Changsheng

    2005-01-01

    In this work, blank polylactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles with unstained surface were prepared by the nano-deposition method. On the basis of the preparation, the effect of surface modification on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) targeting was examined by in vivo experiments and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that PLA nanoparticles are less toxic than PACA nanoparticles but their BMECs targeting is similar to PACA nanoparticles. The experiments suggest that drugs can be loaded onto the particles and become more stable through adsorption on the surface of PLA nanoparticles with high surface activity. The surface of PLA nanoparticles was obviously modified and the hydrophilicity was increased as well in the presence of non-ionic surfactants on PLA nanoparticles. As a targeting moiety, polysobate 80 (T-80) can facilitate BMECs targeting of PLA nanoparticles.

  18. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan, E-mail: s.bhattacharya@jiit.ac.in

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  19. Liposomes to target peripheral neurons and Schwann cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooyeon Lee

    Full Text Available While a wealth of literature for tissue-specific liposomes is emerging, optimal formulations to target the cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS are lacking. In this study, we asked whether a novel formulation of phospholipid-based liposomes could be optimized for preferential uptake by microvascular endothelia, peripheral neurons and Schwann cells. Here, we report a unique formulation consisting of a phospholipid, a polymer surfactant and cholesterol that result in enhanced uptake by targeted cells. Using fluorescently labeled liposomes, we followed particle internalization and trafficking through a distinct route from dextran and escape from degradative compartments, such as lysosomes. In cultures of non-myelinating Schwann cells, liposomes associate with the lipid raft marker Cholera toxin, and their internalization is inhibited by disruption of lipid rafts or actin polymerization. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis does not significantly impact liposome entry. To evaluate the efficacy of liposome targeting in tissues, we utilized myelinating explant cultures of dorsal root ganglia and isolated diaphragm preparations, both of which contain peripheral neurons and myelinating Schwann cells. In these models, we detected preferential liposome uptake into neurons and glial cells in comparison to surrounding muscle tissue. Furthermore, in vivo liposome administration by intramuscular or intravenous injection confirmed that the particles were delivered to myelinated peripheral nerves. Within the CNS, we detected the liposomes in choroid epithelium, but not in myelinated white matter regions or in brain parenchyma. The described nanoparticles represent a novel neurophilic delivery vehicle for targeting small therapeutic compounds, biological molecules, or imaging reagents into peripheral neurons and Schwann cells, and provide a major advancement toward developing effective therapies for peripheral

  20. Novel therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oishi, Xin Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis was first proposed over 40 years ago. Advances in CSC isolation were first achieved in hematological malignancies, with the first CSC demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. However, using similar strategies and technologies, and taking advantage of available surface markers, CSCs have been more recently demonstrated in a growing range of epithelial and other solid organ malignancies, suggesting that the majority of malignancies are dependent on such a compartment.Primary liver cancer consists predominantly of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. It is believed that hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs could be the origin of some HCCs and ICCs. Furthermore, stem cell activators such as Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways also expedite tumorigenesis, and these pathways could serve as molecular targets to assist in designing cancer prevention strategies. Recent studies indicate that additional factors such as EpCAM, Lin28 or miR-181 may also contribute to HCC progression by targeting HCC CSCs. Various therapeutic drugs that directly modulate CSCs have been examined in vivo and in vitro. However, CSCs clearly have a complex pathogenesis, with a considerable crosstalk and redundancy in signaling pathways, and hence targeting single molecules or pathways may have a limited benefit for treatment. Many of the key signaling molecules are shared by both CSCs and normal stem cells, which add further challenges for designing molecularly targeted strategies specific to CSCs but sparing normal stem cells to avoid side effects. In addition to the direct control of CSCs, many other factors that are needed for the maintenance of CSCs, such as angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, invasion and migration, hypoxia, immune evasion, multiple drug resistance, and radioresistance, should be taken into consideration when designing therapeutic strategies for HCC.Here we provide a brief

  1. Lactoferrin targets T cells in the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Mie; Hansen, Gert Helge; Danielsen, E Michael

    2010-01-01

    pathogens, and Lf receptors have been identified at the surfaces of a number of different cells. In the small intestine Lf binds to the luminal surface, but its further interaction with the epithelial cells is controversial. METHODS: In the present work, we studied the uptake of Lf in cultured mucosal...... explants of pig small intestine by immunofluorescence and immunogold microscopy. RESULTS: Lf rapidly bound to the brush border and subsequently appeared in punctae in the apical cytoplasm, indicating internalization into an endosomal compartment. Essentially, no labeling was detected elsewhere...... defense of the small intestinal mucosa by targeting the population of T cells in the lamina propria....

  2. Targeting cancer stem cells: emerging role of Nanog transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mong-Lien Wang,1 Shih-Hwa Chiou,2,3 Cheng-Wen Wu1,4–61Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: The involvement of stemness factors in cancer initiation and progression has drawn much attention recently, especially after the finding that introducing four stemness factors in somatic cells is able to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Following accumulating data revealing abnormal elevated expression levels of key stemness factors, like Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, in several types of cancer stem cells; the importance and therapeutic potential of targeting these stemness regulators in cancers has turned to research focus. Nanog determines cell fate in both embryonic and cancer stem cells; activating Nanog at an inappropriate time would result in cancer stem cells rather than normal pluripotent stem cells or differentiated somatic cells. Upregulated Nanog is correlated with poor survival outcome of patients with various types of cancer. The discoveries of downstream regulatory pathways directly or indirectly mediated by Nanog indicate that Nanog regulates several aspects of cancer development such as tumor cell proliferation, self-renewal, motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, immune evasion, and drug-resistance, which are all defined features for cancer stem cells. The current review paper illustrates the central role of Nanog in the regulatory networks of cancer malignant development and stemness acquirement, as well as in the communication between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma. Though a more defined model is needed to test the

  3. Key cancer cell signal transduction pathways as therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    Growth factor signals are propagated from the cell surface, through the action of transmembrane receptors, to intracellular effectors that control critical functions in human cancer cells, such as differentiation, growth, angiogenesis, and inhibition of cell death and apoptosis. Several kinases are involved in transduction pathways via sequential signalling activation. These kinases include transmembrane receptor kinases (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR); or cytoplasmic kinases (e.g., PI3 kinase). In cancer cells, these signalling pathways are often altered and results in a phenotype characterized by uncontrolled growth and increased capability to invade surrounding tissue. Therefore, these crucial transduction molecules represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. This review will summarize current knowledge of key signal transduction pathways, that are altered in cancer cells, as therapeutic targets for novel selective inhibitors. The most advanced targeted agents currently under development interfere with function and expression of several signalling molecules, including the EGFR family; the vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors; and cytoplasmic kinases such as Ras, PI3K and mTOR.

  4. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-03-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed.

  5. Efficient analysis of a small number of cancer cells at the single-cell level using an electroactive double-well array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Hyeon; Fujii, Teruo

    2016-07-01

    Analysis of the intracellular materials of a small number of cancer cells at the single-cell level is important to improve our understanding of cellular heterogeneity in rare cells. To analyze an extremely small number of cancer cells (less than hundreds of cells), an efficient system is required in order to analyze target cells with minimal sample loss. Here, we present a novel approach utilizing an advanced electroactive double-well array (EdWA) for on-chip analysis of a small number of cancer cells at the single-cell level with minimal loss of target cells. The EdWA consisted of cell-sized trap-wells for deterministic single-cell trapping using dielectrophoresis and high aspect ratio reaction-wells for confining the cell lysates extracted by lysing trapped single cells via electroporation. We demonstrated a highly efficient single-cell arraying (a cell capture efficiency of 96 ± 3%) by trapping diluted human prostate cancer cells (PC3 cells). On-chip single-cell analysis was performed by measuring the intracellular β-galactosidase (β-gal) activity after lysing the trapped single cells inside a tightly enclosed EdWA in the presence of a fluorogenic enzyme substrate. The PC3 cells showed large cell-to-cell variations in β-gal activity although they were cultured under the same conditions in a culture dish. This simple and effective system has great potential for high throughput single-cell analysis of rare cells.

  6. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  7. A novel double-targeted nondrug delivery system for targeting cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shupei Qiao,1,* Yufang Zhao,1,* Shuai Geng,2,* Yong Li,1,* Xiaolu Hou,1,3 Yi Liu,1 Feng-Huei Lin,4,5 Lifen Yao,6 Weiming Tian1 1School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, 2Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, 3Department of Cardiology, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 4Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Nanomedicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan; 6Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Instead of killing cancer stem cells (CSCs, the conventional chemotherapy used for cancer treatment promotes the enrichment of CSCs, which are responsible for tumor growth, metastasis, and recurrence. However, most therapeutic agents are only able to kill a small proportion of CSCs by targeting one or two cell surface markers or dysregulated CSC pathways, which are usually shared with normal stem cells (NSCs. In this study, we developed a novel nondrug delivery system for the dual targeting of CSCs by conjugating hyaluronic acid (HA and grafting the doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1 monoclonal antibody to the surface of poly(ethylene glycol (PEG–poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs, which can specifically target CD44 receptors and the DCLK1 surface marker – the latter was shown to possess the capacity to distinguish between CSCSs and NSCs. The size and morphology of these NPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. This was followed by studies of NP encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release properties. Then, the cytotoxicity of the NPs was tested via Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Finally

  8. Targeted Cytotoxic Therapy Kills Persisting HIV Infected Cells During ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Paul W.; Long, Julie M.; Wietgrefe, Stephen W.; Sykes, Craig; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Snyder, Olivia D.; Perkey, Katherine; Archin, Nancie M.; Choudhary, Shailesh K.; Yang, Kuo; Hudgens, Michael G.; Pastan, Ira; Haase, Ashley T.; Kashuba, Angela D.; Berger, Edward A.; Margolis, David M.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce HIV levels in plasma to undetectable levels, but rather little is known about the effects of ART outside of the peripheral blood regarding persistent virus production in tissue reservoirs. Understanding the dynamics of ART-induced reductions in viral RNA (vRNA) levels throughout the body is important for the development of strategies to eradicate infectious HIV from patients. Essential to a successful eradication therapy is a component capable of killing persisting HIV infected cells during ART. Therefore, we determined the in vivo efficacy of a targeted cytotoxic therapy to kill infected cells that persist despite long-term ART. For this purpose, we first characterized the impact of ART on HIV RNA levels in multiple organs of bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT) humanized mice and found that antiretroviral drug penetration and activity was sufficient to reduce, but not eliminate, HIV production in each tissue tested. For targeted cytotoxic killing of these persistent vRNA+ cells, we treated BLT mice undergoing ART with an HIV-specific immunotoxin. We found that compared to ART alone, this agent profoundly depleted productively infected cells systemically. These results offer proof-of-concept that targeted cytotoxic therapies can be effective components of HIV eradication strategies. PMID:24415939

  9. Targeted cytotoxic therapy kills persisting HIV infected cells during ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Paul W; Long, Julie M; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Sykes, Craig; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Snyder, Olivia D; Perkey, Katherine; Archin, Nancie M; Choudhary, Shailesh K; Yang, Kuo; Hudgens, Michael G; Pastan, Ira; Haase, Ashley T; Kashuba, Angela D; Berger, Edward A; Margolis, David M; Garcia, J Victor

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce HIV levels in plasma to undetectable levels, but rather little is known about the effects of ART outside of the peripheral blood regarding persistent virus production in tissue reservoirs. Understanding the dynamics of ART-induced reductions in viral RNA (vRNA) levels throughout the body is important for the development of strategies to eradicate infectious HIV from patients. Essential to a successful eradication therapy is a component capable of killing persisting HIV infected cells during ART. Therefore, we determined the in vivo efficacy of a targeted cytotoxic therapy to kill infected cells that persist despite long-term ART. For this purpose, we first characterized the impact of ART on HIV RNA levels in multiple organs of bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT) humanized mice and found that antiretroviral drug penetration and activity was sufficient to reduce, but not eliminate, HIV production in each tissue tested. For targeted cytotoxic killing of these persistent vRNA(+) cells, we treated BLT mice undergoing ART with an HIV-specific immunotoxin. We found that compared to ART alone, this agent profoundly depleted productively infected cells systemically. These results offer proof-of-concept that targeted cytotoxic therapies can be effective components of HIV eradication strategies.

  10. Trastuzumab Sensitizes Ovarian Cancer Cells to EGFR-targeted Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilken Jason A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early studies have demonstrated comparable levels of HER2/ErbB2 expression in both breast and ovarian cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody directed against HER2, is FDA-approved for the treatment of both early and late stage breast cancer. However, clinical studies of trastuzumab in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC patients have not met the same level of success. Surprisingly, however, no reports have examined either the basis for primary trastuzumab resistance in ovarian cancer or potential ways of salvaging trastuzumab as a potential ovarian cancer therapeutic. Methods An in vitro model of primary trastuzumab-resistant ovarian cancer was created by long-term culture of HER2-positive ovarian carcinoma-derived cell lines with trastuzumab. Trastuzumab treated vs. untreated parental cells were compared for HER receptor expression, trastuzumab sensitivity, and sensitivity to other HER-targeted therapeutics. Results In contrast to widely held assumptions, here we show that ovarian cancer cells that are not growth inhibited by trastuzumab are still responsive to trastuzumab. Specifically, we show that responsiveness to alternative HER-targeted inhibitors, such as gefitinib and cetuximab, is dramatically potentiated by long-term trastuzumab treatment of ovarian cancer cells. HER2-positive ovarian carcinoma-derived cells are, therefore, not "unresponsive" to trastuzumab as previously assumed, even when they not growth inhibited by this drug. Conclusions Given the recent success of EGFR-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of other solid tumors, and the well-established safety profile of trastuzumab, results presented here provide a rationale for re-evaluation of trastuzumab as an experimental ovarian cancer therapeutic, either in concert with, or perhaps as a "primer" for EGFR-targeted therapeutics.

  11. Tandem CAR T cells targeting HER2 and IL13Rα2 mitigate tumor antigen escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Mukherjee, Malini; Grada, Zakaria; Pignata, Antonella; Landi, Daniel; Navai, Shoba A; Wakefield, Amanda; Fousek, Kristen; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Chow, Kevin K H; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Dotti, Gianpietro; Mamonkin, Maksim; Brenner, Malcolm K; Orange, Jordan S; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical models of glioblastoma, antigen escape variants can lead to tumor recurrence after treatment with CAR T cells that are redirected to single tumor antigens. Given the heterogeneous expression of antigens on glioblastomas, we hypothesized that a bispecific CAR molecule would mitigate antigen escape and improve the antitumor activity of T cells. Here, we created a CAR that joins a HER2-binding scFv and an IL13Rα2-binding IL-13 mutein to make a tandem CAR exodomain (TanCAR) and a CD28.ζ endodomain. We determined that patient TanCAR T cells showed distinct binding to HER2 or IL13Rα2 and had the capability to lyse autologous glioblastoma. TanCAR T cells exhibited activation dynamics that were comparable to those of single CAR T cells upon encounter of HER2 or IL13Rα2. We observed that TanCARs engaged HER2 and IL13Rα2 simultaneously by inducing HER2-IL13Rα2 heterodimers, which promoted superadditive T cell activation when both antigens were encountered concurrently. TanCAR T cell activity was more sustained but not more exhaustible than that of T cells that coexpressed a HER2 CAR and an IL13Rα2 CAR, T cells with a unispecific CAR, or a pooled product. In a murine glioblastoma model, TanCAR T cells mitigated antigen escape, displayed enhanced antitumor efficacy, and improved animal survival. Thus, TanCAR T cells show therapeutic potential to improve glioblastoma control by coengaging HER2 and IL13Rα2 in an augmented, bivalent immune synapse that enhances T cell functionality and reduces antigen escape.

  12. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  13. Alpinetin targets glioma stem cells by suppressing Notch pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianpeng; Yan, Zhiyong; Liu, Xia; Che, Shusheng; Wang, Chao; Yao, Weicheng

    2016-07-01

    Glioma is among the most common human malignancies with poor prognosis. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are the culprit of glioma, suggesting that GSCs are potential therapeutic targets. Notch signaling pathway plays a pivotal role for the function of GSCs, implying that suppression of Notch pathway may be an effective strategy for GSC-targeting therapy. In this study, we found that alpinetin, a natural compound, can suppress the proliferation and invasiveness of GSCs and induce apoptosis in GSCs. Immunoblot analysis and luciferase assay revealed that Notch signaling was suppressed by alpinetin. Furthermore, restoration of Notch signaling activity rescued the effect of alpinetin on GSC's function. The anti-tumor activity of alpinetin was further confirmed in an animal model. Collectively, targeting of GSC by alpinetin is an effective strategy for glioma therapy.

  14. Cancer immunotherapy: nanodelivery approaches for immune cell targeting and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conniot, João; Silva, Joana; Fernandes, Joana; Silva, Liana; Gaspar, Rogério; Brocchini, Steve; Florindo, Helena; Barata, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Cancer is one of the most common diseases afflicting people globally. New therapeutic approaches are needed due to the complexity of cancer as a disease. Many current treatments are very toxic and have modest efficacy at best. Increased understanding of tumor biology and immunology has allowed the development of specific immunotherapies with minimal toxicity. It is important to highlight the performance of monoclonal antibodies, immune adjuvants, vaccines and cell-based treatments. Although these approaches have shown varying degrees of clinical efficacy, they illustrate the potential to develop new strategies. Targeted immunotherapy is being explored to overcome the heterogeneity of malignant cells and the immune suppression induced by both the tumor and its microenvironment. Nanodelivery strategies seek to minimize systemic exposure to target therapy to malignant tissue and cells. Intracellular penetration has been examined through the use of functionalized particulates. These nano-particulate associated medicines are being developed for use in imaging, diagnostics and cancer targeting. Although nano-particulates are inherently complex medicines, the ability to confer, at least in principle, different types of functionality allows for the plausible consideration these nanodelivery strategies can be exploited for use as combination medicines. The development of targeted nanodelivery systems in which therapeutic and imaging agents are merged into a single platform is an attractive strategy. Currently, several nanoplatform-based formulations, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers are in preclinical and clinical stages of development. Herein, nanodelivery strategies presently investigated for cancer immunotherapy, cancer targeting mechanisms and nanocarrier functionalization methods will be described. We also intend to discuss the emerging nano-based approaches suitable to be used as imaging techniques and as cancer treatment options.

  15. CCL22-specific T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenaite, Evelina; Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating macrophages produce the chemokine CCL22, which attracts regulatory T cells (Tregs) into the tumor microenvironment, decreasing anticancer immunity. Here, we investigated the possibility of targeting CCL22-expressing cells by activating specific T cells. We...... analyzed the CCL22 protein signal sequence, identifying a human leukocyte antigen A2- (HLA-A2-) restricted peptide epitope, which we then used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) to expand populations of CCL22-specific T cells in vitro. T cells recognizing an epitope derived from...... the signal-peptide of CCL22 will recognize CCL22-expressing cells even though CCL22 is secreted out of the cell. CCL22-specific T cells recognized and killed CCL22-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, CCL22-specific T cells lysed acute monocytic leukemia cells in a CCL22 expression-dependent manner. Using...

  16. In vitro generation of human cytotoxic lymphocytes by virus. Viral glycoproteins induce nonspecific cell-mediated cytotoxicity without release of interferon

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    Purified hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins of measles virus either in soluble form or inserted in artifical membranes bind to human peripheral blood lymphocytes and induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) in a dose-response fashion. Both autologous and heterologous noninfected target cells are lysed in vitro. The expression of CMC is not inhibited by anti-measles virus antibody added to lymphocytes previously exposed to viral glycoproteins. THe killer lymphocytes are Fc receptor positive...

  17. Delivery of Therapeutic RNAs Into Target Cells IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Hagen, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    RNA-based therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat human diseases. Specifically, the use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) mimics for in vivo RNA interference has immense potential as it directly lowers the expression of the therapeutic target protein. However, there are a number of major roadblocks to the successful implementation of siRNA and other RNA based therapies in the clinic. These include the instability of RNAs in vivo and the difficulty to efficiently deliver the RNA into the target cells. Hence, various innovative approaches have been taken over the years to develop effective RNA delivery methods. These methods include liposome-, polymeric nanoparticle- and peptide-mediated cellular delivery. In a recent innovative study, bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles were used as vehicles for effective delivery of siRNA into cells in vivo.

  18. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens.

  19. Diffusion tensor driven contour closing for cell microinjection targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a novel approach to robust automatic detection of unstained living cells in bright-field (BF) microscope images with the goal of producing a target list for an automated microinjection system. The overall image analysis process is described and includes: preprocessing, ridge enhancement, image segmentation, shape analysis and injection point definition. The developed algorithm implements a new version of anisotropic contour completion (ACC) based on the partial differential equation (PDE) for heat diffusion which improves the cell segmentation process by elongating the edges only along their tangent direction. The developed ACC algorithm is equivalent to a dilation of the binary edge image with a continuous elliptic structural element that takes into account local orientation of the contours preventing extension towards normal direction. Experiments carried out on real images of 10 to 50 microm CHO-K1 adherent cells show a remarkable reliability in the algorithm along with up to 85% success for cell detection and injection point definition.

  20. The polarized double cell target of the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Arik, E; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Ballintijn, M K; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Bird, I G; Birsa, R; Björkholm, P; Bonner, B E; De Botton, N R; Boutemeur, M; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Cavata, C; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dyring, A; Eichblatt, S; Faivre, Jean-Claude; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gaussiran, T; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gülmez, E; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kishi, A; Kiselev, Yu F; Klostermann, L; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Layda, T; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindqvist, T; Litmaath, M; Loewe, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Neganov, B S; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Parks, D P; Pereira, H; Penzo, Aldo L; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Pussieux, T; Pyrlik, J; Rädel, G; Reyhancan, I; Reicherz, G; Rijllart, A; Roberts, J B; Rock, S E; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Rosado, A; Roscherr, B; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Schüler, K P; Segel, R E; Seitz, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Sever, F; Shanahan, P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Teichert, K M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Trentalange, S; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Weinstein, R; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1999-01-01

    The polarized target of the Spin Muon Collaboration at CERN was used for deep inelastic muon scattering experiments during 1993 to 1996 with a polarized muon beam to investigate the spin structure of the nucleon. Most of the experiments were carried out with longitudinal target polarization and 190 GeV muons, and some were done with transverse polarization and 100 GeV muons. Protons as well as deuterons were polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in three kinds of solid materials $-$ butanol, ammonia, and deuterated butanol, with maximum degrees of polarization of 94, 91, and 60 \\%, respectively. Considerable attention was paid to the accuracies of the NMR polarization measurements and their analyses. The achieved accuracies were between 2.0 and 3.2 \\%. The SMC target system with two cells of opposite polarizations, each cell 65 cm long and 5 cm in diameter, constitutes the largest polarized target system ever built and facilitates accurate spin asymmetry measurements. The design considerations, the ...

  1. A novel gene delivery system targeting cells expressing VEGF receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIJUNMIN; JINGCHULUO; 等

    1999-01-01

    Two ligand oligopeptides GV1 and GV2 were designed according to the putative binding region of VEGF to its receptors.GV1,GV2 and endosome releasing oligopeptide HA20 were conjugated with poly-L-lysine or protamine and the resulting conjugates could interact with DNA in a noncovalent bond to form a complex.Using pSV2-β-galactosidase as a reporter gene,it has been demonstrated that exogenous gene was transferred into bovine aortic arch-derived endothelial cells (ABAE) and human malignant melanoma cell lines (A375) in vitro.In vivo experiments,exogenous gene was transferred into tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells of subcutaneously transplanted human colon cancer LOVO,human malignant melanoma A375 and human hepatoma graft in nude mice.This system could also target gene to intrahepatically transplanted human hepatoma injected via portal vein in nude mice.These results are correlated with the relevant receptors(flt-1,flk-1/KDR) expression on the targeted cells and tissues.

  2. Mechanisms of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity and Targets of Hair Cell Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, M. E.; Ricci, A. J.; Cheng, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are commonly prescribed antibiotics with deleterious side effects to the inner ear. Due to their popular application as a result of their potent antimicrobial activities, many efforts have been undertaken to prevent aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Over the years, understanding of the antimicrobial as well as ototoxic mechanisms of aminoglycosides has increased. These mechanisms are reviewed in regard to established and potential future targets of hair cell protection. PMID:22121370

  3. Estrogen enhanced cell-cell signalling in breast cancer cells exposed to targeted irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Held Kathryn D

    2008-06-01

    tumour cells may offer new potential targets for radiation-based therapies in the treatment of breast cancer.

  4. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  5. Incorporating metal into polarized 3He target cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katugampola, Sumudu K.; Matyas, Daniel J.; Wang, Yunxiao; Tobias, William A.; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Cates, Gordon D.

    2017-01-01

    An upcoming measurement at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) of the electric form factor of the neutron will utilize a polarized 3He target at high luminosity. While polarized 3He targets at JLab have previously been made entirely of glass, we describe progress toward incorporating metal windows for the electron beam. Under the conditions of our targets, very few studies have been done on the spin-relaxation of nuclear-polarized 3He on metal surfaces. We have found good performance by using Oxygen Free High Conductivity (OFHC) copper substrates electroplated with gold. The glass-to-metal transitions within our test cells were based on Housekeeper seals. We have further established that Uranium glass (Canary glass) has excellent spin-relaxation properties, and can serve as a transition glass from Pyrex to Aluminosilicate glass (GE180). Another finding was that spin-relaxation properties were sensitive to the manner in which cells were annealed, an important issue because of constraints when annealing cells containing both metal and glass.

  6. The cell's nucleolus: an emerging target for chemotherapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Amanda J; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    The transient nucleolus plays a central role in the up-regulated synthesis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) to sustain ribosome biogenesis, a hallmark of aberrant cell growth. This function, in conjunction with its unique pathohistological features in malignant cells and its ability to mediate apoptosis, renders this sub-nuclear structure a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents. In this Minireview, structurally and functionally diverse small molecules are discussed that have been reported to either interact with the nucleolus directly or perturb its function indirectly by acting on its dynamic components. These molecules include all major classes of nucleic-acid-targeted agents, antimetabolites, kinase inhibitors, anti-inflammatory drugs, natural product antibiotics, oligopeptides, as well as nanoparticles. Together, these molecules are invaluable probes of structure and function of the nucleolus. They also provide a unique opportunity to develop novel strategies for more selective and therefore better-tolerated chemotherapeutic intervention. In this regard, inhibition of RNA polymerase-I-mediated rRNA synthesis appears to be a promising mechanism for killing cancer cells. The recent development of molecules targeted at G-quadruplex-forming rRNA gene sequences, which are currently undergoing clinical trials, seems to attest to the success of this approach.

  7. Targeting cancer stem cells with p53 modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ryo; Appella, Ettore; Kopelovich, Levy; DeLeo, Albert B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) typically over-express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Thus, ALDHbright tumor cells represent targets for developing novel cancer prevention/treatment interventions. Loss of p53 function is a common genetic event during cancer development wherein small molecular weight compounds (SMWC) that restore p53 function and reverse tumor growth have been identified. Here, we focused on two widely studied p53 SMWC, CP-31398 and PRIMA-1, to target ALDHbright CSC in human breast, endometrial and pancreas carcinoma cell lines expressing mutant or wild type (WT) p53. CP-31398 and PRIMA-1 significantly reduced CSC content and sphere formation by these cell lines in vitro. In addition, these agents were more effective in vitro against CSC compared to cisplatin and gemcitabine, two often-used chemotherapeutic agents. We also tested a combinatorial treatment in methylcholantrene (MCA)-treated mice consisting of p53 SMWC and p53-based vaccines. Yet using survival end-point analysis, no increased efficacy in the presence of either p53 SMWC alone or with vaccine compared to vaccine alone was observed. These results may be due, in part, to the presence of immune cells, such as activated lymphocytes expressing WT p53 at levels comparable to some tumor cells, wherein further increase of p53 expression by p53 SMWC may alter survival of these immune cells and negatively impact an effective immune response. Continuous exposure of mice to MCA may have also interfered with the action of these p53 SMWC, including potential direct interaction with MCA. Nonetheless, the effect of p53 SMWC on CSC and cancer treatment remains of great interest. PMID:27074569

  8. New small molecules targeting apoptosis and cell viability in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Maugg

    Full Text Available Despite the option of multimodal therapy in the treatment strategies of osteosarcoma (OS, the most common primary malignant bone tumor, the standard therapy has not changed over the last decades and still involves multidrug chemotherapy and radical surgery. Although successfully applied in many patients a large number of patients eventually develop recurrent or metastatic disease in which current therapeutic regimens often lack efficacy. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this study, we performed a phenotypic high-throughput screening campaign using a 25,000 small-molecule diversity library to identify new small molecules selectively targeting osteosarcoma cells. We could identify two new small molecules that specifically reduced cell viability in OS cell lines U2OS and HOS, but affected neither hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 nor primary human osteoblasts (hOB. In addition, the two compounds induced caspase 3 and 7 activity in the U2OS cell line. Compared to conventional drugs generally used in OS treatment such as doxorubicin, we indeed observed a greater sensitivity of OS cell viability to the newly identified compounds compared to doxorubicin and staurosporine. The p53-negative OS cell line Saos-2 almost completely lacked sensitivity to compound treatment that could indicate a role of p53 in the drug response. Taken together, our data show potential implications for designing more efficient therapies in OS.

  9. Radioprotection of targeted and bystander cells by methylproamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom); Oxford University Hospitals, Cellular Pathology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Smith, Andrea; Lobachevsky, Pavel; Martin, Roger [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Prise, Kevin M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-23

    Radioprotective agents are of interest for application in radiotherapy for cancer and in public health medicine in the context of accidental radiation exposure. Methylproamine is the lead compound of a class of radioprotectors which act as DNA binding anti-oxidants, enabling the repair of transient radiation-induced oxidative DNA lesions. This study tested methylproamine for the radioprotection of both directly targeted and bystander cells. T98G glioma cells were treated with 15 μM methylproamine and exposed to {sup 137}Cs γ-ray/X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} microbeam irradiation. Radioprotection of directly targeted cells and bystander cells was measured by clonogenic survival or γH2AX assay. Radioprotection of directly targeted T98G cells by methylproamine was observed for {sup 137}Cs γ-rays and X-rays but not for He{sup 2+} charged particle irradiation. The effect of methylproamine on the bystander cell population was tested for both X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} ion microbeam irradiation. The X-ray bystander experiments were carried out by medium transfer from irradiated to non-irradiated cultures and three experimental designs were tested. Radioprotection was only observed when recipient cells were pretreated with the drug prior to exposure to the conditioned medium. In microbeam bystander experiments targeted and nontargeted cells were co-cultured with continuous methylproamine treatment during irradiation and postradiation incubation; radioprotection of bystander cells was observed. Methylproamine protected targeted cells from DNA damage caused by γ-ray or X-ray radiation but not He{sup 2+} ion radiation. Protection of bystander cells was independent of the type of radiation which the donor population received. (orig.) [German] Radioprotektive Agenzien sind sowohl in der Strahlentherapie von Krebserkrankungen als auch im Strahlenschutz im Zusammenhang mit akzidenteller Exposition von Bedeutung. Methylproamine ist die Leitsubstanz einer Klasse von

  10. Targeting the Bacterial Division Protein FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Katherine A; Santos, Thiago M A; Nepomuceno, Gabriella M; Huynh, Valerie; Shaw, Jared T; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-08-11

    Similar to its eukaryotic counterpart, the prokaryotic cytoskeleton is essential for the structural and mechanical properties of bacterial cells. The essential protein FtsZ is a central player in the cytoskeletal family, forms a cytokinetic ring at mid-cell, and recruits the division machinery to orchestrate cell division. Cells depleted of or lacking functional FtsZ do not divide and grow into long filaments that eventually lyse. FtsZ has been studied extensively as a target for antibacterial development. In this Perspective, we review the structural and biochemical properties of FtsZ, its role in cell biochemistry and physiology, the different mechanisms of inhibiting FtsZ, small molecule antagonists (including some misconceptions about mechanisms of action), and their discovery strategies. This collective information will inform chemists on different aspects of FtsZ that can be (and have been) used to develop successful strategies for devising new families of cell division inhibitors.

  11. Solid tumor therapy by selectively targeting stromal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shihui; Liu, Jie; Ma, Qian; Cao, Liu; Fattah, Rasem J; Yu, Zuxi; Bugge, Thomas H; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-07-12

    Engineered tumor-targeted anthrax lethal toxin proteins have been shown to strongly suppress growth of solid tumors in mice. These toxins work through the native toxin receptors tumor endothelium marker-8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), which, in other contexts, have been described as markers of tumor endothelium. We found that neither receptor is required for tumor growth. We further demonstrate that tumor cells, which are resistant to the toxin when grown in vitro, become highly sensitive when implanted in mice. Using a range of tissue-specific loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic models, we determined that this in vivo toxin sensitivity requires CMG2 expression on host-derived tumor endothelial cells. Notably, engineered toxins were shown to suppress the proliferation of isolated tumor endothelial cells. Finally, we demonstrate that administering an immunosuppressive regimen allows animals to receive multiple toxin dosages and thereby produces a strong and durable antitumor effect. The ability to give repeated doses of toxins, coupled with the specific targeting of tumor endothelial cells, suggests that our strategy should be efficacious for a wide range of solid tumors.

  12. Novel combination treatments targeting chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Baghdadi, Tareq; Abonour, Rafat; Boswell, H Scott

    2012-04-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is currently considered incurable in most patients. Stem cell transplantation, an accepted curative option for which extensive experience has been gained, is limited by high morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in older patients. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting BCR-ABL are widely used and induce remission in a high proportion of patients, but resistance and incomplete response to these agents portends eventual relapse and disease progression. Although BCR-ABL inhibitors eradicate most CML cells, they are largely ineffective against the reservoir of quiescent leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Thus a strong medical need exists for therapies that effectively eradicate LSCs and is currently a focus of extensive research. To date, evidence obtained from in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical CML specimens suggests that an effective approach may be to partner existing BCR-ABL inhibitors with compounds targeting key stem cell molecular effectors, including Wnt/β-catenin, hedgehog pathway components, histone deacetylase (HDAC), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), Janus kinase 2, promyelocytic leukemia protein, and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5). Novel combinations may sensitize LSCs to BCR-ABL inhibitors, thereby overcoming resistance and creating the possibility of improving disease outcome beyond the current standard of care. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Engineering tumor cell targeting in nanoscale amyloidal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Virtudes Céspedes, María; Saccardo, Paolo; Cortés, Francisco; Rueda, Fabián; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Mangues, Ramon; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial inclusion bodies are non-toxic, mechanically stable and functional protein amyloids within the nanoscale size range that are able to naturally penetrate into mammalian cells, where they deliver the embedded protein in a functional form. The potential use of inclusion bodies in protein delivery or protein replacement therapies is strongly impaired by the absence of specificity in cell binding and penetration, thus preventing targeting. To address this issue, we have here explored whether the genetic fusion of two tumor-homing peptides, the CXCR4 ligands R9 and T22, to an inclusion body-forming green fluorescent protein (GFP), would keep the interaction potential and the functionality of the fused peptides and then confer CXCR4 specificity in cell binding and further uptake of the materials. The fusion proteins have been well produced in Escherichia coli in their full-length form, keeping the potential for fluorescence emission of the partner GFP. By using specific inhibitors of CXCR4 binding, we have demonstrated that the engineered protein particles are able to penetrate CXCR4+ cells, in a receptor-mediated way, without toxicity or visible cytopathic effects, proving the availability of the peptide ligands on the surface of inclusion bodies. Since no further modification is required upon their purification, the biological production of genetically targeted inclusion bodies opens a plethora of cost-effective possibilities in the tissue-specific intracellular transfer of functional proteins through the use of structurally and functionally tailored soft materials.

  14. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti, E-mail: keertijain02@gmail.com; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar, E-mail: neelesh81mph@gmail.com; Jain, N. K., E-mail: dr.jnarendr@gmail.com [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  15. Targeting Gallium to Cancer Cells through the Folate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerissa Viola-Villegas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of gallium(III compounds as anti-cancer agents for both treatment and diagnosis is a rapidly developing field of research. Problems remain in exploring the full potential of gallium(III as a safe and successful therapeutic agent or as an imaging agent. One of the major issues is that gallium(III compounds have little tropism for cancer cells. We have combined the targeting properties of folic acid (FA with long chain liquid polymer poly(ethylene glycol (PEG ‘spacers’. This FA-PEG unit has been coupled to the gallium coordination complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-N,N′,N′′,N′′′-tetraacetic acid (DOTA through amide linkages for delivery into target cells overexpressing the folate receptor (FR. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were conducted against a multi-drug resistant ovarian cell line (A2780/AD that overexpresses the FR and contrasted against a FR free Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell line. Results are rationalized taking into account stability studies conducted in RPMI 1640 media and HEPES buffer at pH 7.4.

  16. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  17. Target cell cyclophilins facilitate human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV-induced diseases.

  18. Neuroblastoma cell lines contain pluripotent tumor initiating cells that are susceptible to a targeted oncolytic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Y Mahller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although disease remission can frequently be achieved for patients with neuroblastoma, relapse is common. The cancer stem cell theory suggests that rare tumorigenic cells, resistant to conventional therapy, are responsible for relapse. If true for neuroblastoma, improved cure rates may only be achieved via identification and therapeutic targeting of the neuroblastoma tumor initiating cell. Based on cues from normal stem cells, evidence for tumor populating progenitor cells has been found in a variety of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four of eight human neuroblastoma cell lines formed tumorspheres in neural stem cell media, and all contained some cells that expressed neurogenic stem cell markers including CD133, ABCG2, and nestin. Three lines tested could be induced into multi-lineage differentiation. LA-N-5 spheres were further studied and showed a verapamil-sensitive side population, relative resistance to doxorubicin, and CD133+ cells showed increased sphere formation and tumorigenicity. Oncolytic viruses, engineered to be clinically safe by genetic mutation, are emerging as next generation anticancer therapeutics. Because oncolytic viruses circumvent typical drug-resistance mechanisms, they may represent an effective therapy for chemotherapy-resistant tumor initiating cells. A Nestin-targeted oncolytic herpes simplex virus efficiently replicated within and killed neuroblastoma tumor initiating cells preventing their ability to form tumors in athymic nude mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that human neuroblastoma contains tumor initiating cells that may be effectively targeted by an oncolytic virus.

  19. Dendritic cell targeting vaccine for HPV-associated cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenjie; Duluc, Dorothée; Joo, HyeMee; Oh, SangKon

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen presenting cells that can efficiently prime and activate cellular immune responses. Delivering antigens to in vivo DCs has thus been considered as a promising strategy that could allow us to mount T cell-mediated therapeutic immunity against cancers in patients. Successful development of such types of cancer vaccines that can target in vivo DCs, however, requires a series of outstanding questions that need to be addressed. These include the proper selection of which DC surface receptors, specific DC subsets and DC activators that can further enhance the efficacy of vaccines by promoting effector T cell infiltration and retention in tumors and their actions against tumors. Supplementing these areas of research with additional strategies that can counteract tumor immune evasion mechanisms is also expected to enhance the efficacy of such therapeutic vaccines against cancers. After more than a decade of study, we have concluded that antigen targeting to DCs via CD40 to evoke cellular responses is more efficient than targeting antigens to the same types of DCs via eleven other DC surface receptors tested. In recent work, we have further demonstrated that a prototype vaccine (anti-CD40-HPV16.E6/7, a recombinant fusion protein of anti-human CD40 and HPV16.E6/7 protein) for HPV16-associated cancers can efficiently activate HPV16.E6/7-specific T cells, particularly CD8+ T cells, from the blood of HPV16+ head-and-neck cancer patients. Moreover, anti-CD40-HPV16.E6/7 plus poly(I:C) can mount potent therapeutic immunity against TC-1 tumor expressing HPV16.E6/7 protein in human CD40 transgenic mice. In this manuscript, we thus highlight our recent findings for the development of novel CD40 targeting immunotherapeutic vaccines for HPV16-associated malignancies. In addition, we further discuss several of key questions that still remain to be addressed for enhancing therapeutic immunity elicited by our prototype vaccine against HPV16

  20. Bacterial cell division as a target for new antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, Peter; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial resistance to currently applied antibiotics complicates the treatment of infections and demands the evaluation of new strategies to counteract multidrug-resistant bacteria. In recent years, the inhibition of the bacterial divisome, mainly by targeting the central cell division mediator FtsZ, has been recognized as a promising strategy for antibiotic attack. New antibiotics were shown to either interfere with the natural dynamics and functions of FtsZ during the cell cycle or to activate a bacterial protease to degrade FtsZ and thus bring about bacterial death in a suicidal manner. Their efficacy in animal models of infection together with resistance-breaking properties prove the potential of such drugs and validate the inhibition of bacterial cell division as an attractive approach for antibiotic intervention.

  1. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  2. A three-dimensional organotypic assay to measure target cell killing by cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weigelin, B.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) mediate antigen- and cell-cell contact dependent killing of target cells, such as cancer cells and virus-infected cells. In vivo, this process requires the active migration of CTL towards and away from target cells. We here describe an organotypic 3D collagen matrix

  3. Targeting cancer stem cells by using the nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong IS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In-Sun Hong,1,2,* Gyu-Beom Jang,1,2,* Hwa-Yong Lee,3 Jeong-Seok Nam1,2 1Laboratory of Tumor Suppressor, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, 3The Faculty of Liberal Arts, Jungwon University, Chungbuk, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs have been shown to be markedly resistant to conventional cancer treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that selectively target CSCs will ultimately lead to better cancer treatments. Currently, accessible conventional therapeutic agents mainly eliminate the bulk tumor but do not eliminate CSCs. Therefore, the discovery and improvement of CSC-targeting therapeutic agents are necessary. Nanoparticles effectively inhibit multiple types of CSCs by targeting specific signaling pathways (Wnt/ß-catenin, Notch, transforming growth factor-ß, and hedgehog signaling and/or specific markers (aldehyde dehydrogenases, CD44, CD90, and CD133 critically involved in CSC function and maintenance. In this review article, we summarized a number of findings to provide current information about their therapeutic potential of nanoparticles in various cancer cell types and CSCs. Keywords: ALDH, Wnt/ß-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch, TGF-ß signaling, CD44, CD133

  4. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases.

  5. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Departement de Neurologie, CHU de Caen (France); Marteau, Lena [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Bernaudin, Jean-Francois [Service d' Histologie-Biologie Tumorale, ER2UPMC, Universite Paris 6, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Roussel, Simon [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, CHU de Caen (France); Bernaudin, Myriam [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Petit, Edwige, E-mail: epetit@cyceron.fr [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France)

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  6. Suppressor T cells - a sensitive target of lead toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambach, A.; Stiller-Winkler, R.; Oberbarnscheidt, J.; Ewers, J.

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed to investigate the effect of chronic low level lead exposure on the regulatory functions of T cells in the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in mice. Female mice were exposed to lead (as lead acetate) in the diet at 545 (group 1) and 2180 ppm (group 2) for 10 weeks. Lead exposure resulting in blood lead levels (PbB) of about 50 ..mu..g/100 g (group 1) produced a substantial increase of the number of IgG antibodies secreting spleen cells on days 3 and 4 after challenge. At the higher exposure level (group 2; PbB 60-80 ..mu..g/100 g) a suppression of the number of IgG plaque forming cells was observed. The IgM response was much smaller than the IgG response. Although differences between the group means were small, the results indicate that there also is an enhancement of the IgM response in the lower dosage group on days 3 and 4. In a second experiment the effect of in vivo lead exposure on antigenic competition was examined. Lead substantially reduced the effect of antigenic competition. Results of both experiments suggest that suppressor T cells rather than helper T cells may represent the primary target for lead. Throughout this study serum complement C3 levels were determined. Complement C3 levels tended to be reduced in the lead exposed groups before as well as after inocculation with SRBC. (orig.*.

  7. Suppressor T cells - a sensitive target of lead toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambach, A.; Stiller-Winkler, R.; Oberbarnscheidt, J.; Ewers, U.

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed to investigate the effect of chronic low level lead exposure on the regulatory functions of T cells in the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in mice. Female mice were exposed to lead (as lead acetate) in the diet at 545 (group 1) and 2180 ppm (group 2) for 10 weeks. Lead exposure resulting in blood lead levels (PbB) of about 50 ..mu..g/100 g (group 1) produced a substantial increase of the number of IgG antibodies secreting spleen cells on days 3 and 4 after challenge. At the higher exposure level (group 2; PbB 60-80 ..mu..m/100 g) a suppression of the number of IgG plawue forming cells was observed. The IgM response was much smaller than the IgG response. Although differences between the group means were small, the results indicate that there also is an enhancement of the IgM response in the lower dosage group on days 3 and 4. In a second experiment the effect of in vivo lead exposure on antigenic competition was examined. Lead substantially reduced the effect of antigenic competition. Results of both experiments suggest that suppressor T cells rather than helper T cells may represent the primary target for lead. Throughout this study serum complement C3 levels were determined. Complement C3 levels tended to be reduced in the lead exposed groups before as well as after inocculation with SRBC.

  8. Cell-permeable nanobodies for targeted immunolabelling and antigen manipulation in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herce, Henry D.; Schumacher, Dominik; Schneider, Anselm F. L.; Ludwig, Anne K.; Mann, Florian A.; Fillies, Marion; Kasper, Marc-André; Reinke, Stefan; Krause, Eberhard; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2017-08-01

    Functional antibody delivery in living cells would enable the labelling and manipulation of intracellular antigens, which constitutes a long-thought goal in cell biology and medicine. Here we present a modular strategy to create functional cell-permeable nanobodies capable of targeted labelling and manipulation of intracellular antigens in living cells. The cell-permeable nanobodies are formed by the site-specific attachment of intracellularly stable (or cleavable) cyclic arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides to camelid-derived single-chain VHH antibody fragments. We used this strategy for the non-endocytic delivery of two recombinant nanobodies into living cells, which enabled the relocalization of the polymerase clamp PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and tumour suppressor p53 to the nucleolus, and thereby allowed the detection of protein-protein interactions that involve these two proteins in living cells. Furthermore, cell-permeable nanobodies permitted the co-transport of therapeutically relevant proteins, such as Mecp2, into the cells. This technology constitutes a major step in the labelling, delivery and targeted manipulation of intracellular antigens. Ultimately, this approach opens the door towards immunostaining in living cells and the expansion of immunotherapies to intracellular antigen targets.

  9. Targeting proliferating cell nuclear antigen and its protein interactions induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekka Müller

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM. Thus inhibiting PCNA's protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells' sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment.

  10. Advanced cell therapies: targeting, tracking and actuation of cells with magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John J; Patrick, P Stephen; Yu, Yichao; Lythgoe, Mark F; Kalber, Tammy L

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine would greatly benefit from a new platform technology that enabled measurable, controllable and targeting of stem cells to a site of disease or injury in the body. Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles offer attractive possibilities in biomedicine and can be incorporated into cells, affording a safe and reliable means of tagging. This review describes three current and emerging methods to enhance regenerative medicine using magnetic particles to guide therapeutic cells to a target organ; track the cells using MRI and assess their spatial localization with high precision and influence the behavior of the cell using magnetic actuation. This approach is complementary to the systemic injection of cell therapies, thus expanding the horizon of stem cell therapeutics.

  11. Roles of export genes cgmA and lysE for the production of L-arginine and L-citrulline by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Dorit; Jorge, João M P; Pérez-García, Fernando; Taniguchi, Hironori; Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-10-01

    L-arginine is a semi-essential amino acid with application in cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and food industries. Metabolic engineering strategies have been applied for overproduction of L-arginine by Corynebacterium glutamicum. LysE was the only known L-arginine exporter of this bacterium. However, an L-arginine-producing strain carrying a deletion of lysE still accumulated about 10 mM L-arginine in the growth medium. Overexpression of the putative putrescine and cadaverine export permease gene cgmA was shown to compensate for the lack of lysE with regard to L-arginine export. Moreover, plasmid-borne overexpression of cgmA rescued the toxic effect caused by feeding of the dipeptide Arg-Ala to lysE-deficient C. glutamicum and argO-deficient Escherichia coli strains. Deletion of the repressor gene cgmR improved L-arginine titers by 5 %. Production of L-lysine and L-citrulline was not affected by cgmA overexpression. Taken together, CgmA may function as an export system not only for the diamine putrescine and cadaverine but also for L-arginine. The major export system for L-lysine and L-arginine LysE may also play a role in L-citrulline export since production of L-citrulline was reduced when lysE was deleted and improved by 45 % when lysE was overproduced.

  12. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  13. CatacLysMic specificity when targeting myeloid cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Thomas; Prinz, Marco

    2016-06-01

    The antibacterial enzyme lysozyme M (LysM) encoded by the Lyz2 gene is broadly expressed in myeloblasts, macrophages, and neutrophils, and thus has been used for a long time as a cell-specific marker for myeloid cells in mice. In order to delete loxP-site flanked genes in myeloid cells, a Cre-recombinase (Cre) expressing mouse line was created by inserting Cre-coding sequence into the translational start site of the LysM gene. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology [2016. 46: 1529-1532], Orthgiess et al. verify, with the help of tdTomato and YFP reporter mouse lines, LysM-driven recombination. Unexpectedly, the authors also describe major expression of the tdTomato reporter protein in brain neurons of the central nervous system (CNS), with only a very small percentage of gene recombination in myeloid cells of the brain, called microglia. These findings cause justified concerns regarding the efficient and specific targeting of microglia and peripheral myeloid cells using LysM-Cre mice and should stimulate thoughts on conclusions drawn from past experiments on the diseased CNS employing this Cre/loxP-deleter line. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous....... This review describes and discusses the current status of the application of gene therapy in relation to SCLC Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...... DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA...

  15. Mannosylated biodegradable polyethyleneimine for targeted DNA delivery to dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun X

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Xun Sun, Simu Chen, Jianfeng Han, Zhirong ZhangKey Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: To establish a potential gene-delivery system with the ability to deliver plasmid DNA to dendritic cells (DCs more efficiently and specifically, we designed and synthesized a low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine and triethyleneglycol polymer (PEI–TEG and a series of its mannosylated derivatives.Methods: PEI–TEG was synthesized from PEI2000 and PEI600 with TEG as the cross-linker. PEI–TEG was then linked to mannose via a phenylisothiocyanate bridge to obtain man-PEI–TEG conjugates. The DNA conveyance abilities of PEI–TEG, man-PEI–TEG, as well as control PEI25k were evaluated by measuring their zeta potential, particle size, and DNA-binding abilities. The in vitro cytotoxicity, cell uptake, and transfection efficiency of these PEI/DNA complexes were examined on the DC2.4 cell line. Finally, a maturation experiment evaluated the effect of costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86 on murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs using flow cytometry.Results: PEI–TEG and man-PEI–TEG were successfully synthesized and were shown to retain the excellent properties of PEI25k for condensing DNA. Compared with PEI–TEG as well as PEI25k, the man-PEI–TEG had less cytotoxicity and performed better in both cellular uptake and transfection assays in vitro. The results of the maturation experiment showed that all the PEI/DNA complexes induced an adequate upregulation of surface markers for DC maturation.Conclusion: These results demonstrated that man-PEI–TEG can be employed as a DC-targeting gene-delivery system.Keywords: dendritic cells, DCs, mannose, polyethyleneimine, PEI, gene delivery

  16. Testicular cell junction: a novel target for male contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nikki P Y; Wong, Elissa W P; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-01-01

    Even though various contraceptive methods are widely available, the number of unwanted pregnancies is still on the rise in developing countries, pressurizing the already resource limited nations. One of the major underlying reasons is the lack of effective, low cost, and safe contraceptives for couples. During the past decade, some studies were performed using animal models to decipher if the Sertoli-germ cell junction in the testis is a target for male fertility regulation. Some of these study models were based on the use of hormones and/or chemicals to disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis (e.g., androgen-based implants or pills) and others utilized a panel of chemical entities or synthetic peptides to perturb spermatogenesis either reversibly or non-reversibly. Among them, adjudin, a potential male contraceptive, is one of the compounds exerting its action on the unique adherens junctions, known as ectoplasmic specializations, in the testis. Since the testis is equipped with inter-connected cell junctions, an initial targeting of one junction type may affect the others and these accumulative effects could lead to spermatogenic arrest. This review attempts to cover an innovative theme on how male infertility can be achieved by inducing junction instability and defects in the testis, opening a new window of research for male contraceptive development. While it will still take much time and effort of intensive investigation before a product can reach the consumable market, these findings have provided hope for better family planning involving men.

  17. Dendritic Cells as a Pharmacological Target of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Chen; Lu Yang; O. M. Zack Howard; Joost J. Oppenheim

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a central role in the initiation and regulation of immune responses. There is considerable evidence that DCs can be used as therapeutic targets for pharmacological modulation of immune responses. Traditional Chines emedicine (TCM) has a long-standing history of using herbal medicine in the treatment of variety of human diseases.Many of the clinical effects of TCM have reportedly been attributed to the up- or down-regulation of immune responses. Accumulating evidence indicates that TCM and its components can interfere with immune responses at the earliest stage by targeting key functions of DCs. Here, we review those published studies of TCM with respect to their effects on immunobiological functions of DCs. Investigations based on both chemical entities derived from TCM as well as TCM herbal mixtures are presented. These studies suggest that various TCM herbal medicines have the capacity to inhibit or promote major functions of DCs, such as differentiation, maturation, cytokine production, survival, antigen uptake and presentation as well as trafficking. These studies have revealed novel biological effects of TCM and documented the utility of this approach to discover novel biological modifier of DC functions derived from natural sources.

  18. Modulating cancer cell survival by targeting intracellular cholesterol transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Omer F; Gowda, Raghavendra; Noory, Mohammad A; Robertson, Gavin P

    2017-08-08

    Demand for cholesterol is high in certain cancers making them potentially sensitive to therapeutic strategies targeting cellular cholesterol homoeostasis. A potential approach involves disruption of intracellular cholesterol transport, which occurs in Niemann-Pick disease as a result of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) deficiency. Hence, a class of lysosomotropic compounds that were identified as functional ASM inhibitors (FIASMAs) might exhibit chemotherapeutic activity by disrupting cancer cell cholesterol homoeostasis. Here, the chemotherapeutic utility of ASM inhibition was investigated. The effect of FIASMAs on intracellular cholesterol levels, cholesterol homoeostasis, cellular endocytosis and signalling cascades were investigated. The in vivo efficacy of ASM inhibition was demonstrated using melanoma xenografts and a nanoparticle formulation was developed to overcome dose-limiting CNS-associated side effects of certain FIASMAs. Functional ASM inhibitors inhibited intracellular cholesterol transport leading to disruption of autophagic flux, cellular endocytosis and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Consequently, major oncogenic signalling cascades on which cancer cells were reliant for survival were inhibited. Two tested ASM inhibitors, perphenazine and fluphenazine that are also clinically used as antipsychotics, were effective in inhibiting xenografted tumour growth. Nanoliposomal encapsulation of the perphenazine enhanced its chemotherapeutic efficacy while decreasing CNS-associated side effects. This study suggests that disruption of intracellular cholesterol transport by targeting ASM could be utilised as a potential chemotherapeutic approach for treating cancer.

  19. Salinomycin as a Drug for Targeting Human Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord Naujokat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a subpopulation of tumor cells that possess self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity and the ability to give rise to the heterogenous lineages of malignant cells that comprise a tumor. CSCs possess multiple intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, novel tumor-targeted drugs, and radiation therapy, allowing them to survive standard cancer therapies and to initiate tumor recurrence and metastasis. Various molecular complexes and pathways that confer resistance and survival of CSCs, including expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC drug transporters, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways, and acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, have been identified recently. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces albus, has been shown to kill CSCs in different types of human cancers, most likely by interfering with ABC drug transporters, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and other CSC pathways. Promising results from preclinical trials in human xenograft mice and a few clinical pilote studies reveal that salinomycin is able to effectively eliminate CSCs and to induce partial clinical regression of heavily pretreated and therapy-resistant cancers. The ability of salinomycin to kill both CSCs and therapy-resistant cancer cells may define the compound as a novel and an effective anticancer drug.

  20. Primary targets in photochemical inactivation of cells in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kristian; Jones, Stuart G.; Prydz, Kristian; Moan, Johan

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms of photoinactivation of NHIK 3025 cells in culture sensitized by tetrasulfonated phenylporphines (TPPS4) are described). Ultracentrifugation studies on postnuclear supernatants indicated that the intracellular distribution of TPPS4 resembles that of (beta) -N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase ((beta) -AGA), a lysosomal marker enzyme, and that the cytosolic content of TPPS4 is below the detection limit of the ultracentrifugation method. Upon light exposure more than 90% of TPPS4 was lost from the lysosomal fractions, due to lysosomal rupture. The content of TPPS4 in the postnuclear supernatants was reduced by 30 - 40% upon exposure to light. This is most likely due to binding of TPPS4 to the nuclei, which were removed from the cell extracts before ultracentrifugation, after photochemical treatment. The unpolymerized form of tubulin seems to be an important target for the photochemical inactivation of NHIK 3025 cells. Since TPPS4 is mainly localized in lysosomes it was assumed that a dose of light disrupting a substantial number of lysosomes followed by microtubule depolymerization by nocodazole would enhance the sensitivity of the cells to photoinactivation. This was confirmed by using a colony-forming assay. The increased phototoxic effect exerted by such a treatment regime could be explained by an enhanced sensitivity of tubulin to light. Another cytosolic constituent, lactate dehydrogenase, was not photoinactivated by TPPS4 and light.

  1. Effects of small interfering RNAs targeting fascin on human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Jose

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fascin induces membrane protrusions and cell motility. Fascin overexpression was associated with poor prognosis, and its downregulation reduces cell motility and invasiveness in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Using a stable knockdown cell line, we revealed the effect of fascin on cell growth, cell adhesion and tumor formation. Methods We examined whether fascin is a potential target in ESCC using in vitro and in vivo studies utilizing a specific siRNA. We established a stable transfectant with downregulated fascin from KYSE170 cell line. Results The fascin downregulated cell lines showed a slower growth pattern by 40.3% (p In vivo, the tumor size was significantly smaller in the tumor with fascin knockdown cells than in mock cells by 95% at 30 days after inoculation. Conclusions These findings suggest that fascin overexpression plays a role in tumor growth and progression in ESCC and that cell death caused by its downregulation might be induced by cell adhesion loss. This indicates that targeting fascin pathway could be a novel therapeutic strategy for the human ESCC.

  2. Neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with renal cell carcinoma

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    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoreductive nephrectomy as an independent option in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cannot be considered as the only effective method, with rare exception, of a few patients with solitary metastases. Cytoreductive nephrectomy is now part of a multimodal approach encompassing surgical treatment and systemic drug therapy. Many retrospective and two prospective studies have demonstrated that it is expedient to perform cytoreductive nephrectomy. Immunotherapy should not be used as preoperatively in the era of cytokine therapy for mRCC due to that fact that it has no impact on primary tumor. In the current targeted therapy era, many investigators have concentrated attentionon the role of neoadjuvant targeted therapy for the treatment of patients with both localized and locally advanced mRCC. The potential benefits of neoadjuvant therapy for localized and locally advanced RCC include to make surgery easier and to increase the possibility of organsparing treatment, by decreasing the stage of primary tumor and the size of tumors. The possible potential advantages of neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with mRCC include prompt initiation of necessary systemic therapy; identification of patients with primary refractory tumors; and a preoperative reduction in the stage of primary tumor. Numerous retrospective and some prospective phase II studies have shown that neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with localized and locally advanced RCC is possible and tolerable and surgical treatment after neoadjuvant targeted therapy is safe and executable with a low incidence of complications. If neoadjuvant therapy is to be performed, it should be done within 2–4 months before surgery. Sorafenib and sunitinib are now most tested and suitable for neoadjuvant targeted therapy. Sorafenib is a more preferred drug due to its shorter half-life and accordingly to the possibility of discontinuing the drug immediately prior to

  3. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudás, József, E-mail: jozsef.dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullár, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Romani, Angela, E-mail: angela.romani@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pritz, Christian, E-mail: christian.pritz@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Hans Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: volker.schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mathias Sprinzl, Georg, E-mail: georg.sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  4. CD8+ lymphocytes that kill allogeneic and xenogeneic major histocompatibility complex class I targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, J S; Splitter, G A

    1995-09-01

    CD8+ CTLs generated in a two-way MLR should lyse target cells only if these targets share a class I MHC allele with the original stimulators. Using cattle PBMCs in a two-way MLR, we generated CD8+ CTLs that kill allogeneic and xenogeneic cell lines. We have named these cells MLK cells. PBMCs isolated from two unrelated animals were cultured together. After 14 days microfluorimetry analysis was performed on the MLK cells with results showing > 90% CD8+ cells. RFLP analysis revealed these cells to be predominately of one animal. MLK cells were then used as effector cells in cytotoxicity assays with syngeneic, allogeneic, and xenogeneic target cells. MLK cells were able to kill all targets. Incubating MLK cells with mAbs to CD8 markedly reduced killing, suggesting a TCR-mediated cytolytic pathway. Effective cytolysis of these targets by MLK cells was dependent on class I expression. MHC class I expression-impaired mutants of allogeneic and xenogeneic targets were not susceptible to cytolysis. Comparisons to LAK cells revealed similarities in phenotype and function to the NK1.1-, CD8+ subset.

  5. Central nervous system myeloid cells as drug targets: current status and translational challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, Knut; Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Erik; Prinz, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), which include parenchymal microglia, macrophages at CNS interfaces and monocytes recruited from the circulation during disease, are increasingly being recognized as targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological and psychiatric diseases. The origin of these cells in the immune system distinguishes them from ectodermal neurons and other glia and endows them with potential drug targets distinct from classical CNS target groups. However, despite the identification of several promising therapeutic approaches and molecular targets, no agents directly targeting these cells are currently available. Here, we assess strategies for targeting CNS myeloid cells and address key issues associated with their translation into the clinic.

  6. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Janice; Hall, Robert R; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-11-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis-all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting.

  7. BABY BOOM target genes provide diverse entry points into cell proliferation and cell growth pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarinho, Paul; Ketelaar, Tijs; Xing, Meiqing; van Arkel, Jeroen; Maliepaard, Chris; Hendriks, Mieke Weemen; Joosen, Ronny; Lammers, Michiel; Herdies, Lydia; den Boer, Bart; van der Geest, Lonneke; Boutilier, Kim

    2008-10-01

    Ectopic expression of the Brassica napus BABY BOOM (BBM) AP2/ERF transcription factor is sufficient to induce spontaneous cell proliferation leading primarily to somatic embryogenesis, but also to organogenesis and callus formation. We used DNA microarray analysis in combination with a post-translationally regulated BBM:GR protein and cycloheximide to identify target genes that are directly activated by BBM expression in Arabidopsis seedlings. We show that BBM activated the expression of a largely uncharacterized set of genes encoding proteins with potential roles in transcription, cellular signaling, cell wall biosynthesis and targeted protein turnover. A number of the target genes have been shown to be expressed in meristems or to be involved in cell wall modifications associated with dividing/growing cells. One of the BBM target genes encodes an ADF/cofilin protein, ACTIN DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR9 (ADF9). The consequences of BBM:GR activation on the actin cytoskeleton were followed using the GFP:FIMBRIN ACTIN BINDING DOMAIN2 (GFP:FABD) actin marker. Dexamethasone-mediated BBM:GR activation induced dramatic changes in actin organization resulting in the formation of dense actin networks with high turnover rates, a phenotype that is consistent with cells that are rapidly undergoing cytoplasmic reorganization. Together the data suggest that the BBM transcription factor activates a complex network of developmental pathways associated with cell proliferation and growth.

  8. Targeting of the WT191-138 fragment to human dendritic cells improves leukemia-specific T-cell responses providing an alternative approach to WT1-based vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagvadorj, Nergui; Deuretzbacher, Anne; Weisenberger, Daniela; Baumeister, Elke; Trebing, Johannes; Lang, Isabell; Köchel, Carolin; Kapp, Markus; Kapp, Kerstin; Beilhack, Andreas; Hünig, Thomas; Einsele, Hermann; Wajant, Harald; Grigoleit, Götz Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    Due to its immunogenicity and overexpression concomitant with leukemia progression, Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1) is of particular interest for immunotherapy of AML relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). So far, WT1-specific T-cell responses have mainly been induced by vaccination with peptides presented by certain HLA alleles. However, this approach is still not widely applicable in clinical practice due to common limitations of HLA restriction. Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines electroporated with mRNA encoding full-length protein have also been tested for generating WT1-derived peptides for presentation to T-cells. Alternatively, an efficient and broad WT1 peptide presentation could be elicited by triggering receptor-mediated protein endocytosis of DCs. Therefore, we developed antibody fusion proteins consisting of an antibody specific for the DEC205 endocytic receptor on human DCs and various fragments of WT1 as DC-targeting recombinant WT1 vaccines (anti-hDEC205-WT1). Of all anti-hDEC205-WT1 fusion proteins designed for overcoming insufficient expression, anti-hDEC205-WT110-35, anti-hDEC205-WT191-138, anti-hDEC205-WT1223-273, and anti-hDEC205-WT1324-371 were identified in good yields. The anti-hDEC205-WT191-138 was capable of directly inducing ex vivo T-cell responses by co-incubation of the fusion protein-loaded monocyte-derived mature DCs and autologous T-cells of either healthy or HSCT individuals. Furthermore, the DC-targeted WT191-138-induced specific T-cells showed a strong cytotoxic activity by lysing WT1-overexpressing THP-1 leukemia cells in vitro while sparing WT1-negative hematopoietic cells. In conclusion, our approach identifies four WT1 peptide-antibody fusion proteins with sufficient production and introduces an alternative vaccine that could be easily translated into clinical practice to improve WT1-directed antileukemia immune responses after allo-HSCT.

  9. Immunotherapeutic targeting of shared melanoma-associated antigens in a murine glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Robert M; Odesa, Sylvia K; Liau, Linda M

    2003-12-01

    Immune-based treatments for central nervous system gliomas have traditionally lagged behind those of more immunogenic tumors such as melanoma. The relative paucity of defined glioma-associated antigens that can be targeted by the immune system may partially account for this situation. Antigens present on melanomas have been extensively characterized, both in humans and in murine preclinical models. Melanocytes and astrocytes are both derived embryologically from the neural ectoderm. Their neoplastic counterparts, malignant melanomas and gliomas, have been shown in humans to share common antigens at the RNA level. However, little is known concerning whether gliomas can be targeted by immune-based strategies that prime T cells to epitopes from melanoma-associated antigens (MAAs). In this study, we provide evidence that two common murine glioma cell lines (GL26 and GL261) express the melanoma antigens gp100 and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2). To understand the immunogenicity of murine gliomas to CD8(+) T cells, we examined the ability of a MAA-specific CTL cell line to lyse the glioma cells, as well as the in vivo expansion of MAA-specific CD8(+) T cells in animals harboring gliomas. Both glioma cell lines were lysed by a human gp100-specific CTL cell line in vitro. Mice harboring s.c. GL26 gliomas possessed TRP-2-specific CD8(+) T cells, providing further evidence that these gliomas express the protein products in the context of MHC class I. Furthermore, MAA peptide-pulsed dendritic cells could prime T cells that specifically recognize GL26 glioma cells in vitro. Lastly, mice that were prevaccinated with human gp100 and TRP-2 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells had significantly extended survival when challenged with tumor cells in the brain, resulting in >50% long-term survival. These results suggest that shared MAAs on gliomas can be targeted immunotherapeutically, pointing the way to a new potential treatment option for patients with malignant gliomas.

  10. RNA interference targeting raptor inhibits proliferation of gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Lee, Chung Wa [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Cho, Chi Hin [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Francis Ka Leung [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Yu, Jun, E-mail: junyu@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu, E-mail: joesung@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2011-06-10

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is dysregulated in gastric cancer. The biologic function of mTORC1 in gastric carcinogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that disruption of mTORC1 function by RNA interference-mediated downregulation of raptor substantially inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. The anti-proliferative effect was accompanied by concomitant downregulation of activator protein-1 and upregulation of Smad2/3 transcriptional activities. In addition, the expression of cyclin D{sub 3} and p21{sup Waf1}, which stabilizes cyclin D/cdk4 complex for G{sub 1}-S transition, was reduced by raptor knockdown. In conclusion, disruption of mTORC1 inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation through multiple pathways. This discovery may have an implication in the application of mTORC1-directed therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  11. Rare earth fluorescent nanoparticles for specific cancer cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanakis, Dimitrios; Ghanotakis, Demetrios F.

    2016-07-01

    Terbium layered hydroxide nanoparticles (Tb2(OH)5NO3) were synthesized by a one-pot coprecipitation method. The characterization of this preparation revealed highly oriented fluorescent nanoparticles. An attempt to improve the properties of Tb2(OH)5NO3 resulted in the preparation of two optimized nanoparticles. In particular, Tb2(OH)5NO3:Eu and Tb2(OH)5NO3-FA were prepared when Tb2(OH)5NO3 was doped with Europium and when the surface was modified with folic acid (FA), respectively. The size of the above nanoparticles was below 100 nm, and thus they have the potential to be used for biomedical applications. The interaction of nanoparticles with human cells was studied using confocal microscopy. This study revealed that only the nanoparticles modified with folic acid have the ability to be targeted to HeLa cells. This specific identification of cancer cells, in combination with the fluorescent properties of Tb2(OH)5NO3, could render these nanoparticles appropriate for biomedical applications.

  12. Cancer stem cell as therapeutic target for melanoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamodi, Abdulhadi A; Eshaq, Abdulaziz M; Hassan, Sofie-Yasmin; Al Hmada, Youssef; El Jamal, Siraj M; Fothan, Ahmed M; Arain, Omair M; Hassan, Sarah-Lilly; Haikel, Youssef; Megahed, Mosaad; Hassan, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    Human malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive skin tumor that is characterized by its extraordinary heterogeneity, propensity for dissemination to distant organs and resistance to cytotoxic agents. Although chemo- and immune-based therapies have been evaluated in clinical trials, most of these therapeutics do not show significant benefit for patients with advanced disease. Treatment failure in melanoma patients is attributed mainly to the development of tumor heterogeneity resulting from the formation of genetically divergent subpopulations. These subpopulations are composed of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) as a small fraction and non-cancer stem cells that form the majority of the tumor mass. In recent years, CSCs gained more attention and suggested as valuable experimental model system for tumor study. In melanoma, intratumoral heterogeneity, progression and drug resistance result from the unique characteristics of melanoma stem cells (MSCs). These MSCs are characterized by their distinct protein signature and tumor growth-driving pathways, whose activation is mediated by driver mutation-dependent signal. The molecular features of MSCs are either in a causal or consequential relationship to melanoma progression, drug resistance and relapse. Here, we review the current scientific evidence that supports CSC hypothesis and the validity of MSCs-dependent pathways and their key molecules as potential therapeutic target for melanoma treatment.

  13. Isocitrate lyase localisation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, R S; Herrero, P; Ordiz, I; Angeles del Brio, M; Moreno, F

    1997-10-01

    The isocitrate lyase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was only located in the cell cytoplasm. This protein was found not to be associated with cell organelles, even under growth conditions that induce peroxisome proliferation. This conclusion is supported by experiments carried out by damaging the protoplast plasma membrane with DEAE-dextran, by differential centrifugation of osmotically lysed protoplast and by using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria as a reporter fusion tag to localise the subcellular compartment to which isocitrate lyase is targeted.

  14. Retinal Targets ALDH Positive Cancer Stem Cell and Alters the Phenotype of Highly Metastatic Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH is a cancer stem cell marker. Retinoic acid has antitumor properties, including the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. Retinal, the precursor of retinoic acid, can be oxidized to retinoic acid by dehydrogenases, including ALDH. We hypothesized that retinal could potentially be transformed to retinoic acid with higher efficiency by cancer stem cells, due to the higher ALDH activity. We previously observed that ALDH activity is greater in highly metastatic K7M2 osteosarcoma (OS cells than in nonmetastatic K12 OS cells. We also demonstrated that ALDH activity correlates with clinical metastases in bone sarcoma patients, suggesting that ALDH may be a therapeutic target specific to cells with high metastatic potential. Our current results demonstrated that retinal preferentially affected the phenotypes of ALDH-high K7M2 cells in contrast to ALDH-low K12 cells, which could be mediated by the more efficient transformation of retinal to retinoic acid by ALDH in K7M2 cells. Retinal treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 cells decreased their proliferation, invasion capacity, and resistance to oxidative stress. Retinal altered the expression of metastasis-related genes. These observations indicate that retinal may be used to specifically target metastatic cancer stem cells in OS.

  15. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  16. T-cell Metabolism as a Target to Control Autoreactive T Cells in β-Cell Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordignon, Carlotta; Canu, Adriana; Dyczko, Aleksandra; Leone, Serena; Monti, Paolo

    2017-05-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that bio-energetic metabolism of activated T cells is a potential target to control the autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes (T1D). T-cell activation and proliferation is linked to the cell capacity to provide sufficient energy and biosynthesis molecules to support T-cell growth and division. This makes T cells susceptible to metabolic inhibition for the control of the T-cell response. There is a wide therapeutic arsenal of metabolic inhibitors, including novel classes of drugs that have become recently available. With the current knowledge and availability of metabolic inhibitors, we are now in the position to design a metabolic inhibition strategy to determine whether targeting of autoreactive T cells is an effective strategy to control the process of β-cell destruction in T1D.

  17. Host Cell Factors as Antiviral Targets in Arenavirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa B. Damonte

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection.

  18. Host cell factors as antiviral targets in arenavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linero, Florencia N; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Giovannoni, Federico; Castilla, Viviana; García, Cybele C; Scolaro, Luis A; Damonte, Elsa B

    2012-09-01

    Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF) in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection.

  19. Functional RNA delivery targeted to dendritic cells by synthetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Kenneth C; Bassi, Isabelle; Démoulins, Thomas; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa J; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential to many aspects of immune defense development and regulation. They provide important targets for prophylactic and therapeutic delivery. While protein delivery has had considerable success, RNA delivery is still expanding. Delivering RNA molecules for RNAi has shown particular success and there are reports on successful delivery of mRNA. Central, therein, is the application of cationic entities. Following endocytosis of the delivery vehicle for the RNA, cationic entities should promote vesicular membrane perturbation, facilitating cytosolic release. The present review explains the diversity of DC function in immune response development and control. Promotion of delivered RNA cytosolic release is discussed, relating to immunoprophylactic and therapeutic potential, and DC endocytic machinery is reviewed, showing how DC endocytic pathways influence the handling of internalized material. The potential advantages for application of replicating RNA are presented and discussed, in consideration of their value and development in the near future.

  20. Targeting stromal glutamine synthetase in tumors disrupts tumor microenvironment-regulated cancer cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive stromal cells are an integral part of tumor microenvironment (TME) and interact with cancer cells to regulate their growth. Although targeting stromal cells could be a viable therapy to regulate the communication between TME and cancer cells, identification of stromal targets that make canc...

  1. Engineering targeted chromosomal amplifications in human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Simeon; Yi, Kyung H; Park, Jeenah; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Price, Amanda J; Lauring, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Chromosomal amplifications are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers. However, experimental systems to study the processes that lead to specific, recurrent amplification events in human cancers are lacking. Moreover, some common amplifications, such as that at 8p11-12 in breast cancer, harbor multiple driver oncogenes, which are poorly modeled by conventional overexpression approaches. We sought to develop an experimental system to model recurrent chromosomal amplification events in human cell lines. Our strategy is to use homologous-recombination-mediated gene targeting to deliver a dominantly selectable, amplifiable marker to a specified chromosomal location. We used adeno-associated virus vectors to target human MCF-7 breast cancer cells at the ZNF703 locus, in the recurrent 8p11-12 amplicon, using the E. coli inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) enzyme as a marker. We applied selective pressure using IMPDH inhibitors. Surviving clones were found to have increased copy number of ZNF703 (average 2.5-fold increase) by droplet digital PCR and FISH. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization confirmed that amplifications had occurred on the short arm of chromosome 8, without changes on 8q or other chromosomes. Patterns of amplification were variable and similar to those seen in primary human breast cancers, including "sawtooth" patterns, distal copy number loss, and large continuous regions of copy number gain. This system will allow study of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are permissive for chromosomal amplification and provide a model to analyze oncogene cooperativity in amplifications harboring multiple candidate driver genes.

  2. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines.

  3. RNA interference targets arbovirus replication in Culicoides cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Esther; Ratinier, Maxime; Watson, Mick; Shaw, Andrew E; McFarlane, Melanie; Varela, Mariana; Elliott, Richard M; Palmarini, Massimo; Kohl, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted to vertebrate hosts by biting arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, and midges. These viruses replicate in both arthropods and vertebrates and are thus exposed to different antiviral responses in these organisms. RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific RNA degradation mechanism that has been shown to play a major role in the antiviral response against arboviruses in mosquitoes. Culicoides midges are important vectors of arboviruses, known to transmit pathogens of humans and livestock such as bluetongue virus (BTV) (Reoviridae), Oropouche virus (Bunyaviridae), and likely the recently discovered Schmallenberg virus (Bunyaviridae). In this study, we investigated whether Culicoides cells possess an antiviral RNAi response and whether this is effective against arboviruses, including those with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes, such as BTV. Using reporter gene-based assays, we established the presence of a functional RNAi response in Culicoides sonorensis-derived KC cells which is effective in inhibiting BTV infection. Sequencing of small RNAs from KC and Aedes aegypti-derived Aag2 cells infected with BTV or the unrelated Schmallenberg virus resulted in the production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (viRNAs) of 21 nucleotides, similar to the viRNAs produced during arbovirus infections of mosquitoes. In addition, viRNA profiles strongly suggest that the BTV dsRNA genome is accessible to a Dicer-type nuclease. Thus, we show for the first time that midge cells target arbovirus replication by mounting an antiviral RNAi response mainly resembling that of other insect vectors of arboviruses.

  4. Cornering metastases: therapeutic targeting of circulating tumor cells and stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishoy eFaltas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed an evolution of our understanding of the biology of the metastatic cascade. Recent insights into the metastatic process show that it is complex, dynamic and multi-directional. This process starts at a very early stage in the natural history of solid tumor growth leading to early development of metastases that grow in parallel with the primary tumor. The role of stem cells in perpetuating cancer metastases is increasingly becoming more evident. At the same time, there is a growing recognition of the crucial role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the development of metastases. These insights have laid the biological foundations for therapeutic targeting of CTCs, a promising area of research that aims to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by preventing the development of metastases at a very early stage. The hematogenous transport phase of the metastatic cascade provides critical access to CTCs for therapeutic targeting aiming to interrupt the metastatic process. Recent advances in the fields of nanotechnology and micro-fluidics have led to the development of several devices for in-vivo targeting of CTC during transit in the circulation. Selectin-coated tubes that target cell adhesion molecules, immuno-magnetic separators and in-vivo photoacoustic flow cytometers are currently being developed for this purpose. On the pharmacological front, several pharmacological and immunological agents targeting cancer stem cells are currently being developed. Such agents may ultimately prove to be effective against circulating tumor stem cells (CTSCs. Although still in its infancy, therapeutic targeting of CTCs and CTSCs offers an unprecedented opportunity to prevent the development of metastasis and potentially alter the natural history of cancer. By rendering cancer a local disease, these approaches could lead to major reductions in metastasis-related morbidity and mortality.

  5. Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles for Targeted Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Brian Tsengchi

    interactions between membranes and synthetic nanoparticles, and how the membrane coating technique faithfully translates the complexities of natural cellular membranes to the nanoscale. The following three sections explore potential therapeutic applications of membrane-coated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery, biodetoxification, and immunomodulation. Ultimately, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have the potential to significantly change the landscape of nanomedicine. The novel applications presented in this thesis are just a few of many examples currently being researched, with countless more avenues waiting to be explored.

  6. Free Extracellular miRNA Functionally Targets Cells by Transfecting Exosomes from Their Companion Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Bryniarski

    Full Text Available Lymph node and spleen cells of mice doubly immunized by epicutaneous and intravenous hapten application produce a suppressive component that inhibits the action of the effector T cells that mediate contact sensitivity reactions. We recently re-investigated this phenomenon in an immunological system. CD8+ T lymphocyte-derived exosomes transferred suppressive miR-150 to the effector T cells antigen-specifically due to exosome surface coat of antibody light chains made by B1a lymphocytes. Extracellular RNA (exRNA is protected from plasma RNases by carriage in exosomes or by chaperones. Exosome transfer of functional RNA to target cells is well described, whereas the mechanism of transfer of exRNA free of exosomes remains unclear. In the current study we describe extracellular miR-150, extracted from exosomes, yet still able to mediate antigen-specific suppression. We have determined that this was due to miR-150 association with antibody-coated exosomes produced by B1a cell companions of the effector T cells, which resulted in antigen-specific suppression of their function. Thus functional cell targeting by free exRNA can proceed by transfecting companion cell exosomes that then transfer RNA cargo to the acceptor cells. This contrasts with the classical view on release of RNA-containing exosomes from the multivesicular bodies for subsequent intercellular targeting. This new alternate pathway for transfer of exRNA between cells has distinct biological and immunological significance, and since most human blood exRNA is not in exosomes may be relevant to evaluation and treatment of diseases.

  7. Osteosarcoma: Cells-of-Origin, Cancer Stem Cells, and Targeted Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander Abarrategi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is the most common type of primary solid tumor that develops in bone. Although standard chemotherapy has significantly improved long-term survival over the past few decades, the outcome for those patients with metastatic or recurrent OS remains dismally poor and, therefore, novel agents and treatment regimens are urgently required. A hypothesis to explain the resistance of OS to chemotherapy is the existence of drug resistant CSCs with progenitor properties that are responsible of tumor relapses and metastasis. These subpopulations of CSCs commonly emerge during tumor evolution from the cell-of-origin, which are the normal cells that acquire the first cancer-promoting mutations to initiate tumor formation. In OS, several cell types along the osteogenic lineage have been proposed as cell-of-origin. Both the cell-of-origin and their derived CSC subpopulations are highly influenced by environmental and epigenetic factors and, therefore, targeting the OS-CSC environment and niche is the rationale for many recently postulated therapies. Likewise, some strategies for targeting CSC-associated signaling pathways have already been tested in both preclinical and clinical settings. This review recapitulates current OS cell-of-origin models, the properties of the OS-CSC and its niche, and potential new therapies able to target OS-CSCs.

  8. Glioblastoma: Molecular Pathways, Stem Cells and Therapeutic Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena, E-mail: meena_jhanwar@nymc.edu; Labagnara, Michael; Friedman, Marissa; Kwasnicki, Amanda; Murali, Raj [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States)

    2015-03-25

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO-defined Grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive CNS malignancy. Despite current treatment modalities, the survival time remains dismal. The main cause of mortality in patients with this disease is reoccurrence of the malignancy, which is attributed to treatment-resistant cancer stem cells within and surrounding the primary tumor. Inclusion of novel therapies, such as immuno- and DNA-based therapy, may provide better means of treating GBM. Furthermore, manipulation of recently discovered non-coding microRNAs, some of which regulate tumor growth through the development and maintenance of GBM stem cells, could provide new prospective therapies. Studies conducted by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) also demonstrate the role of molecular pathways, specifically the activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in GBM tumorigenesis. Inhibition of the aforementioned pathway may provide a more direct and targeted method to GBM treatment. The combination of these treatment modalities may provide an innovative therapeutic approach for the management of GBM.

  9. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1 drug release control experiment; Fig. S2 cell viability assay; video - magnetic manipulation. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02228f

  10. Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    10-1-0422 TITLE: Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early PRINCIPAL...DATES COVERED 1 July 2010 - 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Photoacoustic ...upon request). Aim 2) Prioritize ovarian cancer-associated surface proteins for their utility as molecular photoacoustic imaging targets and

  11. A new target for the HYPOM polarimeter with plane LH{sub 2} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovanov, L.B.; Borzounov, Yu.; Piskunov, N.M.; Tsvinev, A.P.; Ball, J.; Sans, J.L.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E. E-mail: etomasi@cea.fr

    1999-06-01

    We present a new liquid hydrogen target working as a secondary target for an extended polarimeter. The specificity of this target is that the inner cell has a parallelepipedic shape. The dimensions along the beam and along the focal plane are maximized, for a small vertical extension, using a much smaller volume of liquid hydrogen, as compared to standard cylindrical cells.

  12. Clinical immunotherapy of B-cell malignancy using CD19-targeted CAR T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, John

    2014-02-01

    The CD19 molecule is ubiquitously expressed throughout all stages of B-cell differentiation, but is not found on haemopoietic stem cells. Since most B-cell leukaemias and lymphomas retain CD19 expression, it represents an excellent target for immunotherapy of these malignant disorders. Over the past 10 years, compelling pre-clinical evidence has accrued to indicate that expression of a CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) in peripheral blood T-cells exerts therapeutic efficacy in diverse models of B-cell malignancy. Building on this, clinical studies are ongoing in several centres in which autologous CD19-specific CAR T-cells are undergoing evaluation in patients with acute and chronic B-cell leukaemia and refractory lymphoma. Early data have generated considerable excitement, providing grounds to speculate that CAR-based immunotherapy will radically alter existing management paradigms in B-cell malignancy. The focus of this mini-review is to evaluate these emerging clinical data and to speculate on clinical prospects for this new therapeutic modality.

  13. Targeting miR-155 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis of HL-60 cells by targeting Slug/PUMA signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; Dong, Ziyan; Liu, Jiang-Feng; Chuang, Wei; Gao, Li-Zhen; Ren, Yu-Guo

    2016-10-27

    Recent studies have shown that high miR-155 expression was associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myelogeneous leukemia (AML). Furthermore, targeting miR-155 results in monocytic differentiation and apoptosis. However, the exact role and mechanisms of miR-155 in human AML remains speculative. HL-60 cells were treated with anti-miR-155 for 72 h. Cell growth and apoptosis in vitro were detected by MTT, BrdU proliferation, colony formation and flow cytometry assay. The effect of anti-miR-155 on growth of HL-60 cells was also evaluated in a leukemia mouse model. Slug cDNA and PUMA siRNA trannsfection was used to assess the signal pathway. Different protein expression was detected by western blot assay and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay. The results shown that targeting miR-155 resulted in a 24-fold decrease of miR-155 expression compared to negative control in the HL-60 cells. Targeting miR-155 significantly downregulated Slug and upregulated PUMA expression, and decreased HL-60 cell growth by 70% , impaired colony formation by approximately 60%, and increased HL-60 cell apoptosis by 45%. Targeting PUMA reversed miR-155 sliencing-induced proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 cells. Restoration of Slug decreased PUMA expression. In murine engraftment models of HL-60 cells, we showed that targeting miR-155 was able to reduce tumor growth. This was accompanied with decreased Slug expression and increased PUMA expression in these tumors. Collectively, our findings strongly suggest targeting miR-155 exhibited in vivo and in vitro antileukemic activities in AML through a novel mechanism resulting in inhibition of Slug expression and increase of PUMA expression.

  14. Bypassing Protein Corona Issue on Active Targeting: Zwitterionic Coatings Dictate Specific Interactions of Targeting Moieties and Cell Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Sohi, Reihaneh; Maghari, Shokoofeh; Raoufi, Mohammad; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Hajipour, Mohammad J; Ghassempour, Alireza; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-09-07

    Surface functionalization strategies for targeting nanoparticles (NP) to specific organs, cells, or organelles, is the foundation for new applications of nanomedicine to drug delivery and biomedical imaging. Interaction of NPs with biological media leads to the formation of a biomolecular layer at the surface of NPs so-called as "protein corona". This corona layer can shield active molecules at the surface of NPs and cause mistargeting or unintended scavenging by the liver, kidney, or spleen. To overcome this corona issue, we have designed biotin-cysteine conjugated silica NPs (biotin was employed as a targeting molecule and cysteine was used as a zwitterionic ligand) to inhibit corona-induced mistargeting and thus significantly enhance the active targeting capability of NPs in complex biological media. To probe the targeting yield of our engineered NPs, we employed both modified silicon wafer substrates with streptavidin (i.e., biotin receptor) to simulate a target and a cell-based model platform using tumor cell lines that overexpress biotin receptors. In both cases, after incubation with human plasma (thus forming a protein corona), cellular uptake/substrate attachment of the targeted NPs with zwitterionic coatings were significantly higher than the same NPs without zwitterionic coating. Our results demonstrated that NPs with a zwitterionic surface can considerably facilitate targeting yield of NPs and provide a promising new type of nanocarriers in biological applications.

  15. TARGET:?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James M Acton

    2014-01-01

      By 2003. as military planners had become worried that the country's long-range conventional weapons, such as cruise missiles, might be too slow to reach hypothetical distant targets that needed to be struck urgently...

  16. Rationally designed BCL6 inhibitors target activated B cell diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Mariano G; Yu, Wenbo; Beguelin, Wendy; Teater, Matthew R; Geng, Huimin; Goldstein, Rebecca L; Oswald, Erin; Hatzi, Katerina; Yang, Shao-Ning; Cohen, Joanna; Shaknovich, Rita; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Cheng, Huimin; Liang, Dongdong; Cho, Hyo Je; Abbott, Joshua; Tam, Wayne; Du, Wei; Leonard, John P; Elemento, Olivier; Cerchietti, Leandro; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Xue, Fengtian; MacKerell, Alexander D; Melnick, Ari M

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) arise from proliferating B cells transiting different stages of the germinal center reaction. In activated B cell DLBCLs (ABC-DLBCLs), a class of DLBCLs that respond poorly to current therapies, chromosomal translocations and amplification lead to constitutive expression of the B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) oncogene. The role of BCL6 in maintaining these lymphomas has not been investigated. Here, we designed small-molecule inhibitors that display higher affinity for BCL6 than its endogenous corepressor ligands to evaluate their therapeutic efficacy for targeting ABC-DLBCL. We used an in silico drug design functional-group mapping approach called SILCS to create a specific BCL6 inhibitor called FX1 that has 10-fold greater potency than endogenous corepressors and binds an essential region of the BCL6 lateral groove. FX1 disrupted formation of the BCL6 repression complex, reactivated BCL6 target genes, and mimicked the phenotype of mice engineered to express BCL6 with corepressor binding site mutations. Low doses of FX1 induced regression of established tumors in mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. Furthermore, FX1 suppressed ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as primary human ABC-DLBCL specimens ex vivo. These findings indicate that ABC-DLBCL is a BCL6-dependent disease that can be targeted by rationally designed inhibitors that exceed the binding affinity of natural BCL6 ligands.

  17. High-Throughput Screening of Therapeutic Neural Stimulation Targets: Toward Principles of Preventing and Treating Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Han, X., and Boyden, E. S. (2007) Two-color, bi-directional optical voltage control of genetically-targeted neurons, Spotlight Presentation, at...4oC. Cell pellets were resuspended in 1 ml PBS with proteinase inhibitors ( Roche ), lysed in a cup sonicator for 15 seconds and centrifuged for 2...and approved by the MIT  Animal Care and Use and Biosafety Committees.      Tools and Materials:  Tools  Company   Catalogue number  Comments (optional

  18. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Christian R.; Zwartkruis, Fried J.; Vellenga, Edo; Coffer, Paul J.; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    2009-01-01

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myelodysplastic sy

  19. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, C.R.; Zwartkruis, G.J.T.; Vellenga, E.; Coffer, P.J.; Buitenhuis, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myelodysplastic sy

  20. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells.

  1. [Characteristics of a new cyanophage lysing unicellular cyanobacteria of the genus Synechococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudiakov, I Ia

    1977-01-01

    A new cyanophage S-2L growing on three strains of the cyanobacterium belonging to the Synechococcus genus has been isolated. The cyanophage has an icosahedral head, 56 nm in diameter, and flexible tail with a non-contracting sheath, 120 nm long. Over 95 per cent of the cyanophage particles are adsorbed within 10 min, the rate constant of adsorption being 3.2-10(-9) ml/min. The latent period lasts 5 hours, the yield is 100 particles per cell. The intracellular growth is characterized by the accumulation of the cyanophage particles at the poles of the cell. The photosynthetic lamellae remain intact up to the beginning of lysis which consists in local disruptions of the cell envelope.

  2. [NEOADJUVANT TARGET THERAPY IN A RENAL-CELL CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakhovskiy, E O; Voylenko, O A; Stakhovskiy, O E; Vitruk, Yu V; Vukalovych, P S; Kononenko, O A

    2015-12-01

    There were observed 30 patients (32 tumors), to whom preoperatively for renal-cell cancer (ROC) a neoadjuvant target therapy (NATTH) was conducted. In 19 (66.7%) of them a pazopanib (800 mg per os once a day through 2 mo) was applied, and in 10 (33.3%)--sunitinib (50 mg per os once a day through 28 days, the gap--14 days, repeated course--28 days). The indications for the NATTH conduction were: in 7 (21.9%) patients--a locally--spread RCC with the objective to localize a tumor and to search a further possibility of radical surgical intervention performance, and in 25 (78.1%)--the tumor reduction and searching possibility of the organpreserving treatment conduction. The NATTH conduction in the patients, suffering RCC, have guaranteed a primary pathological focus reduction in 90% of observations, and a partial regression in accordance to the RECIST criteria--in 28.1%. A tumor reduction by (22.9 ± 17.8)% at average have permitted to perform a renal resection in 75% of observations, concerning localized RCC, when indication of preservation of enough functioning renal parenchyma was secured.

  3. RNA Interference Targeting Leptin Gene Effect on Hepatic Stellate Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Xiulan; LIN Jusheng; SONG Yuhu; SUN Xuemei; ZHOU Hejun

    2005-01-01

    To construct the specific siRNA expression vectors and investigate their effect on leptin and collagen I in HSC, which provide a new approach to the prevent and treat hepatic fibrosis. The five siRNAs against leptin gene were transcript synthesized intracellularly by expression templates of plasmid vector psiRNA-hH1neo. The recombinant leptin siRNA plasmid vectors could express in eukaryocyte , and then to evaluate them by using enzyme cutting and sequencing. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into HSCs using Lipofectamine methods respectively. The cells were selected after growing in DMEM containing 300 μg/mL G418 for about 4 weeks. Gene expression of leptin and collagen I were showed by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Identification by enzyme cutting and sequencing showed that the leptin siRNA expression vectors were constructed successfully, and leptin siRNA could inhibit the leptin and collagen I gene expression effectively. It was concluded that RNA interference-mediated silencing of leptin gene diminished leptin and collagen I gene expression in HSCs. Furthermore, attenuated the extracellular matrix over-deposition at the same time. Leptin gene is ideal targets of gene therapy for liver fibrosis.

  4. Targeted and non-targeted effects in cell wall polysaccharides from transgenetically modified potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex network composed mainly of polysaccharides. Cell wall polysaccharides surround and protect plant cells and are responsible for the stability and rigidity of plant tissue. Pectin is a major component of primary cell wall and the middle lamella of plants. Ho

  5. Targeted Application of Human Genetic Variation Can Improve Red Blood Cell Production from Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giani, Felix C; Fiorini, Claudia; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ludwig, Leif S; Salem, Rany M; Jobaliya, Chintan D; Regan, Stephanie N; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Liang, Ge; Steinberg-Shemer, Orna; Guo, Michael H; Esko, Tõnu; Tong, Wei; Brugnara, Carlo; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Weiss, Mitchell J; Zon, Leonard I; Chou, Stella T; French, Deborah L; Musunuru, Kiran; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-01-07

    Multipotent and pluripotent stem cells are potential sources for cell and tissue replacement therapies. For example, stem cell-derived red blood cells (RBCs) are a potential alternative to donated blood, but yield and quality remain a challenge. Here, we show that application of insight from human population genetic studies can enhance RBC production from stem cells. The SH2B3 gene encodes a negative regulator of cytokine signaling and naturally occurring loss-of-function variants in this gene increase RBC counts in vivo. Targeted suppression of SH2B3 in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells enhanced the maturation and overall yield of in-vitro-derived RBCs. Moreover, inactivation of SH2B3 by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells allowed enhanced erythroid cell expansion with preserved differentiation. Our findings therefore highlight the potential for combining human genome variation studies with genome editing approaches to improve cell and tissue production for regenerative medicine.

  6. A claudin 3 and claudin 4-targeted Clostridium perfringens protoxin is selectively cytotoxic to PSA-producing prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry C; Waltzer, Wayne C; Gabig, Theodore G

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of non-cutaneous cancer-related death in males, and effective strategies for treatment of metastatic disease are currently limited. The tight junction proteins, claudin 3 and claudin 4, serve as cell-surface receptors for the pore-forming Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin [CPE]. Most prostate cancer cells overexpress claudin 3 and claudin 4, and claudins are aberrantly distributed over the plasma membrane, making these cells particularly sensitive to cytolysis by CPE. Prostate cancer cells secrete PSA locally that is proteolytically active; however, circulating PSA is inactivated via binding to protease inhibitors. To overcome systemic toxicity of CPE, a modified protoxin was constructed with a tethered ligand attached to the C-terminus connected by a flexible linker containing a PSA-specific protease cleavage site. This engineered protoxin selectively and efficiently lyses PSA-producing prostate cancer cells whereas CLDN3 and CLDN4 positive cells that do not express PSA are resistant to cytolysis.

  7. The Effect of Predators on Cholera Biofilms: If it Lyses, We Can Smash It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalziqi, Arben; Bernardy, Eryn; Thomas, Jacob; Ratcliff, Will; Hammer, Brian; Yunker, Peter

    Many microbes form biofilms--dense clumps of cells and proteins--on surfaces. Biofilms are complex communities that facilitate the study of biological competition (e.g., two types of microbes may compete to form a biofilm in the same location) and interesting physics (e.g., the source of a biofilm's rigidity). Vibrio cholerae can produce biofilms which have a network-like structure--however, cholera can be genetically engineered to kill other cholera with different genotypes, which leaves behind a structureless ``slime'' rather than such a biofilm. Through mechanical creep testing of both predator-prey and non-predator populations, we found that the predator-prey population responds viscously and decreases in height with repeated compression, whereas the non-predator population responds elastically and maintains its original height. The current work suggests that cell lysis after killing disrupts biofilm formation, preventing microbial colonies from forming rigid networks.

  8. Identification of ligand-target pairs from combined libraries of small molecules and unpurified protein targets in cell lysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Lynn M; Jain, Tara; Liu, David R

    2014-02-26

    We describe the development and validation of interaction determination using unpurified proteins (IDUP), a method that selectively amplifies DNA sequences identifying ligand+target pairs from a mixture of DNA-linked small molecules and unpurified protein targets in cell lysates. By operating in cell lysates, IDUP preserves native post-translational modifications and interactions with endogenous binding partners, thereby enabling the study of difficult-to-purify targets and increasing the potential biological relevance of detected interactions compared with methods that require purified proteins. In IDUP, target proteins are associated with DNA oligonucleotide tags either non-covalently using a DNA-linked antibody or covalently using a SNAP-tag. Ligand-target binding promotes hybridization of a self-priming hairpin that is extended by a DNA polymerase to create a DNA strand that contains sequences identifying both the target and its ligand. These sequences encoding ligand+target pairs are selectively amplified by PCR and revealed by high-throughput DNA sequencing. IDUP can respond to the effect of affinity-modulating adaptor proteins in cell lysates that would be absent in ligand screening or selection methods using a purified protein target. This capability was exemplified by the 100-fold amplification of DNA sequences encoding FRB+rapamycin or FKBP+rapamycin in samples overexpressing both FRB and FKBP (FRB·rapamycin+FKBP, Kd ≈ 100 fM; FKBP·rapamycin+FRB, Kd = 12 nM). In contrast, these sequences were amplified 10-fold less efficiently in samples overexpressing either FRB or FKBP alone (rapamycin+FKBP, Kd ≈ 0.2 nM; rapamcyin+FRB, Kd = 26 μM). Finally, IDUP was used to process a model library of DNA-linked small molecules and a model library of cell lysates expressing SNAP-target fusions combined in a single sample. In this library×library experiment, IDUP resulted in enrichment of sequences corresponding to five known ligand+target pairs ranging in binding

  9. Inhibition of notch signaling in glioblastoma targets cancer stem cells via an endothelial cell intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovinga, Koos E; Shimizu, Fumiko; Wang, Rong; Panagiotakos, Georgia; Van Der Heijden, Maartje; Moayedpardazi, Hamideh; Correia, Ana Sofia; Soulet, Denis; Major, Tamara; Menon, Jayanthi; Tabar, Viviane

    2010-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly heterogeneous malignant tumor. Recent data suggests the presence of a hierarchical organization within the GBM cell population that involves cancer cells with stem-like behavior, capable of repopulating the tumor and contributing to its resistance to therapy. Tumor stem cells are thought to reside within a vascular niche that provides structural and functional support. However, most GBM studies involve isolated tumor cells grown under various culture conditions. Here, we use a novel three-dimensional organotypic "explant" system of surgical GBM specimens that preserves cytoarchitecture and tumor stroma along with tumor cells. Notch inhibition in explants results in decreased proliferation and self-renewal of tumor cells but is also associated with a decrease in endothelial cells. When endothelial cells are selectively eliminated from the explants via a toxin conjugate, we also observed a decrease in self-renewal of tumor stem cells. These findings support a critical role for tumor endothelial cells in GBM stem cell maintenance, mediated at least in part by Notch signaling. The explant system further highlighted differences in the response to radiation between explants and isolated tumor neurospheres. Combination treatment with Notch blockade and radiation resulted in a substantial decrease in proliferation and in self-renewal in tumor explants while radiation alone was less effective. This data suggests that the Notch pathway plays a critical role in linking angiogenesis and cancer stem cell self-renewal and is thus a potential therapeutic target. Three-dimensional explant systems provide a novel approach for the study of tumor and microenvironment interactions.

  10. An innovative pre-targeting strategy for tumor cell specific imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Peng, Meng-Yun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Cheng, Si-Xue; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-08-01

    A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the ``biotin-avidin'' interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging and therapeutic agents for tumor treatments.A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the ``biotin-avidin'' interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging

  11. miR-1 Inhibits Cell Growth, Migration, and Invasion by Targeting VEGFA in Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs and have been shown to play a crucial role in the osteosarcoma (OS tumorigenesis and progression. VEGFA is a key regulator of angiogenesis and plays an important role in regulation of tumor metastasis. The objective of this study was to determine whether VEGFA was involved in miR-1-mediated suppression of proliferation, migration, and invasion of OS cells. The expression levels of miR-1 were significantly lower in OS tumor tissues than those in adjacent normal tissues and in SAOS-2 and U2OS cell lines compared to a normal osteoblast (NHOst cell line. VEGFA was upregulated in OS tumor tissues and SAOS-2 and U2OS cell lines. The results of CCK-8 assay and transwell assay showed that miR-1 acted as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in U2OS cells. Dual luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that VEGFA was a direct and functional target gene of miR-1. miR-1 directly inhibits the protein expression of VEGFA via its 3′-UTR. Knockdown of VEGFA by siRNA inhibited proliferation, migration, and invasion of U2OS cells. Our study suggested the potential inhibitory function of miR-1 in OS cell proliferation, migration, and invasion via inhibiting VEGFA.

  12. Cell Membrane Capsules for Encapsulation of Chemotherapeutic and Cancer Cell Targeting in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li-Hua; Zhang, Yuan-Hong; Han, Li-Jie; Zhang, Chen-Zhen; Wu, Jia-He; Wang, Xia-Rong; Gao, Jian-Qing; Mao, Zheng-Wei

    2015-08-26

    Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents can cause indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. Until now, encapsulation and targeting of drugs have typically relied on synthetic vehicles, which cannot minimize the clearance by the renal system and may also increase the risk of chemical side effects. Cell membrane capsules (CMCs) provide a generic and far more natural approach to the challenges of drug encapsulation and delivery in vivo. Here aptamer AS1411, which can recognize and bind overexpressed nucleolin on a cancer cell membrane, was chemically conjugated onto CMCs. As a result, AS1411 modified CMCs showed enhanced ingestion in certain cancer cells in vitro and accumulation in mouse cancer xenografts in vivo. Chemotherapeutics and contrast agents with therapeutically significant concentrations can be packaged into CMCs by reversible permeating their plasma membranes. The systematic administration of cancer targeting CMCs loaded with doxorubicin hydrochloride can significantly inhibit tumor growth in mouse xenografts, with significantly reduced toxicity compared to free drug. These findings suggest that cancer targeting CMCs may have considerable benefits in drug delivery and cancer treatment.

  13. A Modular Probe Strategy for Drug Localization, Target Identification and Target Occupancy Measurement on Single Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Anna; Thomson, Douglas W; Vappiani, Johanna; Werner, Thilo; Mueller, Katrin M; Dittus, Lars; Krause, Jana; Muelbaier, Marcel; Bergamini, Giovanna; Bantscheff, Marcus

    2016-09-16

    Late stage failures of candidate drug molecules are frequently caused by off-target effects or inefficient target engagement in vivo. In order to address these fundamental challenges in drug discovery, we developed a modular probe strategy based on bioorthogonal chemistry that enables the attachment of multiple reporters to the same probe in cell extracts and live cells. In a systematic evaluation, we identified the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between trans-cyclooctene labeled probe molecules and tetrazine-tagged reporters to be the most efficient bioorthogonal reaction for this strategy. Bioorthogonal biotinylation of the probe allows the identification of drug targets in a chemoproteomics competition binding assay using quantitative mass spectrometry. Attachment of a fluorescent reporter enables monitoring of spatial localization of probes as well as drug-target colocalization studies. Finally, direct target occupancy of unlabeled drugs can be determined at single cell resolution by competitive binding with fluorescently labeled probe molecules. The feasibility of the modular probe strategy is demonstrated with noncovalent PARP inhibitors.

  14. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijmans, Sander A A; Aleza, Clara Gómez; Roffler, Steve R; van Solinge, Wouter W; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In

  15. Gene targeting in a HUES line of human embryonic stem cells via electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Katherine M; Zheng, Binhai

    2009-07-01

    Genetic modification is critical for achieving the full potential of human embryonic stem (ES) cells as a tool for therapeutic development and for basic research. Targeted modifications in human ES cells have met with limited success because of the unique culture conditions for many human ES cell lines. The HUES lines of human ES cells were developed for ease of manipulation and are gaining increased utility in stem cell research. We tested conditions for gene targeting via electroporation in the HUES-9 human ES cell line and demonstrate here successful gene targeting at the gene encoding Fezf2 (also known as Fezl), a transcription factor involved in corticospinal neuron development. With a targeting strategy involving positive and negative selection that is applicable to all genes, we observed a gene targeting frequency of approximately 1.5% for Fezf2, a gene not expressed in human ES cells. We found that conditions developed for gene targeting in mouse ES cells can be readily adapted to HUES cells with few key modifications. HUES-9 cells exhibit an intrinsically high efficiency of clonal expansion and sustain electroporation-based gene targeting procedures without any significant loss of pluripotency marker expression or karyotypic stability. Thus, human ES cell lines adapted for enzymatic passage and efficient clonal expansion can be highly amenable to genetic modifications, which will facilitate their application in basic science and clinical development.

  16. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  17. Characterization of novel bacteriophage phiC119 capable of lysing multidrug-resistant Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarillas, Luis; Chaidez, Cristóbal; González-Robles, Arturo; Lugo-Melchor, Yadira

    2016-01-01

    Background Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne pathogens that has been frequently implicated in gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections. Moreover, high rates of multiple antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains have been reported worldwide. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, bacteriophages are considered an attractive alternative to biocontrol pathogenic bacteria. Characterization is a preliminary step towards designing a phage for biocontrol. Methods In this study, we describe the characterization of a bacteriophage designated phiC119, which can infect and lyse several multidrug-resistant STEC strains and some Salmonella strains. The phage genome was screened to detect the stx-genes using PCR, morphological analysis, host range was determined, and genome sequencing were carried out, as well as an analysis of the cohesive ends and identification of the type of genetic material through enzymatic digestion of the genome. Results Analysis of the bacteriophage particles by transmission electron microscopy showed that it had an icosahedral head and a long tail, characteristic of the family Siphoviridae. The phage exhibits broad host range against multidrug-resistant and highly virulent E. coli isolates. One-step growth experiments revealed that the phiC119 phage presented a large burst size (210 PFU/cell) and a latent period of 20 min. Based on genomic analysis, the phage contains a linear double-stranded DNA genome with a size of 47,319 bp. The phage encodes 75 putative proteins, but lysogeny and virulence genes were not found in the phiC119 genome. Conclusion These results suggest that phage phiC119 may be a good biological control agent. However, further studies are required to ensure its control of STEC and to confirm the safety of phage use. PMID:27672499

  18. Characterization of novel bacteriophage phiC119 capable of lysing multidrug-resistant Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Amarillas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne pathogens that has been frequently implicated in gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections. Moreover, high rates of multiple antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains have been reported worldwide. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, bacteriophages are considered an attractive alternative to biocontrol pathogenic bacteria. Characterization is a preliminary step towards designing a phage for biocontrol. Methods In this study, we describe the characterization of a bacteriophage designated phiC119, which can infect and lyse several multidrug-resistant STEC strains and some Salmonella strains. The phage genome was screened to detect the stx-genes using PCR, morphological analysis, host range was determined, and genome sequencing were carried out, as well as an analysis of the cohesive ends and identification of the type of genetic material through enzymatic digestion of the genome. Results Analysis of the bacteriophage particles by transmission electron microscopy showed that it had an icosahedral head and a long tail, characteristic of the family Siphoviridae. The phage exhibits broad host range against multidrug-resistant and highly virulent E. coli isolates. One-step growth experiments revealed that the phiC119 phage presented a large burst size (210 PFU/cell and a latent period of 20 min. Based on genomic analysis, the phage contains a linear double-stranded DNA genome with a size of 47,319 bp. The phage encodes 75 putative proteins, but lysogeny and virulence genes were not found in the phiC119 genome. Conclusion These results suggest that phage phiC119 may be a good biological control agent. However, further studies are required to ensure its control of STEC and to confirm the safety of phage use.

  19. Single granule cells reliably discharge targets in the hippocampal CA3 network in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Darrell A; Wittner, Lucia; Buzsáki, György

    2002-08-01

    Processing of neuronal information depends on interactions between the anatomical connectivity and cellular properties of single cells. We examined how these computational building blocks work together in the intact rat hippocampus. Single spikes in dentate granule cells, controlled intracellularly, generally failed to discharge either interneurons or CA3 pyramidal cells. In contrast, trains of spikes effectively discharged both CA3 cell types. Increasing the discharge rate of the granule cell increased the discharge probability of its target neuron and decreased the delay between the onset of a granule cell train and evoked firing in postsynaptic targets. Thus, we conclude that the granule cell to CA3 synapses are 'conditional detonators,' dependent on granule cell firing pattern. In addition, we suggest that information in single granule cells is converted into a temporal delay code in target CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons. These data demonstrate how a neural circuit of the CNS may process information.

  20. Hexokinase II-derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Vogel, Maria C; Rabeh, Wael M; Magzoub, Mazin

    2017-05-01

    Overexpression of mitochondria-bound hexokinase II (HKII) in cancer cells plays an important role in their metabolic reprogramming and protects them against apoptosis, thereby facilitating their growth and proliferation. Here, we show that covalently coupling a peptide corresponding to the mitochondrial membrane-binding N-terminal 15 aa of HKII (pHK) to a short, penetration-accelerating sequence (PAS) enhances the cellular uptake, mitochondrial localization, and cytotoxicity of the peptide in HeLa cells. Further analysis revealed that pHK-PAS depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and depleted intracellular ATP levels. The effects of pHK-PAS were correlated with dissociation of endogenous full-length HKII from mitochondria and release of cytochrome c Of significance, pHK-PAS treatment of noncancerous HEK293 cells resulted in substantially lower cytotoxicity. Thus, pHK-PAS effectively disrupted the mitochondria-HKII association in cancer cells, which led to mitochondrial dysfunction and, finally, apoptosis. Our results demonstrate the potential of the pHK-PAS cell-penetrating peptide as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer.-Woldetsadik, A. D., Vogel, M. C., Rabeh, W. M., Magzoub, M. Hexokinase II-derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells. © The Author(s).

  1. Reprogrammed metabolism of cancer cells as a potential therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijer, J.; Dartel, van D.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism in cancer cells is reprogrammed. Cancer cells largely depend on glycolysis for ATP production. The metabolic alterations in cancer cells facilitate resistance to cell death as well as biosynthesis of nucleotides and lipids, building blocks for growth. The reprogrammed metabolism is

  2. Campylobacter jejuni cell lysates differently target mitochondria and lysosomes on HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, B; Campana, R; Luchetti, F; Arcangeletti, M; Betti, M; Cesarini, E; Ciacci, C; Vittoria, E; Galli, L; Papa, S; Baffone, W

    2014-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The synthesis of cytolethal distending toxin appears essential in the infection process. In this work we evaluated the sequence of lethal events in HeLa cells exposed to cell lysates of two distinct strains, C. jejuni ATCC 33291 and C. jejuni ISS3. C. jejuni cell lysates (CCLys) were added to HeLa cell monolayers which were analysed to detect DNA content, death features, bcl-2 and p53 status, mitochondria/lysosomes network and finally, CD54 and CD59 alterations, compared to cell lysates of C. jejuni 11168H cdtA mutant. We found mitochondria and lysosomes differently targeted by these bacterial lysates. Death, consistent with apoptosis for C. jejuni ATCC 33291 lysate, occurred in a slow way (>48 h); concomitantly HeLa cells increase their endolysosomal compartment, as a consequence of toxin internalization besides a simultaneous and partial lysosomal destabilization. C. jejuni CCLys induces death in HeLa cells mainly via a caspase-dependent mechanism although a p53 lysosomal pathway (also caspase-independent) seems to appear in addition. In C. jejuni ISS3-treated cells, the p53-mediated oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components seems to be lost, inducing the deepest lysosomal alterations. Furthermore, CD59 considerably decreases, suggesting both a degradation or internalisation pathway. CCLys-treated HeLa cells increase CD54 expression on their surface, because of the action of lysate as its double feature of toxin and bacterial peptide. In conclusion, we revealed that C. jejuni CCLys-treated HeLa cells displayed different features, depending on the particular strain.

  3. MicroRNA-93 promotes cell proliferation by directly targeting P21 in osteosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; Yu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that are key regulators of gene expression by directly binding to the 3′-untranslated region of their target mRNAs, resulting in translational repression or degradation of mRNA. It has been demonstrated that miRNAs have key roles in a variety of human malignancies, including osteosarcoma. The present study aimed to assess the molecular mechanism of miR-93 in the regulation of osteosarcoma cell proliferation. Reverse-transcription quantitative PCR and western blot assays were used to examine mRNA and protein expression. An MTT assay and flow cytometry were performed to determine the cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution. A luciferase reporter assay was performed to confirm the direct targeting of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), also known as P21, by miR-93, which was suggested by a bioinformatics analysis. The results showed that the expression of miR-93 was frequently and significantly increased in a total of 19 osteosarcoma tissues compared to their matched adjacent non-tumor tissues, and the upregulation of miR-93 was associated with the malignant progression of osteosarcoma. Furthermore, miR-93 was also upregulated in the human osteosarcoma cell lines Saos-2, U2OS, SW1353 and MG63 when compared with that in the human osteoblast cell line hFOB1.19. Transfection with miR-93 inhibitor significantly reduced the miR-93 levels and inhibited the proliferation of U2OS and MG63 osteosarcoma cells. The protein levels of P21 were negatively regulated by miR-93 in U2OS and MG63 cells. Knockdown of miR-93 caused cell cycle arrest at G1 stage in U2OS and MG63 cells, identical to the effect of P21 overexpression. Finally, P21 was found to be significantly downregulated in osteosarcoma tissues compared to their matched adjacent non-tumor tissues, suggesting that the inhibition of P21 may be due to increased miR-93 expression in osteosarcoma tissues. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that miR-93

  4. MiR-155 inhibits cell migration of human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (hCMPCs) via targeting of MMP-16

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Jia; van Mil, Alain; Aguor, Eissa N. E.; Siddiqi, Sailay; Vrijsen, Krijn; Jaksani, Sridevi; Metz, Corina; Zhao, Jiajun; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Sluijter, Joost P. G.

    2012-01-01

    Undesired cell migration after targeted cell transplantation potentially limits beneficial effects for cardiac regeneration. MicroRNAs are known to be involved in several cellular processes, including cell migration. Here, we attempt to reduce human cardiomyocyte progenitor cell (hCMPC) migration vi

  5. New Strategies in Engineering T-cell Receptor Gene-Modified T cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Thomas M; Stromnes, Ingunn M; Chapuis, Aude G; Greenberg, Philip D

    2015-12-01

    The immune system, T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, antitumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T-cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune evasion.

  6. C1 Domain-targeted isophthalate derivatives induce cell elongation and cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virpi Talman

    Full Text Available Diacylglycerol (DAG-mediated signaling pathways, such as those mediated by protein kinase C (PKC, are central in regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. DAG-responsive C1 domains are therefore considered attractive drug targets. Our group has designed a novel class of compounds targeted to the DAG binding site within the C1 domain of PKC. We have previously shown that these 5-(hydroxymethylisophthalates modulate PKC activation in living cells. In this study we investigated their effects on HeLa human cervical cancer cell viability and proliferation by using standard cytotoxicity tests and an automated imaging platform with machine vision technology. Cellular effects and their mechanisms were further characterized with the most potent compound, HMI-1a3. Isophthalate derivatives with high affinity to the PKC C1 domain exhibited antiproliferative and non-necrotic cytotoxic effects on HeLa cells. The anti-proliferative effect was irreversible and accompanied by cell elongation. HMI-1a3 induced down-regulation of retinoblastoma protein and cyclins A, B1, D1, and E. Effects of isophthalates on cell morphology, cell proliferation and expression of cell cycle-related proteins were different from those induced by phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA or bryostatin 1, but correlated closely to binding affinities. Therefore, the results strongly indicate that the effect is C1 domain-mediated.

  7. An Efficient DNA Extraction Method for Lactobacillus casei, a Difficult-to-Lyse Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimolaei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background There are several protocols to extract DNA from Lactobacillus spp. In the case of L. casei it is harder because of its especial and thick cell wall. Objectives In this study, nine DNA extraction protocols (by lysozyme treatment were evaluated and compared in two categories (traditional and kit-based protocols and an improved method was presented. Materials and Methods DNA quantity and quality was determined by spectrophotometry, agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results The results revealed that the yield of extracted DNA differed by each protocol (5.8 - 17.1 μg/100 μL, but provided appropriate DNA for PCR amplification. The modified protocol offered the best total DNA extraction method when both quality (DNA purity; 1.54 μg and quantity (DNA yield; 17.1 μg were considered. Conclusions We suggest this protocol for effective and inexpensive DNA isolation from L. casei for downstream biological processes such as PCR.

  8. Targeted Lymphoma Cell Death by Novel Signal Transduction Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    binding via direct visualization . negative #41 HB22.7 Figure 11. Ramos B cells were either incubated with anti-mouse FITC (negative), HB22.7 + anti...plemented with 10% FCS and incubated with AET - activated sheep red blood cells (SRBC) for 1 h. B-cells were collected at the interface after centrifugation...prepared and incubated with cells (4 9 104 cells/ml) for 4 days. Percent cell killing was quan- tified by visual examination using trypan blue dye exclusion

  9. Cell physiology regulation by hypoxia inducible factor-1: Targeting oxygen-related nanomachineries of hypoxic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandani, Morteza; Vandghanooni, Somayeh; Barar, Jaleh; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-06-01

    Any dysfunctionality in maintaining the oxygen homeostasis by mammalian cells may elicit hypoxia/anoxia, which results in inescapable oxidative stress and possible subsequent detrimental impacts on certain cells/tissues with high demands to oxygen molecules. The ischemic damage in turn can trigger initiation of a number of diseases including organs ischemia, metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, different types of malignancies, and alteration in wound healing process. Thus, full comprehension of molecular mechanism(s) and cellular physiology of the oxygen homeostasis is the cornerstone of the mammalian cells metabolism, energetic pathways and health and disease conditions. An imbalance in oxygen content within the cellular microenvironment activates a cascade of molecular events that are often compensated, otherwise pathologic condition occurs through a complexed network of biomolecules. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) plays a key transcriptional role in the adaptation of cell physiology in relation with the oxygen content within a cell. In this current study, we provide a comprehensive review on the molecular mechanisms of oxygen sensing and homeostasis and the impacts of HIF-1 in hypoxic/anoxic conditions. Moreover, different molecular and biochemical responses of the cells to the surrounding environment are discussed in details. Finally, modern technological approaches for targeting the hypoxia related proteins are articulated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Immuno nanoparticles integrated electrical control of targeted cancer cell development using whole cell bioelectronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Chengxiao; Chen, Chunying; Ino, Kosuke; Matsue, Tomokazu; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Electrical properties of cells determine most of the cellular functions, particularly ones which occur in the cell's membrane. Manipulation of these electrical properties may provide a powerful electrotherapy option for the treatment of cancer as cancerous cells have been shown to be more electronegative than normal proliferating cells. Previously, we used an electrical impedance sensing system (EIS) to explore the responses of cancerous SKOV3 cells and normal HUVEC cells to low intensity (electric fields, determining that the optimal frequency for SKOV3 proliferation arrest was 200 kHz, without harming the non-cancerous HUVECs. In this study, to determine if these effects are cell type dependant, human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF7) were subjected to a range of frequencies (50 kHz-2 MHz) similar to the previously tested SKOV3. For the MCF7, an optimal frequency of 100 kHz was determined using the EIS, indicating a higher sensitivity towards the applied field. Further experiments specifically targeting the two types of cancer cells using HER2 antibody functionalized gold nanoparticles (HER2-AuNPs) were performed to determine if enhanced electric field strength can be induced via the application of nanoparticles, consequently leading to the killing of the cancerous cells without affecting non cancerous HUVECs and MCF10a providing a platform for the development of a non-invasive cancer treatment without any harmful side effects. The EIS was used to monitor the real-time consequences on cellular viability and a noticeable decrease in the growth profile of the MCF7 was observed with the application of the HER2-AuNPs and the electric fields indicating specific inhibitory effects on dividing cells in culture. To further understand the effects of the externally applied field to the cells, an Annexin V/EthD-III assay was performed to determine the cell death mechanism indicating apoptosis. The zeta potential of the SKOV3 and the MCF7 before and after incorporation of

  11. A general functional response of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated killing of target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J

    2014-04-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) kill virus-infected cells and tumor cells, and play a critical role in immune protection. Our knowledge of how the CTL killing efficiency varies with CTL and target cell numbers is limited. Here, we simulate a region of lymphoid tissue using a cellular Potts model to characterize the functional response of CTL killing of target cells, and find that the total killing rate saturates both with the CTL and the target cell densities. The relative saturation in CTL and target cell densities is determined by whether a CTL can kill multiple target cells at the same time, and whether a target cell can be killed by many CTLs together. We find that all the studied regimes can be well described by a double-saturation (DS) function with two different saturation constants. We show that this DS model can be mechanistically derived for the cases where target cells are killed by a single CTL. For the other cases, a biological interpretation of the parameters is still possible. Our results imply that this DS function can be used as a tool to predict the cellular interactions in cytotoxicity data.

  12. Expression of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored CD59 on Target Cells Enhances Human NK Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity1

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity of target cells is the result of a balance between the activating and inhibitory signals provided by their respective ligand-receptor interactions. In our current study, we have investigated the significance of CD59 on human target cells in modulating this process. A range of CD59 site-specific Abs were used in NK cytotoxicity blocking studies against the CD59-expressing K562 target cell line. Significantly reduced cytotoxicity was observed in the presence of Abs...

  13. Targeted Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma: a Prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Joshi

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: In our cohort, use of sunitinib showed similar outcome to previously published articles. Our study supports the use of sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Keywords: metastatic renal cell carcinoma; sunitinib; tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

  14. Taking Aim at Moving Targets in Computational Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzzo, Paola; Van Troys, Marleen; Ampe, Christophe; Martens, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is central to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Fundamental understanding of cell migration can, for example, direct novel therapeutic strategies to control invasive tumor cells. However, the study of cell migration yields an overabundance of experimental data that require demanding processing and analysis for results extraction. Computational methods and tools have therefore become essential in the quantification and modeling of cell migration data. We review computational approaches for the key tasks in the quantification of in vitro cell migration: image pre-processing, motion estimation and feature extraction. Moreover, we summarize the current state-of-the-art for in silico modeling of cell migration. Finally, we provide a list of available software tools for cell migration to assist researchers in choosing the most appropriate solution for their needs.

  15. Morphological and molecular characterization of several actinophages isolated from soil which lyse Streptomyces cattleya or S. venezuelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anné, J; Wohlleben, W; Burkardt, H J; Springer, R; Pühler, A

    1984-10-01

    Several lytic and lysogenic actinophages were isolated from soil samples infected with Streptomyces cattleya and S. venezuelae. The morphologies and some biological properties of the phages, and the physico-chemical characteristics of their DNAs, were compared. Electron micrographs indicated that all the phage heads were of an icosahedral form, but head size and length of the tail varied. Two of the phages had a broad host range; the other isolates could lyse only a limited number of species. The molecular sizes of the phage DNAs were between 32.2 and 98.5 kb as estimated by electron microscopy and restriction enzyme analysis. The same study also indicated that one of the DNA species contained cohesive ends. The G + C content of the DNAs ranged between 45.1 and 74.2 mol % as estimated from melting studies. Sedimentation velocity experiments implied that several of the phage DNAs were probably heavily glycosylated or methylated. These modifications might explain the partial or slow digestion of some of the DNAs by several of the 23 restriction enzymes tested. Protoplasts of the appropriate Streptomyces strains could be efficiently transfected with phage DNA in the presence of 25% (w/v) polyethylene glycol (mol. wt 6000).

  16. A drug target that stimulates development of healthy stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have overcome a major impediment to the development of effective stem cell therapies by studying mice that lack CD47, a protein found on the surface of both healthy and cancer cells. They discovered that cells obtained from the lungs of CD47-de

  17. Apoptosis and cancer stem cells : Implications for apoptosis targeted therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating showing that cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells are key drivers of tumor formation and progression. Successful therapy must therefore eliminate these cells, which is hampered by their high resistance to commonly used treatment modalities. Thus far, only a limited

  18. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7) is essential for target cell killing in a natural killer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Odemuyiwa, Solomon O; Coughlin, Jason J; Garofoli, Daniella; Ewen, Catherine; Davidson, Courtney E; Ghaffari, Mazyar; Kane, Kevin P; Lacy, Paige; Logan, Michael R; Befus, A Dean; Bleackley, R Chris; Moqbel, Redwan

    2008-02-15

    Natural killer cells recognize and induce apoptosis in foreign, transformed or virus-infected cells through the release of perforin and granzymes from secretory lysosomes. Clinically, NK-cell mediated killing is a major limitation to successful allo- and xenotransplantation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the fusion of granzyme B-containing secretory lysosomes to the plasma membrane in activated NK cells, prior to target cell killing, are not fully understood. Using the NK cell line YT-Indy as a model, we have investigated the expression of SNAP REceptors (SNAREs), both target (t-) and vesicular (v-) SNAREs, and their function in granzyme B-mediated target cell killing. Our data showed that YT-Indy cells express VAMP-7 and SNAP-23, but not VAMP-2. VAMP-7 was associated with granzyme B-containing lysosomal granules. Using VAMP-7 small interfering RNA (siRNA), we successfully knocked down the expression of VAMP-7 protein in YT-Indy to less than 10% of untreated cells in 24h. VAMP7-deficient YT-Indy cells activated via co-culture with Jurkat cells released <1ng/mL of granzyme B, compared to 1.5-2.5 microg/mL from controls. Using Jurkat cells as targets, we showed a 7-fold reduction in NK cell-mediated killing by VAMP-7 deficient YT-Indy cells. Our results show that VAMP-7 is a crucial component of granzyme B release and target cell killing in the NK cell line YT-Indy. Thus, targeting VAMP-7 expression specifically with siRNA, following transplantation, may be a viable strategy for preventing NK cell-mediated transplant rejection, in vivo.

  19. Autoantigenic targets of B-cell receptors derived from chronic lymphocytic leukemias bind to and induce proliferation of leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Carsten; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Kemele, Maria; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Bühler, Andreas; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-06-06

    Antigenic targets of the B-cell receptor (BCR) derived from malignant cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) might play a role in the pathogenesis of this neoplasm. We screened human tissue-derived protein macroarrays with antigen-binding fragments derived from 47 consecutive cases of CLL. An autoantigenic target was identified for 12/47 (25.5%) of the cases, with 3 autoantigens being the target of the BCRs from 2 patients each. Recombinantly expressed autoantigens bound specifically to the CLL cells from which the BCR used for the identification of the respective autoantigen was derived. Moreover, binding of the autoantigen to the respective leukemic cells induced a specific activation and proliferation of these cells. In conclusion, autoantigens are frequent targets of CLL-BCRs. Their specific binding to and induction of proliferation in the respective leukemic cells provide the most convincing evidence to date for the long-time hypothesized role of autoantigens in the pathogenesis of CLL.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles targeting tumor stroma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Christensen, Rikke; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2011-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology continues to evolve by characterization of further types of stem cells and by exploring their therapeutic potential for experimental and clinical applications. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the most promising candidates simply because...... better understanding and in vivo supporting data. The homing ability of hMSCs was investigated by creating a human xenograft model by transplanting an ovarian cancer cell line into immunocompromised mice. Then, genetically engineered hMSC-telo1 cells were injected through the tail vein...

  1. Viral piracy: HIV-1 targets dendritic cells for transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2006-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells, are critical for host immunity by inducing specific immune responses against a broad variety of pathogens. Remarkably the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) subverts DC function leading to spread of the virus. At an early phase of HIV-1 transmission, DCs capture HIV-1 at mucosal surfaces and transmit the virus to T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Capture of the virus on DCs takes place via C-type lectins of which the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is the best studied. DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles accumulate in CD81(+) multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in DCs and are subsequently transmitted to CD4+ T cells resulting in infection of T cells. The viral cell-to-cell transmission takes place at the DC-T cell interface termed the infectious synapse. Recent studies demonstrate that direct infection of DCs contributes to the transmission to T cells at a later phase. Moreover, the infected DCs may function as cellular reservoirs for HIV-1. This review discusses the different processes that govern viral piracy of DCs by HIV-1, emphasizing the intracellular routing of the virus from capture on the cell surface to egress in the infectious synapse.

  2. Genetically Programmed Clusters of Gold Nanoparticles for Cancer Cell-Targeted Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mi Hwa; Yu, Jeong Heon; Kim, Insu; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2015-10-14

    Interpretations of the interactions of nanocarriers with biological cells are often complicated by complex synthesis of materials, broad size distribution, and heterogeneous surface chemistry. Herein, the major capsid proteins of an icosahedral T7 phage (55 nm in diameter) are genetically engineered to display a gold-binding peptide and a prostate cancer cell-binding peptide in a tandem sequence. The genetically modified phage attracts gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to form a cluster of gold nanoparticles (about 70 nanoparticles per phage). The cluster of AuNPs maintains cell-targeting functionality and exhibits excellent dispersion stability in serum. Under a very low light irradiation (60 mW cm(-2)), only targeted AuNP clusters kill the prostate cancer cells in minutes (not in other cell types), whereas neither nontargeted AuNP clusters nor citrate-stabilized AuNPs cause any significant cell death. The result suggests that the prostate cancer cell-targeted clusters of AuNPs are targeted to only prostate cancer cells and, when illuminated, generate local heating to more efficiently and selectively kill the targeted cancer cells. Our strategy can be generalized to target other types of cells and assemble other kinds of nanoparticles for a broad range of applications.

  3. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yingbin [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Cai, Shaoxi, E-mail: sxcai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Li [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Yu, Shuhui [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Library of Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhang, Haoxing [School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Liu, Lan [Department of Laboratory of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Chongqin Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Liu, Qun [College of Life Science and Technology, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China); Du, Jun [Center of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Cai, Shaohui [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Sung, K.L. Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering, University of California, SD 0412 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  4. Target Cell-Specific Modulation of Transmitter Release at Terminals from a Single Axon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanziani, Massimo; Gahwiler, Beat H.; Charpak, Serge

    1998-09-01

    In the hippocampus, a CA3 pyramidal cell forms excitatory synapses with thousands of other pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons. By using sequential paired recordings from three connected cells, we show that the presynaptic properties of CA3 pyramidal cell terminals, belonging to the same axon, differ according to the type of target cell. Activation of presynaptic group III metabotropic glutamate receptors decreases transmitter release only at terminals contacting CA1 interneurons but not CA1 pyramidal cells. Furthermore, terminals contacting distinct target cells show different frequency facilitation. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the pharmacological and physiological properties of presynaptic terminals are determined, at least in part, by the target cells.

  5. A visual targeting system for the microinjection of unstained adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2013-02-01

    Automatic localization and targeting are critical steps in automating the process of microinjecting adherent cells. This process is currently performed manually by highly trained operators and is characterized as a laborious task with low success rate. Therefore, automation is desired to increase the efficiency and consistency of the operations. This research offers a contribution to this procedure through the development of a vision system for a robotic microinjection setup. Its goals are to automatically locate adherent cells in a culture dish and target them for a microinjection. Here the major concern was the achievement of an error-free targeting system to guarantee high consistency in microinjection experiments. To accomplish this, a novel visual targeting algorithm integrating different image processing techniques was proposed. This framework employed defocusing microscopy to highlight cell features and improve cell segmentation and targeting reliability. Three main image processing techniques, operating at three different focus levels in a bright field (BF) microscope, were used: an anisotropic contour completion (ACC) method, a local intensity variation background-foreground classifier, and a grayscale threshold-based segmentation. The proposed framework combined information gathered by each of these methods using a validation map and this was shown to provide reliable cell targeting results. Experiments conducted with sets of real images from two different cell lines (CHO-K1 and HEK), which contained a total of more than 650 cells, yielded flawless targeting results along with a cell detection ratio greater than 50%.

  6. B cells as therapeutic targets in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-10-01

    B cells have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune neurological disorders, not only as precursors of antibody-producing cells, but also as important regulators of the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation, cytokine production, and formation of ectopic germinal centers in the intermeningeal spaces. Two B-cell trophic factors-BAFF (B-cell-activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand)-and their receptors are strongly upregulated in many immunological disorders of the CNS and PNS, and these molecules contribute to clonal expansion of B cells in situ. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules and trophic factors provides a rational approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological diseases. This article reviews the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders and summarizes the experience to date with rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody against CD20, for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, autoimmune neuropathies, neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic neurological disorders, myasthenia gravis, and inflammatory myopathies. It is expected that ongoing controlled trials will establish the efficacy and long-term safety profile of anti-B-cell agents in several autoimmune neurological disorders, as well as exploring the possibility of a safe and synergistic effect with other immunosuppressants or immunomodulators.

  7. HLA-targeted flow cytometric sorting of blood cells allows separation of pure and viable microchimeric cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabbels, Jos J M; van de Keur, Carin; Kemps, Berit M; Mulder, Arend; Scherjon, Sicco A; Claas, Frans H J; Eikmans, Michael

    2011-11-10

    Microchimerism is defined by the presence of low levels of nonhost cells in a person. We developed a reliable method for separating viable microchimeric cells from the host environment. For flow cytometric cell sorting, HLA antigens were targeted with human monoclonal HLA antibodies (mAbs). Optimal separation of microchimeric cells (present at a proportion as low as 0.01% in artificial mixtures) was obtained with 2 different HLA mAbs, one targeting the chimeric cells and the other the background cells. To verify purity of separated cell populations, flow-sorted fractions of 1000 cells were processed for DNA analysis by HLA-allele-specific and Y-chromosome-directed real-time quantitative PCR assays. After sorting, PCR signals of chimeric DNA markers in the positive fractions were significantly enhanced compared with those in the presort samples, and they were similar to those in 100% chimeric control samples. Next, we demonstrate applicability of HLA-targeted FACS sorting after pregnancy by separating chimeric maternal cells from child umbilical cord mononuclear cells. Targeting allelic differences with anti-HLA mAbs with FACS sorting allows maximal enrichment of viable microchimeric cells from a background cell population. The current methodology enables reliable microchimeric cell detection and separation in clinical specimens.

  8. Targeting Endothelial Cells with Multifunctional GaN/Fe Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braniste, Tudor; Tiginyanu, Ion; Horvath, Tibor; Raevschi, Simion; Andrée, Birgit; Cebotari, Serghei; Boyle, Erin C.; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the interaction of multifunctional nanoparticles with living endothelial cells. The nanoparticles were synthesized using direct growth of gallium nitride on zinc oxide nanoparticles alloyed with iron oxide followed by core decomposition in hydrogen flow at high temperature. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that porcine aortic endothelial cells take up GaN-based nanoparticles suspended in the growth medium. The nanoparticles are deposited in vesicles and the endothelial cells show no sign of cellular damage. Intracellular inert nanoparticles are used as guiding elements for controlled transportation or designed spatial distribution of cells in external magnetic fields.

  9. Therapeutic targeting of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugel, Stefano; Delpozzo, Federica; Desantis, Giacomo; Papalini, Francesca; Simonato, Francesca; Sonda, Nada; Zilio, Serena; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2009-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a subset of myeloid cells that expand under pathological conditions, such as cancer development, acute and chronic infections, trauma, bone marrow transplantations, and some autoimmune diseases. MDSCs mediate a negative regulation of the immune response by affecting different T lymphocyte subsets. Potential mechanisms, which underlie this inhibitory activity range from those requiring direct cell-to-cell contact with others, more indirect, and mediated by the modification of the microenvironment. Pharmacological inhibition of MDSC suppressive pathways is a promising strategy to overcome disease-induced immune defects, which might be a key step in enhancing the effectiveness of immune-based therapies.

  10. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells In Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    tumorigenesis (tumorsphere formation) and BCSC, which are linked to increase development of chemotherapeutic resistance and relapse. Effective inhibition of...and& mouse&BC&cells&[5,&29]& Lep7n&&induces&protein&expression&and&ac7va7on&of& Notch1 ,&G3&and&4&in&human&BC&& ER+&and&ERG&&and&mouse&E0771&ER+&cells&[29...mouse&BC&cells&[5,&29]& Lep7n&&induces&protein&expression&and&ac7va7on&of& Notch1 ,&G3&and&4&in&human&BC&& ER+&and&ERG&&and&mouse&E0771&ER+&cells&[29

  11. Cell-Internalization SELEX: Method for Identifying Cell-Internalizing RNA Aptamers for Delivering siRNAs to Target Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, William H.; Thiel, Kristina W.; Flenker, Katie S.; Bair, Tom; Dupuy, Adam J.; McNamara, James O.; Miller, Francis J.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2015-01-01

    After a decade of work to address cellular uptake, the principal obstacle to RNAi-based therapeutics, there is now well-deserved, renewed optimism about RNAi-based drugs. Phase I and II studies have shown safe, strong, and durable-gene knockdown (80–90 %, lasting for a month after a single injection) and/or clinical benefit in treating several liver pathologies. Although promising, these studies have also highlighted the need for robust delivery techniques to develop RNAi therapeutics for treating other organ systems and diseases. Conjugation of siRNAs to cell-specific, synthetic RNA ligands (aptamers) is being proposed as a viable solution to this problem. While encouraging, the extended use of RNA aptamers as a delivery tool for siRNAs awaits the identification of RNA aptamer sequences capable of targeting and entering the cytoplasm of many different cell types. We describe a cell-based selection process for the rapid identification and characterization of RNA aptamers suited for delivering siRNA drugs into the cytoplasm of target cells. This process, termed “cell-internalization SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment),” entails the combination of multiple sophisticated technologies, including cell culture-based SELEX procedures, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and novel bioinformatics tools. PMID:25319652

  12. Rapid and Cost-Effective Gene Targeting in Rat Embryonic Stem Cells by TALENs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Tong; Guanyi Huang; Charles Ashton; Hongping Wu; Hexin Yan; Qi-Long Ying

    2012-01-01

    The rat is the preferred animal model in many areas of biomedical research and drug development.Genetic manipulation in rats has lagged behind that in mice due to the lack of efficient gene targeting tools.Previously,we generated a knockout rat via conventional homologous recombination in rat embryonic stem (ES) cells.Here,we show that efficient gene targeting in rat ES cells can be achieved quickly through transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated DNA double-strand breaks.Using the Golden Gate cloning technique,we constructed a pair of TALEN targeting vectors for the gene of interest in 5 days.After gene transfection,the targeted rat ES cell colonies were isolated,screened,and confirmed by PCR without the need of drug selection.Our results suggest that TALEN-mediated gene targeting is a superior means of establishing genetically modified rat ES cell lines with high efficiency and short turnaround time.

  13. Target cell-dependent normalization of transmitter release at neocortical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Helmut J; Johnston, Daniel

    2005-05-01

    The efficacy and short-term modification of neocortical synaptic connections vary with the type of target neuron. We investigated presynaptic Ca2+ and release probability at single synaptic contacts between pairs of neurons in layer 2/3 of the rat neocortex. The amplitude of Ca2+ signals in boutons of pyramids contacting bitufted or multipolar interneurons or other pyramids was dependent on the target cell type. Optical quantal analysis at single synaptic contacts suggested that release probabilities are also target cell-specific. Both the Ca2+ signal and the release probability of different boutons of a pyramid contacting the same target cell varied little. We propose that the mechanisms that regulate the functional properties of boutons of a pyramid normalize the presynaptic Ca2+ influx and release probability for all those boutons that innervate the same target cell.

  14. [Research progress in developing reporter systems for the enrichment of positive cells with targeted genome modification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yichun; Xu, Kun; Wei, Zehui; Ma, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Targeted genome editing technology plays an important role in studies of gene function, gene therapy and transgenic breeding. Moreover, the efficiency of targeted genome editing is increased dramatically with the application of recently developed artificial nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9. However, obtaining positive cells with targeted genome modification is restricted to some extent by nucleases expression plasmid transfection efficiency, nucleases expression and activity, and repair efficiency after genome editing. Thus, the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification remains a problem that need to be solved. Surrogate reporter systems could be used to reflect the efficiency of nucleases indirectly and enrich genetically modified positive cells effectively, which may increase the efficiency of the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification. In this review, we mainly summarized principles and applications of reporter systems based on NHEJ and SSA repair mechanisms, which may provide references for related studies in future.

  15. The cornerstone K-RAS mutation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: From cell signaling network, target genes, biological processes to therapeutic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Vasseur, Romain; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2017-03-01

    RAS belongs to the super family of small G proteins and plays crucial roles in signal transduction from membrane receptors in the cell. Mutations of K-RAS oncogene lead to an accumulation of GTP-bound proteins that maintains an active conformation. In the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, mutations of the K-RAS oncogene are nearly systematic (>90%). Moreover, K-RAS mutation is the earliest genetic alteration occurring during pancreatic carcinogenetic sequence. In this review, we discuss the central role of K-RAS mutations and their tremendous diversity of biological properties by the interconnected regulation of signaling pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, PI3K, Ral…). In pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, transcriptome analysis and preclinical animal models showed that K-RAS mutation alters biological behavior of PDAC cells (promoting proliferation, migration and invasion, evading growth suppressors, regulating mucin pattern, and miRNA expression). K-RAS also impacts tumor microenvironment and PDAC metabolism reprogramming. Finally we discuss therapeutic targeting strategies of K-RAS that have been developed without significant clinical success so far. As K-RAS is considered as the undruggable target, targeting its multiple effectors and target genes should be considered as potential alternatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The kinematics of cytotoxic lymphocytes influence their ability to kill target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Purnima; Leggatt, Graham; Matthaei, Klaus I; Frazer, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL) have been reported to show a range of motility patterns from rapid long-range tracking to complete arrest, but how and whether these kinematics affect their ability to kill target cells is not known. Many in vitro killing assays utilize cell lines and tumour-derived cells as targets, which may be of limited relevance to the kinetics of CTL-mediated killing of somatic cells. Here, live-cell microscopy is used to examine the interactions of CTL and primary murine skin cells presenting antigens. We developed a qualitative and quantitative killing assay using extended-duration fluorescence time-lapse microscopy coupled with large-volume objective software-based data analysis to obtain population data of cell-to-cell interactions, motility and apoptosis. In vivo and ex vivo activated antigen-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes were added to primary keratinocyte targets in culture with fluorometric detection of caspase-3 activation in targets as an objective determinant of apoptosis. We found that activated CTL achieved contact-dependent apoptosis of non-tumour targets after a period of prolonged attachment - on average 21 hours - which was determined by target cell type, amount of antigen, and activation status of CTL. Activation of CTL even without engagement of the T cell receptor was sufficient to mobilise cells significantly above baseline, while the addition of cognate antigen further enhanced their motility. Highly activated CTL showed markedly increased vector displacement, and velocity, and lead to increased antigen-specific target cell death. These data show that the inherent kinematics of CTL correlate directly with their ability to kill non-tumour cells presenting cognate antigen.

  17. The kinematics of cytotoxic lymphocytes influence their ability to kill target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnima Bhat

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL have been reported to show a range of motility patterns from rapid long-range tracking to complete arrest, but how and whether these kinematics affect their ability to kill target cells is not known. Many in vitro killing assays utilize cell lines and tumour-derived cells as targets, which may be of limited relevance to the kinetics of CTL-mediated killing of somatic cells. Here, live-cell microscopy is used to examine the interactions of CTL and primary murine skin cells presenting antigens. We developed a qualitative and quantitative killing assay using extended-duration fluorescence time-lapse microscopy coupled with large-volume objective software-based data analysis to obtain population data of cell-to-cell interactions, motility and apoptosis. In vivo and ex vivo activated antigen-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes were added to primary keratinocyte targets in culture with fluorometric detection of caspase-3 activation in targets as an objective determinant of apoptosis. We found that activated CTL achieved contact-dependent apoptosis of non-tumour targets after a period of prolonged attachment - on average 21 hours - which was determined by target cell type, amount of antigen, and activation status of CTL. Activation of CTL even without engagement of the T cell receptor was sufficient to mobilise cells significantly above baseline, while the addition of cognate antigen further enhanced their motility. Highly activated CTL showed markedly increased vector displacement, and velocity, and lead to increased antigen-specific target cell death. These data show that the inherent kinematics of CTL correlate directly with their ability to kill non-tumour cells presenting cognate antigen.

  18. Getting to the heart of the matter in cancer: Novel approaches to targeting cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Hugh; Mori, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide. While cancers may initially show good response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, it is not uncommon for them to recur at a later date. This phenomenon may be explained by the existence of a small population of cancer stem cells, which are inherently resistant to anti-cancer treatment as well as being capable of self-renewal. Therefore, while most of the tumour bulk consisting of cells that are not cancer stem cells respond to treatment, the cancer stem cells remain, leading to disease recurrence. Following this logic, the effective targeting of cancer stem cells holds promise for providing long-term cure in individuals with cancer. Cancer stem cells, like normal stem cells are endowed with mechanisms to protect themselves against a wide range of insults including anti-cancer treatments, such as the enhancement of the DNA damage response and the ability to extrude drugs. It is therefore important to develop new strategies if cancer stem cells are to be eradicated. In this review, we describe the strategies that we have developed to target cancer stem cells. These strategies include the targeting of the histone demethylase jumonji, AT rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B), which we found to be functionally significant in the maintenance of cancer stem cells. Other strategies being pursued include reprogramming of cancer stem cells and the targeting of a functional cell surface marker of liver cancer stem cells, the aminopeptidase CD13.

  19. Specific targeting of tumor cells by lyophilisomes functionalized with antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bracht, Etienne; Stolle, Sarah; Hafmans, Theo G.; Boerman, Otto C.; Oosterwijk, Egbert; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daamen, Willeke F.

    2014-01-01

    Lyophilisomes are a novel class of proteinaceous biodegradable nano/micro drug delivery capsules prepared by freezing, annealing and Iyophilization. In the present study, lyophilisomes were functionalized for active targeting by antibody conjugation in order to obtain a selective drug-carrier system

  20. Identification of human embryonic progenitor cell targeting peptides using phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola A Bignone

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem (hPS cells are capable of differentiation into derivatives of all three primary embryonic germ layers and can self-renew indefinitely. They therefore offer a potentially scalable source of replacement cells to treat a variety of degenerative diseases. The ability to reprogram adult cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has now enabled the possibility of patient-specific hPS cells as a source of cells for disease modeling, drug discovery, and potentially, cell replacement therapies. While reprogramming technology has dramatically increased the availability of normal and diseased hPS cell lines for basic research, a major bottleneck is the critical unmet need for more efficient methods of deriving well-defined cell populations from hPS cells. Phage display is a powerful method for selecting affinity ligands that could be used for identifying and potentially purifying a variety of cell types derived from hPS cells. However, identification of specific progenitor cell-binding peptides using phage display may be hindered by the large cellular heterogeneity present in differentiating hPS cell populations. We therefore tested the hypothesis that peptides selected for their ability to bind a clonal cell line derived from hPS cells would bind early progenitor cell types emerging from differentiating hPS cells. The human embryonic stem (hES cell-derived embryonic progenitor cell line, W10, was used and cell-targeting peptides were identified. Competition studies demonstrated specificity of peptide binding to the target cell surface. Efficient peptide targeted cell labeling was accomplished using multivalent peptide-quantum dot complexes as detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The cell-binding peptides were selective for differentiated hPS cells, had little or no binding on pluripotent cells, but preferential binding to certain embryonic progenitor cell lines and early endodermal hPS cell derivatives. Taken

  1. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2014-06-17

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the "magic bullet" concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, "targeted therapy" that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges.

  2. Survivin is a therapeutic target in Merkel cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, Reety; Shuda, Masahiro; Guastafierro, Anna; Feng, Huichen; Toptan, Tuna; Tolstov, Yanis; Normolle, Daniel; Vollmer, Laura L; Vogt, Andreas; Dömling, Alexander; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes ~80% of primary and metastatic Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs). By comparing digital transcriptome subtraction deep-sequencing profiles, we found that transcripts of the cellular survivin oncoprotein [BIRC5a (baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing

  3. Targeted Delivery of Carbon Nanotubes to Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    the linear fit ( Beer -Lambert law) of absorbance at 808 nm versus the B-CNT concentration. Ablation of mAb-CNT-Coated Cells with NIR Light. One million...4Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 5Department of Microbiology , University of Texas Southwestern

  4. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2016-11-01

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  5. Rhodacyanine derivative selectively targets cancer cells and overcomes tamoxifen resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Koren

    Full Text Available MKT-077, a rhodacyanine dye, was shown to produce cancer specific cell death. However, complications prevented the use of this compound beyond clinical trials. Here we describe YM-1, a derivative of MKT-077. We found that YM-1 was more cytotoxic and localized differently than MKT-077. YM-1 demonstrated this cytotoxicity across multiple cancer cell lines. This toxicity was limited to cancer cell lines; immortalized cell models were unaffected. Brief applications of YM-1 were found to be non-toxic. Brief treatment with YM-1 restored tamoxifen sensitivity to a refractory tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cell model. This effect is potentially due to altered estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation, an outcome precipitated by selective reductions in Akt levels (Akt/PKB. Thus, modifications to the rhodocyanine scaffold could potentially be made to improve efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties. Moreover, the impact on tamoxifen sensitivity could be a new utility for this compound family.

  6. Rhodacyanine derivative selectively targets cancer cells and overcomes tamoxifen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, John; Miyata, Yoshinari; Kiray, Janine; O'Leary, John C; Nguyen, Lana; Guo, Jianping; Blair, Laura J; Li, Xiaokai; Li, Xiokai; Jinwal, Umesh K; Cheng, Jin Q; Gestwicki, Jason E; Dickey, Chad A

    2012-01-01

    MKT-077, a rhodacyanine dye, was shown to produce cancer specific cell death. However, complications prevented the use of this compound beyond clinical trials. Here we describe YM-1, a derivative of MKT-077. We found that YM-1 was more cytotoxic and localized differently than MKT-077. YM-1 demonstrated this cytotoxicity across multiple cancer cell lines. This toxicity was limited to cancer cell lines; immortalized cell models were unaffected. Brief applications of YM-1 were found to be non-toxic. Brief treatment with YM-1 restored tamoxifen sensitivity to a refractory tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cell model. This effect is potentially due to altered estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation, an outcome precipitated by selective reductions in Akt levels (Akt/PKB). Thus, modifications to the rhodocyanine scaffold could potentially be made to improve efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties. Moreover, the impact on tamoxifen sensitivity could be a new utility for this compound family.

  7. Targeted and ultrasound-triggered cancer cell injury using perfluorocarbon emulsion-loaded liposomes endowed with cancer cell-targeting and fusogenic capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Yamashita, Takahiro; Tanabe, Yamato; Imai, Miki; Takahashi, Kenji; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the targeting and ultrasound-triggered injury of cancer cells using anticancer drug-free liposomes that contained an emulsion of perfluoropentane (ePFC5) and were co-modified with avidin as a targeting ligand for cancer cells and the hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ) envelope to promote liposome fusion with the cells. These liposomes are designated as ePFC5-loaded avidin/HVJ liposomes. ePFC5-loaded liposomes were sensitized to ultrasound irradiation. Liposomes modified with avidin alone (avidin liposomes) showed binding to MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and liposomes modified with HVJ envelope alone (HVJ liposomes) were found to fuse with MCF-7 cells. The irradiation of MCF-7 cells with 1 MHz ultrasound (30s, 1.2 W/cm(2), duty ratio 30%) combined with ePFC5-loaded avidin/HVJ liposomes resulted in a decrease in cell viability at 1h after irradiation to 43% of that of controls without ultrasound irradiation or liposomes. The cell viability was lower than that of cells treated with ultrasound irradiation with ePFC5-loaded avidin liposomes or ePFC5-loaded HVJ liposomes. This indicates that co-modification of liposome with avidin and HVJ envelope could enhance ultrasound-induced cell injury in the presence of ePFC5-loaded liposomes.

  8. Oct4 targets regulatory nodes to modulate stem cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A Campbell

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1 is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain 'ES' have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer.

  9. Coexpression of the Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor and Stem Cell Markers: A Novel Approach to Target Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    experimental animals or chemical agents. PRODUCTS: Nothing to Report PARTICIPANTS & OTHER COLLABORATING ORGANIZATIONS: David W. Schomberg, PI Jane... experimental target for novel nanotechnology approaches capable of destroying ovarian cancer stem/progenitor cells (OCSCs). Scope: We examined...surface membrane of the same cell. Cells co-expressing the markers and the FSHR (plus appropriate controls) were then tested in mice to determine

  10. The hair follicle and its stem cells as drug delivery targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2006-05-01

    The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. The follicle offers many potential therapeutic targets. Hoffman and colleagues have pioneered hair-follicle-specific targeting using liposomes to deliver small and large molecules, including genes. They have also pioneered ex vivo hair-follicle targeting with continued expression of the introduced gene following transplantation. Recently, it has been discovered that hair follicle stem cells are highly pluripotent and can form neurons, glial cells and other cell types, and this has suggested that hair follicle stem cells may serve as gene therapy targets for regenerative medicine.

  11. Targeting of liposomes to HIV-1-infected cells by peptides derived from the CD4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepushkin, V A; Salem, I I; Andreev, S M; Dazin, P; Düzgüneş, N

    1996-10-23

    Liposomes can be targeted to HIV-infected cells by either reconstituting transmembrane CD4 in the membrane or covalently coupling soluble CD4 to modified lipids. We investigated whether synthetic peptides could be used as ligands for targeting liposomes. A synthetic peptide from the complementarity determining region 2 (CDR-2)-like domain of CD4 could bind specifically to HIV-infected cells and mediate the binding of peptide-coupled liposomes to these cells. A peptide from the CDR-3-like domain of CD4 inhibited HIV-induced syncytia formation, but failed to target liposomes to infected cells. This apparent discrepancy may be due to the requirement for a conformational change in the CD4 receptor for the CDR-3 region to interact with the HIV envelope protein. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using synthetic peptides to target liposomes containing antiviral drugs to HIV-infected cells.

  12. Integrin Targeting and Toxicological Assessment of Peptide-Conjugated Liposome Delivery Systems to Activated Endothelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Villadsen, Klaus; Østrem, Ragnhild Garborg

    2017-01-01

    Utilisation of functionalized liposomes as the means of targeted delivery of therapeutics may enhance specific transport of biologically active drugs to target tissues, while avoiding or reducing undesired side effects. In the present investigation, peptide-conjugated cationic liposomes were cons....... Therefore, this study demonstrates the feasibility of constructing a peptide-conjugated cationic liposome, which displays targeting to activated endothelial cells at concentrations that are not cytotoxic or inflammogenic to the cells....... constructed with the aim of targeting integrins (i.e. vitronectin and/or fibronectin receptors) on activated endothelial cells. The peptide-conjugated liposomes induced only cytotoxicity at the highest concentration in non-activated or activated endothelial cells, as well as in co-culture of endothelial cells...

  13. Effect of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting survivin on growth of human gastric cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantao Xu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Our study investigated the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting survivin on human gastric cancer cells. Human gastric cancer cells were incubated with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting survivin for pre-designed durations, and then the cell growth was observed under light and electronic microscopes. Electrophoresis of fractured DNA fragments was performed to detect the DNA distribution and telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP was used for the detection of telomerase activity. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting survivin could induce the apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells which were characterized by plasma membrane blistering, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, and formation of apoptotic bodies. Electrophoresis showed characteristic DNA ladder. Flow cytometry revealed hypo-diploid apoptosis peak before G1 phase and the telomerase activity was significantly inhibited. These results demonstrated antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting survivin can induce the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells to inhibit their proliferation.

  14. Investigation of the strategies for targeting of the afterglow nanoparticles to tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Leila Hossein; Homayoni, Homa; Zou, Xiaoju; Liu, Li; Chen, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Afterglow nanoparticles have been widely investigated as new agents for cancer imaging and as a light source for photodynamic activation for cancer treatment. For both applications, the targeting of the afterglow nanoparticles to tumor cells is an important and challenging issue. Here we report the strategies for targeting Sr3MgSi2O8:Eu(2+),Dy(3+) afterglow nanoparticles to tumor cells by conjugating with variety of targeting molecules such as folic acid, RGD peptide, and R-11 peptide. For folic acid targeting, experimental observations were conducted on PC-3 cells (folate receptor negative), MCF-7 (folate receptor positive), and KB cells (folate receptor positive) to compare the cellular uptake and confirm targeted delivery. For the cyclic RGDfK peptide, experiments were carried out on the integrin αvβ3 positive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line and the integrin αvβ3 negative MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines in order to compare the cellular uptakes. As for R11-SH peptide, cellular uptake of the afterglow nanoparticles was observed on LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. All the observations showed that the cellular uptakes of the nanoparticles were enhanced by conjugation to variety of targeting molecules which are specific for breast and prostate cancer cells.

  15. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana Jill Williams

    Full Text Available Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells. To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ. Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Briana Jill; Bhatia, Shilpa; Adams, Lisa K; Boling, Susan; Carroll, Jennifer L; Li, Xiao-Lin; Rogers, Donna L; Korokhov, Nikolay; Kovesdi, Imre; Pereboev, Alexander V; Curiel, David T; Mathis, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs) with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells). To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ). Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Concise Review: Cell Therapies for Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury: Targeting Microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, Sean I; Cox, Charles S

    2016-03-01

    We present a model hypothesis of how several types of cell therapies may target microglia as one of the principal cell types contributing to the inflammatory response after brain injury and discuss how imaging of brain inflammation could potentially be applied to develop biomarkers in patients with stroke and TBI enrolled into stem cell clinical trials. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  18. Targeted liposomes for delivery of protein-based drugs into the cytoplasm of tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrobattista, E; Crommelin, DJA; Wilschut, J; Storm, G

    2002-01-01

    Our goal was to deliver therapeutically active macromolecules into the cytosol of target cells. First, attempts were made to prepare virosomes that specifically interact with OVCAR-3 cells (human ovarian cancer cells). Detergent solubilized influenza virus envelopes were reconstituted forming viroso

  19. Plectasin, a Fungal Defensin, Targets the Bacterial Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Tanja; Kruse, Thomas; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    that plectasin, a fungal defensin, acts by directly binding the bacterial cell-wall precursor Lipid II. A wide range of genetic and biochemical approaches identify cell-wall biosynthesis as the pathway targeted by plectasin. In vitro assays for cell-wall synthesis identified Lipid II as the specific cellular...

  20. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  1. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleo Goyvaerts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  2. Understanding and Targeting Cell Growth Networks in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Briata P, et al. (2003) The Wnt/beta-catenin-->Pitx2 pathway controls the turnover of Pitx2 and other unstable mRNAs. Molecular Cell 12(5):1201-1211...transcripts. Molecular Cell 20(6):891-903. 20. Gherzi R, et al. (2004) A KH domain RNA binding protein, KSRP, promotes ARE-directed mRNA turnover by...recruiting the degradation machinery. Molecular Cell 14(5):571-583. 21. Kroll TT, Zhao WM, Jiang C, & Huber PW (2002) A homolog of FBP2/KSRP binds to

  3. Novel Enzymes for Targeted Hydrolysis of Algal Cell Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Johansen, Mikkel

    are incapable of breaking the complex polysaccharides found in seaweed cell walls. Therefore, new enzymes are needed for degradation of seaweed biomass. Bacteria that colonize the surfaces of seaweed secrete enzymes that allow them to degrade and utilize seaweed polysaccharides as energy. In addition, sea...... urchins are known algae-eaters and may therefore be inhabited by endosymbiotic bacteria that help in degradation of algal cell wall constituents. This thesis work investigated bacteria associated with seaweed, seagrass and sea urchins for their enzymatic activities against algal cell wall polysaccharides...

  4. Targeted genome editing in human cells using CRISPR/Cas nucleases and truncated guide RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanfang; Reyon, Deepak; Joung, J Keith

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases have recently emerged as a robust genome-editing platform that functions in a wide range of organisms. To reduce off-target effects of these nucleases, we developed and validated a modified system that uses truncated guide RNAs (tru-gRNAs). The use of tru-gRNAs leads to decreases in off-target effects and does not generally compromise the on-target efficiencies of these genome-editing nucleases. In this chapter, we describe guidelines for identifying potential tru-gRNA target sites and protocols for measuring the on-target efficiencies of CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases in human cells.

  5. A one-step rectification of sperm cell targeting ensures the success of double fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilei Huang; Yan Ju; Xiangfeng Wang; Quan Zhang; Sodmergen

    2015-01-01

    Successful fertilization in animals depends on competition among millions of sperm cells, whereas double fertilization in flowering plants usually involves just one pollen tube releasing two immobile sperm cells. It is largely a mystery how the plant sperm cells fuse efficiently with their female targets within an embryo sac. We show that the initial positioning of sperm cells upon discharge from the pollen tube is usually inopportune for gamete fusions and that adjustment of sperm cell targeting occurs through release and re-adhesion of one sperm cell, while the other connected sperm cell remains in stagnation. This enables proper adhesion of each sperm cell to a female gamete and coordinates the gamete fusions. Our findings reveal inner embryo sac dynamics that ensure the reproductive success of flowering plants and suggest a requirement for sperm cell differentiation as the basis of double fertilization.

  6. Salinomycin encapsulated nanoparticles as a targeting vehicle for glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tığlı Aydın, R Seda; Kaynak, Gökçe; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2016-02-01

    Salinomycin has been introduced as a novel alternative to traditional anti-cancer drugs. The aim of this study was to test a strategy designed to deliver salinomycin to glioblastoma cells in vitro. Salinomycin-encapsulated polysorbate 80-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (P80-SAL-PLGA) were prepared and characterized with respect to particle size, morphology, thermal properties, drug encapsulation efficiency and controlled salinomycin-release behaviour. The in vitro cellular uptake of P80-SAL-PLGA (5 and 10 µM) or uncoated nanoparticles was assessed in T98G human glioblastoma cells, and the cell viability was investigated with respect to anti-growth activities. SAL, which was successfully transported to T98G glioblastoma cells via P80 coated nanoparticles (∼14% within 60 min), greatly decreased (p salinomycin delivery system in the treatment of human glioblastoma.

  7. TARGETING CD8 T CELL METABOLISM IN TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle eYap

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infiltration of effector CD8 T cells play a major role in allograft rejection, and increases in memory and terminally-differentiated effector memory (TEMRA CD8 T cells are associated with long term allograft dysfunction. Alternatively, CD8 regulatory T (Tregs cells suppress the inflammatory responses of effector lymphocytes and induce allograft tolerance in animal models. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the field of immunometabolics and its important role in CD8 function and differentiation. The purpose of this review is to highlight the key metabolic pathways involved in CD8 T cells and to discuss how manipulating these metabolic pathways could lead to new immunosuppressive strategies for the transplantation field.

  8. Targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase: a potential approach for cell labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)], E-mail: ganesan.v@duke.edu; Song, Haijing; Affleck, Donna; McDougald, Darryl L. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Storms, Robert W. [Division of Cellular Therapy, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R.; Chin, Bennett B. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Introduction: To advance the science and clinical application of stem cell therapy, the availability of a highly sensitive, quantitative and translational method for tracking stem cells would be invaluable. Because hematopoetic stem cells express high levels of the cytosolic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1), we sought to develop an agent that is specific to ALDH1 and thus to cells expressing the enzyme. Such an agent might be also helpful in identifying tumors that are resistant to cyclophosphomide chemotherapy because ALDH1 is known to be responsible for this resistance. Methods: We developed schemes for the synthesis of two radioiodinated aldehdyes - N-formylmethyl-5-[*I]iodopyridine-3-carboxamide ([*I]FMIC) and 4-diethylamino-3-[*I]iodobenzaldehyde ([*I]DEIBA)-at no-carrier-added levels from their respective tin precursors. These agents were evaluated using pure ALDH1 and tumor cells that expressed the enzyme. Results: The average radiochemical yields for the synthesis of [{sup 125}I]FMIC and [{sup 125}I]DEIBA were 70{+-}5% and 47{+-}14%, respectively. ALDH1 converted both compounds to respective acids suggesting their suitability as ALDH1 imaging agents. Although ability of ALDH1 within the cells to oxidize one of these substrates was shown, specific uptake in ALDH-expressing tumor cells could not be demonstrated. Conclusion: To pursue this approach for ALDH1 imaging, radiolabeled aldehydes need to be designed such that, in addition to being good substrates for ALDH1, the cognate products should be sufficiently polar so as to be retained within the cells.

  9. Targeting epidermal Langerhans cells by epidermal powder immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Immune reactions to foreign or self-antigens lead to protective immunity and, sometimes, immune disorders such as allergies and autoimmune diseases. Antigen presenting cells (APC) including epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) play an important role in the course and outcome of the immune reactions. Epidermal powder immunization (EPI) is a technology that offers a tool to manipulate the LCs and the potential to harness the immune reactions towards prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and immune disorders.

  10. Biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted ultrasound imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, 270 Bevis Hall, 1080 Carmack Rd, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Jie [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, 270 Bevis Hall, 1080 Carmack Rd, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Rosol, Thomas J [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Ohio State University, 1925 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pan Xueliang [Department of Statistics, Ohio State University, 1958 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Voorhees, Jeffrey L [Ohio State Biochemistry Program, Ohio State University, 108 Aronoff Building, 318 West 12 Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2007-08-21

    Disease-specific enhanced imaging through a targeted agent promises to improve the specificity of medical ultrasound. Nanoparticles may provide unique advantages for targeted ultrasound imaging due to their novel physical and surface properties. In this study, we examined a nanoparticle agent developed from a biodegradable polymer, polylactic acid (PLA). The nanoparticles (mean diameter = 250 nm) were surface conjugated to an anti-Her2 antibody (i.e., Herceptin) for specific binding to breast cancer cells that overexpress Her2 receptors. We examined the targeting specificity and the resultant ultrasound enhancement in Her2-positive and negative cells. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging were used to assess the nanoparticle-cell binding. Her2-positive cells demonstrated substantial staining after incubation with nanoparticle/antibody conjugates, while minimal staining was found in Her2-negative cells, indicating receptor-specific binding of the conjugated PLA nanoparticles. In high-resolution ultrasound B-mode images, the average gray scale of the Her2-positive cells was consistently and significantly higher after nanoparticle treatment (133 {+-} 4 in treated cells versus 109 {+-} 4 in control, p < 0.001, n = 5), while no difference was detected in the cells that did not overexpress the receptors (117 {+-} 3 in treated cells versus 118 {+-} 5 in control). In conclusion, the feasibility of using targeted nanoparticles to enhance ultrasonic images was demonstrated in vitro. This may be a promising approach to target cancer biomarkers for site-specific ultrasound imaging.

  11. Microcystins derived from lysing Microcystis cells do not cause negative effects on crustacean zooplankton in Lake Taihu, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, F.; Dai, X.; Shu, T.; Gulati, R.D.; Liu, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) have a toxic effect on crustacean zooplankton in the laboratory, but there is little or no unequivocal evidence in the literature of their lethal effects on crustacean zooplankton in the field. We used the natural microcystins extracted from Microcystis spp. to test if they could

  12. Hyaluronic acid-conjugated liposome nanoparticles for targeted delivery to CD44 overexpressing glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Stephen L.; Wilson, Christina L.; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a highly prevalent and deadly brain malignancy characterized by poor prognosis and restricted disease management potential. Despite the success of nanocarrier systems to improve drug/gene therapy for cancer, active targeting specificity remains a major hurdle for GBM. Additionally, since the brain is a multi-cell type organ, there is a critical need to develop an approach to distinguish between GBM cells and healthy brain cells for safe and successful treatment. In this report, we have incorporated hyaluronic acid (HA) as an active targeting ligand for GBM. To do so, we employed HA conjugated liposomes (HALNPs) to study the uptake pathway in key cells in the brain including primary astrocytes, microglia, and human GBM cells. We observed that the HALNPs specifically target GBM cells over other brain cells due to higher expression of CD44 in tumor cells. Furthermore, CD44 driven HALNP uptake into GBM cells resulted in lysosomal evasion and increased efficacy of Doxorubicin, a model anti-neoplastic agent, while the astrocytes and microglia cells exhibited extensive HALNP-lysosome co-localization and decreased antineoplastic potency. In summary, novel CD44 targeted lipid based nanocarriers appear to be proficient in mediating site-specific delivery of drugs via CD44 receptors in GBM cells, with an improved therapeutic margin and safety. PMID:27120809

  13. Functional genetic targeting of embryonic kidney progenitor cells ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junttila, Sanna; Saarela, Ulla; Halt, Kimmo; Manninen, Aki; Pärssinen, Heikki; Lecca, M Rita; Brändli, André W; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Skovorodkin, Ilya; Vainio, Seppo J

    2015-05-01

    The embryonic mammalian metanephric mesenchyme (MM) is a unique tissue because it is competent to generate the nephrons in response to Wnt signaling. An ex vivo culture in which the MM is separated from the ureteric bud (UB), the natural inducer, can be used as a classic tubule induction model for studying nephrogenesis. However, technological restrictions currently prevent using this model to study the molecular genetic details before or during tubule induction. Using nephron segment-specific markers, we now show that tubule induction in the MM ex vivo also leads to the assembly of highly segmented nephrons. This induction capacity was reconstituted when MM tissue was dissociated into a cell suspension and then reaggregated (drMM) in the presence of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 7/human recombinant fibroblast growth factor 2 for 24 hours before induction. Growth factor-treated drMM also recovered the capacity for organogenesis when recombined with the UB. Cell tracking and time-lapse imaging of chimeric drMM cultures indicated that the nephron is not derived from a single progenitor cell. Furthermore, viral vector-mediated transduction of green fluorescent protein was much more efficient in dissociated MM cells than in intact mesenchyme, and the nephrogenic competence of transduced drMM progenitor cells was preserved. Moreover, drMM cells transduced with viral vectors mediating Lhx1 knockdown were excluded from the nephric tubules, whereas cells transduced with control vectors were incorporated. In summary, these techniques allow reproducible cellular and molecular examinations of the mechanisms behind nephrogenesis and kidney organogenesis in an ex vivo organ culture/organoid setting.

  14. Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase signaling as an emerging therapeutic agent of B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bing; Qu, Fulian; Yuan, Tian; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2015-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is central to the development and function of B cells. BCR signaling has emerged as a pivotal pathway and a key driver of numerous B-cell lymphomas. Disruption of BCR signaling can be lethal to malignant B cells. Recently, kinase inhibitors that target BCR signaling have induced notable clinical responses. These inhibitors include spleen tyrosine kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, phosphoinositide 3'-kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Ibrutinib, an oral irreversible BTK inhibitor, has emerged as a promising targeted therapy for patients with B-cell malignancies. The present review discusses the current understanding of BTK-mediated BCR signaling in the biology and pathobiology of normal and malignant B cells, and the cellular interaction with the tumor microenvironment. The data on ibrutinib in the preclinical and clinical settings is also discussed, and perspectives for the future use of ibrutinib are outlined.

  15. CAM and Cell Fate Targeting: Molecular and Energetic Insights into Cell Growth and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ventura

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence–based CAM.

  16. Colon cancer stem cells: promise of targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaro, Matilde; Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2010-06-01

    First developed for hematologic disorders, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) was expanded to solid tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The traditional model of colon carcinogenesis includes several steps that occur via mutational activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Intestinal epithelial cells exist for a shorter amount of time than that required to accumulate tumor-inducing genetic changes, so researchers have investigated the concept that CRC arises from the long-lived stem cells, rather than from the differentiated epithelial cells. Colon CSCs were originally identified through the expression of the CD133 glycoprotein using an antibody directed to its epitope AC133. It is not clear if CD133 is a marker of colon CSCs-other cell surface markers, such as epithelial-specific antigen, CD44, CD166, Musashi-1, CD29, CD24, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, have been proposed. In addition to initiating and sustaining tumor growth, CSCs are believed to mediate cancer relapse after chemotherapy. How can we identify and analyze colon CSCs and what agents are being designed to kill this chemotherapy-refractory population?

  17. Tapping Stem Cells to Target AMD: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Brandl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are increasingly gaining attention in biomedicine as valuable resources to establish patient-derived cell culture models of the cell type known to express the primary pathology. The idea of “a patient in a dish” aims at basic, but also clinical, applications with the promise to mimic individual genetic and metabolic complexities barely reflected in current invertebrate or vertebrate animal model systems. This may particularly be true for the inherited and complex diseases of the retina, as this tissue has anatomical and physiological aspects unique to the human eye. For example, the complex age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the leading cause of blindness in Western societies, can be attributed to a large number of genetic and individual factors with so far unclear modes of mutual interaction. Here, we review the current status and future prospects of utilizing hPSCs, specifically induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, in basic and clinical AMD research, but also in assessing potential treatment options. We provide an outline of concepts for disease modelling and summarize ongoing and projected clinical trials for stem cell-based therapy in late-stage AMD.

  18. Generation of tumor-targeted human T lymphocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themeli, Maria; Kloss, Christopher C; Ciriello, Giovanni; Fedorov, Victor D; Perna, Fabiana; Gonen, Mithat; Sadelain, Michel

    2013-10-01

    Progress in adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer and infectious diseases is hampered by the lack of readily available, antigen-specific, human T lymphocytes. Pluripotent stem cells could provide an unlimited source of T lymphocytes, but the therapeutic potential of human pluripotent stem cell-derived lymphoid cells generated to date remains uncertain. Here we combine induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) technologies to generate human T cells targeted to CD19, an antigen expressed by malignant B cells, in tissue culture. These iPSC-derived, CAR-expressing T cells display a phenotype resembling that of innate γδ T cells. Similar to CAR-transduced, peripheral blood γδ T cells, the iPSC-derived T cells potently inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model. This approach of generating therapeutic human T cells 'in the dish' may be useful for cancer immunotherapy and other medical applications.

  19. Influence of interferon on the functional expression of natural killer target structures of murine lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, S; Guadagni, F; Bonmassar, E; Potenza, P; Giuliani, A

    1986-10-01

    Murine lymphoma cells (YAC-1), induced by Moloney leukemia virus, nontreated (YAC) or pretreated in vitro with interferon (YAC-IF), were tested for their susceptibility to natural killer (NK)-mediated cytolysis. In line with previous reports YAC-IF were less susceptible to NK lysis than YAC cells. In cold competition assay, YAC-IF inhibited cytotoxicity to a lesser extent than YAC lymphoma when labeled target YAC cells were used. However, when radioactive YAC-IF cells were used as targets, cold competition attained with both YAC and YAC-IF was essentially the same. Furthermore, effector splenocytes, depleted of NK effector cells through immunoabsorption on YAC monolayer, were inactive against both YAC and YAC-IF targets. On the other hand, effector lymphocytes, absorbed on YAC-IF monolayer, retained NK activity against YAC cells but not against YAC-IF targets. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that interferon (IF) modulates negatively a subset of "interferon-susceptible" (IFS) NK target structure(s) (TS) of YAC cells, which would then express membrane determinants not functionally present on YAC-IF cells. On the other hand YAC and YAC-IF cells share "interferon-resistant" (IFR) TS not affected by pretreatment with IF. In order to test whether IFS X TS and IFR X TS are present on the same cell or clonally distributed, YAC cells were cloned and tested for NK susceptibility following IF pretreatment. The results did not support the hypothesis of a clonal distribution of both IFS X TS and IFR X TS since IF pretreatment of all clones, obtained by limiting dilution, resulted in a net impairment of target susceptibility to NK effector cells.

  20. Targeting development of incretin-producing cells increases insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Natalia; Reimann, Frank; van Es, Johan H

    2015-01-01

    systems and augmented glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion. In a high-fat diet-fed mouse model of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes, dibenzazepine administration increased L cell numbers in the intestine, improved the early insulin response to glucose, and restored glucose tolerance......Glucagon-like peptide-1-based (GLP-1-based) therapies improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. While these agents augment insulin secretion, they do not mimic the physiological meal-related rise and fall of GLP-1 concentrations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that increasing...... the number of intestinal L cells, which produce GLP-1, is an alternative strategy to augment insulin responses and improve glucose tolerance. Blocking the NOTCH signaling pathway with the γ-secretase inhibitor dibenzazepine increased the number of L cells in intestinal organoid-based mouse and human culture...

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells after Polytrauma: Actor and Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Huber-Lang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells that are considered indispensable in regeneration processes after tissue trauma. MSCs are recruited to damaged areas via several chemoattractant pathways where they function as “actors” in the healing process by the secretion of manifold pro- and anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, pro- and anticoagulatory, and trophic/angiogenic factors, but also by proliferation and differentiation into the required cells. On the other hand, MSCs represent “targets” during the pathophysiological conditions after severe trauma, when excessively generated inflammatory mediators, complement activation factors, and damage- and pathogen-associated molecular patterns challenge MSCs and alter their functionality. This in turn leads to complement opsonization, lysis, clearance by macrophages, and reduced migratory and regenerative abilities which culminate in impaired tissue repair. We summarize relevant cellular and signaling mechanisms and provide an up-to-date overview about promising future therapeutic MSC strategies in the context of severe tissue trauma.

  2. A novel strategy for cancer treatment:Targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jia; MA LeiNa; WANG YiGang; LIU XinYuan; QIAN QiJun

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating cell (CSC/TIC) is a subclass of cancer cells possessing parts of properties of normal stem cell. It has a high capacity of proliferation and plays a pivotal role in tumor recurrence and tumor resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. At present, small molecule in-hibitors and fusion proteins are widely used in the CSC-targeting strategy. Gene-virotherapy, which uses oncolytic adenovirus as a vector to mediate the expression of therapeutic gene, shows a signifi-cant superiority to other regimens of cancer treatment and has a good efficacy in the treatment of solid tumors. Thus, it is a promising choice to apply gene-virotherapy into the CSC-targeting treatment. Based on the molecular mechanism underlying CSC self-renewal, a series of effective strategies for targeting CSC have been established. This review will summarize the recent research progresses on CSC-targeting treatment.

  3. Cell-mediated Delivery and Targeted Erosion of Noncovalently Crosslinked Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds from hydrogels is presented. The method involves administering to a cell a hydrogel in which a therapeutic compound is noncovalently bound to heparin.

  4. MicroRNAs targeting TGFβ signalling underlie the regulatory T cell defect in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Mary E; Lee, Priscilla W; Liu, Yue; Selhorst, Amanda J; Gormley, Matthew G; Pei, Wei; Yang, Yuhong; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling is critical for regulatory T cell development and function, and regulatory T cell dysregulation is a common observation in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. In a comprehensive miRNA profiling study of patients with multiple sclerosis naïve CD4 T cells, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs predicted to target the TGFβ signalling pathway were identified, leading to the hypothesis that miRNAs may be responsible for the regulatory T cell defect observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Patients with multiple sclerosis had reduced levels of TGFβ signalling components in their naïve CD4 T cells. The differentially expressed miRNAs negatively regulated the TGFβ pathway, resulting in a reduced capacity of naïve CD4 T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the limited number of regulatory T cells, that did develop when these TGFβ-targeting miRNAs were overexpressed, were capable of suppressing effector T cells. As it has previously been demonstrated that compromising TGFβ signalling results in a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire insufficient to control autoimmunity, and patients with multiple sclerosis have a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire, these data indicate that the elevated expression of multiple TGFβ-targeting miRNAs in naïve CD4 T cells of patients with multiple sclerosis impairs TGFβ signalling, and dampens regulatory T cell development, thereby enhancing susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis.

  5. A Sigmoid Functional Response Emerges When Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Start Killing Fresh Target Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J

    2017-03-28

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing involves the formation of a synapse with a target cell, followed by delivery of perforin and granzymes. Previously, we derived a general functional response for CTL killing while considering that CTLs form stable synapses (i.e., single-stage) and that the number of conjugates remains at steady state. However, the killing of target cells sometimes requires multiple engagements (i.e., multistage). To study how multistage killing and a lack of steady state influence the functional response, we here analyze a set of differential equations as well as simulations employing the cellular Potts model, in both cases describing CTLs that kill target cells. We find that at steady state the total killing rate (i.e., the number of target cells killed by all CTLs) is well described by the previously derived double saturation function. Compared to single-stage killing, the total killing rate during multistage killing saturates at higher CTL and target cell densities. Importantly, when the killing is measured before the steady state is approached, a qualitatively different functional response emerges for two reasons: First, the killing signal of each CTL gets diluted over several targets and because this dilution effect is strongest at high target cell densities; this can result in a peak in the dependence of the total killing rate on the target cell density. Second, the total killing rate exhibits a sigmoid dependence on the CTL density when killing is a multistage process, because it takes typically more than one CTL to kill a target. In conclusion, a sigmoid dependence of the killing rate on the CTLs during initial phases of killing may be indicative of a multistage killing process. Observation of a sigmoid functional response may thus arise from a dilution effect and is not necessarily due to cooperative behavior of the CTLs. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Combination of chemotherapy and cancer stem cell targeting agents: Preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Atkinson, Katharine; Zhang, Tao

    2017-06-28

    The cancer stem cell model claims that the initiation, maintenance, and growth of a tumor are driven by a small population of cancer cells termed cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells possess a variety of phenotypes associated with therapeutic resistance and often cause recurrence of the diseases. Several strategies have been investigated to target cancer stem cells in a variety of cancers, such as blocking one or more self-renewal signaling pathways, reducing the expression of drug efflux and ATP-binding cassette efflux transporters, modulating epigenetic aberrations, and promoting cancer stem cell differentiation. A number of cell and animal studies strongly support the potential benefits of combining chemotherapeutic drugs with cancer stem cell targeting agents. Clinical trials are still underway to address the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of combination treatment. This mini-review provides an updated discussion of these preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Glycoengineering of Human Cell Lines Using Zinc Finger Nuclease Gene Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography is a powerful technique for isolation of glycoproteins carrying a specific glycan structure of interest. However, the enormous diversity of glycans present on the cell surface, as well as on individual proteins, makes it difficult to isolate an entire glycoproteome...... with one or even a series of lectins. Here we present a technique to generate cell lines with homogenous truncated O-glycans using zinc finger nuclease gene targeting. Because of their simplified O-glycoproteome, the cells have been named SimpleCells. Glycoproteins from SimpleCells can be isolated...... in a single purification step by lectin chromatography performed on a long lectin column. This protocol describes Zinc finger nuclease gene targeting of human cells to simplify the glycoproteome, as well as lectin chromatography and isolation of glycopeptides from total cell lysates of SimpleCells....

  8. Avian erythroblastosis virus transforms a novel mast cell-basophil precursor target in the Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovici, M G; Siegel, M L; Moscovici, C

    1989-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells of the Japanese quail were transformed by avian erythroblastosis virus in vivo and in vitro. In both circumstances, the infected hematopoietic tissues exhibited a dual oncogenic response of erythroid and mast cell-basophil elements. The erythroid transformants escaped the avian erythroblastosis virus block in differentiation and progressed to hemoglobinization. Resulting basophilic cells were morphologically, biochemically, and ultrastructurally identical to mast cell-basophils observed in other species. None of the virally transformed cells actively produced reverse transcriptase activity. Nonproducer cell lines synthesized viral RNA and both v-erbA and v-erbB proteins. These results indicate that the Japanese quail has a viral target cell different from that of the chicken. The implications of a single bipotential transformation target yielding both erythroid and mast cell-basophil colonies is discussed. Images PMID:2539521

  9. Laser capture microdissection of bacterial cells targeted by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard; Mølbak, Lars; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    2005-01-01

    . By this method, a potentially pathogenic strain of the genus Brachyspira from formalin-fixed human colonic biopsies were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 16S rRNA-targeting oligonucleotide probe, followed by laser capture microdissection (LCM) of the targeted cells. Direct 16S r...

  10. Targeted therapies for renal cell carcinoma: review of adverse event management strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisen, T.; Sternberg, C.N.; Robert, C.; Mulders, P.F.; Pyle, L.; Zbinden, S.; Izzedine, H.; Escudier, B.

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of targeted agents for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), overall survival has improved, and patients are being treated continuously for increasingly long periods of time. This has raised challenges in the management of adverse events (AEs) associated with the six targeted

  11. Polarizing T and B cell responses by APC-targeted subunit vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnveig eGrødeland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines mostly aim at the induction of specific neutralizing antibodies. While antibodies are important for protection against a particular virus strain, T cells can recognize epitopes that will offer broader protection against influenza. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine format by which protein antigens can be targeted specifically to receptors on antigen presenting cells (APCs. The DNA-encoded vaccine proteins are homodimers, each chain consisting of a targeting unit, a dimerization unit, and an antigen. The strategy of targeting antigen to APCs greatly enhances immune responses as compared to non-targeted controls. Furthermore, targeting of antigen to different receptors on APCs can polarize the immune response to different arms of immunity. Here, we discuss how targeting of hemagglutinin (HA to MHC class II molecules increases Th2 and IgG1 antibody responses, whereas targeting to chemokine receptors XCR1 or CCR1/3/5 increases Th1 and IgG2a responses, in addition to CD8+ T cell responses. We also discuss these results in relation to work published by others on APC-targeting. Differential targeting of APC surface molecules may allow the induction of tailor-made phenotypes of adaptive immune responses that are optimal for protection against various infectious agents, including influenza virus.

  12. Cancer cell signaling pathways targeted by spice-derived nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, cardamonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer.

  13. Drug resistance to chlorambucil in murine B-cell leukemic cells is overcome by its conjugation to a targeting peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellerman, Gary; Baskin, Sophia; Galia, Luboshits; Gilad, Yosef; Firer, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    Targeting drugs through small-molecule carriers with a high affinity to receptors on cancer cells can overcome the lack of target cell specificity of most anticancer drugs. These targeted carrier-drug conjugates are also capable of reversing drug resistance in cancer cells. Although many targeted drug delivery approaches are being tested, the linkage of several and different drugs to a single carrier molecule might further enhance their therapeutic efficacy, particularly if the drugs are engineered for variable time release. This report shows that murine B-cell leukemic cells previously resistant to a chemotherapeutic drug can be made sensitive to that drug as long as it is conjugated to a targeting peptide and, in particular, when the conjugate contains multiple copies of the drug. Using a 13mer peptide (VHFFKNIVTPRTP) derived from the myelin basic protein (p-MBP), dendrimer-based peptide conjugates containing one, two, or four molecules of chlorambucil were synthesized. Although murine hybridomas expressing antibodies to either p-MBP (MBP cells) or a nonrelevant antigen (BCL-1 cells) were both resistant to free chlorambucil, exposure of the cells to the p-MBP-chlorambucil conjugate completely reversed the drug resistance in MBP, but not BCL-1 cells or normal spleen cells. Moreover, at equivalent drug doses, there was significant enhancement in the cytotoxic activity of multidrug versus single-drug copy conjugates. On the basis of these results, the use of multifunctional dendrone linkers bearing several covalently bound cytotoxic agents allows the development of more effective targeted drug systems and enhances the efficacy of currently approved drugs for B-cell leukemia.

  14. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H+-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:27234586

  15. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-06-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function.

  16. Engineering of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Using Internalizing Aptamers Isolated by Cell-Uptake Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zeyu; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Alexis, Frank; Lupták, Andrej; Teply, Benjamin A.; Chan, Juliana M.; Shi, Jinjun; Digga, Elise; Cheng, Judy; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of targeted nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy is to discover targeting ligands that allow for differential binding and uptake by the target cancer cells. Using prostate cancer (PCa) as a model disease, we developed a cell-uptake selection strategy to isolate PCa-specific internalizing 2'-Omethyl RNA aptamers (Apts) for NP incorporation. Twelve cycles of selection and counter-selection were done to obtain a panel of internalizing Apts, which can distinguish PCa cells from non-prostate and normal prostate cells. After Apt characterization, size minimization, and conjugation of the Apts with fluorescently-labeled polymeric NPs, the NP-Apt bioconjugates exhibit PCa specificity and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to non-targeted NPs lacking the internalizing Apts. Furthermore, when docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of PCa, was encapsulated within the NP-Apt, a significant improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved in targeted PCa cells. Rather than isolating high-affinity Apts as reported in previous selection processes, our selection strategy was designed to enrich cancer-cell specific internalizing Apts. A similar cell-uptake selection strategy may be used to develop specific internalizing ligands for a myriad of other diseases and can potentially facilitate delivering various molecules, including drugs and siRNAs, into cells. PMID:22214176

  17. MiR-661 inhibits glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting hTERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhen, E-mail: lizhen7111@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110004 (China); Liu, Yun-hui; Diao, Hong-yu [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110004 (China); Ma, Jun [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110001 (China); Yao, Yi-long [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, 110004 (China)

    2015-12-25

    In this study, we analyzed the functional role of miR-661 in glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that overexpression of miR-661 obviously suppressed the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells. MiRNA target prediction algorithms implied that hTERT is a candidate target gene for miR-661. A fluorescent reporter assay confirmed that miR-661 could lead to hTERT gene silencing by recognizing and specifically binding to the predicted site of the hTERT mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) specifically. Furthermore, hTERT knockdown significantly decreased the growth and viability of glioma cells. These results indicate that miR-661 can inhibit glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting hTERT. - Highlights: • MiR-661 was downregulated in glioma tissues and functional as a tumor suppressor. • MiR-661 modulates cell proliferation, invasion and migration of glioma cells. • MiR-661 directly target hTERT in glioma cells. • MiR-661 inhibits glioma cell tumorgenesis by targeting hTERT.

  18. Utilization of Rad51C promoter for transcriptional targeting of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Ying; Tian, Xiao; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Mao, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy that specifically targets malignant cells with minimal or no toxicity to normal tissue has been a long-standing goal of cancer research. Rad51 expression is elevated in a wide range of cancers and Rad51 promoter has been used to transcriptionally target tumor cells, however, a large size of Rad51 promoter limits its application for gene therapy. To identify novel tumor-specific promoters, we examined expression levels of Rad51 paralogs, Rad51B, Rad51C, and Rad51D as well as Rad52 in a panel of normal and tumor cell lines. We found that Rad51C is significantly overexpressed in cancer cells. The expression was up-regulated by approximately 6-fold at the mRNA level and 9-fold at the protein level. Interestingly, the 2064 bp long Rad51C promoter fragment was approximately 300-fold higher in cancer cells than in normal cells. A construct containing Rad51C promoter driving diphtheria toxin A efficiently killed several types of cancer cells with very mild effect to normal cells. These results underscore the potential of targeting the homologous recombination pathway in cancer cells and provide a proof of principle that the Rad51C promoter fragment can be used to transcriptionally target cancer cells. PMID:24742710

  19. Targeting and Imaging of Cancer Cells via Monosaccharide-Imprinted Fluorescent Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangshou; Yin, Danyang; Wang, Wenjing; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    The recognition of cancer cells is a key for cancer diagnosis and therapy, but the specificity highly relies on the use of biorecognition molecules particularly antibodies. Because biorecognition molecules suffer from some apparent disadvantages, such as hard to prepare and poor storage stability, novel alternatives that can overcome these disadvantages are highly important. Here we present monosaccharide-imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for targeting and imaging of cancer cells. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) probe was fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped silica NPs with a shell imprinted with sialic acid, fucose or mannose as the template. The monosaccharide-imprinted NPs exhibited high specificity toward the target monosaccharides. As the template monosaccharides used are over-expressed on cancer cells, these monosaccharide-imprinted NPs allowed for specific targeting cancer cells over normal cells. Fluorescence imaging of human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) over normal hepatic cells (L-02) and mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) over normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by these NPs was demonstrated. As the imprinting approach employed herein is generally applicable and highly efficient, monosaccharide-imprinted NPs can be promising probes for targeting cancer cells.

  20. Targeting Prostate Cancer Cells by Combined Oxidative Stress Induction and Androgen Receptor Antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0340 TITLE: Targeting Prostate Cancer Cells by Combined Oxidative Stress Induction and Androgen...COVERED 1 Aug 2014 - 21 Jul 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Prostate Cancer Cells by Combined Oxidative Stress Induction and... oxidative stress . Five classes of hybrid drugs have been designed and synthesized, i.e. Enz-PL (e.g. compd 28), Enz-catechol (e.g., compds 29, 30), Enz

  1. Folate-conjugated polymer micelles for active targeting to cancer cells: preparation, in vitro evaluation of targeting ability and cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You Jian [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Li Xin [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Cui Fude [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Du Yongzhong [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yuan Hong [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Hu Fuqiang [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2008-01-30

    To obtain an active-targeting carrier to cancer cells, folate-conjugated stearic acid grafted chitosan oligosaccharide (Fa-CSOSA) was synthesized by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)-mediated coupling reaction. The substitution degree is 22.1%. The critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) of Fa-CSOSA were 0.017 and 0.0074 mg ml{sup -1} in distilled water and PBS (pH 7.4), respectively. The average volume size range of Fa-CSOSA micelles was 60-120 nm. The targeting ability of Fa-CSOSA micelles was investigated against two kinds of cell lines (A549 and Hela), which have different amounts of folate receptors in their surface. The results indicated that Fa-CSOSA micelles presented a targeting ability to the cells (Hela) with a higher expression of folate receptor during a short-time incubation (<6 h). As incubation proceeded, the special spatial structure of the micelles gradually plays a main role in cellular internalization of the micelles. Good internalization of the micelles into both Hela and A549 cells was shown. Then, paclitaxel (PTX) was encapsulated into the micelles, and the content of PTX in the micelles was about 4.8% (w/w). The average volume size range of PTX-loaded micelles was 150-340 nm. Furthermore, the anti-tumor efficacy in vitro was investigated by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. The IC{sub 50} of Taxol (a clinical formulation containing PTX) on A549 and Hela cells was 7.0 and 11.0 {mu}g ml{sup -1}, respectively. The cytotoxicity of PTX-loaded micelles was improved sharply (IC{sub 50} on A549: 0.32 {mu}g ml{sup -1}; IC{sub 50} on Hela: 0.268 {mu}g ml{sup -1}). This is attributed to the increased intracellular delivery of the drug. The Fa-CSOSA micelles that are presented may be a promising active-targeting carrier candidate via folate mediation.

  2. Targeted treatments in advanced renal cell carcinoma: focus on axitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzoni E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Elena Verzoni, Paolo Grassi, Isabella Testa, Roberto Iacovelli, Pamela Biondani, Enrico Garanzini , Filippo De Braud, Giuseppe ProcopioDepartment of Medical Oncology 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Antiangiogenesis options have evolved rapidly in the last few years, with an increasing number of agents currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been shown to be very effective for the treatment of metastatic renal cancer cell. Axitinib is a third-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and is currently being developed for the treatment of various malignancies. The pharmacokinetic properties of axitinib may have a selective therapeutic effect, with minimal adverse reactions and enhanced safety. In a large Phase III study of previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib achieved a longer progression-free survival than sorafenib with an acceptable safety profile and good quality of life. This review focuses on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity of axitinib in the current treatment of renal cell carcinoma. The role of axitinib in the adjuvant and/or neoadjuvant setting needs to be evaluated in further clinical trials.Keywords: axitinib, renal cell carcinoma, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, angiogenesis

  3. Targeting inflammation with autoantigen-specific T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune diseases are driven by cells that respond to tissue components of the body. Inflammation in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can be suppressed by drug therapy. However, the broad range of immunosuppressive action of these drugs often does not res

  4. Targeting cancer cells with folic acid-iminoboronate fluorescent conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, Pedro M S D; Frade, Raquel F M; Chudasama, Vijay; Cordeiro, Carlos; Caddick, Stephen; Gois, Pedro M P

    2014-05-25

    Herein we present the synthesis of fluorescent 2-acetylbenzeneboronic acids that undergo B-N promoted conjugation with lysozyme and N-(2-aminoethyl) folic acid (EDA-FA), generating conjugates that are selectively recognized and internalized by cancer cells that over-express folic acid receptors.

  5. Lung Dendritic cells: Targets for therapy in allergic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells are crucial in determining the functional outcome of allergen encounter in the lung. Antigen presentation by myeloid DCs leads to Th2 sensitization typical of allergic disease, whereas antigen presentation by plasmacytoid DCs serves to dampen inflammation. It is increasin

  6. Targeting inflammation with autoantigen-specific T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune diseases are driven by cells that respond to tissue components of the body. Inflammation in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can be suppressed by drug therapy. However, the broad range of immunosuppressive action of these drugs often does not

  7. Candidate Medical Countermeasures Targeting Ebola Virus Cell Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-03

    promising small molecule is LJ001 that functions by intercalating into the viral 228 membrane of enveloped virions, thereby preventing virion-cell... intercalator that inhibits EBOV infection in vitro is 234 teicoplanin [90], and arbidol, which also is highly effective against EBOV, may work in a similar

  8. Targeting Dendritic Cell Function during Systemic Autoimmunity to Restore Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Mackern-Oberti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags, current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders.

  9. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  10. Prediction of intracellular exposure bridges the gap between target- and cell-based drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Laurie J.; Wayne, Gareth J.; Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Treyer, Andrea; Lundbäck, Thomas; West, Andy; Hann, Michael M.; Artursson, Per

    2017-01-01

    Inadequate target exposure is a major cause of high attrition in drug discovery. Here, we show that a label-free method for quantifying the intracellular bioavailability (Fic) of drug molecules predicts drug access to intracellular targets and hence, pharmacological effect. We determined Fic in multiple cellular assays and cell types representing different targets from a number of therapeutic areas, including cancer, inflammation, and dementia. Both cytosolic targets and targets localized in subcellular compartments were investigated. Fic gives insights on membrane-permeable compounds in terms of cellular potency and intracellular target engagement, compared with biochemical potency measurements alone. Knowledge of the amount of drug that is locally available to bind intracellular targets provides a powerful tool for compound selection in early drug discovery. PMID:28701380

  11. Increasing intracellular bioavailable copper selectively targets prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Michael A; Pearson, Helen B; Wolyniec, Kamil; Klaver, Paul; Bilandzic, Maree; Paterson, Brett M; Bush, Ashley I; Humbert, Patrick O; La Fontaine, Sharon; Donnelly, Paul S; Haupt, Ygal

    2013-07-19

    The therapeutic efficacy of two bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes, glyoxalbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(gtsm)] and diacetylbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)], for the treatment of prostate cancer was assessed in cell culture and animal models. Distinctively, copper dissociates intracellularly from Cu(II)(gtsm) but is retained by Cu(II)(atsm). We further demonstrated that intracellular H2gtsm [reduced Cu(II)(gtsm)] continues to redistribute copper into a bioavailable (exchangeable) pool. Both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm) selectively kill transformed (hyperplastic and carcinoma) prostate cell lines but, importantly, do not affect the viability of primary prostate epithelial cells. Increasing extracellular copper concentrations enhanced the therapeutic capacity of both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm), and their ligands (H2gtsm and H2atsm) were toxic only toward cancerous prostate cells when combined with copper. Treatment of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model with Cu(II)(gtsm) (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate cancer burden (∼70%) and severity (grade), while treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) (30 mg/kg) was ineffective at the given dose. However, Cu(II)(gtsm) caused mild kidney toxicity in the mice, associated primarily with interstitial nephritis and luminal distention. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibits proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, a feature further established as being common to copper-ionophores that increase intracellular bioavailable copper. We have demonstrated that increasing intracellular bioavailable copper can selectively kill cancerous prostate cells in vitro and in vivo and have revealed the potential for bis(thiosemicarbazone) copper complexes to be developed as therapeutics for prostate cancer.

  12. Analysis of the role of homology arms in gene-targeting vectors in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Ishii

    Full Text Available Random integration of targeting vectors into the genome is the primary obstacle in human somatic cell gene targeting. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ, a major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks, is thought to be responsible for most random integration events; however, absence of DNA ligase IV (LIG4, the critical NHEJ ligase, does not significantly reduce random integration frequency of targeting vector in human cells, indicating robust integration events occurring via a LIG4-independent mechanism. To gain insights into the mechanism and robustness of LIG4-independent random integration, we employed various types of targeting vectors to examine their integration frequencies in LIG4-proficient and deficient human cell lines. We find that the integration frequency of targeting vector correlates well with the length of homology arms and with the amount of repetitive DNA sequences, especially SINEs, present in the arms. This correlation was prominent in LIG4-deficient cells, but was also seen in LIG4-proficient cells, thus providing evidence that LIG4-independent random integration occurs frequently even when NHEJ is functionally normal. Our results collectively suggest that random integration frequency of conventional targeting vectors is substantially influenced by homology arms, which typically harbor repetitive DNA sequences that serve to facilitate LIG4-independent random integration in human cells, regardless of the presence or absence of functional NHEJ.

  13. Mitochondrial targeted β-lapachone induces mitochondrial dysfunction and catastrophic vacuolization in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Lim, Chaemin; Sacher, Joshua R; Van Houten, Bennett; Qian, Wei; Wipf, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in tumor cell physiology and survival by providing energy and metabolites for proliferation and metastasis. As part of their oncogenic status, cancer cells frequently produce increased levels of mitochondrial-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, extensive stimulation of ROS generation in mitochondria has been shown to be able to induce cancer cell death, and is one of the major mechanisms of action of many anticancer agents. We hypothesized that enhancing mitochondrial ROS generation through direct targeting of a ROS generator into mitochondria will exhibit tumor cell selectivity, as well as high efficacy in inducing cancer cell death. We thus synthesized a mitochondrial targeted version of β-lapachone (XJB-Lapachone) based on our XJB mitochondrial targeting platform. We found that the mitochondrial targeted β-lapachone is more efficient in inducing apoptosis compared to unconjugated β-lapachone, and the tumor cell selectivity is maintained. XJB-Lapachone also induced extensive cellular vacuolization and autophagy at a concentration not observed with unconjugated β-lapachone. Through characterization of mitochondrial function we revealed that XJB-Lapachone is indeed more capable of stimulating ROS generation in mitochondria, which led to a dramatic mitochondrial uncoupling and autophagic degradation of mitochondria. Taken together, we have demonstrated that targeting β-lapachone accomplishes higher efficacy through inducing ROS generation directly in mitochondria, resulting in extensive mitochondrial and cellular damage. XJB-Lapachone will thus help to establish a novel platform for the design of next generation mitochondrial targeted ROS generators for cancer therapy.

  14. Mechanism of Action of Two Flavone Isomers Targeting Cancer Cells with Varying Cell Differentiation Status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M LeJeune

    Full Text Available Apoptosis can be triggered in two different ways, through the intrinsic or the extrinsic pathway. The intrinsic pathway is mediated by the mitochondria via the release of cytochrome C while the extrinsic pathway is prompted by death receptor signals and bypasses the mitochondria. These two pathways are closely related to cell proliferation and survival signaling cascades, which thereby constitute possible targets for cancer therapy. In previous studies we introduced two plant derived isomeric flavonoids, flavone A and flavone B which induce apoptosis in highly tumorigenic cancer cells of the breast, colon, pancreas, and the prostate. Flavone A displayed potent cytotoxic activity against more differentiated carcinomas of the colon (CaCo-2 and the pancreas (Panc28, whereas flavone B cytotoxic action is observed on poorly differentiated carcinomas of the colon (HCT 116 and pancreas (MIA PaCa. Apoptosis is induced by flavone A in better differentiated colon cancer CaCo-2 and pancreatic cancer Panc 28 cells via the intrinsic pathway by the inhibition of the activated forms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and pS6, and subsequent loss of phosphorylation of Bcl-2 associated death promoter (BAD protein, while apoptosis is triggered by flavone B in poorly differentiated colon cancer HCT 116 and MIA PaCa pancreatic cancer cells through the extrinsic pathway with the concomitant upregulation of the phosphorylated forms of ERK and c-JUN at serine 73. These changes in protein levels ultimately lead to activation of apoptosis, without the involvement of AKT.

  15. ALK signaling and target therapy in anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio eTabbo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The discovery by Morris SW et al. in 1994 of the genes contributing to the t(2;5(p23;q35 translocation has put the foundation for a molecular based recognition of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL and pointed out the need for a further stratification of T-cell neoplasia. Likewise the detection of ALK genetic lesions among many human cancers has defined unique subsets of cancer patients, providing new opportunities for innovative therapeutic interventions. The objective of this review is to appraise the molecular mechanisms driving ALK-mediated transformation, and to maintain the neoplastic phenotype. The understanding of these events will allow the design and implementation of novel tailored strategies for a well-defined subset of cancer patients.

  16. DNA-templated antibody conjugation for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tianqiang

    2016-01-01

    -templated organic synthesis due to the wide existence of the 3-histidine cluster in most wild-type proteins. In this thesis, three projects that relate to targeted drug delivery to cancer cells based on the DTPC method is described. The first project was a delivery system which uses transferrin as the targeting...... ligand and saporin (ribosome inactivating protein) as the warhead to achieve enhanced cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of saporin to transferrin receptor overexpressed cancer cell line. The transferrin-saporin conjugate complex are formed by linking the site-selective DNA-transferrin conjugates with mono...... to cancer cells. The DNA duplex in the conjugates could be used for doxorubicin intercalation since it contains CGA repeats. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results showed a receptor-mediated targeting manner to EGFR+ cancer cell lines (KB and MDA-MB-231), and resulted in enhanced cell killing...

  17. Keratin 15 promoter targets putative epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaping; Lyle, Stephen; Yang, Zaixin; Cotsarelis, George

    2003-11-01

    Putative epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge are thought to play pivotal roles in the homeostasis, aging, and carcinogenesis of the cutaneous epithelium. Elucidating the role of bulge cells in these processes has been hampered by the lack of gene promoters that target this area with specificity. Here we describe the isolation of the mouse keratin 15 (K15) promoter and demonstrate its utility for preferentially targeting hair follicle bulge cells in adult K15/lacZ transgenic mice. We found that patterns of K15 expression and promoter activity changed with age and correlated with levels of differentiation within the cutaneous epithelium; less differentiated keratinocytes in the epidermis of the neonatal mouse and in the bulge area of the adult mouse preferentially expressed K15. These findings demonstrate the utility of the K15 promoter for targeting epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge and set the stage for elucidating the role of bulge cells in skin biology.

  18. Study of targeted-treatment on colon cancer cell via spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Da; Hsu, Hao Yun; Khaleel, Mai Ibrahim; Chan, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Yia-Chung; Wu, Chien-Hsun; Wu, Han-Chung

    2017-04-01

    We present the enhancement of targeted treatment on colon cancer cell via microscopic imaging ellipsometry (MIE). All spectroscopic MIE signals on 5μm×5μm area in visible range are captured within the modified Optrel MULTISKOP system. Colon cancer cells are cultured in Bottom-up Millicell EZ SLIDE 4-well structure under the environment (37°C, 10% CO2). Original single colon cancer cell, single colon cancer cell under untargeted-treatment, and single colon cancer cell under targeted-treatment are studied by specular-reflective mode and off-specular scattering mode in this experiment. Some polarization-related and phase-related MIE images are analyzed to reveal the improvement of targeted-treatment by observing changes in specular and off-specular reflectance and absorption.

  19. miR-1271 promotes non-small-cell lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion via targeting HOXA5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yongfang; Xu, Lianhong; Jiang, Lixin, E-mail: jianglx66766@163.com

    2015-03-13

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs (∼22 nt) that play important roles in the pathogenesis of human diseases by negatively regulating numerous target genes at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in lung cancer, particularly non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has remained elusive. In this study, two microRNAs, miR-1271 and miR-628, and their predicted target genes were identified differentially expressed in NSCLC by analyzing the miRNA and mRNA expression data from NSCLC tissues and their matching normal controls. miR-1271 and its target gene HOXA5 were selected for further investigation. CCK-8 proliferation assay showed that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-1271 in NSCLC cells, while miR-1271 inhibitor could significantly inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells. Interestingly, migration and invasion assay indicated that overexpression of miR-1271 could significantly promoted the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells, whereas miR-1271 inhibitor could inhibited both cell migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Western blot showed that miR-1271 suppressed the protein level of HOXA5, and luciferase assays confirmed that miR-1271 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of HOXA5. This study indicated indicate that miR-1271 regulates NSCLC cell proliferation and invasion, via the down-regulation of HOXA5. Thus, miR-1271 may represent a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC intervention. - Highlights: • Overexpression of miR-1271 promoted proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 inhibitor inhibited the proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 targets 3′ UTR of HOXA5 in NSCLC cells. • miR-1271 negatively regulates HOXA5 in NSCLC cells.

  20. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform ...

  1. Histone modifications: Targeting head and neck cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; M; Le; Cristiane; H; Squarize; Rogerio; M; Castilho

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma(HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and is responsible for a quarter of a million deaths annually. The survival rate for HNSCC patients is poor, showing only minor improvement in the last three decades. Despite new surgical techniques and chemotherapy protocols, tumor resistance to chemotherapy remains a significant challenge for HNSCC patients. Numerous mechanisms underlie chemoresistance, including genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer cells that may be acquired during treatment and activation of mitogenic signaling pathways, such as nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer-of activated B cell, that cause reduced apoptosis. In addition to dysfunctional molecular signaling, emerging evidence reveals involvement of cancer stem cells(CSCs) in tumor development and in tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These observations have sparked interest in understanding the mechanisms involved in the control of CSC function and fate. Post-translational modifications of histones dynamically influence gene expression independent of alterations to the DNA sequence. Recent findings from our group have shown that pharmacological induction of posttranslational modifications of tumor histones dynamically modulates CSC plasticity. These findings suggest that a better understanding of the biology of CSCs in response to epigenetic switches and pharmacological inhibitors of histone function may directly translate to the development of a mechanism-based strategy to disrupt CSCs. In this review, we present and discuss current knowledge on epigenetic modifications of HNSCC and CSC response to DNA methylation and histone modifications. In addition, we discuss chromatin modifications and their role in tumor resistance to therapy.

  2. Hyperinsulinism induced by targeted suppression of beta cell KATP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, J C; Remedi, M S; Flagg, T P; Johnson, J D; Markova, K P; Marshall, B A; Nichols, C G

    2002-12-24

    ATP-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channels couple cell metabolism to electrical activity. To probe the role of K(ATP) in glucose-induced insulin secretion, we have generated transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative, GFP-tagged K(ATP) channel subunit in which residues 132-134 (Gly-Tyr-Gly) in the selectivity filter were replaced by Ala-Ala-Ala, under control of the insulin promoter. Transgene expression was confirmed by both beta cell-specific green fluorescence and complete suppression of channel activity in those cells ( approximately 70%) that did fluoresce. Transgenic mice developed normally with no increased mortality and displayed normal body weight, blood glucose levels, and islet architecture. However, hyperinsulinism was evident in adult mice as (i) a disproportionately high level of circulating serum insulin for a given glucose concentration ( approximately 2-fold increase in blood insulin), (ii) enhanced glucose-induced insulin release from isolated islets, and (iii) mild yet significant enhancement in glucose tolerance. Enhanced glucose-induced insulin secretion results from both increased glucose sensitivity and increased release at saturating glucose concentration. The results suggest that incomplete suppression of K(ATP) channel activity can give rise to a maintained hyperinsulinism.

  3. Targeting Protective Autophagy Exacerbates UV-Triggered Apoptotic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hwa Chiou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is activated by various stresses, including DNA damage, and previous studies of DNA damage-induced autophagy have focused on the response to chemotherapeutic drugs, ionizing radiation, and reactive oxygen species. In this study, we investigated the biological significance of autophagic response to ultraviolet (UV irradiation in A549 and H1299 cells. Our results indicated that UV induces on-rate autophagic flux in these cells. Autophagy inhibition resulting from the knockdown of beclin-1 and Atg5 reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptosis. Moreover, we found that ATR phosphorylation was accompanied by microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B II (LC3B-II expression during the early phases following UV irradiation, which is a well-established inducer of ATR. Knocking down ATR further attenuated the reduction in LC3B-II at early stages in response to UV treatment. Despite the potential role of ATR in autophagic response, reduced ATR expression does not affect autophagy induction during late phases (24 and 48 h after UV treatment. The result is consistent with the reduced ATR phosphorylation at the same time points and suggests that autophagic response at this stage is activated via a distinct pathway. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that autophagy acts as a cytoprotective mechanism against UV-induced apoptosis and that autophagy induction accompanied with apoptosis at late stages is independent of ATR activation.

  4. An off-target nucleostemin RNAi inhibits growth in human glioblastoma-derived cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Gil-Ranedo

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBM may contain a variable proportion of active cancer stem cells (CSCs capable of self-renewal, of aggregating into CD133(+ neurospheres, and to develop intracranial tumors that phenocopy the original ones. We hypothesized that nucleostemin may contribute to cancer stem cell biology as these cells share characteristics with normal stem cells. Here we report that nucleostemin is expressed in GBM-CSCs isolated from patient samples, and that its expression, conversely to what it has been described for ordinary stem cells, does not disappear when cells are differentiated. The significance of nucleostemin expression in CSCs was addressed by targeting the corresponding mRNA using lentivirally transduced short hairpin RNA (shRNA. In doing so, we found an off-target nucleostemin RNAi (shRNA22 that abolishes proliferation and induces apoptosis in GBM-CSCs. Furthermore, in the presence of shRNA22, GBM-CSCs failed to form neurospheres in vitro or grow on soft agar. When these cells are xenotransplanted into the brains of nude rats, tumor development is significantly delayed. Attempts were made to identify the primary target/s of shRNA22, suggesting a transcription factor involved in one of the MAP-kinases signaling-pathways or multiple targets. The use of this shRNA may contribute to develop new therapeutic approaches for this incurable type of brain tumor.

  5. The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyano enone), TBE-31, targets microtubule dynamics and cell polarity in migrating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eddie; Saito, Akira; Honda, Tadashi; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M

    2016-04-01

    Cell migration is dependent on the microtubule network for structural support as well as for the proper delivery and positioning of polarity proteins at the leading edge of migrating cells. Identification of drugs that target cytoskeletal-dependent cell migration and protein transport in polarized migrating cells is important in understanding the cell biology of normal and tumor cells and can lead to new therapeutic targets in disease processes. Here, we show that the tricyclic compound TBE-31 directly binds to tubulin and interferes with microtubule dynamics, as assessed by end binding 1 (EB1) live cell imaging. Interestingly, this interference is independent of in vitro tubulin polymerization. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we also observed that TBE-31 interferes with the polarity of migratory cells. The polarity proteins Rac1, IQGAP and Tiam1 were localized at the leading edge of DMSO-treated migrating cell, but were observed to be in multiple protrusions around the cell periphery of TBE-31-treated cells. Finally, we observed that TBE-31 inhibits the migration of Rat2 fibroblasts with an IC50 of 0.75 μM. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of cell migration by TBE-31 may result from the improper maintenance of cell polarity of migrating cells.

  6. Intracellular protein target detection by quantum dots optimized for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngseon; Kim, Keumhyun; Hong, Sukmin; Kim, Hichul; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Song, Rita

    2011-08-17

    Imaging of specific intracellular target proteins in living cells has been of great challenge and importance for understanding intracellular events and elucidating various biological phenomena. Highly photoluminescent and water-soluble semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) have been extensively applied to various cellular imaging applications due to the long-term photostability and the tunable narrow emission spectra with broad excitation. Despite the great success of various bioimaging and diagnostic applications, visualization of intracellular targets in live cells still has been of great challenge. Nonspecific binding, difficulty of intracellular delivery, or endosomal trapping of nanosized QDs are the main reasons to hamper specific target binding in live cells. In this context, we prepared the polymer-coated QDs (pcQD) of which the surface was optimized for specific intracellular targeting in live cells. Efficient intracellular delivery was achieved through PEGylation and subsequent cell penetrating peptide (i.e., TAT) conjugation to the pcQD in order to avoid significant endosomal sequestration and to facilitate internalization of the QDs, respectively. In this study, we employed HEK293 cell line overexpressing endothelin A receptor (ET(A)R), a family of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), of which the cytosolic c-terminal site is genetically engineered to possess green fluorescent protein (GFP) as our intracellular protein target. The fluorescence signal of the target protein and the well-defined intracellular behavior of the GPCR help to evaluate the targeting specificity of QDs in living cells. To test the hypothesis that the TAT-QDs conjugated with antibody against intracellular target of interest can find the target, we conjugated anti-GFP antibody to TAT-PEG-pcQD using heterobifunctional linkers. Compared to the TAT-PEG-pcQD, which was distributed throughout the cytoplasm, the antiGFP-functionalized TAT-PEG-pcQD could penetrate the cell membrane

  7. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  8. Development of an efficient targeted cell-SELEX procedure for DNA aptamer reagents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Meyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA aptamers generated by cell-SELEX offer an attractive alternative to antibodies, but generating aptamers to specific, known membrane protein targets has proven challenging, and has severely limited the use of aptamers as affinity reagents for cell identification and purification. METHODOLOGY: We modified the BJAB lymphoblastoma cell line to over-express the murine c-kit cell surface receptor. After six rounds of cell-SELEX, high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, we identified aptamers that bound BJAB cells expressing c-kit but not wild-type BJAB controls. One of these aptamers also recognizes c-kit endogenously expressed by a mast cell line or hematopoietic progenitor cells, and specifically blocks binding of the c-kit ligand stem cell factor (SCF. This aptamer enables better separation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS of c-kit(+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from mixed bone marrow populations than a commercially available antibody, suggesting that this approach may be broadly useful for rapid isolation of affinity reagents suitable for purification of other specific cell types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we describe a novel procedure for the efficient generation of DNA aptamers that bind to specific cell membrane proteins and can be used as high affinity reagents. We have named the procedure STACS (Specific TArget Cell-SELEX.

  9. Development of an Efficient Targeted Cell-SELEX Procedure for DNA Aptamer Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jeff; Stewart, Ron; McIntosh, Brian E.; Conti, Lisa R.; Ahmad, Kareem M.; Soh, H. Tom; Thomson, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA aptamers generated by cell-SELEX offer an attractive alternative to antibodies, but generating aptamers to specific, known membrane protein targets has proven challenging, and has severely limited the use of aptamers as affinity reagents for cell identification and purification. Methodology We modified the BJAB lymphoblastoma cell line to over-express the murine c-kit cell surface receptor. After six rounds of cell-SELEX, high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, we identified aptamers that bound BJAB cells expressing c-kit but not wild-type BJAB controls. One of these aptamers also recognizes c-kit endogenously expressed by a mast cell line or hematopoietic progenitor cells, and specifically blocks binding of the c-kit ligand stem cell factor (SCF). This aptamer enables better separation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of c-kit+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from mixed bone marrow populations than a commercially available antibody, suggesting that this approach may be broadly useful for rapid isolation of affinity reagents suitable for purification of other specific cell types. Conclusions/Significance Here we describe a novel procedure for the efficient generation of DNA aptamers that bind to specific cell membrane proteins and can be used as high affinity reagents. We have named the procedure STACS (Specific TArget Cell-SELEX). PMID:23967247

  10. Targeting the gut vascular endothelium induces gut effector CD8 T cell responses via cross-presentation by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Dorothee; Zhan, Yifan; Brady, Jamie L; Braley, Hal; Caminschi, Irina; Prato, Sandro; Villadangos, José A; Lew, Andrew M

    2007-11-01

    Systemic delivery of Ag usually induces poor mucosal immunity. To improve the CD8 T cell response at mucosal sites, we targeted the Ag to MAdCAM-1, a mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule expressed mainly by high endothelial venules (HEV) in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches of gut-associated lymphoid tissue. When chemical conjugates of anti-MAdCAM-1 Ab and model Ag OVA were injected i.v., a greatly enhanced proliferative response of Ag-specific OT-I CD8 T cells was detected in MLN. This was preceded by prolonged accumulation, up to 2 wk, of the anti-MAdCAM OVA conjugate on HEV of Peyer's patches and MLN. In contrast, nontargeted OVA conjugate was very inefficient in inducing OT-I CD8 T cell proliferation in MLN and required at least 20-fold more Ag to induce a comparable response. In addition, MAdCAM targeting elicits an endogenous OVA-specific CD8 T cell response, evident by IFN-gamma production and target killing. Induced response offers protection against an OVA-expressing B cell lymphoma. We propose that the augmentation of gut CD8 T cell responses by MAdCAM targeting is due to both accumulation of Ag in the HEV and conversion of a soluble Ag to a cell-associated one, allowing cross-presentation by DCs.

  11. MicroRNA-145 targets YES and STAT1 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea H; Jacobsen, Anders B; Frankel, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    miRNA overexpression. Gene Ontology analysis showed an overrepresentation of genes involved in cell death, cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle, gene expression and cancer. A number of the identified miRNA targets have previously been implicated in cancer, including YES, FSCN1, ADAM17, BIRC2......, VANGL1 as well as the transcription factor STAT1. Both YES and STAT1 were verified as direct miR-145 targets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study identifies and validates new cancer-relevant direct targets of miR-145 in colon cancer cells and hereby adds important mechanistic understanding of the tumor......BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important gene regulators and are recognized as key players in tumorigenesis. miR-145 is reported to be down-regulated in several cancers, but knowledge of its targets in colon cancer remains limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate...

  12. Amidine-bearing lipoplex targeting to hepatocyte cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuya Kudo; Kazunori Koiwai; Kazuhiro Shimizu; Shota Kusuki; Mina Sakuragi; Naohiko Shimada; Yoichi Takeda; Kazuo Sakurai

    2008-01-01

    A lipoplex (i.e., pDNA#1/lipid complex and transfection reagent for pDNA delivery) containing galactosylceramide (GalCer) and an amidine-bearing lipid (TRX) was examined whether the bound pDNA was specifically ingested by hepatocyte via asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) and then expressed protein. Gel electrophoresis and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirmed that the TRX-GalCer liposome#2 complexed with pDNA and the resultant lipoplex took a hexagonally packed inverted cylinder structure when the GalCer composition was less than 20 wt.% of the total lipid. When the lipoplex carrying pGL3 (luciferase-cording pDNA) was administrated to HepG2, the luciferase activity was increased with increasing the GalCer composition until it reached 3 wt.% and then decreased upon further addition of GalCer. When we added galactose itself as a competitor, the luciferase activity was decreased, while glucose did not show such decrease, suggesting that HepG2 ingested the lipoplex via ASGPR-mediated endocytosis. This paper indicated that the hexagonally packed inverted cylinder structures of lipoplex may not always provide excellent transfection and presented a possibility that the TRX lipoplex#3 can obtain a cellular-targeting ability through the receptors for oligosaccharide.

  13. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  14. Targeting CXCR4 in HIV Cell-Entry Inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Schwartz, T W; Rosenkilde, M M

    2010-01-01

    CXCR4 and CCR5 constitute the two major coreceptors for HIV-1 entry into host cells. In the course of an HIV-infection, a coreceptor switch takes place in approximately half of the patients - from R5 HIV-1 (CCR5 utilizing) strains to X4 HIV-1 (CXCR4 utilizing) strains. Treatment of HIV......-infected individuals with CXCR4 antagonists delays the onset of AIDS by preventing the CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor switch. In addition to the endogenous CXCR4 and CCR5 ligands, other chemokines, for example the human herpesvirus 8 encoded CC-chemokine, vCCL2, and modifications hereof, have proven efficient HIV-1 cell...... no oral bioavailability. The hunt for orally active small-molecule CXCR4 antagonists led to the development of monocyclam-based compounds, and recently to the non-cyclam antagonist AMD070, which is orally active and currently in Phase II clinical trial as anti-HIV treatment. Current review provides...

  15. Specific silencing of the REST target genes in insulin-secreting cells uncovers their participation in beta cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Martin

    Full Text Available The absence of the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST in insulin-secreting beta cells is a major cue for the specific expression of a large number of genes. These REST target genes were largely ascribed to a function of neurotransmission in a neuronal context, whereas their role in pancreatic beta cells has been poorly explored. To identify their functional significance, we have generated transgenic mice expressing REST in beta cells (RIP-REST mice, and previously discovered that REST target genes are essential to insulin exocytosis. Herein we characterized a novel line of RIP-REST mice featuring diabetes. In diabetic RIP-REST mice, high levels of REST were associated with postnatal beta cell apoptosis, which resulted in gradual beta cell loss and sustained hyperglycemia in adults. Moreover, adenoviral REST transduction in INS-1E cells led to increased cell death under control conditions, and sensitized cells to death induced by cytokines. Screening for REST target genes identified several anti-apoptotic genes bearing the binding motif RE-1 that were downregulated upon REST expression in INS-1E cells, including Gjd2, Mapk8ip1, Irs2, Ptprn, and Cdk5r2. Decreased levels of Cdk5r2 in beta cells of RIP-REST mice further confirmed that it is controlled by REST, in vivo. Using siRNA-mediated knock-down in INS-1E cells, we showed that Cdk5r2 protects beta cells against cytokines and palmitate-induced apoptosis. Together, these data document that a set of REST target genes, including Cdk5r2, is important for beta cell survival.

  16. Transfection and mutagenesis of target genes in mosquito cells by locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpour, Nazzy; Cheung, Kong Wai; Souvannaseng, Lattha; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Luckhart, Shirley

    2010-12-26

    Plasmodium parasites, the causative agent of malaria, are transmitted through the bites of infected Anopheles mosquitoes resulting in over 250 million new infections each year. Despite decades of research, there is still no vaccine against malaria, highlighting the need for novel control strategies. One innovative approach is the use of genetically modified mosquitoes to effectively control malaria parasite transmission. Deliberate alterations of cell signaling pathways in the mosquito, via targeted mutagenesis, have been found to regulate parasite development (1). From these studies, we can begin to identify potential gene targets for transformation. Targeted mutagenesis has traditionally relied upon the homologous recombination between a target gene and a large DNA molecule. However, the construction and use of such complex DNA molecules for generation of stably transformed cell lines is costly, time consuming and often inefficient. Therefore, a strategy using locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides (LNA-ONs) provides a useful alternative for introducing artificial single nucleotide substitutions into episomal and chromosomal DNA gene targets (reviewed in (2)). LNA-ON-mediated targeted mutagenesis has been used to introduce point mutations into genes of interest in cultured cells of both yeast and mice (3,4). We show here that LNA-ONs can be used to introduce a single nucleotide change in a transfected episomal target that results in a switch from blue fluorescent protein (BFP) expression to green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in both Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi cells. This conversion demonstrates for the first time that effective mutagenesis of target genes in mosquito cells can be mediated by LNA-ONs and suggests that this technique may be applicable to mutagenesis of chromosomal targets in vitro and in vivo.

  17. MicroRNA-944 Affects Cell Growth by Targeting EPHA7 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minxia; Zhou, Kecheng; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have critical roles in lung tumorigenesis and development. To determine aberrantly expressed miRNAs involved in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigate pathophysiological functions and mechanisms, we firstly carried out small RNA deep sequencing in NSCLC cell lines (EPLC-32M1, A549 and 801D) and a human immortalized cell line 16HBE, we then studied miRNA function by cell proliferation and apoptosis. cDNA microarray, luciferase reporter assay and miRNA transfection were used to investigate interaction between the miRNA and target gene. miR-944 was significantly down-regulated in NSCLC and had many putative targets. Moreover, the forced expression of miR-944 significantly inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells in vitro. By integrating mRNA expression data and miR-944-target prediction, we disclosed that EPHA7 was a potential target of miR-944, which was further verified by luciferase reporter assay and microRNA transfection. Our data indicated that miR-944 targets EPHA7 in NSCLC and regulates NSCLC cell proliferation, which may offer a new mechanism underlying the development and progression of NSCLC. PMID:27681722

  18. Identification of internalizing human single-chain antibodies targeting brain tumor sphere cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Hashizume, Rintaro; James, C David; Berger, Mitchel S; Liu, Bin

    2010-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor for which there is no curative treatment to date. Resistance to conventional therapies and tumor recurrence pose major challenges to treatment and management of this disease, and therefore new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. Previous studies by other investigators have shown that a subpopulation of GBM cells can grow as neurosphere-like cells when cultured in restrictive medium and exhibits enhanced tumor-initiating ability and resistance to therapy. We report here the identification of internalizing human single-chain antibodies (scFv) targeting GBM tumor sphere cells. We selected a large naive phage antibody display library on the glycosylation-dependent CD133 epitope-positive subpopulation of GBM cells grown as tumor spheres and identified internalizing scFvs that target tumor sphere cells broadly, as well as scFvs that target the CD133-positive subpopulation. These scFvs were found to be efficiently internalized by GBM tumor sphere cells. One scFv GC4 inhibited self-renewal of GBM tumor sphere cells in vitro. We have further developed a full-length human IgG1 based on this scFv, and found that it potently inhibits proliferation of GBM tumor sphere cells and GBM cells grown in regular nonselective medium. Taken together, these results show that internalizing human scFvs targeting brain tumor sphere cells can be readily identified from a phage antibody display library, which could be useful for further development of novel therapies that target subpopulations of GBM cells to combat recurrence and resistance to treatment. (c)2010 AACR.

  19. Identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies targeting brain tumor sphere cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Hashizume, Rintaro; James, C. David; Berger, Mitchel S.; Liu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor and there is no curative treatment to date. Resistance to conventional therapies and tumor recurrence pose major challenges to treatment and management of this disease, and therefore new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. Previous studies by other investigators have shown that a subpopulation of GBM cells can grow as neurosphere-like cells when cultured in restrictive media, and exhibit enhanced tumor initiating ability and resistance to therapy. We report here the identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies (scFvs) targeting GBM tumor sphere cells. We selected a large naive phage antibody display library on the glycosylation-dependent CD133 epitope-positive subpopulation of GBM cells grown as tumor spheres and identified internalizing scFvs that target tumor sphere cells broadly, as well as scFvs that target the CD133 positive subpopulation. These scFvs were found to be efficiently internalized by GBM tumor sphere cells. One scFv GC4 inhibited self-renewal of GBM tumor sphere cells in vitro. We have further developed a full-length human IgG1 based on this scFv and found that it potently inhibits proliferation of GBM tumor sphere cells and GBM cells grown in regular non-selective media. Taken together, these results show that internalizing human scFvs targeting brain tumor sphere cells can be readily identified from a phage antibody display library, which could be useful for further development of novel therapies that target subpopulations of GBM cells to combat recurrence and resistance to treatment. PMID:20587664

  20. Odin (ANKS1A is a Src family kinase target in colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feller Stephan M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Src family kinases (SFK are implicated in the development of some colorectal cancers (CRC. One SFK member, Lck, is not detectable in normal colonic epithelium, but becomes aberrantly expressed in a subset of CRCs. Although SFK have been extensively studied in fibroblasts and different types of immune cells, their physical and functional targets in many epithelial cancers remain poorly characterised. Results 64 CRC cell lines were tested for expression of Lck. SW620 CRC cells, which express high levels of Lck and also contain high basal levels of tyrosine phosphorylated (pY proteins, were then analysed to identify novel SFK targets. Since SH2 domains of SFK are known to often bind substrates after phosphorylation by the kinase domain, the LckSH2 was compared with 14 other SH2s for suitability as affinity chromatography reagent. Mass spectrometric analyses of LckSH2-purified pY proteins subsequently identified several proteins readily known as SFK kinase substrates, including cortactin, Tom1L1 (SRCASM, GIT1, vimentin and AFAP1L2 (XB130. Additional proteins previously reported as substrates of other tyrosine kinase were also detected, including the EGF and PDGF receptor target Odin. Odin was further analysed and found to contain substantially less pY upon inhibition of SFK activity in SW620 cells, indicating that it is a formerly unknown SFK target in CRC cells. Conclusion Rapid identification of known and novel SFK targets in CRC cells is feasible with SH2 domain affinity chromatography. The elucidation of new SFK targets like Odin in epithelial cancer cells is expected to lead to novel insight into cancer cell signalling mechanisms and may also serve to indicate new biomarkers for monitoring tumor cell responses to drug treatments.

  1. Tracking targeted bimodal nanovaccines: immune responses and routing in cells, tissue, and whole organism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, L.J.; Tacken, P.J.; Zeelenberg, I.S.; Srinivas, M.; Bonetto, F.; Weigelin, B.; Eich, C.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Figdor, C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs), involved in the induction of immunity and currently exploited for antitumor immunotherapies. An optimized noninvasive imaging modality capable of determining and quantifying DC-targeted nanoparticle (NP) trajectories could

  2. MicroRNA-145 targets YES and STAT1 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea H; Jacobsen, Anders B; Frankel, Lisa;

    2010-01-01

    miRNA overexpression. Gene Ontology analysis showed an overrepresentation of genes involved in cell death, cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle, gene expression and cancer. A number of the identified miRNA targets have previously been implicated in cancer, including YES, FSCN1, ADAM17, BIRC2...

  3. Biotin-tagged platinum(iv) complexes as targeted cytostatic agents against breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Nafees; Sadia, Nasreen; Zhu, Chengcheng; Luo, Cheng; Guo, Zijian; Wang, Xiaoyong

    2017-09-05

    A biotin-guided platinum(IV) complex is highly cytotoxic against breast cancer cells but hypotoxic against mammary epithelial cells. The mono-biotinylated Pt(IV) complex is superior to the di-biotinylated one and hence a promising drug candidate for the targeted therapy of breast cancer.

  4. Targeting TGF-β1 suppresses survival of and invasion by anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenhai; Xu, Yanyan; Zhao, Cheng; Hao, Fengyun; Chen, Dong; Guan, Jinping; Zhang, Kejun

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 has been implicated in promoting cell survival, migration and invasion in many cancers, including anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). In the present study, we studied the effect of suppressing TGF-β1 by RNA silencing on the survival, invasion and metastasis of ATC cells. Methods: Small interfering RNA (siRNA) constructs targeting TGF-β1 were validated and used to develop clonal derivatives of the ATC cell line, 8505C. The cells were used in several in vitro assays, including migration, invasion, survival rate, colony formation and apoptosis. A wound healing assay was used to determine the migration of cells in culture and a Boyden chamber transwell assay was used for invasion. Further, clones were used in an in vivo mouse model to study the kinetics of tumor growth and metastatic growth in lungs. Results: Targeting TGF-β1 expression in 8505C cells caused a 70% decrease in migration and a 78% decrease in invasion, as well as a 68% decrease in proliferation and a 19% increase in apoptosis in vitro. The growth of primary tumors in vivo was also inhibited when compared with parental 8505C cells; however, the number of mice bearing lung metastases was not significantly decreased. Conclusions: Targeting TGF-β1 may be effective in inhibiting primary tumor formation, but not metastasis, by ATC cells. TGF-β1 inhibition in combination with other tumor-targeted therapies may be more effective in inhibiting ATC.

  5. Detection of circulating tumor cells by nested RT-PCR targeting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salwa H. Teama

    cancer compared with that of known markers of circulating cancer cells CEA and CK20. Subjects ..... Greene MI. ErbB receptors: from oncogenes to targeted cancer therapies. ... and prostate stem cell antigen RT-PCR in blood of patients with.

  6. Chemosensitization of cancer cells by siRNA using targeted nanogel delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackburn William H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoresistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment. Targeted therapies that enhance cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents have the potential to increase drug efficacy while reducing toxic effects on untargeted cells. Targeted cancer therapy by RNA interference (RNAi is a relatively new approach that can be used to reversibly silence genes in vivo by selectively targeting genes such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, which has been shown to increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to taxane chemotherapy. However, delivery represents the main hurdle for the broad development of RNAi therapeutics. Methods We report here the use of core/shell hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels functionalized with peptides that specially target the EphA2 receptor to deliver small interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting EGFR. Expression of EGFR was determined by immunoblotting, and the effect of decreased EGFR expression on chemosensitization of ovarian cancer cells after siRNA delivery was investigated. Results Treatment of EphA2 positive Hey cells with siRNA-loaded, peptide-targeted nanogels decreased EGFR expression levels and significantly increased the sensitivity of this cell line to docetaxel (P 0.05. Conclusion This study suggests that targeted delivery of siRNAs by nanogels may be a promising strategy to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs for the treatment of ovarian cancer. In addition, EphA2 is a viable target for therapeutic delivery, and the siRNAs are effectively protected by the nanogel carrier, overcoming the poor stability and uptake that has hindered clinical advancement of therapeutic siRNAs.

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor targeting in non-small cell lung cancer: revisiting different strategies against the same target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañón, Eduardo; Martín, Patricia; Rolfo, Christian; Fusco, Juan P; Ceniceros, Lucía; Legaspi, Jairo; Santisteban, Marta; Gil-Bazo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have changed the paradigm of treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular biology study of EGFR has led to clinical trials that select patients more accurately, regarding the presence of EGFR activating mutations. Nonetheless, a lack of response or a temporary condition of the response has been detected in patients on EGFR TKIs. This has urged to study potential resistance mechanisms underneath. The most important ones are the presence of secondary mutations in EGFR, such as T790M, or the overexpression of mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) that may explain why patients who initially respond to EGFR TKIs, may ultimately become refractory. Several approaches have been taken and new drugs both targeting EGFR resistance-mutation or MET are currently being developed. Here we review and update the EGFR biological pathway as well as the clinical data leading to approval of the EGFR TKIs currently in the market. New compounds under investigation targeting resistance mutations or dually targeting EGFR and other relevant receptors are also reviewed and discussed.

  8. AS1411 aptamer tagged PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles for tumor cell targeting and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Athulya; Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Nair, Remya; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2012-11-01

    Liposomes and polymers are widely used drug carriers for controlled release since they offer many advantages like increased treatment effectiveness, reduced toxicity and are of biodegradable nature. In this work, anticancer drug-loaded PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and were functionalized with AS1411 anti-nucleolin aptamers for site-specific targeting against tumor cells which over expresses nucleolin receptors. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The drug-loading efficiency, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release studies were conducted using UV spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out in two different cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and GI-1 cells and two different normal cells, L929 cells and HMEC cells. Confocal microscopy and flowcytometry confirmed the cellular uptake of particles and targeted drug delivery. The morphology analysis of the NPs proved that the particles were smooth and spherical in shape with a size ranging from 60 to 110 nm. Drug-loading studies indicated that under the same drug loading, the aptamer-targeted NPs show enhanced cancer killing effect compared to the corresponding non-targeted NPs. In addition, the PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs exhibited high encapsulation efficiency and superior sustained drug release than the drug loaded in plain PLGA NPs. The results confirmed that AS1411 aptamer-PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs are potential carrier candidates for differential targeted drug delivery.

  9. T cells targeting NY-ESO-1 demonstrate efficacy against disseminated neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nathan; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Barrett, David M; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Jakobsen, Bent; Martinez, Daniel; Pawel, Bruce; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael D; Grupp, Stephan A

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is expressed by many solid tumors and has limited expression by mature somatic tissues, making it a highly attractive target for tumor immunotherapy. Targeting NY-ESO-1 using engineered T cells has demonstrated clinical efficacy in the treatment of some adult tumors. Neuroblastoma is a significant cause of cancer mortality in children, and is a tumor type shown to be responsive to immunotherapies. We evaluated a large panel of primarily resected neuroblastoma samples and demonstrated that 23% express NY-ESO-1. After confirming antigen-specific activity of T cells genetically engineered to express an NY-ESO-1 directed high-affinity transgenic T cell receptor in vitro, we performed xenograft mouse studies assessing the efficacy of NY-ESO-1-targeted T cells in both localized and disseminated models of neuroblastoma. Disease responses were monitored by tumor volume measurement and in vivo bioluminescence. After delivery of NY-ESO-1 transgenic TCR T cells, we observed significant delay of tumor progression in mice bearing localized and disseminated neuroblastoma, as well as enhanced animal survival. These data demonstrate that NY-ESO-1 is an antigen target in neuroblastoma and that targeted T cells represent a potential therapeutic option for patients with neuroblastoma.

  10. A novel microfluidic chip for assessing dynamic adhesion behavior of cell-targeting microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Chunxiang; Jin, Qiaofeng; Zhang, Zidong; Shandas, Robin; Wu, Junru; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to develop a microfluidic chip to study the dynamic adhesion behavior of cell-targeted microbubbles. The microfluidic device is composed of polydimethylsiloxane and is fabricated using the soft lithography technique. Each chamber of the microfluidic chip comprises eight U-shaped microsieves, by which various flow velocity distributions are generated. LyP-1-conjugated microbubbles were prepared by coating the surface of the phospholipid shell of microbubbles with LyP-1 peptides via biotin-avidin linkage. Under static conditions, the resulting targeted microbubbles are able to bind onto the surface of cells on incubation with breast cancer cells. Under dynamic fluid conditions, the cell targeting efficiency of the microbubbles was assessed at various flow velocity distributions in a chamber. Accumulation of targeted microbubbles was strongly influenced by flow velocity. Better retention of targeted microbubbles on cell surfaces was achieved at low mean flow velocities (<0.03 cm/s), in agreement with our computer simulation results. In conclusion, our results indicate that the microfluidic system is a useful platform for studying the microbubble-cell adhesive interaction. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. All rights reserved.

  11. Recent advances of novel targeted therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jed A. Katzel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies have proven beneficial for patients suffering from a number of different malignancies, including cancers of the head and neck. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor has shown benefit in combination with radiation for untreated patients or as a single agent for patients with platinum resistant disease. Cetuximab is the only targeted agent currently approved by the Federal Drug Administration for the treatment of head and neck cancer. A number of other agents have shown promising initial results including intracellular tyrosine kinase inhibitors, agents targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, as well as other classes of novel therapies. Some of the data supporting the use of targeted therapy, including agents not yet approved in head and neck cancer, will be presented in this review. As our understanding of the cancer cell signaling pathways and novel targeted agents increases, the potential for treatment with reduced toxicity and improved clinical outcomes will become a reality.

  12. Multifunctional AS1411-functionalized fluorescent gold nanoparticles for targeted cancer cell imaging and efficient photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jun; Xu, Yuanhong; Lou, Baohua; Li, Dan; Wang, Erkang

    2014-01-01

    Herein, one multifunctional AS1411-functionalized fluorescent gold nanoparticles (named NAANPs) is synthesized and successfully applied for both targeted cancer cell imaging and efficient photodynamic therapy (PDT). The NAANPs are obtained by functionalizing the gold nanoparticles with AS1411 aptamer and then bound with one porphyrin derivative N-methylmesoporphyrin IX (NMM). Using HeLa cells over expressing nucleolin as representative cancer cells, the formed NAANPs can target to the cell surface via the specific AS1411-nucleolin interaction, which can discriminate the cancer cells from normal ones (e.g. HEK293) unambiguously. That the fluorescence intensity of NMM increased significantly upon binding to AS1411 G-quadruplex makes the NAANPs appropriate fluorescence reagent for cell imaging. Meanwhile, NMM can also be used as a photosensitizer, thus irradiation of the NAANPs by the white light from a common electric torch can lead to efficient production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species for establishing a new type of PDT to cancer cells. Gold nanoparticles play the roles of both carrier and enhancer of the functional groups onto the cells. In addition, they not only possess inherently certain cytotoxicity to the cancer cells, but also boost the cellular uptake of the fluorescent groups. As a result, the efficiency of both the targeted cell imaging and PDT could be ensured.

  13. GABAergic cells are the major postsynaptic targets of mossy fibers in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acsády, L; Kamondi, A; Sík, A; Freund, T; Buzsáki, G

    1998-05-01

    Dentate granule cells communicate with their postsynaptic targets by three distinct terminal types. These include the large mossy terminals, filopodial extensions of the mossy terminals, and smaller en passant synaptic varicosities. We examined the postsynaptic targets of mossy fibers by combining in vivo intracellular labeling of granule cells, immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy. Single granule cells formed large, complex "mossy" synapses on 11-15 CA3 pyramidal cells and 7-12 hilar mossy cells. In contrast, GABAergic interneurons, identified with immunostaining for substance P-receptor, parvalbumin, and mGluR1a-receptor, were selectively innervated by very thin (filopodial) extensions of the mossy terminals and by small en passant boutons in both the hilar and CA3 regions. These terminals formed single, often perforated, asymmetric synapses on the cell bodies, dendrites, and spines of GABAergic interneurons. The number of filopodial extensions and small terminals was 10 times larger than the number of mossy terminals. These findings show that in contrast to cortical pyramidal neurons, (1) granule cells developed distinct types of terminals to affect interneurons and pyramidal cells and (2) they innervated more inhibitory than excitatory cells. These findings may explain the physiological observations that increased activity of granule cells suppresses the overall excitability of the CA3 recurrent system and may form the structural basis of the target-dependent regulation of glutamate release in the mossy fiber system.

  14. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer-immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell based anti-cancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell based clinical and pre-clinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immunesurveillance is summarized and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed.

  15. Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor and Metastasis Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0461 TITLE: Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor - and Metastasis-Initiating Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daotai...29 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor - and Metastasis-Initiating Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...the c-MYC oncogene. POU5F1B is a pseudogene of embryonic Oct4 (POU5F1). A recent study found that tumor Oct4 found in prostate cancer cells is due

  16. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

  17. Radioiodinated Naphthylalanine Derivatives Targeting Pancreatic Beta Cells in Normal and Nonobese Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amartey, John K.; Shi, Yufei; Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim; Esguerra, Celestina; Al-Otaibi, Basem; Al-Mohanna, Futwan

    2008-01-01

    An imaging method capable of using a signal from pancreatic beta cells to determine their mass would be of immense value in monitoring the progression of diabetes as well as response to treatment. Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are expressed on beta cells and are a potential target for imaging. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether pancreatic beta cells are a target for radiolabeled naphthylalanine derivatives. The molecules were subjected to in vitro and ex vivo evaluations. Pancreatic uptake of radioactivity was lower in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice than normal mice at all time points investigated (P < .05) and correlated with the number of islets in tissue sections of both control and NOD mice. Immunohistochemical and confocal fluorescent microscopic studies showed colocalization of insulin and the conjugate radioligand in the pancreas. The results demonstrated that pancreatic uptake is receptor-mediated, and that beta cells are the primary target. PMID:18483609

  18. Expression and subcellular targeting of canine parvovirus capsid proteins in baculovirus-transduced NLFK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Leona; Välilehto, Outi; Kirjavainen, Sanna; Tikka, Päivi J; Mellett, Mark; Käpylä, Pirjo; Oker-Blom, Christian; Vuento, Matti

    2005-01-17

    A mammalian baculovirus delivery system was developed to study targeting in Norden Laboratories feline kidney (NLFK) cells of the capsid proteins of canine parvovirus (CPV), VP1 and VP2, or corresponding counterparts fused to EGFP. VP1 and VP2, when expressed alone, both had equal nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution. However, assembled form of VP2 had a predominantly cytoplasmic localization. When VP1 and VP2 were simultaneously present in cells, their nuclear localization increased. Thus, confocal immunofluorescence analysis of cells transduced with the different baculovirus constructs or combinations thereof in the absence or presence of infecting CPV revealed that the VP1 protein is a prerequisite for efficient targeting of VP2 to the nucleus. The baculovirus vectors were functional and the genes of interest efficiently introduced to this CPV susceptible mammalian cell line. Thus, we show evidence that the system could be utilized to study targeting of the CPV capsid proteins.

  19. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging of Stem Cells in Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R. Santoso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has broad applications in regenerative medicine and increasingly within cardiovascular disease. Stem cells have emerged as a leading therapeutic option for many diseases and have broad applications in regenerative medicine. Injuries to the heart are often permanent due to the limited proliferation and self-healing capability of cardiomyocytes; as such, stem cell therapy has become increasingly important in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Despite extensive efforts to optimize cardiac stem cell therapy, challenges remain in the delivery and monitoring of cells injected into the myocardium. Other fields have successively used nanoscience and nanotechnology for a multitude of biomedical applications, including drug delivery, targeted imaging, hyperthermia, and tissue repair. In particular, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs have been widely employed for molecular and cellular imaging. In this mini-review, we focus on the application of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in targeting and monitoring of stem cells for the treatment of myocardial infarctions.

  20. ErbB-targeted CAR T-cell immunotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whilding, Lynsey M; Maher, John

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) based immunotherapy has been under development for the last 25 years and is now a promising new treatment modality in the field of cancer immunotherapy. The approach involves genetically engineering T cells to target malignant cells through expression of a bespoke fusion receptor that couples an HLA-independent antigen recognition domain to one or more intracellular T-cell activating modules. Multiple clinical trials are now underway in several centers to investigate CAR T-cell immunotherapy of diverse hematologic and solid tumor types. The most successful results have been achieved in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies, in whom several complete and durable responses have been achieved. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of CAR T-cell immunotherapy of solid cancers, targeted against members of the ErbB family.

  1. Targeting KIT on innate immune cells to enhance the antitumor activity of checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Maximilian; Gedrich, Richard; Peck, Ronald; LaVallee, Theresa; Eder, Joseph Paul

    2016-06-01

    Innate immune cells such as mast cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells are key components of the tumor microenvironment. Recent evidence indicates that levels of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in melanoma patients are associated with poor survival to checkpoint inhibitors. This suggests that targeting both the innate and adaptive suppressive components of the immune system will maximize clinical benefit and elicit more durable responses in cancer patients. Preclinical data suggest that targeting signaling by the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT, particularly on mast cells, may modulate innate immune cell numbers and activity in tumors. Here, we review data highlighting the importance of the KIT signaling in regulating antitumor immune responses and the potential benefit of combining selective KIT inhibitors with immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  2. Targeted antigen delivery to dendritic cells elicits robust antiviral T cell-mediated immunity in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckmar, Julia; Gereke, Marcus; Ebensen, Thomas; Riese, Peggy; Philipsen, Lars; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Wohlleber, Dirk; Klopfleisch, Robert; Stegemann-Koniszewski, Sabine; Müller, Andreas J.; Gruber, Achim D.; Knolle, Percy; Guzman, Carlos A.; Bruder, Dunja

    2017-01-01

    Hepatotropic viruses such as hepatitis C virus cause life-threatening chronic liver infections in millions of people worldwide. Targeted in vivo antigen-delivery to cross-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) has proven to be extraordinarily efficient in stimulating antigen-specific T cell responses. To determine whether this approach would as well be suitable to induce local antiviral effector T cells in the liver we compared different vaccine formulations based on either the targeting of DEC-205 or TLR2/6 on cross-presenting DCs or formulations not involving in vivo DC targeting. As read-outs we used in vivo hepatotropic adenovirus challenge, histology and automated multidimensional fluorescence microscopy (MELC). We show that targeted in vivo antigen delivery to cross-presenting DCs is highly effective in inducing antiviral CTLs capable of eliminating virus-infected hepatocytes, while control vaccine formulation not involving DC targeting failed to induce immunity against hepatotropic virus. Moreover, we observed distinct patterns of CD8+ T cell interaction with virus-infected and apoptotic hepatocytes in the two DC-targeting groups suggesting that the different vaccine formulations may stimulate distinct types of effector functions. Our findings represent an important step toward the future development of vaccines against hepatotropic viruses and the treatment of patients with hepatic virus infection after liver transplantation to avoid reinfection. PMID:28266658

  3. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, Gabriella; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the conservation of this process across divergent cancer

  4. In vivo targeting of antigens to maturing dendritic cells via the DEC-205 receptor improves T cell vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura C; Bonnyay, David P; Charalambous, Anna; Darguste, Dara I; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Soares, Helena; Brimnes, Marie K; Moltedo, Bruno; Moran, Thomas M; Steinman, Ralph M

    2004-03-15

    The prevention and treatment of prevalent infectious diseases and tumors should benefit from improvements in the induction of antigen-specific T cell immunity. To assess the potential of antigen targeting to dendritic cells to improve immunity, we incorporated ovalbumin protein into a monoclonal antibody to the DEC-205 receptor, an endocytic receptor that is abundant on these cells in lymphoid tissues. Simultaneously, we injected agonistic alpha-CD40 antibody to mature the dendritic cells. We found that a single low dose of antibody-conjugated ovalbumin initiated immunity from the naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell repertoire. Unexpectedly, the alphaDEC-205 antigen conjugates, given s.c., targeted to dendritic cells systemically and for long periods, and ovalbumin peptide was presented on MHC class I for 2 weeks. This was associated with stronger CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity relative to other forms of antigen delivery, even when the latter was given at a thousand times higher doses. In parallel, the mice showed enhanced resistance to an established rapidly growing tumor and to viral infection at a mucosal site. By better harnessing the immunizing functions of maturing dendritic cells, antibody-mediated antigen targeting via the DEC-205 receptor increases the efficiency of vaccination for T cell immunity, including systemic and mucosal resistance in disease models.

  5. Novel Roles for P53 in the Genesis and Targeting of Tetraploid Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Batzaya Davaadelger; Hong Shen; Maki, Carl G.

    2014-01-01

    Tetraploid (4N) cells are considered important in cancer because they can display increased tumorigenicity, resistance to conventional therapies, and are believed to be precursors to whole chromosome aneuploidy. It is therefore important to determine how tetraploid cancer cells arise, and how to target them. P53 is a tumor suppressor protein and key regulator of tetraploidy. As part of the "tetraploidy checkpoint", p53 inhibits tetraploid cell proliferation by promoting a G1-arrest in incipie...

  6. Nanovectors for Targeting and Delivery of Therapeutics to HER-2 NEU Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Gabizon, A., Shmeeda, H., Horowitz, A. T., Zalipsky, S., Tumor cell targeting of liposome- entrapped drugs with phospholipid-anchored folic acid ...AND DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTICS TO HER-2 NEU POSITIVE BREAST CANCER CELLS Serda, Rita E INTRODUCTION While our vast knowledge of cellular biology...determines the population of phagocytic cells responsible for their clearance (23). For example, plasma protein adsorption by poly(D,L-lactic acid

  7. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander A. A. Kooijmans

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods: EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF. EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results: V analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression, but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions: We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules.

  8. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijmans, Sander A. A.; Aleza, Clara Gómez; Roffler, Steve R.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF). EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results EV analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression), but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules. PMID:26979463

  9. Repurposing Established Compounds to Target Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard W. Renz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC carries a dismal prognosis, in particular, when patients present with unresectable disease. While significant progress has been made in understanding the biology of PDAC, this knowledge has not translated into a clear clinical benefit and current chemotherapeutic strategies only offer a modest improvement in overall survival. Accordingly, novel approaches are desperately needed. One hypothesis that could—at least in part—explain the desolate response of PDAC to chemotherapy is the so-called cancer stem cell (CSC concept, which attributes specific traits, such as chemoresistance, metastatic potential and a distinct metabolism to a small cellular subpopulation of the whole tumor. At the same time, however, some of these attributes could make CSCs more permissive for novel therapeutic strategies with compounds that are already in clinical use. Most recently, several publications have tried to enlighten the field with the idea of repurposing established drugs for antineoplastic use. As such, recycling drugs could present an intriguing and fast-track method with new therapeutic paradigms in anti-cancer and anti-CSC treatments. Here, we aim to summarize important aspects and novel findings of this emerging field.

  10. Sickle cell disease: time for a targeted neonatal screening programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, C

    2015-02-01

    Ireland has seen a steady increase in paediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). In 2005, only 25% of children with SCD were referred to the haemoglobinopathy service in their first year. A non-funded screening programme was implemented. This review aimed to assess the impact screening has had. All children referred to the haemoglobinopathy service born in Ireland after 2005 were identified. Data was collected from the medical chart and laboratory system. Information was analysed using Microsoft Excel. 77 children with SCD were identified. The median age at antibiotic commencement in the screened group was 56 days compared with 447 days in the unscreened group, p = < 0.0003. 22 (28%) of infants were born in centre\\'s that do not screen and 17 (81%) were over 6 months old at referral, compared with 14 (21%) in the screened group. 6 (27%) of those in the unscreened group presented in acute crisis compared with 2 (3%) in the screened population. The point prevalence of SCD in Ireland is 0.2% in children under 15 yr of African and Asian descent. We identified delays in referral and treatment, which reflect the lack of government funded support and policy. We suggest all maternity units commence screening for newborns at risk of SCD. It is a cost effective intervention with a number needed to screen of just 4 to prevent a potentially fatal crisis.

  11. Single cell targeting using plasmon resonant gold-coated liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2012-03-01

    We have developed an experimental system with the potential for the delivery and localized release of an encapsulated agent with high spatial and temporal resolution. We previously introduced liposome-supported plasmon resonant gold nanoshells; in this composite structure, the liposome allows for the encapsulation of substances, such as therapeutic agents, neurotransmitters, or growth factors, and the plasmon resonant structure facilitates the rapid release of encapsulated contents upon laser light illumination. More recently, we demonstrated that these gold-coated liposomes are capable of releasing their contents in a spectrally-controlled manner, where plasmon resonant nanoparticles only release content upon illumination with a wavelength of light matching their plasmon resonance band. We now show that this release mechanism can be used in a biological setting to deliver a peptide derivative of cholecystokinin to HEK293 cells overexpressing the CCK2 receptor. Using directed laser light, we may enable localized release from gold-coated liposomes to enable accurate perturbation of cellular functions in response to released compounds; this system may have possible applications in signaling pathways and drug discovery.

  12. Temporally controlled targeting of 4-hydroxynonenal to specific proteins in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xinqiang; Fu, Yuan; Long, Marcus J C; Haegele, Joseph A; Ge, Eva J; Parvez, Saba; Aye, Yimon

    2013-10-02

    In-depth chemical understanding of complex biological processes hinges upon the ability to systematically perturb individual systems. However, current approaches to study impacts of biologically relevant reactive small molecules involve bathing of the entire cell or isolated organelle with excess amounts, leading to off-target effects. The resultant lack of biochemical specificity has plagued our understanding of how biological electrophiles mediate signal transduction or regulate responses that confer defense mechanisms to cellular electrophilic stress. Here we introduce a target-specific electrophile delivery platform that will ultimately pave the way to interrogate effects of reactive electrophiles on specific target proteins in cells. The new methodology is demonstrated by photoinducible targeted delivery of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) to the proteins Keap1 and PTEN. Covalent conjugation of the HNE-precursor to HaloTag fused to the target proteins enables directed HNE delivery upon photoactivation. The strategy provides proof of concept of selective delivery of reactive electrophiles to individual electrophile-responsive proteins in mammalian cells. It opens a new avenue enabling more precise determination of the pathophysiological consequences of HNE-induced chemical modifications on specific target proteins in cells.

  13. Designing nanoconjugates to effectively target pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameel Ahmad Khan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in America. Monoclonal antibodies are a viable treatment option for inhibiting cancer growth. Tumor specific drug delivery could be achieved utilizing these monoclonal antibodies as targeting agents. This type of designer therapeutic is evolving and with the use of gold nanoparticles it is a promising approach to selectively deliver chemotherapeutics to malignant cells. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs are showing extreme promise in current medicinal research. GNPs have been shown to non-invasively kill tumor cells by hyperthermia using radiofrequency. They have also been implemented as early detection agents due to their unique X-ray contrast properties; success was revealed with clear delineation of blood capillaries in a preclinical model by CT (computer tomography. The fundamental parameters for intelligent design of nanoconjugates are on the forefront. The goal of this study is to define the necessary design parameters to successfully target pancreatic cancer cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The nanoconjugates described in this study were characterized with various physico-chemical techniques. We demonstrate that the number of cetuximab molecules (targeting agent on a GNP, the hydrodynamic size of the nanoconjugates, available reactive surface area and the ability of the nanoconjugates to sequester EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor, all play critical roles in effectively targeting tumor cells in vitro and in vivo in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest the specific targeting of tumor cells depends on a number of crucial components 1 targeting agent to nanoparticle ratio 2 availability of reactive surface area on the nanoparticle 3 ability of the nanoconjugate to bind the target and 4 hydrodynamic diameter of the nanoconjugate. We believe this study will help define the design parameters for formulating better strategies

  14. Adoptive transfer of osteoclast-expanded natural killer cells for immunotherapy targeting cancer stem-like cells in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowska, Anna K; Kaur, Kawaljit; Topchyan, Paytsar; Jewett, Anahid

    2016-07-01

    Based on data obtained from oral, pancreatic and lung cancers, glioblastoma, and melanoma, we have established that natural killer (NK) cells target cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). CSCs displaying low MHC class I, CD54, and PD-L1 are killed by cytotoxic NK cells and are differentiated by split anergized NK cells through both membrane bound and secreted forms of TNF-α and IFN-γ. NK cells select and differentiate both healthy and transformed stem-like cells, resulting in target cell maturation and shaping of their microenvironment. In our recent studies, we have observed that oral, pancreatic, and melanoma CSCs were capable of forming large tumors in humanized bone marrow, liver, thymus (hu-BLT) mice with fully reconstituted human immune system. In addition, major human immune subsets including NK cells, T cells, B cells, and monocytes were present in the spleen, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and tumor microenvironment. Similar to our previously published in vitro data, CSCs differentiated with split anergized NK cells prior to implantation in mice formed smaller tumors. Intravenous injection of functionally potent osteoclast-expanded NK cells inhibited tumor growth through differentiation of CSCs in humanized mice. In this review, we present current approaches, advances, and existing limitations in studying interactions of the immune system with the tumor, in particular NK cells with CSCs, using in vivo preclinical hu-BLT mouse model. In addition, we discuss the use of osteoclast-expanded NK cells in targeting cancer stem-like tumors in humanized mice-a strategy that provides a much-needed platform to develop effective cancer immunotherapies.

  15. Targeted images of KB cells using folate-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinaraj, Pierson; Lee, Kyubae; Park, Soo-Young; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Mercaptosuccinic acid-coated gold (GM) nanoparticles were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Folic acid (F) was then conjugated to the GM to preferentially target oral squamous cancer (KB) cells with folate receptors expressed on their membranes and facilitate the transit of the nanoparticles across the cell membrane. Finally, a fluorescence dye (Atto) was conjugated to the nanoparticles to visualize their internalization into KB cells. After culture of the cells in a medium containing GM and folate-conjugated GM (GF), the interaction of surface-modified gold nanoparticles with KB cells was studied.

  16. Notch signaling: targeting cancer stem cells and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Ingrid; Pochampally, Radhika; Xing, Fei; Watabe, Kounosuke; Miele, Lucio

    2013-09-06

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway involved in cell fate control during development, stem cell self-renewal, and postnatal tissue differentiation. Roles for Notch in carcinogenesis, the biology of cancer stem cells, tumor angiogenesis, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been reported. This review describes the role of Notch in the "stemness" program in cancer cells and in metastases, together with a brief update on the Notch inhibitors currently under investigation in oncology. These agents may be useful in targeting cancer stem cells and to reverse the EMT process.

  17. Nanobiotechnology meets plant cell biology: Carbon nanotubes as organelle targeting nanocarriers

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2013-01-01

    For years, nanotechnology has shown great promise in the fields of biomedical and biotechnological sciences and medical research. In this review, we demonstrate its versatility and applicability in plant cell biology studies. Specifically, we discuss the ability of functionalized carbon nanotubes to penetrate the plant cell wall, target specific organelles, probe protein-carrier activity and induce organelle recycling in plant cells. We also, shed light on prospective applications of carbon nanomaterials in cell biology and plant cell transformation. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Isolation,Identifcation and Characterization of Algae-lysing Strain H5 from Xiangxi Bay of Three Gorges Reservoir%溶藻细菌H5的分离、鉴定及溶藻特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国勇; 胡亚平; 石小丹; 聂小倩; 黄应平

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The study was conducted to isolate and identify alage-lysing bacterium and explore the characterization of alage-lysing bacterium so as to provide reference for the control of algae bloom. [ Method] A high-efficient algae-lysing strain H5 was isolated during spring blooms in Xiangxi Bay at Three Gorges Reservoir. According to the similarity analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence and by Biolog microsta-tion system, the strain was identified. By direct counting, the lytic efficiency of H5 to Stephanodiscus hantzschii, Peridiniopsis niei, Komma caudata and performing mode of H5 to S. hantzschii were studied. [ Result] 16S rDNA sequence analysis and Biolog analysis showed that H5 strain belonged to Lysinibacillus fusiformis. The highest and lowest algicidal rate of the strain was 71.3% and 57.4% respectively in the cultures of 5. hantzschii, P. niel, and K. caudata. The filtrate of cell spent media, and the heated above filtrate displayed the same algae-lytic ability, while the cell-free supernatant of the cells of bacteria showed no algae-lytic ability, indicating that some extracellular and thermo-stable substances were produced by this strain. [Conclusion] The strain H5 produced better lytic efficiency to S. hantzschii and performed algae-lytic ability by producing extracellular substances.%[目的]分离和鉴定溶藻细菌,研究其溶藻特性,为进一步研究溶藻细菌对水华的治理作用提供帮助.[方法]从香溪河春季水华集聚区水体中分离得到1株有高效溶藻效果的菌株(H5),采用16S rDNA序列相似性分析和Biolog微生物自动鉴定系统等对细菌进行鉴定.采用直接计数法,研究了其对汉斯冠盘藻(Stephanodiscus hantzschii、倪氏拟多甲藻(Peridiniopsis niei)、具尾逗隐藻(Kommia caudata)的抑制效果,及对汉斯冠盘藻的溶藻作用方式.[结果]根据生理生化及16S rDNA序列分析鉴定,H5属于纺缍形赖氨酸芽孢杆菌(Lysinibacillus fusiformis).该菌对汉斯冠

  19. Folic acid-CdTe quantum dot conjugates and their applications for cancer cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suriamoorthy, Preethi; Zhang, Xing; Hao, Guiyang; Joly, Alan G.; Singh, S.; Hossu, Marius; Sun, Xiankai; Chen, Wei

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we report the preparation,luminescence, and targeting properties of folic acid- CdTe quantum dot conjugates. Water-soluble CdTe quantum dots were synthesized and conjugated with folic acid using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide-N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry. The in-fluence of folic acid on the luminescence properties of CdTe quantum dots was investigated, and no energy transfer between them was observed. To investigate the efficiency of folic acid-CdTe nanoconjugates for tumor targeting, pure CdTe quantum dots and folic acid-coated CdTe quantum dots were incubated with human naso- pharyngeal epidermal carcinoma cell line with positive expressing folic acid receptors (KB cells) and lung cancer cells without expression of folic acid receptors (A549 cells). For the cancer cells with positive folate receptors (KB cells), the uptake for CdTe quantum dots is very low, but for folic acid-CdTe nanoconjugates, the uptake is very high. For the lung cancer cells without folate receptors (A549 cells), the uptake for folic acid- CdTe nanoconjugates is also very low. The results indicate that folic acid is an effective targeting molecule for tumor cells with overexpressed folate receptors.

  20. Nuclear Membrane-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles Inhibit Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Moustafa R K; Wu, Yue; Ghosh, Deepraj; Do, Brian H; Chen, Kuangcai; Dawson, Michelle R; Fang, Ning; Sulchek, Todd A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2017-03-27

    Most cancer patients die from metastasis. Recent studies have shown that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can slow down the migration/invasion speed of cancer cells and suppress metastasis. Since nuclear stiffness of the cell largely decreases cell migration, our hypothesis is that targeting AuNPs to the cell nucleus region could enhance nuclear stiffness, and therefore inhibit cell migration and invasion. Our results showed that upon nuclear targeting of AuNPs, the ovarian cancer cell motilities decrease significantly, compared with nontargeted AuNPs. Furthermore, using atomic force microscopy, we observed an enhanced cell nuclear stiffness. In order to understand the mechanism of cancer cell migration/invasion inhibition, the exact locations of the targeted AuNPs were clearly imaged using a high-resolution three-dimensional imaging microscope, which showed that the AuNPs were trapped at the nuclear membrane. In addition, we observed a greatly increased expression level of lamin A/C protein, which is located in the inner nuclear membrane and functions as a structural component of the nuclear lamina to enhance nuclear stiffness. We propose that the AuNPs that are trapped at the nuclear membrane both (1) add to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus and (2) stimulate the overexpression of lamin A/C located around the nuclear membrane, thus increasing nuclear stiffness and slowing cancer cell migration and invasion.

  1. CollagenVI-Cre mice: A new tool to target stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, Alejandro; Kollias, George; Koliaraki, Vasiliki

    2016-09-08

    Stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are non-hematopoietic cells involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Three major stromal populations have been identified in adult SLOs: fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and marginal reticular cells (MRCs). The properties of these individual populations are not clearly defined, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic tools, especially for MRCs. Here, we analyzed stromal cell targeting in SLOs from a transgenic mouse strain that expresses Cre recombinase under the CollagenVI promoter, using lineage tracing approaches. We show that these mice target specifically MRCs and FDCs, but not FRCs in Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles in the intestine. In contrast, stromal cells in lymph nodes and the spleen do not express the transgene, which renders ColVI-cre mice ideal for the specific targeting of stromal cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This funding further supports the hypothesis of organ-specific stromal precursors in SLOs. Interestingly, in all tissues analyzed, there was also high specificity for perivascular cells, which have been proposed to act as FDC precursors. Taken together, ColVI-Cre mice are a useful new tool for the dissection of MRC- and FDC-specific functions and plasticity in the GALT.

  2. Gene Transfer from Targeted Liposomes to Specific Lymphoid Cells by Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machy, Patrick; Lewis, Florence; McMillan, Lynette; Jonak, Zdenka L.

    1988-11-01

    Large unilamellar liposomes, coated with protein A and encapsulating the gene that confers resistance to mycophenolic acid, were used as a model system to demonstrate gene transfer into specific lymphoid cells. Protein A, which selectively recognizes mouse IgG2a antibodies, was coupled to liposomes to target them specifically to defined cell types coated with IgG2a antibody. Protein A-coated liposomes bound human B lymphoblastoid cells preincubated with a mouse IgG2a anti-HLA monoclonal antibody but failed to adhere to cells challenged with an irrelevant (anti-H-2) antibody of the same isotype or to cells incubated in the absence of antibody. Transfection of target cells bound to protein A-coated liposomes was achieved by electroporation. This step was essential since only electroporated cells survived in a selective medium containing mycophenolic acid. Transfection efficiency with electroporation and targeted liposomes was as efficient as conventional procedures that used unencapsulated plasmids free in solution but, in the latter case, cell selectivity is not possible. This technique provides a methodology for introducing defined biological macromolecules into specific cell types.

  3. Targeted alternative splicing of TAF4: a new strategy for cell reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Sadam, Helle; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells has become a versatile tool for biomedical research and for regenerative medicine. In the current study, we show that manipulating alternative splicing (AS) is a highly potent strategy to produce cells for therapeutic applications. We demonstrate that silencing of hTAF4-TAFH activity of TAF4 converts human facial dermal fibroblasts to melanocyte-like (iMel) cells. iMel cells produce melanin and express microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its target genes at levels comparable to normal melanocytes. Reprogramming of melanoma cells by manipulation with hTAF4-TAFH activity upon TAFH RNAi enforces cell differentiation towards chondrogenic pathway, whereas ectoptic expression of TAF4 results in enhanced multipotency and neural crest-like features in melanoma cells. In both cell states, iMels and cancer cells, hTAF4-TAFH activity controls migration by supporting E- to N-cadherin switches. From our data, we conclude that targeted splicing of hTAF4-TAFH coordinates AS of other TFIID subunits, underscoring the role of TAF4 in synchronised changes of Pol II complex composition essential for efficient cellular reprogramming. Taken together, targeted AS of TAF4 provides a unique strategy for generation of iMels and recapitulating stages of melanoma progression. PMID:27499390

  4. Determining duration of HER2-targeted therapy using stem cell extinction models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Riley

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Trastuzumab dramatically improves survival in breast cancer patients whose tumor overexpresses HER2. A subpopulation of cells in human breast tumors has been identified with characteristics of cancer stem cells. These breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSCs rely on HER2 signaling for self-renewal, suggesting that HER2-targeted therapy targets BCSCs even when the bulk of the tumor does not overexpress HER2. In order to guide clinical trials examining HER2-targeted therapy in the adjuvant setting, we propose a mathematical model to examine BCSC population dynamics and predict optimal duration of therapy. METHODS: Varying the susceptibility of BCSCs to HER2-targeted therapy, we quantify the average time to extinction of BCSCs. We expand our model using stochastic simulation to include the partially differentiated tumor cells (TCs that represent bulk tumor population and examine effects of plasticity on required duration of therapy. RESULTS: Lower susceptibility of BCSCs and increased rates of dedifferentiation entail longer extinction times, indicating a need for prolonged administration of HER2-targeted therapy. We predict that even when therapy does not appreciably reduce tumor size in the advanced cancer setting, it will eventually eradicate the tumor in the adjuvant setting as long as there is at least a modest effect on BCSCs. CONCLUSIONS: We anticipate that our results will inform clinical trials of targeted therapies in planning the duration of therapy needed to eradicate BCSCs. Our predictions also address safety, as longer duration of therapy entails a greater potential impact on normal stem cells that may also be susceptible to stem cell-targeted therapies.

  5. Visual cells remember earlier applied target: plasticity of orientation selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcis Ghisovan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A canonical proposition states that, in mature brain, neurons responsive to sensory stimuli are tuned to specific properties installed shortly after birth. It is amply demonstrated that that neurons in adult visual cortex of cats are orientation-selective that is they respond with the highest firing rates to preferred oriented stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In anesthetized cats, prepared in a conventional fashion for single cell recordings, the present investigation shows that presenting a stimulus uninterruptedly at a non-preferred orientation for twelve minutes induces changes in orientation preference. Across all conditions orientation tuning curves were investigated using a trial by trial method. Contrary to what has been previously reported with shorter adaptation duration, twelve minutes of adaptation induces mostly attractive shifts, i.e. toward the adapter. After a recovery period allowing neurons to restore their original orientation tuning curves, we carried out a second adaptation which produced three major results: (1 more frequent attractive shifts, (2 an increase of their magnitude, and (3 an additional enhancement of responses at the new or acquired preferred orientation. Additionally, we also show that the direction of shifts depends on the duration of the adaptation: shorter adaptation in most cases produces repulsive shifts, whereas adaptation exceeding nine minutes results in attractive shifts, in the same unit. Consequently, shifts in preferred orientation depend on the duration of adaptation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The supplementary response improvements indicate that neurons in area 17 keep a memory trace of the previous stimulus properties, thereby upgrading cellular performance. It also highlights the dynamic nature of basic neuronal properties in adult cortex since repeated adaptations modified both the orientation tuning selectivity and the response strength to the preferred orientation. These

  6. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE®) antibody constructs can mediate bystander tumor cell killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sandra L.; Sherman, Marika; McElroy, Patricia L.; Lofgren, Julie A.; Moody, Gordon; Baeuerle, Patrick A.; Coxon, Angela

    2017-01-01

    For targets that are homogenously expressed, such as CD19 on cells of the B lymphocyte lineage, immunotherapies can be highly effective. Targeting CD19 with blinatumomab, a CD19/CD3 bispecific antibody construct (BiTE®), or with chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T) has shown great promise for treating certain CD19-positive hematological malignancies. In contrast, solid tumors with heterogeneous expression of the tumor-associated antigen (TAA) may present a challenge for targeted therapies. To prevent escape of TAA-negative cancer cells, immunotherapies with a local bystander effect would be beneficial. As a model to investigate BiTE®-mediated bystander killing in the solid tumor setting, we used epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a target. We measured lysis of EGFR-negative populations in vitro and in vivo when co-cultured with EGFR-positive cells, human T cells and an EGFR/CD3 BiTE® antibody construct. Bystander EGFR-negative cells were efficiently lysed by BiTE®-activated T cells only when proximal to EGFR-positive cells. Our mechanistic analysis suggests that cytokines released by BiTE®-activated T-cells induced upregulation of ICAM-1 and FAS on EGFR-negative bystander cells, contributing to T cell-induced bystander cell lysis. PMID:28837681

  7. Targeting Th17 Cells with Small Molecules and Small Interference RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Song, Pingfang; Zhao, Yi; Xue, Li-Jia; Liu, Yi; Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play a central role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases via the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17, IL-17F, and IL-22. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibodies show potent efficacy in psoriasis but poor effect in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease. Alternative agents targeting Th17 cells may be a better way to inhibit the development and function of Th17 cells than antibodies of blocking a single effector cytokine. Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) which acts as the master transcription factor of Th17 differentiation has been an attractive pharmacologic target for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune disease. Recent progress in technology of chemical screen and engineering nucleic acid enable two new classes of therapeutics targeting RORγt. Chemical screen technology identified several small molecule specific inhibitors of RORγt from a small molecule library. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) technology enabled target specific aptamers to be isolated from a random sequence oligonucleotide library. In this review, we highlight the development and therapeutic potential of small molecules inhibiting Th17 cells by targeting RORγt and aptamer mediated CD4(+) T cell specific delivery of small interference RNA against RORγt gene expression to inhibit pathogenic effector functions of Th17 lineage.

  8. Targeting Th17 Cells with Small Molecules and Small Interference RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available T helper 17 (Th17 cells play a central role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases via the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL- 17, IL-17F, and IL-22. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibodies show potent efficacy in psoriasis but poor effect in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and Crohn’s disease. Alternative agents targeting Th17 cells may be a better way to inhibit the development and function of Th17 cells than antibodies of blocking a single effector cytokine. Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt which acts as the master transcription factor of Th17 differentiation has been an attractive pharmacologic target for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune disease. Recent progress in technology of chemical screen and engineering nucleic acid enable two new classes of therapeutics targeting RORγt. Chemical screen technology identified several small molecule specific inhibitors of RORγt from a small molecule library. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX technology enabled target specific aptamers to be isolated from a random sequence oligonucleotide library. In this review, we highlight the development and therapeutic potential of small molecules inhibiting Th17 cells by targeting RORγt and aptamer mediated CD4+ T cell specific delivery of small interference RNA against RORγt gene expression to inhibit pathogenic effector functions of Th17 lineage.

  9. Unusual target selectivity of perisomatic inhibitory cells in the hilar region of the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acsády, L; Katona, I; Martínez-Guijarro, F J; Buzsáki, G; Freund, T F

    2000-09-15

    Perisomatic inhibitory innervation of all neuron types profoundly affects their firing characteristics and vulnerability. In this study we examined the postsynaptic targets of perisomatic inhibitory cells in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus where the proportion of potential target cells (excitatory mossy cells and inhibitory interneurons) is approximately equal. Both cholecystokinin (CCK)- and parvalbumin-immunoreactive basket cells formed multiple contacts on the somata and proximal dendrites of mossy cells. Unexpectedly, however, perisomatic inhibitory terminals arriving from these cell types largely ignored hilar GABAergic cell populations. Eighty-ninety percent of various GABAergic neurons including other CCK-containing basket cells received no input from CCK-positive terminals. Parvalbumin-containing cells sometimes innervated each other but avoided 75% of other GABAergic cells. Overall, a single mossy cell received 40 times more CCK-immunoreactive terminals and 15 times more parvalbumin-positive terminals onto its soma than the cell body of an average hilar GABAergic cell. In contrast to the pronounced target selectivity in the hilar region, CCK- and parvalbumin-positive neurons innervated each other via collaterals in stratum granulosum and moleculare. Our observations indicate that the inhibitory control in the hilar region is qualitatively different from other cortical areas at both the network level and the level of single neurons. The paucity of perisomatic innervation of hilar interneurons should have profound consequences on their action potential generation and on their ensemble behavior. These findings may help explain the unique physiological patterns observed in the hilus and the selective vulnerability of the hilar cell population in various pathophysiological conditions.

  10. Aptamer-targeted inhibition of mTOR in T cells enhances antitumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnoy, Alexey; Castro, Iris; Levay, Agata; Malek, Thomas R; Gilboa, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have underscored the importance of memory T cells in mediating protective immunity against pathogens and cancer. Pharmacological inhibition of regulators that mediate T cell differentiation promotes the differentiation of activated CD8(+) T cells into memory cells. Nonetheless, pharmacological agents have broad targets and can induce undesirable immunosuppressive effects. Here, we tested the hypothesis that aptamer-targeted siRNA inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) function in CD8(+) T cells can enhance their differentiation into memory T cells and potentiate antitumor immunity more effectively than the pharmacologic inhibitor rapamycin. To specifically target activated cells, we conjugated an siRNA targeting the mTORC1 component raptor to an aptamer that binds 4-1BB, a costimulatory molecule that is