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Sample records for lymphoproliferative syndrome xlp

  1. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning 2.5 Mbp in Xq25, the critical region for the X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) gene

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    Lanyi, A.; Li, B.F.; Li, S. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is characterized by a marked vulnerability in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Infection of XLP patients with EBV invariably results in fatal mononucleosis, agammaglobulinemia or B-cell lymphoma. The XLP gene lies within a 10 cM region in Xq25 between DXS42 and DXS10. Initial chromosome studies revealed an interstitial, cytogenetically visible deletion in Xq25 in one XLP family (43-004). We estimated the size of the Xq25 deletion by dual laser flow karyotyping to involve 2% of the X chromosome, or approximately 3 Mbp of DNA sequences. To further delineate the deletion we performed a series of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analyses which showed that DXS6 and DXS100, two Xq25-specific markers, are missing from 45-004 DNA. Five yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from a chromosome X specific YAC library containing sequences deleted in patient`s 43-004 DNA were isolated. These five YACs did not overlap, and their end fragments were used to screen the CEPH MegaYAC library. Seven YACs were isolated from the CEPH MegaYAC library. They could be arranged into a contig which spans between DXS6 and DXS100. The contig contains a minimum of 2.5 Mbp of human DNA. A total of 12 YAC end clone, lambda subclones and STS probes have been used to order clones within the contig. These reagents were also used in Southern blot and patients showed interstitial deletions in Xq25. The size of these deletions range between 0.5 and 2.5 Mbp. The shortest deletion probably represents the critical region for the XLP gene.

  2. [X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1 complicated with secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and ileal perforation: case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, L; Guan, X M; Meng, Y; Zhao, X D; Xian, Y; An, Y F; Yu, J

    2016-04-01

    To analyze and summarize the clinical characteristics, laboratory tests and treatment of X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1 (XLP-1). A retrospective study was done in 2012 on an XLP-1 patient to collect the data on clinical manifestation, laboratory examination, gene and protein expression, complications and prognosis. Literatures were reviewed in Pubmed with the key word"X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome". The patient with persistent high fever, jaundice, abdominal distension, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenectasis, rash and suspicious positive family history; the patient eventually died of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), with intestinal perforation, intestinal infection and bleeding after being infected with EB virus. This patient with SH2D1A gene exon 1 large fragment of the coding region of the nucleotide deletion and insertion mutations causing missense mutations (p.Leu25Lys) and nonsense mutations (stop codon TAG was inserted after missense mutation so that the protein encoded by the early termination of the 25 amino acids), which led to SAP protein missing. The expression of SAP in his mother was also partly missing. Retrieval of reports on XLP-1 was conducted through literature search (included totally 157 cases) at home and abroad, positive family history accounted for 60.6%(40/66); lymphoma incidence accounted for 49.7%(72/145); low gamma globulin occurred in 24.8%(39/157) of cases; secondary HLH ratio accounted for 43.3%(68/157); XLP-1 in patients with hemorrhagic enteritis and gastritis was low, accounted for only 2.6%(3/116). XLP-1 patients occasionally develop necrotic enteritis complicated with ileal perforation.XLP-1 with large fragment deletion of SH2D1A gene might be associated with serious gastrointestinal manifestations.

  3. Mapping the x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

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    Skare, J.C.; Milunsky, A.; Byron, K.S.; Sullivan, J.L.

    1987-04-01

    The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection and results in fatal mononucleosis, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This study shows that the mutation responsible for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is genetically linked to a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with the DXS42 probe (from Xq24-q27). The most likely recombination frequency between the loci is 4%, and the associated logarithm of the odds is 5.26. Haplotype analysis using flanking restriction fragment length polymorphism markers indicates that the locus for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is distal to probe DXS42 but proximal to probe DXS99 (from Xq26-q27). It is now possible to predict which members of a family with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome are carrier females and to diagnose the syndrome prenatally.

  4. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome with Red Cell Aplasia.

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    Meena, K R; Bisht, Supriya; Tamaria, K C

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of abnormal lymphocyte apoptosis, leading to chronic lymphoproliferation. It presents as lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Pure red cell aplasia is characterized by normochromic normocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and absence of erythroblasts from a normal bone marrow. Only few lymphoproliferative disorders have been associated with erythroid aplasia. The authors are reporting a case of ALPS associated with red cell aplasia in a 7-y-old girl.

  5. Rapamycin improves lymphoproliferative disease in murine autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

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    Teachey, David T; Obzut, Dana A; Axsom, Kelly; Choi, John K; Goldsmith, Kelly C; Hall, Junior; Hulitt, Jessica; Manno, Catherine S; Maris, John M; Rhodin, Nicholas; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Brown, Valerie I; Grupp, Stephan A

    2006-09-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by defective Fas-mediated apoptosis, leading to lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and an increased number of double-negative T cells (DNTs). Treatment options for patients with ALPS are limited. Rapamycin has been shown to induce apoptosis in normal and malignant lymphocytes. Since ALPS is caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, we hypothesized that rapamycin would be effective in treating ALPS. We tested this hypothesis using rapamycin in murine models of ALPS. We followed treatment response with serial assessment of DNTs by flow cytometry in blood and lymphoid tissue, by serial monitoring of lymph node and spleen size with ultrasonography, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibodies. Three-dimensional ultrasound measurements in the mice correlated to actual tissue measurements at death (r = .9648). We found a dramatic and statistically significant decrease in DNTs, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and autoantibodies after only 4 weeks when comparing rapamycin-treated mice with controls. Rapamycin induced apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. We compared rapamycin to mycophenolate mofetil, a second-line agent used to treat ALPS, and found rapamycin's control of lymphoproliferation was superior. We conclude that rapamycin is an effective treatment for murine ALPS and should be explored as treatment for affected humans.

  6. Updated Understanding of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS).

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    Li, Pu; Huang, Ping; Yang, Ye; Hao, Mu; Peng, Hongwei; Li, Fei

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), a disorder characterized by immune dysregulation due to disrupted lymphocyte homeostasis, is mainly resulted from the mutations in FAS-mediated apoptotic pathway. In addition, other mutations of the genes such as Fas-ligand (FASLG), Caspase 10 (CASP10) and Caspase 8 (CASP8), NRAS and KRAS have also been observed in a small number of patients with ALPS or ALPS-related disorders. However, approximately 20-30% of patients with ALPS have unidentified defect. Its clinical manifestations observed in multiple family members include unexplained lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias such as thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and anemia due to excessive production of antibodies by lymphocytes, elevated number of double-negative T (DNT) cells, and increased risk of lymphoma. As a very rare disease, ALPS was first characterized in the early 1990s. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have been reported till now; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years. ALPS has historically considered as a primary immune defect presenting in early childhood, however, recent studies have shown that it may be more common than previous thought because adult onset presentation is increasingly becoming recognized and more adult ALPS patients are diagnosed. The new genetic and biological insights have improved the understanding of ALPS and a number of targeted therapeutic strategies such as mycophenolate mofetil, sirolimus, and pentostatin have been successfully applied in ALPS patients with promising treatment efficacy. This article comprehensively reviews the clinical and laboratory manifestations, new research advances in the molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatments of this disorder.

  7. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): a rare cause of immune cytopenia.

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    John, M Joseph; Rajasekhar, Reena; Mathews, Vikram

    2008-02-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an inherited disorder manifesting with autoimmune cytopenia, lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. The differential diagnosis includes infections, autoimmune disorders or malignancies. The disease is characterized by accumulation of double negative (CD3+ CD4- CD8-) T cells (DNT) in the peripheral blood. We describe a case and review the literature.

  8. X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease (XLP)

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  9. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) in a Boy with Massive Lymphadenopathy.

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    Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Khalesi, Maryam; Farid, Reza; Badiee, Zahra; Rastin, Maryam; Ahanchian, Hamid

    2010-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an uncommon nonmalignant lymphoproliferative disease which is characterized by chronic, persistent or recurrent lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, immune cytopenia , hypergammaglobinemia and increased risk of lymphoma. We report a 2-year old boy with hepatosplenomegaly as first presentation. Petechial and purpuric rashes with massive cervical lymphadenopathies developed 10 months later.In laboratory tests anemia, thrombocytopenia and hypergammaglobinemia were observed. According to flocytometry increased double negative T cells and by apoptosis assay decrease apoptosis of lymphocytes accompanied clinical manifestations, thus diagnosis of ALPS was established. In conclusion; in all patients with massive lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegay; especially with cytopenia; ALPS should be considered.

  10. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Case report and family history.

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    Ries, F; Ferster, A; Rieux-Laucat, F; Biwer, A; Dicato, M

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disease caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis and is characterized by non-malignant lymphoproliferation, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune manifestations and increased risk of both Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Most forms of the disease are due to germ line mutations of the FAS gene and manifest during the first years of life with fluctuating lymphadenopathies, hemolysis, immune thrombocytopenia. During the second decade of life disease manifestations improve spontaneously but autoimmune problems still occur and there is an increased risk of lymphoproliferative malignancy. We describe a typical case of ALPS in a now 44 year old man, followed since the age of 2 for disease manifestations that were unclear at the beginning.

  11. Treatment of the X-linked lymphoproliferative, Griscelli and Chédiak-Higashi syndromes by HLH directed therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trottestam, Helena; Beutel, Karin; Meeths, Marie;

    2009-01-01

    be used for these syndromes. PROCEDURE: In the HLH-94/HLH-2004 treatment study registries, we evaluated all patients with GS2 (n = 5), XLP (n = 2) or CHS (n = 2) treated between 1994 and 2004. RESULTS: All patients responded to the therapy, and all are alive but one (suffering from CHS), with a mean...... follow-up of 5.6 years. All GS2, one XLP and one CHS patient underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Mean follow-up post transplant was 6.0 years. Six of the seven transplanted children achieved non-active disease status at the time for SCT. Neurological sequelae were reported in all, except...

  12. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient.

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    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-12-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient.

  13. Optimal Management of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome in Children.

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    George, Lindsey A; Teachey, David T

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte homeostasis, resulting from mutations in the Fas apoptotic pathway. Clinical manifestations include noninfectious and nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and autoimmune pathology-most commonly, autoimmune cytopenias. Rarely, and in association with specific genetic mutations, patients with ALPS may go on to develop secondary lymphoid malignancies. Though ALPS is a rare disorder, it should be suspected and ruled out in children presenting with chronic and refractory multilineage cytopenias associated with nonmalignant lymphoproliferation. Revised diagnostic criteria and insights into disease biology have improved both diagnosis and treatment. Sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil are the best-studied and most effective corticosteroid-sparing therapies for ALPS, and they should be considered first-line therapy for patients who need chronic treatment. This review highlights practical clinical considerations for diagnosis and management of ALPS.

  14. Síndrome linfoproliferativo ligado al cromosoma X, infección por el virus EBV y defectos en la regulación de la citotoxicidad linfocitaria X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, EBV infection and impaired regulation of cell-mediated cytotoxicity

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    A. Malbrán

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available La deficiencia del gen SH2D1A que codifica para la proteína reguladora SAP trae aparejada la activación incontrolada de la vía de activación linfocitaria señalizada por SLAM (molécula señaladora de la activación linfocitaria. Es una inmunodeficiencia ligada al cromosoma X (XLP que se pone en evidencia cuando los pacientes portadores de mutaciones en el gen se enfrentan con el virus de Epstein Barr, desarrollando una mononucleosis infecciosa fulminante. Algunos pacientes desarrollan un síndrome linfoproliferativo fatal; los que sobreviven pueden presentar hipogammaglobulinemia severa y mayor frecuencia de neoplasia hematológica que la población normal. En esta revisión se discuten los mecanismos inmuno-regulatorios involucrados en el desarrollo de la patología mencionada, así como la participación de diferentes células efectoras de la respuesta inmune (linfocitos CD8 citotóxicos, células NK.Mutations in SH2D1A, a gene that codifies for the regulatory protein SAP, result in uncontrolled activation of the SLAM (signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule pathway. This X-linked immunodeficiency becomes evident when the patients are infected with Epstein Barr virus (EBV and develop a fulminant form of infectious mononucleosis leading to a lymphoproliferative syndrome that is often fatal (X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, XLP. In those who survive, hypogammaglobulinemia and oncohematologic diseases are frequently observed. In this revision, the immuno-regulatory mechanisms involved in XLP immunopathology and the role of different effector cells (CD8 T lymphocytes, NK cells are discussed.

  15. Deregulation of Fas ligand expression as a novel cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease.

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    Nabhani, Schafiq; Ginzel, Sebastian; Miskin, Hagit; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Harlev, Dan; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Kuhlen, Michaela; Thiele, Ralf; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Stepensky, Polina; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is frequently caused by mutations in genes involved in the Fas death receptor pathway, but for 20-30% of patients the genetic defect is unknown. We observed that treatment of healthy T cells with interleukin-12 induces upregulation of Fas ligand and Fas ligand-dependent apoptosis. Consistently, interleukin-12 could not induce apoptosis in Fas ligand-deficient T cells from patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We hypothesized that defects in the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may cause a similar phenotype as that caused by mutations of the Fas ligand gene. To test this, we analyzed 20 patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome of unknown cause by whole-exome sequencing. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.698G>A, p.R212*) in the interleukin-12/interleukin-23 receptor-component IL12RB1 in one of these patients. The mutation led to IL12RB1 protein truncation and loss of cell surface expression. Interleukin-12 and -23 signaling was completely abrogated as demonstrated by deficient STAT4 phosphorylation and interferon γ production. Interleukin-12-mediated expression of membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligand was lacking and basal expression was much lower than in healthy controls. The patient presented with the classical symptoms of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: chronic non-malignant, non-infectious lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated numbers of double-negative T cells, autoimmune cytopenias, and increased levels of vitamin B12 and interleukin-10. Sanger sequencing and whole-exome sequencing excluded the presence of germline or somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Our data suggest that deficient regulation of Fas ligand expression by regulators such as the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may be an alternative cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease. Copyright© Ferrata Storti

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: Case report and review of literature

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    Vaishnavi Chandramohan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by headache, nausea, vomiting, seizures and visual disturbances. PRES has been usually associated with hypertension, chronic renal disease, malignancy and chemotherapeutic agents. We report the association of PRES with Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, which to our best knowledge has not been reported before.

  17. Immunoglobulin G4-positive multi-organ lymphoproliferative syndrome with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

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    Kawakami, Nobuyo; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Baba, Naoko; Ohshima, Kouichi; Kanekura, Takuro

    2012-07-01

    We report immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-positive multi-organ lymphoproliferative syndrome (IgG4(+) -MOLPS) with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) in a 56-year-old Japanese man presenting with purpuric patches on his legs. Skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Laboratory tests demonstrated high levels of serum IgG and IgG4, hypocomplementemia and anticardiolipin antibody. Echography of the lower limbs and pulmonary scintigraphy showed a thrombus in the left soleal vein and multiple emboli in the basal part of both inferior pulmonary arteries. Computed tomography revealed systemic lymphadenopathy. Histologically, there was reactive paracortical hyperplasia with proliferation of histiocytes and infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells. We made a diagnosis of IgG4(+) -MOLPS with APS. To our knowledge, this complication has not been reported previously.

  18. Association of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI with probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-variant

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    A. Berio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported on a case of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI associated with a probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome variant (Dianzani autoimmune lymphoproliferative disease (DALD. A male patient with typical features of SMEI and a SCN1A gene variant presented in the first year of life with multiple lymph nodes, palpable liver at 2 cm from the costal margin, neutropenia, dysgammaglobulinemia, relative and sometimes absolute lymphocytosis. Subsequently the patient presented with constantly raised IgA in serum and positive antinuclear and thyroid antimicrosomal antibodies. The diagnosis of probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome was made; arthritis, skin and throat blisters, which appeared subsequently led to the diagnosis of linear IgA disease. On the basis of these unique associations, the Authors hypothesized that autoimmunity may be partly responsible of the severe epileptic symptomatology, perhaps mediated by autoantibodies against sodium channels or by accompanying cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Corticosteroid treatment ameliorated the epilepsy and laboratory tests. Future studies will be necessary to evaluate the relevance of autoimmunity in SMEI.

  19. Unmasking Evans syndrome: T-cell phenotype and apoptotic response reveal autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

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    Teachey, David T; Manno, Catherine S; Axsom, Kelly M; Andrews, Timothy; Choi, John K; Greenbaum, Barbara H; McMann, Joseph M; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Travis, Susan F; Grupp, Stephan A

    2005-03-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of disrupted lymphocyte homeostasis. Clinical manifestations of ALPS vary but typically include autoimmune cytopenias, organomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and increased risk of malignancies. A similar spectrum of symptoms may be seen in some patients with Evans syndrome (ES), a hematologic disorder defined by autoimmune destruction of at least 2 hematologic cell types. We hypothesized that a subset of patients diagnosed with ES may have ALPS. We screened 12 children with ES by flow cytometric analysis for CD4-/CD8- (double negative) T cells (DNTs) and with the definitive test for ALPS, defective in vitro Fas-mediated apoptosis. Six of the patients had elevated DNTs, suggestive of ALPS and also had defective Fas-mediated apoptosis. The other 6 patients displayed normal T-cell apoptosis; 5 of whom had normal DNTs, and 1 had a borderline result. Thus, 7 (58%) of 12 patients with ES had elevated DNTs suggestive of ALPS, with functional confirmation in 6 of 7. This suggests that analysis of DNTs may be a sensitive first-line screening test, serving as a marker of patients who should undergo definitive testing for ALPS. Our data further suggest that a number of patients with ES may have ALPS, a novel finding with important therapeutic implications.

  20. Molecular pathogenesis of EBV susceptibility in XLP as revealed by analysis of female carriers with heterozygous expression of SAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umaimainthan Palendira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in SH2D1A which encodes SAP. SAP functions in signalling pathways elicited by the SLAM family of leukocyte receptors. A defining feature of XLP is exquisite sensitivity to infection with EBV, a B-lymphotropic virus, but not other viruses. Although previous studies have identified defects in lymphocytes from XLP patients, the unique role of SAP in controlling EBV infection remains unresolved. We describe a novel approach to this question using female XLP carriers who, due to random X-inactivation, contain both SAP(+ and SAP(- cells. This represents the human equivalent of a mixed bone marrow chimera in mice. While memory CD8(+ T cells specific for CMV and influenza were distributed across SAP(+ and SAP(- populations, EBV-specific cells were exclusively SAP(+. The preferential recruitment of SAP(+ cells by EBV reflected the tropism of EBV for B cells, and the requirement for SAP expression in CD8(+ T cells for them to respond to Ag-presentation by B cells, but not other cell types. The inability of SAP(- clones to respond to Ag-presenting B cells was overcome by blocking the SLAM receptors NTB-A and 2B4, while ectopic expression of NTB-A on fibroblasts inhibited cytotoxicity of SAP(- CD8(+ T cells, thereby demonstrating that SLAM receptors acquire inhibitory function in the absence of SAP. The innovative XLP carrier model allowed us to unravel the mechanisms underlying the unique susceptibility of XLP patients to EBV infection in the absence of a relevant animal model. We found that this reflected the nature of the Ag-presenting cell, rather than EBV itself. Our data also identified a pathological signalling pathway that could be targeted to treat patients with severe EBV infection. This system may allow the study of other human diseases where heterozygous gene expression from random X-chromosome inactivation can be exploited.

  1. Molecular Pathogenesis of EBV Susceptibility in XLP as Revealed by Analysis of Female Carriers with Heterozygous Expression of SAP

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    Palendira, Umaimainthan; Low, Carol; Chan, Anna; Hislop, Andrew D.; Ho, Edwin; Phan, Tri Giang; Deenick, Elissa; Cook, Matthew C.; Riminton, D. Sean; Choo, Sharon; Loh, Richard; Alvaro, Frank; Booth, Claire; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Moretta, Alessandro; Khanna, Rajiv; Rickinson, Alan B.; Tangye, Stuart G.

    2011-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in SH2D1A which encodes SAP. SAP functions in signalling pathways elicited by the SLAM family of leukocyte receptors. A defining feature of XLP is exquisite sensitivity to infection with EBV, a B-lymphotropic virus, but not other viruses. Although previous studies have identified defects in lymphocytes from XLP patients, the unique role of SAP in controlling EBV infection remains unresolved. We describe a novel approach to this question using female XLP carriers who, due to random X-inactivation, contain both SAP+ and SAP− cells. This represents the human equivalent of a mixed bone marrow chimera in mice. While memory CD8+ T cells specific for CMV and influenza were distributed across SAP+ and SAP− populations, EBV-specific cells were exclusively SAP+. The preferential recruitment of SAP+ cells by EBV reflected the tropism of EBV for B cells, and the requirement for SAP expression in CD8+ T cells for them to respond to Ag-presentation by B cells, but not other cell types. The inability of SAP− clones to respond to Ag-presenting B cells was overcome by blocking the SLAM receptors NTB-A and 2B4, while ectopic expression of NTB-A on fibroblasts inhibited cytotoxicity of SAP− CD8+ T cells, thereby demonstrating that SLAM receptors acquire inhibitory function in the absence of SAP. The innovative XLP carrier model allowed us to unravel the mechanisms underlying the unique susceptibility of XLP patients to EBV infection in the absence of a relevant animal model. We found that this reflected the nature of the Ag-presenting cell, rather than EBV itself. Our data also identified a pathological signalling pathway that could be targeted to treat patients with severe EBV infection. This system may allow the study of other human diseases where heterozygous gene expression from random X-chromosome inactivation can be exploited. PMID:22069374

  2. Molecular pathogenesis of EBV susceptibility in XLP as revealed by analysis of female carriers with heterozygous expression of SAP.

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    Palendira, Umaimainthan; Low, Carol; Chan, Anna; Hislop, Andrew D; Ho, Edwin; Phan, Tri Giang; Deenick, Elissa; Cook, Matthew C; Riminton, D Sean; Choo, Sharon; Loh, Richard; Alvaro, Frank; Booth, Claire; Gaspar, H Bobby; Moretta, Alessandro; Khanna, Rajiv; Rickinson, Alan B; Tangye, Stuart G

    2011-11-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in SH2D1A which encodes SAP. SAP functions in signalling pathways elicited by the SLAM family of leukocyte receptors. A defining feature of XLP is exquisite sensitivity to infection with EBV, a B-lymphotropic virus, but not other viruses. Although previous studies have identified defects in lymphocytes from XLP patients, the unique role of SAP in controlling EBV infection remains unresolved. We describe a novel approach to this question using female XLP carriers who, due to random X-inactivation, contain both SAP(+) and SAP(-) cells. This represents the human equivalent of a mixed bone marrow chimera in mice. While memory CD8(+) T cells specific for CMV and influenza were distributed across SAP(+) and SAP(-) populations, EBV-specific cells were exclusively SAP(+). The preferential recruitment of SAP(+) cells by EBV reflected the tropism of EBV for B cells, and the requirement for SAP expression in CD8(+) T cells for them to respond to Ag-presentation by B cells, but not other cell types. The inability of SAP(-) clones to respond to Ag-presenting B cells was overcome by blocking the SLAM receptors NTB-A and 2B4, while ectopic expression of NTB-A on fibroblasts inhibited cytotoxicity of SAP(-) CD8(+) T cells, thereby demonstrating that SLAM receptors acquire inhibitory function in the absence of SAP. The innovative XLP carrier model allowed us to unravel the mechanisms underlying the unique susceptibility of XLP patients to EBV infection in the absence of a relevant animal model. We found that this reflected the nature of the Ag-presenting cell, rather than EBV itself. Our data also identified a pathological signalling pathway that could be targeted to treat patients with severe EBV infection. This system may allow the study of other human diseases where heterozygous gene expression from random X-chromosome inactivation can be exploited.

  3. A FAS-ligand variant associated with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in cats.

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    Aberdein, Danielle; Munday, John S; Gandolfi, Barbara; Dittmer, Keren E; Malik, Richard; Garrick, Dorian J; Lyons, Leslie A

    2017-02-01

    British shorthair (BSH) kittens in multiple litters died as a result of a severe non-neoplastic lymphoproliferative disease that showed many similarities with human autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Human ALPS is caused by inherited defects in FAS-mediated lymphocyte apoptosis and the possibility of similar defects was investigated in BSH cats. The whole genomes of two affected kittens were sequenced and compared to 82 existing cat genomes. Both BSH kittens had homozygous insertions of an adenine within exon 3 of the FAS-ligand gene. The resultant frameshift and premature stop codon were predicted to result in a severely truncated protein that is unlikely to be able to activate FAS. Three additional affected BSH kittens were homozygous for the variant, while 11 of 16 unaffected, but closely related, BSH cats were heterozygous for the variant. All BSH cats in the study were from a population with significant inbreeding. The variant was not identified in a further survey of 510 non-BSH cats. Identification of a genetic defect in the FAS-mediated apoptosis pathway confirms that the lymphoproliferative disease in BSH cats fulfills the diagnostic criteria for ALPS in humans. These results will enable the development of a genetic test to detect BSH carrier animals.

  4. Bone marrow findings in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with germline FAS mutation

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    Xie, Yi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Price, Susan; Raffeld, Mark; Hahn, Jamie; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Rao, V. Koneti; Maric, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by defective FAS-mediated apoptosis, autoimmune disease, accumulation of mature T-cell receptor alpha/beta positive, CD4 and CD8 double-negative T cells and increased risk of lymphoma. Despite frequent hematologic abnormalities, literature is scarce regarding the bone marrow pathology in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed 3l bone marrow biopsies from a cohort of 240 patients with germline FAS mutations. All biopsies were performed for the evaluation of cytopenias or to rule out lymphoma. Clinical information was collected and morphological, immunohistochemical, flow cytometric and molecular studies were performed. Bone marrow lymphocytosis was the predominant feature, present in 74% (23/31) of biopsies. The lymphoid cells showed several different patterns of infiltration, most often forming aggregates comprising T cells in 15 cases, B cells in one and a mixture of T and B cells in the other seven cases. Double-negative T cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in the minority of cases (10/31; 32%); significantly, all but one of these cases had prominent double-negative T-lymphoid aggregates, which in four cases diffusely replaced the marrow space. One case showed features of Rosai-Dorfman disease, containing scattered S-100+ cells with emperipolesis and double-negative T cells. No clonal B or T cells were detected by polymerase chain reaction in any evaluated cases. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma was identified in three cases. Our results demonstrate that infiltrates of T cells, or rarely B cells, can be extensive in patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, mimicking lymphoma. A multi-modality approach, integrating clinical, histological, immunohistochemical as well as other ancillary tests, can help avoid this diagnostic pitfall. This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov ID # NCT00001350 PMID:27846610

  5. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for monitoring lymphadenopathy in the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V Koneti; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Dale, Janet K; Bacharach, Stephen L; Whatley, Millie; Dugan, Faith; Tretler, Jean; Fleisher, Thomas; Puck, Jennifer M; Wilson, Wyndham; Jaffe, Elaine S; Avila, Nilo; Chen, Clara C; Straus, Stephen E

    2006-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is associated with mutations that impair the activity of lymphocyte apoptosis proteins, leading to chronic lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmunity, and an increased risk of lymphoma. We investigated the utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in discriminating benign from malignant lymphadenopathy in ALPS. We report that FDG avidity of benign lymph nodes in ALPS can be high and, hence, by itself does not imply presence of lymphoma; but FDG-PET can help guide the decision for selecting which of many enlarged nodes in ALPS patients to biopsy when lymphoma is suspected.

  6. Atypical presentation of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to CASP10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripodi, Serena Ilaria; Mazza, Cinzia; Moratto, Daniele; Ramenghi, Ugo; Caorsi, Roberta; Gattorno, Marco; Badolato, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    Herein we describe the case of a 8-years-old boy with diagnosis of atypical autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), carrying heterozygous mutation of CASP10 gene (I406L). He presented with multiple non-invasive infections of the skin, that were associated to chronic non-malignant non-infectious lymphadenopathy, failure to thrive, weakness, arthralgia, relapsing oral aftosis, and expansion of TCRαβ(+) CD4(-)/CD8(-) T cells. This observation suggests that cutaneous infections can be observed in ALPS patients carrying CASP10 mutations.

  7. Advances in the management and understanding of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachey, David T; Seif, Alix E; Grupp, Stephan A

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of T cell dysregulation caused by defective Fas-mediated apoptosis. Patients with ALPS can develop a myriad of clinical manifestations including lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmunity and increased rates of malignancy. ALPS may be more common that originally thought, and testing for ALPS should be considered in patients with unexplained lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and/or autoimmunity. As the pathophysiology of ALPS is better characterized, a number of targeted therapies are in preclinical development and clinical trials with promising early results. This review describes the clinical and laboratory manifestations found in ALPS patients, as well as the molecular basis for the disease and new advances in treatment.

  8. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in a patient with a new minimal deletion in the death domain of the FAS gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gualco, Gabrieta; van den Berg, Anke; Koopmans, Sicco; Bacchi, Livia M.; Carneiro, Siderley S.; Ruiz, Everaldo; Vecchi, Ana Paula; Chan, John K. C.

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) caused by a previously undescribed minimal deletion in the death domain of the FAS gene. ALPS is an uncommon disease associated with an impaired Fas-mediated apoptosis. The patient presented with a history of splenomegaly since 4 mo

  9. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease in patients with LRBA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Keller, Bärbel; Nabhani, Schafiq; Gámez-Díaz, Laura; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gombert, Michael; Hönscheid, Andrea; Saleh, Hani; Shaag, Avraham; Borkhardt, Arndt; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Elpeleg, Orly; Stepensky, Polina

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in LPS-responsive and beige-like anchor (LRBA) gene were recently described in patients with combined immunodeficiency, enteropathy and autoimmune cytopenia. Here, we extend the clinical and immunological phenotypic spectrum of LRBA associated disorders by reporting on three patients from two unrelated families who presented with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, cytopenia, elevated double negative T cells and raised serum Fas ligand levels resembling autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and one asymptomatic patient. Homozygous loss of function mutations in LRBA were identified by whole exome analysis. Similar to ALPS patients, Fas mediated apoptosis was impaired in LRBA deficient patients, while apoptosis in response to stimuli of the intrinsic mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathway was even enhanced. This manuscript illustrates the phenotypic overlap of other primary immunodeficiencies with ALPS-like disorders and strongly underlines the necessity of genetic diagnosis in order to provide early correct diagnosis and subsequent care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase alpha restores restimulation-induced cell death and reduces immunopathology in XLP-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffo, Elisa; Malacarne, Valeria; Larsen, Sasha E.; Das, Rupali; Patrussi, Laura; Wülfing, Christoph; Biskup, Christoph; Kapnick, Senta M.; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Baldari, Cosima T.; Rubio, Ignacio; Nichols, Kim E.; Snow, Andrew L.; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Graziani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1) is an often-fatal primary immunodeficiency associated with the exuberant expansion of activated CD8+ T cells following Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. XLP-1 is caused by defects in SAP, an adaptor protein that modulates T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling. SAP-deficient T cells exhibit impaired TCR restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) and diminished TCR-induced inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKα), leading to increased diacylglycerol metabolism and decreased signaling through Ras and PKCθ. Here, we show that down-regulation of DGKα activity in SAP-deficient T cells restores diacylglycerol signaling at the immune synapse and rescues RICD via induction of the pro-apoptotic proteins NUR77 and NOR1. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of DGKα prevents the excessive CD8+ T cell expansion and IFNγ production that occur in Sap-deficient mice following Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus infection without impairing lytic activity. Collectively, these data highlight DGKα as a viable therapeutic target to reverse the life-threatening EBV-associated immunopathology that occurs in XLP-1 patients. PMID:26764158

  11. Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase α restores restimulation-induced cell death and reduces immunopathology in XLP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffo, Elisa; Malacarne, Valeria; Larsen, Sasha E; Das, Rupali; Patrussi, Laura; Wülfing, Christoph; Biskup, Christoph; Kapnick, Senta M; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Baldari, Cosima T; Rubio, Ignacio; Nichols, Kim E; Snow, Andrew L; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Graziani, Andrea

    2016-01-13

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1) is an often-fatal primary immunodeficiency associated with the exuberant expansion of activated CD8(+) T cells after Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. XLP-1 is caused by defects in signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP), an adaptor protein that modulates T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling. SAP-deficient T cells exhibit impaired TCR restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) and diminished TCR-induced inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase α (DGKα), leading to increased diacylglycerol metabolism and decreased signaling through Ras and PKCθ (protein kinase Cθ). We show that down-regulation of DGKα activity in SAP-deficient T cells restores diacylglycerol signaling at the immune synapse and rescues RICD via induction of the proapoptotic proteins NUR77 and NOR1. Pharmacological inhibition of DGKα prevents the excessive CD8(+) T cell expansion and interferon-γ production that occur in SAP-deficient mice after lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection without impairing lytic activity. Collectively, these data highlight DGKα as a viable therapeutic target to reverse the life-threatening EBV-associated immunopathology that occurs in XLP-1 patients.

  12. Revised diagnostic criteria and classification for the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): report from the 2009 NIH International Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Joao B.; Bleesing, Jack J.; Dianzani, Umberto; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Lenardo, Michael J.; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic; Siegel, Richard M.; Su, Helen C.; Teachey, David T.; Rao, V. Koneti

    2010-01-01

    Lymphadenopathy in children for which no infectious or malignant cause can be ascertained constitutes a challenging diagnostic dilemma. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human genetic disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis resulting in an accumulation of lymphocytes and childhood onset chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, multilineage cytopenias, and an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. In 1999, investigators at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) suggested criteria to esta...

  13. Hyperactive mTOR pathway promotes lymphoproliferation and abnormal differentiation in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völkl, Simon; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Allgäuer, Andrea; Schreiner, Elisabeth; Lorenz, Myriam Ricarda; Rohr, Jan; Klemann, Christian; Fuchs, Ilka; Schuster, Volker; von Bueren, André O; Naumann-Bartsch, Nora; Gambineri, Eleonora; Siepermann, Kathrin; Kobbe, Robin; Nathrath, Michaela; Arkwright, Peter D; Miano, Maurizio; Stachel, Klaus-Daniel; Metzler, Markus; Schwarz, Klaus; Kremer, Anita N; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-07-14

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human disorder characterized by defective Fas signaling, resulting in chronic benign lymphoproliferation and accumulation of TCRαβ(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) double-negative T (DNT) cells. Although their phenotype resembles that of terminally differentiated or exhausted T cells, lack of KLRG1, high eomesodermin, and marginal T-bet expression point instead to a long-lived memory state with potent proliferative capacity. Here we show that despite their terminally differentiated phenotype, human ALPS DNT cells exhibit substantial mitotic activity in vivo. Notably, hyperproliferation of ALPS DNT cells is associated with increased basal and activation-induced phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinases Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abrogated survival and proliferation of ALPS DNT cells, but not of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in vitro. In vivo, mTOR inhibition reduced proliferation and abnormal differentiation by DNT cells. Importantly, increased mitotic activity and hyperactive mTOR signaling was also observed in recently defined CD4(+) or CD8(+) precursor DNT cells, and mTOR inhibition specifically reduced these cells in vivo, indicating abnormal programming of Fas-deficient T cells before the DNT stage. Thus, our results identify the mTOR pathway as a major regulator of lymphoproliferation and aberrant differentiation in ALPS.

  14. Onset of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in humans as a consequence of genetic defect accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Neven, Bénédicte; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Daussy, Cécile; Arkwright, Peter D; Lanzarotti, Nina; Schaffner, Catherine; Cluet-Dennetiere, Sophie; Haerynck, Filomeen; Michel, Gérard; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Zarhrate, Mohammed; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Romana, Serge P; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases develop in approximately 5% of humans. They can arise when self-tolerance checkpoints of the immune system are bypassed as a consequence of inherited mutations of key genes involved in lymphocyte activation, survival, or death. For example, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) results from defects in self-tolerance checkpoints as a consequence of mutations in the death receptor-encoding gene TNF receptor superfamily, member 6 (TNFRSF6; also known as FAS). However, some mutation carriers remain asymptomatic throughout life. We have now demonstrated in 7 ALPS patients that the disease develops as a consequence of an inherited TNFRSF6 heterozygous mutation combined with a somatic genetic event in the second TNFRSF6 allele. Analysis of the patients' CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative) T cells--accumulation of which is a hallmark of ALPS--revealed that in these cells, 3 patients had somatic mutations in their second TNFRSF6 allele, while 4 patients had loss of heterozygosity by telomeric uniparental disomy of chromosome 10. This observation provides the molecular bases of a nonmalignant autoimmune disease development in humans and may shed light on the mechanism underlying the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases.

  15. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) caused by Fas (CD95) mutation mimicking sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllauer, Leonhard; Emhofer, Josef; Wohlfart, Sabine; Pichlhöfer, Bettina; Stary, Susanne; Ebetsberger, Georg; Mannhalter, Christine; Chott, Andreas

    2008-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an inherited disorder associated with defects in apoptosis, characterized by childhood onset of lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and autoimmune disease. ALPS is most frequently associated with a mutation in the cell death receptor Fas (CD95). Very rarely a mutation in caspase 10 is present. An increase of CD4/CD8 double negative T cells in the peripheral blood and lymph nodes is a feature characteristic of ALPS. Additionally, histiocytic proliferations resembling sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease) were reported recently in patients with ALPS. In the rare cases with a caspase 10 mutation an accumulation of dendritic cells in lymphoid organs was noted. We describe a different, sarcoidosislike, histiocytic infiltration of lymph nodes that persisted for years in a girl, that was initially supposed to suffer from sarcoidosis, but was eventually diagnosed as ALPS, associated with a missense mutation in the intracellular death domain of Fas. This sarcoidosislike histologic picture extends the spectrum of histiocytic lymph node alterations observed in ALPS and alerts of a potential diagnostic pitfall.

  16. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: implications for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, L J

    2001-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) comprise a histologic spectrum, ranging from hyperplastic-appearing lesions to frank non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or multiple myeloma histology. Multiple clones may coexist, each representing a discrete lymphomagenic event, a situation that is unique to immunodeficiency states. The incidence varies from 1% in renal recipients to 5% in heart recipients, but can be markedly increased by the use of anti-T-cell therapies or by T-cell depletion in bone marrow transplantation. PTLD continues to arise, even many years after transplantation, and late T-cell lymphomas have recently been recognized. Pretransplant Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seronegativity increases risk to as high as 30%-50%. PTLD has a highly variable clinical picture; certain patterns are, however, seen. Reversibility of PTLD with reduction in immunosuppressives has long been recognized. Predicting reversibility has been difficult. The presence or absence of bcl-6 mutations has recently been identified as being of predictive value. Surgical resection can be curative. Cytotoxics, although problematic, can also be curative. Long-term remission has been achieved with anti CD21 and CD24 antibodies; efficacy has been reported for interferon alfa and for rituximab. In vitro expanded EBV-specific T cells have been effective as treatment and as prophylaxis in the setting of bone marrow transplantation. EBV viral load measured in blood appears to associate with the emergence of PTLD and may facilitate prophylactic studies. PTLD is a model of immunodeficiency-related EBV lymphomagenesis. Pathogenetic, therapeutic, and prophylactic insights gained from the study of PTLD are likely to be applicable to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome setting.

  17. Use of Sirolimus (Rapamycin) for Treatment of Cytopenias and Lymphoproliferation Linked to Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS). Two Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrol, Julie; Garrido Colino, Carmen

    2017-02-23

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis. Children present with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and autoimmune cytopenias. Recent advances show efficacy of treatment with immunosuppressive drugs. Sirolimus, an mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, improves autoimmune cytopenias and lymphoproliferation, with a safe profile. We present 2 patients, a 5-year-old girl and 15-year-old boy, diagnosed with ALPS with initial partial response to steroid treatment. Autoimmune cytopenias and lymphoproliferation then became refractory to treatment, with recurrence of symptoms. In both cases, treatment with sirolimus was started, with a rapid response, complete remission of cytopenias, and resolution of lymphoproliferation, with no significant adverse effects.

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation conditioning with use of rituximab in EBV related lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamriz, Oded; Vilk, Shoshana Revel; Wolf, Dana G; Ta-Shma, Asaf; Averbuch, Diana; Weintraub, Michael; Stepensky, Polina

    2014-04-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) and IL-2-inducible T cell kinase (ITK) deficiency are rare immunodeficiencies with a spectrum of clinical manifestations. Although there are no official guidelines for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in these patients, previous reports have shown that reduced intensity conditioning regimens provide successful engraftment with limited toxicity. Here, we report on three children with XLP and one with ITK deficiency, who underwent successful HSCT using a rituximab containing conditioning regimen, and review the current literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular and cellular pathogenesis of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kim E; Ma, Cindy S; Cannons, Jennifer L; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Tangye, Stuart G

    2005-02-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an inherited immune defect caused by mutations in the Src homology 2 domain-containing gene 1A, which encodes the adapter protein, signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP). SAP is expressed in T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and NKT cells, where it binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the surface receptor SLAM (CD150) and the related receptors, 2B4 (CD244), CD84, Ly9 (CD229), NK-T-B-antigen, and CD2-like receptor-activating cytotoxic T cells. SAP also binds to the Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn and recruits it to SLAM, which leads to the generation of downstream phosphotyrosine signals. While the roles of the SLAM family receptors are only beginning to be understood, experiments suggest that these molecules regulate important aspects of lymphocyte function, such as proliferation, cytokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and antibody production. Thus, in XLP patients who lack functional SAP, the SLAM family receptors may not signal properly. This property likely contributes to the phenotypes of XLP, including fulminant infectious mononucleosis, lymphoma, and hypogammaglobulinemia. Further studies of SAP and the SLAM family receptors will provide insights into XLP and elucidate the signaling events regulating lymphocyte ontogeny and function.

  20. Impaired humoral immunity in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is associated with defective IL-10 production by CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cindy S.; Hare, Nathan J.; Nichols, Kim E.; Dupré, Loic; Andolfi, Grazia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Adelstein, Stephen; Hodgkin, Philip D.; Tangye, Stuart G.

    2005-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an often-fatal immunodeficiency characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, fulminant infectious mononucleosis, and/or lymphoma. The genetic lesion in XLP, SH2D1A, encodes the adaptor protein SAP (signaling lymphocytic activation molecule–associated [SLAM-associated] protein); however, the mechanism(s) by which mutations in SH2D1A causes hypogammaglobulinemia is unknown. Our analysis of 14 XLP patients revealed normal B cell development but a marked reduction in the number of memory B cells. The few memory cells detected were IgM+, revealing deficient isotype switching in vivo. However, XLP B cells underwent proliferation and differentiation in vitro as efficiently as control B cells, which indicates that the block in differentiation in vivo is B cell extrinsic. This possibility is supported by the finding that XLP CD4+ T cells did not efficiently differentiate into IL-10+ effector cells or provide optimal B cell help in vitro. Importantly, the B cell help provided by SAP-deficient CD4+ T cells was improved by provision of exogenous IL-10 or ectopic expression of SAP, which resulted in increased IL-10 production by T cells. XLP CD4+ T cells also failed to efficiently upregulate expression of inducible costimulator (ICOS), a potent inducer of IL-10 production by CD4+ T cells. Thus, insufficient IL-10 production may contribute to hypogammaglobulinemia in XLP. This finding suggests new strategies for treating this immunodeficiency. PMID:15761493

  1. Revised diagnostic criteria and classification for the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): report from the 2009 NIH International Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joao B; Bleesing, Jack J; Dianzani, Umberto; Fleisher, Thomas A; Jaffe, Elaine S; Lenardo, Michael J; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic; Siegel, Richard M; Su, Helen C; Teachey, David T; Rao, V Koneti

    2010-10-07

    Lymphadenopathy in children for which no infectious or malignant cause can be ascertained constitutes a challenging diagnostic dilemma. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human genetic disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis resulting in an accumulation of lymphocytes and childhood onset chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, multilineage cytopenias, and an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. In 1999, investigators at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) suggested criteria to establish the diagnosis of ALPS. Since then, with approximately 500 patients with ALPS studied worldwide, significant advances in our understanding of the disease have prompted the need for revisions to the existing diagnostic criteria and classification scheme. The rationale and recommendations outlined here stem from an international workshop held at NIH on September 21 and 22, 2009, attended by investigators from the United States, Europe, and Australia engaged in clinical and basic science research on ALPS and related disorders. It is hoped that harmonizing the diagnosis and classification of ALPS will foster collaborative research and better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune cytopenias and B-cell lymphomas.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder occurring after bone marrow transplantation for aplastic anemia in Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Aya; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshii, Miyuki; Okuno, Hiroko; Horinouchi, Akiko; Nakanishi, Ryota; Harada, Ayumi; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that Down's syndrome exhibits a predisposition to development of leukemia, however, association between aplastic anemia and Down's syndrome is exceptional. Herein, we describe a case of aplastic anemia occurring in Down's syndrome following post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). A 27-year-old Japanese male with Down's syndrome presented with a headache. Laboratory tests revealed severe pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy demonstrated hypocellular bone marrow with decrease of trilineage cells, which led to a diagnosis of aplastic anemia. One year after diagnosis, he was incidentally found to have an anterior mediastinal tumor, which was histopathologically diagnosed as seminoma. Subsequently, he received BMT from a female donor, and engraftment was observed. Three months after transplantation, he experienced cough and high fever. Biopsy specimen from the lung revealed diffuse proliferation of large-sized lymphoid cells expressing CD20 and EBER. These lymphoid cells had XY chromosomes. Thus, a diagnosis of EBV-associated PTLD was made. This is the seventh documented case of aplastic anemia occurring in Down's syndrome. Association between aplastic anemia and Down's syndrome has not been established, therefore, additional clinicopathological studies are needed. Moreover, this is the first case to undergo BMT for aplastic anemia in Down's syndrome. Although engraftment was observed, he developed EBV-positive PTLD. The neoplastic cells of the present case were considered to be of recipient origin, although the majority of PTLD cases with BMT are of donor origin.

  3. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an important part of the normal cell lifecycle. When cells do not receive the message that ... of Interventional Agents Development Services, NIAID, NIH Biopharmaceutical Product Development Services Examples of Services by Category Vaccine ...

  4. Monotherapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in a heart transplant recipient with sick sinus syndrome and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsiang-Yu; Ke, Hung-Yen; Hong, Gou-Jieng; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Li, Chung-Yi; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2009-10-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication of organ transplantation, with an incidence of 0.8% to 20% in heart transplant (HTx) recipients, and standard treatment may be too toxic in some cases. Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has demonstrated efficacy in patients with various lymphoid malignancies and has been demonstrated effective in combination with chemotherapy regimens such as CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone). Cardiotoxicity with CHOP remains a major concern for treating HTx recipients with PTLD, however. We present a case of an HTx recipient with sick sinus syndrome and PTLD who was successfully treated with rituximab alone, avoiding the cardiotoxicity of CHOP. The cardiotoxicity induced by CHOP should be kept in mind in HTx recipients with PTLD, especially when there is an existing heart problem in such recipients. Monotherapy with rituximab can be considered a safe choice.

  5. Lymphoma and cerebral vasculitis in association with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zhu; Yu Zhang; Zi-Jun Zhen; Yan Chen; Juan Wang; Rui-Qing Cai; Xiao-Fei Sun

    2013-01-01

    Lymphoma is seen in up to 30% of patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), but cerebral vasculitis related with XLP after cure of Burkitt lymphoma is rarely reported. We describe a case of a 5-year-old boy with XLP who developed cerebral vasculitis two years after cure of Burkitt lymphoma. He had Burkitt lymphoma at the age of 3 years and received chemotherapy (non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma-Berlin-Frankfurt-Milan-90 protocol plus rituximab), which induced complete remission over the following two years. At the age of 5 years, the patient first developed headache, vomiting, and then intel ectual and motorial retrogression. His condition was not improved after anti-infection, dehydration, or dexamethasone therapy. No tumor cells were found in his cerebrospinal fluid. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple non-homogeneous, hypodense masses along the bilateral cortex. Pathology after biopsy revealed hyperplasia of neurogliocytes and vessels, accompanied by lymphocyte infiltration but no tumor cell infiltration. Despite aggressive treatment, his cognition and motor functions deteriorated in response to progressive cerebral changes. The patient is presently in a vegetative state. We present this case to inform clinicians of association between lymphoma and immunodeficiency and explore an optimal treatment for lymphoma patients with compromised immune system.

  6. Characterization of SH2D1A missense mutations identified in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, M; Simarro-Grande, M; Martin, M; Chen, A S; Lanyi, A; Silander, O; Calpe, S; Davis, J; Pawson, T; Eck, M J; Sumegi, J; Engel, P; Li, S C; Terhorst, C

    2001-09-28

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by extreme susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus. The XLP disease gene product SH2D1A (SAP) interacts via its SH2 domain with a motif (TIYXXV) present in the cytoplasmic tail of the cell-surface receptors CD150/SLAM, CD84, CD229/Ly-9, and CD244/2B4. Characteristically, the SH2D1A three-pronged interaction with Tyr(281) of CD150 can occur in absence of phosphorylation. Here we analyze the effect of SH2D1A protein missense mutations identified in 10 XLP families. Two sets of mutants were found: (i) mutants with a marked decreased protein half-life (e.g. Y7C, S28R, Q99P, P101L, V102G, and X129R) and (ii) mutants with structural changes that differently affect the interaction with the four receptors. In the second group, mutations that disrupt the interaction between the SH2D1A hydrophobic cleft and Val +3 of its binding motif (e.g. T68I) and mutations that interfere with the SH2D1A phosphotyrosine-binding pocket (e.g. C42W) abrogated SH2D1A binding to all four receptors. Surprisingly, a mutation in SH2D1A able to interfere with Thr -2 of the CD150 binding motif (mutant T53I) severely impaired non-phosphotyrosine interactions while preserving unaffected the binding of SH2D1A to phosphorylated CD150. Mutant T53I, however, did not bind to CD229 and CD224, suggesting that SH2D1A controls several critical signaling pathways in T and natural killer cells. Because no correlation is present between identified types of mutations and XLP patient clinical presentation, additional unidentified genetic or environmental factors must play a strong role in XLP disease manifestations.

  7. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to somatic FAS mutation (ALPS-sFAS) combined with a germline caspase-10 (CASP10) variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Feito, Ana; Melero, Josefa; Mora-Díaz, Sergio; Rodríguez-Vigil, Carmen; Elduayen, Ramón; González-Granado, Luis I; Pérez-Méndez, Dolores; Sánchez-Zapardiel, Elena; Ruiz-García, Raquel; Menchén, Miguela; Díaz-Madroñero, Josefa; Paz-Artal, Estela; Del Orbe-Barreto, Rafael; Riñón, Marta; Allende, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by impaired Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis of lymphocytes and is characterized by chronic nonmalignant or benign lymphoproliferation, autoimmune manifestations and expansion of double negative (DN) T-cells (TCRαβ+CD4-CD8-). Most cases of ALPS are associated with germline (ALPS-FAS) or somatic (ALPS-sFAS) heterozygous FAS mutations or a combination of both. Here we report three unrelated patients with ALPS-sFAS. Only one of them showed impaired Fas function in PHA-activated T-cells. In this patient, the genetic analysis of the caspase-10 gene (CASP10) identified a heterozygous germline change in exon 9 (c.1337A>G) causing Y446C substitution in the caspase-10 protein. In addition, this patient had a dysregulated T- and B-cell phenotype; circulating lymphocytes showed expansion of T effector memory CD45RA+ (TEMRA) CD4 T-cells, effector memory CD8 T-cells, CD21(low) B-cells and reduced memory switched B-cells. Additionally, this patient showed altered expression in T-cells of several molecules that change during differentiation from naïve to effector cells (CD27, CD95, CD57 and perforin). Molecular alterations in genes of the Fas pathway are necessary for the development of ALPS and this syndrome could be influenced by the concurrent effect of other mutations hitting different genes involved in Fas or related pathways.

  8. Dominant inhibition of Fas ligand-mediated apoptosis due to a heterozygous mutation associated with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS Type Ib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonald Jay M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS is a disorder of lymphocyte homeostasis and immunological tolerance due primarily to genetic defects in Fas (CD95/APO-1; TNFRSF6, a cell surface receptor that regulates apoptosis and its signaling apparatus. Methods: Fas ligand gene mutations from ALPS patients were identified through cDNA and genomic DNA sequencing. Molecular and biochemical assessment of these mutant Fas ligand proteins were carried out by expressing the mutant FasL cDNA in mammalian cells and analysis its effects on Fas-mediated programmed cell death. Results: We found an ALPS patient that harbored a heterozygous A530G mutation in the FasL gene that replaced Arg with Gly at position 156 in the protein's extracellular Fas-binding region. This produced a dominant-interfering FasL protein that bound to the wild-type FasL protein and prevented it from effectively inducing apoptosis. Conclusion: Our data explain how a naturally occurring heterozygous human FasL mutation can dominantly interfere with normal FasL apoptotic function and lead to an ALPS phenotype, designated Type Ib.

  9. HLA B44 is associated with decreased severity of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in patients with CD95 defects (ALPS type Ia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Marla M; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Davis, Joie; Fischer, Roxanne E; Dale, Janet K; Adams, Sharon; Straus, Stephen E; Puck, Jennifer M

    2006-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis characterized by non-malignant lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, expansion of T cells without either CD4 or CD8 surface markers, and increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and lymphoma. Most patients with ALPS have dominant, heterozygous mutations in tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 6 (TNFRSF6), which encodes CD95, also known as Fas, a mediator of apoptosis. Penetrance and range of disease manifestations in ALPS are highly variable, even among family members who share the same dominant TNFRSF6 mutation. To evaluate HLA as a candidate modifier locus, we typed HLA A, B (including subtypes), and DQB alleles in 356 individuals from 63 unrelated families with defined TNFRSF6 mutations associated with ALPS. We also developed a quantitative severity score and performed statistical analysis. Among the healthier, mutation-bearing individuals, transmission of HLA B44 was significantly overrepresented (nominal PALPS. The B44 allele may exert a protective role in ALPS.

  10. STAT3 gain-of-function mutations associated with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome like disease deregulate lymphocyte apoptosis and can be targeted by BH3 mimetic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Schipp, Cyrill; Miskin, Hagit; Levin, Carina; Postovsky, Sergey; Dujovny, Tal; Koren, Ariel; Harlev, Dan; Bis, Anne-Marie; Auer, Franziska; Keller, Baerbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Gombert, Michael; Ginzel, Sebastian; Borkhardt, Arndt; Stepensky, Polina; Fischer, Ute

    2017-08-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is typically caused by mutations in genes of the extrinsic FAS mediated apoptotic pathway, but for about 30% of ALPS-like patients the genetic diagnosis is lacking. We analyzed 30 children with ALPS-like disease of unknown cause and identified two dominant gain-of-function mutations of the Signal Transducer And Activator Of Transcription 3 (STAT3, p.R278H, p.M394T) leading to increased transcriptional activity. Hyperactivity of STAT3, a known repressor of FAS, was associated with decreased FAS-mediated apoptosis, mimicking ALPS caused by FAS mutations. Expression of BCL2 family proteins, further targets of STAT3 and regulators of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, was disturbed. Cells with hyperactive STAT3 were consequently more resistant to intrinsic apoptotic stimuli and STAT3 inhibition alleviated this effect. Importantly, STAT3-mutant cells were more sensitive to death induced by the BCL2-inhibitor ABT-737 indicating a dependence on anti-apoptotic BCL2 proteins and potential novel therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and lymphoproliferative disorders: mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglia, Gian Paolo; Sciacca, Claudio; Abate, Maria Lorena; Olivero, Antonella; Rosso, Chiara; Touscoz, Giovanni Antonio; Ciancio, Alessia; Rizzetto, Mario; Smedile, Antonina

    2015-04-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) has been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) such as mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (MCS), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). The aim of the present study is to assess MCS, MGUS, and B-NHL prevalence in a cohort of CHC-infected patients and to evaluate the association of demographic, clinical, and virologic factors with the presence of LPDs. A total of 121 CHC patients with LPDs (50 M, 71 F; mean age 61.5 ± 11.8) and 130 CHC patients without extrahepatic manifestations (60 M, 70 F; mean age 60.4 ± 9.2) were retrospectively enrolled from a cohort of 1313 CHC patients between January 2006 and December 2013. Patients with LPDs included: 25 patients with MCS (9 M, 16 F; mean age 60.2 ± 1.4), 55 patients with MGUS (18 M, 37 F; mean age 61.3 ± 12.1), and 41 patients with B-NHL (23 M, 18F; mean age 62.5 ± 11.0) RESULTS: Patients with MCS (25/1313; 1.9%), MGUS (55/1313; 4.2%), and B-LNH (41/1313; 3.1%) did not differ in age, severity of liver disease, HCV genotype, and response to antiviral therapy. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, a positive association was found between the presence of cirrhosis and MGUS (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8924, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2693-6.5909; P = 0.012) and between cirrhosis and B-NHL (OR = 3.9407, 95% CI 1.7226-9.0153; P = 0.001), whereas no association with MCS diagnosis emerged. Despite the pathogenetic mechanism of HCV-associated LPDs is still unclear, cirrhosis is an additional risk factor for the development of lymphoproliferative disorders in patients with chronic HCV infection. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. CD3-CD4+ lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome: nodal and extranodal histopathological and immunophenotypic features of a peripheral indolent clonal T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Guillaume; Copin, Marie-Christine; Roumier, Christophe; Aubert, Hélène; Avenel-Audran, Martine; Grardel, Nathalie; Poulain, Stéphanie; Staumont-Sallé, Delphine; Seneschal, Julien; Salles, Gilles; Ghomari, Kamel; Terriou, Louis; Leclech, Christian; Morati-Hafsaoui, Chafika; Morschhauser, Franck; Lambotte, Olivier; Ackerman, Félix; Trauet, Jacques; Geffroy, Sandrine; Dumezy, Florent; Capron, Monique; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Taieb, Alain; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Hachulla, Eric; Prin, Lionel; Labalette, Myriam; Launay, David; Preudhomme, Claude; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel

    2015-08-01

    The CD3(-)CD4(+) lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by hypereosinophilia and clonal circulating CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma has been described during this disease course, and we observed in our cohort of 23 patients 2 cases of angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. We focus here on histopathological (n=12 patients) and immunophenotypic (n=15) characteristics of CD3(-)CD4(+) lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome. Atypical CD4(+) T cells lymphoid infiltrates were found in 10 of 12 CD3(-)CD4(+) L-HES patients, in lymph nodes (n=4 of 4 patients), in skin (n=9 of 9) and other extra-nodal tissues (gut, lacrymal gland, synovium). Lymph nodes displayed infiltrates limited to the interfollicular areas or even an effacement of nodal architecture, associated with proliferation of arborizing high endothelial venules and increased follicular dendritic cell meshwork. Analysis of 2 fresh skin samples confirmed the presence of CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells. Clonal T cells were detected in at least one tissue in 8 patients, including lymph nodes (n=4 of 4): the same clonal T cells were detected in blood and in at least one biopsy, with a maximum delay of 23 years between samples. In the majority of cases, circulating CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells were CD2(hi) (n=9 of 14), CD5(hi) (n=12 of 14), and CD7(-)(n=4 of 14) or CD7(low) (n=10 of 14). Angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma can also present with CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells; despite other common histopathological and immunophenotypic features, CD10 expression and follicular helper T-cell markers were not detected in lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome patients, except in both patients who developed angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, and only at T-cell lymphoma diagnosis. Taken together, persistence of tissular clonal T cells and histopathological features define CD3(-)CD4(+) lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome as a peripheral indolent clonal T-cell lymphoproliferative

  13. Impaired Epstein-Barr virus-specific CD8+ T-cell function in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is restricted to SLAM family-positive B-cell targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hislop, Andrew D; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Leese, Alison M; Arkwright, Peter D; Rohrlich, Pierre S; Tangye, Stuart G; Gaspar, H Bobby; Lankester, Arjan C; Moretta, Alessandro; Rickinson, Alan B

    2010-10-28

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a condition associated with mutations in the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP; SH2D1A). SAP functions as an adaptor, binding to and recruiting signaling molecules to SLAM family receptors expressed on T and natural killer cells. XLP is associated with extreme sensitivity to primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, often leading to a lethal infectious mononucleosis. To investigate EBV-specific immunity in XLP patients, we studied 5 individuals who had survived EBV infection and found CD8(+) T-cell responses numerically comparable with healthy donors. However, further investigation of in vitro-derived CD8(+) T-cell clones established from 2 of these donors showed they efficiently recognized SLAM ligand-negative target cells expressing EBV antigens, but showed impaired recognition of EBV-transformed, SLAM ligand-positive, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Importantly, LCL recognition was restored when interactions between the SLAM receptors CD244 and natural killer-, T-, and B-cell antigen (NTBA) and their ligands on LCLs were blocked. We propose that XLP patients' particular sensitivity to EBV, and not to other viruses, reflects at least in part EBV's strict tropism for B lymphocytes and the often inability of the CD8(+) T-cell response to contain the primary infection of SLAM ligand-expressing target cells.

  14. Differential regulation of miR-146a/FAS and miR-21/FASLG axes in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to FAS mutation (ALPS-FAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marega, Lia Furlaneto; Teocchi, Marcelo Ananias; Dos Santos Vilela, Maria Marluce

    2016-08-01

    Most cases of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) have an inherited genetic defect involving apoptosis-related genes of the FAS pathway. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding regulatory RNAs playing a role in the control of gene expression. This is the first report on miRNAs in ALPS patients. We studied a mother and son carrying the same FAS cell surface death receptor (FAS) mutation, but with only the son manifesting the signs and symptoms of ALPS-FAS. The aim was to analyse, by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) relative expression of miR-146a and miR-21, including their passenger strands and respective targets (FAS and FASLG). In comparison with healthy matched control individuals, miR-21-3p was over-expressed significantly (P = 0·0313) in the son, with no significant change in the expression of miR-146a, miR-146a-3p and miR-21. In contrast, the mother had a slight under-expression of the miR-146a pair and miR-21-3p (P = 0·0625). Regarding the miRNA targets, FAS was up-regulated markedly for the mother (P = 0·0078), but down-regulated for the son (P = 0·0625), while FASLG did not have any significant alteration. Taken together, our finding clearly suggests a role of the miR-146a/FAS axis in ALPS-FAS variable expressivity in which FAS haploinsufficiency seems to be compensated only in the mother who had the miR-146a pair down-regulated. As only the son had the major clinical manifestations of ALPS-FAS, miR-21-3p should be investigated as playing a critical role in ALPS physiopathology, including the development of lymphoma.

  15. Missense mutations in SH2D1A identified in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease differentially affect the expression and function of SAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Nathan J; Ma, Cindy S; Alvaro, Frank; Nichols, Kim E; Tangye, Stuart G

    2006-07-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an immunodeficiency resulting from mutations in SH2D1A, which encodes signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP). In addition to SLAM, SAP associates with several other cell-surface receptors including 2B4 (CD244), Ly9 (CD229), CD84 and NTB-A. SAP contains a single src-homology-2 domain and acts as an intracellular adaptor protein by recruiting the protein tyrosine kinase FynT to the cytoplasmic domains of some of these receptors, which results in the initiation of specific downstream signal transduction pathways. XLP is likely to result from perturbed signalling through one or more of these SAP-associating receptors. In this study, we identified missense (Y54C, I84T and F87S) and insertion (fs82 --> X103) mutations in four different kindreds affected by XLP. Each mutation dramatically reduced the half-life of SAP, thus diminishing its expression in primary lymphocytes as well as in transfected cell lines. Interestingly, although the Y54C and F87S mutations compromised the ability of SAP to associate with different receptors, the I84T mutation had no effect on the ability of SAP to bind SLAM, CD84 or 2B4. However, signalling downstream of SLAM was reduced in the presence of SAP bearing the I84T mutation. These findings indicate that, irrespective of the type of mutation, signalling through SAP-associating receptors in XLP can be impaired by reducing the expression of SAP, the ability of SAP to bind surface receptors and/or its ability to activate signal transduction downstream of the SLAM-SAP complex.

  16. FAS-L, IL-10, and double-negative CD4- CD8- TCR alpha/beta+ T cells are reliable markers of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) associated with FAS loss of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Loffredo, Maria S; Neven, Bénédicte; Schaffner, Catherine; Ducrot, Nicolas; Arkwright, Peter D; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Barbot, José; Blanche, Stéphane; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Debré, Marianne; Ferster, Alina; Fieschi, Claire; Florkin, Benoit; Galambrun, Claire; Hermine, Olivier; Lambotte, Olivier; Solary, Eric; Thomas, Caroline; Le Deist, Francoise; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2009-03-26

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, hypergammaglobulinemia, accumulation of double-negative TCRalphabeta(+) CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells (DNT cells), and autoimmunity. Previously, DNT cell detection and a functional defect of T cells in a FAS-induced apoptosis test in vitro had been used for ALPS diagnosis. However, a functional defect can also be detected in mutation-positive relatives (MPRs) who remain free of any ALPS-related disease. In contrast, lymphocytes from patients carrying a somatic mutation of FAS exhibit normal sensitivity to FAS-induced apoptosis in vitro. We assessed the soluble FAS-L concentration in the plasma of ALPS patients carrying FAS mutations. Overall, we showed that determination of the FAS-L represents, together with the IL-10 concentration and the DNT cell percentage, a reliable tool for the diagnosis of ALPS.

  17. SAP gene transfer restores cellular and humoral immune function in a murine model of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivat, Christine; Booth, Claire; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria; Blundell, Michael; Sebire, Neil J; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2013-02-14

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1) arises from mutations in the gene encoding SLAM-associated protein (SAP) and leads to abnormalities of NKT-cell development, NK-cell cytotoxicity, and T-dependent humoral function. Curative treatment is limited to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. We tested whether HSC gene therapy could correct the multilineage defects seen in SAP(-/-) mice. SAP(-/-) murine HSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors containing either SAP or reporter gene before transplantation into irradiated recipients. NKT-cell development was significantly higher and NK-cell cytotoxicity restored to wild-type levels in mice receiving the SAP vector in comparison to control mice. Baseline immunoglobulin levels were significantly increased and T-dependent humoral responses to NP-CGG, including germinal center formation, were restored in SAP-transduced mice.We demonstrate for the first time that HSC gene transfer corrects the cellular and humoral defects in SAP(-/-) mice providing proof of concept for gene therapy in XLP1.

  18. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder in an adult patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N K Desai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male patient presented with fever, epistaxis and multiple lymphadenopathy since 15 days. In the light of the above presentation a complete workup was initiated to exclude common conditions like tuberculosis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, lymphoid malignancy and sarcoidosis. After excluding common conditions a biopsy of cervical lymph node demonstrated reactive lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated double negative lymphocytes (CD4-, CD8-. A diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder syndrome (ALPS (probable was made and patient was started on 1 mg/kg of steroids. Patient showed a dramatic improvement with respect to general wellbeing, fever and regression of lymphadenopathy. This entity of ALPS has been recently identified and classified; most of the reports are from the pediatric population. To the best of our knowledge ours is one of the few cases of this entity being reported in an adult patient from India.

  19. Diagnóstico de imunofenótipos de síndromes linfoproliferativas crônicas por citometria de fluxo na Fundação HEMOPA Diagnosis of immunophenotyping of chronic lymphoproliferative syndromes by flow cytometry at HEMOPA blood center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacy Cardoso de Brito Junior

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: As síndromes linfoproliferativas formam um grupo heterogêneo de neoplasias malignas com diferentes comportamentos clínicos, fatores patológicos e características epidemiológicas e podem ter seu diagnóstico geral com base na morfologia das células linfoides observadas no sangue periférico. OBJETIVO: Testar a factibilidade diagnóstica do método de imunofenotipagem por citometria de fluxo para síndromes linfoproliferativas a partir da definição de um painel mínimo de anticorpos. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Participaram 47 pacientes para diagnóstico diferencial dos subtipos de síndromes linfoproliferativas por citometria de fluxo, no período de julho de 2008 a julho de 2010, atendidos na Fundação HEMOPA. RESULTADOS: A mediana de idade dos pacientes foi de 68 anos, não houve diferença estatística entre os sexos e o subtipo de síndromes linfoproliferativas mais frequente foi a leucemia linfoide crônica/linfoma linfocítico de pequenas células B. CONCLUSÃO: O método de imunofenotipagem por citometria de fluxo, ao lado da morfologia, de amostras de sangue periférico mostrou-se uma metodologia auxiliar, segura, rápida, factível e não invasiva para o diagnóstico de síndromes linfoproliferativas crônicas a partir do painel de anticorpos sugerido.INTRODUCTION: Lymphoproliferative syndromes comprise a heterogeneous group of malignant neoplasias with different clinical behaviors, pathological factors and epidemiological characteristics, whose diagnosis may be based on lymphoid cell morphology observed in peripheral blood. OBJECTIVE: To test the diagnostic feasibility of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry for lymphoproliferative syndromes through the definition of minimal antibody panel. MATERIAL AND METHODS: During the period of July 2008 to July 2010, 47 patients from HEMOPA blood center participated in this study for differential diagnosis of lymphoproliferative syndromes subtypes by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The

  20. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome:a case report and literature review%自身免疫性淋巴细胞增生综合征1例并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙佳鹏; 卢新天; 赵卫红; 华瑛

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We described 1 case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome ( ALPS) , first diagnosed in our hospital, and reviewed the recent literature. The 11-month old male patient presented with a histo-ry of splenomegaly and hepatomegaly since 1 month after birth. He suffered recurrent infectious diseases including cytomegalovirus infection, parvovirus B19 infection and chronic diarrhea disease. Besides, his symptoms included hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The laboratory abnormality indicated an ex-panded population of alpha/beta double-negative T cells (DNTs) (27. 18% of lymphocytes, 35. 16% of CD3 + T lymphocytes) in peripheral blood, and autoantibodies including antinuclear antibody, double-stranded DNA and rheumatic factor were positive. Hyper gamma globulinemia and positive direct Coombs tests were seen in the patient. His parents were both healthy and denied autoimmune diseases. We iden-tified a heterozygous point mutation in exon 3 of the FAS gene carrying c. 309 A>C, resulting in a single base pair substitution in exon 3 of FAS gene which changed the codon of Arg103 to Ser103 . Unfortunate-ly, we were unable to obtain the gene results of the child' s parents. The patient was treated with glu-cocorticoids in our hospital and with mycophenolatemofetil in other hospital. And we were informed that his anemia condition relieved through the telephone follow-up, but he still suffered recurrent infections, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly still existed. As we all know ALPS is characterized by defective lympho-cyte apoptosis, and thus cause lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmune disease, and increase the risk of lymphoma. It is more likely to be misdiagnosed as other diseases. ALPS should be suspected in the case of chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and autoimmune features. Flow cytometry approach is helpful for the diagnosis. Immunosuppressive drugs are the necessary treatment.%报道2013年10月北京大学第一医院诊治的1例自身免疫

  1. Pure Red Cell Aplasia and Lymphoproliferative Disorders: An Infrequent Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthymia Vlachaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA is a rare bone marrow failure syndrome defined by a progressive normocytic anaemia and reticulocytopenia without leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Secondary PRCA can be associated with various haematological disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL. The aim of the present review is to investigate the infrequent association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders. PRCA might precede the appearance of lymphoma, may present simultaneously with the lymphoid neoplastic disease, or might appear following the lymphomatic disorder. Possible pathophysiological molecular mechanisms to explain the rare association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders are reported. Most cases of PRCA are presumed to be autoimmune mediated by antibodies against either erythroblasts or erythropoietin, by T-cells secreting factors selectively inhibiting erythroid colonies in the bone marrow or by NK cells directly lysing erythroblasts. Finally, focus is given to the therapeutical approach, as several treatment regimens have failed for PRCA. Immunosuppressive therapy and/or chemotherapy are effective for improving anaemia in the majority of patients with lymphoma-associated PRCA. Further investigation is required to define the pathophysiology of PRCA at a molecular level and to provide convincing evidence why it might appear as a rare complication of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  2. Pure red cell aplasia and lymphoproliferative disorders: an infrequent association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Efthymia; Diamantidis, Michael D; Klonizakis, Philippos; Haralambidou-Vranitsa, Styliani; Ioannidou-Papagiannaki, Elizabeth; Klonizakis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare bone marrow failure syndrome defined by a progressive normocytic anaemia and reticulocytopenia without leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Secondary PRCA can be associated with various haematological disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The aim of the present review is to investigate the infrequent association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders. PRCA might precede the appearance of lymphoma, may present simultaneously with the lymphoid neoplastic disease, or might appear following the lymphomatic disorder. Possible pathophysiological molecular mechanisms to explain the rare association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders are reported. Most cases of PRCA are presumed to be autoimmune mediated by antibodies against either erythroblasts or erythropoietin, by T-cells secreting factors selectively inhibiting erythroid colonies in the bone marrow or by NK cells directly lysing erythroblasts. Finally, focus is given to the therapeutical approach, as several treatment regimens have failed for PRCA. Immunosuppressive therapy and/or chemotherapy are effective for improving anaemia in the majority of patients with lymphoma-associated PRCA. Further investigation is required to define the pathophysiology of PRCA at a molecular level and to provide convincing evidence why it might appear as a rare complication of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  3. Hepatitis C virus-related lymphoproliferative disorders: An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Linda Zignego; Carlo Giannini; Clodoveo Ferri

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem affecting 3% of the world's population (about 180 million) and a cause of both hepatic and extrahepatic diseases. B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, whose prototype is mixed cryoglobulinemia, represent the most closely related as well as the most investigated HCV-related extrahepatic disorder. The association between extrahepatic (lymphoma) as well as hepatic malignancies (hepatocellular carcinoma) has justified the inclusion of HCV among human cancer viruses. HCV-associated manifestations also include porphyria cutanea tarda,lichen planus, nephropathies, thyreopathies, sicca syndrome, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, diabetes,chronic polyarthritis, sexual dysfunctions, cardiopathy/atherosclerosis, and psychopathological disorders.A pathogenetic link between HCV virus and some lymphoproliferative disorders was confirmed by their responsiveness to antiviral therapy, which is now considered the first choice treatment. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection with particular attention to B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Available pathogenetic hypotheses and suggestions about the most appropriate, currently available, therapeutic approaches will also be discussed.

  4. X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease Presenting as Pancytopenia in a 10-Month-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nicole Chadha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, also known as Duncan's syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder that causes exaggerated immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection and often leads to death. Patient presentation varies but can include signs and symptoms typical of EBV, pancytopenia, and fulminant hepatitis.

  5. Disease-causing mutations in the XIAP BIR2 domain impair NOD2-dependent immune signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Rune Busk; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Speckmann, Carsten;

    2013-01-01

    X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis (XIAP) is an essential ubiquitin ligase for pro-inflammatory signalling downstream of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing (NOD)-1 and -2 pattern recognition receptors. Mutations in XIAP cause X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type-2 (XLP2......), an immunodeficiency associated with a potentially fatal deregulation of the immune system, whose aetiology is not well understood. Here, we identify the XIAP baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR)2 domain as a hotspot for missense mutations in XLP2. We demonstrate that XLP2-BIR2 mutations severely impair NOD1/2-dependent...... immune signalling in primary cells from XLP2 patients and in reconstituted XIAP-deficient cell lines. XLP2-BIR2 mutations abolish the XIAP-RIPK2 interaction resulting in impaired ubiquitylation of RIPK2 and recruitment of linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) to the NOD2-complex. We show...

  6. Mutlifocal osseous posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Ryan [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Michalicek, Zachary [Northshore University Healthsystems, Department of Pathology, Evanston, IL (United States); Lazarus, Martin [Northshore University Healthsystems, Department of Radiology, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a known complication of organ transplantation, but musculoskeletal involvement of PTLD remains very rare. We present a case of recurrent PTLD of the bone in a heart transplant patient that was misdiagnosed as gout for several years. There are only a few cases of osseous PTLD in the literature, and we hope to better characterize its imaging findings on multiple imaging modalities. (orig.)

  7. A Novel and Likely Inherited Lymphoproliferative Disease in British Shorthair Kittens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberdein, D; Munday, J S; Fairley, R A; Vernau, W; Thompson, K G

    2015-11-01

    An unusual lymphoproliferative disease was identified in multiple closely related British Shorthair (BSH) kittens, suggesting an inherited predisposition to disease. Affected kittens typically developed rapidly progressive and marked generalized lymphadenopathy, moderate splenomegaly, and regenerative and likely hemolytic anemia from 6 weeks of age. Microscopic findings were suggestive of multicentric T-cell lymphoma, but additional testing revealed a polyclonal population of CD3+/CD4-/CD8- "double negative" T cells (DNT cells). This is a novel disease presentation with similarities to the human disorder autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), a rare inherited disease causing lymphoproliferation and variable manifestations of autoimmunity. The human disease is most commonly due to the presence of Fas gene mutations causing defective lymphocyte apoptosis, and further investigations of both the mode of inheritance and genetic basis for disease in affected cats are currently in progress.

  8. "Primary Immunodeficiencies Inducing EBV-Associated Severe Illnesses "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Miyawaki

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a ubiquitous human -herpesvirus that infects about 95% of the adult population. The majority of primary infections occurs in early childhood and is generally subclinical; it can cause infectious mononucleosis (IM, which is usually a self-limiting lymphoproliferative disorder. However, infection of EBV occasionally results in severe, often lethal diseases, which include fatal IM, hemophagocytic syndrome, polyclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, and malignant lymphoma. These severe EBV-related illnesses occur secondary to some primary immunodeficiency diseases showing inefficient immune reaction to EBV. One example is X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP, which is caused by mutations in the SLAM-associated protein (SAP gene. The major clinical manifestations of XLP are fulminant IM, malignant lymphoma and dysgammaglobulinemia. Aplastic anemia, virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome, and vasculitis have also been reported in XLP. We have developed a flow cytometric method using the anti-SAP monoclonal antibody to search for XLP. This clinically useful assay has successfully been used to identify XLP patients in Japan. In this review, clinical and mutational characteristics of XLP in Japan are mainly described. In addition, it is shown that the similar situations to XLP can occur in other primary immunodeficiencies involving T-cell killing function, such as autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by Fas gene mutations or familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis caused by perforin gene mutations. Finally, the EBV-related terrible disease condition, namely chronic active EBV infection, which is common in Asian areas but its genetic background remains to be elucidated, will be toughed on.

  9. Clinical characteristics of patients with lymphoproliferative neoplasms in the setting of systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvajdzic, Nada; Djurdjevic, Predrag; Todorovic, Milena; Perunicic, Maja; Stojanović, Roksanda; Novkovic, Aleksandra; Mihaljevic, Biljana

    2012-09-01

    Clinical features of 40 lymphoproliferative neoplasm patients in the setting of systemic autoimmune diseases managed in the Clinic of Hematology during 1994-2006 were analyzed retrospectively. The classification of systemic autoimmune disease patients was as follows: 15 systemic lupus erythematosus--SLE, 11 rheumatoid arthritis--RA, 12 Sjögren's syndrome--SS, 1 scleroderma, and 1 dermatomyositis. Patients comprised 31 women and 9 men of mean age 55 years (range 33-76). Systemic autoimmune diseases preceeded the development of lymphoproliferative neoplasms in 37/40 (92.5%) patients. Mean latency period between the onset of systemic autoimmune diseases and lymphoproliferative neoplasms occurrence was significantly longer in RA (113 months) than in SLE (75 months) and SS patients (65 months)--P autoimmune diseases type or antirheumatic treatment P > 0.05. Our findings are in line with earlier reports showing a high proportion of patients with advanced disease, constitutional symptoms, extranodal manifestations, high grade histology, and low OS in the systemic autoimmune diseases setting.

  10. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speckmann, C.; Lehmberg, K.; Albert, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency caused by mutations in BIRC4 was initially described in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) who had no mutations in SH2D1A. In the initial reports, EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) was the predominant...

  11. Extreme lymphoproliferative disease and fatal autoimmune thrombocytopenia in FasL and TRAIL double-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedger, Lisa M; Katewa, Arna; Pettersen, Ann K; Osvath, Sarah R; Farrell, Geoff C; Stewart, Graeme J; Bendall, Linda J; Alexander, Stephen I

    2010-04-22

    To delineate the relative roles of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand in lymphocyte biology and lymphoproliferative disease, we generated mice defective in both molecules. B6.GT mice develop severe polyclonal lymphoproliferative disease because of accumulating CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-)B220(+) T cells, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and follicular B cells, and mice die prematurely from extreme lymphocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and hemorrhage. Accumulating lymphocytes resembled antigen-experienced lymphocytes, consistent with the maximal resistance of B6.GT CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell to activation-induced cell death. More specifically, we show that TRAIL contributes to Fas ligand-mediated activation-induced cell death and controls lymphocyte apoptosis in the presence of interferon-gamma once antigen stimulation is removed. Furthermore, dysregulated lymphocyte homeostasis results in the production of anti-DNA and rheumatoid factor autoantibodies, as well as antiplatelet IgM and IgG causing thrombocytopenia. Thus, B6.GT mice reveal new roles for TRAIL in lymphocyte homeostasis and autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndromes and are a model of spontaneous idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura secondary to lymphoproliferative disease.

  12. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease involving the pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriden, Zina; Bullock, Grant C; Bagg, Adam; Bonatti, Hugo; Cousar, John B; Lopes, M Beatriz; Robbins, Mark K; Cathro, Helen P

    2010-11-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are heterogeneous lesions with variable morphology, immunophenotype, and molecular characteristics. Multiple distinct primary lesions can occur in PTLD, rarely with both B-cell and T-cell characteristics. Lesions can involve both grafted organs and other sites; however, PTLD involving the pituitary gland has not been previously reported. We describe a patient who developed Epstein-Barr virus-negative PTLD 13 years posttransplantation involving the terminal ileum and pituitary, which was simultaneously involved by a pituitary adenoma. Immunohistochemistry of the pituitary lesion showed expression of CD79a, CD3, and CD7 with clonal rearrangements of both T-cell receptor gamma chain (TRG@) and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH@) genes. The terminal ileal lesion was immunophenotypically and molecularly distinct. This is the first report of pituitary PTLD and illustrates the potentially complex nature of PTLD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, M; Hunter, B; Alba, A; Calabrán, L; Flores, L; Soto, P; Herzog, C

    2009-01-01

    The success rate of pediatric liver transplantation has improved in recent years. Advances in immunosuppression have reduced the risk of rejection, but have enhanced the risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Since 1994, we have performed 197 orthotopic liver transplantations in 157 recipients younger than 15 years. Herein we have performed a retrospective study to review the incidence and clinical characteristics, along with the treatment and outcomes of PTLD diagnosed over this 14-year experience. We documented 8 cases of PTLD (5%), half of which occurred during the first 2 years posttransplantation; 5 presented with abdominal involvement and 2 with thoracic masses. The histological findings showed lymphoma in 6 cases. All were treated with reduction of immunosuppression and 2 received Rituximab. Three patients died, a mortality rate of 37.5%. One subject experienced rejection, and the others responded to treatment. PTLD is a life-threatening condition that requires a high index of suspicion, appropriate imaging, biopsy diagnosis, and prompt treatment to achieve positive results. Quantitative monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus load may be useful to detect a high-risk population.

  14. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Marek’s disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  15. T-cell receptor gene rearrangement analysis: cutaneous T cell lymphoma, peripheral T cell lymphoma, and premalignant and benign cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelickson, B D; Peters, M S; Muller, S A; Thibodeau, S N; Lust, J A; Quam, L M; Pittelkow, M R

    1991-11-01

    T-cell receptor gene rearrangement analysis is a useful technique to detect clonality and determine lineage of lymphoid neoplasms. We examined 103 patients with mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, peripheral T cell lymphoma, potentially malignant lymphoproliferative disorders including pre-Sézary syndrome, large plaque parapsoriasis, lymphomatoid papulosis and follicular mucinosis, and various benign inflammatory infiltrates. A clonal rearrangement was detected in skin samples in 20 of 24 patients with mycosis fungoides and in peripheral blood samples in 19 of 21 patients with Sézary syndrome. A clonal population was also detected in seven of eight cases classified as peripheral T cell lymphoma. The potentially malignant dermatoses tended to have clonal rearrangement, with the exception of large plaque parapsoriasis, and further follow-up is needed to correlate clonality with the disease course. These studies demonstrate the value of molecular genetics as an adjunct to morphology in the examination of patients with cutaneous lymphoproliferative disease.

  16. MicroRNA gene expression in malignant lymphoproliferative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wei; LI Jian-yong

    2007-01-01

    Objective To review the recent studies about microRNAs and advances in malignant lymphoproliferative disorders.Data sources Published articles (2001-2006) about microRNAs and malignant iymphoproliferative disorders were selected using MEDLINE.Study selection After independent review by two observers, 43 of 421 originally identified articles were selected that specifically addressed the stated purpose.Results Two observers independently assessed studies using explicit methodological criteria for evaluating microRNAs in malignant lymphoproliferative disorders. Recent work has revealed a class of small noncoding RNA species,microRNAs, which affect various biological processes. MicroRNAs inhibit the expression of protein encoding genes at the posttranscriptional level in a variety of eukaryotic organisms. In this review, we focused on the biogenetic pathways of microRNAs (miR-15a, miR-16-1, miR-155, miR-17-92 cluster, miR-142) and discussed the implications for human malignant lymphoproliferative disorders.Conclusions microRNAs are involved in tumorigenesis and mediate gene regulation as a fundamental genetic program at the posttranscriptional level. Further study of microRNAs may lead to novel concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders.

  17. Tubulointerstitial nephritis in a patient with probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Mia; Herlin, Troels; Rittig, Søren

    2013-01-01

    associated with glomerulonephritis and we present the first report of tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with probable ALPS. A 5-year-old girl presented with fever, vomiting, hypertension, and azotemia. No autoantibodies, viral, or streptococcal antibodies were detected. A renal biopsy showed small......-vessel vasculitis with normal glomeruli and inflammation in the interstitium. The patient responded to prednisolone treatment and obtained a full renal recovery. Symptoms of connective tissue disorder supervened and after the development of more pronounced splenomegaly, a diagnosis of ALPS was confirmed....

  18. Molecular Testing of Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Current Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Kyung Jeon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular pathologic testing plays an important role for the diagnosis, prognostication and decision of treatment strategy in lymphoproliferative disease. Here, we briefly review the molecular tests currently used for lymphoproliferative disease and those which will be implicated in clinical practice in the near future. Specifically, this guideline addresses the clonality test for B- and T-cell proliferative lesions, molecular cytogenetic tests for malignant lymphoma, determination of cell-of-origin in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and molecular genetic alterations incorporated in the 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms. Finally, a new perspective on the next-generation sequencing for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic purpose in malignant lymphoma will be summarized.

  19. SLAM family receptors and SAP adaptors in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannons, Jennifer L; Tangye, Stuart G; Schwartzberg, Pamela L

    2011-01-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein, SAP, was first identified as the protein affected in most cases of X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormal responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection, lymphoproliferative syndromes, and dysgammaglobulinemia. SAP consists almost entirely of a single SH2 protein domain that interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of SLAM and related receptors, including 2B4, Ly108, CD84, Ly9, and potentially CRACC. SLAM family members are now recognized as important immunomodulatory receptors with roles in cytotoxicity, humoral immunity, autoimmunity, cell survival, lymphocyte development, and cell adhesion. In this review, we cover recent findings on the roles of SLAM family receptors and the SAP family of adaptors, with a focus on their regulation of the pathways involved in the pathogenesis of XLP and other immune disorders.

  20. HCV-related liver and lymphoproliferative diseases: association with polymorphisms of IL28B and TLR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Re, Valli; De Zorzi, Mariangela; Caggiari, Laura; Lauletta, Gianfranco; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Fognani, Elisa; Miorin, Marta; Racanelli, Vito; Quartuccio, Luca; Gragnani, Laura; Russi, Sabino; Pavone, Fabio; Ghersetti, Michela; Costa, Elena Garlatti; Casarin, Pietro; Bomben, Riccardo; Mazzaro, Cesare; Basaglia, Giancarlo; Berretta, Massimiliano; Vaccher, Emanuela; Izzo, Francesco; Buonaguro, Franco Maria; De Vita, Salvatore; Zignego, Anna Linda; De Paoli, Paolo; Dolcetti, Riccardo

    2016-06-21

    To explore the relationship between innate immunity and hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in determining the risk of cirrhosis (CIR), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (MCS) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we investigated the impact of the toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) and interleukin-28B (IL28B) genetic variants. TLR2 -174 del variant was associated with TLR2 expression and with specific downstream molecules that drive the expression of different interleukins; rs12979860 Il28B was important in response to interferon-treatment and in spontaneous clearance of HCV. The risk for liver and lymphoproliferative diseases in HCV progression was clarified by stratifying 862 HCV-positive patients into groups based on liver (CIR, HCC) and lymphoproliferative HCV-related diseases (MCS, NHL) and compared with chronic HCV (CHC) infection. Analysis of TLR2-IL28B haplotypes showed an association of wild type haplotype with the lymphoproliferative diseases (OR 1.77, p = 0.029) and a slight increase in HCV viral load (HR 1.38, p = 0.054). Wild type haplotype (TLR2 ins/ins- IL28B C/C) was also found associated with older age in patients with an hepatic diseases (in CIR and in HCC p = 0.038 and p = 0.020, respectively) supporting an effect of innate immunity in the liver disease progression. TLR2 and IL28B polymorphisms in combination showed a role in the control of HCV viral load and different HCV disease progression.

  1. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The eight cases described herein represent the first reports of lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) infection in wild turkeys and the first identification of LPDV in North America. Systemic lymphoproliferative disease was presumably the cause of morbidity and mortality in five of the eight turk...

  2. Isolated Upper Extremity Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Halula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a well-described complication of solid organ and bone marrow transplants. The most common presentation is intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy or single or multiple intraparenchymal masses involving the liver, spleen, or kidneys. Here we describe the imaging and pathology findings of an unusual case of PTLD appearing as an intramuscular forearm lesion in a pediatric male. The manifestation of PTLD as an isolated upper extremity mass in a pediatric patient has to our knowledge not been described.

  3. [Immunoglobulin G4-associated to multiorganic lymphoproliferative disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlon, María T; Chapa, Mónica; Chablé Montero, Fredy; Hernández Calleros, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a woman with lymphoproliferative multiorganic immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) related disease with extensive involvement showing dacryoadenitis, sialoadenitis, parotiditis, pancreatitis, pneumonitis, lymphadenopathy and immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Serum elevation of acute phase reactant, polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, positivity for antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor was found. Hystologically plasma cell infiltration was demonstrated on glandular and lymphatic tissue and immunochemistry was positive for IgG4 in > 30%. Immunosuppressive treatment with steroids and azathioprine was given with an excellent clinical response, the marked radiologic evidence of improvement and the decrease in inflammatory makers that conducted to symptom remission are shown in the text.

  4. Thymic Hyperplasia after Lung Transplantation Imitating Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Maria Steger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymic hyperplasia is usually associated with the treatment of malignant tumours and is sometimes linked with endocrine diseases. For the first time, we report a case of thymic hyperplasia in a patient 2 years after bilateral lung transplantation. Contrast-enhanced chest CT scan was highly suspicious for a posttransplant lymphoma or thymoma. Therefore, the patient received total thymectomy. Excised specimens were sent to the Department of Pathology. Unexpectedly, the histological examination revealed hyperplastic thymic tissue without evidence for a posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder or malignancy.

  5. A Rare Presentation of Isolated CNS Posttransplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Casey; Streicher, Andrew; Magnuson, Allison; Newman, Susan; Bertoli, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a recognized and extremely morbid complication of solid organ transplantation, but central nervous system involvement, particularly in isolation, is rare. There are no standardized treatment strategies for PTLD, though commonly used strategies include reduction of immunosuppression, chemotherapy, rituximab, radiation, and surgery. We present a case of an unusual morphologic variant of primary central nervous system PTLD with successful response to rituximab and cranial radiation. A 69-year-old Asian male, who underwent postrenal transplant nine years earlier, presented with a one-month history of new onset seizure activity. His evaluation revealed multiple brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as serologic and cerebrospinal fluid studies which were positive for Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection. Ultimately, he underwent craniotomy with tissue biopsy with the final pathology report showing posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, polymorphic type. The patient was managed with reduction in immunosuppression, rituximab therapy, and cranial radiation treatments. He had demonstrated marked improvement in his neurologic function and was ultimately discharged to inpatient rehabilitation facility. PMID:28116196

  6. A 5-year old male with “leukemic form” of disseminated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadiya Haque

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD represents an abnormal lymphoid proliferation that occurs in recipients of solid organ or bone marrow allograft. It includes a diverse group of diseases ranging from polymorphic B-cell hyperplasia to frank malignant lymphoma. Clinical presentation is variable, ranging from asymptomatic to generalized lymphadenopathy, mononucleosis-like syndrome, nodal or extranodal tumors (usually gastrointestinal tract, systemic lymphomatous involvement, and rare (less than 1% of cases fulminant disseminated disease. PTLD is more common in children than in adults. Younger patients usually present with mononucleosis-like symptoms. We present an unusual case of a 5-year old male who developed a widely disseminated leukemic form of PTLD, involving lymph nodes, tonsils, multiple organs, bone marrow, cerebrospinal fluid, and peripheral blood.

  7. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders of oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Junu; Islam, Nadim; Cohen, Donald M; Marshal, David; Reavis, Michael R; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel

    2008-05-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are long-term complications of immunosuppression after solid organ/bone marrow transplantation. In most cases, PTLD arises as a result of primary or reactivated Epstein-Barr virus infection in a host with impaired cellular immunity. PTLD is most often seen in the gastrointestinal tract, although it has also been reported in other organ systems, including the central nervous system and, rarely, in the head and neck. It is characterized histologically by abnormal lymphoid cell proliferation. Although many forms of PTLD do not meet all of the histologic criteria of lymphoma, they often behave clinically in a malignant fashion if left untreated. We present 3 rare cases of PTLD manifesting in the oral cavity as mucosal masses after solid organ transplantation. There are only 8 published reports of PTLD in the literature presenting as oral lesions. The clinical, pathologic, and therapeutic spectra of PTLD are discussed.

  8. Interleukin-10 and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, S.A.; Bendtzen, K.; Moller, B.;

    1999-01-01

    Background. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a life-threatening complication of transplantation, which comprises a morphologically and clinically heterogeneous spectrum of B-lymphocyte diseases. Risk factors include primary or reactivated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection...... to the development of PTLD in three kidney transplanted patients. The study now includes nine patients that could be followed before and/or after the occurrence of lymphoma, Methods. Nine patients with lymphomas (eight PTLDs and one Hodgkin's disease) were diagnosed among 268 consecutive renal transplantations (1990...... human recombinant IL-10 was employed; the assay is specific for human natural and viral IL-10, Results, Three patients experienced primary EBV infection, five reactivated EBV infections, and one did not change EBV status. Three patients had a fulminant course and died with EBV-associated PTLD; confirmed...

  9. IgG4-related disease: a novel lymphoproliferative disorder discovered and established in Japan in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Yasufumi; Kurose, Nozomu; Umehara, Hisanori

    2011-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a novel lymphoproliferative disorder that shows hyper-IgG4-γ-globulinemia and IgG4-producing plasma cell expansion in affected organs with fibrotic or sclerotic changes. Patients show systemic inflammatory conditions and various symptoms depending on the affected organ. Since the first report of patients with elevated serum IgG4 in sclerosing pancreatitis in 2001, various systemic disorders described by many names have been reported. Despite similarities in the organs involved in IgG4-related Mikulicz's disease and Sjögren's syndrome, there are marked clinical and pathological differences between these conditions. Most patients diagnosed with autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan have IgG4-related pancreatitis [Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)], a disease distinct from some of the western type [Type 2 AIP, idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP), autoimmune pancreatitis with granulocytic epithelial lesions (GEL)]. Diagnosis of IgG4-related disease is characterized by both elevated serum IgG4 (>135 mg/dL) and histopathological features including lymphocyte and IgG4(+) plasma cell infiltration (IgG4(+) plasma cells/IgG(+) plasma cells>40%). Differential diagnosis from other distinct disorders, such as sarcoidosis, Castleman's disease, Wegener's granulomatosis, lymphoma, cancer, and other existing conditions associated with high serum IgG4 level or abundant IgG4-bearing plasma cells in tissues is necessary. We have begun a clinical prospective study to establish a treatment strategy (Phase II prospective treatment study for IgG4-multiorgan lymphoproliferative syndrome: UMIN R000002311).

  10. Familial Lymphoproliferative Malignancies and Tandem Duplication of NF1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in a tumor suppressor gene (NF1 which codifies the protein neurofibromin. The frequent genetic alterations that modify neurofibromin function are deletions and insertions. Duplications are rare and phenotype in patients bearing duplication of NF1 gene is thought to be restricted to developmental abnormalities, with no reference to cancer susceptibility in these patients. We evaluated a patient who presented with few clinical signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 and a conspicuous personal and familiar history of different types of cancer, especially lymphoproliferative malignancies. The coding region of the NF-1 gene was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect the number of mutant copies. The NF1 gene analysis showed the following alterations: mosaic duplication of NF1, TRAF4, and MYO1D. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using probes (RP5-1002G3 and RP5-92689 flanking NF1 gene in 17q11.2 and CEP17 for 17q11.11.1 was performed. There were three signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689 in the interphases analyzed and two signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689 in 93% of cells. These findings show a tandem duplication of 17q11.2. Conclusion. The case suggests the possibility that NF1 gene duplication may be associated with a phenotype characterized by lymphoproliferative disorders.

  11. Structural characterization of disease-causing mutations on SAP and the functional impact on the SLAM peptide: a molecular dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, P; Rajasekaran, R

    2014-07-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) syndrome is an extremely rare inherited immunodeficiency disease characterized by severe immune dysregulation caused by mutations in signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) associated protein (SAP) gene. The XLP syndrome was manifested due to dysfunction of SAP as a result of amino acid substitution. Hence, to understand the molecular aspects of the XLP syndrome, we structurally characterized two observed mutations, R32Q and T53I on SAP through the systematic molecular dynamics (MD) approach. Our MD analysis showed that mutant structures elucidated an atomic level variation influenced by mutations that substantially altered the residual flexibility and more importantly the hot spot residues as well in unbound and bound systems. In addition, change in residual flexibility of mutant structures showed an unusual conformational behavior associated with their molecular recognition function compared to the wild-type SAP in both systems. Besides, both mutant structures established different secondary structural profiles during the course of the simulation period in both systems. Moreover, the docking analysis revealed that mutant R32Q and T53I structures displayed remarkably reduced levels of binding affinity to the unphosphorylated SLAM peptide with respect to their docking scores. Collectively, our findings provide knowledge to understand the structural and functional relationship of disease-causing mutations, R32Q and T53I on SAP as well as gain further insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the XLP syndrome.

  12. Notch signalling in primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders: a new therapeutic approach?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M R; Biskup, E; Gniadecki, R

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of deregulated Notch signalling has been described in several haematopoietic malignancies. We have previously reported an increased expression of Notch1 in primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-...

  13. Early onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease is associated with allograft localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, NA; van Imhoff, GW; Verschuuren, EAM; van Son, WJ; van der Heide, JJH; Veeger, NJGM; Kluin, PM; Kluin-Nelemans, HC

    2005-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a major complication after solid organ transplantation. We analyzed incidence, patient characteristics, clinical presentation, and prognostic factors for treatment outcome and survival of PTLD patients transplanted at our center. Records from adu

  14. Notch signalling in primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders: a new therapeutic approach?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M R; Biskup, E; Gniadecki, R

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of deregulated Notch signalling has been described in several haematopoietic malignancies. We have previously reported an increased expression of Notch1 in primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large...

  15. Gastrointestinal involvement of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in lung transplant recipients: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitrit, David; Shitrit, Ariella Bar-Gil; Dickman, Ram; Sahar, Gidon; Saute, Milton; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2005-11-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorder is a well-recognized complication of lung transplantation. Risk factors include Epstein-Barr virus infection and immunosuppression. The gastrointestinal manifestations of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in lung transplant recipients have not been fully characterized. Case presentation and 16 previously reported cases of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder with gastrointestinal involvement are reviewed. Patient ages ranged from 25 to 65 (median, 52) years. Median time from lung transplantation to onset of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder was 36 (range, 1-109) months; 35 percent of cases (6/17) occurred within 18 months; Eighty-eight percent of patients (15/17) had positive Epstein-Barr virus serology before transplantation. In five patients (29 percent), the posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder also involved sites other than the gastrointestinal tract. The most common gastrointestinal site of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder was the colon, followed by the small intestine and stomach. Clinical features included abdominal pain, nausea, and bloody diarrhea. Diagnosis was based on typical pathologic changes on gastrointestinal tract biopsy obtained mainly by colonoscopy. Treatment included a reduction in the immunosuppressive regimen in 15 of 17 cases (88 percent) and surgical resection in 10 (59 percent). One patient was untreated. Seven of 16 patients (44 percent) responded to treatment and 9 patients died. Median time from onset of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder to death was 70 (range, 10-85) days. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder with gastrointestinal involvement is a unique entity that should be considered in all Epstein-Barr-Virus-positive lung transplant recipients who present with abdominal symptoms. Although immunosuppressive modulation and resection can lead to remission, the risk of death is 50 percent.

  16. Ibrutinib: another weapon in our arsenal against lympho-proliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabras, Maria Giuseppina; Angelucci, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    In Volume 16, issue 12 of Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, an important article on the new drug ibrutinib was published. This new drug promises to further improve outcome in the treatment of several lympho-proliferative disorders. In this editorial, the most important findings of the article looking particularly to the integration of ibrutinib in current clinical practice will be summarized. Finally this editorial will focus on the next challenges for scientists and physicians in the treatment of lympho-proliferative disorders.

  17. Cerebral Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Occurring after Renal Transplantation: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jang Ho; Byun, Woo Mok; Kim, Hong Chul; Hwang, Min Su [Dept. of Radiology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of organ transplantation and immunosuppression. A 36-year-old woman with a history of renal transplantation visited the hospital complaining of headache and on pathology was diagnosed with cerebral PTLD manifesting as multiple rim enhanced masses in both hemispheres. We report here a case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder involving the cerebrum occurring after renal transplantation, and describe the MRI findings for this patient

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated polymorphic lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, Roland G; Chadburn, Amy; Gundappa, Girija; Cesarman, Ethel; Said, Jonathan W; Knowles, Daniel M

    2003-03-01

    The majority of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are clinically aggressive monoclonal B-cell Burkitt's lymphomas, large cell lymphomas, or immunoblastic lymphomas. In contrast, the lymphoid proliferations arising in solid organ transplant recipients, collectively referred to as posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PT-LPDs), represent a clinically and histopathologically heterogeneous group of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven B-cell proliferations of variable clonal composition. During a retrospective histopathologic review of lymphoid proliferations associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection we identified 10 cases that morphologically resemble the polymorphic PT-LPDs. They arose in lymph nodes (five), lungs (two), and the parotid gland, perineum, and skin (one each). They exhibit a diffuse growth pattern and are composed of a polymorphic lymphoid cell population exhibiting a variable degree of plasmacytic differentiation, cytologic atypia, and numbers of atypical immunoblasts. A clonal B-cell population was detected by immunoglobulin heavy and light chain gene rearrangement and/or EBV terminal repeat analysis in 8 of the 10 (80%) cases by Southern blotting. The nongermline hybridizing bands were usually faint, however, suggesting that the clonal B-cell population represented only a subpopulation within the polymorphic lesion. Strong clonal rearrangement bands were present in one case in which there was clear morphologic evidence of transformation to diffuse large cell lymphoma. This case exhibited C-MYC, BCL-6, and p53 gene mutations. One other case exhibited a p53 gene mutation. The remaining eight cases lacked C-MYC, BCL-6, RAS, and p53 gene alterations. Clonal EBV infection was detected in 4 of the 10 (40%) lesions. Like EBV-containing PT-LPDs, all four EBV-positive HIV-associated polymorphic lesions were associated with type A EBV. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus was detectable in two cases by polymerase chain

  19. The accuracy of positron emission tomography in the detection of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas; Requilé, Annelies; Verscuren, Raf; Sagaert, Xavier; Morscio, Julie; Wlodarska, Iwona; Herreman, An; Kuypers, Dirk; Van Cleemput, Johan; Nevens, Frederik; Dupont, Lieven; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Pirenne, Jacques; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Verhoef, Gregor; Brepoels, Lieselot; Gheysens, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    We investigated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in 170 cases with suspected or biopsy-proven posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. All solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients who underwent an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan between 2003 and 2010 in our center for the indication posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, were retrospectively reviewed and results were compared with tissue biopsy whenever possible. One hundred and seventy positron emission tomography scans in 150 patients were eligible for evaluation. In 45 cases, the patient had a biopsy-confirmed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder before positron emission tomography scanning and positron emission tomography was performed for staging purposes. In the remaining 125 cases, positron emission tomography was performed to differentiate between posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other diseases. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-uptake was quantitatively expressed by calculation of maximum and mean standardized uptake value in the most intense lesion or, in the absence of attenuation corrected positron emission tomography scans, by comparing uptake in target lesion to liver and mediastinal uptake. We found an overall sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 89%, positive predictive value of 91% and negative predictive value of 87% for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder detection by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. In a subanalysis of the 125 scans performed for differentiating posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder from other diseases, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 90%, 89%, 85% and 93%, respectively. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-uptake in posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder was generally high with a median mean and maximum standardized uptake

  20. Frequent hypermethylation of DBC1 in malignant lymphoproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Karin Elmegård; Ralfkiaer, U.; Dahl, C.

    2008-01-01

    follicular lymphomas, 5 of 5 mantle cell lymphomas, 4 of 4 small lymphocytic lymphomas, 1 of 2 lymphoplasmacytoid lymphomas, and in 12 of 12 acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but was unmethylated in 1 case of splenic marginal zone lymphoma, in 12 of 12 multiple myelomas, in 24 of 24 reactive lymph nodes......Allelic loss at chromosome 9q31-34 is a frequent event in many lymphoproliferative malignancies. Here, we examined DBC1 at 9q33.1 as a potential target in lymphomagenesis. DBC1 is a putative tumor suppressor that has been shown to be involved in the regulation of cell growth and programmed cell...... death. The methylation status of the DBC1 promoter CpG island was examined by methylation-specific PCR, bisulfite sequencing, and methylation-specific melting curve analysis. DBC1 was hypermethylated in 5 of 5 B-cell-derived lymphoma cell lines, 41 of 42 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, 24 of 24...

  1. SAP modulates B cell functions in a genetic background-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detre, Cynthia; Yigit, Burcu; Keszei, Marton; Castro, Wilson; Magelky, Erica M; Terhorst, Cox

    2013-06-01

    Mutations affecting the SLAM-associated protein (SAP) are responsible for the X-linked lympho-proliferative syndrome (XLP), a severe primary immunodeficiency syndrome with disease manifestations that include fatal mononucleosis, B cell lymphoma and dysgammaglobulinemia. It is well accepted that insufficient help by SAP-/- CD4+ T cells, in particular during the germinal center reaction, is a component of dysgammaglobulinemia in XLP patients and SAP-/- animals. It is however not well understood whether in XLP patients and SAP-/- mice B cell functions are affected, even though B cells themselves do not express SAP. Here we report that B cell intrinsic responses to haptenated protein antigens are impaired in SAP-/- mice and in Rag-/- mice into which B cells derived from SAP-/- mice together with wt CD4+ T cells had been transferred. This impaired B cells functions are in part depending on the genetic background of the SAP-/- mouse, which affects B cell homeostasis. Surprisingly, stimulation with an agonistic anti-CD40 causes strong in vivo and in vitro B cell responses in SAP-/- mice. Taken together, the data demonstrate that genetic factors play an important role in the SAP-related B cell functions. The finding that anti-CD40 can in part restore impaired B cell responses in SAP-/- mice, suggests potentially novel therapeutic interventions in subsets of XLP patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical, laboratory, and morphological characteristics of kidney damage in lymphoproliferative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Dzhumabaeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney involvement in the onset of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD detected rarely, observed mainly at tumor progression or relapse.Objective: to determine the clinical and morphological features of kidney damage in the initial manifestation of LPD.Materials and methods: 19 patients with LPD and kidney damage were included in the study. The diagnosis of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas was established according to 2008 WHO classification. Histological and immunohistochemical, immunofluorescent and electron microscopic studies of nephrobiopsy have been performed.Results. Patients were aged 46-83 years (median 63 years, of which 13 were men and 6 women. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia / small cell lymphocytic lymphoma was established in 12 patients, marginal zone lymphoma – in 4 pts, follicular lymphoma – in 1 patient, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia – in 1 patient and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL in 1 patient. Proteinuria was observed in 18 patients, microhematuria – in 6 pts, arterial hypertension – in 8 pts, nephrotic syndrome – in 3 pts and renal failure in 18 patients. The mean creatinine level was 330.9 ± 52.3 µmol/L, the average glomerular filtration rate was 25.7 ± 12.9 ml/min. Monoclonal IgMκ secretion was detected in 6 patients, BJκ protein – in 9 pts, increased free light chain level – in 4 pts, cryoglobulin – in 4 pts (type II cryoglobulin in 3 of them, type I – in 1 patient.Morphological study of nephrobiopsy revealed tumor lymphoid infiltration of kidney interstitium in 10 (52.6 % cases. Diffuse small cell lymphoid proliferation was detected in 1 patient, local infiltration – in 9 pts, in 3 of them in combination with glomerulonephritis, and in 4 cases with kidney carcinoma. Local large cell lymphoid proliferation was found in 1 patient with DLBCL. Amyloidosis was detected in 2 pts and thrombotic microangiopathy – in 2 patients. Glomerulopathy was revealed in 10 patients (52.6 %: mesangioproliferative

  3. Upper airway obstruction and pulmonary abnormalities due to lymphoproliferative disease following bone marrow transplantation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, B.D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, 332 N. Lauderdale St., Memphis, TN 38105 (United States)]|[Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Heslop, H.E. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Kaste, S.C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Bodner, S. [Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    1998-07-01

    We report three patients who developed severe supraglottic airway obstruction due to Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disease following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In addition to enlarged pharyngeal lymphoid tissue seen in all three patients, two had supraglottic airway narrowing and two developed pulmonary lymphoproliferative disease. They were treated with unmanipulated T cells or EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Life-threatening upper airway obstruction is a radiologically detectable complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in children. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs.

  4. 基于XLP技术的超低功耗数据采集系统设计%Design of Ultra-Low Power Data Acquisition System Based on the XLP Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李闯泽; 姚金杰; 王黎明; 张回园

    2011-01-01

    The present portable acquisition device for gas concentration has many disadvantages including big volume, high power consumption and single function. On account of these disadvantages, we designed a new portable gas concentration acquisition device with characters of small volume, low power consumption and multifunction by using the low-power chips-PIC16F193X which was based on the technology of XLP and belonged to Microchip Company. In this paper, we first analyzed the low-consumption design principle of hardware for the whole system, and then a corresponding low- power consumption program was designed according to the character of low- power consumption. The whole software program in fact was designed based on finite state machine. Finally, low-power consumption test was performed for the whole system. Testing results turned out that the new method of design could prolong the working time six times comparing with the conventional method.%针对目前便携式气体浓度数据采集仪体积大、功耗高以及功能单一等缺点,采用Microchip公司基于XLP技术的低功耗器件-PIC16F193X设计了一款多功能、小体积、低功耗的便携式数据采集仪.本文首先分析了整个系统的硬件低功耗设计原理,然后针对系统的低功耗特点,进行了低功耗的软件程序设计.整个软件采用了基于有限状态机的设计,最后对整个系统进行了低功耗特性测试,测试结果表明采用这种设计方法比传统的设计方法能延长便携式数据采集仪的工作时间6倍以上.

  5. [POEMS syndrome: role and value of interleukin-6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrès, E; Courouau, F; Kaltenbach, G; Maloisel, F; Imler, M

    1996-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a systemic disorder with peripheral neuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy and skin changes. The association of POEMS syndrome with lympho-proliferative disorder is very commun. The pathogenesis remains poorly understood but implication of cytokines (interleukins 1 and 6) is suspected. We report a case of a classic POEMS syndrome (with polyneuropathy, hepatomegaly, diabetes melitus, hyperpigmentation, monoclonal IgG lambda, anasarca and solitary plasmocytoma), associated with high serum levels of interleukin 6.

  6. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Expression of HSV-1 receptors in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease determines susceptibility to oncolytic HSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, P.Y.; Currier, M.A.; Hansford, L.; Kaplan, D.; Chiocca, E.A.; Uchida, H.; Goins, W.F.; Cohen, J.B.; Glorioso, J.C.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Mo, X.; Cripe, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. A

  8. Rapidly progressive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease following withdrawal of sirolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Marc; Barday, Zunaid; Eastman, Roland; Le Feuvre, David; Candy, Sally; Wu, Hue-Tsi; Swanepoel, Charles

    2012-08-24

    Sirolimus, a potent inhibitor of B- and T-cell activation. is a commonly used immunosuppressant after renal transplantation. Withdrawal of sirolimus from the immunosuppression regimen may reduce B-cell surveillance. We present a case of rapidly progressive central nervous system (CNS) polymorphic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following the withdrawal of sirolimus.

  9. Pesticide exposure as a risk factor for lymphoproliferative disorders in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, E A; Hegazy, M M; El Khouley, E A

    2014-06-18

    In view of the widespread use of pesticides in Egypt and the increasing incidence of leukaemia and lymphoma we aimed to assess pesticide exposure and other selected variables as risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders (leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma). In a hospital-based, retrospective, case-control study in 2011-2012, adult cases of lymphoproliferative disorders (n = 130) were recruited from outpatient clinics in Menoufia, Egypt, while controls (n = 130) were age- and sex-matched fracture patients. Family history of cancer, exposure to X-rays, smoking and use of hair dyes were not risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders in univariate analysis. History of exposure to pesticides and HCV infection were significant risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders in multivariate analysis (OR = 2.24; 95% CI: 1.22-4.11 and OR = 2.67; 95% CI: 1.50-4.80 respectively). The risk was significant for cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma but not chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

  10. Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative disorder in the United States : Young Caucasian males are at highest risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dharnidharka, VR; Tejani, AH; Ho, PL; Harmon, WE

    2002-01-01

    We have previously documented Caucasian race and cadaver donor source as risk factors for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) development in recipients registered in the North American Pediatric Renal Transplant Cooperative Study (NAPRTCS). We analyzed data from the Scientific Regist

  11. The risk factors of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders following haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder(PTLD)occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT)is rare but severe.Risk factors including pre-HSCT exposure variables,conditioning regimens,transplant-related complications,and post-HSCT immune reconstitution were investigated in the development of PTLD after allo-HSCT.Methods A

  12. Prevalence and patterns of renal involvement in imaging of malignant lymphoproliferative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Behrmann, Curd; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Surov, Alexey (Dept. of Radiology, Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)), Email: andreas.bach@medizin.uni-halle.de; Holzhausen, Hans Jurgen (Dept. of Pathology, Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)); Katzer, Michaela (Dept. of Urology, Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)); Arnold, Dirk (Univ. Cancer Center Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany))

    2012-04-15

    Background: Renal involvement in patients with lymphoproliferative disease is an uncommon radiological finding. Purpose: To determine its prevalence and radiological appearances in a patient population. Material and Methods: All forms of lymphoproliferative disease (ICD: C81-C96) were considered. From January 2005 to January 2010, 668 consecutive patients with lymphoproliferative disease were identified with the help of the radiological database and patient records. Inclusion criteria were complete staging including appropriate CT scan and/or MRI. All stored images (initial staging and follow-up examinations) were reviewed. Results: Review of all stored images revealed renal infiltration in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (11 of 364 = 3.0%; median age = 65 years, m:f = 6:5) but also multiple myeloma (2 of 162 = 1.2%; median age = 72 years; m:f = 1:1) and leukemia (5 of 101 4.9%; median age = 12 years; m:f = 2:3). There were no cases of renal infiltration in 41 patients with Hodgkin's disease. In total there were six patients with solitary lesions, five patients with diffuse renal enlargement, four patients with perirenal lesions, and two patients with direct invasion of the kidney. Conclusion: In leukemia the most common imaging pattern is diffuse enlargement. In the other subtypes of lymphoproliferative disease no specific correlation between typical CT patterns and subtype of lymphoproliferative disease can be found. The prevalence of renal involvement is in line with earlier studies. Contrary to earlier reports, multiple lesions were not found to be a common pattern

  13. Intronic SH2D1A mutation with impaired SAP expression and agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recher, Mike; Fried, Ari J; Massaad, Michel J; Kim, Hye Young; Rizzini, Michela; Frugoni, Francesco; Walter, Jolan E; Mathew, Divij; Eibel, Hermann; Hess, Christoph; Giliani, Silvia; Umetsu, Dale T; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Geha, Raif S

    2013-02-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) disease is a primary immunodeficiency syndrome associated with the inability to control Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), lymphoma, and hypogammaglobulinemia. XLP is caused by mutations in the SH2D1A gene, which encodes the SLAM-associated protein (SAP), or in the BIRC4 gene, which encodes the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). Here we report a patient with recurrent respiratory tract infections and early onset agammaglobulinemia who carried a unique disease-causing intronic loss-of-function mutation in SH2D1A. The intronic mutation affected SH2D1A gene transcription but not mRNA splicing, and led to markedly reduced level of SAP protein. Despite undetectable serum immunoglobulins, the patient's B cells replicated and differentiated into antibody producing cells normally in vitro.

  14. Role of Metabolism by Intestinal Bacteria in Arbutin-Induced Suppression of Lymphoproliferative Response in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi Jeong; Ha, Hyun Woo; Kim, Ghee Hwan; Lee, Sang Kyu; Ahn, Young Tae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in arbutin-induced immunotoxicity was investigated in splenocyte cultures. Following an incubation of arbutin with 5 different intestinal bacteria for 24 hr, its aglycone hydroquinone could be produced and detected in the bacterial culture media with different amounts. Toxic effects of activated arbutin by intestinal bacteria on lymphoproliferative response were tested in splenocyte cultures from normal mice. Lipopolysaccharide and concanavalin A were used as mitogens for B- and T-cells, respectively. When bacteria cultured medium with arbutin was treated into the splenocytes for 3 days, the medium cultured with bacteria producing large amounts of hydroquinone induced suppression of lymphoproliferative responses, indicating that metabolic activation by intestinal bacteria might be required in arbutin-induced toxicity. The results indicated that the present testing system might be applied for determining the possible role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in certain chemical-induced immunotoxicity in animal cell cultures. PMID:24116295

  15. Association of Chronic HBV Infection with Chronic Lymphoproliferative Disorders: A Review and Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna M. Mulina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a clinical report on the associated course of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection with Castleman's disease (CD. We noticed the reactivation of previously latent chronic hepatitis B (CHB with high replicative activity of HBV DNA during the treatment of lymphoproliferative disease. This clinical case dictates the need for pre-emptive therapy of HBV infection with nucleoside analogues in patients who are receiving chemotherapy.

  16. The immunophenotypic characteristics of 260 patients with CD5~+ B cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易树华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the immunophenotypic characteristics of CD5+B cell lymphoproliferative disorders(BLPD)of Chinese patients.Methods Immunophenotyping of bone marrow and(or)of peripheral blood was performed in patients with B-LPD by four color multiparameter flow cytometry analysis using a panel of monoclonal antibodes,and the patients clinical data were retrospectively analyzed.The difference in immunophenotypes and

  17. Occurrence and prognostic relevance of CD30 expression in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Bendix, Knud;

    2015-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are potentiallyfatal, often Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven neoplasias developing in immunocompromised hosts. Initial treatment usually consists of a reduction in immunosuppressive therapy and/or rituximab with or without chemotherapy. However...... favorable outcome. For diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)-type PTLD this was regardless of EBV status, and remained significant in multivariate analysis. Cell-of-origin had no independent prognostic value in our series of DLBCL PTLD....

  18. Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising from Renal Allograft Parenchyma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Chan Kyo; Kwon, Ghee Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a rare but serious complication that occurs in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. PTLD usually manifests as a renal hilar mass comprised of histologically B-lymphocytes. We report our experience of managing a patient with PTLD arising from renal parenchyma. Ultrasonographic and MR imaging features of this unusual PTLD suggested differentiated renal cell carcinoma arising from the renal allograft

  19. Challenges and opportunities for checkpoint blockade in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Tycel; Devata, Sumana; Wilcox, Ryan A.

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are a heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL) for which current therapeutic strategies are inadequate, as most patients afflicted with these NHL will succumb to disease progression within 2 years of diagnosis. Appreciation of the genetic and immunologic landscape of these aggressive NHL, including PD-L1 (B7-H1, CD274) expression by malignant T cells and within the tumor microenvironment, provides a strong rationale for therapeutic targetin...

  20. Patogenetic correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in lymphoproliferative disorders (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Romanenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature review of anemia pathogenesis in patients with lymphatic system malignancies is presented. Advantages and disadvanta ges of eritropoiesis-stimulating preparations (ESP used for anemia correction are shown. Efficacy of anemia treatment with ESP in various types of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD is presented. Prognostic factors that predict positive response on ESP in LPD pati ents and reduce treatment cost are identified.

  1. Patogenetic correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in lymphoproliferative disorders (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Romanenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Literature review of anemia pathogenesis in patients with lymphatic system malignancies is presented. Advantages and disadvanta ges of eritropoiesis-stimulating preparations (ESP used for anemia correction are shown. Efficacy of anemia treatment with ESP in various types of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD is presented. Prognostic factors that predict positive response on ESP in LPD pati ents and reduce treatment cost are identified.

  2. Sjogren′s Syndrome: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Somani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren′s syndrome, also known as "Mikulicz disease" or "Sicca syndrome" is a systemic autoimmune disease in which immune cells attack and destroy the exocrine glands that produce tears and saliva. It can exist by itself (primary Sjogren syndrome or develop in association with another disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, primary biliary cirrhosis or Hashimoto thyroiditis (associated Sjogren syndrome. Hallmarks are the dry mouth and dry eyes known as the Sicca syndrome. Sjogren syndrome affects t million to 4 million people in the United States- Most are over 40 years old at the time of diagnosis. As there is no known cure for Sjogren syndrome, treatment focuses on relieving symptoms and preventing complications. The most serious complication associated with primary Sjogren syndrome is the development of a lymphoproliferative disease. primarily non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  3. Effects of oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cataldo Di Bisceglie; Angela Bertagna; Emanuela R Composto; Fabio Lanfranco; Matteo Baldi; Giovanna Motta; Anna M Barberis

    2013-01-01

    Pretherapy sperm cryopreservation in young men is currently included in good clinical practice guidelines for cancer patients.The aim of this paper is to outline the effects of different oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders,based on an 8-year experience of the Cryopreservation Centre of a large public hospital.Two hundred and sixty-one patients with testicular neoplasia and 219 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders who underwent chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and pretherapy semen cryopreservation were evaluated.Sperm and hormonal parameters (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH),luteinizing hormone (LH),testosterone,inhibin B levels) were assessed prior to and 6,12,18,24 and 36 months after the end of cancer treatment.At the time of sperm collection,baseline FSH level and sperm concentration were impaired to a greater extent in patients with malignant testicular neoplasias than in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders.Toxic effects on spermatogenesis were still evident at 6 and 12 months after the end of cancer therapies,while an improvement of seminal parameters was observed after 18 months.In conclusion,an overall increase in sperm concentration was recorded about 18 months after the end of cancer treatments in the majority of patients,even if it was not possible to predict the evolution of each single case ‘a priori'.For this reason,pretherapy semen cryopreservation should be considered in all young cancer patients.

  4. Intralymphatic Spread Is a Common Finding in Cutaneous CD30+ Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Gerardo; Ena, Luca; Cota, Carlo; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    An intralymphatic variant of the cutaneous CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders (cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma [ALCL] and lymphomatoid papulosis [LyP]) has been described recently. We retrieved 60 cases of ALCL of the skin (primary cutaneous: 37; cases with concomitant involvement of 1 regional lymph node: 4; skin involvement from systemic disease: 4; cases with staging results unknown: 15) and 16 cases of LyP, to evaluate the presence of lymphatic vessel involvement by neoplastic cells. A D2-40 immunohistochemical staining was used to highlight lymphatic vessels. Lymphatic vessel involvement was found in 36 cases (60%) of ALCL (primary cutaneous: 24; concomitant: 3; secondary cutaneous: 4; staging unknown: 5), and in 6 cases (37.5%) of LyP. Follow-up data, available in 28 patients with ALCL and 11 with LyP, suggested that lymphatic vessel involvement had no negative prognostic implication. Our study demonstrates that cutaneous CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders are frequently characterized by involvement of the lymphatic vessels. The intralymphatic variant of ALCL and LyP may be explained, at least in part, by a particular lymphotropism of the neoplastic cells of cutaneous CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders.

  5. ROLE OF SERUM EOSINOPHILIC CATIONIC PROTEIN AND TRYPTASE IN MYELOPROLIFERATIVE AND LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Komarova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A role of intracellular proteins of eosinophils and mast cells remains unclear in the patients with hematological neoplasia. There is a substantial evidence that eosinophils possess some common mechanisms of cooperation with mast cells. Therapeutic interventions into key events controlling eosinophil migration may be a leading factor in treatment of hypereosinophylic states in onco-hematological disorders. Due to unknown functions of eosinophils in majority of eosinophilia-associated diseases, it would be useful to establish an algorithm of accurate diagnostics in the patients with eosinophilia, in order to choose more effective treatment in future.We studied serum levels of secretable eosinophil and mast cells proteins in oncohematological patients with increased eosinophil counts. The aim of our study was to test a significance of quantitative assay for tryptase and ECP in the patients with myelo- and lymphoproliferative diseases. The study group included thirty-eight patients with oncohematological diseases, accompanied by a marked eosinophilia (> 0.4 x 109/L. Eighteen patients with bronchial asthma (BA, and eight cases of solid tumors comprised a reference group for polyclonal eosinophilia. The levels of ECP and tryptase were measured in blood serum using a commercial fluoroimmunoenzyme assay («Pharmacia», Uppsala, Sweden. Total ECP levels were markedly increased in general group with hematological malignancies (p < 0.03, , and in cases of chronic GvHD (p < 0.03, and in a sub-group with lymphoproliferative disorders (р = 0.007 as compared to the group of non-hematological diseases.Serum levels of tryptase were significantly increased in the patients with chronic GvHD after allo-HSCT and lymphoproliferative diseases, as compared to the group of patients with solid tumors (р = 0.03, as well in GvHD compared with lymphoproliferative disorders (р < 0.05.A direct correlation was found between serum ECP levels and absolute

  6. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-2 detection and typing in immunocompromised children correlated with lymphoproliferative disorder biopsy findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Marques Mendes

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis, plays a significant role as a cofactor in the process of tumorigenesis, and has consistently been associated with a variety of malignancies especially in immunocompromised patients. Forty-four children and adolescents (21 liver transplant patients, 7 heart transplant, 5 AIDS, 3 autoimmune hepatitis, 2 nephritic syndromes, 2 medullar aplasia, 2 primary immunodeficiency disorder patients, 1 thrombocytopenic purpura and 1 systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with chronic active EBV infection (VCA-IgM persistently positive; VCA-IgG > 20 AU/mL and positive IgG _ EBNA had peripheral blood samples obtained during clinically characterized EBV reactivation episodes. DNA samples were amplified in order to detect and type EBV on the basis of the EBNA-2 sequence (EBNA2 protein is essential for EBV-driven immortalization of B lymphocytes. Although we have found a predominance of type 1 EBNA-2 virus (33/44; 75%, 10 patients (22.73% carried type 2 EBNA-2, and one liver transplant patient (2.27% a mixture of the two types, the higher proportion of type 2 EBV, as well as the finding of one patient bearing the two types is in agreement with other reports held on lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD patients, which analyzed tumor biopsies. We conclude that EBNA-2 detection and typing can be performed in peripheral blood samples, and the high prevalence of type 2 in our casuistic indicates that this population is actually at risk of developing LPD, and should be monitored.

  7. Study Provides Insights into Diagnosis, Treatment of Rare Immune Disease: Autoimmmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Award Clinical Terms of Award Restriction for China Clinical Terms Guidance Compliance Sample Letter Inclusion Codes ... Division of AIDS Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Division of ...

  8. Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in Iranian patients with lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Maryam; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Ghane, Masood; Basi, Ali; Meysami, Parisa; Keyvani, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Occult HCV infection is a form of chronic HCV infection characterized by absence of detectable anti-HCV antibodies or plasma HCV-RNA but presence of HCV-RNA in liver biopsy and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The aim of this study was to determine the presence of HCV-RNA in PBMCs of patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. One hundred and four consecutive patients with lymphoproliferative disorders admitted to Firouzgar Hospital from January 2010 to March 2011 were recruited in this cross-sectional study. A 6-ml sample of whole blood was taken from the patients, the total RNA was extracted from the samples after the separation of plasma and PBMCs. The HCV-RNA of the samples was amplified by reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR). The HCV genotypes of the positive samples were tested using the INNO-LiPA™ HCV II kit, and the HCV genotypes were then confirmed by sequencing of the 5'-UTR fragments after the PCR products were cloned into a pJET1.2/blunt cloning vector. The mean age of the patients was 48.3 ± 1.76 years (range: 16-83). HCV-RNA was found in PBMCs from 2 (1.9%) of the 104 patients. Genotyping showed that the patients were infected with HCV subtype 1a. One patient suffered non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and the other suffered chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Patients with lymphoproliferative disorders with negative anti-HCV antibodies and negative plasma HCV-RNA may have occult HCV infection. Therefore, in the absence of a liver biopsy, the testing of PBMCs for the detection of genomic HCV-RNA may be beneficial.

  9. What is the Incidence of Kidney Stones after Chemotherapy in Patients with Lymphoproliferative or Myeloproliferative Disorders?

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    Hossein S. Mirheydar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study describes the incidence and risk factors of de novo nephrolithiasis among patients with lymphoproliferative or myeloproliferative diseases who have undergone chemotherapy. Materials and Methods From 2001 to 2011, patients with lymphoproliferative or myeloproliferative disorders treated with chemotherapy were retrospectively identified. The incidence of image proven nephrolithiasis after chemotherapy was determined. Demographic and clinical variables were recorded. Patients with a history of nephrolithiasis prior to chemotherapy were excluded. The primary outcome was incidence of nephrolithiasis, and secondary outcomes were risk factors predictive of de novo stone. Comparative statistics were used to compare demographic and disease specific variables for patients who developed de novo stones versus those who did not. Results A total of 1,316 patients were identified and the incidence of de novo nephrolithiasis was 5.5% (72/1316; symptomatic stones 1.8% 24/1316. Among patients with nephrolithiasis, 72.2% had lymphoproliferative disorders, 27.8% had myeloproliferative disorders, and 25% utilized allopurinol. The median urinary pH was 5.5, and the mean serum uric acid, calcium, potassium and phosphorus levels were 7.5, 9.6, 4.3, and 3.8 mg/dL, respectively. In univariate analysis, mean uric acid (p=0.013, calcium (p<0.001, and potassium (p=0.039 levels were higher in stone formers. Diabetes mellitus (p<0.001, hypertension (p=0.003, and hyperlipidemia (p<0.001 were more common in stone formers. In multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus, hyperuricemia, and hypercalcemia predicted stone. Conclusions We report the incidence of de novo nephrolithiasis in patients who have undergone chemotherapy. Diabetes mellitus, hyperuricemia, and hypercalcemia are patient-specific risk factors that increase the odds of developing an upper tract stone following chemotherapy.

  10. Evidence of abnormality of lymphocyte uroporphyrinogen synthase in family members of patients with lymphoproliferative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, M; Epstein, O; Schoenfeld, N; Nemesh, L; Shaklai, M; Atsmon, A

    1985-01-01

    Patients with active lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD) were shown to have high activity of lymphocyte uroporphyrinogen synthase (L-UROS), the enzyme which converts porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen. The mean L-UROS activity of 64 first-degree relatives of patients with LPD was significantly higher than that of a control group and 45% of these relatives had pathological values of L-UROS. L-UROS activity was also determined in the spouses of 2 patients and was pathologically elevated in both. The pattern of pathological values among family members may indicate the presence of a communicable agent.

  11. Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus in egyptian patients with chronic lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Samar Samir; Nasr, Aml S; El Zanaty, Taher; El Rawi, Rasha Sayed; Mattar, Mervat M

    2012-01-01

    Background. Occult hepatitis C virus infection (OCI) was identified as a new form of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), characterized by undetectable HCV antibodies and HCV RNA in serum, while HCV RNA is detectable in liver and peripheral blood cells only. Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of OCI in Egyptian patients with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) and to compare its prevalence with that of HCV in those patients. Subjects and Methods. The current study included 100 subjects, 50 of them were newly diagnosed cases having different lymphoproliferative disorders (patients group), and 50 were apparently healthy volunteers (controls group). HCV antibodies were detected by ELISA, HCV RNA was detected in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR), and HCV genotype was detected by INNO-LiPA. Results. OCI was detected in 20% of patients group, compared to only 4% OCI in controls group. HCV was detected in 26% of patients group with a slightly higher prevalence. There was a male predominance in both HCV and OCI. All HCV positive patients were genotype 4. Conclusion. Our data revealed occurrence of occult HCV infection in Egyptian LPD patients at a prevalence of 20% compared to 26% of HCV.

  12. Prevalence of Occult Hepatitis C Virus in Egyptian Patients with Chronic Lymphoproliferative Disorders

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    Samar Samir Youssef

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Occult hepatitis C virus infection (OCI was identified as a new form of Hepatitis C virus (HCV, characterized by undetectable HCV antibodies and HCV RNA in serum, while HCV RNA is detectable in liver and peripheral blood cells only. Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of OCI in Egyptian patients with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs and to compare its prevalence with that of HCV in those patients. Subjects and Methods. The current study included 100 subjects, 50 of them were newly diagnosed cases having different lymphoproliferative disorders (patients group, and 50 were apparently healthy volunteers (controls group. HCV antibodies were detected by ELISA, HCV RNA was detected in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR, and HCV genotype was detected by INNO-LiPA. Results. OCI was detected in 20% of patients group, compared to only 4% OCI in controls group. HCV was detected in 26% of patients group with a slightly higher prevalence. There was a male predominance in both HCV and OCI. All HCV positive patients were genotype 4. Conclusion. Our data revealed occurrence of occult HCV infection in Egyptian LPD patients at a prevalence of 20% compared to 26% of HCV.

  13. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lan; Zhang, Lin; Cai, Bo; Li, Honghua; Huang, Wenrong; Jing, Yu; Zhu, Haiyan; Zhao, Yu; Bo, Jian; Wang, Quanshun; Han, Xiaoping; Yu, Li; Gao, Chunji

    2014-01-08

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a rare and serious complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) or solid organ transplantation. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the occurrence of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in allo-HSCT recipients over 12 years in a single center in China. A total of 343 patients received allo-HSCT. The conditioning therapy consisted of a busulfan/cyclophosphamide-based regimen, a fludarabine/cyclophosphamide-based regimen, or total-body irradiation and cyclophosphamide. In transplantations from unrelated donors and haplo-identical donors, patients also received antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or thymoglobulin as part of the conditioning. Five of the 343 patients (1.46%) were diagnosed with PTLD and all 5 were given ATG as part of conditioning. Among these 5 patients, 4 had lymphoid neoplasm before transplantation. EBV-positivity was confirmed in 4 patients. All 5 PTLD patients received reduction of immunosuppression (RI) as fundamental therapy. At follow-up on April 1, 2013, 1 patient had survived for 2 years and 1 had survived for 9 years. The correlation of PTLD with ATG and underlying diseases were examined by statistical analysis using the chi-squared test or Fisher's exact test (P=0.011 and 0.025, respectively). Although only 1.46% of patients progressed to PTLD associated with ATG and underlying diseases, the mortality was still high. Moreover, RI can be an effective therapy for PTLD patients, but other approaches should be further explored.

  14. Transgenic mouse model of IgM+ lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M+ (IgM+) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-Ld-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2+IL6+AID− and found that they developed—with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)—a severe IgM+ lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2+IL6+AID− model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM. PMID:27813533

  15. The role of noradrenergic nerves in the development of the lymphoproliferative disease in fas-deficient, lpr/lpr mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    del Rey, A; Roggero, E; Kabiersch, A; Schafer, M; Besedovsky, HO

    2006-01-01

    Lp/lpr mice develop a lymphoproliferative, autoimmune, lupus-like disease. These mice lack functional Fas (CD95) expression and are resistant to Fas ligand (CD 178)-mediated apoptosis, a critical mechanism for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. In this study, we show that noradrenaline (NA), t

  16. Potential involvement of Notch1 signalling in the pathogenesis of primary cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M.R.; Ralfkiaer, E.; Skovgaard, G.L.;

    2008-01-01

    to coexpress Notch1 and activated Akt kinase. Conclusions These results imply a potential role for the Notch signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders and provide a rationale for the exploration of the activity of Notch antagonists in the therapy...

  17. NK cell cytotoxicity mediated by 2B4 and NTB-A is dependent on SAP acting downstream of receptor phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eMeinke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 2B4 (CD244 and NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A, CD352 are activating receptors on human NK cells and belong to the family of SLAM-related receptors. Engagement of these receptors leads to phosphorylation of their cytoplasmic tails and recruitment of the adapter proteins SAP and EAT-2. X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP is a severe immunodeficiency that results from mutations in the SAP gene. 2B4 and NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity are abrogated in XLP NK cells. To elucidate the molecular basis for this defect we analyzed early signaling events in SAP knockdown cells. Similar to XLP NK cells, knockdown of SAP in primary human NK cells leads to a reduction of 2B4 and NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that early signaling events such as raft recruitment and receptor phosphorylation are not affected by the absence of SAP, indicating the defect in the absence of SAP is downstream of these events. In addition, knockdown of EAT-2 does not impair 2B4 or NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity. Surprisingly, EAT-2 recruitment to both receptors is abrogated in the absence of SAP, revealing a novel cooperativity between these adapters.

  18. NK cell cytotoxicity mediated by 2B4 and NTB-A is dependent on SAP acting downstream of receptor phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Stephan; Watzl, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    2B4 (CD244) and NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A, CD352) are activating receptors on human natural killer (NK) cells and belong to the family of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-related receptors (SRR). Engagement of these receptors leads to phosphorylation of their cytoplasmic tails and recruitment of the adapter proteins SLAM-associated protein (SAP) and Ewing's sarcoma-activated transcript-2 (EAT-2). X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) is a severe immunodeficiency that results from mutations in the SAP gene. 2B4 and NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity are abrogated in XLP NK cells. To elucidate the molecular basis for this defect we analyzed early signaling events in SAP knockdown cells. Similar to XLP NK cells, knockdown of SAP in primary human NK cells leads to a reduction of 2B4 and NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that early signaling events such as raft recruitment and receptor phosphorylation are not affected by the absence of SAP, indicating the defect in the absence of SAP is downstream of these events. In addition, knockdown of EAT-2 does not impair 2B4 or NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity. Surprisingly, EAT-2 recruitment to both receptors is abrogated in the absence of SAP, revealing a novel cooperativity between these adapters.

  19. Complicated Tumor Lysis Syndrome after CVVH Treatment in a Renal Transplantation Patient: One Case Report and Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengbo Liu; Li Li; Jianhui Yang; Zhishuang Han; Zengyi Ma; Aimei Feng

    2009-01-01

    @@ Introduction Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a potentially lethal emergency caused by lysed tumor cells, and it frequently occurs in tumors of hematologic origin. Up until now, there has been only one known report published overseas about TLS resulting from post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD)[1].

  20. A rare association of Castleman′s disease and nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Tazi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman′s Disease (CD is an uncommon and poorly understood disorder of lymph node hyperplasia of unknown etiology. This entity belongs to the atypical lymphoproliferative disorders, a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by a hyperplastic reactive process involving the immune system. The association of the nephrotic syndrome and CD is extremely rare and their interrelation remains enigmatic. We report a case of CD of the hyaline-vascular type with unicentric localization complicated by nephrotic syndrome.

  1. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) Manifesting in the Oral Cavity of a 13-Year-Old Liver Transplant Recipient (LTx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska-Sławińska, Ewa; Minko-Chojnowska, Izabela; Pawłowska, Joanna; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Pronicki, Maciej; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota

    2015-08-18

    BACKGROUND Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a potential complication of solid organ or bone marrow transplants. The main PTLD risk factors are: the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), transplant type, and use of immunosuppressants. It mainly consists of an uncontrolled growth of lymphocytes in transplant recipients under chronic immunosuppressive therapy. About 85% of PTLDs are EBV-containing B-cell proliferations; 14% are T-cell proliferations, of which only 40% contain EBV; and the remaining 1% is NK-cell or plasmocyte proliferations. PTLD may present various clinical manifestations, from non-specific mononucleosis-like syndrome to graft or other organ damage resulting from pathologic lymphocyte infiltration. PTLD may manifest in the oral cavity. CASE REPORT The objective of this study was to present the case of a 13-year-old female living-donor liver transplant recipient, resulting from biliary cirrhosis caused by congenital biliary atresia, with exophytic fibrous lesions on buccal mucosa and tongue. Exophytic and hyperplastic lesion of oral mucosa were removed and histopathological examination revealed polymorphic PTLD. The patient underwent 6 cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and all the oral lesions regressed completely. CONCLUSIONS All oral pathological lesions in organ transplant recipients need to be surgically removed and histopathologically examined because they present an increased risk of neoplastic transformations such as PTLD.

  2. HLA associations and risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in Danish population-based cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Strandhave, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    . Possible associations between certain HLA types and the risk of developing PTLD have been reported by other investigators; however, results are conflicting. Methods: We conducted a retrospective, population-based study on 4295 Danish solid organ transplant patients from the Scandiatransplant database......Background: Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a feared complication to organ transplantation, associated with substantial morbidity and inferior survival. Risk factors for PTLD include T cell–depleting induction therapy and primary infection or reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus....... Having identified 93 PTLD patients in the cohort, we investigated the association of HLA types with PTLD, Epstein-Barr virus status and time to PTLD onset. The outcomes survival and PTLD were evaluated using Cox regression; mismatching, and the PTLD-specific mortality were evaluated in a competing risk...

  3. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD.

  4. EBV-positive mucocutaneous ulcer in organ transplant recipients: a localized indolent posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Melissa; Thakral, Beenu; Yohe, Sophia; Balfour, Henry H; Singh, Charanjeet; Spears, Michael; McKenna, Robert W

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive mucocutaneous ulcer (EBV MCU) is a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder occurring in elderly or iatrogenic immunocompromised patients. It has not been reported in solid organ transplant recipients. We observed 7 patients with EBV MCU in a cohort of 70 transplant recipients with EBV posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Transplants included: 5 renal, 1 heart, and 1 lung. Median patient age was 61; 5 were male. EBV MCU was observed in oral mucosa in 4 and gastrointestinal tract in 3. Duration of immunosuppressive therapy before EBV MCU was 0.6 to 13 years. Ulcers were undermined by inflammatory cells and polymorphic or monomorphic large cell lymphoproliferation. Reed-Sternberg-like cells were present in 5/7. Large B cells were CD20, CD30, and EBV-encoded RNA positive in all cases. Diagnosis in 3 recent patients was EBV MCU; 4 patients diagnosed before familiarity with EBV MCU were classified as monomorphic large cell (n=3) and polymorphic (n=1) PTLD. None of the patients had EBV DNA in their blood (<1000 copies/mL) at diagnosis or follow-up versus 35/44 transplant patients with systemic PTLD (P<0.001). All lesions resolved with reduced immunosuppression (7/7), change in immunosuppression (2/7), and rituximab (3/7). Five patients are living: 4 healthy, 1 awaiting second renal transplant. Two patients died 3 and 5 years after resolution of EBV MCU. No patient recurred with EBV MCU or other PTLDs. EBV MCU mimics more aggressive categories of PTLD but lacks EBV DNA in blood, which may be a useful distinguishing feature. Lesions are likely to resolve with conservative management. Awareness of EBV MCU in the posttransplant setting is necessary for appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the pelvis successfully treated with consolidative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habibeh, Omar; Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are aggressive malignancies which represent one of the major post-transplant complications. However, treatment options vary significantly and localized disease may be curatively treated with radiotherapy (RT) or surgery. We report a case of recurrent rectal PTLD, which was successfully treated by chemoimmunotherapy followed by RT. We describe a patient who developed a rectal lymphoproliferative lesion 11 years after kidney transplant, which was successfully treated with consolidative RT using 25.4 Gy sequential to chemoimmunotherapy (R-CHOP). RT was well tolerated and the patient showed no signs of grade 3 or 4 toxicity. This patient is free of recurrence 52 months after RT, with an overall survival of 62 months since diagnosis. Conventionally fractionated moderate-dose RT appears to be a tolerable and effective treatment option for localized PTLD if a sufficient systemic treatment cannot be applied. (orig.) [German] Posttransplantationslymphoproliferative Erkrankungen (PTLDs) sind eine haeufige Komplikation nach einer Organtransplantation. Nichtdestotrotz unterscheiden sich die Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten signifikant und vor allem lokalisierte Stadien koennen kurativ entweder mit Strahlentherapie (RT) und/oder Operation behandelt werden. Wir berichten ueber einen Fall einer rezidivierten rektalen PTLD, die erfolgreich mit einer Chemoimmuntherapie mit anschliessender RT behandelt wurde. Wir beschreiben einen Patienten der 11 Jahre nach einer Nierentransplantation eine PTLD entwickelte. Diese wurde erfolgreich mit konsolidierender RT (25,4 Gy) im Anschluss an eine Chemoimmuntherapie (R-CHOP) behandelt. Die RT wurde komplikationslos vertragen und es zeigten sich keine Nebenwirkungen. Das rezidivfreie Ueberleben betrug zum Zeitpunkt der letzten Nachsorgeuntersuchung 52 Monate mit einer Gesamtueberlebenszeit von 62 Monaten seit der Diagnose. Die konventionelle fraktionierte moderat dosierte RT scheint eine gut

  6. Small intestinal involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders post-renal transplantation: A report from the post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder international survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, data on post-renal transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD collected from the existing literature were pooled and analyzed to compare the characteristics, predictors and prognosis of small intestinal PTLDs. We performed a comprehensive search for the available data by Pubmed and Google scholar search engines for reports on this subject. Data from 18 previously published studies, comprising 120 renal allograft recipients, were included in the analysis. Renal transplant recipients with intestinal PTLD were significantly less likely to have Hogkin′s and Hogkin′s-like lesions (P = 0.044 and to be younger at the time of transplan-tation (P = 0.07. Except for Hodgkin′s-like lesions, histopathological evaluations elsewhere were comparable between the group with PTLD in the small intestine and age- and sex-matched renal transplant recipients with PTLD in other sites. The overall mortality was relatively higher in the control group (P = 0.09. When death only due to PTLD was used as the outcome, a trend toward better outcome was seen for the intestinal PTLD group compared with the other localizations (P = 0.1. The 1- and 5-year survival rates for intestinal PTLD patients were 57% and 37%, respectively, compared with 54% and 21%, respectively, for the control group. According to our findings based on analysis of international data, renal transplant patients with small intestinal PTLD are more likely to be of younger age but less frequently represent Hodgkin′s and Hodgkin′s-like lesions. They also have better patient survival compared with transplant recipients with PTLD in other locations. Further multi-center prospective studies are needed to confirm our results.

  7. EBV-negative monomorphic B-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are pathologically distinct from EBV-positive cases and frequently contain TP53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Elizabeth L; Yohe, Sophia; Chou, David; Nardi, Valentina; Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Thakral, Beenu; Nelson, Andrew C; Ferry, Judith A; Sohani, Aliyah R

    2016-10-01

    Monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder commonly resembles diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma, and most are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive. We retrospectively identified 32 cases of monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder from two institutions and evaluated EBV in situ hybridization; TP53 mutation status; p53, CD30, myc, and BCL2 expression by immunohistochemistry; proliferation index by Ki67; and germinal center vs non-germinal center immunophenotype by Hans criteria. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder arose after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in five and solid organ transplant in 27 patients, a median of 4 and 96 months after transplant, respectively (overall median latency 71 months, range 2-295). The most common morphology was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (28 cases), with three cases of Burkitt lymphoma, and one case of plasmablastic lymphoma. Ten cases (31%) were EBV negative. Of those with the morphology of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the EBV-negative cases were more frequently TP53-mutated (Pnegative (Ppost-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder were older with a longer latency from time of transplant to diagnosis (Ppost-transplant setting and underscores differences between EBV-positive and EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in terms of immunophenotype and TP53 mutation frequency, supporting an alternative pathogenesis for EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  8. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo from the Eastern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Thomas

    Full Text Available Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA. To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47% turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease.

  9. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the Eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jesse M; Allison, Andrew B; Holmes, Edward C; Phillips, Jamie E; Bunting, Elizabeth M; Yabsley, Michael J; Brown, Justin D

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease.

  10. DIAGNOSING LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASE VIRUS IN LIVE WILD TURKEYS (MELEAGRIS GALLOPAVO) USING WHOLE BLOOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alger, Katrina; Bunting, Elizabeth; Schuler, Krysten; Jagne, Jarra; Whipps, Christopher M

    2015-12-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a retrovirus that infects wild and domestic turkeys ( Meleagris gallopavo ). The first cases of LPDV in the United States were diagnosed in 2009, and subsequent surveillance has revealed the virus to be widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern half of the country. More research is needed to determine whether LPDV is having a negative effect on turkey populations, but progress has been impeded by the lack of a simple method for diagnosing the virus in living birds. Infected animals may appear asymptomatic, and diagnostics currently rely on tissue or bone marrow, which can be difficult to obtain. This study investigated the reliability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect LPDV in whole blood, compared with previous methods using buffy coat (concentrated white blood cells) and bone marrow. Paired samples of whole blood and buffy coat were collected from 137 live turkeys and paired samples of whole blood and bone marrow were collected from 32 turkeys postmortem. Compared with buffy coat, whole blood had 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity. When compared with bone marrow, whole blood had 100% sensitivity and 89% specificity. Both comparisons had a high degree of agreement using Cohen's kappa statistic. Based on these results, PCR of whole blood provides detection of LPDV in living birds that is on par with both buffy coat and bone marrow.

  11. HHV8/EBV Coinfection Lymphoproliferative Disorder: Rare Entity with a Favorable Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhouha Bacha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HHV8/EBV-associated germinotropic lymphoproliferative disorder (GLD is a challenging diagnosis given its rarity, the particular clinical presentation, and the lack of expression of markers usually used in establishing hematopoietic lineage. We report a new case of HHV8/EBV GLD in an immunocompetent 78-year-old woman. The diagnosis was made in an incidentally discovered lymphadenopathy. Histological examination showed a nodular lymphoid proliferation centered by aggregates of atypical plasmablastic cells admixed with small lymphoid cells. Tumor cells were strongly positive with EMA, HHV8, LMP1, CD38, CD138, and kappa light chains. They were negative with common lymphoma-associated markers (CD20, CD3, CD15, CD30, CD10, and bcl2. In situ hybridization confirmed the monotypic kappa light chains and the EBV infection (EBER+. A polyclonal pattern of Ig gene rearrangement was detected by PCR analysis. In the adjacent lymph node parenchyma, some germinal centers mimicked Castleman disease. In this case, the differential diagnosis was discussed with an early stage of large B-cell lymphoma arising in HHV8-associated multicentric Castleman disease. The clinical presentation, the immunophenotype, and the molecular results helped to make the accurate diagnosis. Through the review of the nine previously reported cases in literature, we discuss the clinical and pathologic features and the differential diagnosis of HHV8/EBV GLD.

  12. Verotoxin targets lymphoma infiltrates of patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbus, G S; Grisaru, S; Segal, O; Dosch, M; Pop, M; Lala, P; Nutikka, A; Lingwood, C A

    2000-10-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is an invasive, EBV expressing B lymphoma and a major cause of morbidity and mortality following organ transplantation. Presently there is limited therapy available; rather the patient often loses the allograft or succumbs to the malignancy. CD77 (or globotriaosyl ceramide -Gb(3)) is a germinal center B cell marker [Gregory et al. Int J Cancer 1998;42:213-20; Gregory et al., J Immunol 1987;139:313-8; Mangeney et al. Eur J Immunol 1991;21:1131-40], expressed on most EBV infected B cells and is the receptor for the E. coli derived verotoxin (VT) [Lingwood CA. Advances in Lipid Research 1993;25:189-212]. We present the basis of a possible novel approach to PTLD therapy utilizing the specific targeting of VT to the infiltrating lymphoma cells. Biopsies of adenoid, kidney or liver tissue of four PTLD patients were stained with verotoxin to determine expression of CD77. VT is a potent inducer of necrosis/apoptosis of receptor positive cells. In each PTLD case, the infiltrating EBV positive B lymphoma cells were strongly and selectively stained with VT, identifying CD77 as a new marker for these cells. For such individuals, VT might provide the basis of an approach to control their malignancy.

  13. LYMPHO-PROLIFERATIVE RESPONSES TO VARIOUS FASCIOLA HEPATICA WORM'S ANTIGENS: AN IN VITRO STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, Osama F; Amir, Elamir M; Hawash, Yousry A

    2016-04-01

    Fascioliasis is an important zoonotic disease with approximately 2-4 million people infected worldwide and a further 180 million at risk of infection. F. hepatica can survive within the bile ducts for many years through its ability to suppress the host immunity with Fasciola cathepsin L1 cysteine protease and Glutathione S transferase playing an important role. The aim of the present study is to investigate the in vitro lympho-proliferative responses of hepatic hilar lymphocytes (HLN) of infected sheep in response to different F. hepatica antigens. The suppressive effects of Fasciola excretory/secretory (ES) and tegument (TEG) and their fractions were also investigated. Our results showed that both ES and TEG had significant suppressive effects on lympho-proliferation, up to 74% and 92%, respectively. When these antigens were fractionated, fraction 3 (MW of >10000-30000) of both ES (64%) and TEG (59%) in addition to fraction 4 (MW of ≤ 10000) of TEG (38%) inherited the suppressive effects. Identification of the potential molecule(s) with such suppressive effects on lymphocytes in TEG fraction 4 could reveal vaccine candidates.

  14. Clonality assessment of lymphoproliferative lesions using the polymerase chain reaction: An analysis of two methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Moorchung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lymphoid malignancies are a heterogeneous group of disorders which may be difficult to differentiate from reactive proliferations even after immunohistochemistry. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR is believed to be a good adjunct tool for diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We examined 24 cases of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lymphoproliferative lesions in this study and evaluated the PCR as an additional tool in the confirmation of the diagnosis. Two different PCR methodologies were evaluated. Results: In the evaluation of the T-cell PCR, it was seen that the correlation using both the commercial kits and the custom-synthesized primers was highly significant at a P value of 0.05. Conclusions: Both the methods showed an excellent concordance for T-cell γ gene rearrangements, However, the same was not seen in the B-cell receptor rearrangements. This may be because of the small sample size or the inability of consensus V primers to recognize complementary DNA sequences in all of the V segments.

  15. Circulating antibody free light chains and risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, E A; Preiksaitis, J; Zingone, A; Landgren, O

    2012-05-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a major complication of solid-organ transplantation. With human immunodeficiency virus infection (an analogous immunosuppressive state), elevated kappa and lambda immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs) in peripheral blood are associated with increased risk of lymphoma. To assess the role of B-cell dysfunction in PTLD, we measured circulating FLCs among Canadian transplant recipients, including 29 individuals with PTLD and 57 matched transplant recipients who were PTLD-free. Compared with controls, PTLD cases had higher kappa FLCs (median 1.53 vs. 1.07 times upper limit of normal) and lambda FLCs (1.03 vs. 0.68). Using samples obtained on average 3.5 months before PTLD diagnosis, cases were more likely to have polyclonal FLC elevations (i.e. elevated kappa and/or lambda with normal kappa/lambda ratio: odds ratio [OR] 4.2, 95%CI 1.1-15) or monoclonal elevations (elevated kappa and/or lambda with abnormal ratio: OR 3.0, 95%CI 0.5-18). Strong FLC-PTLD associations were also observed at diagnosis/selection. Among recipients with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA measured in blood, EBV DNAemia was associated with FLC abnormalities (ORs 6.2 and 3.2 for monoclonal and polyclonal elevations). FLC elevations are common in transplant recipients and associated with heightened PTLD risk. FLCs likely reflect B-cell dysfunction, perhaps related to EBV-driven lymphoproliferation.

  16. An Appropriate Modulation of Lymphoproliferative Response and Cytokine Release as Possible Contributors to Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Toda, Irene; Vida, Carmen; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2017-01-01

    The decrease in the proliferative response of lymphocytes is one of the most evident among the age-related changes of the immune system. This has been linked to a higher risk of mortality in both humans and experimental animals. However, long-lived individuals, in spite of optimally maintaining most of the functions of the immune system, also seem to show an impaired proliferative response. Thus, it was hypothesized that these individuals may have distinct evolution times in this proliferation and a different modulatory capacity through their cytokine release profiles. An individualized longitudinal study was performed on female ICR-CD1 mice, starting at the adult age (40 weeks old), analyzing the proliferation of peritoneal leukocytes at different ages in both basal conditions and in the presence of the mitogen Concanavalin A, for 4, 24 and 48 h of culture. The cytokine secretions (IL-2, IL-17, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10) in the same cultures were also studied. Long-lived mice show a high proliferative capacity after short incubation times and, despite experiencing a functional decline when they are old, are able to compensate this decrease with an appropriate modulation of the lymphoproliferative response and cytokine release. This could explain their elevated resistance to infections and high longevity. PMID:28737707

  17. The impact of hepatitis viruses on chronic lymphoproliferative disorders; preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufu, C; Neagu, AM; Onisai, M; Bumbea, H; Ciufu, C; Vintilescu, AM; Dobrea, C; Arama, V; Mihailescu, R; Arama, S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze a group of patients with chronic lymphoproliferative disorders associated with B, C, D hepatitis viral infection. This group of chronic lymphoproliferative disordered patients with associated hepatitis viral infection has been diagnosed and monitored in the Hematology Department of the University Emergency Hospital of Bucharest, between December 2007 and January 2009. Our study is meant to observe the influence of the viral infection on clinical and biological evolution of the enrolled patients. The diagnosis of the chronic lymphoproliferative disorder was based on the bone marrow / lymph node biopsy and flow–cytometry analysis. The positive diagnosis for hepatitis viral infection was established by ELISA serological tests and viremia was performed by TaqMan method at INBI ‘Matei Bals’ Bucharest. The analyzed group is made up of 41 patients, 25/41 (60,97%) females and 16/41 (39,02%) males, with ages: 20–50 years old – 6/41 (14,63%), 51–70 years old – 23/41 (56,09%) and over 71 years old – 12/41 (29,26%) patients. The histological types of CLD: B–cell non–Hodgkin's lymphoma – in 28/41 (68,29%) patients, T–cell non–Hodgkin's lymphoma – 2/41 (4,87%) patients, Hodgkin's lymphoma – 2/41 (4,87%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia – 7/41 (17,07%), Waldenström disease – 2/41 (4,87%) patients. Regarding the type of CLD, 19/41 (46,34%) of the patients have an aggressive type of CLD and 22/41 (53,65%) a non–aggressive type of CLD. The hepatitis viral infection distribution in our patients: 14/41 (34,14%) have HBV infection, 24/41 (58,53%) have HCV infection, double/triple association of viral infection was found in 3/41 (7,31%) patients. Within HBV infection subgroup 9/14 (64,28%) patients have an aggressive type of CLD and 5/14 (35,71%) patients have a non–aggressive type, whereas within the group with HCV infection we found a different distribution: 9/24 (37,5%) patients with aggressive type and 15/24 (62

  18. How genetic testing can lead to targeted management of XIAP deficiency-related inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; LaCasse, Eric Charles

    2017-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 2 (XLP-2, OMIM 300635) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by the loss of X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis gene at Xq25. XLP-2 individuals are susceptible to several specific and potentially fatal inf......, and expedite specific targeted therapy.Genet Med advance online publication 14 July 2016Genetics in Medicine (2016); doi:10.1038/gim.2016.82....

  19. Schnitzler's syndrome: 3-year radiological follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, A. [Hopital Bichat, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Feydy, A. [Hopital Bichat, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Hopital Cochin, Service de Radiologie B, Paris (France); Belmatoug, N.; Fantin, B. [Hopital Beaujon, Department of Internal Medicine, Clichy (France)

    2007-02-15

    Schnitzler's syndrome comprises urticaria, monoclonal gammapathy, inflammatory signs (fever, enlarged lymph nodes, hyperleukocytosis), and bone lesions. We report the imaging findings and follow-up of a new case with extensive osteosclerosis of the iliac bone, associated with inflammatory signal changes on MRI and foci of increased uptake on bone scintigraphy. When a diagnosis of Schnitzler's syndrome is established, treatment should be towards symptoms only; a long follow-up is warranted, as a delayed evolution towards a lymphoproliferative syndrome is possible. (orig.)

  20. Multiple clinical presentations of lymphoproliferative disorders in pediatric liver transplant recipients: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Apezzato, M L; Tannuri, U; Tannuri, A C A; Mello, E S; Lima, F; Gibelli, N E; Santos, M M; Ayoub, A A; Maksoud-Filho, J G; Velhote, M C; Silva, M M; Andrade, W C; Miyatani, H T

    2010-06-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication following solid organ transplantation that has been linked to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The aim of this article was to describe a single-center experience with the multiplicity of clinical presentations of PTLD. Among 350 liver transplantations performed in 303 children, 13 survivor children displayed a histological diagnosis of PTLD (13/242 survivors; 5.4%). The age at diagnosis ranged from 12 to 258 months (median, 47), and the time from transplantation ranged from 1 to 84 months (median, 13). Ten of these children (76.9%) were EBV-naïve prior to transplantation. Fever was present in all cases. The clinical signs at presentation were anemia (92.3%), diarrhea and vomiting (69.2%), recurrent upper airway infections (38.4%), Waldeyer ring lymphoid tissue hypertrophy (23.0%), abdominal mass lesions (30.7%), massive cervical and mediastinal adenopathy (15.3%), or gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms (30.7%). One child developed fulminant hepatic allograft failure secondary to graft involvement by PTLD. Polymorphic PTLD was diagnosed in 6 patients; 7 had the diagnosis of lymphoma. Treatment consisted of stopping immunosuppression as well as starting intravenous gancyclovir and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy. The mortality rate was 53.8%. The clinical presentation of PTLD varied from fever of unknown origin to fulminant hepatic failure. The other symptoms that may be linked to the diagnosis of PTLD are pancytopenia, tonsil and adenoid hypertrophy, cervical or mediastinal lymph node enlargement, as well as abdominal masses. Despite numerous advances, the optimal treatment approach for PTLD is not completely known and the mortality rate is still high.

  1. Treatment of Recurrent Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder of the Central Nervous System with High-Dose Methotrexate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare J. Twist

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a frequent complication of intestinal transplantation and is associated with a poor prognosis. There is currently no consensus on optimal therapy. Recurrent PTLD involving the central nervous system (CNS represents a particularly difficult therapeutic challenge. We report the successful treatment of CNS PTLD in a pediatric patient after liver/small bowel transplantation. Initial immunosuppression (IS was with thymoglobulin, solucortef, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil. EBV viremia developed 8 weeks posttransplantation, and despite treatment with cytogam and valganciclovir the patient developed a polymorphic, CD20+, EBV+ PTLD with peripheral lymphadenopathy. Following treatment with rituximab, the lymphadenopathy resolved, but a new monomorphic CD20−, EBV+, lambda-restricted, plasmacytoid PTLD mesenteric mass emerged. Complete response of this PTLD was achieved with 6 cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP chemotherapy; however, 4 months off therapy he developed CNS PTLD (monomorphic CD20−, EBV+, lambda-restricted, plasmacytoid PTLD of the brain and spine. IS was discontinued and HD-MTX (2.5–5 gm/m2/dose followed by intrathecal HD-MTX (2 mg/dose ×2-3 days Q 7–10 days per cycle was administered Q 4–7 weeks. After 3 cycles of HD-MTX, the CSF was negative for malignant cells, MRI of head/spine showed near-complete response, and PET/CT was negative. The patient remains in complete remission now for 3.5 years after completion of systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy. Conclusion. HD-MTX is an effective therapy for CNS PTLD and recurrent PTLD that have failed rituximab and CHOP chemotherapy.

  2. HLA Associations and Risk of Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Danish Population-Based Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Strandhave, Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Bendix, Knud; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Andersen, Claus; Møller, Michael Boe; Sørensen, Søren Schwartz; Kampmann, Jan; Eiskjær, Hans; Iversen, Martin; Weinreich, Ilse Duus; Møller, Bjarne; Jespersen, Bente; d'Amore, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a feared complication to organ transplantation, associated with substantial morbidity and inferior survival. Risk factors for PTLD include T cell–depleting induction therapy and primary infection or reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus. Possible associations between certain HLA types and the risk of developing PTLD have been reported by other investigators; however, results are conflicting. Methods We conducted a retrospective, population-based study on 4295 Danish solid organ transplant patients from the Scandiatransplant database. Having identified 93 PTLD patients in the cohort, we investigated the association of HLA types with PTLD, Epstein-Barr virus status and time to PTLD onset. The outcomes survival and PTLD were evaluated using Cox regression; mismatching, and the PTLD-specific mortality were evaluated in a competing risk analysis. Results Risk of PTLD was associated with male sex (odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.71), and, in women, HLA-DR13 conferred an increased risk (odds ratio, 3.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.41-7.31). In multivariate analysis, HLA-B45 and HLA-DR13 remained independent predictive factors of PTLD. Mismatching in the B locus was associated with a reduced risk of PTLD (P < 0.001). Overall survival was poor after a PTLD diagnosis and was significantly worse than that in the remaining transplant cohort (P < 0.001). Conclusions Our data indicate risk-modifying HLA associations, which can be clinically useful after transplantation in personalized monitoring schemes. Given the strong linkage disequilibrium in the HLA region, the associations must be interpreted carefully. The large size, virtually complete ascertainment of cases and no loss to follow-up remain important strengths of the study. PMID:27500227

  3. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: Case reports of three children with kidney transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasojević-Dimitrijeva Brankica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by abnormal lymphoid proliferation following transplantation. It is a disease of the immunosuppressed state, and its occurrence is mostly associated with the use of T-cell depleting agents, and also intensification of immunosuppressive regimens. In the majority of cases, PTLD is a consequence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection and is a B-cell hyperplasia with CD-20 positive lymphocytes. The 2008 World Health Organization classification for lymphoid malignancies divides PTLD into four major categories: early lesions, polymorphic PTLD, monomorphic PTLD and Hodgkin PTLD. The treatment and prognosis depend on histology. The cornerstone of PTLD therapy includes reduction/withdrawal of immunosuppression, monoclonal anti CD-20 antibody (rituximab and chemotherapy. Outline of Cases. We reported here our experiences with three patients, two girls aged 7.5 and 15 and a 16-year old boy. They had different organ involvement: brain, combined spleen-liver and intestines, respectively. Even though EBV was a trigger of lymphoid proliferation as it was confirmed by histopathology or in cerebrospinal fluid, qualitative EBV-PCR was positive only in one patient at disease presentation. Reduction of immunosuppression therapy was applied in treatment of all three patients, while two of them received rituximab and ganciclovir. They had an excellent outcome besides many difficulties in diagnosis and management of disease. Conclusion. Qualitative EBV-PCR is not useful marker in pediatric transplant recipients. Our suggestion is that patients with the risk factors like T-cell depleting agents, immunosuppressant protocol or increasing immunosuppressive therapy and EBV miss-match with donor must be more accurately monitored with quantitative EBV PCR. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175085

  4. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in lymphoproliferative disorders and rituximab-related secondary hypogammaglobulinemia: a single-center experience in 61 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagno, Nicolò; Cinetto, Francesco; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Agostini, Carlo

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy represents the standard treatment for hypogammaglobulinemia secondary to B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin infusion is an effective, safe and well-tolerated treatment approach in primary immunodeficiencies but no extensive data are available on their use in secondary hypogammaglobulinemia, a frequent phenomenon occurring after treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies in lymphoproliferative disorders. In this retrospective study we evaluated efficacy (serum IgG trough levels, incidence of infections per year, need for antibiotics) and safety (number of adverse events) of intravenous (300 mg/kg/4 weeks) versus subcutaneous (75 mg/kg/week) immunoglobulin replacement therapy in 61 patients. In addition, the impact of the infusion methods on quality of life was compared. All patients were treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin, and 33 out of them had been previously treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Both treatments appeared to be effective in replacing Ig production deficiency and in reducing the incidence of infectious events and the need for antibiotics. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin obtained a superior benefit when compared to intravenous immunoglobulin achieving higher IgG trough levels, lower incidence of overall infection and need for antibiotics. The incidence of serious bacterial infections was similar with both infusion ways. As expected, a lower number of adverse events was registered with subcutaneous immunoglobulin, compared to intravenous immunoglobulin, with no serious adverse events. Finally, we observed an improvement in health-related quality of life parameters after the switch to subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Our results suggest that subcutaneous immunoglobulin is safe and effective in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia associated to lymphoproliferative disorders.

  5. Isolated Post-Transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease Involving the Breast and Axilla as Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji-Young [Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 150-950 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Suk; Lee, Jee Eun [Department of Radiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Sun Hee [Department of Pathology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases that represent serious complications following immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ or hematopoietic-cell recipients. In contrast to B-cell PTLD, T-cell PTLD is less frequent and is not usually associated with Epstein Barr Virus infection. Moreover, to our knowledge, isolated T-cell PTLD involving the breast is extremely rare and this condition has never been reported previously in the literature. Herein, we report a rare case of isolated T-cell PTLD of the breast that occurred after a patient had been treated for allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation due to acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus-Negative Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Diseases: Three Distinct Cases from a Single Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Mine Bakanay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease that occurred 6 to 8 years after renal transplantation are reported. The patients respectively had gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and atypical Burkitt lymphoma. Absence of EBV in the tissue samples was demonstrated by both in situ hybridization for EBV early RNA and polymerase chain reaction for EBV DNA. Patients were treated with reduction in immunosuppression and combined chemotherapy plus an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab. Despite the reduction in immunosuppression, patients had stable renal functions without loss of graft functions. The patient with atypical Burkitt lymphoma had an abnormal karyotype, did not respond to treatment completely, and died due to disease progression. The other patients are still alive and in remission 5 and 3 years after diagnosis, respectively. EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases are usually late-onset and are reported to have poor prognosis. Thus, reduction in immunosuppression is usually not sufficient for treatment and more aggressive approaches like rituximab with combined chemotherapy are required.

  7. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

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    Kim, Manbok, E-mail: manbok66@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Rahman, Masmudur M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Cogle, Christopher R. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McFadden, Grant [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  8. Hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma: a chronic EBV+ lymphoproliferative disorder with risk to develop a systemic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Ridaura, Cecilia; Nagl, Florian; Sáez-de-Ocariz, Marimar; Durán-McKinster, Carola; Ruiz-Maldonado, Ramon; Alderete, Georgia; Grube, Peter; Lome-Maldonado, Carmen; Bonzheim, Irina; Fend, Falko

    2013-10-31

    Hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma (HVLL) is an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder of childhood that occurs mainly in Central and South America and Asia. We present the clinicopathological features of 20 Mexican children with HVLL with a median age of 8 years at diagnosis (range, 1-15). All patients presented with skin lesions involving sun-exposed areas, but not exclusively. Fever, lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly were often observed. Most patients were treated with immunomodulators and/or immunosuppressive agents, resulting in temporary remission. For 13 patients follow-up was available for a median of 3 years (range, 1 month-13 years). Three patients with long follow-up (9-13 years) are alive with disease. Four patients died, 2 after developing systemic lymphoma. Histologically, the skin showed a predominantly angiocentric and periadnexal Epstein-Barr early RNA+ lymphoid infiltrate with variable atypia and subcutaneous involvement. Fifteen patients showed a T-cell phenotype (12, αβ; 2, γδ; 1, silent phenotype) and monoclonal T-cell receptor-γ rearrangements, whereas 6 exhibited a natural killer (NK)-cell phenotype. Four patients had hypersensitivity to mosquito bites. One patient showed both phenotypes. HVLL is an EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder of αβ-, γδ-, or NK-cell phenotype with a broad clinical spectrum, usually prolonged clinical course, and risk for progression to systemic disease.

  9. Epstein-barr virus-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases: three distinct cases from a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakanay, Sule Mine; Kaygusuz, Gülşah; Topçuoğlu, Pervin; Sengül, Sule; Tunçalı, Timur; Keven, Kenan; Kuzu, Işınsu; Uysal, Akın; Arat, Mutlu

    2014-03-01

    Three cases of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease that occurred 6 to 8 years after renal transplantation are reported. The patients respectively had gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and atypical Burkitt lymphoma. Absence of EBV in the tissue samples was demonstrated by both in situ hybridization for EBV early RNA and polymerase chain reaction for EBV DNA. Patients were treated with reduction in immunosuppression and combined chemotherapy plus an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab. Despite the reduction in immunosuppression, patients had stable renal functions without loss of graft functions. The patient with atypical Burkitt lymphoma had an abnormal karyotype, did not respond to treatment completely, and died due to disease progression. The other patients are still alive and in remission 5 and 3 years after diagnosis, respectively. EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases are usually late-onset and are reported to have poor prognosis. Thus, reduction in immunosuppression is usually not sufficient for treatment and more aggressive approaches like rituximab with combined chemotherapy are required.

  10. EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disorders in rheumatic patients: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Alvise; Felicetti, Mara; Peccatori, Susanna; Bortolotti, Roberto; Guella, Anna; Vivaldi, Paolo; Morelli, Luca; Barabareschi, Mattia; Paolazzi, Giuseppe

    2017-02-11

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is involved in the pathogenesis of approximately 40% of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) arising in patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment (IST) for rheumatic diseases, but data from large cohorts are still not available. We aimed to identify clinicopathological features, management and outcome of this condition. We reviewed all published cases of EBV-encoded RNA (EBER)-positive LPDs and included in our analysis one unpublished patient diagnosed in our Hospital. We excluded those cases without an underling rheumatic condition, a specific IST or not reporting univocal data. In the cumulative cohort of 159 patients, most were affected by rheumatoid arthritis (83.0%) and treated with methotrexate (75.4%). 68.5% of LPDs developed between the age of 40 and 70 years, after 13.3±9.6 years from rheumatic disease onset and 58.7±47.0 months of IST. LPDs were mostly B-cell lineage derived (39.0%), Ann Arbor disease's stage I (38.3%) and presented with extra-nodal involvement in 63.1%, which was most frequently represented by central nervous system (17.6%). The most common approach was IST withdrawal (93.3%), variably associated with radiotherapy(RT)/chemotherapy(CT) in 38.3% of cases. Overall, 61.7% of patients achieved a complete remission (CR; 30.2±24.0 months). Among published cases of patients that only suspended IS as first line treatment approach, 67.2% achieved CR. No significant demographic, clinical and histological differences between patients who achieved CR and who did not, and between who achieved CR by IST withdrawal alone and who did not were observed (P>0.05 in all comparison). The current study reviews all the published evidences of EBV-induced LPDs in patients receiving IST treatment for rheumatic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. SV40 and p53 as team players in childhood lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinsohn, Susanne; Scholz, Roswitha; Kabisch, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is known to be potently oncogenic and can induce several types of tumours, such as lymphoma. p53 was discovered as a cellular partner of the SV40 large T-antigen, the oncoprotein of this virus. There have not been many studies on SV40 and p53 in lymphomas and the ones that exist, are controversial. A comparison of these two components in lymphoma has not been reported previously. We examined 91 lymphomas [60 B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (B-NHLs), 19 B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs), 7 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias and 5 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias] for the presence of SV40. Overall, 40 samples from 12 B-NHL/19 B-ALL patients were additionally investigated for p53 mutation in the hot-spot exons 5 to 8. Overall, we found 62/91 lymphomas to be SV40-positive, among them 16/19 B-ALLs and 38/60 B-NHLs. SV40 was absent in 147 of the 149 blood control samples. We found 11 p53 mutations in 19 B-ALL patients: 5 in exon 5 (codons 132, 141, 143, 155 and 181), 4 in exon 7 (codons 236, 238 and 248), 2 in exon 8 (codon 273). In B-NHL patients we found p53-mutations in 9/12 samples: 6 of these in 3 lymph nodes (LNs). One LN harboured 3 different p53 mutations: Exon 5 (codon 132), exon 6 (codon 213) and exon 8 (codon 288). Another LN showed 2 different p53 mutations: Exon 6 (codon 213) and exon 8 (codon 285). Except for 1 nonsense mutation in an LN of a B-NHL patient, all 20 mutations were missense mutations, 2 were homozygous, both found in B-NHL-samples, and one of these (codon 175) is known to cause the global denaturation of p53. All occur in the DNA-binding domain of p53. All specimens showing a p53 mutation, were SV40-positive. p53 mutaions found in LNs of B-NHL patients harbour high SV40 copy numbers. Our data strongly support an important role for SV40, as well as a strong association of SV40 and p53 in childhood lympho-proliferative disorders.

  12. [Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant recipients--Merkur University Hospital single center experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipec-Kanizaj, Tajana; Budimir, Jelena; Colić-Cvrlje, Vesna; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Sustercić, Dunja; Naumovski-Mihalić, Slavica; Mrzljak, Anna; Kolonić, Slobodanka Ostojić; Sobocan, Nikola; Bradić, Tihomir; Dolić, Zrinka Misetić; Kocman, Branislav; Katicić, Miroslava; Zidovec-Lepej, Snjezana; Vince, Adriana

    2011-09-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is an increasingly recognized condition as the number of solid organ and bone marrow transplant recipients increases. It can be a life threatening fulminant disorder and affects approximately 8% of solid organ transplant recipients. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is closely involved in the pathogenesis of PTLD and the majority of PTLD cases arise in response to primary infection with EBV or to re-activation of previously acquired EBV. The principal risk factors underlying the development of PTLD are the degree of overall immunosuppression and EBV serostatus of the recipient. The most commonly used pathologic classification of PTLD is the World Health Organization classification, which divides PTLD into three categories: early lesions, polymorphic PTLD, and monomorphic PTLD. Early lesions are characterized by reactive plasmacytic hyperplasia. Polymorphic PTLD may be either polyclonal or monoclonal and is characterized by destruction of the underlying lymphoid architecture, necrosis, and nuclear atypia. In monomorphic PTLD, the majority of cases (>80%) arise from B cells, similar to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in immunocompetent hosts. The most common subtype is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, but Burkitt's/Burkitt's-like lymphoma and plasma cell myeloma are also seen. Rarely T-cell variants occur, which include peripheral T-cell lymphomas and, rarely, other uncommon types, including gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma and T-natural killer (NK) cell varieties. Hodgkin's disease-like lymphoma is very unusual. An accurate diagnosis of PTLD requires a high index of suspicion, since the disorder may present subtly and/or extranodally. Radiologic evidence of a mass or the presence of elevated serum markers (such as increased LDH levels) are suggestive of PTLD, with positive finding on ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and/or positron emission tomography scanning (possibly indicating metabolically active areas) also

  13. Scheie syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hurler syndrome) MPS II (Hunter syndrome) MPS IV (Morquio syndrome) MPS III (Sanfilippo syndrome) Causes Scheie syndrome ... Autosomal recessive Cloudy cornea Hearing loss Hurler syndrome Morquio syndrome Review Date 4/20/2015 Updated by: ...

  14. Frequent monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus DNA load in unfractionated whole blood is essential for early detection of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in high-risk patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, SJC; Verschuuren, EAM; Pronk, [No Value; van der Bij, W; Harmsen, MC; The, TH; Meijer, CJLM; van den Brule, AJC; Middeldorp, JM

    2001-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a frequent and severe Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated complication in transplantation recipients that is caused by iatrogenic suppression of T-cell function, The diagnostic value of weekly EBV DNA load monitoring was investigated in prospectiv

  15. Associations among Epstein-Barr virus subtypes, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in bone marrow transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görzer, Irene; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; van Esser, Joost W J; Niesters, Hubert G M; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    The association between Epstein-Barr virus subtype, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder was examined in a group of 25 bone marrow transplant recipients. A highly statistically significant correlation was observed between th

  16. Quantitative Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology in lung transplant recipients with primary EBV infection and/or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, E; van der Bij, W; de Boer, W; Timens, W; Middeldorp, J; The, TH

    2003-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antibody response was studied in lung transplant patients to assess their value in the diagnosis and prognosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Recently developed synthetic peptides representing Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1), diffuse ear

  17. A strange case of Evans syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Monti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Evans syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease presenting hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and/or neutropenia. It may be associated with other autoimmune or lymphoproliferative diseases. It can have an extremely serious disease course and, in rare cases, this can even be life-threatening. First-line treatment consists of steroids and/or immunoglobulin. Further therapy with rituximab, vincristine, cyclophosphamide and other immunosuppressive drugs can be considered in unresponsive patients. We report a case of Evans syndrome in a 54-year old woman admitted to the Emergency Department (ED for asthenia. Etiopathogenic, clinical, therapeutic and evolutive aspects are discussed. In contrast to many cases described in the literature, our patient had a satisfactory response to corticoids. We also discuss how to make a specific diagnosis, even in a suburban ED with limited resources, in order to admit patients to the appropriate hospital department and allow the correct therapy to be started as early as possible.

  18. Sjogren syndrome complicated by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma eAhmed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren Syndrome (SS is an autoimmune disease with exocrine glands dysfunction and multiorgan involvement. It is associated with increased risk of lymphoproliferative disorders, especially B-cell marginal zone lymphoma. While the role of F-18 Flurodoxyglucose position emission tomography/CT (F-18 FDG PET/CT for evaluation of lymphoma has been established, its use in patients with a chronic history of SS to evaluate for possible lymphoproliferative disorders or multiorgan involvement is limited. We present a case of chronic SS in which F-18 FDG PET/CT demonstrated FDG avid intraparotid and cervical lymph nodes pathologically proven to be Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. In addition, the patient had bibasilar cystic changes consistent with lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP.

  19. Effectiveness of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil in a child with refractory evans syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Farruggia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Evans Syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease consisting of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and/or neutropenia. It may be associated with other autoimmune or lymphoproliferative diseases. Its course can be extremely serious and, rarely, even life-threatening; thus it represents a excellent treatment challenge for the pediatric hematologist. First line treatment consists of steroids and/or immunoglobulin; further therapy with rituximab, vincristine, cyclophosphamide and other immunosuppressive drugs can be considered in unresponsive patients. We describe a baby with refractory Evans Syndrome that was cured by prolonged administration of mycophenolate mofetil and remained disease-free for 4 years after the discontinuation of treatment.

  20. Composite Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated B-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder and Tubular Adenoma in a Rectal Polyp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Amy A; Gao, Juehua; Rao, M Sambasivia; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Composite tumors are formed when there is intermingling between two components of separate tumors seen histologically. Cases demonstrating composite tubular adenoma with other types of tumors in the colon are rare. Composite tubular adenomas with nonlymphoid tumors including carcinoids, microcarcinoids, and small cell undifferentiated carcinoma have been reported in the literature. The occurrence of composite lymphoma and tubular adenoma within the colorectal tract is extremely rare. Only three cases have been reported and include one case of mantle cell lymphoma and two cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arising in composite tubular adenomas. We present the first case of composite Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and tubular adenoma in a rectal polyp with a benign endoscopic appearance.

  1. Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) regulate intestinal immunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jannie; LaCasse, Eric C; Seidelin, Jakob B; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole H

    2014-11-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family members, notably cIAP1, cIAP2, and XIAP, are critical and universal regulators of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mediated survival, inflammatory, and death signaling pathways. Furthermore, IAPs mediate the signaling of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)1/NOD2 and other intracellular NOD-like receptors in response to bacterial pathogens. These pathways are important to the pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Inactivating mutations in the X-chromosome-linked IAP (XIAP) gene causes an immunodeficiency syndrome, X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 2 (XLP2), in which 20% of patients develop severe intestinal inflammation. In addition, 4% of males with early-onset IBD also have inactivating mutations in XIAP. Therefore, the IAPs play a greater role in gut homeostasis, immunity and IBD development than previously suspected, and may have therapeutic potential.

  2. XIAP Restricts TNF- and RIP3-Dependent Cell Death and Inflammasome Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yabal, Monica; Müller, Nicole; Adler, Heiko;

    2014-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) has been identified as a potent regulator of innate immune responses, and loss-of-function mutations in XIAP cause the development of the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2 (XLP-2) in humans. Using gene-targeted mice, we show that loss...... but proceeds independently of caspase-1/caspase-11 or caspase-8 function. Loss of XIAP results in aberrantly elevated ubiquitylation of RIP1 outside of TNFR complex I. Virally infected Xiap(-/-) mice present with symptoms reminiscent of XLP-2. Our data show that XIAP controls RIP3-dependent cell death and IL-1...... of XIAP or deletion of its RING domain lead to excessive cell death and IL-1β secretion from dendritic cells triggered by diverse Toll-like receptor stimuli. Aberrant IL-1β secretion is TNF dependent and requires RIP3 but is independent of cIAP1/cIAP2. The observed cell death also requires TNF and RIP3...

  3. Primary mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders of the head and neck rarely involving epiglottis: clinicopathological, immunohistomchemical and genetic features of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Guannan; Zhang, Dandan; Yin, Yuhui; Pang, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yanpin; Li, Wencai

    2015-01-01

    A case of primary mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder of the head and neck rarely involving epiglottis in a 59-year-old male was reported. Histologically, the ulcerative mucosa was affected by sheets of mixed inflammatory infiltration, with scattered large atypical lymphoid cells arranging in an individual or small clusters with focal epidermotropism. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were uniformly immunoreactive to antibodies against CD2, CD3, CD7, CD43, CD4, TIA-1, with a heterogeneous expression of CD30, but negative for CD20, CD79a, CD21, CD8, CD56, ALK, EMA, granzyme B. Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNA (EBER) were detected. Genetically, T-cell receptor (TCR) γ gene showed an oligoclonal rearrangement. This first case developing in epiglottis demonstrates mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are characteristic of a broad clinicopathologic spectrum similar to the counterpart in the skin with a favorable prognosis.

  4. [Analyses of the rearrangement of T-cell receptor- and immunoglobulin genes in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesser, D H

    1995-01-01

    Rearrangements are developmentally regulated genetic recombinations in T and B cells which generate functional T cell receptor (TcR) and immunoglobulin genes, respectively. Different variable, sometimes diversity, and joining gene segments which are discontinuously spread out within their chromosomal location in germline configuration, are randomly assembled in individual lymphocytes. These rearrangements can be detected by Southern Blot analysis if more than 5% of a total lymphocyte population in a biopsy specimen carries the same clonal rearrangement. We analyzed DNA from 324 snap-frozen biopsy specimens from lympho-proliferative disorders. None of the 20 reactive lesions and four malignant myelomonocytic tumors had a clonal antigen receptor gene rearrangement. All 117 malignant B cell lymphomas of different subtypes and 95 of 97 malignant T cell lymphomas showed a clonal gene rearrangement. Only two angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy(AILD)-type T cell lymphomas did not have immune receptor gene rearrangements. They were morphologically indistinguishable from the other 47 T/AILD lymphomas with clonal rearrangement patterns. In most cases TcR beta and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene probes were sufficient for lineage assignment of the clonal T or B lymphocyte population. In 18% of B lymphomas, however, a cross-lineage rearrangement of TcR beta genes, and in 20% of the T cell lymphomas a clonal IgH gene rearrangement was detected. After exclusion of centrocytic, large cell anaplastic lymphomas (LCAL) of B-type, and T/AILD lymphomas which are overrepresented in our study, only 10% of the remaining 147 T and B cell lymphomas had aberrant rearrangements. TcR rearrangements other than those of the beta chain genes were extremely rare in B cell lymphomas, as were Ig kappa rearrangements in T lymphomas. Only two T/AILD lymphomas had IgH and Ig kappa rearrangement in addition to their clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements. Both samples likely contain a clonal B

  5. [Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome, periarteritis nodosa, non-Hodgkin's lymphoplasmocytic lymphoma and acquired C4 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreman, G; Ferme, I; Diebold, J; Baviera, E; Audouin, J; Bazin, C; Godeau, P

    1983-01-01

    A Sjögren syndrome was confirmed histologically in a 19 year old woman. Four years later, periarteritis nodosa (PAN) with characteristic vascular lesions on muscle biopsy occurred simultaneously with lymphatic hyperplasia comprising splenomegaly and polyadenopathy. The PAN was cured with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide and the lymphadenopathy regressed. Several months after treatment was stopped the lymphadenopathy recurred which histologically resembled a malignant non-hodgkin lymphoplasmocytoma secreting an IgM kappa monoclonal immunonoglobulin. During the PAN and the establishment of the lymphoproliferative syndrome a severe C4 deficit was detected which disappeared after chemotherapy.

  6. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System & How it Works Digestive Diseases A-Z Dumping Syndrome What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ... the colon and rectum—and anus. What causes dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome is caused by problems with ...

  7. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2015-12-15

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56(low) NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56(low) NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94(hi)/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

  8. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2015-07-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts.

  9. EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after umbilical cord blood transplantation in adults with hematological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, J; Arango, M; Senent, L; Jarque, I; Montesinos, P; Sempere, A; Lorenzo, I; Martín, G; Moscardó, F; Mayordomo, E; Salavert, M; Cañigral, C; Boluda, B; Salazar, C; López-Hontangas, J L; Sanz, M A; Sanz, G F

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed the incidence, clinicopathological features, risk factors and prognosis of patients with EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV-PTLD) in 288 adults undergoing umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) at a single institution. Twelve patients developed proven EBV-PTLD at a median time of 73 days (range, 36-812). Three-year cumulative incidence (CI) of EBV-PTLD was 4.3% (95% CI: 1.9-6.7). All patients presented with extranodal involvement. Most frequently affected sites were the liver, spleen, central nervous system (CNS), Waldeyer's ring and BM in 7, 6, 4, 3 and 3 patients, respectively. One patient had polymorphic and 11 had monomorphic EBV-PTLD (7 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified, 4 plasmablastic lymphomas). We confirmed donor origin and EBV infection in all histological samples. EBV-PTLD was the cause of death in 11 patients at a median time of 23 days (range, 1-84). The 3-year CI of EBV-PTLD was 12.9% (95% CI: 3.2-22.5) and 2.6% (95% CI: 0.5-4.7) for patients receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and myeloablative conditioning, respectively (P<0.0001). In conclusion, adults with EBV-PTLD after UCBT showed frequent visceral and CNS involvement. The prognosis was poor despite routine viral monitoring and early intervention. An increased risk of EBV-PTLD was noted among recipients of RIC regimens.

  10. Loss-of-function mutations within the IL-2 inducible kinase ITK in patients with EBV-associated lymphoproliferative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linka, R M; Risse, S L; Bienemann, K; Werner, M; Linka, Y; Krux, F; Synaeve, C; Deenen, R; Ginzel, S; Dvorsky, R; Gombert, M; Halenius, A; Hartig, R; Helminen, M; Fischer, A; Stepensky, P; Vettenranta, K; Köhrer, K; Ahmadian, M R; Laws, H-J; Fleckenstein, B; Jumaa, H; Latour, S; Schraven, B; Borkhardt, A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was the appraisal of the clinical and functional consequences of germline mutations within the gene for the IL-2 inducible T-cell kinase, ITK. Among patients with Epstein-Barr virus-driven lymphoproliferative disorders (EBV-LPD), negative for mutations in SH2D1A and XIAP (n=46), we identified two patients with R29H or D500T,F501L,M503X mutations, respectively. Human wild-type (wt) ITK, but none of the mutants, was able to rescue defective calcium flux in murine Itk(-/-) T cells. Pulse-chase experiments showed that ITK mutations lead to varying reductions of protein half-life from 25 to 69% as compared with wt ITK (107 min). The pleckstrin homology domain of wt ITK binds most prominently to phosphatidylinositol monophosphates (PI(3)P, PI(4)P, PI(5)P) and to lesser extend to its double or triple phosphorylated derivates (PIP2, PIP3), interactions which were dramatically reduced in the patient with the ITK(R29H) mutant. ITK mutations are distributed over the entire protein and include missense, nonsense and indel mutations, reminiscent of the situation in its sister kinase in B cells, Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

  11. Gene expression profiling reveals clear differences between EBV-positive and EBV-negative posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscio, J; Dierickx, D; Ferreiro, J F; Herreman, A; Van Loo, P; Bittoun, E; Verhoef, G; Matthys, P; Cools, J; Wlodarska, I; De Wolf-Peeters, C; Sagaert, X; Tousseyn, T

    2013-05-01

    Posttransplant patients are at risk of developing a potentially life-threatening posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), most often of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) morphology and associated with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinicopathological and molecular-genetic characteristics of posttransplant DLBCL and to elucidate whether EBV(+) and EBV(-) posttransplant DLBCL are biologically different. We performed gene expression profiling studies on 48 DLBCL of which 33 arose posttransplantation (PT-DLBCL; 72% EBV+) and 15 in immunocompetent hosts (IC-DLBCL; none EBV+). Unsupervised hierarchical analysis showed clustering of samples related to EBV-status rather than immune status. Except for decreased T cell signaling these cases were inseparable from EBV(-) IC-DLBCL. In contrast, a viral response signature clearly segregated EBV(+) PT-DLBCL from EBV(-) PT-DLBCL and IC-DLBCL cases that were intermixed. The broad EBV latency profile (LMP1+/EBNA2+) was expressed in 59% of EBV(+) PT-DLBCL and associated with a more elaborate inflammatory response compared to intermediate latency (LMP1+/EBNA2-). Inference analysis revealed a role for innate and tolerogenic immune responses (including VSIG4 and IDO1) in EBV(+) PT-DLBCL. In conclusion we can state that the EBV signature is the most determining factor in the pathogenesis of EBV(+) PT-DLBCL.

  12. Indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of the gastrointestinal tract after treatment with adalimumab in resistant Crohn's colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Natalia; Belhanes-Peled, Hila; Eitan, Yuval; Guthmann, Yifat; Yeremenko, Yelena; Raffeld, Mark; Elmalah, Irit; Trougouboff, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    We report a case of intestinal indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (TCLPD) occurring after the initiation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor therapy for resistant Crohn's disease. A prominent T-cell infiltrate positive for CD8, TIA-1, and T-cell receptor-βF1 was associated with the foci of active inflammation. T-cell receptor gene clonality studies (BIOMED-2) demonstrated monoclonality. After the TNF-α inhibitor treatment was withdrawn, the T-cell infiltrates regressed, but 2 years later, the same monoclonal T-cell infiltrate reappeared at the only site of active inflammation. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to show a link between active inflammation and the TCLPD. In addition, it suggests a possible influence of the TNF-α inhibitor treatment on the evolution of the TCLPD. A high degree of suspicion is required in the presence of any unusual lymphoid infiltrate in inflammatory bowel disease to avoid overlooking an indolent TCLPD or misdiagnose an aggressive lymphoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and ...

  14. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... two medicines that affect the body's level of serotonin are taken together at the same time. The ...

  15. Primary cardiac B cell lymphoma: Manifestation of Felty's syndrome or TNFα antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerdjeb, Nazim; Ameur, Fatima; Ikoli, Jean-Fortune; Sevestre, Henri

    2016-12-01

    Primary cardiac B cell lymphoma is rare. To date, fewer than 90 cases have been described in the literature. We report a 67-year-old woman with a 30-year history of rheumatoid arthritis, who had received treatment with leflunomide for 10 years and infliximab for 2 years. Secondary Felty's syndrome appeared. She was admitted to the hospital for abdominal pain. Investigations disclosed a 5cm cardiac mass in the right atrium. Histopathologic examination of tissue specimens obtained at surgical myocardial biopsy demonstrated primary cardiac B cell lymphoma. The other iatrogenic lymphoproliferative disorders are reviewed. This lesion might be a manifestation of long term TNFα antagonists treatment.

  16. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder of the Thorax: CT and FDG-PET Features in a Single Tertiary Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ga Young; Kim, Mi Young; Huh, Joo Rryung; Jo, Kyung-Wook; Shim, Tae Sun

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the chest computed tomography (CT) and F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomographic (FDG-PET) findings of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in the thorax.From November 2004 to February 2013, the cases of 12 adult patients (3 female and 9 male, age range 34-68, and median age 46 years) with proven PTLD were retrospectively reviewed. The transplanted organs included the kidney (5/12), liver (4/12), heart (1/12), combined kidney and pancreas (1/12), and hematopoietic stem cell (1/12). We investigated the relationship of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to the patients' long-term follow-up, and evaluated the characteristics of the lesions on the chest CT and FDG-PET. The lesions were classified into 2 patterns: that of lymph node and lung involvement.The interval between the transplantation and the onset of PTLD was 2 to 128 months (median, 49). Positive EBV-encoded RNA in the pathologic specimens was found in 10 patients (83.3%). Eight patients were positive for EBV PCR in their blood, and 3 patients showed seroconversion without antiviral therapy. The responses to treatment were complete in 7 cases (58.3%), partial remission in 4 cases (33.3%), and undetermined in 1 case (8.3%). The more common chest CT patterns showed lymph node involvement (10/12) rather than lung involvement (3/12). The median maximum-standardized uptake value on the FDG-PET scans was 7.7 (range, 2.7-25.5).In patients with PTLD involving the thorax, lymphadenopathy was the more common manifestation on the chest CT rather than lung involvement. The lesions showed hypermetabolism on FDG-PET.

  17. UK-based real-time lymphoproliferative disorder diagnostic service to improve the management of patients in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Elizabeth; Owen, Roger G; Bedu-Addo, George; Sem, Ohene Opare; Ekem, Ivy; Adomakoh, Yvonne; Bates, Imelda

    2009-07-09

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of a UK-based real-time service to improve the diagnosis and management of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) in Ghana. Adult patients reporting to hospital with a suspected LPD, during a 1 year period, were prospectively enrolled. Bone marrow and/or lymph node biopsies were posted to the Haematology Malignancy Diagnostic Service (HMDS), Leeds, UK and underwent morphological analysis and immunophenotyping. Results were returned by e-mail. The initial diagnoses made in Ghana were compared with the final HMDS diagnoses to assess the contribution of the HMDS diagnosis to management decisions. The study was conducted at the two teaching hospitals in Ghana-Komfo Anokye, Kumasi and Korle Bu, Accra. Participants comprised 150 adult patients (>/=12 years old), 79 women, median age 46 years. Bone marrow and lymph node biopsy samples from all adults presenting with features suggestive of a LPD, at the two teaching hospitals in Ghana, over 1 year were posted to a UK LPD diagnostic centre, where immunophenotyping was performed by immunohistochemistry. Molecular analysis was performed where indicated. Diagnostic classifications were made according to international criteria. Final diagnosis was compared to the initial Ghanaian diagnosis to evaluate discrepancies; implications for alterations in treatment decisions were evaluated. Median time between taking samples and receiving e-mail results in Ghana was 15 days. Concordance between initial and final diagnoses was 32% (48 of 150). The HMDS diagnosis would have changed management in 31% (46 of 150) of patients. It is feasible to provide a UK-based service for LPD diagnosis in Africa using postal services and e-mail. This study confirmed findings from wealthy countries that a specialised haematopathology service can improve LPD diagnosis. This model of Ghana-UK collaboration provides a platform on which to build local capacity to operate an international quality

  18. P-glycoprotein is expressed and causes resistance to chemotherapy in EBV-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimori, Mayumi; Takada, Honami; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Kurata, Morito; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Koyama, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Norio; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi; Miura, Osamu; Arai, Ayako

    2015-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (EBV-T-LPDs) are rare lymphomas with poor prognosis. Although chemotherapeutic strategies such as CHOP have been often selected, they have exhibited only limited efficacy. To clarify the mechanism of chemoresistance, we examined P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. P-gp acts as an energy-dependent efflux pump that excretes drugs from the cytoplasm, resulting in low-intracellular drug concentrations and poor sensitivity to chemotherapy. We examined P-gp expression in EBV-positive cells by immunohistochemistry staining in three patients of EBV-T-LPDs and the expression was detected in all patients. We also examined mdr1 mRNA expression by reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain reaction (RT-PCR) in EBV-positive tumor cells from these patients and additional three patients. The expression was detected in all examined patients. In five EBV-T-LPDs patients, P-gp function was detected by Rhodamine-123 efflux assay in these cells. The efflux was inhibited by treatment with a P-gp inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA). We also examined and detected P-gp expression in EBV-positive T-cell lines SNT8 and SNT16 established from EBV-T-LPDs patients, by RT-PCR and western blotting. The function was also detected by Rhodamine-123 efflux in these cell lines. Inhibition and knock down of P-gp by CsA and siRNA, respectively, enhanced etoposide- and doxorubicin-induced cell death in the EBV-positive T-cell lines. Finally, we infected the T-cell line MOLT4 with EBV, and found that mdr1 mRNA expression and Rhodamine 123 efflux were upregulated after infection. These results indicated that enhanced P-gp expression contributed to the chemoresistance of EBV-T-LPDs.

  19. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD localized in the central nervous system: Report from an international survey on PTLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD localized to the central nervous system (CNS is a rare but potentially fatal side-effect of immunosuppression for organ transplantation. Till now, to the best of our knowledge, the total number of such cases reported worldwide is less than 100. In this survey, we collected the data of PTLD localized to the CNS (CNS-PTLD and compared this data with other PTLD patients with localizations to other areas serving as the control group. A comprehensive search was performed for studies reporting CNS-PTLD data in the Pubmed and Google scholar search engines. Finally, international data from 21 different studies were included in the analysis. Overall, 367 patients were entered into analysis. Organ recipients with CNS-PTLD had comparable gender make up, lymphoma cell types, Epstein-Barr virus infection rate, remission and mortality rates, with PTLD patients having other localizations. Multiorgan involvement as well as disseminated lymphoma were significantly more prevalent in the control group (P <0.05. At the last follow-up, 192 (60% patients were dead (47 missing data. Irrespective of whether the overall death or only death due to PTLD was used as the final outcome, we found that the survival rates were similar for patients of the two groups (P = 0.895. Renal transplant recipients are at greater risk for developing CNS involvement by PTLD, while heart and liver recipients represent significant lower risks for the same. This study showed that PTLD patients who had CNS presentation have quite a comparable outcome compared with those with other areas of localization. However, further prospective studies are needed for reaffirming our findings.

  20. Preliminary experience on the use of PET/CT in the management of pediatric post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-García, Pilar; Hirsch, Steffen; Levine, Daniel S; Taj, Mary M

    2017-06-14

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-known complication following prolonged immunosuppression. Contrary to other lymphomas, there is no standardized imaging approach to assess PTLD either at staging or for response to therapy. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an imaging modality that has proven to be useful in lymphoma. However, there is still limited data concerning its use in pediatric PTLD. Our study evaluates the use of PET/CT in pediatric PTLD at our institution. To assess the role of PET/CT in pediatric PTLD, we reviewed the pediatric patients with PTLD who had undergone PET/CT at our institution between 2000 and 2016. Nine patients were identified. Six had PET/CT at diagnosis. All lesions seen on CT were identified with PET/CT. Fourteen PET/CTs were done during treatment. Eight PET/CTs were negative, including three where CT showed areas of uncertain significance. In these cases, PET/CT helped us to stop treatment and the patients remain in remission after a long follow-up (mean 74.3 months; range 12.4-180.9 months). PET/CT revealed additional disease in two cases, therefore treatment was intensified. Six biopsies and close follow-up was done to confirm PET/CT results. In one case, PET/CT did not identify central nervous system involvement demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging. PET/CT may have an important role in the staging and follow-up of pediatric PTLD. In our cohort, PET/CT was helpful in staging and assessing treatment response and in clarifying equivocal findings on other imaging modalities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. POST-TRANSPLANT LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS: ROLE OF VIRAL INFECTION, GENETIC LESIONS AND ANTIGEN STIMULATION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Capello

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD are a life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation or, more rarely, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The majority of PTLD is of B-cell origin and associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection. PTLD generally display involvement of extranodal sites, aggressive histology and aggressive clinical behavior. The molecular pathogenesis of PTLD involves infection by oncogenic viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus, as well as genetic or epigenetic alterations of several cellular genes. At variance with lymphoma arising in immunocompetent hosts, whose genome is relatively stable, a fraction of PTLD are characterized by microsatellite instability as a consequence of defects in the DNA mismatch repair mechanism. Apart from microsatellite instability, molecular alterations of cellular genes recognized in PTLD include alterations of cMYC, BCL6, TP53, DNA hypermethylation, and aberrant somatic hypermutation of protooncogenes. The occurrence of IGV mutations in the overwhelming majority of PTLD documents that malignant transformation targets germinal centre (GC B-cells and their descendants both in EBV–positive and EBV–negative cases. Analysis of phenotypic markers of B-cell histogenesis, namely BCL6, MUM1 and CD138, allows further distinction of PTLD histogenetic categories. PTLD expressing the BCL6+/MUM1+/-/CD138- profile reflect B-cells actively experiencing the GC reaction, and comprise diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL centroblastic and Burkitt lymphoma. PTLD expressing the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138- phenotype putatively derive from B-cells that have concluded the GC reaction, and comprise the majority of polymorphic PTLD and a fraction of DLBCL immunoblastic. A third group of PTLD is reminiscent of post-GC and preterminally differentiated B-cells that show the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138+ phenotype, and are morphologically represented by either polymorphic PTLD or DLBCL immunoblastic.

  2. Gardner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Gardner Syndrome Request Permissions Gardner Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 06/2014 What is Gardner syndrome? Gardner syndrome is a subtype of familial ...

  3. Characterization of the tumor microenvironment in primary cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders: a predominance of CD163-positive M2 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Aieska; Tinguely, Marianne; Burghart, Daniel R; Berisha, Arbeneshe; Mertz, Kirsten D; Kempf, Werner

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is essential for tumor survival, growth and progression. There are only a few studies on the tumor microenvironment in cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders. We assessed the composition of the tumor microenvironment using immunohistochemistry studies in skin biopsies from cases diagnosed with lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP: 18 specimens), primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL: 8 specimens), and reactive diseases harboring CD30-positive cells (18 specimens). The predominant cells present in LyP and PC-ALCL were CD163+ M2 macrophages (44.7%, 35%), followed by CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (11%, 15%), FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells (9%, 4.5%) and programmed cell death 1(PD-1) + lymphocytes (2.2%, 6.8%). In contrast, CD30-positive reactive inflammatory and infectious disorders were characterized by higher numbers of CD123+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (6.3%) when compared to LyP (1%), and PC-ALCL (1.1%). Key differences exist between the microenvironment of CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders and reactive conditions harboring CD30-positive lymphocytes. The high number of tumor associated macrophages, and the close vicinity of these immune cells to the CD30-positive tumor cells might suggest that tumor associated macrophages have direct influence on tumorigenesis in LyP and ALCL. Therefore, modulation of M2 macrophages may represent a new therapeutic strategy in cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Alok R. [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Peirce, Susan K. [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Joshi, Shweta [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Durden, Donald L., E-mail: ddurden@ucsd.edu [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, UCSD Rady Children' s Hospital, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-09-10

    -3 kinase inhibitors reverse the lymphoproliferative phenotype in vivo. - Highlights: • First genetic evidence that PTEN controls LPS/TLR4 signaling in B lymphocytes. • Evidence that PTEN regulates LPS induced lymphoproliferation in vivo. • PI-3 kinase inhibitors block LPS induced lymphoproliferation in vivo.

  5. Chronic lymphoproliferative diseases: survival in cohort study of 310 patients (single-center study results and literature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Pop

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic lymphoproliferative disease (CLPD are common hematologic malignancies, accompanied by highly variable clinical course, different prognosis and understudied survival as one of the main criteria for long-term treatment efficacy, especially outside of clinical trials.Materials and methods. Patients with CLPD (n = 310 treated in hematology center of Burdenko Main Military Clinical Hospital from June 2003 to September 2014 are included in the study. The diagnosis of specific nosology verified in accordance with national and international recommendations. Analysis of study outcomes was based on overall survival (OS using the Kaplan–Meier method.Results and discussion. Most patients (mainly with non-Hodgkin»s lymphoma (NHL – 75 %, or multiple myeloma (MM – 80.6 % had advanced disease (III–IV, and 20.3 % admitted to the hospital in poor general condition (ECOG somatic status – 3–4. A significant proportion of patients (38.3 % with NHL and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL had a large tumor masses. Median of OS in patients with CLPD was 81.1 months. 5-year survival of total patients from time of diagnosis was 62 %, 10-year survival rate – 37 %. Patients with MM have shortest median of OS – 39 months, while patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL have the longest – 117.8 months. Median OS for NHL patients was 68.1 months, for HL patients – 99.3 months. When comparing survival for two time intervals (2003–2009 and 2009–2014, a tendency to increasethe survival rate for certain groups of patients with CLPD was revealed, that could be due to target therapy and new therapeutic approaches.Conclusion. New drug efficacy for certain diseases has led to renewed interest in the results of CLPD therapy. In our study, most CLPD patients have long-term OS, but the subsequent therapy lines influence on OS requires further study. These results will contribute to new developments in the organization and planning of

  6. Chronic lymphoproliferative diseases: survival in cohort study of 310 patients (single-center study results and literature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Pop

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic lymphoproliferative disease (CLPD are common hematologic malignancies, accompanied by highly variable clinical course, different prognosis and understudied survival as one of the main criteria for long-term treatment efficacy, especially outside of clinical trials.Materials and methods. Patients with CLPD (n = 310 treated in hematology center of Burdenko Main Military Clinical Hospital from June 2003 to September 2014 are included in the study. The diagnosis of specific nosology verified in accordance with national and international recommendations. Analysis of study outcomes was based on overall survival (OS using the Kaplan–Meier method.Results and discussion. Most patients (mainly with non-Hodgkin»s lymphoma (NHL – 75 %, or multiple myeloma (MM – 80.6 % had advanced disease (III–IV, and 20.3 % admitted to the hospital in poor general condition (ECOG somatic status – 3–4. A significant proportion of patients (38.3 % with NHL and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL had a large tumor masses. Median of OS in patients with CLPD was 81.1 months. 5-year survival of total patients from time of diagnosis was 62 %, 10-year survival rate – 37 %. Patients with MM have shortest median of OS – 39 months, while patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL have the longest – 117.8 months. Median OS for NHL patients was 68.1 months, for HL patients – 99.3 months. When comparing survival for two time intervals (2003–2009 and 2009–2014, a tendency to increasethe survival rate for certain groups of patients with CLPD was revealed, that could be due to target therapy and new therapeutic approaches.Conclusion. New drug efficacy for certain diseases has led to renewed interest in the results of CLPD therapy. In our study, most CLPD patients have long-term OS, but the subsequent therapy lines influence on OS requires further study. These results will contribute to new developments in the organization and planning of

  7. POST-TRANSPLANT LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS: ROLE OF VIRAL INFECTION, GENETIC LESIONS AND ANTIGEN STIMULATION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gaidano

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD are a life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation or, more rarely, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The majority of PTLD is of B-cell origin and associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection. PTLD generally display involvement of extranodal sites, aggressive histology and aggressive clinical behavior. The molecular pathogenesis of PTLD involves infection by oncogenic viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus, as well as genetic or epigenetic alterations of several cellular genes. At variance with lymphoma arising in immunocompetent hosts, whose genome is relatively stable, a fraction of PTLD are characterized by microsatellite instability as a consequence of defects in the DNA mismatch repair mechanism. Apart from microsatellite instability, molecular alterations of cellular genes recognized in PTLD include alterations of cMYC, BCL6, TP53, DNA hypermethylation, and aberrant somatic hypermutation of protooncogenes. The occurrence of IGV mutations in the overwhelming majority of PTLD documents that malignant transformation targets germinal centre (GC B-cells and their descendants both in EBV–positive and EBV–negative cases. Analysis of phenotypic markers of B-cell histogenesis, namely BCL6, MUM1 and CD138, allows further distinction of PTLD histogenetic categories. PTLD expressing the BCL6+/MUM1+/-/CD138- profile reflect B-cells actively experiencing the GC reaction, and comprise diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL centroblastic and Burkitt lymphoma. PTLD expressing the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138- phenotype putatively derive from B-cells that have concluded the GC reaction, and comprise the majority of polymorphic PTLD and a fraction of

  8. [Pathogenesis and morphology of hemophagocytic syndrome in the spleen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattenlöhner, S; Müller-Hermelink, H K

    2008-03-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (macrophage activation syndrome) is a group of disorders characterized by clinical, histological and biological symptoms of T-lymphocytes/NK cell-driven macrophage stimulation with subsequent hemophagocytosis which can be observed in various organs, particularly in the bone marrow and spleen. The main clinical symptoms include cytopenia, multiple organ dysfunction, fever unresponsive to antibiotics, hepatosplenomegaly and rash. Besides rare inherited immune system anomalies (primary hemophagocytic syndrome), the most prevalent etiologies of hemophagocytic syndrome are infections (viral, bacterial and parasitic), cancers, lymphoproliferative disorders and systemic diseases. Hemophagocytic syndrome is treated with immunosuppressives, cytostatic drugs, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulins/anti-TNF antibodies and due to the multiorgan involvement and the associated high mortality, recognition of early serum changes, such as very high levels of ferritin is mandatory. The most relevant histological changes are the increase of histiocytes showing evidence of phagocytosis of erythroid cells, platelets and granulocytes as well as in the spleen a rarefaction of the white pulpa with lack of lymph follicles and abundant lymphocytes, plasma cells and plasma cell precursors in the pulpa cords.

  9. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation is a frequent event after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) and quantitatively predicts EBV-lymphoproliferative disease following T-cell--depleted SCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esser, J W; van der Holt, B; Meijer, E; Niesters, H G; Trenschel, R; Thijsen, S F; van Loon, A M; Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A; Schaefer, U W; Osterhaus, A D; Gratama, J W; Löwenberg, B; Verdonck, L F; Cornelissen, J J

    2001-01-01

    Reactivation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) may evoke a protective cellular immune response or may be complicated by the development of EBV-lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). So far, very little is known about the incidence, recurrence, and

  11. Impaired recovery of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)--specific CD8+ T lymphocytes after partially T-depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation may identify patients at very high risk for progressive EBV reactivation and lymphoproliferative disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Meij; B. Löwenberg (Bob); J.W. Gratama (Jan-Willem); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); J.W.J. van Esser (Joost); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); D. van Baarle (Debbie); F. Miedema (Frank); N. Blake; A.B. Rickinson; I. Leiner; E. Pamer

    2003-01-01

    textabstractEpstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes are considered pivotal to prevent lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) recipients. We evaluated the recovery of EBV-specific CD8+ T cells after partially T-cell-depleted

  12. Impaired recovery of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)--specific CD8+ T lymphocytes after partially T-depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation may identify patients at very high risk for progressive EBV reactivation and lymphoproliferative disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, Pauline; van Esser, Joost W J; Niesters, Hubert G M; van Baarle, Debbie; Miedema, Frank; Blake, Neil; Rickinson, Alan B; Leiner, Ingrid; Pamer, Eric; Lowenberg, Bob; Cornelissen, Jan J; Gratama, Jan W

    2003-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes are considered pivotal to prevent lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) recipients. We evaluated the recovery of EBV-specific CD8+ T cells after partially T-cell-depleted SCT and studied the interacti

  13. Epstein-Barr virus-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder of the central nervous system, after renal transplantation with a discrepancy in viral load between peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Marijke Nynke; van der Zanden, Adri; Laverman, Gozewijn Dirk; Sanders, Jan Stephan; de Vries, Peter Alexander Marcel

    2012-01-01

    A 43-year-old female developed an EpsteinBarr virus (EBV)-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in the central nervous system (CNS), 14 years after renal transplantation. One year prior to presentation, the patients treatment regimen was altered from cyclosporine, azathioprine

  14. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance syndrome, low HDL cholesterol, Metabolic Syndrome, overweight, syndrome x, type 2 diabetes Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Women January 2005 Copyright © American Academy of Family PhysiciansThis ...

  15. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  16. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. Parents may not have any family history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the ...

  17. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Fahr's Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? ... and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Fahr's Syndrome. The goals of this research are to ...

  18. EB病毒相关淋巴增生性疾病的分类和治疗%Classification and treatment of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学文

    2009-01-01

    Since its discovery as the first human tumor associated virus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the development of a wide range of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, including Burkitt' slymphoma, classic Hodgkin' s lymphoma and lymphomas arising in immunocompromised individuals (posttransplant and HIV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders). T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that have been reported to be EBV associated include a subset of peripheral T-cell lymphomas, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, extranodal nasal type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, and other rare histotypes. EBV encodes a series of products interacting with or exhibiting homology to wide variety of antiapoptotic molecules,cytokines, and signal transducers, hence promoting EBV infection, immortalization and transformation.However, the exact mechanism by which EBV promotes oncogenesis is still an area of active debate. This review is focused on the pathology, diagnosis, classification, and pathogenesis of EBV-associated lymphomas.Recent advances in EBV cell-based immunotherapy, which is beginning to show promise in the treatment of EBV-related disorders, are discussed.%自从EB病毒(EBV)作为第一种人类肿瘤病毒被发现以来,EBV已涉及广泛的B细胞淋巴增生性疾病(LPD)的发生,包括伯基特(Burkitt)淋巴瘤、经典的霍奇金淋巴瘤(cHL)及免疫减损个体发生的淋巴瘤(移植后和HIV相关的LPD).EBV相关的T细胞LPD已有报道,包括外周T细胞淋巴瘤、血管性免疫母细胞性T细胞淋巴瘤及其他罕见的组织学类型.EBV编码一系列与之相互作用或同源的产物,它包括多种抗凋亡分子、细胞因子和信号转导蛋白,从而促进EBV感染、无限增生化(永生)和转化.EBV促发肿瘤的确切机制正在被活跃地思考和讨论中.文章重点综述EBV相关淋巴瘤的病理学、诊断、分类、发病学以及以EBV的细胞为基础的免疫治疗用于EBV相关疾病,后者在临床应用中已展示希望.

  19. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan Makwana; R. K. Vishnoi; Jai Prakash Soni; Kapil Jetha; Suresh Kumar Verma; Pradeep Singh Rathore; Monika Choudhary

    2017-01-01

    ...,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease...

  20. Desordem linfoproliferativa pós-transplante em paciente pediátrico Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Manuel Pêgo Fernandes

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Terapias de imunossupressão, a que pacientes transplantados devem ser submetidos, os expõe a um alto risco de desenvolver desordens linfoproliferativas pós-transplante (PTLD. Descrevemos o caso de uma criança submetida a transplante cardíaco aos sete meses de idade e que acabou desenvolvendo PTLD, aos nove anos, diagnosticada por meio de retirada de nódulo pulmonar.Immunosuppressive therapy for transplanted patients exposes them to a high risk of developing posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD. We report the case of a child undergoing heart transplantation at seven months of age who developed PTLD at nine years of age, diagnosed by resection of a pulmonary nodule.

  1. Post cardiac transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder presenting as t(8;14) Burkitt leukaemia/lymphoma treated with low intensity chemotherapy and rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windebank, Kevin; Walwyn, Tom; Kirk, Richard; Parry, Gareth; Hasan, Asif; Bown, Nick; Wilkins, Bridget

    2009-09-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) occasionally presents as Burkitt lymphoma/L3 leukaemia (BLL). We reviewed records of cases of PTLD post-cardiac transplantation (1990-2007) occurring in our unit. There were 15 episodes in 13 patients including four cases of EBV-driven Burkitt-type disease with t(8;14) translocations presenting with advanced stage disease. The first case was treated with a variety of low dose chemotherapy combinations. Despite problems during therapy he obtained complete remission, but died from complications of pre-existing cardiac allograft vasculopathy 7 months later. The subsequent three cases were treated with a UKCCSG low stage lymphoma protocol, NHL 9001 and Rituximab. They remain in complete remission. In the context of PTLD the prognostic significance of advanced stage EBV-driven BLL with the t(8;14) translocation may be different to that in immunocompetent children. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. CD8-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder associated with Epstein-Barr virus-infected B-cells in a rheumatoid arthritis patient under methotrexate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koji, Hitoshi; Yazawa, Takuya; Nakabayashi, Kimimasa; Fujioka, Yasunori; Kamma, Hiroshi; Yamada, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a 48-year-old female who developed lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) during treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with methotrexate (MTX). She presented with multiple tumors in the cervical lymph nodes (LNs), multiple lung shadows and round shadows in both kidneys with pancytopenia and a high CRP level. The LN showed CD8-positive T-cell LPD associated with Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-infected B-cells. Clonality assays for immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain and T-cell receptor gamma (TCRγ) were negative. The cessation of MTX without chemotherapy resulted in the complete disappearance of the tumors and abnormal clinical features. We compared this case with previously published ones and discuss the pathological findings, presuming that the proliferation of CD8 T-cells was a reactive manifestation to reactivated EB virus-infected B-cells.

  3. Lack of evidence of human herpesvirus 8 DNA sequences in HIV-negative patients with various lymphoproliferative disorders of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, N; Franck, N; Calvez, V; Gorin, I; Grandadam, M; Huraux, J M; Leibowitch, M; Agut, H; Escande, J P

    1997-06-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is a new virus which has been reported in Kaposi's sarcoma and some lymphoproliferative disorders such as Castleman's disease and body-cavity-based lymphoma. Because HHV-8 shares homology with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), we searched for the presence of HHV-8 DNA sequences in various cutaneous T- and B-cell lymphoma by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Forty-seven HIV-negative patients with cutaneous lymphoma or large plaque parapsoriasis were enrolled in the study. For the detection of HHV-8 DNA sequences we used PCR followed by a hybridization with a digoxigenin-labelled probe and nested-PCR. HHV-8 DNA sequences could only be detected in a patient with large plaque parapsoriasis. Our study does not suggest any direct implication of HHV-8 in the pathogenesis of most cutaneous lymphoma. Serological studies will be helpful to appreciate if there is an epidemiological link between HHV-8 and cutaneous lymphomas.

  4. Oral cyclophosphamide was effective for Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia in CD16+CD56- chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Nishina, Sayaka; Kawakami, Toru; Sakai, Hitoshi; Senoo, Noriko; Senoo, Yasushi; Ito, Toshiro; Saito, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-12-27

    An 84-year-old woman was referred to our hospital presenting anemia. Her hemoglobin level was 5.8 g/dL, and white blood cell count was 9400/μL, consisting of 82% lymphocytes. Given the lymphocyte phenotype (CD2+, CD3-, CD16+, and CD56-) and negative whole blood EBV viral load, we made a diagnosis of chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells (CLPD-NK). We suspected hemolytic anemia because of the high levels of reticulocytes in the peripheral blood and the low haptoglobin value. Although the direct Coombs test was negative and there was no cold agglutination, we examined her red-blood-cell-bound IgG (RBC-IgG), which was elevated. She was diagnosed as having as Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report the effectiveness of oral cyclophosphamide for Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia in CLPD-NK.

  5. Role of Epstein-Barr virus status and immunophenotypic studies in the evaluation of exfoliative cytology specimens from patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sarah E; Picarsic, Jennifer; Swerdlow, Steven H; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-06-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are well characterized in tissue sections, but their evaluation in exfoliative cytology specimens is limited. This study reports a 25-year experience with PTLDs in exfoliative cytology specimens. All solid organ or allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients with PTLDs and exfoliative cytology specimens from 1987 to 2011 were identified. The cytomorphology, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and molecular studies were reviewed from all exfoliative cytology specimens previously diagnosed as atypical lymphoid proliferations or PTLDs. A total of 55 patients (age range, 1-72 years) with PTLDs had 434 exfoliative cytology specimens. Thirty-six of the 55 patients (65%) had 54 specimens with abnormal lymphoid proliferations (12% of the specimens), and 26 of these patients had 37 specimens available for review (15 cerebrospinal fluid specimens, 12 peritoneal fluid specimens, 9 pleural fluid specimens, and 1 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimen). Thirty percent of the reviewed cytology specimens were diagnostic of PTLDs, including 8 cases of monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (M-PTLD) with abnormal B/T-cell populations identified with flow cytometry/immunohistochemistry and 3 EBV-positive specimens with a differential diagnosis of polymorphic PTLD versus M-PTLD. All cases diagnostic of a PTLD had 1 to 3 ancillary studies performed. Forty percent of the cytology specimens (15 of 37) were suspicious for a PTLD, but ancillary studies were performed for only a third of them, and they did not support a definitive diagnosis of a PTLD. Thirty percent of the cytology specimens (11 of 37) appeared reactive, but they lacked sufficient ancillary studies to exclude a PTLD. Atypical lymphoid proliferations are common in exfoliative cytology specimens from patients with PTLDs, and they require ancillary studies at least including immunophenotyping and EBV evaluations for a

  6. T-Cell lymphoproliferative disorder of hand-mirror cell morphology presenting in an eosinophilic loculated peritoneal effusion, with omental "caking"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufankjian Dearon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cells with "hand mirror" morphology have not, to the best of our knowledge, been described in a primary effusion sample. This paper describes a case of T-cell lymphoma with eosinophilia in a patient with suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis. Rarely, a T-cell lymphoproliferative process may mimic primary peritoneal carcinomatosis, clinically suggested by a presentation in CT imaging of omental caking with bilateral massive loculated effusions in a patient without lymphadenopathy or splenomegaly. Methods A 60 year old caucasian male presented with vague abdominal discomfort and increasing abdominal girth. Computed tomography showed a two centimeter thick omental cake and a small loculated effusion. The clinical presentation and imaging findings were most consistent with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Cytologic evaluation of the effusion was undertaken for diagnostic study. Results Rapid intraprocedural interpretation of the effusion sample showed a monomorphic population of cells with "hand-mirror" cell morphology exhibiting cytoplasmic extensions (uropodia with 3–5 course dark cytoplasmic granules and a rim of vacuolated cytoplasm capping the opposing "mirror head" side. These cells were seen within a background of mature eosinophils. Flow cytometric evaluation of the ascites fluid demonstrated an atypical T-cell population with the following immunophenotype: CD2-, CD3+, CD4-, CD5-, CD7-, CD8+, CD56+. T-cell receptor (TCR gene rearrangement was positive for clonal TCR-gamma gene rearrangement, supporting the diagnosis of a T-lymphoprolifereative disorder. Conclusion A T-cell lymphoproliferative process may present with "hand mirror" morphology in an effusion sample. These cells may show polar cytoplasmic vacuolization and 3–5 course granules within the "handle" of these unique cells. Cytoplasm shows peripheral constriction around the nucleus.

  7. Autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation markers in naïve HCV-RNA positive patients without clinical evidences of autoimmune/lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulli, Francesca; Basile, Umberto; Gragnani, Laura; Fognani, Elisa; Napodano, Cecilia; Colacicco, Luigi; Miele, Luca; De Matthaeis, Nicoletta; Cattani, Paola; Zignego, Anna Linda; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico

    2016-08-01

    HCV can lead to both chronic liver disease and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. A strong association exists between HCV and mixed cryoglobulinaemia (MC). Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor Ig-G (RF-IgG), free light chain κ and λ (FLC-κ, FLC-λ) levels and κ/λ ratio were evaluated in 50/420 subjects unexpectedly resulted anti-HCV positive after routine screenings for non-hepathological procedures. Three/fifty patients had HCV-RNA undetectable in the serum and were excluded from the analysis. Thirty-nine/fifty patients had laboratory evidence of circulating cryoglobulins without liver disease and MC-related symptoms. Among them, 17 resulted ANA-positive. The mean cryocrit was higher in ANA-positive patients, while no other demographic/clinical differences were observed between the groups. Significantly higher levels of RF-IgG were observed in ANA-positive vs ANA-negative patients. κ and λ FLC were higher in ANA-positive patients. A ROC analysis, based on ANA-positivity vs ANA-negativity, confirmed a high sensitivity and specificity of RF-IgG test. Published data concerning MC come mostly from symptomatic vasculitis. We analyzed HCV-patients without MC symptoms, founding cryoglobulins in the majority of them. The increased levels of FR-IgG and FLC in CGs-ANA-positive patients, suggest these test could be used to identify a state of silent autoimmune and/or lymphoproliferative condition before the transition to a frank disease in naïve HCV-patients without symptoms of extrahepatic manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  9. [Kikuchi's disease associated with cutaneous manifestations evoking Well's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viseux, V; Schoenlaub, P; Marciniak, S; Staroz, F; Plantin, P

    2003-12-01

    Wells' syndrome is a dermatological disease with polymorphous lesions characterized histologically by an eosinophilic infiltrate of the dermis with edema and flame figures. Kikuchi's disease is a benign cause of lymphadenitis corresponding histologically to a necrotizing histiocyting adenitis without neutrophils. We describe the association of a Kikuchi's disease and cutaneous lesions similar to Wells'syndrome. A 62-year-old man presented over 3 years several simultaneous episodes of left axillary lymphadenitis and of cutaneous lesions compatible with a diagnosis of Wells'syndrome. No precipitating event or disease described with the Wells'syndrome was established. Concerning the axillary nodes, a cancer, a lymphoproliferative syndrome, a systemic lupus and several infectious diseases were excluded. Standard histology and immunochemistry of a lymph node showed signs of Kikuchi's disease. Bilateral anterior uveitis was incidentally detected. The three conditions improved with oral corticosteroids (1 mg/kg/d). The patient had Kikuchi's disease and a recurrent dermatosis for which the clinical and histological aspects, the evolution and the absence of arguments for another cause, suggest a Wells'syndrome. Cutaneous manifestations occur in 16 to 40 p. 100 of cases of Kikuchi's disease and often have characteristic histologic features not corresponding to Wells'syndrome. The association of the 2 diseases may be then incidental, despite 4 simultaneous episodes. Two viral agents, VIH and VZV have been associated with the two diseases but do not seem to be the cause in our patient. Concerning the anterior uveitis, a single case of uveitis has been described for each condition.

  10. Successful treatment of autoimmune and lymphoproliferative complications of patients with intrinsic B-cell immunodeficiencies with Rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Christian; Baumann, Ulrich; Ilginus, Claudia; Horneff, Gerd; Foell, Juergen; Hansen, Gesine

    2010-02-01

    The heterogeneous group of primary immunodeficiencies requires personalized diagnosis and therapy to acheive an optimal outcome for each patient. This was exemplified by two patients with intrinsic B-cell class-switch defects (subclass of Hyper-IgM syndromes), where lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity determined the clinical course for many years due to lack of exact diagnosis. Based on genetics or a novel functional diagnostic approach, a definite individual diagnosis was established for each patient and they started Rituximab therapy. Autoimmune phenomena and generalized lymphadenopathy disappeared and remained well controlled during the observation period (3-4 years) without adverse effects. Quality of life increased remarkably in both patients.

  11. A 13 year-old boy with post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: a case report [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2p0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Y. Ho

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One well recognized and potentially serious complication of chronic immunosuppression in organ transplant recipients is post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD. This accounts for 20% of all malignancies in transplant recipients, which is four times higher than the general population1,2. The diagnosis of PTLD is often difficult, due to various manifestations resulting in late diagnosis. We report an unusual presentation of PTLD in a pediatric patient where the diagnosis was achieved only after extensive investigation.

  12. Favorable outcome of Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder complicated by immunoglobulin G4-related disease treated with rituximab-based therapy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Koki; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Sukegawa, Masumi; Sano, Takahiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Hashimoto, Yuko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background After acute infection of Epstein-Barr virus, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells survive but usually do not show clonal proliferation. However, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells occasionally acquire a proliferative capacity that provokes clonal lymphoproliferative disorders. We herein present a case with Epstein-Barr virus-infected CD30+ B cell and immunoglobulin G4+ plasmacytoid cell proliferation in the lymph nodes, suggesting a pathological and clinical interaction between Eps...

  13. Syndromic autism: II. Genetic syndromes associated with autism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Artigas-Pallarés, J; Gabau-Vila, E; Guitart-Feliubadaló, M

    2005-01-01

    ..., tuberous sclerosis, Duchenne's disease, Timothy syndrome, 10p terminal deletion, Cowden syndrome, 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, Myhre syndrome, Sotos syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Goldenhar syndrome, Joubert...

  14. Edwards' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  15. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  16. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic ... dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic ...

  17. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  18. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone ... cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  19. Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... colon cancer may include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Cancer screening for people with Lynch syndrome If you ... et al. Milestones of Lynch syndrome: 1895-2015. Nature Reviews Cancer. http://www.nature.com/nrc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/ ...

  20. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  1. Meckel syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salonen, R; Paavola, P

    1998-01-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a lethal syndrome with a central nervous system malformation, usually occipital meningoencephalocele, bilaterally large multicystic kidneys with fibrotic changes of the liver, and polydactyly in most cases...

  2. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause ... this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause ...

  3. Apert Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.

  4. TAFRO syndrome: New subtype of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordan Srkalovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (CD describes a group of three rare and poorly understood lymphoproliferative disorders that have heterogeneous clinical symptoms and common lymph node histopathological features. Unicentric CD (UCD involves a single region of enlarged nodes. Multicentric CD (MCD involves multiple regions of enlarged lymph nodes, constitutional symptoms, and organ dysfunction due to a cytokine storm often including interleukin 6. MCD is further divided into Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8-associated MCD, which occurs in immunocompromised individuals, and HHV-8-negative/idiopathic MCD (iMCD. Recently, iMCD has been further sub-divided into patients with TAFRO syndrome, which involves thrombocytopenia (T, anasarca (A, fevers (F, reticulin myelofibrosis (R, organomegaly (O, and normal or only slightly elevated immunoglobulin levels, and those who do not have TAFRO syndrome. Non-TAFRO iMCD patients typically have thrombocytosis, less severe fluid accumulation, and hypergammaglobulinemia. iMCD patients with TAFRO syndrome may have a worse prognosis, but more research is needed.

  5. Learning about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? What are the symptoms ... syndrome Additional Resources for Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome is a chromosomal condition related to ...

  6. Cytotoxic drug sensitivity of Epstein-Barr virus transformed lymphoblastoid B-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olah Eva

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is the causative agent of immunosuppression associated lymphoproliferations such as post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD, AIDS related immunoblastic lymphomas (ARL and immunoblastic lymphomas in X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP. The reported overall mortality for PTLD often exceeds 50%. Reducing the immunosuppression in recipients of solid organ transplants (SOT or using highly active antiretroviral therapy in AIDS patients leads to complete remission in 23–50% of the PTLD/ARL cases but will not suffice for recipients of bone marrow grafts. An additional therapeutic alternative is the treatment with anti-CD20 antibodies (Rituximab or EBV-specific cytotoxic T-cells. Chemotherapy is used for the non-responding cases only as the second or third line of treatment. The most frequently used chemotherapy regimens originate from the non-Hodgkin lymphoma protocols and there are no cytotoxic drugs that have been specifically selected against EBV induced lymphoproliferative disorders. Methods As lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs are well established in vitro models for PTLD, we have assessed 17 LCLs for cytotoxic drug sensitivity. After three days of incubation, live and dead cells were differentially stained using fluorescent dyes. The precise numbers of live and dead cells were determined using a custom designed automated laser confocal fluorescent microscope. Results Independently of their origin, LCLs showed very similar drug sensitivity patterns against 29 frequently used cytostatic drugs. LCLs were highly sensitive for vincristine, methotrexate, epirubicin and paclitaxel. Conclusion Our data shows that the inclusion of epirubicin and paclitaxel into chemotherapy protocols against PTLD may be justified.

  7. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  8. Fraser syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Kumari M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by major features such as cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be made on clinical examination and perinatal autopsy. We present the autopsy findings of a rare case of Fraser syndrome in a male infant.

  9. Rowell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Y Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine.

  10. Wallenberg's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Wallenberg's Syndrome Information Page Wallenberg's Syndrome Information Page What ... better ways to prevent, treat, and ultimately cure disorders such as Wallenberg’s syndrome. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s ...

  11. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández López, M T; López Otero, M J; Alvarez Vázquez, P; Arias Delgado, J; Varela Correa, J J

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a complex syndrome that occurs as a result of reintroducing nutrition (oral, enteral or parenteral) to patients who are starved or malnourished. Patients can develop fluid-balance abnormalities, electrolyte disorders (hypophosphataemia, hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia), abnormal glucose metabolism and certain vitamin deficiencies. Refeeding syndrome encompasses abnormalities affecting multiple organ systems, including neurological, pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular and haematological functions. Pathogenic mechanisms involved in the refeeding syndrome and clinical manifestations have been reviewed. We provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of refeeding syndrome. The most important steps are to identify patients at risk, reintroduce nutrition cautiously and correct electrolyte and vitamin deficiencies properly.

  12. [Metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Masanori; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome, which is consisted of hypertension, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance, is one of the most significant lifestyle-related disorders that lead to cardiovascular diseases. Among many upstream factors that are related to metabolic syndrome, obesity, especially visceral obesity, plays an essential role in its pathogenesis. In recent studies, possible mechanisms which connect obesity to metabolic syndrome have been elucidated, such as inflammation, abnormal secretion of adipokines and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the relationship between obesity and metabolic syndrome; and illustrate how visceral obesity contributes to, and how the treatments for obesity act on metabolic syndrome.

  13. [Autoinflammatory syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2009-03-01

    The autoinflammatory syndromes include a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by 1) seemingly unprovoked episodes of systemic inflammations, 2) absence of high titer of autoantibody or auto-reactive T cell, and 3) inborn error of innate immunity. In this article, we will focus on the clinical features, the pathogenesis related the genetic defects, and the therapeutic strategies in the representative disorders including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), hyper-IgD with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA), and Blau syndrome. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have proceeded our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus positive B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder/polymorphous B-cell lymphoma of the urinary bladder: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Sundaram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of a localized Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-positive B cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD/polymorphous B cell lymphoma of the urinary bladder in a 67 years old female patient. She had no known predisposing immunodeficiencies and presented with recent onset of hematuria. The CT and cystoscopic examination revealed a localized 2.5 cm polypoid or plaque-like mucosal mass on the right posterior and lateral wall of the bladder. The biopsy sample showed a diffuse and densely polymorphous atypical lymphoid infiltrate admixed with numerous small lymphocytes, histiocytes and occasional plasma cells and neutrophils. The large atypical cells were CD20+, CD79a+, CD30+, CD43+ and they were strongly positive for EBV by in situ hybridization using anti-EBER-1 probe. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR for immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement study showed a clonal gene rearrangement. The findings indicated EBV+LPD of the bladder. Primary lymphoma of bladder is rare and primary EBV+LPD of the bladder has not been previously described. Potential misdiagnosis of poorly differentiated urothelial carcinoma can occur and accurate diagnosis depends on comprehensive immunohistochemical and molecular workups.

  15. Early Gastric Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder and H pylori Detection after Kidney Transplantation: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CL Nash

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD in the adult renal transplant population ranges from 0.7% to 4%. The majority of cases involve a single site and arise, on average, seven months after transplantation. Histopathology usually reveals B-cell proliferative disease and has been standardized into its own classification. Treatment modalities consist of decreased immunosuppression, eradication of Epstein-Barr virus, surgical resection, systemic chemotherapy and monoclonal antibody therapy; however, mortality remains high, typically with a short survival time. In patients who have undergone renal transplantation, approximately 10% of those with PTLDs present with gastrointestinal symptomatology and disease. Reported sites include the stomach, and small and large bowel. Very few cases of Helicobacter pylori or mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue have been described in association with PTLD. In the era of cyclosporine immunosuppression, the incidence of PTLD affecting the gastrointestinal tract may be increasing in comparison with the incidence seen with the use of older immunosuppression regimens. A case of antral PTLD and H pylori infection occurring three months after renal transplantation is presented, and the natural history and management of gastric PTLD are reviewed.

  16. Clinicopathological characteristics of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders of T-cell origin: single-center series of nine cases and meta-analysis of 147 reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreman, An; Dierickx, Daan; Morscio, Julie; Camps, Jordi; Bittoun, Emilie; Verhoef, Gregor; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Sagaert, Xavier; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    T-cell or natural killer (NK)-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (T-PTLD) is a rare but severe complication after transplant. Here we present the clinicopathological features of a single-center series of nine cases. Additionally, we summarize the clinicopathological findings of 147 cases of T/NK-cell PTLD reported in the literature in an attempt to define subtype-specific characteristics. T/NK-cell PTLD occurs in patients of all ages, usually extranodally, and most frequently after kidney transplant. Organ specific incidence, however, is highest following heart transplant. Approximately one-third of T-cell PTLDs are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related, with peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS) being the most prevalent EBV-associated T-cell PTLD. A male predominance is observed, which is most striking in the EBV(+) group, particularly in PTCL, NOS. With a median posttransplant interval of 72 months, T-cell PTLDs are among the late-occurring PTLDs. Of the most common T-cell PTLDs, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) has the best prognosis, whereas PTCL, NOS and hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL) have the worst prognosis. EBV(+) cases seem to have a longer survival than EBV(-) cases, suggesting a different pathogenetic mechanism.

  17. A meta-analysis of potential relationship between Epstein-Barr-Encoded-RNA (EBER and onset time of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encodes two non-polyadenylated RNAs termed EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs. In this study, we tried to find series in which data of EBER and onset time of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD for patients have been documented to conduct a meta-analysis. A comprehensive search of the literature was performed by Pubmed and Google scholar to find reports indicating test results for EBER and PTLD onset in transplant patients. PTLD was considered "early onset" when it develops within the first post-transplant year. Finally, 265 patients from 15 studies have been included in the meta-analysis. The overall meta-analysis also showed a significant relation between EBER test positivity and early-onset PTLD development [relative risk (RR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.16-1.59; P <0.001]. The i2 index was 49.8%. Our study suggests that PTLD lesions with positive EBER test are more likely to develop within the early post-transplant period. Since early-onset PTLD is supposed to have better prognosis, having a positive EBER test might not be a bad news. However, for having a precise conclusion, prospective studies are needed to be conducted.

  18. Three different histological subtypes of Epstein-Barr virus-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient with hepatitis C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mikiko; Asano, Naoko; Fukushima, Mana; Honda, Takayuki

    2014-09-01

    We report a rare case in which Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative polymorphic B-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and EBV-negative monomorphic T-cell PTLD [anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL)] were observed simultaneously in the same cervical lymph node, 34 months after liver transplantation for hepatitis C liver cirrhosis. Although hepatitis C recurred after 2 months, he had no other complications until PTLD occurred 34 months post-transplantation. The patient underwent reduction of the immunosuppressive drug and rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone therapy, and he was considered to have achieved complete remission. However, PTLD recurred, and he died 6 months after the initial diagnosis. Autopsy revealed only EBV-negative monomorphic T-cell PTLD (ALK-negative ALCL) that involved the liver, spleen, bilateral kidneys, stomach, bladder, heart, bone marrow, right ureter, and pons. Thus, recurrent PTLD may show a different histological type from the primary disorder, as PTLD has a multiclonal potentiality that causes various types of lymphomas. Therefore, it may be difficult to predict PTLD-related prognosis from the initial PTLD histological identification.

  19. Post transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric solid organ transplant patients: A possible role for [{sup 18}F]-FDG-PET(/CT) in initial staging and therapy monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falck, C. von [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: Falck.Christian.von@mh-hannover.de; Maecker, B. [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Schirg, E. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Boerner, A.R.; Knapp, W.H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Klein, C. [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Galanski, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    Post transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a severe complication after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. In pediatric transplant recipients PTLD is the most common malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible role for positron emission tomography with [{sup 18}F]-2-fluoro-2-desoxy-glucose (FDG) in the initial staging and in therapy monitoring of pediatric patients suffering from biopsy-proven CD20-positive PTLD after solid organ transplantation. Seven pediatric patients were included. All available imaging studies - CT (n = 15), MRI (n = 16) and PET/PETCT (n = 16) - were reviewed on a lesion by lesion base. The performance of FDG-PET in the initial staging and during therapy with a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody was compared to conventional cross sectional imaging and correlated with the clinical outcome. FDG-PET identified all sites of disease as shown by CT/MRI and helped to clarify the significance of equivocal findings. The initial stage of disease was correctly identified by FDG-PET alone when compared to CT/MRI. During therapy, FDG-PET was superior to conventional cross-sectional imaging in the early evaluation of response.

  20. X连锁淋巴组织细胞异常增生症研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兰勤; 刘春燕; 申昆玲

    2011-01-01

    @@ X连锁淋巴组织细胞异常增生症(X-linked lymphoproliferative disease,XLP)是一种罕见的先天性免疫缺陷病,1975年被正式命名为x-连锁的淋巴细胞异常增生症(X-linked lymphoproliferative disease,XLP)[1].XLP最常见的临床表型包括暴发性或致死性传染性单核细胞增多症(fulminant or fetal infectious mononucleosis,FIM)、免疫球蛋白异常血症和(或)恶性淋巴瘤.

  1. Wellens' syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Lai

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of quite rare cause of thoracic pain suspected by emergency physician as Wellens’ syndrome. Wellens’ syndrome is a pattern of electrocardiographic T-wave changes associated with critical, proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD. This syndrome is about 10-15% of all unstable angina in emergency department (ED. The cardiologic consult was obtained in ED and it was not conclusive for a Wellens’ syndrome, so that the diagnostistic planning was wrong. The authors point out the importance of this syndrome in ED and the necessity of an urgent angiographic study as every acute coronary syndrome presented in ED. We remark the importance in ED to recognize these changes associated with critical LAD obstruction and the high risk for anterior wall myocardial infarction.

  2. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, P; Gross, W L

    2009-06-01

    In its strict sense, the term "autoinflammatory syndromes" comprises the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF), which are caused by mutations of pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) and perturbations of the cytokine balance. These include the crypyrinopathies, familial Mediterranean fever, TNF-receptor associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), hyper-IgD and periodic syndrome (HIDS), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, NALP12-HPF, and the Blau syndrome. The diseases are characterized by spontaneous activation of cells of the innate immunity in the absence of ligands. Autoantibodies are usually not found. HPF clinically present with recurrent fever episodes and inflammation, especially of serosal and synovial interfaces and the skin. Intriguingly, PRR-mediated autoinflammtory mechanisms also play a role in a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  3. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  4. Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanti Devi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  5. Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Basanti; Behera, Binodini; Patro, Sibasish; Pattnaik, Subhransu S; Puhan, Manas R

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  6. Metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  7. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  8. Chediak Higashi Syndrome masquerading as acute leukemia / storage disorder - A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Asif Baig

    2015-07-01

    CHS is characterised by partial oculocutaneous albinism, frequent fatal bacterial infections, bleeding diathesis and peripheral + Cranial nerve palsies. This disorder further culminates into accelerated phase (Lymphoproliferative Syndrome progressing into pancytopenia. CHS is due to single gene mutation in LYST (CHS gene localized to 1q chromosome. The diagnostic hallmark of CHS is presence of giant purple to blue violet inclusions in leucocytes. In this study granules are more prominent in Bone marrow than in PBS correlating well with previous studies. Approximately 85% of the cases, of CHS culminates into Accelerated phase showing Lymphohistiocytic infiltration progressing to pancytopenia and death due to infection. The very rare nature of this disease and its grave prognosis merits its reporting. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1785-1787

  9. Transitional type of Castleman's disease manifested as the POEMS syndrome

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    Tomić Ilija

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Castleman’s disease is an atypical lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by angiofollicular hyperplasia of lymph nodes. Histologically it can be classified into a hyaline-vascular type, plasma-cell type, and transitional (mixed-cell type, while clinically localized type has been classified as unicentric, or generalized (multicentric form of the disease. Case report. This paper presents a 21 years old male patient with multicentric Castleman’s disease, a transitional (mixed-cell type. The disease was manifested by fever, generalized enlargement of peripherial lymph nodes, breast glands enlargement, hyperemia of the face, and weakness of the lower extremities. We found mediastinal lymphadenopathy, pleural and pericardial effusions, sensorimotor peripherial neuropathy and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. The simultaneous presence of these manifestations of the disease (sensomotor peripheral neuropathy, lymphadenopathy, effusions endocrinopathy, polyclonal gammaglobulinemia and skin changes is indentified as POEMS syndrome. The diagnosis of Castleman’s disease was based on the results of histopathologic analysis of mediastinal lymph node biopsies after thoracotomy. The patient was treated with corticosteroids (prednisone 80 mg daily for 2 weeks followed by 60 mg daily. A partial response was achieved after 4 months of treatment. Conclusion. A transitional type of multicentric Castleman’s disease may be present itself as POEMS syndrome. The effect of corticosteroid therapy in this form of the disease is unpredictable.

  10. Lentiviral vectors for the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinelli, Giada; Capo, Valentina; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    In the last years important progress has been made in the treatment of several primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs) with gene therapy. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy indeed represents a valid alternative to conventional transplantation when a compatible donor is not available and recent success confirmed the great potential of this approach. First clinical trials performed with gamma retroviral vectors were promising and guaranteed clinical benefits to the patients. On the other hand, the outcome of severe adverse events as the development of hematological abnormalities highlighted the necessity to develop a safer platform to deliver the therapeutic gene. Self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors (LVVs) were studied to overcome this hurdle through their preferable integration pattern into the host genome. In this review, we describe the recent advancements achieved both in vitro and at preclinical level with LVVs for the treatment of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), ADA deficiency (ADA-SCID), Artemis deficiency, RAG1/2 deficiency, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (γchain deficiency, SCIDX1), X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus infection and gene promoter hypermethylation in rheumatoid arthritis patients with methotrexate-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejima-Yamada, Kozue; Oshiro, Yumi; Okamura, Seiichi; Fujisaki, Tomoaki; Mihashi, Yasuhito; Tamura, Kazuo; Fukushige, Tomoko; Kojima, Masaru; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Takeshita, Morishige

    2017-02-01

    We analyzed CpG-island hypermethylation status in 12 genes of paraffin-embedded tissues from 38 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with methotrexate (MTX)-associated large B cell lymphoproliferative disorder (BLPD), 11 RA patients with non-MTX-associated BLPD (non-MTX-BLPD), 22 controls with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and 10 controls with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)(+) DLBCL. Among them, tumor cells from EBV(+) MTX-BLPD patients and control EBV(+) DLBCL patients had significantly lower median incidence of CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) than those from non-MTX-BLPD and control DLBCL groups (2.3 and 1.7 vs. 4.3 and 4.4; P < 0.01 for each). In the MTX-BLPD group, EBV(+) patients showed lower median CIMP than EBV(-) patients (2.3 vs. 3.2); they also had significantly lower hypermethylation incidence in four apoptosis-related genes, especially death-associated protein kinase (14 vs. 55 %), higher incidence of massive tumor necrosis (86 vs. 27 %), and lower BCL2 protein expression (19 vs. 86 %) than did the control DLBCL group (P < 0.01 for all). In all clinical stages, EBV(+) MTX-BLPD patients had better prognoses than the EBV(-) MTX-BLPD (P = 0.011), non-MTX-BLPD (P = 0.002), and control DLBCL groups (P = 0.015). MTX-BLPD patients without hypermethylated RAS-associated domain family-1A (RASSF1A) or O (6) -methyl guanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) had significantly better prognosis than those with hypermethylation of those genes (P = 0.033). We conclude that in RA patients with MTX-BLPD, EBV infection is associated with a lower incidence of CIMP, apoptosis-related gene hypermethylation, and BCL2 expression, which can induce tumor regression by MTX withdrawal and lead to better prognoses.

  12. Virus and autoantigen-specific CD4+ T cells are key effectors in a SCID mouse model of EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W; Mautner, Josef

    2014-05-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies.

  13. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  14. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causi...

  15. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder K. Gupta, Ritu Gupta, Sunil Dutt Sharma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Turner Syndrome is one of the important chromosomal disorders characterised by loss (total or part ofsex chromosome. The manifestations being peripheral edema, short stature, extra skin fold, webbing ofneck, renal and cardiovascular anomalies, sexual infantilism, learning disability etc. We present here aone month female baby who had classical features of Turner Syndrome. The karyotape analysis wasconsistent with the diagnosis.

  16. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body, the white blood cells that fight infections, and the platelets that help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy blood cells. ... anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do ...

  17. Proteus syndrome

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    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  18. Franceschetti syndrome

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    Vikrant Kasat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Franceschetti syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with variable expressivity. It is commonly known as Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS. It is named after E. Treacher Collins who described the essential components of the condition. It affects both genders equally. This article reports a case of TCS in an 18-year-old female.

  19. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... L, Strano S, Carbone A, Calvieri C, Giustini S. LEOPARD syndrome. Dermatol Online J . 2008;14(3):7. PMID: 18627709 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18627709 . Sarkozy A, Digilio MC, Dallapiccola B. LEOPARD syndrome. Orphanet J Rare Dis . 2008;3:13. PMID: ...

  20. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcan AB.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is an important cause of short stature in girls and primer amenorrhea in young women that is usually caused by loss of part or all of an X chromosome. This topic will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

  1. Poland syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra Madhur Sharma; Shrawan Kumar; Meghwani, Manoj K.; Agrawal, Ravi P.

    2014-01-01

    Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  2. Poland syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Madhur Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  3. The syndrome of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in primary immunodeficiencies: implications for differential diagnosis and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Sebastian Fn; Ammann, Sandra; Al-Herz, Waleed; Bataneant, Mihaela; Dvorak, Christopher C; Gehring, Stephan; Gennery, Andrew; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Gonzalez-Granado, Luis I; Groß-Wieltsch, Ute; Ifversen, Marianne; Lingman-Framme, Jenny; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Mesters, Rolf; Meyts, Isabelle; van Montfrans, Joris M; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Pai, Sung-Yun; Soler-Palacin, Pere; Schuermann, Uta; Schuster, Volker; Seidel, Markus G; Speckmann, Carsten; Stepensky, Polina; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Tesi, Bianca; Vraetz, Thomas; Waruiru, Catherine; Bryceson, Yenan T; Moshous, Despina; Lehmberg, Kai; Jordan, Michael B; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a hyperinflammatory syndrome defined by clinical and laboratory criteria. Current criteria were created to identify patients with familial hemophagocytic lmyphohistiocytosis in immediate need of immunosuppressive therapy. However, these criteria also identify patients with infection-associated hemophagocytic inflammatory states lacking genetic defects typically predisposing to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. These patients include those with primary immunodeficiencies, in whom the pathogenesis of the inflammatory syndrome may be distinctive and aggressive immunosuppression is contraindicated. To better characterize hemophagocytic inflammation associated with immunodeficiencies, we combined an international survey with a literature search and identified 63 patients with primary immunodeficiencies other than cytotoxicity defects or X-linked lymphoproliferative disorders, presenting with conditions fulfilling current criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Twelve patients had severe combined immunodeficiency with immunodeficiencies; (ii) this syndrome can develop despite severe deficiency of T and NK cells, implying that the pathophysiology is distinct and not appropriately described as "lympho"-histiocytosis in these patients; and (iii) current criteria for hemophagocytoc lymphohistiocytosis are insufficient to differentiate hemophagocytic inflammatory syndromes with different pathogeneses. This is important because of implications for therapy, in particular for protocols targeting T cells.

  4. Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma with multiple extranodal locations in a patient with Sjögren’s syndrome – a diagnostic problem

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    Marta Domżalska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren’s syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of lymphocytic infiltrates in exocrine glands, mainly salivary and lacrimal glands, which result in xerophthalmia and xerostomia. About half of the patients develop systemic complications, including lymphoproliferative disorders. We report a case of a 27-year-old woman with a diagnosis of Sjögren’s syndrome and a suspicion of respiratory system involvement in the course of granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Histopathological examination of a skin lesion suggested marginal zone B-cell lymphoma. After pathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of all available previous biopsy samples and the medical documentation the diagnosis of extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma stage IV according to the Ann Arbor classification was rendered. The patient was referred to the Department of Haematology and was treated with R-CVP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, rituximab.

  5. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  6. CLOVES syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jacob; Upton, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    A cohort of patients with overgrowth syndromes has been identified with congenital lipomatous overgrowth, dysregulated fat deposits, and mixed vascular malformations. The acronym CLOVES was given on a heuristic basis to stand for congenital lipomatous overgrowth (CLO), vascular malformation (V), epidermal nevi (E), and scoliosis and spinal deformities (S). These patients have upper limb anomalies with variable phenotypes. Although hand anomalies alone cannot make the diagnosis, the foot, truncal, cutaneous and spinal anomalies are particularly diagnostic. CLOVES syndrome has emerged as a distinct clinical entity diagnosed by clinical and radiographic examinations. The overgrowth pattern is now easily distinguished from other overgrowth syndromes.

  7. Hubris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair.

  8. HYDROLETHALUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aradhana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hydrolethalus Syndrome (HLS is a rare lethal genetic syndrome, recognized as a consequence of a study on Meckle syndrome in Finland .1 HLS is characterized by multiple developmental defects of fetus which include fetal hydrocephalus, agenesis of corpus callosum, absent midline structures of brain, Cleft lip and cleft palate, defective lobulation of lungs, micrognathia and very characteristic abnormality of polydactyly. About 80% of patients have polydactyly, in hands it is postaxial and preaxial in feet with duplicated big toe. A highly characteristic hallux duplex is seen in almost no other situation .2 Club feet is also common.

  9. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  10. Jerusalem syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-el, Y; Durst, R; Katz, G; Zislin, J; Strauss, Z; Knobler, H Y

    2000-01-01

    Jerusalem's psychiatrists expect to encounter, as the millennium approaches, an ever-increasing number of tourists who, upon arriving in Jerusalem, may suffer psychotic decompensation. To describe the Jerusalem syndrome as a unique acute psychotic state. This analysis is based on accumulated clinical experience and phenomenological data consisting of cultural and religious perspectives. Three main categories of the syndrome are identified and described, with special focus on the category pertaining to spontaneous manifestations, unconfounded by previous psychotic history or psychopathology. The discrete form of the Jerusalem syndrome is related to religious excitement induced by proximity to the holy places of Jerusalem, and is indicated by seven characteristic sequential stages.

  11. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  12. Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least once every year. Alternative Names Aortic aneurysm - ... syndrome. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 702. ...

  13. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Life After Diagnosis Support for Chronic Illness Corporate Partnerships Interview with Kristen Hanks Liver Lowdown July ... poor blood clotting and bleeding caused by liver failure. What are the symptoms of Reye syndrome? Reye ...

  14. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  15. Premenstrual syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwan, Irene; Onwude, Joseph Loze

    2015-01-01

    A woman has premenstrual syndrome (PMS) if she complains of recurrent psychological and/or physical symptoms occurring during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and often resolving by the end of menstruation...

  16. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... done? The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), conduct research exploring the molecular and genetic basis of Zellweger syndrome and the other PBDs, ...

  17. Autoinflammatory syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M; Gasbarrini, G; Ghirardello, A; Grandemange, S; Hoffman, H M; Manna, R; Podswiadek, M; Punzi, L; Sebastiani, G D; Touitou, I; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorders are a new and expanding classification of inflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent episodes of systemic inflammation in the absence of pathogens, autoantibodies or antigen specific T cells. These disorders are caused by primary dysfunction of the innate immune system, without evidence of adaptive immune dysregulation. Innate immune abnormalities include aberrant responses to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) like lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan, prominent neutrophilia in blood and tissues, and dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha) or their receptors. The autoinflammatory diseases comprise both hereditary (Familial Mediterranean Fever, FMF; Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, MKD; TNF Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome, TRAPS; Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndrome, CAPS; Blau syndrome; Pyogenic sterile Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum and Acne syndrome, PAPA; Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis, CRMO) and multifactorial (Crohn's and Behçet's diseases) disorders. Mutations responsible for FMF, TRAPS, CAPS, PAPA are in proteins involved in modulation of inflammation and apoptosis.

  18. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of sitting for a long period of time, climbing stairs, walking, or running. × Definition Piriformis syndrome is a ... of sitting for a long period of time, climbing stairs, walking, or running. View Full Definition Treatment Generally, ...

  19. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart,...

  20. Bart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad Anil

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An infant presenting with extensive aplasia cutis on lower extremities later developed blisters on skin and mucous membrane. Clinical features and histopathological examination of skin favoured the diagnosis of Bart syndrome.

  1. Neurocutaneous Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect kids include: neurofibromatosis, types 1 and 2 (NF1 and NF2) Sturge-Weber syndrome tuberous sclerosis (TS) ... forms of this disorder are neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), and Schwannomatosis. NF1 is ...

  2. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... optic nerve (arrow) looks very pale, the vessels (stars) are very thin and there is characteristic pigment, ... syndrome gene have a child together, with each birth there is a: 1-in-4 chance of ...

  3. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne;

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  4. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arachnoldactyly (CCA), which refers to the joint contractures (shortening) that are key features of the syndrome. How ... remain contracted for long periods of time, the muscles can become tight and short, restricting movement. When ...

  5. Isaac's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS ... Support Library Clinical Research Next Steps Pre-Funding: After Review Terms of Award Pre-Award Start-up ...

  6. Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest shape (most often a sunken chest called pectus excavatum) Webbed and short-appearing neck Exams and Tests ... to consider genetic counseling before having children. Images Pectus excavatum References Ali O, Donohoue PA. Noonan syndrome. In: ...

  7. Dressler's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome can cause more-serious complications, including: Cardiac tamponade. Inflammation of the pericardium can cause fluids to ... including: Draining excess fluids. If you develop cardiac tamponade, your doctor will likely recommend a procedure (pericardiocentesis) ...

  8. [Mobius syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladuţiu, Cristina; Duma, Ionela

    2012-01-01

    Mobius syndrom, an anomaly in cranial nerve developement, presents with a remarkable clinical polymorphism. The rare occurence of this pathology and the questions raised by the diagnosis and treatment determined us to make this presentation.

  9. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnostic tests that can identify Down syndrome include: Amniocentesis. A sample of the amniotic fluid surrounding the ... somewhat higher risk of miscarriage than second trimester amniocentesis. Cordocentesis. In this test, also known as percutaneous ...

  10. Metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... obesity ). This body type may be described as "apple-shaped." Insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced ... Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  11. Establishment and operation of a Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant allogeneic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic cell bank for the treatment of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Mark A; Wilkie, Gwen M; Robinson, Nicolas; Rivera, Nadja; Haque, Tanzina; Crawford, Dorothy H; Barry, Jacqueline; Fraser, Neil; Turner, David M; Robertson, Victoria; Dyer, Phil; Flanagan, Peter; Newlands, Helen R; Campbell, John; Turner, Marc L

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignancies, including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Conventional treatments for PTLD are often successful, but risk organ rejection and cause significant side effects. EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) generated in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes provide an alternative treatment modality with few side effects, but autologous CTLs are difficult to use in clinical practice. Here we report the establishment and operation of a bank of EBV-specific CTLs derived from 25 blood donors with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) types found at high frequency in European populations. Since licensure, there have been enquiries about 37 patients, who shared a median of three class I and two class II HLA types with these donors. Cells have been infused into ten patients with lymphoproliferative disease, eight of whom achieved complete remission. Neither patient with refractory disease was matched for HLA class II. Both cases of EBV-associated non-haematopoietic sarcoma receiving cells failed to achieve complete remission. Thirteen patients died before any cells could be issued, emphasizing that the bank should be contacted before patients become pre-terminal. Thus, this third party donor-derived EBV-specific CTL cell bank can supply most patients with appropriately matched cells and most recipients have good outcomes.

  12. Detection of EBV genomes in plasmablasts/plasma cells and non-B cells in the blood of most patients with EBV lymphoproliferative disorders by using Immuno-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calattini, Sara; Sereti, Irini; Scheinberg, Philip; Kimura, Hiroshi; Childs, Richard W; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2010-11-25

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present in B cells in the blood of healthy people; few studies have looked for EBV in other cell types in blood from patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. We use a new technique combining immunofluorescent cell-surface staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization to quantify both EBV copy number per cell and cell types in blood from patients with high EBV DNA loads. In addition to CD20(+) B cells, EBV was present in plasmablast/plasma cells in the blood of 50% of patients, in monocytes or T cells in a small proportion of patients, and in "non-B, non-T, non-monocytes" in 69% of patients. The mean EBV copy number in B cells was significantly higher than in plasmablast/plasma cells. There was no correlation between EBV load and virus copy number per cell. Although we detected CD21, the EBV B-cell receptor, on EBV-infected B cells, we could not detect it on virus-infected T cells. These findings expand the range of cell types infected in the blood. Determining the number of EBV genomes per cell and the type of cells infected in patients with high EBV loads may provide additional prognostic information for the development of EBV lymphoproliferative diseases.

  13. Eagle's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Soares,Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira,Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo,Igor Teixeira; Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is diffic...

  14. SAPHO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sueli; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D

    2013-05-01

    SAPHO syndrome is a disorder characterized by Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis. As the osteoarticular and skin manifestations often do not occur simultaneously and there are no validated diagnostic criteria, the diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical and imaging investigation is necessary to establish the many differential diagnoses of SAPHO syndrome. The etiopathogenesis involves infectious (probably Propionibacterium acnes), immunologic, and genetic factors. Treatment is based on information gathered from case reports and small series, and is related to specific skin or articular symptoms.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus-associated posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder after high-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous CD34-selected hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Richard A; Dansey, Roger; Storek, Jan; Georges, George E; Bowen, James D; Holmberg, Leona A; Kraft, George H; Mayes, Maureen D; McDonagh, Kevin T; Chen, Chien-Shing; Dipersio, John; Lemaistre, C Fred; Pavletic, Steven; Sullivan, Keith M; Sunderhaus, Julie; Furst, Daniel E; McSweeney, Peter A

    2003-09-01

    High-dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently being evaluated for the control of severe autoimmune diseases. The addition of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) to high-dose chemoradiotherapy in the high-dose immunosuppressive therapy regimen and CD34 selection of the autologous graft may induce a higher degree of immunosuppression compared with conventional autologous HSCT for malignant diseases. Patients may be at higher risk of transplant-related complications secondary to the immunosuppressed state, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), but this is an unusual complication after autologous HSCT. Fifty-six patients (median age, 42 years; range, 23-61 years) with either multiple sclerosis (n = 26) or systemic sclerosis (n = 30) have been treated. The median follow-up has been 24 months (range, 2-60 months). Two patients (multiple sclerosis, n = 1; systemic sclerosis, n = 1) had significant reactivations of herpesvirus infections early after HSCT and then developed aggressive EBV-PTLD and died on days +53 and +64. Multiorgan clonal B-cell infiltrates that were EBV positive by molecular studies or immunohistology were identified at both autopsies. Both patients had positive screening skin tests for equine ATG (Atgam) and had been converted to rabbit ATG (Thymoglobulin) from the first dose. Of the other 54 patients, 2 of whom had partial courses of rabbit ATG because of a reaction to the intravenous infusion of equine ATG, only 1 patient had a significant clinical reactivation of a herpesvirus infection (herpes simplex virus 2) early after HSCT, and none developed EBV-PTLD. The T-cell count in the peripheral blood on day 28 was 0/microL in all 4 patients who received rabbit ATG; this was significantly less than in patients who received equine ATG (median, 174/microL; P =.001; Mann-Whitney ranked sum test). Although the numbers are limited

  16. Carpenter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidestrand, Pip; Vasconez, Henry; Cottrill, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that belongs to a group of rare craniosynostosis syndromes (Bull Soc Med Paris 1906;23:1310). Carpenter syndrome is the rarest, with only occasional patients seen. There are 3 common features in all of these syndromes: craniosynostosis (skull base abnormalities, with early fusion in different sutures), midface hypoplasia, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. Clinical features of Carpenter syndrome include peculiar facies, asymmetry of the skull, polydactyly, brachymesophalangy, mild soft tissue syndactyly, obesity, hypogenitalism, congenital heart disease, and mental retardation (J Pediatr 1966;69:1; Am J Roentgenol 1969;106). The brachycephaly is caused by early fusion in the coronal, sagittal, and lambdoidal sutures (Proc R Soc Med Sect Study Dis Child 1909). Most of the affected patients have a surgical procedure between 3 to 9 months of age to open the cranial vault to make space for the brain to grow (Plast Reconstr Surg 1978;62:335). We present a patient with Carpenter syndrome who is unusual in that she is an adult who has never had surgical intervention.

  17. Favorable outcome of Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder complicated by immunoglobulin G4-related disease treated with rituximab-based therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Koki; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Sukegawa, Masumi; Sano, Takahiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Hashimoto, Yuko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-08-24

    After acute infection of Epstein-Barr virus, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells survive but usually do not show clonal proliferation. However, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells occasionally acquire a proliferative capacity that provokes clonal lymphoproliferative disorders. We herein present a case with Epstein-Barr virus-infected CD30+ B cell and immunoglobulin G4+ plasmacytoid cell proliferation in the lymph nodes, suggesting a pathological and clinical interaction between Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and immunoglobulin G4-related disease. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease has been recognized as a benign disease with proliferation of IgG4-related disease+ plasmacytoid cells. Several studies have recently reported the coexistence of immunoglobulin G4-related disease+ plasmacytoid cells with Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells in lymph nodes in some immunoglobulin G4-related disease cases. However, the pathogenic role of the clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells in immunoglobulin G4-related disease, as well as the treatments for patients with both Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells and immunoglobulin G4-related disease, have never been discussed. A 50-year-old Japanese man was referred to us for persistent fatigue and lymphadenopathy. His blood examination showed elevated IgG4, and detected high levels of Epstein-Barr virus DNA. A lymph node biopsy revealed IgG4+ plasmacytoid cells and infiltration of large lymphoid cells, which were positive for CD20, CD30, Epstein-Barr virus-related late membrane protein 1, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA, and were negative for IgG4. Based on the diagnosis of both Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and IgG4-related disease, the patient received eight cycles of rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, which resulted in the complete disappearance of lymphadenopathy. Moreover, his serum IgG4 level was significantly

  18. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome A A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  19. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Down Syndrome Print A A ... skills. continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  20. Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of Cancer > Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Request Permissions Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 12/2015 What is juvenile polyposis syndrome? Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a ...

  1. Cardiac Syndrome X

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  2. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the ...

  3. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  4. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used are: WAGR Complex Wilms' Tumor-Aniridia-Genitourinary Anomalies-Mental Retardation Syndrome Wilms' Tumor-Aniridia-Gonadoblastoma-Mental Retardation Syndrome Chromosome 11p deletion syndrome 11p deletion syndrome The cause ...

  5. Escobar syndrome mimicing congenital patellar syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ezirmik, Naci; Yildiz, Kadri; Can, Cahit Emre

    2012-01-01

    ...) syndrome is a rare syndrome. Intrauterin growth reterdation, abnormal face, wide-spead pterygiums that resulted in joint contractures, ptosis, chryptoorchidism, patellar dysplasia and foot deformities are seen on this syndrome...

  6. Evolving role of 2B4/CD244 in T and NK cell responses during virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Noel Waggoner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM family receptor, 2B4/CD244, was first implicated in anti-viral immunity by the discovery that mutations of the SLAM-associated protein, SAP/SH2D1A, impaired 2B4-dependent stimulation of T and natural killer (NK cell anti-viral functions in X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP syndrome patients with uncontrolled Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infections. Engagement of 2B4 has been variably shown to either activate or inhibit lymphocytes which express this receptor. While SAP expression is required for stimulatory functions of 2B4 on lymphocytes, it remains unclear whether inhibitory signals derived from 2B4 can predominate even in the presence of SAP. Regardless, mounting evidence suggests that 2B4 expression by NK and CD8 T cells is altered by virus infection in mice as well as in humans, and 2B4-mediated signaling may be an important determinant of effective immune control of chronic virus infections. In this review, recent findings regarding the expression and function of 2B4 as well as SAP on T and NK cells during virus infection is discussed, with a focus on the role of 2B4-CD48 interactions in crosstalk between innate and adaptive immunity.

  7. Molecular basis for positive and negative signaling by the natural killer cell receptor 2B4 (CD244).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissmann, Philipp; Beauchamp, Lisa; Wooters, Joe; Tilton, John C; Long, Eric O; Watzl, Carsten

    2005-06-15

    Triggering of 2B4 (CD244) can induce natural killer (NK)-cell activation, costimulation, or even inhibition of NK-cell activity. Here, we investigate the molecular basis for the different signals generated by 2B4. We show that the first immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif (ITSM) within the cytoplasmic tail of 2B4 is sufficient for 2B4-mediated NK-cell activation, whereas the third ITSM can negatively influence 2B4 signaling. We further identify signaling molecules that associate with 2B4. Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) can bind to all 4 ITSMs of 2B4 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The phosphorylated third ITSM can additionally recruit the phosphatases SHP-1, SHP-2, SHIP, and the inhibitory kinase Csk. SAP acts as an inhibitor of interactions between 2B4 and these negative regulatory molecules, explaining how 2B4 inhibits NK-cell activation in the absence of functional SAP, as occurs in cells from patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP). Recently, another function for SAP was proposed: SAP can recruit the kinase Fyn to the SLAM (CD150) immune receptor. We now show that Fyn can also associate with phosphorylated 2B4. Finally, we demonstrate that Fyn and Csk can both phosphorylate 2B4, suggesting a possible mechanism of 2B4 phosphorylation.

  8. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  9. Refeeding syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Swagata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  10. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  11. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  12. Microcephaly syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, Dianne

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this article is to review microcephaly from a genetics point of view, especially with regard to the process of identification of syndromes in which small head circumference occurs. Microcephaly can be due to either genetic or environmental causes. It can be the only positive finding or may be part of a syndrome of congenital anomalies. The genetic etiology can be caused by autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked genes or various types of chromosome anomalies. Some of the gene mutations have been identified recently. Syndromic microcephaly is associated with a large number of conditions. Some can be diagnosed, or at least suspected, based on their characteristic facial dysmorphism, and others can be searched for using databases of genetic disorders.

  13. Postconcussional Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method for definite diagnosis, trials searching for both neuroimaging and specific serum biomarkers stil continue. The treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. Information, education, reassurance and multifaceted rehabilitation programmes can be beneficial. There are promising trials reporting the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of postconcussional syndrome. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 96-109

  14. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network...... of birth defect registries. Between January 1990 and December 2008, we identified 26 cases of Fraser syndrome in the monitored population of 12,886,464 births (minimal estimated prevalence of 0.20 per 100,000 or 1:495,633 births). Most cases (18/26; 69%) were registered in the western part of Europe, where...... was particularly high (42%). Most cases of Fraser syndrome (85%) are suspected prenatally, often due to the presence of the association of renal agenesis and cryptophthalmos. In the European population, a high proportion (82%) of pregnancies is terminated, thus reducing the live birth prevalence to a third...

  15. [Serotonin syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lheureux, P; Penaloza, A; De Cottenier, V; Ullmann, U; Gris, M

    2002-10-01

    The serotonin syndrome is a hyperserotoninergic state resulting from an excess of intrasynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine, induced by multiple psychotropic agents, but also non psychiatric drugs. It is a potentially dangerous and sometimes lethal condition. The clinical manifestations usually include cognitive, neuromuscular and autonomic features and are mediated by the action of serotonin on various subtypes of receptors. The main differential diagnosis is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Treatment is mainly supportive. No pharmacological agent has been definitely demonstrated really effective. However, reports of cases treated with the 5-HT2 blockers, including cyproheptadine or chlorpromazine have suggested that these agents could have some efficacy. Serotonin syndrome is a toxic condition which requires heightened clinical awareness among physicians in order to prevent, recognize, and treat the condition promptly.

  16. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, José Melo; Gomes, Sónia Melo; Conde, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes (AIS) are a heterogeneous group of congenital diseases characterized by the presence of recurrent episodes of fever and local or generalized inflammation, in the absence of infectious agents, detectable auto-antibodies or antigen-specific autoreactive T-cells. These diseases have been much better understood during the past 15 years, mainly due to the marked advances of the Human Genoma Project and its implications in the identification and characterization of genetic mutations. In this paper we make a revision of the classification of AIS and focus our attention specially on the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), in particular the CINCA syndrome that shares many clinical characteristics with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  17. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  18. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  19. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  20. [PFAPA syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Suzete Costa Anjos; Vales, Fernando; Cardoso, Eduardo; Santos, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by periodic fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis and aphthous stomatitis. The bouts of fever can last for days or even weeks. Between crises, patients remain asymptomatic for variable periods. It appears before the age of five and has limited duration (4-8 years). Its aetiopathogeny is unknown. Corticoids are the treatment of choice. Tonsillectomy has been proposed as a solution but remains controversial. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl with PFAPA syndrome who underwent tonsillectomy in January, 2008, and we review the literature.

  1. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  2. Eisenmengers syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G;

    2009-01-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right......-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. Udgivelsesdato...

  3. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  4. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  5. Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Risbaf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a dominant autosomal familial disorder. The manifestations begin at an early age and a combination of phenotypic abnormalities such special facial appearance, jaw cysts and skeletal anomalies are seen in this disease. A 22-year-old woman referred to Zahedan Dental School complaining of pain on the left cheek. During the examination, several cutaneous lesions in the neck, pits in palm and sole and multiple jaw cysts were observed. According to the clinical symptoms, lesion biopsy and reports of Gorlin syndrome radiography were presented.

  6. [Wilkie's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognár, Gábor; Ledniczky, György; Palik, Eva; Zubek, László; Sugár, István; Ondrejka, Pál

    2008-10-01

    Loss of retroperitoneal fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions and noxa is believed to be the etiologic factor of superior mesenteric artery syndrome. A case of a 35 years old female patient with severe malnutrition and weight loss is presented, who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome. Various theories of etiology, clinical course and treatment options of this uncommon disease are discussed. In our case, conservative management was inefficient, while surgical treatment aiming to bypass the obstruction by an anastomosis between the jejunum and the proximal duodenum (duodenojejunostomy) was successful. An interdisciplinary teamwork provides the most beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic result in this often underestimated disease.

  7. Morbihan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Stefano; Persico, Maria Chiara; Francia, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face) in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks).

  8. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  9. Paraneoplastic Pemphigus: A Paraneoplastic Autoimmune Multiorgan Syndrome or Autoimmune Multiorganopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram K. Mahajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP, a clinically and immunopathologically distinct mucocutaneous blistering dermatosis, is a severe form of autoimmune multiorgan syndrome generally associated with poor therapeutic outcome and high mortality. This IgG-mediated disease is initiated by an obvious or occult lymphoproliferative disorder in most cases. Clinically severe mucositis, and polymorphic blistering skin eruptions, and histologically acantholysis, keratinocyte necrosis and interface dermatitis are its hallmark features. A 58-year-old female presented with recurrent, severe, recalcitrant stomatitis and widespread erosions/blistering lesions of one-year duration. Treatment with repeated courses of systemic corticosteroids at a peripheral center would provide temporary relief. She also had fever, productive cough, odynophagia and poor oral intake, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, pain in the abdomen, and watery diarrhea. An array of investigations revealed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, mediastinal and para-aortic lymphadenopathy, bronchiolitis obliterans, and vertebral osteoporosis/fractures. With the diagnosis of CLL-associated PNP she was managed with dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide pulse (DCP therapy for 3 cycles initially, followed by COP regimen (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone for 5 cycles. Remission is being maintained with chlorambucil and prednisolone pulse therapy once in 3 weeks with complete resolution of skin lesions and adequate control of CLL.

  10. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  11. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Althou

  12. Klinefelter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Peynirci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder in males. Variation in clinical presentation and insufficient awareness of this syndrome among clinicians lead to fifty percent of patients remain undetected. Typical clinical features of Klinefelter syndrome are various degrees of hypogonadal symptoms, atrophic testes and gynaecomastia. However, these typical clinical symptoms may not be present in all patients. Even if serum testosterone levels are not markedly low, elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone is a considerable laboratory finding. Definitive diagnosis is made by karyotype analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. It must be kept in mind that this analysis may be normal in rare conditions. Early recognition of patients during puberty and handling them as soon as possible is important. Testosterone replacement therapy results in increased muscle mass, bone mineral density and libido. The patient’s mood and self-esteem improve significantly. In general, patients with Klinefelter syndrome are accepted as infertile, however, assisted reproductive techniques may provide fertilization. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 63-7

  13. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    /or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium...

  14. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach move to your small intestine in an uncontrolled, abnormally fast manner. This is most often related to changes in your stomach associated with surgery. Dumping syndrome can occur after any stomach operation or removal of the esophagus (esophagectomy). Gastric bypass surgery for ...

  15. Brugada Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to look at your heart's electrical activity (electrophysiology study), you'll need to fast for eight to 12 hours before your test. Write down any symptoms you're experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to Brugada syndrome. Write down key personal information, especially any family ...

  16. Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harleen; Chacon, Anna H; Choudhary, Sonal; McLeod, Michael P; Meshkov, Lauren; Nouri, Keyvan; Izakovic, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Bloom Syndrome (BS, MIM #210900) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the BLM gene, which codes for the DNA repair enzyme RecQL3 helicase. Without proper DNA repair mechanisms, abnormal DNA exchange takes place between sister chromatids and results in genetic instability that may lead to cancer, especially lymphoma and acute myelogenous leukemia, lower and upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasias, cutaneous tumors, and neoplasias in the genitalia and urinary tract. BS patients are usually of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and exhibit narrow facial features, elongated limbs, and several dermatologic complications including photosensitivity, poikiloderma, and telangiectatic erythema. The most concerning manifestation of BS is multiple malignancies, which require frequent screenings and strict vigilance by the physician. Therefore, distinguishing between BS and other dermatologic syndromes of similar presentation such as Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome, Erythropoietic Protoporphyria, and Cockayne Syndrome is paramount to disease management and to prolonging life. BS can be diagnosed through a variety of DNA sequencing methods, and genetic testing is available for high-risk populations. This review consolidates several sources on BS sequelae and aims to suggest the importance of differentiating BS from other dermatologic conditions. This paper also elucidates the recently discovered BRAFT and FANCM protein complexes that link BS and Fanconi anemia.

  17. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  18. Chylomicronemia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the blood. The disorder is passed down through families. Causes Chylomicronemia syndrome can occur due to a rare genetic disorder in which a protein (enzyme) called lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is broken or missing. LpL is normally found in fat and muscle. ...

  19. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  20. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  1. [Waardenburg's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimñenez, F; Carbonell, R; Pérez, F; Lozano, I

    1994-01-01

    Reporting one case of this condition type-2 with heterochromia iridis and cochlear deafness. The AA. review the syndrome's components and it nomenclature as well. They discuss about the convenience of including this deviation in the chapter of "diseases of the embryonic neural crest". The specific place of the gene responsibly in the chromosome-2 and the possibilities of genetic counselling are considered.

  2. Waardenburg's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesudian, D P; Jayaraman, M; Janaki, V R; Yesudian, P

    1995-01-01

    Three children in a family of five presented with heterochromia iridis, lateral displacement of inner canthi and varying degrees of sensorineural deafness. All the 3 showed iris atrophy. The father of the children had only heterochromia iridis. A diagnosis of Waardenburg's syndrome Type I was made in the children with the father probably representing a forme fruste of the condition.

  3. Caplan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT scan of the chest Joint x-rays Pulmonary function tests Rheumatoid factor test and other blood tests Treatment There is no specific treatment for Caplan syndrome, other than treating any lung and joint disease. ... MD, MHS, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, ...

  4. Metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  5. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 663-4637) Sotos Syndrome Support Association P.O. Box 4626 Wheaton IL Wheaton, IL 60189 info@sotossyndrome.org http://www.sotossyndrome.org/ Tel: 888-246-7772 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  6. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  7. Reifenstein syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgens are most important during early development in the womb. People with Reifenstein syndrome can have a normal lifespan and be totally healthy, but they may have difficulty conceiving a child. In the most severe cases, boys with outer female genitals ...

  8. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  9. [SAPHO syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary.

  10. Compartment syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aly Saber

    2014-01-01

    Body compartments bound by fascia and limited by bony backgrounds are found in the extremities, buttocks, abdomen and thoracic cavity; conditions that cause intracompartmental swelling and hypertension can lead to ischemia and limb loss.Although compartment syndromes are described in all body regions from head to toe, the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are best characterized for three key body regions: the first is extremity, the second is abdominal, and the third is thoracic compartment syndromes.Thoracic compartment syndrome usually occurs as a result of pathological accumulation of air, fluid or blood in the mediastinum and has traditionally been described in trauma.As the intracranial contents are confined within a rigid bony cage, any increase in volume within thiscompartment as a result of brain oedema or an expanding traumatic intracranial haematoma, leads to a reciprocal decrease in the volume of cerebrospinal fluid and intracranial venous blood volume.Limb compartment syndromes may present either in acute or chronic clinical forms.Intra-abdominal pressure can be measured by direct or indirect methods.While the direct methods are quite accurate, theyare impractical and not feasible for routine practice.Indirect measurement is done through inferior vena cava, gastric, rectal and urinary bladder.Indirect measurement through urinary bladder is the simplest and is considered the method of choice for intra-abdominal pressure measurement.The management of patients with intra-abdominal hypertension is based on four important principles: the first is related to the specific procedures aiming at lowering intra-abdominal pressure and the consequences of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome; the second is for general support and medical management of the critically ill patient; while the third is surgical decompression and the fourth is optimization after surgical decompression.

  11. Trisomy 12 is seen within a specific subtype of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disease affecting the peripheral blood/bone marrow and co-segregates with elevated expression of CD11a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'ut, L; O'Connor, S J; Richards, S J; Jones, R A; Roberts, B E; Davies, F E; Fegan, C D; Jack, A S; Morgan, G J

    1998-04-01

    In order to delineate the specific morphological and immunophenotypic features of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders associated with trisomy 12, 172 sequential unselected cases of CD19+CD5+ B-cell disorders, primarily affecting the peripheral blood and bone marrow, were studied. Trisomy 12 was found in 24 cases (13.9%), with all cases morphologically classified as either CLL-PL or CLL-mixed by FAB criteria. Trisomy 12 was not found in any cases of typical CLL. Trisomy 12 cases demonstrated a significant higher expression of CD11a (P<0.0001) and CD20 (P<0.0006) when compared to cases with the equivalent morphology and immunophenotype, but without the chromosomal abnormality. Trisomy 12 cases also demonstrated a higher frequency of FMC7, CD38 expression and moderate to strong surface immunoglobulin staining. However, no correlation was detected between the percentages of trisomy 12 cells and cells expressing CD11a, CD38, FMC7 or sIg mean fluorescent intensity. Cells from trisomy 12 positive cases were sorted according to their CD11a expression using fluorescent activated cell sorting. There was a significant increase in the percentage of trisomy 12 cells within the CD11a+ sorted fraction compared to the unsorted population (P < 0.05), implying that trisomy 12 is associated with increased expression of CD11a. With the highly specific morphological and immunophenotypic features demonstrated by trisomy 12 cases in this study, it is highly likely that these cases constitute a specific group of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

  12. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome. National Down Syndrome Society 8 E 41st Street, 8th Floor New ... New York 10017 800-221-4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & ...

  13. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... Where can I find more information regarding Down Syndrome? National Down Syndrome Society VISIT SITE » Downs Syndrome Association VISIT ...

  14. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Shop NDSS Home » Resources » Wellness » Sexuality » Sexuality & Down Syndrome Sexuality & Down Syndrome Human sexuality encompasses an individual's self-esteem, ...

  15. Otodental syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloch-Zupan Agnès

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The otodental syndrome also named otodental dysplasia, is characterised by a striking dental phenotype known as globodontia, associated with sensorineural high frequency hearing loss and eye coloboma. Globodontia occurs in both primary and permanent dentition, affecting canine and molar teeth (i.e. enlarged bulbous malformed posterior teeth with almost no discernable cusps or grooves. The condition appears to be inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, although sporadic cases have been reported. It is a rare disease, a few families have been described in the literature. In the British family, the locus for oculo-oto-dental syndrome was mapped to 20q13.1 within a 12-cM critical chromosomal region. Dental management is complex, interdisciplinary and will include regular follow up, scheduled teeth extraction and orthodontic treatment. Hearing checks and, if necessary, hearing aids are mandatory, as well as eye examination and ad hoc treatment if necessary.

  16. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and...... necrophorum. We found a total of 137 cases of LS, of which 47 were infected with F. necrophorum and others with Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Complications of this rare but severe disease included osteomyelitis, meningitis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mortality was extremely high in the pre......-antibiotic era but has diminished with the advent of antibiotics. This review showed a mortality rate of only 2% of which none of the cases involved fusobacteria. Duration of treatment varied; a 4-6-week course of carbapenem or piperacillin/tazobactam in combination with metronidazole was optimum. Other...

  17. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  18. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Ricard

    2017-03-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the development of venous and/or arterial thromboses, often multiple, and pregnancy morbidity (mainly, recurrent fetal losses), in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Some estimates indicate that the incidence of the APS is around 5 new cases per 100,000 persons per year and the prevalence around 40-50 cases per 100,000 persons. The aPL are positive in approximately 13% of patients with stroke, 11% with myocardial infarction, 9.5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis and 6% of patients with pregnancy morbidity. Currently, there is consensus in treating APS patients with thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation and to prevent obstetric manifestations with the use of aspirin and heparin. This review summarizes the main knowledge on the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Parinaud's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffie, D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Stefanko, S Z

    1983-02-01

    Five cases of a tumour in the quadrigeminal area have been described, 4 of which could be verified by autopsy. In 2 cases with a metastasis in the tegmentum of the mesencephalon, a Parinaud syndrome was present. In 2 other cases, however, with extensive destruction of the quadrigeminal plate and of the posterior commissure this syndrome was not present. In the 5th case, with a big vascular tumour of the pineal area, disturbances of eye movements and pupils were also lacking. From these observations we may conclude that (1) destruction of the quadrigeminal plate has no influence upon vertical eye movements. (2) destruction of the posterior commissure, in combination with the quadrigeminal plate, is not always followed by disturbances of vertical eye movements. In man it is still not clear which structures are responsible for the performance of vertical eye movements.

  20. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  1. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  2. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  3. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  4. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharon Turban; Paul J Thuluvath; Mohamed G Atta

    2007-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a "functional" and reversible form of renal failure that occurs in patients with advanced chronic liver disease. The distinctive hallmark feature of HRS is the intense renal vasoconstriction caused by interactions between systemic and portal hemodynamics. This results in activation of vasoconstrictors and suppression of vasodilators in the renal circulation. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, as well as current and emerging therapies of HRS are discussed in this review.

  5. Postconcussional Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Necla Keskin; Lut Tamam

    2013-01-01

    Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral) symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method f...

  6. Fraser syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay A

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Fraser Syndrome is a rare disorder with only a few cases having been described in Indian literature. We report here a case of a patient aged 16 yr present with primary amenorrhea which is a very unusual mode of presentation. Multiple associated anomalies were present including those of eyelids, eyebrow, face, fingers and genitalia. Chromosome analysis revealed a normal female karyotype. Pituitary gonadotropins were within normal range.

  7. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  8. Gerstmann's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Sukumar, S.; Ferguson, G C

    1996-01-01

    Although Gerstmann's syndrome has been well documented since it was characterised in the latter half of last century, there has not been much literature on it in the last few years. We present a classical case in a patient who was admitted into hospital for an unrelated problem. We conclude that clinical examination still has a valuable role in neurology, despite the availability of excellent imaging techniques.

  9. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease with recurrent thromboses and pregnancy complications (90% are female patients that can be primary and secondary (with concomitant autoimmune disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies are prothrombotic but also act directly with brain tissue. One clinical and one laboratory criterion is necessary for the diagnosis of APS. Positive serological tests have to be confirmed after at least 12 weeks. Clinical picture consists of thromboses in many organs and spontaneous miscarriages, sometimes thrombocytopaenia and haemolytic anaemia, but neurological cases are the most frequent: headaches, stroke, encephalopathy, seizures, visual disturbances, Sneddon syndrome, dementia, vertigo, chorea, balism, transitory global amnesia, psychosis, transversal myelopathy and Guillain-Barre syndrome. About 50% of strokes below 50 years of age are caused by APS. The first line of therapy in stroke is anticoagulation: intravenous heparin or low-weight heparins. In chronic treatment, oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy are used, warfarin and aspirin, mostly for life. In resistant cases, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are necessary. Prognosis is good in most patients but some are treatment-resistant with recurrent thrombotic events and eventually death.

  10. Kartagener syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedaa Skeik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nedaa Skeik1–3, Fadi I Jabr41Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Dartmouth Medical School, Hannover, NH, USA; 3New York Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 4Horizon Medical Center, Hospital Medicine, Dickson, TN, USAAbstract: Kartagener syndrome is a rare, ciliopathic, autosomal recessive genetic disorder that causes a defect in the action of the cilia lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tube. Patients usually present with chronic recurrent rhinosinusitis, otitis media, pneumonia, and bronchiectasis caused by pseudomonal infection. Situs inversus can be seen in about 50% of cases. Diagnosis can be made by tests to prove impaired cilia function, biopsy, and genetic studies. Treatment is supportive. In severe cases, the prognosis can be fatal if bilateral lung transplantation is delayed. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with chronic recurrent upper respiratory infections, pseudomonal pneumonia, and chronic bronchiectasis who presented with acute respiratory failure. She was diagnosed with Kartagener syndrome based on her clinical presentation and genetic studies. She expired on ventilator with refractory respiratory and multiorgan failure.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, immotile cilia syndrome, situs inversus

  11. Crush syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Lovallo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The first detailed cases of crush syndrome were described in 1941 in London after victims trapped beneath bombed buildings presented with swollen limbs, hypovolemic shock, dark urine, renal failure, and ultimately perished. The majority of the data and studies on this topic still draw from large databases of earthquake victims. However, in Africa, a continent with little seismic activity, the majority of crush syndrome cases are instead victims of severe beatings rather than earthquake casualties, and clinical suspicion by emergency personnel must be high in this patient group presenting with oliguria or pigmenturia. Damaged skeletal muscle fibres and cell membranes lead to an inflammatory cascade resulting in fluid sequestration in the injured extremity, hypotension, hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia and their complications, and renal injury from multiple sources. Elevations in the serum creatinine, creatine kinase (CK, and potassium levels are frequent findings in these patients, and can help guide critical steps in management. Fluid resuscitation should begin prior to extrication of trapped victims or as early as possible, as this basic intervention has been shown to in large part prevent progression of renal injury to requiring haemodialysis. Alkalinization of the urine and use of mannitol for forced diuresis are recommended therapies under specific circumstances and are supported by studies done in animal models, but have not been shown to change clinical outcomes in human crush victims. In the past 70 years the crush syndrome and its management have been studied more thoroughly, however clinical practice guidelines continue to evolve.

  12. Asperger Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Asperger Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Asperger Syndrome Print A ... the medical community still use the term. About Asperger Syndrome The disorder is named after Hans Asperger, ...

  13. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome.

  14. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care » Associated Conditions » Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Complications of anesthesia (sedation during surgery) occur in ... histories are complicated. Why Would an Individual With Down Syndrome Need A nesthesia? 40-60% of infants born ...

  15. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  16. Heart and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  17. ADHD & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care » Associated Conditions » ADHD & Down Syndrome ADHD & Down Syndrome Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, is a ... age. How Common Is ADD in Children With Down Syndrome? The frequency of ADHD in children with Down ...

  18. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry​ . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  19. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  20. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis.

  1. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (Juvenile) Polymyalgia Rheumatica Psoriatic Arthritis Raynaud's Phenomenon Reactive Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren's Syndrome Spinal Stenosis Spondyloarthritis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Juvenile) Takayasu's ...

  2. Binding of toxic-shock-syndrome toxin-1 to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poindexter, N.J.; Schlievert, P.M.

    1987-07-01

    Toxic-shock-syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), produced by Staphylococcus aureus and associated with toxic shock syndrome, functions in vitro as both a lymphoproliferative and immunosuppressive protein for human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMs). We analyzed TSST-1-target cell interactions by receptor-ligand binding analyses. In competitive binding experiments, 2 X 10(5) human PBMs or purified cell populations were incubated in the presence of small amounts of (5-50 ng) of /sup 125/I-labeled TSST-1 and increasing amounts of unlabeled TSST-1 (25-10,000 ng). Data were analyzed by the method of Scatchard. Toxin-specific receptors were shown to exist on T lymphocytes within the PBM population. T4+ cells had 27.5 X 10(6) receptors per cell, and T8+ cells had 9 X 10(6) receptors per cell. T4+ and T8+ receptors had dissociation constants of 2.58 X 10(-8) M and 1.8 X 10(-8) M, respectively. These studies confirm earlier work showing that TSST-1 causes the functional activation of a population of T lymphocytes involved in suppression of immunoglobulin responses.

  3. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome Occurring in a Kidney Transplant Patient with Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Kandria Jumil; Liu, Jessie

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) occurring in solid organ transplantation (SOT) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality usually due to delays in diagnosis, drug toxicity encountered with antimycobacterial therapy, and drug-drug interactions. TB in SOT patients may mimic other infectious and noninfectious posttransplant complications such as posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and systemic cytomegalovirus infection. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a host response resulting in paradoxical worsening of an infectious disease which occurs after the employment of effective therapy and reversal of an immunosuppressed state. We describe the development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), a unique complication occurring during the treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis occurring after transplant which resulted from decreasing immunosuppression in a patient who received Alemtuzumab induction therapy. Although (IRIS) has been originally described in HIV/AIDS patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), solid organ transplant recipients with diagnosed or occult TB whose immune system may undergo immune reconstitution during their posttransplant course represent a new high risk group.

  4. [Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Anna Carolina Faria Moreira Gomes; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Guimarães, Luciano Junqueira; Guimarães, Raquel Rosa; Santos, Flávia Patrícia Sena Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Machrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially fatal disease, commonly associated with chronic rheumatic diseases, mainly juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is included in the group of secondary forms of haemophagocytic syndrome, and other causes are lymphoproliferative diseases and infections. Its most important clinical and laboratorial manifestations are non-remitting fever, splenomegaly, bleeding, impairment of liver function, cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypofibrinogenemia and hyperferritinemia. The treatment needs to be started quickly, and the majority of cases have a good response with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. The Epstein-Barr virus is described as a possible trigger for many cases of MAS, especially in these patients in treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. In these refractory cases, etoposide (VP16) should be administered, associated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Our objective is to describe a rare case of MAS probably due to EBV infection in a subject with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which achieved complete remission of the disease after therapy guided by 2004-HLH protocol.

  5. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome Occurring in a Kidney Transplant Patient with Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Jose; Ledesma, Kandria Jumil; Couto, Paul J; Liu, Jessie

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) occurring in solid organ transplantation (SOT) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality usually due to delays in diagnosis, drug toxicity encountered with antimycobacterial therapy, and drug-drug interactions. TB in SOT patients may mimic other infectious and noninfectious posttransplant complications such as posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and systemic cytomegalovirus infection. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a host response resulting in paradoxical worsening of an infectious disease which occurs after the employment of effective therapy and reversal of an immunosuppressed state. We describe the development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), a unique complication occurring during the treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis occurring after transplant which resulted from decreasing immunosuppression in a patient who received Alemtuzumab induction therapy. Although (IRIS) has been originally described in HIV/AIDS patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), solid organ transplant recipients with diagnosed or occult TB whose immune system may undergo immune reconstitution during their posttransplant course represent a new high risk group.

  6. Raynaud's syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, D G; Dathan, J R

    1985-01-01

    We report three cases of Raynaud's syndrome with digital ischaemic ulceration, in association with carpal tunnel syndrome. In all cases, the aetiology of the Raynaud's syndrome was probably unrelated to the nerve compression. However, symptoms were worse on the side of the median nerve lesion in two patients and worse on the side with the most severe nerve dysfunction in the third; symptoms were relieved by carpal tunnel decompression in two patients. We suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome ma...

  7. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  8. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Lata

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension.This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys,where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration,which ultimately results in uraemia.The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites.Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output.Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure,but refractory ascites,and its impact on prognosis is less negative.Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method,nevertheless,only a few patients can receive it.The most suitable "bridge treatments" or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin.Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response.Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term.Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS.

  9. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  10. Role of the 2B4 Receptor in CD8+ T-Cell-Dependent Immune Control of Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Mice With Reconstituted Human Immune System Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chijioke, Obinna; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Moretta, Alessandro; Capaul, Riccarda; Münz, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) disease due to deficiency in the adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) are highly susceptible to one specific viral pathogen, the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This susceptibility might result from impaired CD8(+) T-cell and natural killer cell responses to EBV infection in these patients. We demonstrate that antibody blocking of the SAP-dependent 2B4 receptor is sufficient to induce XLP-like aggravation of EBV disease in mice with reconstituted human immune system components. CD8(+) T cells require 2B4 for EBV-specific immune control, because 2B4 blockade after CD8(+) T-cell depletion did not further aggravate symptoms of EBV infection.

  11. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  12. Eagle Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beytholahi JM

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Eagle's syndrome is characterized by an elongated styloid process and (or calcification of"nstylohyoid ligament besides clinical symptoms. The symptoms are those related to pain when"nswallowing or rotating the neck, headacke, earache, dizziness, intermittent glossitis, sensation of"nforeign body in pharynx and transient syncope. The case which is presented can be considered a very"nrare form of the disease in which complete calcification of the ligament and it's thickening has"noccured. Also there is little relationship between the severity of calcification and severity of symptoms."nA careful and thorough evaluation of each panoramic radiography is emphasized.

  13. HELLP syndrome

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    Dilek Acar

    2014-08-01

    Suggested treatment modality consists, stabilization of blood pressure and magnesium sulfate infusion. Then evaluation of fetal status and planning delivery method and time if maternal status remains unstable. If prognosis seems favorable without urgent delivery and fetus can benefit from it, a course of betamethasone can be given to fetuses between 24 and 34 weeks of gestational age. The only and definite treatment of HELLP syndrome is delivering the baby. Suggested benefits of steroid therapy and other experimental treatments are still to be proven effective by large randomized controlled trials. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 735-760

  14. Jacobsen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from approximately 7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe

  15. Chilaiditi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S D; Cruikshank, J G

    1977-02-01

    The features of the Chilaiditi Syndrome are described, together with the historial background, and a brief review of the literature on the condition is given. The prevalence in our geriatric population was found to be 1% and the 13 cases seen over 22 months are reported briefly. The prevalence increases with age and may be related to the consumption of drugs by the elderly; although in the majority it is asymptomatic, it may, particularly when associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, lead to unnecessary laparotomy. In the geriatric patient, interposition of the bowel should be considered in the differential diagnosis of air under the right hemidiaphragm.

  16. Myofascial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Carli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome is common cause one of musculoskeletal pain and it is characterized by trigger points (TP, limited range of motion in joints and local twitch response (LTR during mechanical stimulation of the TP. Trigger point is a hyperirritable spot in skeletal muscle that is associated with a hypersensitive palpable nodule in a taut band. The spot is tender when pressed and can give rise to characteristic referred pain, motor dysfunction and autonomic phenomena. Palpation is reliable diagnostic criterion for locating TP in patients. Treatment is based on anesthetise TP, stretch and spray, local pression and physical activity.

  17. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  18. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  19. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentebella, Judy; Kerner, John A

    2009-10-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS) is the result of aggressive enteral or parenteral feeding in a malnourished patient, with hypophosphatemia being the hallmark of this phenomenon. Other metabolic abnormalities, such as hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia, may also occur, along with sodium and fluid retention. The metabolic changes that occur in RFS can be severe enough to cause cardiorespiratory failure and death. This article reviews the pathophysiology, the clinical manifestations, and the management of RFS. The key to prevention is identifying patients at risk and being aware of the potential complications involved in rapidly reintroducing feeds to a malnourished patient.

  20. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  1. Japanese variant of multicentric castleman's disease associated with serositis and thrombocytopenia--a report of two cases: is TAFRO syndrome (Castleman- Kojima disease) a distinct clinicopathological entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Yasufumi; Nakajima, Akio; Iwao, Haruka; Kurose, Nozomu; Sato, Tomomi; Nakamura, Takuji; Miki, Miyuki; Sakai, Tomoyuki; Kawanami, Takafumi; Sawaki, Toshioki; Fujita, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Masao; Fukushima, Toshihiro; Okazaki, Toshiro; Umehara, Hisanori

    2013-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) is a polyclonal lymphoproliferative disorder that manifests as marked hyper-γ-globulinemia, severe inflammation, anemia, and thrombocytosis. Recently, Takai et al. reported a new disease concept, TAFRO syndrome, named from thrombocytopenia, anasarca, fever, reticulin fibrosis, and organomegaly. Furthermore, Kojima et al. reported Japanese MCD cases with effusion and thrombocytopenia (Castleman-Kojima disease). Here, we report two cases of MCD associated with marked pleural effusion, ascites, and thrombocytopenia, and discuss the independence of the TAFRO syndrome (Castleman-Kojima disease). Case 1: A 57-year-old woman had fever, anemia, anasarca, and some small cervical lymphadenopathy. Although she had been administered steroid therapy, and full-coverage antibiotics, her general condition, including fever, systemic inflammation, and anasarca, deteriorated steadily. We administered chemotherapy [CHOEP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, etoposide, and prednisolone) regimen], but despite a transient improvement, she died due to septic shock. Case 2: A 73-year-old man with a history of aplastic anemia and remission presented with fever, severe inflammation, and anasarca. Prednisolone was administered (15 mg daily), and his hyperinflammation once improved. Nevertheless, his general condition, including pleural effusion and ascites, worsened, and C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels showed marked increases. The patient died due to multiorgan failure. Cases of TAFRO syndrome (Castleman-Kojima disease) are still rare. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct multicenter clinical surveys including similar cases, such as ours, to reach a consensus regarding diagnostic criteria, therapeutic strategy, and pathophysiological etiology for this syndrome.

  2. Lowe syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loi Mario

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a multisystem disorder characterised by anomalies affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. It is a uncommon, panethnic, X-linked disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of approximately 1 in 500,000. Bilateral cataract and severe hypotonia are present at birth. In the subsequent weeks or months, a proximal renal tubulopathy (Fanconi-type becomes evident and the ocular picture may be complicated by glaucoma and cheloids. Psychomotor retardation is evident in childhood, while behavioural problems prevail and renal complications arise in adolescence. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5 bisphosphate 5 phosphatase, PtdIns (4,5P2, in the trans-Golgi network is responsible for the disease. Both enzymatic and molecular testing are available for confirmation of the diagnosis and for prenatal detection of the disease. The treatment includes: cataract extraction, glaucoma control, physical and speech therapy, use of drugs to address behavioural problems, and correction of the tubular acidosis and the bone disease with the use of bicarbonate, phosphate, potassium and water. Life span rarely exceeds 40 years.

  3. Cardiorenal syndrome

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    Sabry Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease.  Heart failure may lead to acute kidney injury and vice versa. Chronic kidney disease may affect the clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Renal impairment with any degree of albuminuria has been increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and heart failure hospitalizations, while chronic heart failure may cause chronic kidney disease. The bidirectional nature of these disorders contributes to the complexity and the composite definitions of cardiorenal syndromes. However, the most important clinical trials in heart failure tend to exclude patients with significant renal dysfunction. The mechanisms whereby renal insufficiency worsens the outcome in heart failure are not known, and several pathways could contribute to the ‘‘vicious heart/kidney circle.’’ Traditionally, renal impairment has been attributed to the renal hypoperfusion due to reduced cardiac output and decreased systemic pressure. The hypovolemia leads to sympathetic activity, increased renin-angiotensin aldosterone pathway, and arginine-vasopressin release. These mechanisms cause fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, and volume overload. Therapy to improve renal dysfunction, reduce neurohormonal activation and ameliorate renal blood flow could lead to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with cardiorenal syndrome.

  4. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  5. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  6. Sheehan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicli, Fatih; Dokmetas, Hatice Sebila; Acibucu, Fettah

    2013-04-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is characterized by various degrees of hypopituitarism, and develops as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. Increased pituitary volume, small sella size, disseminated intravascular coagulation and autoimmunity are the proposed factors in the pathogenesis of SS. Hormonal insufficiencies, ranging from single pituitary hormone insufficiency to total hypopituitarism, are observed in patients. The first most important issue in the diagnosis is being aware of the syndrome. Lack of lactation and failure of menstrual resumption after delivery that complicated with severe hemorrhage are the most important clues in diagnosing SS. The most frequent endocrine disorders are the deficiencies of growth hormone and prolactin. In patients with typical obstetric history, prolactin response to TRH seems to be the most sensitive screening test in diagnosing SS. Other than typical pituitary deficiency, symptoms such as anemia, pancytopenia, osteoporosis, impairment in cognitive functions and impairment in the quality of life are also present in these patients. Treatment of SS is based on the appropriate replacement of deficient hormones. Growth hormone replacement has been found to have positive effects; however, risk to benefit ratio, side effects and cost of the treatment should be taken into account.

  7. Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, C M; Bremner, W J

    1998-06-22

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder. Affected males carry an additional X chromosome, which results in male hypogonadism, androgen deficiency, and impaired spermatogenesis. Some patients may exhibit all of the classic signs of this disorder, including gynecomastia, small testes, sparse body hair, tallness, and infertility, whereas others, because of the wide variability in clinical expression, lack many of these features. Treatment consists of testosterone replacement therapy to correct the androgen deficiency and to provide patients with appropriate virilization. This therapy also has positive effects on mood and self-esteem and has been shown to protect against osteoporosis, although it will not reverse infertility. Although the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome is now made definitively using chromosomal karyotyping, revealing in most instances a 47,XXY genotype, the diagnosis also can be made using a careful history and results of a physical examination, with the hallmark being small, firm testes. As it affects 1 in 500 male patients and presents with a variety of clinical features, primary care physicians should be familiar with this condition.

  8. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Down Syndrome Print A A ... Help en español El síndrome de Down About Down Syndrome Down syndrome (DS), also called Trisomy 21, is ...

  9. Facts about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label> Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Down Syndrome Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... children with Down syndrome. View charts » What is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a condition in which a ...

  10. Burnout Syndrome of Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Semrádová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis covers burnout syndrome of teachers. Defines burnout syndrome, describes its causes and symptoms. Describes teaching as helping profession and focousing on stressful situations at school. In the last chapter described different prevention strategies burnout syndrome. Key words: burnout syndrome, teaching, teacher, helping professions, beginning teacher, stress

  11. Leopard syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallapiccola Bruno

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract LEOPARD syndrome (LS, OMIM 151100 is a rare multiple congenital anomalies condition, mainly characterized by skin, facial and cardiac anomalies. LEOPARD is an acronym for the major features of this disorder, including multiple Lentigines, ECG conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, and sensorineural Deafness. About 200 patients have been reported worldwide but the real incidence of LS has not been assessed. Facial dysmorphism includes ocular hypertelorism, palpebral ptosis and low-set ears. Stature is usually below the 25th centile. Cardiac defects, in particular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mostly involving the left ventricle, and ECG anomalies are common. The lentigines may be congenital, although more frequently manifest by the age of 4–5 years and increase throughout puberty. Additional common features are café-au-lait spots (CLS, chest anomalies, cryptorchidism, delayed puberty, hypotonia, mild developmental delay, sensorineural deafness and learning difficulties. In about 85% of the cases, a heterozygous missense mutation is detected in exons 7, 12 or 13 of the PTPN11 gene. Recently, missense mutations in the RAF1 gene have been found in two out of six PTPN11-negative LS patients. Mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. LS is largely overlapping Noonan syndrome and, during childhood, Neurofibromatosis type 1-Noonan syndrome. Diagnostic clues of LS are multiple lentigines and CLS, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and deafness. Mutation-based differential diagnosis in patients with borderline clinical manifestations is warranted. LS is an autosomal dominant condition, with full penetrance and variable expressivity. If one parent is affected, a 50% recurrence risk is appropriate. LS should be suspected in foetuses with severe cardiac hypertrophy and prenatal DNA test may be performed. Clinical management should

  12. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy.

  13. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Vaccaro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS is the collective name of three rare congenital conditions characterised by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. The three known types of TRPS have different modalities of genetic transmission: namely, TRPS I and III are inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, while the cases of TRPS II are essentially sporadic.The diagnosis of the different types of TRPS is based on clinical and radiological findings, eventually integrated by genetic analysis, particularly useful in some cases with the non-classical clinical presentation. Alopecia and structural abnormalities of the nose and the hands should be considered as clinical hallmarks, whereas endocrine disorders, renal alterations, ureteral reflux, heart pathology and bone dysplasia have been documented, in the setting of a multisystem involvement.

  14. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

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    Giuseppe Civardi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The last few years have seen a complete change in the etiopathogenetic features, classification and therapeutic approach of the hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES, a multiorgan targeted blood disease. The discovery of a genetic mutation and the occurrence of a new fusion gene, named FIP1L1-PDGFRA (FIP gene, in some patients allowed the identification of a new myeloproliferative disorder, M-HES: thereafter, the pivotal therapeutic role of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, particularly, imatinib mesylate, was clearly detected. In the same period a new pathogenetic mechanism has been detected: some authors described the presence of a CD3-CD4 +Tcell clone correlating with the overproduction of IL5, a potent eosinophilic cell line stimulating cytokine. As a consequence an international consensus committee proposed a new classification for these syndromes, in accordance with these new pathogenetic features. The disease is characterized by an extensive tissue and organ damage due to an eosinophilic cell infiltration and leading to the release of toxic cytokines and subsequent organ dysfunction. The heart, lungs, gastrointestinal apparatus, skin and central nervous system are affected. Moreover the released cytokines can induce a thrombophilic status and thromboembolic events can occur throughout the body. Aim of the study: We describe the diagnostic procedures that are necessary in order to obtain a correct diagnosis and classification of the disease and to evaluate the presence of an organ and tissue damage. In particular, bone marrow biopsy and cytogenetic examination of blood and marrow are necessary for detecting M-HES cases that are positive for the FIP gene. In these patients, imatinib mesylate has a leading role for obtaining complete remission of the disease in a high percentage of cases. We also examine the therapeutic options for the other forms of the disease: prednisone, interferon, hydroxiurea are effective therapeutic tools in

  15. ADHD and genetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo-Castro, Adriana; D'Agati, Elisa; Curatolo, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    A high rate of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)-like characteristics has been reported in a wide variety of disorders including syndromes with known genetic causes. In this article, we review the genetic and the neurobiological links between ADHD symptoms and some genetic syndromes such as: Fragile X Syndrome, Neurofibromatosis 1, DiGeorge Syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Turner Syndrome, Williams Syndrome and Klinefelter Syndrome. Although each syndrome may arise from different genetic abnormalities with multiple molecular functions, the effects of these abnormalities may give rise to common effects downstream in the biological pathways or neural circuits, resulting in the presentation of ADHD symptoms. Early diagnosis of ADHD allows for earlier treatment, and has the potential for a better outcome in children with genetic syndromes.

  16. A case of age-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disorder, so-called polymorphous subtype, of the mandible, with a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Fukunaga, Shuichi; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kojima, Masaru; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

    2013-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is known to be associated with the development of lymphomas in immunocompromised patients. Recently, age-related immune impairment has been recognized as a predisposing factor in the development of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) in elderly patients without any known immunodeficiency or prior lymphoma. In approximately 70% of reported cases, the affected sites have been extranodal, such as the skin, lung, tonsil and stomach. However, age-related EBV-associated B cell (EBV + B cell) LPD is extremely rare in the oral cavity. Here we report a 71-year-old Japanese man who developed an EBV + B cell LPD resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL)--so-called polymorphous subtype-of the mandible. Histopathologically, infiltration of large atypical lymphoid cells including Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells into granulation tissue with marked necrosis was found in the mandibular bone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the large atypical Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells were CD3-, CD15-, CD20+, CD30+ and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-latent infection membrane protein-1 (LMP-1)+. In situ hybridization (ISH) demonstrated EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) + in numerous Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells. EBNA-2 was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using an extract from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimen. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the polymorphous subtype of age-related EBV + B cell LPD affecting the mandible.

  17. Comparison of two real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation in lymphoproliferative disorders: correlation between immunoglobulin gene mutation load and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Starza, Irene; Cavalli, Marzia; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Barbero, Daniela; Mantoan, Barbara; Genuardi, Elisa; Urbano, Marina; Mannu, Claudia; Gazzola, Anna; Ciabatti, Elena; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin; Galimberti, Sara; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Gaidano, Gianluca; Ladetto, Marco; Monitillo, Luigia

    2014-09-01

    We compared two strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by a variable immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) genes mutation load. Twenty-five samples from chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (n = 18) or mantle cell lymphoma (n = 7) patients were analyzed. Based on IGH variable region genes, 22/25 samples carried > 2% mutations, 20/25 > 5%. In the IGH joining region genes, 23/25 samples carried > 2% mutations, 18/25 > 5%. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed on IGH genes using two strategies: method A utilizes two patient-specific primers, whereas method B employs one patient-specific and one germline primer, with different positions on the variable, diversity and joining regions. Twenty-three samples (92%) resulted evaluable using method A, only six (24%) by method B. Method B poor performance was specifically evident among mutated IGH variable/joining region cases, although no specific mutation load above, which the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction failed was found. The molecular strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation should be adapted to the B-cell receptor features of the disease investigated.

  18. Methotrexate-related Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferative disorder--so-called "Hodgkin-like lesion"--of the oral cavity in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Tanaka, Akio; Shigematu, Hisao; Kojima, Masaru; Sakashita, Hideaki; Kusama, Kaoru

    2010-12-01

    Patients affected by autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, dermatomyositis) who are treated with methotrexate (MTX) sometimes develop lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). In approximately 40% of reported cases, the affected sites have been extranodal, and have included the gastrointestinal tract, skin, lung, kidney, and soft tissues. However, MTX-associated LPD (MTX-LPD) is extremely rare in the oral cavity. Here we report a 69-year-old Japanese woman with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed MTX-LPD resembling Hodgkin's disease--so-called "Hodgkin-like lesion"--in the left upper jaw. Histopathologically, large atypical lymphoid cells including Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells were found to have infiltrated into granulation tissue in the ulcerative oral mucosa. Immunohistochemistry showed that the large atypical cells were positive for CD20, CD30 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-latent infection membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) and negative for CD15. EBV was detected by in situ hybridization (ISH) with EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for LMP-1 and EBNA-2 in material taken from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimen. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MTX-related EBV-associated LPD (MTX-EBVLPD), "Hodgkin-like lesion", of the oral cavity in a patient with RA.

  19. EBV-associated post-transplantation B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder following allogenic stem cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: tumor regression after reduction of immunosuppression - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niedobitek Gerald

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated B-cell post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a severe complication following stem cell transplantation. This is believed to occur as a result of iatrogenic immunosuppression leading to a relaxation of T-cell control of EBV infection and thus allowing viral reactivation and proliferation of EBV-infected B-lymphocytes. In support of this notion, reduction of immunosuppressive therapy may lead to regression of PTLD. We present a case of an 18-year-old male developing a monomorphic B-cell PTLD 2 months after receiving an allogenic stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Reduction of immunosuppressive therapy led to regression of lymphadenopathy. Nevertheless, the patient died 3 months afterwards due to extensive graft-vs.-host-disease and sepsis. As a diagnostic lymph node biopsy was performed only after reduction of immunosuppressive therapy, we are able to study the histopathological changes characterizing PTLD regression. We observed extensive apoptosis of blast cells, accompanied by an abundant infiltrate comprising predominantly CD8-positive, Granzyme B-positive T-cells. This observation supports the idea that regression of PTLD is mediated by cytotoxic T-cells and is in keeping with the observation that T-cell depletion, represents a major risk factor for the development of PTLD.

  20. First Trimester Down Syndrome Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21) or Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) . The first trimester screen is one ... chromosome material that results in Down syndrome or Edwards syndrome , the levels of PAPP-A tend to be ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alport Syndrome Recessive Type MalaCards: alport syndrome Merck Manual Consumer Version My46 Trait Profile Orphanet: Alport syndrome Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Alport Syndrome Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) The Kidney Foundation of ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Werner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Condition Adult premature aging syndrome Adult Progeria Werner's Syndrome Werners Syndrome WS Related Information How ... BK, Monnat RJ Jr. Werner and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes: mechanistic basis of human progeroid diseases. Nat ...

  3. Prenatal Tests for Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME What Is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a common birth defect that includes mental retardation and— often— heart problems. Children with Down syndrome have round faces and almond-shaped eyes that ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Donohue syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resistance syndromes. These disorders, which also include Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome and type A insulin resistance syndrome , are ... of the insulin receptor (type A and Rabson-Mendenhall syndromes): a 30-year prospective. Medicine (Baltimore). 2004 ...

  5. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-16

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  6. Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Duane Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U D Shrestha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome (GHS is also known as Oculo-Auriculo-Vertebral (OAV syndrome or Branchial arch syndrome. Duane retraction syndrome (DRS is a congenital disorder of ocular motility characterized by limited abduction, adduction or both. It is unilateral in 80% of cases. The important and interesting part of this eight months old child is presence of GHS with DRS. She has bilateral invol-vement, which is seen in only 5-8% of GHS, as compared to high incidence of unilateral involve-ment. This child also had refractive error of + 6.00/ - 1.5 * 180. At four year of age her vision with glass was 6/9. Children with GHS and DRS should have early eye examination done to treat the problem of refractive error. Keywords: Duane retraction syndrome; goldenhar syndrome, refractive error.

  7. Cushing syndrome in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-12-01

    Cushing syndrome is characterized by truncal obesity, growth deceleration, skin changes, muscle weakness, and hypertension. Cushing syndrome in childhood usually results from the exogenous administration of glucocorticoids. This article presents the causes and discusses the treatment of endogenous Cushing syndrome. It also discusses the clinical and molecular genetics of inherited forms of this syndrome. Cushing syndrome needs to be diagnosed and treated properly when first recognized; improper treatment can turn this otherwise completely curable disorder into a chronic ailment. Barriers to optimal care of a pediatric patient with Cushing syndrome are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Gitelman syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levtchenko Elena N

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gitelman syndrome (GS, also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence of heterozygotes is approximately 1% in Caucasian populations, making it one of the most frequent inherited renal tubular disorders. In the majority of cases, symptoms do not appear before the age of six years and the disease is usually diagnosed during adolescence or adulthood. Transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, sometimes accompanied by abdominal pain, vomiting and fever are often seen in GS patients. Paresthesias, especially in the face, frequently occur. Remarkably, some patients are completely asymptomatic except for the appearance at adult age of chondrocalcinosis that causes swelling, local heat, and tenderness over the affected joints. Blood pressure is lower than that in the general population. Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported occasionally. In general, growth is normal but can be delayed in those GS patients with severe hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. GS is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Mutations in the solute carrier family12, member 3 gene, SLC12A3, which encodes the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC, are found in the majority of GS patients. At present, more than 140 different NCC mutations throughout the whole protein have been identified. In a small minority of GS patients, mutations in the CLCNKB gene, encoding the chloride channel ClC-Kb have been identified. Diagnosis is based on the clinical symptoms and biochemical abnormalities (hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. Bartter syndrome (especially type III is the most important genetic disorder to consider in the differential diagnosis of GS. Genetic counseling is important. Antenatal diagnosis for GS

  9. Rare case of nephrotic syndrome: Schimke syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kelly Krislane de Vasconcelos Pedrosa

    Full Text Available Abstract Schimke syndrome corresponds to dysplasia of bone and immunity, associated with progressive renal disease secondary to nephrotic syndrome cortico-resistant, with possible other abnormalities such as hypothyroidism and blond marrow aplasia. It is a rare genetic disorder, with few reports in the literature. The most frequent renal involvement is nephrotic syndrome with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and progressive renal failure. The objective of this study was to report a case of Schimke syndrome, diagnostic investigation and management of the case.

  10. Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyllerman, Mårten

    2013-01-01

    Angelman syndrome combines severe mental retardation, epilepsy, ataxia, speech impairment, and unique behavior with happy demeanor, laughing, short attention span, hyperactivity, and sleep disturbance. Occurrence has been calculated at 1:20000 to 1:12000 constituting about 6% of all children with severe mental retardation and epilepsy. The physical "prototype" includes microcephaly with flat neck, fair skin and hair, wide-spaced teeth, and open mouth with tongue protrusion. Epilepsy is characterized by atypical absences, erratic myoclonus, and occasional tonic-clonic seizures. EEG demonstrates high-amplitude 2-3Hz delta activity with spike and slow-wave discharges and sleep-activated generalized epileptiform discharges. Sodium valproate, benzodiazepines, and priacetam are frequently used and effective. Development is generally slow, the majority attaining independent walking in the first 2.5-6 years. Vocabulary is limited to a few single words with superior speech and object apprehension. The condition is due to a lack of expression of the UBE3A gene on chromosome 15q. Maternal deletions of 15q11-13 produce the most pronounced phenotype (65-70% of probands), uniparental disomy and imprinting center mutations (10%), and UBE3A point mutations (11%) produce milder phenotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Seth S; Sell, Gabrielle L; Zbinden, Mark A; Bird, Lynne M

    2015-07-01

    In this review we summarize the clinical and genetic aspects of Angelman syndrome (AS), its molecular and cellular underpinnings, and current treatment strategies. AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive disability, motor dysfunction, speech impairment, hyperactivity, and frequent seizures. AS is caused by disruption of the maternally expressed and paternally imprinted UBE3A, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Four mechanisms that render the maternally inherited UBE3A nonfunctional are recognized, the most common of which is deletion of the maternal chromosomal region 15q11-q13. Remarkably, duplication of the same chromosomal region is one of the few characterized persistent genetic abnormalities associated with autistic spectrum disorder, occurring in >1-2% of all cases of autism spectrum disorder. While the overall morphology of the brain and connectivity of neural projections appear largely normal in AS mouse models, major functional defects are detected at the level of context-dependent learning, as well as impaired maturation of hippocampal and neocortical circuits. While these findings demonstrate a crucial role for ubiquitin protein ligase E3A in synaptic development, the mechanisms by which deficiency of ubiquitin protein ligase E3A leads to AS pathophysiology in humans remain poorly understood. However, recent efforts have shown promise in restoring functions disrupted in AS mice, renewing hope that an effective treatment strategy can be found.

  12. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome irritable bowel syndrome thyroid disease Depression and anxiety disorders are the most common conditions that overlap with PMS. About one half of women seeking treatment for PMS have one of these ...

  13. Brain Fag Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    syndrome. BFS is a tetrad of somatic complaints; cognitive impairments; sleep related complaints; and other somatic impairments. ..... BFS is a history told over time and through space. Divisions ..... Social origins of the brain fag syndrome.

  14. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  15. Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  16. Locked-In Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  17. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  18. Central Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  19. Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  20. What Is Marfan Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11:11 Size: 10.5 MB November 2014 What Is Marfan Syndrome? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Being Done on Marfan Syndrome? For More Information What Is Connective Tissue? Connective tissue supports many parts ...

  1. Post-Concussion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-concussion syndrome Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Post-concussion syndrome is a complex disorder in which various symptoms — ... sometimes months after the injury that caused the concussion. Concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury that ...

  2. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001311.htm Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes ...

  3. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masoud Poureisa

    2009-01-01

    "nDescription and Definition: Synonym: patau syndrome with an incidence of 1 in 5000 births, this syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities involving virtually every organ system...

  4. Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Into Relieved Are you experiencing symptoms linked to restless legs syndrome (RLS)? Find tools and support to help get ... I couldn’t sleep. Fortunately, I found the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation and learned what type of doctor to ...

  5. Dubin-Johnson syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000242.htm Dubin-Johnson syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dubin-Johnson syndrome (DJS) is a disorder passed down ...

  6. The obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, R. H. W. M.; de Grootb, Ph. G.

    2008-01-01

    The association of persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies and thromboembolic events, (recurrent) pregnancy loss or both is termed antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in women with the syndrome should be regarded as at high-risk for complications. Optimal management consist

  7. Learning about Klinefelter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Klinefelter Syndrome What is Klinefelter syndrome? What ... they are referred to a doctor to evaluate learning disabilities. The diagnosis may also be considered in ...

  8. Learning about Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Definitions for genetic terms used on this page. Learning About Velocardiofacial Syndrome What is velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS)? ... are formed or work; a characteristic facial appearance; learning problems; and speech and feeding problems. The name ...

  9. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000304.htm Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of ...

  10. Ectopic Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cushing syndrome in which a tumor outside the pituitary gland produces a hormone called adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Causes Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher ...

  11. Organic brain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... state Intoxication from drug or alcohol use Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (a long-term effect of excessive alcohol consumption ... Substance use Transient ischemic attack Vascular dementia Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome Review Date 2/27/2016 Updated by: Amit ...

  12. Gorlin‑Goltz Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Mar-Apr 2014 | Vol 4 | Issue 2 | ... Oral Medicine and Radiology, College of Dental Sciences and Reasearch, Bopal, Ahmeadabad, .... or GGS, Oro-facial-digital syndrome, Noonan syndrome,.

  13. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children who have Tourette syndrome may also have learning disabilities or obsessive-compulsive disorder (thoughts or behaviors that ... my child who has tourette syndrome, involuntary movement, learning disabilities, learning disability, movement disorders, obsessive thoughts, obsessive-compulsive ...

  14. Sheehan's Syndrome (Postpartum Hypopituitarism)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan's syndrome Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Sheehan's syndrome is a condition that affects women who lose a life-threatening amount of blood in childbirth or who have severe low blood pressure ...

  15. Barth Syndrome (BTHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be prescribed to control heart problems. The dietary supplement carnitine has aided some children with Barth syndrome but ... may be prescribed to control heart problems. The dietary supplement carnitine has aided some children with Barth syndrome but ...

  16. Recurrent Goodpasture's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, B. R.; Bear, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Goodpasture's syndrome was diagnosed in a 17-year-old boy with glomerulonephritis and hemoptysis. He was successfully treated with cyclophosphamide, prednisone and courses of plasmapheresis. The syndrome recurred 3 1/2 years later and was again successfully treated.

  17. What Is Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Down syndrome are chorionic villus sampling (CVS) and amniocentesis. These procedures, which carry up to a 1% ... are nearly 100% accurate in diagnosing Down syndrome. Amniocentesis is usually performed in the second trimester between ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: otopalatodigital syndrome type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Oto-palato-digital syndrome, type I Other Diagnosis and ... syndrome faciopalatoosseous syndrome FPO OPD syndrome, type 1 oto-palato-digital syndrome, type I Taybi syndrome Related ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: otopalatodigital syndrome type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Oto-palato-digital syndrome, type II Other Diagnosis and ... syndrome faciopalatoosseous syndrome FPO OPD syndrome, type 2 oto-palato-digital syndrome, type II Taybi syndrome Related ...

  20. Ogilvies syndrom efter sectio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, B T; Sørensen, Jette Led; Svaerke, T

    2001-01-01

    Ogilvie's syndrome, acute pseudo-obstruction of the colon, can lead to perforation of the caecum and death. The syndrome is not well known and diagnosis can be difficult to make in time.......Ogilvie's syndrome, acute pseudo-obstruction of the colon, can lead to perforation of the caecum and death. The syndrome is not well known and diagnosis can be difficult to make in time....

  1. Hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ristiniemi, Heli; Perski, Aleksander; Lyskov, Eugene; Emtner, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress is among the most common diagnoses in Sweden, most commonly in the form of exhaustion syndrome (ICD-10 classification - F43.8). The majority of patients with this syndrome also have disturbed breathing (hyperventilation). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome. Thirty patients with exhaustion syndrome and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated with the Nijmegen Symptom Questionnaire (NQ). The participants completed ...

  2. Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is ... the affected eye. What are the signs of Horner’s syndrome? In Horner’s syndrome, the pupil in the ...

  3. Cushing's Syndrome in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing’s Syndrome in Children by Meg Keil, MS, CRNP How is Cushing’s syndrome (CS) in children different than in adults? · CS ... conditions may cause what is known as pseudo-Cushing’s syndrome. Although this is more common in adults, it ...

  4. Williams Syndrome and Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Karen; Wharton, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder with a variety of medical and developmental features, focuses on frequent outward expression of happiness. Analysis of the unique expression of happiness in individuals with Williams syndrome is followed by discussion of this happiness in the context of other dimensions of the syndrome,…

  5. Familial Crouzon syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Samatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition of the craniosynostotic syndromes without syndactyly and with various dentofacial anomalies. Craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis and hypertelorism are the characteristic features of Crouzon syndrome. This report describes the variable clinical features in affected individuals over two generations of a family with dentofacial deformities and review of literature.

  6. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  7. Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Liver in a Patient with Sjogren Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Gorodetskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren’s syndrome (SS has the highest incidence of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders transformation among autoimmune diseases. We present a case of extranodal high grade lymphoma of the liver in a 52-year-old patient with long history of SS. Lymphoma manifested with sharp significant pain in the right hypochondrium, weakness, and profuse night sweats. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan (CT-scan of the abdomen revealed multiple low density foci with homogeneous structure and clear contours in both lobes of the liver. Histologically, proliferation of medium sized lymphoma cells with round-oval and slightly irregular nuclei with fine chromatin was shown. Immunohistochemical and molecular features of the tumors allowed diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. To exclude secondary liver lesion by non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chest and small pelvis CT-scan, endoscopy of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract and study of bone marrow were performed. After 8 cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, the complete remission was achieved, which persists after 45 months of follow-up. Primary hepatic lymphomas are extremely rare, and previously only low-grade hepatic lymphomas have been described in SS. To our knowledge, the patient described here represents the first reported case of DLBCL with primary liver involvement in SS.

  8. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Immune Deficiency Disorders; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorders; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  9. Down syndrome: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Otabor Wajuihian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optometrists as primary eye care providers examine patients from diverse populations, including those with special needs such as Down syndrome. Down syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality associated with several health conditions including vision anomalies such as refractive, accommodative and vergence anomalies, as well as ocular pathology. In this article, a narrative review of Down syndrome including the background, historical perspective, aetiology and genetic mechanisms, types, epidemiology, as well as the physical and medical profile of Down syndrome is presented.Keywords: Down syndrome review; Trisomy 21; historical perspective; etiology; types and epidemiology; features; Optometrist

  10. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Pandeshwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome—NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions.

  11. [Postpartum endocrine syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarme, G; Châtel, P; Luton, D

    2008-05-01

    Postpartum endocrine syndromes occur in the year after delivery. They are due to immunologic and vascular modifications during pregnancy. The Sheehan syndrome is the first described postpartum endocrine syndrome and consists on a hypophyse necrosis in relation with a hypovolemic shock during delivery. The immunologic consequences of the pregnancy are the most frequent, sometimes discrete and transitory. The physiological evolution of the endocrine glands during pregnancy and the most frequent post-partum endocrine syndromes are discussed: postpartum lymphocytic hypophysitis, thyroiditis and Sheehan' syndrome.

  12. Behcet's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Sam R; Yildirim, Resit; Yazici, Yusuf

    2012-12-03

    Behcet's syndrome (BS) is a vasculitis, seen more commonly around the Mediterranean and the Far East, and manifests with oral and genital ulcerations, skin lesions, uveitis, and vascular, central nervous system and gastrointestinal involvement. Its natural history of getting less severe over time, more severe disease in males and lack of specific diagnostic testing separates it from other commonly seen conditions in rheumatology. Most of the serious manifestations respond well to immunosuppression, and these are the mainstays of treatment for BS. BS is more prevalent in regions along the Silk Road, from the Mediterranean to the Far East. The genetic risk factor most strongly associated with BS is the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B51 allele. While genetic factors seem to play a role in the development of certain features of BS, there is general consensus that as yet unidentified environmental stimuli are necessary for initiation of disease. Proposed exogenous triggers include both bacterial and viral infections, which may then lead to dysregulation of the immune system, ultimately leading to the phenotypic expression of disease. The clinical manifestations of BS are protean in nature. While most patients develop mucocutaneous and genital ulcers along with eye disease, other patients may also present with arthritis, frank vasculitis, thrombophlebitis and CNS disease. Interestingly, the manifestations of this illness vary considerably based on gender and ethnicity. As the phenotypic expression among patients with BS is quite heterogeneous, pharmacological therapy is variable and dependent upon the severity of the disease as well as organ involvement. Treatment for BS overlaps considerably with therapies for other autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and the vasculitides. Pharmacological agents utilized for treatment of BS include corticosteroids, colchicine, azathioprine, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF).α inhibitors

  13. Barth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  14. Imunofenotipagem e rearranjo gênico em doenças pulmonares linfocíticas e linfoproliferativas Immunophenotyping and gene rearrangement analysis in lymphoid/lymphoproliferative disorders of the lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Cristina Ishikawa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a utilidade, na prática rotineira, da análise da clonalidade dos linfócitos T e B nos tecidos pulmonares por reação em cadeia da polimerase no diagnóstico das doenças linfoproliferativas pulmonares. MÉTODOS: Avaliaram-se, mediante análise imunohistoquímica e rearranjo molecular dos genes, 8 casos de pneumonia intersticial linfocítica (PIL e 7 casos de doenças linfoproliferativas pulmonares. RESULTADOS: Todos os 8 casos de PIL expressaram imunocoloração moderada a forte para CD3, em contraste com apenas 2 casos de linfoma e 1 caso de pseudolinfoma. Rearranjo gênico foi detectado em 4 de 8 casos de PIL, o que mudou o diagnóstico de PIL para linfoma, indicando, assim, a importância da detecção de rearranjo gênico em casos de PIL. Nesta situação, rearranjo gênico usando-se os pares de primers VH/JH e Vgama11/Jgama12 foi detectado em 3 e 1 casos de PIL, respectivamente, e não foram detectadas anormalidades gênicas usando-se as pares Dbeta1/Jbeta2 e Vgama101/Jgama12. Uma associação positiva foi detectada entre a intensidade de imunoexpressão CD20 e CD68 e rearranjo gênico usando-se o par de primers VH/JH. Antes do rearranjo gênico, 4 pacientes com PIL morreram rapidamente, enquanto que, após o rearranjo gênico, apenas 1 paciente com PIL morreu. CONCLUSÕES: A detecção de células B e T monoclonais por imunofenotipagem e reação em cadeia da polimerase mostrou impacto no diagnóstico de linfomas pulmonares em pacientes previamente diagnosticados com PIL. Portanto, imunofenotipagem e reação em cadeia da polimerase devem ser incluídas como métodos de 'padrão ouro' na rotina diagnóstica.OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness, in routine practice, of using polymerase chain reaction to analyze B and T lymphocyte clonality in pulmonary tissue as a tool for the diagnosis of pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry and molecular gene rearrangement analysis were

  15. [Epidemiology of Asperger's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yukiko; Saito, Kazuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Only a little data is available so far on the prevalence of Asperger's syndrome. The prevalence that Fombonne (2003) estimated after considering six European research was 2/10,000. In Ishikawa's study (2006) conducted in Nagoya city, Japan, the prevalence of Asperger's syndrome was 56/10,000. Currently there are not strict diagnostic criteria of Asperger's syndrome and methods of investigation are not consistent in each study. Therefore the prevalence rate for Asperger's syndrome covered very wide range. Although we still don't have a precise prevalence data on Asperger's syndrome, the awareness of this syndrome emerged in these several decades tells us that further research and support for the children of Asperger's syndrome and their family are necessary.

  16. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sarraf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed.

  17. Down Syndrome Myths and Truths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome. National Down Syndrome Society 8 E 41st Street, 8th Floor New ... New York 10017 800-221-4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & ...

  18. Do you know this syndrome? Leopard syndrome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cançado, Flávio Heleno da Silva Queiroz; da Silva, Luis Candido Pinto; Taitson, Paulo Franco; de Andrade, Ana Carolina Dias Viana; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is known as Leopard syndrome, which is a mnemonic rule for multiple lentigines (L), electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities (E), ocular hypertelorism (O), pulmonary stenosis (P), abnormalities of genitalia (A), retardation of growth (R), and deafness (D). We report the case of a 12-year-old patient with some of the abovementioned characteristics: hypertelorism, macroglossia, lentigines, hypospadias, cryptorchidism, subaortic stenosis, growth retardation, and hearing impairment. Due to this set of symptoms, we diagnosed Leopard syndrome. PMID:28225973

  19. Identification and characterization of SF2000 and SF2001, two new members of the immune receptor SLAM/CD2 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Christopher C; Howie, Duncan; Morra, Massimo; Qiu, Yubin; Murphy, Curran; Shen, Qiong; Gutierrez-Ramos, Jose-Carlos; Coyle, Anthony; Kingsbury, Gillian A; Terhorst, Cox

    2002-02-01

    The SLAM family of human genes currently consists of seven related members of the immunoglobulin superfamily, membrane-associated proteins, including CD150 (SLAM), CD244 (2B4), CD84, CD229 ( Ly-9), BLAME, CD48, and 19A. These genes are expressed to varying degrees in subsets of immune cells (T, B, natural killer, and myeloid cells) and may function as ligands or receptors. This set of genes, related to CD2 and CD58 on Chromosome (Chr) 1p98, are found clustered close together in the human genome on Chr 1q22. Four of these family members (CD150, CD244, CD84, CD229) contain conserved tyrosine motifs in their cytoplasmic tails that enable them to bind intracellular signaling molecules SAP and EAT-2. SAP is mutated in human X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), and studies in XLP patients have shown that improper signaling via molecules that bind SAP contributes to the disease. We have identified two new members of the SLAM family (SF), which we term SF2000 and SF2001, which are expressed in immune cells and map in the SLAM gene cluster. SF2001 does not contain SAP-binding motifs in its short cytoplasmic tail. SF2000, which is co-expressed with SAP in T cells, binds both SAP and EAT-2. The data suggest that signaling through SF2000, together with CD150, CD244, CD84, and CD229, is controlled by SAP and therefore contributes to the pathogenesis of XLP.

  20. Targeted sequencing identifies a novel SH2D1A pathogenic variant in a Chinese family: Carrier screening and prenatal genetic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Yao; Li, Shu-Yuan; Zhang, Lan-Lan; Shen, Ying-Hua; Chang, Chun-Xin; Xiang, Yu-Qian; Huang, He-Feng; Xu, Chen-Ming

    2017-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 1 (XLP1) is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by a clinical triad consisting of severe EBV-induced hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, B-cell lymphoma, and dysgammaglobulinemia. Mutations in SH2D1A gene have been revealed as the cause of XLP1. In this study, a pregnant woman with recurrence history of birthing immunodeficiency was screened for pathogenic variant because the proband sample was unavailable. We aimed to clarify the genetic diagnosis and provide prenatal testing for the family. Next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based multigene panel was used in carrier screening of the pregnant woman. Variants of immunodeficiency related genes were analyzed and prioritized. Candidate variant was verified by using Sanger sequencing. The possible influence of the identified variant was evaluated through RNA assay. Amniocentesis, karyotyping, and Sanger sequencing were performed for prenatal testing. We identified a novel de novo frameshift SH2D1A pathogenic variant (c.251_255delTTTCA) in the pregnant carrier. Peripheral blood RNA assay indicated that the mutant transcript could escape nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and might encode a C-terminal truncated protein. Information of the variant led to success prenatal diagnosis of the fetus. In conclusion, our study clarified the genetic diagnosis and altered disease prevention for a pregnant carrier of XLP1. PMID:28231257