WorldWideScience

Sample records for lymphoproliferative disease ptld

  1. Bone marrow involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders after renal transplantation: PTLD. Int. Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Izadi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Renal recipients with BM PTLD represent worse outcome and more unfavorable histopathological phenomenon than in other organ involvements. Moreover, a concomitant PTLD involvement site in liver was found which necessitates full hepatic evaluation for a potential complication by the disease in renal recipients whose BM is involved.

  2. HLA antigens and post renal transplant lymphoproliferative disease : HLA-B matching is critical

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, N.A.; van Imhoff, G.W.; Verschuuren, E.A.M.; van Son, W.J.; van der Heide, J.J.H.; Lems, S.P.M.; Veeger, N.J.G.M.; Kluin, P.M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke; Hepkema, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    Although several risk factors for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) after solid organ transplantation have been identified, the immunosuppressive regimen probably as most important one, their exact pathogenic role and relevance is still unclear. In hematopoietic stem cell

  3. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Rubio-Manzanares-Dorado

    Full Text Available Introduction: Post-transplant lymphoproliferative syndrome (PTLD is a rare and potentially life-threatening complication after liver transplantation. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinicopathologic features related to PTLD in a single institution after liver transplantation. Methods: Observational study where we have retrospectively analyzed 851 cases who underwent liver transplantation. Ten cases have developed PTLD. Their clinical-pathological characteristics and the treatment received have been analyzed. Results: PTLD incidence was 1.2% (10/851. The mean time from liver transplantation to PTLD diagnosis was 36 months (range 1.2 to 144 months. PTLD localization was extranodal in all cases, the most frequent location being intestinal. Seven cases showed a monomorphic lymphoma which in all cases was differentiated B cell lymphomas. Fifty per cent of the series were seropositive for Epstein-Barr virus. Five patients were alive at the time of the review. Among these patients, we observed three cases of complete remission and two cases of disease stabilization. The death rate was higher in the first year after diagnosis of PTLD. Conclusion: PTLD is a rare complication after liver transplantation, but it may pose a threat to the life of a liver transplant recipient. It is essential to identify patients at risk, to establish an early diagnosis and treatment that can change the outcome of the disease.

  4. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) Manifesting in the Oral Cavity of a 13-Year-Old Liver Transplant Recipient (LTx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska-Sławińska, Ewa; Minko-Chojnowska, Izabela; Pawłowska, Joanna; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Pronicki, Maciej; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota

    2015-08-18

    BACKGROUND Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a potential complication of solid organ or bone marrow transplants. The main PTLD risk factors are: the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), transplant type, and use of immunosuppressants. It mainly consists of an uncontrolled growth of lymphocytes in transplant recipients under chronic immunosuppressive therapy. About 85% of PTLDs are EBV-containing B-cell proliferations; 14% are T-cell proliferations, of which only 40% contain EBV; and the remaining 1% is NK-cell or plasmocyte proliferations. PTLD may present various clinical manifestations, from non-specific mononucleosis-like syndrome to graft or other organ damage resulting from pathologic lymphocyte infiltration. PTLD may manifest in the oral cavity. CASE REPORT The objective of this study was to present the case of a 13-year-old female living-donor liver transplant recipient, resulting from biliary cirrhosis caused by congenital biliary atresia, with exophytic fibrous lesions on buccal mucosa and tongue. Exophytic and hyperplastic lesion of oral mucosa were removed and histopathological examination revealed polymorphic PTLD. The patient underwent 6 cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and all the oral lesions regressed completely. CONCLUSIONS All oral pathological lesions in organ transplant recipients need to be surgically removed and histopathologically examined because they present an increased risk of neoplastic transformations such as PTLD.

  5. Isolated Post-Transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease Involving the Breast and Axilla as Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Ji-Young; Cha, Eun Suk; Lee, Jee Eun; Sung, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases that represent serious complications following immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ or hematopoietic-cell recipients. In contrast to B-cell PTLD, T-cell PTLD is less frequent and is not usually associated with Epstein Barr Virus infection. Moreover, to our knowledge, isolated T-cell PTLD involving the breast is extremely rare and this condition has never been reported previously in the litera...

  6. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease involving the pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriden, Zina; Bullock, Grant C; Bagg, Adam; Bonatti, Hugo; Cousar, John B; Lopes, M Beatriz; Robbins, Mark K; Cathro, Helen P

    2010-11-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are heterogeneous lesions with variable morphology, immunophenotype, and molecular characteristics. Multiple distinct primary lesions can occur in PTLD, rarely with both B-cell and T-cell characteristics. Lesions can involve both grafted organs and other sites; however, PTLD involving the pituitary gland has not been previously reported. We describe a patient who developed Epstein-Barr virus-negative PTLD 13 years posttransplantation involving the terminal ileum and pituitary, which was simultaneously involved by a pituitary adenoma. Immunohistochemistry of the pituitary lesion showed expression of CD79a, CD3, and CD7 with clonal rearrangements of both T-cell receptor gamma chain (TRG@) and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH@) genes. The terminal ileal lesion was immunophenotypically and molecularly distinct. This is the first report of pituitary PTLD and illustrates the potentially complex nature of PTLD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. End-of-Treatment Positron Emission Tomography After Uniform First-Line Therapy of B-Cell Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Identifies Patients at Low Risk of Relapse in the Prospective German PTLD Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Heiner; Denecke, Timm; Dreyling, Martin H; Franzius, Christiane; Reinke, Petra; Subklewe, Marion; Amthauer, Holger; Kneba, Michael; Riess, Hanno; Trappe, Ralf U

    2018-05-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) is a recommended standard in the staging and response assessment of 18F-FDG-avid lymphoma. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) can be detected by 18F-FDG-PET at diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity. However, the role of response assessment by end-of-treatment (EOT) PET has only been addressed in small case series. We performed a retrospective, multicenter study of 37 patients with CD20-positive PTLD after solid organ transplantation treated with uniform, up-to-date, first-line protocols in the prospective German PTLD registry who had received EOT 18F-FDG-PET between 2006 and 2014. Median follow-up was 5.0 years. Any nonphysiological 18F-FDG uptake (Deauville score greater 2) was interpreted as PET-positive. By computed tomography (CT) final staging, 18 of 37 patients had a complete response, 18 had a partial response and 1 patient had stable disease. EOT PET was negative in 24 of 37 patients and positive in 13 of 37 patients. The positive predictive value of EOT PET for PTLD relapse was 38%, and the negative predictive value was 92%. Time to progression (TTP) and progression-free-survival were significantly longer in the PET negative group (P = 0.019 and P = 0.013). In the 18 patients in a partial response by CT staging, we noted highly significant differences in overall survival (P = 0.001), time to progression (P = 0.007), and progression-free survival (P < 0.001) by EOT PET. Even without baseline imaging, EOT PET in PTLD identifies patients at low risk of relapse and offers clinically relevant information, particularly in patients in a partial remission by CT staging.

  8. Isolated Post-Transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease Involving the Breast and Axilla as Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji-Young [Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 150-950 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Suk; Lee, Jee Eun [Department of Radiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Sun Hee [Department of Pathology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases that represent serious complications following immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ or hematopoietic-cell recipients. In contrast to B-cell PTLD, T-cell PTLD is less frequent and is not usually associated with Epstein Barr Virus infection. Moreover, to our knowledge, isolated T-cell PTLD involving the breast is extremely rare and this condition has never been reported previously in the literature. Herein, we report a rare case of isolated T-cell PTLD of the breast that occurred after a patient had been treated for allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation due to acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  9. Isolated Post-Transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease Involving the Breast and Axilla as Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Ji-Young; Cha, Eun Suk; Lee, Jee Eun; Sung, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases that represent serious complications following immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ or hematopoietic-cell recipients. In contrast to B-cell PTLD, T-cell PTLD is less frequent and is not usually associated with Epstein Barr Virus infection. Moreover, to our knowledge, isolated T-cell PTLD involving the breast is extremely rare and this condition has never been reported previously in the literature. Herein, we report a rare case of isolated T-cell PTLD of the breast that occurred after a patient had been treated for allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation due to acute myeloblastic leukemia

  10. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singavi, Arun K; Harrington, Alexandra M; Fenske, Timothy S

    2015-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a serious complication after solid organ or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and include a range of diseases from benign proliferations to malignant lymphomas. Risk factors for developing PTLD include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, recipient age, transplanted organ, type of immunosuppression, and genetics. Uncontrolled proliferation of EBV-infected B cells is implicated in EBV-positive PTLD, whereas the pathogenesis of EBV-negative PTLD may be similar to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the general population. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies PTLD into four categories: early lesions, polymorphic PTLD, monomorphic PTLD, and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL). Treatment is aimed at cure of PTLD, while maintaining transplanted organ function. However, there are no established guidelines for the treatment of PTLD. Immune suppression reduction (ISR) is the first line of treatment in most cases, with more recent data suggesting early use of rituximab. In more aggressive forms of PTLD, upfront chemotherapy may offer a better and more durable response. Sequential therapy using rituximab followed by chemotherapy has demonstrated promising results and may establish a standard of care. Novel therapies including anti-viral agents, adoptive immunotherapy, and monoclonal antibodies targeting cytokines require further study in the prevention and treatment of PTLD.

  11. Hodgkin's disease as unusual presentation of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for malignant glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scelsi Mario

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a complication of solid organ and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT; following autologous HSCT only rare cases of PTLD have been reported. Here, a case of Hodgkin's disease (HD, as unusual presentation of PTLD after autologous HSCT for malignant glioma is described. Case presentation 60-years old man affected by cerebral anaplastic astrocytoma underwent subtotal neurosurgical excision and subsequent high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous HSCT. During the post HSCT course, cranial irradiation and corticosteroids were administered as completion of therapeutic program. At day +105 after HSCT, the patient developed HD, nodular sclerosis type, with polymorphic HD-like skin infiltration. Conclusion The clinical and pathological findings were consistent with the diagnosis of PTLD.

  12. Low incidence of lymphoproliferative disease post kidney transplantation with prevalent use of alemtuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fredy Nieto-Ríos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is well known that the incidence of malignancy is significantly higher in transplanted patients than in general population. The incidence of lymphoproliferative disease post-transplantation (PTLD is approximately of 1% to 2% in kidney transplantation recipients. Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the PTLD incidence when monitoring kidney transplanted patients between the years 2005 and 2010. Methods: Kidney transplanted patients’ data was retrospectively taken between the years 2005 to 2010 in order to determine the number of PTLD cases according to the inductor scheme used. Results: 425 patients were transplanted between 2005 and 2010. They received alemtuzumab 76.2%, daclizumab 10.7%, basiliximab 3.6% and thymoglobulin 2.4%. The 7% did not receive antibody induction. During this period 2 cases of PTLD ocurred: One with multiple myeloma and the other with lymphoma. One of them had been treated with alemtuzumab and the other with thymoglobulin. Conclusions: The PTLD incidence in our group, where alemtuzumab was used predominantly as inductor, was very low; this might suggest that alemtuzumab is a medication that does not increase the risk of this kind of neoplasia.

  13. Primary tacrolimus (FK506) therapy and the long-term risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciarelli, T V; Reyes, J; Jaffe, R; Mazariegos, G V; Jain, A; Fung, J J; Green, M

    2001-10-01

    While the overall incidence of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in pediatric liver transplant recipients has been reported to be 4-11%, the long-term risk of PTLD associated with primary tacrolimus therapy is unknown. Therefore, in order to determine the incidence and long-term risk of PTLD, the present study examined 131 pediatric recipients who underwent liver transplantation (LTx) between October 1989 and December 1991 and received primary tacrolimus therapy. This cohort of children was evaluated over an extended time-period (until December 31 1996) with a mean follow-up of 6.3 yr. Actuarial Kaplan-Meier analysis was utilized to determine the risk of PTLD over time. The overall incidence of PTLD was 13% (17/131) with an average age of 4.3 +/- 0.75 yr at diagnosis. Pretransplant Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serologies were negative in 82%, positive in 12%, and not available in 6% of the patients. The median time to diagnosis of PTLD post-Tx was 11.9 months (mean 16.4 +/- 3.9, range 1.7-63.0 months). Mean tacrolimus dose and plasma trough level (as evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) at the time of diagnosis was 0.32 +/- 0.06 mg/kg/day and 1.3 +/- 0.3 ng/mL, respectively. The cumulative long-term risk of PTLD was found to increase over time: 3% at 6 months, 8% at 1 yr, 12% at 2 yr, 14% at 3 yr, and 15% at 4 and 5 yr. Mortality from PTLD was 12% (two of 17 patients). Primary tacrolimus use in pediatric LTx has a long-term risk of PTLD approaching 15%, with the majority of episodes (78%) occurring in the first 2 yr, suggesting that intense EBV surveillance should occur early post-transplantation.

  14. Interleukin-18, Interferon-γ, IP-10, and Mig Expression in Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Infectious Mononucleosis and Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setsuda, Joyce; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Harris, Nancy L.; Ferry, Judith A.; Sorbara, Lynn; Gupta, Ghanshyam; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Tosato, Giovanna

    1999-01-01

    T cell immunodeficiency plays an important role in the pathogenesis of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) by permitting the unbridled expansion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B lymphocytes. However, factors other than T cell function may contribute to PTLD pathogenesis because PTLD infrequently develops even in the context of severe T cell immunodeficiency, and athymic mice that are T-cell-immunodeficient can reject EBV-immortalized cells. Here we report that PTLD tissues express significantly lower levels of IL-18, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), Mig, and RANTES compared to lymphoid tissues diagnosed with acute EBV-induced infectious mononucleosis, as assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis. Other cytokines and chemokines are expressed at similar levels. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that PTLD tissues contain less IL-18 and Mig protein than tissues with infectious mononucleosis. IL-18, primarily a monocyte product, promotes the secretion of IFN-γ, which stimulates Mig and RANTES expression. Both IL-18 and Mig display antitumor activity in mice involving inhibition of angiogenesis. These results document greater expression of IL-18, IFN-γ, Mig, and RANTES in lymphoid tissues with acute EBV-induced infectious mononucleosis compared to tissues with PTLD and raise the possibility that these mediators participate in critical host responses to EBV infection. PMID:10393857

  15. Epstein-Barr virus load monitoring: its role in the prevention and management of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, D T; Webber, S; Schauer, E M; Reyes, J; Green, M

    2001-06-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus load in the peripheral blood at the time of diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is elevated 1000- to 10,000-fold compared to the level detected in normal latency. With the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), changes in the viral load over time can be measured with a two- to fourfold accuracy. This has allowed early detection of first-time infections and reactivations that may lead to PTLD and has provided an opportunity to intervene before symptomatic disease has occurred. Viral load monitoring has also been used to follow patients with PTLD and, along with other parameters, provided an assessment of the effectiveness of therapeutic protocols. Viral load monitoring has led to the discovery that at least two-thirds of transplant recipients become persistent viral load carriers. While the persistent load appears to be largely carried in latently infected memory B cells, more work is needed to clearly define this type of persistent infection and determine the risks associated with it. New diagnostic tests need to be developed to distinguish the persistent latent viral loads from viral loads that are likely to become symptomatic PTLD.

  16. The role of antiviral and immunoglobulin therapy in the prevention of Epstein-Barr virus infection and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease following solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M; Reyes, J; Webber, S; Rowe, D

    2001-06-01

    The recognition of the importance of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, including EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), has led to a new focus on the prevention of this problem. This paper reviews the scientific rationale behind, and clinical experience with, the use of chemoprophylaxis (using acyclovir or ganciclovir) and immunoprophylaxis (using intravenous immunoglobulin) in the prevention of EBV/PTLD. While some centers have already introduced the use of one or both of these agents as standard prophylaxis against the development of this complication, published data in support of these protocols are currently lacking. Well designed clinical trials are necessary to evaluate the potential role of both antiviral and immunoglobulin agents in the prevention of EBV/PTLD in organ transplant recipients.

  17. Response to rituximab-based therapy and risk factor analysis in Epstein Barr Virus-related lymphoproliferative disorder after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in children and adults: a study from the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styczynski, Jan; Gil, Lidia; Tridello, Gloria; Ljungman, Per; Donnelly, J Peter; van der Velden, Walter; Omar, Hamdy; Martino, Rodrigo; Halkes, Constantijn; Faraci, Maura; Theunissen, Koen; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Hubacek, Petr; Sica, Simona; Nozzoli, Chiara; Fagioli, Franca; Matthes, Susanne; Diaz, Miguel A; Migliavacca, Maddalena; Balduzzi, Adriana; Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Camara, Rafael de la; van Biezen, Anja; Hoek, Jennifer; Iacobelli, Simona; Einsele, Hermann; Cesaro, Simone

    2013-09-01

     The objective of this analysis was to investigate prognostic factors that influence the outcome of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after a rituximab-based treatment in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) setting.  A total of 4466 allogeneic HSCTs performed between 1999 and 2011 in 19 European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation centers were retrospectively analyzed for PTLD, either biopsy-proven or probable disease.  One hundred forty-four cases of PTLD were identified, indicating an overall EBV-related PTLD frequency of 3.22%, ranging from 1.16% for matched-family donor, 2.86% for mismatched family donor, 3.97% in matched unrelated donors, and 11.24% in mismatched unrelated donor recipients. In total, 69.4% patients survived PTLD. Multivariable analysis showed that a poor response of PTLD to rituximab was associated with an age ≥30 years, involvement of extralymphoid tissue, acute GVHD, and a lack of reduction of immunosuppression upon PTLD diagnosis. In the prognostic model, the PTLD mortality increased with the increasing number of factors: 0-1, 2, or 3 factors being associated with mortality of 7%, 37%, and 72%, respectively (P disease, and acute graft-vs-host disease predicted poor outcome.

  18. Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouce, Rayne H; Louis, Chrystal U; Heslop, Helen E

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation can cause significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Delays in reconstitution of EBV-specific T lymphocyte activity can lead to life-threatening EBV lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-PTLD). This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of EBV viremia and PTLD. During the past decade, early detection strategies, such as serial measurement of EBV-DNA load, have helped identify high-risk patients and diagnose early lymphoproliferation. The most significant advances have come in the form of innovative treatment options, including manipulation of the balance between outgrowing EBV-infected B cells and the EBV cytotoxic T lymphocyte response, and targeting infected B cells with monoclonal antibodies, chemotherapy, unmanipulated donor lymphocytes, and donor or more recently third-party EBV cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Defining criteria for preemptive therapy remains a challenge. EBV reactivation is a significant complication after stem cell transplant. Continued improvements in risk stratification and treatment options are required to improve the morbidity and mortality caused by EBV-associated diseases. Current approaches use rituximab to deplete B cells or adoptive transfer of EBV cytotoxic T lymphocyte to reconstitute immunity. The availability of rapid EBV-specific T cell products offers the possibility of improved outcomes.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my area? Other Names for This Condition Duncan disease Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoproliferative disease in males familial fatal ... the proapoptotic SAP function in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease aggravates Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induced mononucleosis and promotes lymphoma development. ...

  20. POST-TRANSPLANT LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS: ROLE OF VIRAL INFECTION, GENETIC LESIONS AND ANTIGEN STIMULATION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Capello

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD are a life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation or, more rarely, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The majority of PTLD is of B-cell origin and associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection. PTLD generally display involvement of extranodal sites, aggressive histology and aggressive clinical behavior. The molecular pathogenesis of PTLD involves infection by oncogenic viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus, as well as genetic or epigenetic alterations of several cellular genes. At variance with lymphoma arising in immunocompetent hosts, whose genome is relatively stable, a fraction of PTLD are characterized by microsatellite instability as a consequence of defects in the DNA mismatch repair mechanism. Apart from microsatellite instability, molecular alterations of cellular genes recognized in PTLD include alterations of cMYC, BCL6, TP53, DNA hypermethylation, and aberrant somatic hypermutation of protooncogenes. The occurrence of IGV mutations in the overwhelming majority of PTLD documents that malignant transformation targets germinal centre (GC B-cells and their descendants both in EBV–positive and EBV–negative cases. Analysis of phenotypic markers of B-cell histogenesis, namely BCL6, MUM1 and CD138, allows further distinction of PTLD histogenetic categories. PTLD expressing the BCL6+/MUM1+/-/CD138- profile reflect B-cells actively experiencing the GC reaction, and comprise diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL centroblastic and Burkitt lymphoma. PTLD expressing the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138- phenotype putatively derive from B-cells that have concluded the GC reaction, and comprise the majority of polymorphic PTLD and a fraction of DLBCL immunoblastic. A third group of PTLD is reminiscent of post-GC and preterminally differentiated B-cells that show the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138+ phenotype, and are morphologically represented by either polymorphic PTLD or DLBCL immunoblastic.

  1. The Role of Antiviral Prophylaxis for the Prevention of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDabbagh, M A; Gitman, M R; Kumar, D; Humar, A; Rotstein, C; Husain, S

    2017-03-01

    The role of antiviral prophylaxis for the prevention of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) remains controversial for solid organ transplantation (SOT) recipients who are seronegative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) but who received organs from seropositive donors. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to address this issue. Two independent assessors extracted data from studies after determining patient eligibility and completing quality assessments. Overall, 31 studies were identified and included in the quantitative synthesis. Nine studies were included in the direct comparisons (total 2366 participants), and 22 were included in the indirect analysis. There was no significant difference in the rate of EBV-associated PTLD in SOT recipients among those who received prophylaxis (acyclovir, valacyclovir, ganciclovir, valganciclovir) compared with those who did not receive prophylaxis (nine studies; risk ratio 0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.58-1.54). No significant differences were noted across all types of organ transplants, age groups, or antiviral use as prophylaxis or preemptive therapy. There was no significant heterogeneity in the effect of antiviral prophylaxis on the incidence of PTLD. In conclusion, the use of antiviral prophylaxis in high-risk EBV-naive patients has no effect on the incidence of PTLD in SOT recipients. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. Mutlifocal osseous posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Ryan; Michalicek, Zachary; Lazarus, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a known complication of organ transplantation, but musculoskeletal involvement of PTLD remains very rare. We present a case of recurrent PTLD of the bone in a heart transplant patient that was misdiagnosed as gout for several years. There are only a few cases of osseous PTLD in the literature, and we hope to better characterize its imaging findings on multiple imaging modalities. (orig.)

  3. Mutlifocal osseous posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Ryan [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Michalicek, Zachary [Northshore University Healthsystems, Department of Pathology, Evanston, IL (United States); Lazarus, Martin [Northshore University Healthsystems, Department of Radiology, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a known complication of organ transplantation, but musculoskeletal involvement of PTLD remains very rare. We present a case of recurrent PTLD of the bone in a heart transplant patient that was misdiagnosed as gout for several years. There are only a few cases of osseous PTLD in the literature, and we hope to better characterize its imaging findings on multiple imaging modalities. (orig.)

  4. Interleukin-10 and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, S.A.; Bendtzen, K.; Moller, B.

    1999-01-01

    Background. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a life-threatening complication of transplantation, which comprises a morphologically and clinically heterogeneous spectrum of B-lymphocyte diseases. Risk factors include primary or reactivated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection...... to the development of PTLD in three kidney transplanted patients. The study now includes nine patients that could be followed before and/or after the occurrence of lymphoma, Methods. Nine patients with lymphomas (eight PTLDs and one Hodgkin's disease) were diagnosed among 268 consecutive renal transplantations (1990...

  5. Post transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric solid organ transplant patients: A possible role for [{sup 18}F]-FDG-PET(/CT) in initial staging and therapy monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falck, C. von [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: Falck.Christian.von@mh-hannover.de; Maecker, B. [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Schirg, E. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Boerner, A.R.; Knapp, W.H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Klein, C. [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Galanski, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    Post transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a severe complication after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. In pediatric transplant recipients PTLD is the most common malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible role for positron emission tomography with [{sup 18}F]-2-fluoro-2-desoxy-glucose (FDG) in the initial staging and in therapy monitoring of pediatric patients suffering from biopsy-proven CD20-positive PTLD after solid organ transplantation. Seven pediatric patients were included. All available imaging studies - CT (n = 15), MRI (n = 16) and PET/PETCT (n = 16) - were reviewed on a lesion by lesion base. The performance of FDG-PET in the initial staging and during therapy with a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody was compared to conventional cross sectional imaging and correlated with the clinical outcome. FDG-PET identified all sites of disease as shown by CT/MRI and helped to clarify the significance of equivocal findings. The initial stage of disease was correctly identified by FDG-PET alone when compared to CT/MRI. During therapy, FDG-PET was superior to conventional cross-sectional imaging in the early evaluation of response.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus in inflammatory bowel disease: the spectrum of intestinal lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Loes H C; Nagtegaal, Iris D; de Jong, Dirk J; Kievit, Wietske; Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Groenen, Patricia J T A; van Krieken, J Han J M; Hoentjen, Frank

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients on thiopurine therapy are at increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphomas. This virus is frequently detected in the intestinal mucosa of IBD patients and may cause a wide spectrum of lymphoproliferations similar to post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). We aimed to assess whether histological aberrations aid in predicting EBV presence and to correlate histological assessment and EBV load with disease outcome in IBD. We included all IBD patients from our centre who underwent EBV testing of intestinal biopsies between January 2004 and October 2013. All biopsies were classified according to the WHO PTLD classification and the EBV load was scored per high-power field (HPF). Clinical data were collected from patient charts. Reported clinical outcomes included colectomy, need for chemotherapy and mortality. Our cohort included 58 patients: 28 were EBV-positive and 30 EBV-negative. An atypical infiltrate was seen more frequently in EBV-positive than in EBV-negative patients (57.1 versus 3.3%; p < 0.001). A high EBV load occurred more frequently in EBV-positive patients undergoing colectomy than in EBV-positive patients without colectomy (50.0 versus 10.0%; p = 0.048). Monomorphic lymphoproliferative disorders, including two overt lymphomas, were present in 10 patients. Reduction of immunosuppression resulted in histological normalization and loss of EBV expression in seven of eight non-lymphoma patients. The presence of atypical infiltrate in the intestinal mucosa of IBD patients warrants EBV testing. Reduction of immunosuppression is an effective strategy to achieve morphological normalization and loss of EBV. Lymphoproliferation related to IBD appears to have less aggressive clinical behaviour than PTLDs. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. POST-TRANSPLANT LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS: ROLE OF VIRAL INFECTION, GENETIC LESIONS AND ANTIGEN STIMULATION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gaidano

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD are a life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation or, more rarely, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The majority of PTLD is of B-cell origin and associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection. PTLD generally display involvement of extranodal sites, aggressive histology and aggressive clinical behavior. The molecular pathogenesis of PTLD involves infection by oncogenic viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus, as well as genetic or epigenetic alterations of several cellular genes. At variance with lymphoma arising in immunocompetent hosts, whose genome is relatively stable, a fraction of PTLD are characterized by microsatellite instability as a consequence of defects in the DNA mismatch repair mechanism. Apart from microsatellite instability, molecular alterations of cellular genes recognized in PTLD include alterations of cMYC, BCL6, TP53, DNA hypermethylation, and aberrant somatic hypermutation of protooncogenes. The occurrence of IGV mutations in the overwhelming majority of PTLD documents that malignant transformation targets germinal centre (GC B-cells and their descendants both in EBV–positive and EBV–negative cases. Analysis of phenotypic markers of B-cell histogenesis, namely BCL6, MUM1 and CD138, allows further distinction of PTLD histogenetic categories. PTLD expressing the BCL6+/MUM1+/-/CD138- profile reflect B-cells actively experiencing the GC reaction, and comprise diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL centroblastic and Burkitt lymphoma. PTLD expressing the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138- phenotype putatively derive from B-cells that have concluded the GC reaction, and comprise the majority of polymorphic PTLD and a fraction of

  8. Possible Association of Multicentric Castleman's Disease with Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Minemura

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD is lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by systemic inflammatory symptoms such as fever and weight loss. Human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8 is thought to be a causable pathogen in all HIV-positive and some HIV-negative MCD patients. Furthermore, the term idiopathic MCD (iMCD was recently proposed to represent a group of HIV-negative and HHV-8-negative patients with unknown etiologies. Although the international diagnostic criteria for iMCD require exclusion of infection-related disorders, autoimmune/autoinflammatory diseases and malignant/lymphoproliferative disorders to make an iMCD diagnosis, the relationships and differences between these disorders and MCD have not yet been clarified. We recently reported the first case of MCD with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS. Although ALPS was included in the iMCD exclusion criteria as an autoimmune/autoinflammatory disease according to the international diagnostic criteria, there is a lack of evidence on the association between MCD and ALPS. In this study, we review the recent understanding of MCD and discuss the possible association between MCD with ALPS.

  9. X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease (XLP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Types of PIDDs Genetics & Inheritance Talking to Your Doctor XLP primarily affects boys, and is characterized by a life-long vulnerability to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a common type of herpes virus ...

  10. Endobronchial Epstein-Barr Virus Associated Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Feuillet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV associated Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders (PTLD are increasingly recognized as a fatal complication of hematological stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Thoracic involvement, that may be isolated or part of a disseminated disease, usually encompasses pulmonary nodules or masses and mediastinal lymph node enlargement. The current case study presents 2 patients who underwent HSCT, one allogenic and the other autologous, who developed an exceptional endobronchial EBV related PTLD. The first patient had a fleshy white endobronchial mass resulting in a right upper lobe atelectasis and the second had an extensive necrotising mucosa from trachea to both basal bronchi without any significant change of lung parenchyma on the CT scan. In both cases, the diagnosis was made by bronchial biopsies. Physicians should be aware of an endobronchial pattern of EBV associated PTLD after HSCT to permit quick diagnosis and therapeutic intervention.

  11. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Patient with Worsening Ascites after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh D. Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a spectrum of diseases that involves abnormal lymphoid and/or plasmacytic proliferation in patients with solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplantation. It is a condition with a low incidence of 3.5–4.3% in liver transplant (LT recipients. This case involves a 63-year-old male with history of LT for chronic HCV induced cirrhosis who presented with abdominal distension related to worsening ascites. Cytological ascitic fluid analysis revealed EBV (+ malignant cells without a malignant focal point on imaging. Diagnosis of monomorphic PTLD with primary effusion lymphoma-like morphology and immunophenotype was established. This case highlights the complexity in diagnosis, different diagnostic modalities, and rare clinical presentations of PTLD.

  12. Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising from Renal Allograft Parenchyma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Chan Kyo; Kwon, Ghee Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a rare but serious complication that occurs in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. PTLD usually manifests as a renal hilar mass comprised of histologically B-lymphocytes. We report our experience of managing a patient with PTLD arising from renal parenchyma. Ultrasonographic and MR imaging features of this unusual PTLD suggested differentiated renal cell carcinoma arising from the renal allograft

  13. Establishment and operation of a Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant allogeneic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic cell bank for the treatment of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Mark A; Wilkie, Gwen M; Robinson, Nicolas; Rivera, Nadja; Haque, Tanzina; Crawford, Dorothy H; Barry, Jacqueline; Fraser, Neil; Turner, David M; Robertson, Victoria; Dyer, Phil; Flanagan, Peter; Newlands, Helen R; Campbell, John; Turner, Marc L

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignancies, including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Conventional treatments for PTLD are often successful, but risk organ rejection and cause significant side effects. EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) generated in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes provide an alternative treatment modality with few side effects, but autologous CTLs are difficult to use in clinical practice. Here we report the establishment and operation of a bank of EBV-specific CTLs derived from 25 blood donors with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) types found at high frequency in European populations. Since licensure, there have been enquiries about 37 patients, who shared a median of three class I and two class II HLA types with these donors. Cells have been infused into ten patients with lymphoproliferative disease, eight of whom achieved complete remission. Neither patient with refractory disease was matched for HLA class II. Both cases of EBV-associated non-haematopoietic sarcoma receiving cells failed to achieve complete remission. Thirteen patients died before any cells could be issued, emphasizing that the bank should be contacted before patients become pre-terminal. Thus, this third party donor-derived EBV-specific CTL cell bank can supply most patients with appropriately matched cells and most recipients have good outcomes. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. IgG4-related disease in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Annick A J M; Seidl, Maximilian; Drendel, Vanessa; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Voll, Reinhard E; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Warnatz, Klaus; Kollert, Florian

    2017-07-01

    A patient with autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder (ALPS) developed IgG4-related disease. In retrospect, he had high levels of serum IgG4 for several years prior to presenting with IgG4-related pancreatitis. These high IgG4 levels were masked by hypergammaglobulinemia, a common feature of ALPS. We next screened 18 ALPS patients; four of them displayed increased levels of IgG4. Hence, IgG4-related disease should be considered in ALPS patients, especially in those manifesting lymphocytic organ infiltration or excessive hypergammaglobulinaemia. Screening of IgG4-related disease patients for ALPS-associated mutations would provide further information on whether this disease could be a late-onset atypical presentation of ALPS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Current preventive strategies and management of Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in solid organ transplantation in Europe. Results of the ESGICH Questionnaire-based Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, R; Manuel, O; Hirsch, H H; Fernández-Ruiz, M; López-Medrano, F; Comoli, P; Caillard, S; Grossi, P; Aguado, J M

    2015-06-01

    There is limited clinical evidence on the utility of the monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNAemia in the pre-emptive management of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. We investigated current preventive measures against EBV-related PTLD through a web-based questionnaire sent to 669 SOT programmes in 35 European countries. This study was performed on behalf of the ESGICH study group from the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. A total of 71 SOT programmes from 15 European countries participated in the study. EBV serostatus of the recipient is routinely obtained in 69/71 centres (97%) and 64 (90%) have access to EBV DNAemia assays. EBV monitoring is routinely used in 85.9% of the programmes and 77.4% reported performing pre-emptive treatment for patients with significant EBV DNAemia levels. Pre-emptive treatment for EBV DNAemia included reduction of immunosuppression in 50.9%, switch to mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in 30.9%, and use of rituximab in 14.5% of programmes. Imaging by whole-body 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is used in 60.9% of centres to rule out PTLD and complemented computer tomography is used in 50%. In 10.9% of centres, FDG-PET is included in the first-line diagnostic workup in patients with high-risk EBV DNAemia. Despite the lack of definitive evidence, EBV load measurements are frequently used in Europe to guide diagnostic workup and pre-emptive reduction of immunosuppression. We need prospective and controlled studies to define the impact of EBV monitoring in reducing the risk of PTLD in SOT recipients. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Native kidney posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a renal transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhilash; Kaul, Anupama; Aggarwal, Vinita; Srivastava, Divya

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the general population, cancer risk in kidney transplant recipients is much higher. In the present study, we report a patient who was diagnosed with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and had a fulminant course, dying within few days of diagnosis. This case report highlights the importance of timely detection and treatment of PTLD as it is associated with high mortality rate.

  17. Native kidney posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a renal transplant recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Abhilash Chandra; Anupama Kaul; Vinita Aggarwal; Divya Srivastava

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the general population, cancer risk in kidney transplant recipients is much higher. In the present study, we report a patient who was diagnosed with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and had a fulminant course, dying within few days of diagnosis. This case report highlights the importance of timely detection and treatment of PTLD as it is associated with high mortality rate.

  18. Molecular Pathogenesis of B-Cell Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder: What Do We Know So Far?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Morscio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a potentially fatal disease that arises in 2%–10% of solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplants and is most frequently of B-cell origin. This very heterogeneous disorder ranges from benign lymphoproliferations to malignant lymphomas, and despite the clear association with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV infection, its etiology is still obscure. Although a number of risk factors have been identified (EBV serostatus, graft type, and immunosuppressive regimen, it is currently not possible to predict which transplant patient will eventually develop PTLD. Genetic studies have linked translocations (involving C-MYC, IGH, BCL-2, various copy number variations, DNA mutations (PIM1, PAX5, C-MYC, RhoH/TTF, and polymorphisms in both the host (IFN-gamma, IL-10, TGF-beta, HLA and the EBV genome to B-cell PTLD development. Furthermore, the tumor microenvironment seems to play an important role in the course of disease representing a local niche that can allow antitumor immune responses even in an immunocompromised host. Taken together, B-cell PTLD pathogenesis is very complex due to the interplay of many different (patient-dependent factors and requires thorough molecular analysis for the development of novel tailored therapies. This review aims at giving a global overview of the currently known parameters that contribute to the development of B-cell PTLD.

  19. Establishment and operation of a Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant allogeneic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic cell bank for the treatment of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, Mark A; Wilkie, Gwen M; Robinson, Nicolas; Rivera, Nadja; Haque, Tanzina; Crawford, Dorothy H; Barry, Jacqueline; Fraser, Neil; Turner, David M; Robertson, Victoria; Dyer, Phil; Flanagan, Peter; Newlands, Helen R; Campbell, John; Turner, Marc L

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignancies, including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Conventional treatments for PTLD are often successful, but risk organ rejection and cause significant side effects. EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) generated in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes provide an alternative treatment modality with few side effects, but autologous CTLs are difficult to use in clinical practice. Here we report the establis...

  20. A 5-year old male with “leukemic form” of disseminated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadiya Haque

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD represents an abnormal lymphoid proliferation that occurs in recipients of solid organ or bone marrow allograft. It includes a diverse group of diseases ranging from polymorphic B-cell hyperplasia to frank malignant lymphoma. Clinical presentation is variable, ranging from asymptomatic to generalized lymphadenopathy, mononucleosis-like syndrome, nodal or extranodal tumors (usually gastrointestinal tract, systemic lymphomatous involvement, and rare (less than 1% of cases fulminant disseminated disease. PTLD is more common in children than in adults. Younger patients usually present with mononucleosis-like symptoms. We present an unusual case of a 5-year old male who developed a widely disseminated leukemic form of PTLD, involving lymph nodes, tonsils, multiple organs, bone marrow, cerebrospinal fluid, and peripheral blood.

  1. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the pelvis successfully treated with consolidative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habibeh, Omar; Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are aggressive malignancies which represent one of the major post-transplant complications. However, treatment options vary significantly and localized disease may be curatively treated with radiotherapy (RT) or surgery. We report a case of recurrent rectal PTLD, which was successfully treated by chemoimmunotherapy followed by RT. We describe a patient who developed a rectal lymphoproliferative lesion 11 years after kidney transplant, which was successfully treated with consolidative RT using 25.4 Gy sequential to chemoimmunotherapy (R-CHOP). RT was well tolerated and the patient showed no signs of grade 3 or 4 toxicity. This patient is free of recurrence 52 months after RT, with an overall survival of 62 months since diagnosis. Conventionally fractionated moderate-dose RT appears to be a tolerable and effective treatment option for localized PTLD if a sufficient systemic treatment cannot be applied. (orig.) [German] Posttransplantationslymphoproliferative Erkrankungen (PTLDs) sind eine haeufige Komplikation nach einer Organtransplantation. Nichtdestotrotz unterscheiden sich die Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten signifikant und vor allem lokalisierte Stadien koennen kurativ entweder mit Strahlentherapie (RT) und/oder Operation behandelt werden. Wir berichten ueber einen Fall einer rezidivierten rektalen PTLD, die erfolgreich mit einer Chemoimmuntherapie mit anschliessender RT behandelt wurde. Wir beschreiben einen Patienten der 11 Jahre nach einer Nierentransplantation eine PTLD entwickelte. Diese wurde erfolgreich mit konsolidierender RT (25,4 Gy) im Anschluss an eine Chemoimmuntherapie (R-CHOP) behandelt. Die RT wurde komplikationslos vertragen und es zeigten sich keine Nebenwirkungen. Das rezidivfreie Ueberleben betrug zum Zeitpunkt der letzten Nachsorgeuntersuchung 52 Monate mit einer Gesamtueberlebenszeit von 62 Monaten seit der Diagnose. Die konventionelle fraktionierte moderat dosierte RT scheint eine gut

  2. Preliminary experience on the use of PET/CT in the management of pediatric post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-García, Pilar; Hirsch, Steffen; Levine, Daniel S; Taj, Mary M

    2017-12-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-known complication following prolonged immunosuppression. Contrary to other lymphomas, there is no standardized imaging approach to assess PTLD either at staging or for response to therapy. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an imaging modality that has proven to be useful in lymphoma. However, there is still limited data concerning its use in pediatric PTLD. Our study evaluates the use of PET/CT in pediatric PTLD at our institution. To assess the role of PET/CT in pediatric PTLD, we reviewed the pediatric patients with PTLD who had undergone PET/CT at our institution between 2000 and 2016. Nine patients were identified. Six had PET/CT at diagnosis. All lesions seen on CT were identified with PET/CT. Fourteen PET/CTs were done during treatment. Eight PET/CTs were negative, including three where CT showed areas of uncertain significance. In these cases, PET/CT helped us to stop treatment and the patients remain in remission after a long follow-up (mean 74.3 months; range 12.4-180.9 months). PET/CT revealed additional disease in two cases, therefore treatment was intensified. Six biopsies and close follow-up was done to confirm PET/CT results. In one case, PET/CT did not identify central nervous system involvement demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging. PET/CT may have an important role in the staging and follow-up of pediatric PTLD. In our cohort, PET/CT was helpful in staging and assessing treatment response and in clarifying equivocal findings on other imaging modalities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. EXPRESSION OF A NEW A3 ANTIGEN IN THE CELLS OF PATIENTS WITH VARIOUS LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Deineko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have conducted a study of a novel monoclonal A3 antibody raised by means of hybridoma biotechnology. The study was performed with malignant cells of the patients with various lymphoproliferative disorders, and persons with nonmalignant diseases, as compared with intact lymphocytes from healthy people,using a method of immunocytochemical staining and indirect immunofluorescence technique. It was found that in cases of lymphoproliferative diseases with low proliferation rates, as based on the numbers of Ki-67 positive cells, as well as in non-malignant blood diseases, the A3 antigen was localized in nucleoli, and it was visualized as focal fluorescence. In malignant lymphoproliferative diseases with high proliferation indexes, the number of brightly fluorescent foci is observed, with formation of necklace-like structures within the nucleolar structures. The obtained data point to a diagnostic significance of A3 Mab in assessment of cellular proliferative rates in patients with various lymphoproliferative diseases. It was established that, in contrast to Ki-67, the proliferation stage could be determined for each cell, according to the number of fuorescent foci in nucleoli. This specific property of the A3 antigen points to its significance for diagnostics and malignancy staging of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  4. Chronic high Epstein-Barr viral load state and risk for late-onset posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease/lymphoma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingler, M A; Feingold, B; Miller, S A; Quivers, E; Michaels, M G; Green, M; Wadowsky, R M; Rowe, D T; Webber, S A

    2008-02-01

    Increased use of serial EBV-PCR monitoring after pediatric transplantation has led to the identification of asymptomatic patients who carry very high viral loads over prolonged periods. The significance of this high-load state is unknown. We speculated that this state may identify patients at high risk for development of late PTLD/lymphoma. We reviewed data on 71 pediatric heart recipients who had serial viral load monitoring since 1997. Chronic high-load state was defined as the presence of >16,000 genome copies/mL whole blood on > or =50% of samples over at least 6 months. Among 20 high-load carriers (eight following prior PTLD, seven with prior symptomatic EBV infection, five without previous EBV disease), 9 (45%) developed late-onset PTLD 2.5-8.4 years posttransplant (including with four Burkitt's lymphoma). Among 51 controls with low (n = 39) or absent (n = 12) loads, only 2 (4%; p < 0.001 absent/low vs. high load) developed late PTLD/lymphoma. By multivariable analysis, high-load carrier state (OR = 12.4, 95% CI 2.1-74.4) and prior history of PTLD (OR = 10.7, 95% CI 1.9-60.6) independently predicted late PTLD. A chronic high EBV-load state is not benign and is a predictor of de novo or recurrent PTLD.

  5. EBV-associated post-transplantation B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder following allogenic stem cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: tumor regression after reduction of immunosuppression - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niedobitek Gerald

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated B-cell post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a severe complication following stem cell transplantation. This is believed to occur as a result of iatrogenic immunosuppression leading to a relaxation of T-cell control of EBV infection and thus allowing viral reactivation and proliferation of EBV-infected B-lymphocytes. In support of this notion, reduction of immunosuppressive therapy may lead to regression of PTLD. We present a case of an 18-year-old male developing a monomorphic B-cell PTLD 2 months after receiving an allogenic stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Reduction of immunosuppressive therapy led to regression of lymphadenopathy. Nevertheless, the patient died 3 months afterwards due to extensive graft-vs.-host-disease and sepsis. As a diagnostic lymph node biopsy was performed only after reduction of immunosuppressive therapy, we are able to study the histopathological changes characterizing PTLD regression. We observed extensive apoptosis of blast cells, accompanied by an abundant infiltrate comprising predominantly CD8-positive, Granzyme B-positive T-cells. This observation supports the idea that regression of PTLD is mediated by cytotoxic T-cells and is in keeping with the observation that T-cell depletion, represents a major risk factor for the development of PTLD.

  6. Mucosal Healing and Risk of Lymphoproliferative Malignancy in Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Granath, Fredrik; Ekbom, Anders; Smedby, Karin Ekström; Murray, Joseph A.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Green, Peter HR; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is associated with an increased risk of lymphoproliferative malignancy (LPM). It is unknown whether this risk is affected by the results of the follow-up intestinal biopsy, performed to document mucosal healing. Objective To examine the association between mucosal healing in CD and later LPM. Design Population-based cohort study Setting We identified patients with CD from all of Sweden’s 28 pathology departments. Patients Individuals with CD who had a follow-up biopsy after initial diagnosis. Measurements We compared the risk of LPM to that of the general population using expected rates; and through Cox regression we compared the rate of LPM in those with persistent villous atrophy to those with mucosal healing. Results Among 7,625 patients with CD and a follow-up biopsy, persistent villous atrophy was present in 3,308 (43%). The overall risk of LPM was increased compared to the general population (Standardized incidence ratio, SIR 2.81; 95%CI 2.10–3.67), but this increase was greater among those with persistent villous atrophy (SIR 3.78; 95%CI 2.71–5.12) as compared to those with mucosal healing (SIR 1.50; 95%CI 0.77–2.62). Persistent villous atrophy compared to mucosal healing was associated with an increased risk of LPM (Hazard ratio, HR 2.26; 95%CI 1.18–4.34). We found an increased risk of T cell lymphoma (HR 3.51; 95%CI 0.75–16.34), but no excess risk of B cell lymphoma (HR 0.97; 95%CI 0.21–4.49). Limitation We had no data on dietary compliance. Conclusions The increased LPM risk in CD is associated with the results of the follow-up biopsy, with a higher risk among those with persistent villous atrophy. Follow-up biopsy may be a means to effectively stratify CD patients regarding subsequent LPM risk. Primary funding source the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, The American Scandinavian Foundation, the Celiac Sprue Association, Örebro University Hospital, Karolinska

  7. Early Gastric Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder and H pylori Detection after Kidney Transplantation: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CL Nash

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD in the adult renal transplant population ranges from 0.7% to 4%. The majority of cases involve a single site and arise, on average, seven months after transplantation. Histopathology usually reveals B-cell proliferative disease and has been standardized into its own classification. Treatment modalities consist of decreased immunosuppression, eradication of Epstein-Barr virus, surgical resection, systemic chemotherapy and monoclonal antibody therapy; however, mortality remains high, typically with a short survival time. In patients who have undergone renal transplantation, approximately 10% of those with PTLDs present with gastrointestinal symptomatology and disease. Reported sites include the stomach, and small and large bowel. Very few cases of Helicobacter pylori or mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue have been described in association with PTLD. In the era of cyclosporine immunosuppression, the incidence of PTLD affecting the gastrointestinal tract may be increasing in comparison with the incidence seen with the use of older immunosuppression regimens. A case of antral PTLD and H pylori infection occurring three months after renal transplantation is presented, and the natural history and management of gastric PTLD are reviewed.

  8. Upper airway obstruction and pulmonary abnormalities due to lymphoproliferative disease following bone marrow transplantation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, B.D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, 332 N. Lauderdale St., Memphis, TN 38105 (United States)]|[Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Heslop, H.E. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Kaste, S.C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Bodner, S. [Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    1998-07-01

    We report three patients who developed severe supraglottic airway obstruction due to Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disease following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In addition to enlarged pharyngeal lymphoid tissue seen in all three patients, two had supraglottic airway narrowing and two developed pulmonary lymphoproliferative disease. They were treated with unmanipulated T cells or EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Life-threatening upper airway obstruction is a radiologically detectable complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in children. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs.

  9. Cerebral Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Occurring after Renal Transplantation: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jang Ho; Byun, Woo Mok; Kim, Hong Chul; Hwang, Min Su [Dept. of Radiology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of organ transplantation and immunosuppression. A 36-year-old woman with a history of renal transplantation visited the hospital complaining of headache and on pathology was diagnosed with cerebral PTLD manifesting as multiple rim enhanced masses in both hemispheres. We report here a case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder involving the cerebrum occurring after renal transplantation, and describe the MRI findings for this patient

  10. Cerebral Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Occurring after Renal Transplantation: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jang Ho; Byun, Woo Mok; Kim, Hong Chul; Hwang, Min Su

    2012-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of organ transplantation and immunosuppression. A 36-year-old woman with a history of renal transplantation visited the hospital complaining of headache and on pathology was diagnosed with cerebral PTLD manifesting as multiple rim enhanced masses in both hemispheres. We report here a case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder involving the cerebrum occurring after renal transplantation, and describe the MRI findings for this patient

  11. Diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in solid organ transplant recipients - BCSH and BTS Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Anne; Bowles, Kristin; Bradley, J Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Featherstone, Carrie; Gupte, Girish; Marcus, Robert; Parameshwar, Jayan; Ramsay, Alan; Newstead, Charles

    2010-06-01

    A joint working group established by the Haemato-oncology subgroup of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) and the British Transplantation Society (BTS) has reviewed the available literature and made recommendations for the diagnosis and management of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in adult recipients of solid organ transplants. This review details the risk factors predisposing to development, initial features and diagnosis. It is important that the risk of developing PTLD is considered when using post transplant immunosuppression and that the appropriate investigations are carried out when there are suspicions of the diagnosis. These must include tissue for histology and computed tomography scan to assess the extent of disease. These recommendations have been made primarily for adult patients, there have been some comments made with regard to paediatric practice.

  12. Native kidney posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a renal transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with the general population, cancer risk in kidney transplant recipients is much higher. In the present study, we report a patient who was diagnosed with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD and had a fulminant course, dying within few days of diagnosis. This case report highlights the importance of timely detection and treatment of PTLD as it is associated with high mortality rate.

  13. X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease Presenting as Pancytopenia in a 10-Month-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nicole Chadha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, also known as Duncan's syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder that causes exaggerated immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection and often leads to death. Patient presentation varies but can include signs and symptoms typical of EBV, pancytopenia, and fulminant hepatitis.

  14. Prevalence and patterns of renal involvement in imaging of malignant lymphoproliferative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Behrmann, Curd; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Surov, Alexey; Holzhausen, Hans Jurgen; Katzer, Michaela; Arnold, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Background: Renal involvement in patients with lymphoproliferative disease is an uncommon radiological finding. Purpose: To determine its prevalence and radiological appearances in a patient population. Material and Methods: All forms of lymphoproliferative disease (ICD: C81-C96) were considered. From January 2005 to January 2010, 668 consecutive patients with lymphoproliferative disease were identified with the help of the radiological database and patient records. Inclusion criteria were complete staging including appropriate CT scan and/or MRI. All stored images (initial staging and follow-up examinations) were reviewed. Results: Review of all stored images revealed renal infiltration in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (11 of 364 = 3.0%; median age = 65 years, m:f = 6:5) but also multiple myeloma (2 of 162 = 1.2%; median age = 72 years; m:f = 1:1) and leukemia (5 of 101 4.9%; median age = 12 years; m:f = 2:3). There were no cases of renal infiltration in 41 patients with Hodgkin's disease. In total there were six patients with solitary lesions, five patients with diffuse renal enlargement, four patients with perirenal lesions, and two patients with direct invasion of the kidney. Conclusion: In leukemia the most common imaging pattern is diffuse enlargement. In the other subtypes of lymphoproliferative disease no specific correlation between typical CT patterns and subtype of lymphoproliferative disease can be found. The prevalence of renal involvement is in line with earlier studies. Contrary to earlier reports, multiple lesions were not found to be a common pattern

  15. Risk factors for Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlin, Michael; Wikell, Helena; Sundin, Mikael; Blennow, Ola; Maeurer, Markus; Ringden, Olle; Winiarski, Jacek; Ljungman, Per; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas

    2014-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a successful treatment for hematologic malignancies and a variety of genetic and metabolic disorders. In the period following stem cell transplantation, the immune-compromised milieu allows opportunistic pathogens to thrive. Epstein-Barr virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease can be a life-threatening complication for transplanted patients because of suppressed T-cell-mediated immunity. We analyzed possible risk factors associated with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in a cohort of over 1,000 patients. The incidence of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease was 4%. Significant risk factors identified by multivariate analysis were: human leukocyte antigen-mismatch (PEpstein-Barr virus mismatch recipient-/donor+ (Pdisease grade II to IV (P=0.006), pre-transplant splenectomy (P=0.008) and infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells (P=0.015). The risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease has increased in more recent years, from less than 2% before 1998 to more than 6% after 2011. Additionally, we show that long-term survival of patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease is poor despite initial successful treatment. The 3-year survival rate among the 40 patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease was 20% as opposed to 62% among patients without post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (Pdisease after transplantation in need of pre-emptive measures.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus induced hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar Sankararaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP is a rare, often fatal genetic disorder characterized by extreme vulnerability to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. EBV-induced hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a known presentation in XLP. In EBV-induced HLH in XLP, the brain imaging findings in the acute phase include a non specific pattern. In this report, we highlight the magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings in a child with EBV induced HLH in XLP.

  17. Chemoimmunotherapy and withdrawal of immunosupression for monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoltsev, Nikolai; Zhang, Bingnan; Yao, Xiaopan; Bustillo, Ivan; Deng, Yanhong; Cooper, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are the most aggressive type of PTLD occurring after solid organ transplantation (SOT). Current guidelines for treatment suggest a stepwise approach that includes a reduction of immunosuppression (RIS) with or without rituximab, followed by chemotherapy if there is no response. Nevertheless, recommendations regarding the extent and duration of RIS are non-standardized and RIS as an initial strategy may be associated with an unacceptably high frequency of graft loss and disease progression. Patients and Methods We reviewed the outcome of a combination program of aggressive chemo-immunotherapy and complete withdrawal of immunosuppression in treating 22 patients with monomorphic PTLD between January 1995 and August 2012. Results 12 of 22 patients (55%) received CHOP-R every 2 weeks (dose dense CHOP-R) and 10 patients received other doxorubicin-based regimens. There was no treatment related mortality (TRM). Complete response (CR) was seen in 91% of patients. Median overall survival was 9.61 years with 95% CI (5.21-10.74). Median progression free survival (PFS) was 5.39 years with 95% CI (2.10-10.74). The graft-rejection rate was 18% with 95% CI (0.03-0.34). Conclusion We conclude that the use of aggressive chemo-immunotherapy in combination with withdrawal of immunosuppression approach yields excellent results and should be prospectively studied in a multi-institutional setting. PMID:24035715

  18. Response to rituximab-based therapy and risk factor analysis in epstein barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disorder after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in children and adults: a study from the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Styczynski, J.; Gil, L.; Tridello, G.; Ljungman, P.; Donnelly, J.P.; Velden, W. van der; Omar, H.; Martino, R.; Halkes, C.; Faraci, M.; Theunissen, K.; Kalwak, K.; Hubacek, P.; Sica, S.; Nozzoli, C.; Fagioli, F.; Matthes, S.; Diaz, M.A.; Migliavacca, M.; Balduzzi, A.; Tomaszewska, A.; amara Rde, L. C; Biezen, A. van; Hoek, J. van den; Iacobelli, S.; Einsele, H.; Cesaro, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this analysis was to investigate prognostic factors that influence the outcome of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after a rituximab-based treatment in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) setting.

  19. EBV-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorder and Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Patient with Severe Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jacob Kinross-Wright

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Epstein-Barr virus- (EBV- associated lymphoproliferative disease (LPD is a rare condition, usually occurring in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of EBV-associated LPD in a patient with severe celiac disease, the first report to describe this syndrome in a patient with this diagnosis. Case Summary. A 69-year-old Caucasian woman with recent diagnosis of celiac sprue presented to our hospital with persistent diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, and fatigue despite adherence to gluten-free diet for a number of weeks prior to presentation. She underwent evaluation for occult malignancy and was found to have diffuse intra-abdominal mesenteric lymphadenopathy on CT scan. Biopsy of mesenteric nodes revealed an EBV positive, CD20 positive mixed lymphoproliferative process with T-cell predominance, but without a monoclonal cell population felt to be consistent with EBV-associated LPD. Bone marrow biopsy revealed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, complicating her course. She was treated with steroids and rituximab but continued to decline, eventually developing MSSA bacteremia and succumbing to her disease. Conclusion. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the constellation of celiac sprue, EBV-associated LPD, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Providers caring for patients with severe, uncontrolled celiac disease and adenopathy should consider EBV-associated LPD.

  20. Occurrence and prognostic relevance of CD30 expression in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Bendix, Knud

    2015-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are potentiallyfatal, often Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven neoplasias developing in immunocompromised hosts. Initial treatment usually consists of a reduction in immunosuppressive therapy and/or rituximab with or without chemotherapy. However...... favorable outcome. For diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)-type PTLD this was regardless of EBV status, and remained significant in multivariate analysis. Cell-of-origin had no independent prognostic value in our series of DLBCL PTLD....

  1. Long-term follow-up of kidney transplant patients with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, S A; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques; Bendtzen, K

    2003-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) can be resolved in many transplant patients by the reduction or cessation of immunosuppression, after which many grafts continue to function as the result of a form of operational tolerance. When graft function deteriorates, retransplantation may...... be an option. Cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-18 may play a role in PTLD tolerance induction and tumor regression. We report long-term follow-up on the duration of graft tolerance and the course of retransplantation in a series of patients who underwent kidney transplantation and demonstrated PTLD...

  2. MLKL and FADD Are Critical for Suppressing Progressive Lymphoproliferative Disease and Activating the NLRP3 Inflammasome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available MLKL, a key component downstream of RIPK3, is suggested to be a terminal executor of necroptosis. Genetic studies have revealed that Ripk3 ablation rescues embryonic lethality in Fadd- or Caspase-8-deficient mice. Given that RIPK3 has also been implicated in non-necroptotic pathways including apoptosis and inflammatory signaling, it remains unclear whether the lethality in Fadd−/− mice is indeed caused by necropotosis. Here, we show that genetic deletion of Mlkl rescues the developmental defect in Fadd-deficient mice and that Fadd−/−Mlkl−/− mice are viable and fertile. Mlkl−/−Fadd−/− mice display significantly accelerated lymphoproliferative disease characterized by lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly when compared to Ripk3−/− Fadd−/− mice. Mlkl−/−Fadd−/− bone-marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells have impaired NLRP3 inflammasome activation associated with defects in ASC speck formation and NF-κB-dependent NLRP3 transcription. Our findings reveal that MLKL and FADD play critical roles in preventing lymphoproliferative disease and activating the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  3. CD30-Positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disease of the Oral Mucosa in Children: A Manifestation of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated T-Lymphoproliferative Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mineui; Ko, Young Hyeh

    2015-11-01

    Eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa (EUOM) is a very rare, benign, self-limiting ulcerative lesion of the oral cavity of unknown pathogenesis, and belongs to the same spectrum of CD30(+) T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) of the oral mucosa. The etiology and pathogenesis of the disease are unknown. We report two cases in children who were initially diagnosed with EUOM and CD30(+) T-cell LPD, respectively. However, retrospective analysis revealed that a majority of infiltrated atypical T cells were positive for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The present cases suggest that the pathogenesis and etiology of EUOM or CD30(+) T-cell LPD occurring in children are different from those in adults. EUOM or CD30(+) T-cell LPD in children is a manifestation of EBV-positive T-cell LPD, and should therefore be distinguished from the disease in adults.

  4. Screening for PTLD in lung and heart-lung transplant recipients by measuring EBV DNA load in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid using real time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Peter; Watkins, Bradley; Webber, Steven A; Wadowsky, Robert; Michaels, Marian G

    2008-06-01

    Pediatric L-HLTx recipients are at risk for developing PTLD with the lung being a primary site of disease. We hypothesized that BALF is a better sample than peripheral blood for measuring EBV DNA load in this high-risk population. Archived BALF specimens from pediatric L-HLTx recipients with and without PTLD were assayed for EBV DNA load using a quantitative real time TaqMan PCR assay. These values were compared with values determined in peripheral blood by a competitive PCR assay. Fifty-five BALF specimens from 16 L-HLTx patients were evaluated. Three patients with PTLD had mean BALF EBV DNA load values almost 50-fold higher than subjects without PTLD (4.6 x 10(5) copies/mL vs. 1.0 x 10(4) copies/mL). Patients who were EBV seronegative pretransplantation (i.e., high risk for PTLD) had elevated EBV DNA load values vs. patients who were EBV seropositive pretransplantation, regardless of the diagnosis of PTLD (mean values of 3.2 x 10(5) copies/mL vs. 1.1 x 10(4) copies/mL). Lastly, BALF analysis identified all subjects with PTLD, whereas peripheral blood analysis identified only one of these cases. Therefore, it can be concluded that monitoring EBV DNA load in BALF following L-HLTx facilitates detection of PTLD in high-risk patients and may be superior to peripheral blood assays.

  5. Post-kidney transplant large bowel lymphoproliferative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a serious complication of organ transplantation. The gastrointestinal (GI tract is a common site involved, but non-specific signs and symptoms often delay the diagnosis. We report a case of EBV-associated GI-PTLD in a 68-year-old kidney transplant patient who received the kidney ten months earlier. He presented with chronic diarrhea and developed massive pneumo-peritoneum secondary to multiple colonic perforations.

  6. Adult systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youping; Liu, Xinyue; Chen, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV + T-LPD) occurs mainly in Asia and South America and is extremely rare in adults. The disease is characterized by a clonal proliferation of EBV-infected T cells with a cytotoxic immunophenotype and is associated with a poor clinical outcome and can be life-threatening. The majority of the patients have evidence of systemic disease, often with lymph node, liver and spleen involvement. The present study describes a case of adult systemic EBV + T-LPD with high fever, systemic lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, nose-pharynx neoplasm, pancytopenia, EB virus infection and proliferative bone marrow, with the aim of improving the understanding of the condition.

  7. Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Leptin Levels in Lymphoproliferative Diseases - Relation to the Bone Marrow Fat and Infiltration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaja, A.; Churý, Z.; Pecen, Ladislav; Fraňková, H.; Jandáková, H.; Hejlová, N.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2000), s. 307-312 ISSN 0028-2685 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : leptin * bone marrow fat * bone marrow infiltration * lymphoproliferative disease Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.579, year: 2000

  8. Immune-mediated neuropathy with Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takaaki; Arai, Ayako; Yokota, Takanori; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Miura, Osamu; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T/NK- cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-T/NK-LPD) developed acute-onset weakness. A nerve conduction study showed a conduction block in both the proximal and most distal segments. Although the patient's neuropathy transiently responded to intravenous immunoglobulin, it was progressive for at least 25 days until the start of prednisolone (PSL) administration, after which it remarkably improved. The neuropathy further improved after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The present patient's clinical course is not consistent with that of typical Guillain-Barré syndrome. This case suggests that EBV-T/NK-LPD can cause progressive immune-mediated neuropathy as a result of chronic EBV antigen presentation and can be treated with PSL and BMT.

  9. Systemic Epstein-Barr Virus-positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disease of Childhood With Good Response to Steroid Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo; Han, Kyungja; Han, Eunhee; Lee, Jae Wook; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cho, Bin

    2017-11-01

    Systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood is a rare disease and has a very fulminant clinical course with high mortality. A 21-month-old female patient was referred to our hospital with a 1 week history of fever and was subsequently diagnosed with systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood. After starting treatment with dexamethasone, she showed early defervescence and improvement of laboratory parameters, and has remained disease-free after stopping steroid treatment, although longer follow-up is necessary. Our report underscores the possibility that this disease entity may be heterogenous in terms of prognosis.

  10. Spectrum of Epstein-Barr virus-associated diseases in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Li; Jiang, Xinmiao; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Fen; Fan, Zhiping; Guo, Xutao; Dai, Min; Liu, Can; Yu, Guopan; Zhang, Xian; Wu, Meiqing; Huang, Xiaojun; Liu, Qifa

    2013-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection may result in a spectrum of diseases in recipients of transplant. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence, clinical characteristics, and prognosis of the spectrum of EBV-associated diseases in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). A total of 263 recipients undergoing allo-HSCT were prospectively enrolled. The blood EBV-DNA loads were regularly monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The 3-year cumulative incidence of total EBV-associated diseases, posttransplantation lymphoproliferative diseases (PTLD), EBV fever, and EBV end-organ diseases (pneumonia, encephalitis/myelitis, and hepatitis) were 15.6%±2.5%, 9.9%±2.0%, 3.3%±1.3%, and 3.3%±1.2% (2.2%±1.0%, 1.6%±0.8%, and 0.9%±0.6%), respectively. Fever was the most common symptom of EBV-associated diseases. Patients with PTLD had better response rate to rituximab-based treatments compared with those with EBV end-organ diseases (including PTLD accompanied by EBV end-organ diseases) (P=0.014). The 3-year overall survival was 37.3%±13.7%, 100.0%, and 0.0%±0.0% in patients with PTLD, EBV fever, and EBV end-organ diseases (P=0.001). EBV-associated diseases other than PTLD are not rare in the recipients of allo-HSCT. The clinical manifestations of EBV end-organ diseases are similar to PTLD. EBV end-organ diseases had poorer response to rituximab-based therapy compared with PTLD.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus load in transplant patients: Early detection of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, María Dolores; Durand, Karina A; Solernou, Veronica; Bosaleh, Andrea; Balbarrey, Ziomara; García de Dávila, María T; Rodríguez, Marcelo; Irazu, Lucía; Alonio, Lidia V; Picconi, María A

    2016-01-01

    High levels of circulating EBV load are used as a marker of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). There is no consensus regarding the threshold level indicative of an increase in peripheral EBV DNA. The aim of the study was to clinically validate a developed EBV quantification assay for early PTLD detection. Transversal study: paired peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), plasma and oropharyngeal lymphoid tissue (OLT) from children undergoing a solid organ transplant with (n=58) and without (n=47) PTLD. Retrospective follow-up: 71 paired PBMC and plasma from recipients with (n=6) and without (n=6) PTLD history. EBV load was determined by real-time PCR. The diagnostic ability to detect all PTLD (categories 1-4), advanced PTLD (categories 2-4) or neoplastic PTLD (categories 3 and 4) was estimated by analyzing the test performance at different cut-off values or with a load variation greater than 0.5log units. The higher diagnostic performance for identifying all, advanced or neoplastic PTLD, was achieved with cut-off values of 1.08; 1.60 and 2.47log EBVgEq/10(5) PBMC or 2.30; 2.60; 4.47loggEq/10(5) OLT cells, respectively. EBV DNA detection in plasma showed high specificity but low (all categories) or high (advanced/neoplastic categories) sensitivity for PTLD identification. Diagnostic performance was greater when: (1) a load variation in PBMC or plasma was identified; (2) combining the measure of EBV load in PBMC and plasma. The best diagnostic ability to identify early PTLD stages was achieved by monitoring EBV load in PBMC and plasma simultaneously; an algorithm was proposed. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. [Lymphocytic Clonal Expansion in Adult Patients with Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Feng-Luan; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Qian; Feng, Jia; Zhang, Wen-Li; Xu, Lei; Xu, Hai-Chan; Wen, Juan-Juan; Meng, Qing-Xiang

    2017-12-01

    To explore the lymphocytic clonal expansion in adult patients with Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative diseases (EBV+LPD), and to investigate the experimental methods for EBV+LPD cells so as to provide a more objective measure for the diagnosis, classification and prognosis in the early stage of this disease. Peripheral blood samples from 5 patients with EBV+LPD, 4 patients with adult infectious mononucleosis(IM) as negative control and 3 patients with acute NK-cell leukemia(ANKL) as positive control were collected. Prior to immunochemotherapy, viral loads and clonality were analysed by flow cytometry (FCM), T cell receptor gene rearrangement (TCR) was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and diversity of EB virus terminal repeat (EBV-TR) was detected by Southern blot. FCM showed only 1 case with clonal TCRVβ in 5 patients with EBV+LPD, TCR clonal expansion could be detected both in patients with IM(4 of 4) and 4 patients with EBV+LPD(4 of 5), Out of patients with EBV+LPD, 1 patient displayed a monoclonal band and 2 patients showed oligoclonal bands when detecting EBV-TR by southen blot. Detecting the diversity of EBV-TR by Southern blot may be the most objective way to reflex clonal transformation of EBV+LPD, which is of great benefit to the diagnosis, classification and prognosis in the early stage of this disease.

  13. Correlation between flow cytometry and histologic findings: ten year experience in the investigation of lymphoproliferative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanna Mara Pinheiro Sobreira Bezerra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate the advantages of correlatingflow cytometry immunophenotyping with the pathology/immunohistochemistry of lymph nodes or nodules in the diagnosisof lymphoproliferative diseases. Methods: A retrospective studywas carried out of 157 biopsy or fine-needle aspiration lymph nodes/nodule specimens taken from 142 patients, from 1999 and 2009.The specimens were simultaneously studied with flow cytometryand pathology at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. The specimenswere prepared in hematoxylin/eosin, Giemsa, or monoclonal antibodystained slides for detecting specific antibodies for the purposesof pathology/immunohistochemical analysis. The samples werehemolyzed and marked with different monoclonal antibody panels fordifferent antigens in flow cytometry immunophenotyping. Results:The diagnostic results of pathology/immunohistochemical studiesand flow cytometry immunophenotyping agreed in 115 patients(81%, corresponding to 127 specimens, as follows according tothe pathologic diagnosis: 63 patients with non-Hodgkin’s B-celllymphoma; 26 patients with reactive lymphoid hyperplasia; 5 patientswith non-Hodgkin’s T-cell lymphoma; 4 patients with atypical lymphoidproliferation; 5 patients with a chronic granulomatous inflammatoryprocess; 5 patients with a non-hematologic diagnosis; 2 patientswith granulocytic sarcoma; 2 patients with thymoma; 1 patientwith byphenotypic leukemia; 1 patient with kappa plasmocytoma;1 patient with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Subtypes of lymphomas couldbe classified by associating the two techniques: 19 patients withfollicular lymphoma; 15 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma; 7patients with small lymphocytic B-cell lymphoma/chronic lymphocyticleukemia; 3 patients with mantle cell lymphoma; 1 patient withBurkitt’s lymphoma; 1 patient with MALT type lymphoma; 1 patientwith post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease; 2 patients with highgrade non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma; 1 patient with low grade

  14. Small intestinal involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders post-renal transplantation: A report from the post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder international survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, data on post-renal transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD collected from the existing literature were pooled and analyzed to compare the characteristics, predictors and prognosis of small intestinal PTLDs. We performed a comprehensive search for the available data by Pubmed and Google scholar search engines for reports on this subject. Data from 18 previously published studies, comprising 120 renal allograft recipients, were included in the analysis. Renal transplant recipients with intestinal PTLD were significantly less likely to have Hogkin′s and Hogkin′s-like lesions (P = 0.044 and to be younger at the time of transplan-tation (P = 0.07. Except for Hodgkin′s-like lesions, histopathological evaluations elsewhere were comparable between the group with PTLD in the small intestine and age- and sex-matched renal transplant recipients with PTLD in other sites. The overall mortality was relatively higher in the control group (P = 0.09. When death only due to PTLD was used as the outcome, a trend toward better outcome was seen for the intestinal PTLD group compared with the other localizations (P = 0.1. The 1- and 5-year survival rates for intestinal PTLD patients were 57% and 37%, respectively, compared with 54% and 21%, respectively, for the control group. According to our findings based on analysis of international data, renal transplant patients with small intestinal PTLD are more likely to be of younger age but less frequently represent Hodgkin′s and Hodgkin′s-like lesions. They also have better patient survival compared with transplant recipients with PTLD in other locations. Further multi-center prospective studies are needed to confirm our results.

  15. Recurrent posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder involving the larynx and trachea: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Caroline A; Meier, Jeremy D; Stallworth, Christina R; White, David R

    2012-05-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-recognized complication of solid organ transplantation and commonly affects upper airway lymphoid tissue. Tracheal and laryngeal involvement in patients with PTLD, however, is rare. We present one such case. We report the case of a patient with recurrent PTLD involving the larynx and trachea and describe the presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome. An 11-year-old boy who underwent bilateral nephrectomy and renal transplantation as an infant was admitted to the hospital with chronic cough, fever, stridor, and dyspnea. His post-transplantation course was complicated by PTLD in cervical lymph nodes at 9 years of age that was successfully treated with chemotherapy. A computed tomographic scan during his present admission revealed supraglottic swelling, a distal tracheal mass, and paratracheal lymph node enlargement. The patient underwent laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy with biopsy specimens taken from the right laryngeal ventricle and distal trachea. Pathologic examination yielded a diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus-positive PTLD. The patient was treated with chemotherapy, which resulted in resolution of the airway lesions, as seen on repeat bronchoscopy. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of recurrent PTLD involving simultaneous lesions in the larynx and the trachea. PTLD in the head and neck can present as lymphoid hypertrophy, airway obstruction, stridor, or cough. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential for prompt diagnosis of this life-threatening complication.

  16. Characterization of skin blister fluids from children with Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Taizo; Toma, Tomoko; Miyazawa, Hanae; Koizumi, Eiko; Shirahashi, Tetsujiro; Matsuda, Yusuke; Yachie, Akihiro

    2018-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T- or natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by chronic proliferation of EBV-infected lymphocytes. Patients may present with severe skin manifestations, including hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) and hydroa vacciniforme (HV)-like eruption, which are characterized by blister formation and necrotic ulceration. Skin biopsy specimens show inflammatory reactions comprising EBV-infected lymphocytes. However, blister fluids have not been fully assessed in patients with this disease. Blister fluids were collected from three patients with EBV-associated LPD: two with HMB and one with HV. Immunophenotyping of blister lymphocytes and measurement of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in blister fluids were performed. The patients with HMB and HV exhibited markedly increased percentages of NK and γδ T cells, respectively, in both peripheral blood and blister fluids. These NK and γδ T cells strongly expressed the activation marker human leukocyte antigen-DR and were considered to be cellular targets of EBV infections. TNF-α was highly elevated in all blister fluids. Severe local skin reactions of EBV-associated LPD may be associated with infiltrating EBV-infected lymphocytes and a high TNF-α concentration in blister fluids. © 2018 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  17. Leflunomide/teriflunomide inhibit Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- induced lymphoproliferative disease and lytic viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, Andrea; Plowshay, Julie; Ma, Shidong; Nawandar, Dhananjay; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Romero-Masters, James C; Bristol, Jillian A; Li, Zhe; Tsai, Ming-Han; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Kenney, Shannon C

    2017-07-04

    EBV infection causes mononucleosis and is associated with specific subsets of B cell lymphomas. Immunosuppressed patients such as organ transplant recipients are particularly susceptible to EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease (LPD), which can be fatal. Leflunomide (a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis) and its active metabolite teriflunomide (used to treat multiple sclerosis) inhibit de novo pyrimidine synthesis by targeting the cellular dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, thereby decreasing T cell proliferation. Leflunomide also inhibits the replication of cytomegalovirus and BK virus via both "on target" and "off target" mechanisms and is increasingly used to treat these viruses in organ transplant recipients. However, whether leflunomide/teriflunomide block EBV replication or inhibit EBV-mediated B cell transformation is currently unknown. We show that teriflunomide inhibits cellular proliferation, and promotes apoptosis, in EBV-transformed B cells in vitro at a clinically relevant dose. In addition, teriflunomide prevents the development of EBV-induced lymphomas in both a humanized mouse model and a xenograft model. Furthermore, teriflunomide inhibits lytic EBV infection in vitro both by preventing the initial steps of lytic viral reactivation, and by blocking lytic viral DNA replication. Leflunomide/teriflunomide might therefore be clinically useful for preventing EBV-induced LPD in patients who have high EBV loads yet require continued immunosuppression.

  18. Animal in vivo models of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative diseases: special references to rabbit models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K; Teramoto, N; Akagi, T

    2002-10-01

    Animal models of human EBV-associated diseases are essential to elucidate the pathogenesis of EBV-associated diseases. Here we review those previous models using EBV or EBV-like herpesviruses and describe the details on our two newly-developed rabbit models of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD) induced by simian EBV-like viruses. The first is Cynomolgus-EBV-induced T-cell lymphomas in rabbits inoculated intravenously (77-90%) and orally (82-89%) during 2-5 months. EBV-DNA was detected in peripheral blood by PCR from 2 days after oral inoculation, while anti-EBV-VCA IgG was raised 3 weeks later. Rabbit lymphomas and their cell lines contained EBV-DNA and expressed EBV-encoded RNA-1 (EBER-1). Rabbit lymphoma cell lines, most of which have specific chromosomal abnormality, showed tumorigenicity in nude mice. The second is the first animal model for EBV-infected T-cell LPD with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS), using rabbits infected with an EBV-like herpesvirus, Herpesvirus papio (HVP). Rabbits inoculated intravenously with HVP-producing cells showed increased anti-EBV-VCA-IgG titers, and most (85%) subsequently died of fatal LPD and VAHS, with bleeding and hepatosplenomegaly, during 22-105 days. Peroral spray of cell-free HVP induced viral infection with seroconversion in 3 out of 5 rabbits, with 2 of the 3 infected rabbits dying of LPD with VAHS. Atypical T lymphocytes containing HVP-DNA and expressing EBER-1 were observed in many organs. Hemophagocytic histiocytosis was observed in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus. These rabbit models are also useful and inexpensive alternative experimental model systems for studying the biology and pathogenesis of EBV, and prophylactic and therapeutic regimens.

  19. Comprehensive molecular diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative diseases using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Shintaro; Nakayama, Manabu; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Hoshino, Akihiro; Shimodera, Saeko; Shibata, Hirofumi; Fujino, Hisanori; Fujino, Takahiro; Yunomae, Yuta; Okano, Tsubasa; Yamashita, Motoi; Yasumi, Takahiro; Izawa, Kazushi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Imai, Kohsuke; Zhang, Kejian; Marsh, Rebecca; Picard, Capucine; Latour, Sylvain; Ohara, Osamu; Morio, Tomohiro

    2018-05-18

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several life-threatening diseases, such as lymphoproliferative disease (LPD), particularly in immunocompromised hosts. Some categories of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) including X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP), are characterized by susceptibility and vulnerability to EBV infection. The number of genetically defined PIDs is rapidly increasing, and clinical genetic testing plays an important role in establishing a definitive diagnosis. Whole-exome sequencing is performed for diagnosing rare genetic diseases, but is both expensive and time-consuming. Low-cost, high-throughput gene analysis systems are thus necessary. We developed a comprehensive molecular diagnostic method using a two-step tailed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to detect mutations in 23 candidate genes responsible for XLP or XLP-like diseases. Samples from 19 patients suspected of having EBV-associated LPD were used in this comprehensive molecular diagnosis. Causative gene mutations (involving PRF1 and SH2D1A) were detected in two of the 19 patients studied. This comprehensive diagnosis method effectively detected mutations in all coding exons of 23 genes with sufficient read numbers for each amplicon. This comprehensive molecular diagnostic method using PCR and NGS provides a rapid, accurate, low-cost diagnosis for patients with XLP or XLP-like diseases.

  20. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder After Clinical Islet Transplantation: Report of the First Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A; Olateju, T; Deschenes, J; Shankarnarayan, S H; Chua, N; Shapiro, A M J; Senior, P

    2017-09-01

    We report the first two cases of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in recipients of islet transplants worldwide. First, a 44-year-old recipient of three islet infusions developed PTLD 80 months after his initial transplantation, presenting with abdominal pain and diffuse terminal ileum thickening on imaging. He was treated with surgical excision, reduction of immunosuppression, and rituximab. Seven months later, he developed central nervous system PTLD, presenting with vertigo and diplopia; immunosuppression was discontinued, resulting in graft loss, and he was given high-dose methotrexate and underwent consolidative autologous stem cell transplantation. He remains in remission 37 months after the initial diagnosis. Second, a 58-year-old female recipient of two islet infusions developed PTLD 24 months after initial islet infusion, presenting with pancytopenia secondary to extensive bone marrow involvement. Immunosuppression was discontinued, resulting in graft loss, and she received rituximab and chemotherapy, achieving complete remission. Both patients were monomorphic B cell PTLD subtype by histology and negative for Epstein-Barr virus in tissue or blood. These cases document the first occurrences of this rare complication in islet transplantation, likely secondary to prolonged, intensive immunosuppression, and highlight the varying clinical manifestations of PTLD. Further studies are needed to determine incidence rate and risk factors in islet transplantation. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  1. Lack of correlation between immunologic markers and cell surface ultrastructure in the leukemic phase of lymphoproliferative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golomb, Harvey M.; Simon, Deberah

    1977-01-01

    In a prospective study of malignant cells from 13 patients with the leukemic phase of lymphoproliferative diseases, we wished to determine whether any correlation between the immunologic markers and the cell surface ultrastructure. Five patients had chronic lymphocytic leukemia, four had malignant lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphocytic type, two had the Sezary syndrome, and one each had acute prolymphocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. Cell separation and isolation was done at room temperature for all specimens. Immunologic markers tested for were surface immunoglobins, a B-cell property, and E-rosettes, a T-cell property. Three patients had T-cell diseases, 6 had B-cell diseases, and 4 were classified as ''null.'' All but one patient had moderate to large numbers of microvilli on their malignant cells. The single exception had a typical B-cell form of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. There appears to be no correlation between immunologic markers and cell surface ultrastructure; therefore, SEM appears not to be valuable in the diagnosis or classification of immunologic sub-types of certain lymphoproliferative diseases.

  2. Persistent Epstein-Barr viral load in Epstein-Barr viral naïve pediatric heart transplant recipients: Risk of late-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bibhuti; Morrow, Robert; Huang, Rong; Fixler, David

    2016-12-24

    To examine the risk of late-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in the presence of persisting high Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in EBV naïve pediatric heart transplant (HT) recipients. A retrospective review of the medical records of the 145 pediatric HT recipients who had serial EBV viral load monitoring at our center was performed. We defined EBV naive patients whose EBV serology either IgM or IgG in the blood were negative at the time of HT and excluded passive transmission from mother to child in subjects less than 6 mo of age. PTLD was diagnosed in 8 out of 145 patients (5.5%); 6/91 (6.5%) in those who were EBV seropositive and 2/54 (3.7%) in the EBV naïve group at the time of HT ( P = 0.71). We found 32/145 (22%) patients with persistently high EBV load during continuing follow-up; 20/91 (22%) in EBV seropositive group vs 12/54 (22%) in EBV naïve group ( P = 0.97). There was no significant association between pre-HT serostatus and EBV load after transplant ( P > 0.05). In the EBV seropositive group, PTLD was diagnosed in 15% (3/20) of patients with high EBV vs 4.2% (3/71) of patients with low or undetectable EBV load ( P = 0.14) whereas in EBV naïve patients 8.3% (1/12) of those with high EBV load and 2.3% (1/42) with low or undetectable EBV load ( P = 0.41). There was a highly significant association between occurrence of PTLD in those with high EBV load and duration of follow up (4.3 ± 3.9 years) after HT by Cochran-Armitage test for the entire cohort ( P = 0.005). At least one episode of acute rejection occurred in 72% (23/32) of patients with high EBV vs 36% (41/113) patients with low or undetectable EBV after HT ( P < 0.05). There is an association between persistently high EBV load during post-HT follow up and the occurrence of late-onset PTLD in pediatric HT recipients irrespective of serostatus at the time of transplant. The occurrence of allograft rejection increased in patients with high EBV load presumably due to reduction in

  3. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Manbok, E-mail: manbok66@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Rahman, Masmudur M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Cogle, Christopher R. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McFadden, Grant [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus-Negative Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Diseases: Three Distinct Cases from a Single Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Mine Bakanay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease that occurred 6 to 8 years after renal transplantation are reported. The patients respectively had gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and atypical Burkitt lymphoma. Absence of EBV in the tissue samples was demonstrated by both in situ hybridization for EBV early RNA and polymerase chain reaction for EBV DNA. Patients were treated with reduction in immunosuppression and combined chemotherapy plus an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab. Despite the reduction in immunosuppression, patients had stable renal functions without loss of graft functions. The patient with atypical Burkitt lymphoma had an abnormal karyotype, did not respond to treatment completely, and died due to disease progression. The other patients are still alive and in remission 5 and 3 years after diagnosis, respectively. EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases are usually late-onset and are reported to have poor prognosis. Thus, reduction in immunosuppression is usually not sufficient for treatment and more aggressive approaches like rituximab with combined chemotherapy are required.

  5. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases

  6. A typical aspects of intrathoracic posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beigelman, C.; Leblond, V.; Suberbielle, C.; Lenoir, S.; Dorent, R.; Grenier, P.

    1995-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD), developing after immunosuppressive therapy in human organ-graft recipients, are, for the most part, Epstein-Barr virus-induced. The earlier the diagnosis is made, the greater the potential for reversibility. The chest radiographs and CT scans of 10 patients with thoracic locations of PTLD were reviewed. Mediastinal and hilar adenopathy, pulmonary nodules, and pleural thickening or effusion were encountered. The incidence of partial resolution with clinical remission appears to be noteworthy, and in all likelihood is related to the extensive necrosis that is frequently seen. Slow regression, transitory deterioration in one case, and localization only on the graft side in two cases, were observed. These morphological and evolutionary peculiarities must be known in order to optimize the diagnosis, and thus the prognosis, of these very original disorders. (orig.)

  7. Two rare cases of Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders in inflammatory bowel disease patients on thiopurines and other immunosuppressive medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, K; Cherian, M; Jain, S; Latimer, M; Corbett, M; D'Rozario, J; Pavli, P

    2013-12-01

    The setting of chronic immunosuppression in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may promote the proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus-positive neoplastic clones. We report two rare cases of Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in IBD patients: one resembled lymphomatoid granulomatosis, and the other was a lymphoma resembling Hodgkin lymphoma. There are currently no guidelines for the prevention of lymphoproliferative disorder in IBD patients on immunosuppressive therapy. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. HLA associations and risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in Danish population-based cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Strandhave, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a feared complication to organ transplantation, associated with substantial morbidity and inferior survival. Risk factors for PTLD include T cell–depleting induction therapy and primary infection or reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus....... Possible associations between certain HLA types and the risk of developing PTLD have been reported by other investigators; however, results are conflicting. Methods: We conducted a retrospective, population-based study on 4295 Danish solid organ transplant patients from the Scandiatransplant database...... can be clinically useful after transplantation in personalized monitoring schemes. Given the strong linkage disequilibrium in the HLA region, the associations must be interpreted carefully. The large size, virtually complete ascertainment of cases and no loss to follow-up remain important strengths...

  9. Quantitative Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology in lung transplant recipients with primary EBV infection and/or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, E; van der Bij, W; de Boer, W; Timens, W; Middeldorp, J; The, TH

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antibody response was studied in lung transplant patients to assess their value in the diagnosis and prognosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Recently developed synthetic peptides representing Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1), diffuse

  10. Quantitative Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology in lung transplant recipients with primary EBV infection and/or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, E; van der Bij, W; Boer, W.; Timens, W.; Middeldorp, J.M.; The, T.H.

    2003-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antibody response was studied in lung transplant patients to assess their value in the diagnosis and prognosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Recently developed synthetic peptides representing Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1), diffuse

  11. Prevention of Epstein-Barr virus-lymphoproliferative disease by molecular monitoring and preemptive rituximab in high-risk patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.J. van Esser (Joost); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); B. van der Holt (Bronno); E. Meijer (Ellen); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.W. Gratama (Jan-Willem); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); B. Löwenberg (Bob); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractRecipients of a partially T-cell-depleted (TCD) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) developing reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with quantified viral DNA levels exceeding 1000 genome equivalents/milliliter (geq/mL) are at high risk for EBV-lymphoproliferative disease

  12. Recent advances in the risk factors, diagnosis and management of Epstein-Barr virus post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo-Hiraldo, Paibel; Arasaratnam, Reuben; Rouce, Rayne H

    Fifty years after the first reports of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated endemic Burkitt's lymphoma, EBV has emerged as the third most prevalent oncogenic virus worldwide. EBV infection is associated with various malignancies including Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, NK/T-cell lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Despite the highly specific immunologic control in the immunocompetent host, EBV can cause severe complications in the immunocompromised host (namely, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease). This is particularly a problem in patients with delayed immune reconstitution post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant or solid organ transplant. Despite advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment algorithms allowing earlier identification and treatment of patients at highest risk, mortality rates remain as high as 90% if not treated early. The cornerstones of treatment include reduction in immunosuppression and in vivo B cell depletion with an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. However, these treatment modalities are not always feasible due to graft rejection, emergence of graft vs. host disease, and toxicity. Newer treatment modalities include the use of adoptive T cell therapy, which has shown promising results in various EBV-related malignancies. In this article we will review recent advances in risk factors, diagnosis and management of EBV-associated malignancies, particularly post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. We will also discuss new and innovative treatment options including adoptive T cell therapy as well as management of special situations such as chronic active EBV and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Desordem linfoproliferativa pós-transplante em paciente pediátrico Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Manuel Pêgo Fernandes

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Terapias de imunossupressão, a que pacientes transplantados devem ser submetidos, os expõe a um alto risco de desenvolver desordens linfoproliferativas pós-transplante (PTLD. Descrevemos o caso de uma criança submetida a transplante cardíaco aos sete meses de idade e que acabou desenvolvendo PTLD, aos nove anos, diagnosticada por meio de retirada de nódulo pulmonar.Immunosuppressive therapy for transplanted patients exposes them to a high risk of developing posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD. We report the case of a child undergoing heart transplantation at seven months of age who developed PTLD at nine years of age, diagnosed by resection of a pulmonary nodule.

  14. Deregulated expression of HDAC9 in B cells promotes development of lymphoproliferative disease and lymphoma in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica S. Gil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9 is expressed in B cells, and its overexpression has been observed in B-lymphoproliferative disorders, including B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL. We examined HDAC9 protein expression and copy number alterations in primary B-NHL samples, identifying high HDAC9 expression among various lymphoma entities and HDAC9 copy number gains in 50% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. To study the role of HDAC9 in lymphomagenesis, we generated a genetically engineered mouse (GEM model that constitutively expressed an HDAC9 transgene throughout B-cell development under the control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH enhancer (Eμ. Here, we report that the Eμ-HDAC9 GEM model develops splenic marginal zone lymphoma and lymphoproliferative disease (LPD with progression towards aggressive DLBCL, with gene expression profiling supporting a germinal center cell origin, as is also seen in human B-NHL tumors. Analysis of Eμ-HDAC9 tumors suggested that HDAC9 might contribute to lymphomagenesis by altering pathways involved in growth and survival, as well as modulating BCL6 activity and p53 tumor suppressor function. Epigenetic modifications play an important role in the germinal center response, and deregulation of the B-cell epigenome as a consequence of mutations and other genomic aberrations are being increasingly recognized as important steps in the pathogenesis of a variety of B-cell lymphomas. A thorough mechanistic understanding of these alterations will inform the use of targeted therapies for these malignancies. These findings strongly suggest a role for HDAC9 in B-NHL and establish a novel GEM model for the study of lymphomagenesis and, potentially, preclinical testing of therapeutic approaches based on histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  15. Minimal disease detection of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders by flow cytometry: multidimensional cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Ricardo E

    2012-04-01

    Flow cytometric analysis of cell suspensions involves the sequential 'registration' of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of thousands of cells in list mode files. Thus, it is almost irresistible to describe phenomena in numerical terms or by 'ratios' that have the appearance of 'accuracy' due to the presence of numbers obtained from thousands of cells. The concepts involved in the detection and characterization of B cell lymphoproliferative processes are revisited in this paper by identifying parameters that, when analyzed appropriately, are both necessary and sufficient. The neoplastic process (cluster) can be visualized easily because the parameters that distinguish it form a cluster in multidimensional space that is unique and distinguishable from neighboring clusters that are not of diagnostic interest but serve to provide a background. For B cell neoplasia it is operationally necessary to identify the multidimensional space occupied by a cluster whose kappa:lambda ratio is 100:0 or 0:100. Thus, the concept of kappa:lambda ratio is without meaning and would not detect B cell neoplasia in an unacceptably high number of cases.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disease misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaodan; Xie, Jianlan; Zhou, Xiaoge

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is not uncommon in China, but gastrointestinal involvement is very rare. We report on an immunocompetent patient with EBV-associated T-cell LPD of the colon. The 26-year-old man was initially misdiagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC). A colon biopsy revealed the presence of small to medium-sized lymphoid cells infiltrating the intestinal wall. The neoplastic cells expressed CD3, CD5, and granzyme B, not CD56. EBV-encoded small ribonucleic acid was detected in the tumor cells of the colon as well as the lymph node, and the T-cell receptor gene rearrangement result displayed δ gene monoclonal rearrangement. The patient died 2 moths after the diagnosis. The clinical course of EBV-associated T-cell LPD is aggressive and the prognosis is poor, the wrong diagnosis may delay treatment. Therefore, we should be very careful to prevent misdiagnosis. When patients have multiple intestinal ulcers that are not typical of UC and the clinical course is unusual, although morphology looks like inflammatory change, pathologist should consider the possibility of EBV-associated LPD. The treatment strategy and prognosis of these two diseases are different.

  17. Systematic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease presenting as a persistent fever and cough: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, Fereshteh; Ghafourian, Firouzeh; Masir, Noraidah

    2014-08-27

    Systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease is an extremely rare disorder and classically arises following primary acute or chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection. It is characterized by clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus-infected T-cells with an activated cytotoxic phenotype. This disease has a rapid clinical course and is more frequent in Asia and South America, with relatively few cases being reported in Western countries. The clinical and pathological features of the disease overlap with other conditions including infectious mononucleosis, chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and natural killer cell malignancies. We describe the rare case of systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease in a 16-year-old Malay boy. He presented with a six-month history of fever and cough, with pulmonary and mediastinal lymphadenopathy and severe pancytopenia. Medium- to large-sized, CD8+ and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA-positive atypical lymphoid cells were present in the bone marrow aspirate. He subsequently developed fatal virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome and died due to sepsis and multiorgan failure. Although systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease is a disorder which is rarely encountered in clinical practice, our case report underlines the importance of a comprehensive diagnostic approach in the management of this disease. A high level of awareness of the disease throughout the diagnosis process for young patients who present with systemic illness and hemophagocytic syndrome may be of great help for the clinical diagnosis of this disease.

  18. A meta-analysis of potential relationship between Epstein-Barr-Encoded-RNA (EBER and onset time of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encodes two non-polyadenylated RNAs termed EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs. In this study, we tried to find series in which data of EBER and onset time of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD for patients have been documented to conduct a meta-analysis. A comprehensive search of the literature was performed by Pubmed and Google scholar to find reports indicating test results for EBER and PTLD onset in transplant patients. PTLD was considered "early onset" when it develops within the first post-transplant year. Finally, 265 patients from 15 studies have been included in the meta-analysis. The overall meta-analysis also showed a significant relation between EBER test positivity and early-onset PTLD development [relative risk (RR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.16-1.59; P <0.001]. The i2 index was 49.8%. Our study suggests that PTLD lesions with positive EBER test are more likely to develop within the early post-transplant period. Since early-onset PTLD is supposed to have better prognosis, having a positive EBER test might not be a bad news. However, for having a precise conclusion, prospective studies are needed to be conducted.

  19. Epstein-Barr Virus-positive T-cell Lymphoproliferative Disease Following Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Shunsuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Imadome, Ken-ichi; Arai, Ayako; Takahashi, Mikiko; Ohashi, Ryuji; Tamai, Hayato; Moriya, Keiichi; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Shimizu, Akira; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of the extremely rare condition Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) which occurred after umbilical cord blood transplantation. A 25-year-old Japanese man underwent cord blood transplantation from a male human leukocyte antigen 4/6-matched donor due to acute myeloid leukemia with trisomy 8. Bone marrow examination on day 30 showed chimerism with at least 90% donor cells and complete hematological response. Chronic symptoms of graft-versus-host disease appeared only on the skin and were successfully treated with cyclosporine alone. Three years later, however, the patient experienced repeated cold-like symptoms and was hospitalized with liver dysfunction. A high fever developed and was followed by significant edema of the right side of the face. The EBV DNA copy number in whole peripheral blood was 2×10(4)/mL. Liver biopsy showed invasion of EBV-infected CD8-positive T cells. Southern blotting analysis of the whole peripheral blood showed that the T-cell receptor Cβ1 rearrangement was positive. On the basis of these results, EBV-positive T-cell LPD was diagnosed and treated with prednisolone, cyclosporine, and etoposide, followed by cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone. However, the patient died of cardiac function failure, pneumonia, and pulmonary hemorrhage, all of unidentified cause. Most cases of EBV-related LPD after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation consist of EBV-positive B-cell LPD, and, to our knowledge, de novo EBV-positive T-cell LPD subsequent to transplantation has not been previously reported.

  20. Herpesvirus-associated central nervous system diseases after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meiqing; Huang, Fen; Jiang, Xinmiao; Fan, Zhiping; Zhou, Hongsheng; Liu, Can; Jiang, Qianli; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Ke; Xuan, Li; Zhai, Xiao; Zhang, Fuhua; Yin, Changxin; Sun, Jing; Feng, Ru; Liu, Qifa

    2013-01-01

    Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with encephalitis/myelitis and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As of now, data of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases in transplant recipients is limited. Hence, in this prospective study, we investigated the incidence of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases and explored the diagnosis of these diseases in 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients. Herpesvirus-DNA and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells were sampled from 58 recipients with herpesvirus-associated diseases or with unexplainable CNS manifestations. Results showed that 23 patients were diagnosed as herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases, including 15 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated diseases (4 encephalitis and 11 lymphoproliferative diseases), 5 herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis, 2 cytomegalovirus encephalitis/myelitis and 1 varicella zoster virus encephalitis. The median time of diseases onset was 65 (range 22-542) days post-transplantation. The 3-year cumulative incidence of herpesvirus-associated encephalitis/myelitis and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) was 6.3% ± 1.9% and 4.1% ± 1.2%, respectively. Of the evaluable cases, CSF cells mainly consisted of CD19(+)CD20(+) B cells (7/11) and had clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes (3/11) in patients with CNS-PTLD. On the contrary, in patients with encephalitis/myelitis, CSF cells were comprised of different cell populations and none of the gene rearrangement was detected. Herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases are common in the early stages of allo-HSCT, wherein EBV is the most frequent causative virus. The immunophenotypic and clonal analysis of CSF cells might be helpful in the differential diagnosis between encephalitis and lymphoproliferative diseases.

  1. P-glycoprotein is expressed and causes resistance to chemotherapy in EBV-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimori, Mayumi; Takada, Honami; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Kurata, Morito; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Koyama, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Norio; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi; Miura, Osamu; Arai, Ayako

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (EBV-T-LPDs) are rare lymphomas with poor prognosis. Although chemotherapeutic strategies such as CHOP have been often selected, they have exhibited only limited efficacy. To clarify the mechanism of chemoresistance, we examined P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. P-gp acts as an energy-dependent efflux pump that excretes drugs from the cytoplasm, resulting in low-intracellular drug concentrations and poor sensitivity to chemotherapy. We examined P-gp expression in EBV-positive cells by immunohistochemistry staining in three patients of EBV-T-LPDs and the expression was detected in all patients. We also examined mdr1 mRNA expression by reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain reaction (RT-PCR) in EBV-positive tumor cells from these patients and additional three patients. The expression was detected in all examined patients. In five EBV-T-LPDs patients, P-gp function was detected by Rhodamine-123 efflux assay in these cells. The efflux was inhibited by treatment with a P-gp inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA). We also examined and detected P-gp expression in EBV-positive T-cell lines SNT8 and SNT16 established from EBV-T-LPDs patients, by RT-PCR and western blotting. The function was also detected by Rhodamine-123 efflux in these cell lines. Inhibition and knock down of P-gp by CsA and siRNA, respectively, enhanced etoposide- and doxorubicin-induced cell death in the EBV-positive T-cell lines. Finally, we infected the T-cell line MOLT4 with EBV, and found that mdr1 mRNA expression and Rhodamine 123 efflux were upregulated after infection. These results indicated that enhanced P-gp expression contributed to the chemoresistance of EBV-T-LPDs

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus Lymphoproliferative Disease Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Prediction and Early Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.J. van Esser (Joost)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractEpstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of both infectious and malignant human diseases. These viruses are characterized by (B-cell) lymphotropism, their ability to establish latent infection in host cells and to induce proliferation of these latently infected cells.

  3. Preventing acute rejection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation: Use of aciclovir and mycophenolate mofetil in a steroid-free immunosuppressive protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, S.A.; Andersen, H.K.; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques

    1999-01-01

    Background: A widely held view is that any increase in the potency of an immunosuppressive agent will lead to an increase in infection and malignancy, such as life-threatening Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induced posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD), We tested this paradigm by studying...... or reactivated EBV infection (PREBV) was correlated to acute rejection (treated with OKT3; Pdisease is included); (2) aciclovir protected against PREBV (P

  4. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation is a frequent event after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) and quantitatively predicts EBV-lymphoproliferative disease following T-cell--depleted SCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esser, J W; van der Holt, B; Meijer, E; Niesters, H G; Trenschel, R; Thijsen, S F; van Loon, A M; Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A; Schaefer, U W; Osterhaus, A D; Gratama, J W; Löwenberg, B; Verdonck, L F; Cornelissen, J J

    2001-01-01

    Reactivation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) may evoke a protective cellular immune response or may be complicated by the development of EBV-lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). So far, very little is known about the incidence, recurrence, and

  5. Facial manifestations of Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission: Two atypical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benjamin Y; Kojima, Lisa; Huang, Mary S; Friedmann, Alison M; Ferry, Judith A; Weinstein, Howard J

    2016-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) rarely occurs in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), who have not received hematopoietic transplantation. We describe EBV-LPD manifesting as facial lesions in two children with ALL in remission. One patient was a 16-year-old male with T-cell ALL with an EBV-positive angiocentric polymorphous lip lesion presenting as right-sided facial swelling. The other patient was a 12-year-old male with B-cell ALL with an EBV-positive polymorphous lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate presenting as bilateral dacryoadenitis. Neither patient had known primary immunodeficiencies. Both cases improved with immunosuppressant de-escalation. These cases suggest that immunosuppression induced by maintenance chemotherapy is sufficient to promote EBV-LPD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A Case Report of NK-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disease With a Wide Involvement of Digestive Tract Develop Into Epstein-Barr Virus Associated NK/T Cell Lymphoma in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haotian; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Zhinong; Zhou, Wei; Cao, Qian

    2016-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays an important role in various diseases. EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is a rare disease with a canceration tendency. It is difficult to differentiate LPD with involvement of digestive tract from Crohn disease due to similar clinical and endoscopic manifestations. We present a case report of multiple ulcers with esophagus, small bowel and the entire colon involved, proved to be NK-Cell LPD, developed into EBV-associated NK/T Cell lymphoma, in an immunocompetent man who was initially misdiagnosed as Crohn disease.This report underscores that intestinal ulcers should be cautiously diagnosed, for it sometimes could be a precancerous lesion.

  7. Clinicopathological categorization of Epstein-Barr virus-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disease: an analysis of 42 cases with an emphasis on prognostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Jin Ho; Choe, Ji-Young; Kim, Hyojin; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Lee, Dong Soon; Heo, Dae Seog; Kim, Chul-Woo; Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Yoon Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (EBV-T/NK-LPDs) include several overlapping EBV-related conditions with variably aggressive courses. For prognostic categorization, we retrospectively analyzed 42 EBV-T/NK-LPD cases. Male (79% [33/42]), young (≤40 years; 83% [35/42]) patients and T-cell lineage (81% [34/42]; CD8/CD4 = 1.8) were predominant. Clinicopathologically, three systemic and one cutaneous category were developed: hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH; 26% [11/42]), chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV; 31% [13/42]), systemic unclassifiable disease (24% [10/42]), and hydroa vacciniforme/hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma (HV/HVL; 19% [8/42]). Prognostically, cutaneous disease (HV/HVL) was better than systemic disease (p = 0.014; median, 285 vs. 10 months). In systemic diseases, HLH was worst (p = 0.002; 3[HLH] vs. 4[unclassifiable] vs. not reached [CAEBV]). Univariate survival analysis (n = 42) revealed cytopenia (≥one lineage; p 40 years; p = 0.001), T-cell lineage (p = 0.041), hemophagocytic histiocytes (p = 0.031), elevated lactate dehydrogenase (p = 0.020), and liver dysfunction (p = 0.023) predicted shorter survival. In multivariate analysis, T-cell lineage (p = 0.025 [HR =11.3]) and cytopenia (p = 0.028 [HR =5.4]) were independent prognostic factors. Therefore, EBV-T/NK-LPD could be classified into four prognostic categories.

  8. Mouse model of Epstein-Barr virus LMP1- and LMP2A-driven germinal center B-cell lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamitani, Takeharu; Ma, Yijie; Zhou, Hufeng; Kida, Hiroshi; Tsai, Chao-Yuan; Obana, Masanori; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Fujio, Yasushi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Zhao, Bo; Kikutani, Hitoshi; Kieff, Elliott; Gewurz, Benjamin E; Yasui, Teruhito

    2017-05-02

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a major cause of immunosuppression-related B-cell lymphomas and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). In these malignancies, EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and LMP2A provide infected B cells with surrogate CD40 and B-cell receptor growth and survival signals. To gain insights into their synergistic in vivo roles in germinal center (GC) B cells, from which most EBV-driven lymphomas arise, we generated a mouse model with conditional GC B-cell LMP1 and LMP2A coexpression. LMP1 and LMP2A had limited effects in immunocompetent mice. However, upon T- and NK-cell depletion, LMP1/2A caused massive plasmablast outgrowth, organ damage, and death. RNA-sequencing analyses identified EBV oncoprotein effects on GC B-cell target genes, including up-regulation of multiple proinflammatory chemokines and master regulators of plasma cell differentiation. LMP1/2A coexpression also up-regulated key HL markers, including CD30 and mixed hematopoietic lineage markers. Collectively, our results highlight synergistic EBV membrane oncoprotein effects on GC B cells and provide a model for studies of their roles in immunosuppression-related lymphoproliferative diseases.

  9. Synergistic defects of novo FAS and homozygous UNC13D leading to autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease: A 10-year-old Chinese boy case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hao; Ma, Jie; Chen, Zhenping; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Runhui

    2018-06-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) usually presents in childhood with fever, nonmalignant splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy along with hemocytopenia. This case report describes a 10-year-old boy presenting with signs of autoimmune disease, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and resistant hemocytopenia. Sirolimus controlled the relapsed thrombocytopenia after splenectomy. Sequencing of the FAS gene identified two spontaneous heterozygous mutations (c.234 T > G, p.D78E) (c.236dupA, p.P80Tfs*26). The boy's homozygous missense variation (c.2588G > A, p.G863D) (rs140184929) in UNC13D gene had been identified as being related to familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). TCRαβ + CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells (markers of ALPS) were not significantly increased from the outset. Elevated cytokines, such as interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor α decreased to normal levels after splenectomy whereas IL-10 remained high. Immunological analysis of the patient revealed a marked depletion of forkhead-box P3 + expressing regulatory T cells (Treg) and Th17 cells. The obtained data demonstrate that mutations to FAS and UNC13D which result in overwhelming T-cell and macrophage activation, one associated with inhibited Treg cell development and a severe ALPS-like symptom. Therefore, we propose that variations of UND13D may be a risk factor of ALPS development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Favorable outcome of Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder complicated by immunoglobulin G4-related disease treated with rituximab-based therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Koki; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Sukegawa, Masumi; Sano, Takahiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Hashimoto, Yuko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-08-24

    After acute infection of Epstein-Barr virus, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells survive but usually do not show clonal proliferation. However, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells occasionally acquire a proliferative capacity that provokes clonal lymphoproliferative disorders. We herein present a case with Epstein-Barr virus-infected CD30+ B cell and immunoglobulin G4+ plasmacytoid cell proliferation in the lymph nodes, suggesting a pathological and clinical interaction between Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and immunoglobulin G4-related disease. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease has been recognized as a benign disease with proliferation of IgG4-related disease+ plasmacytoid cells. Several studies have recently reported the coexistence of immunoglobulin G4-related disease+ plasmacytoid cells with Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells in lymph nodes in some immunoglobulin G4-related disease cases. However, the pathogenic role of the clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells in immunoglobulin G4-related disease, as well as the treatments for patients with both Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells and immunoglobulin G4-related disease, have never been discussed. A 50-year-old Japanese man was referred to us for persistent fatigue and lymphadenopathy. His blood examination showed elevated IgG4, and detected high levels of Epstein-Barr virus DNA. A lymph node biopsy revealed IgG4+ plasmacytoid cells and infiltration of large lymphoid cells, which were positive for CD20, CD30, Epstein-Barr virus-related late membrane protein 1, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA, and were negative for IgG4. Based on the diagnosis of both Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and IgG4-related disease, the patient received eight cycles of rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, which resulted in the complete disappearance of lymphadenopathy. Moreover, his serum IgG4 level was significantly

  11. Preventing acute rejection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation: Use of aciclovir and mycophenolate mofetil in a steroid-free immunosuppressive protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, S.A.; Andersen, H.K.; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques

    1999-01-01

    Background: A widely held view is that any increase in the potency of an immunosuppressive agent will lead to an increase in infection and malignancy, such as life-threatening Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induced posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD), We tested this paradigm by studying......; the effect of adding mofetil to a steroid-free protocol under cover of high-dose aciclovir prophylaxis on the number of acute rejections, EBV infections and PTLDs after kidney transplantation. Methods: EBV serology was performed in 267 consecutive renal transplantations (1990-1997), All were treated...

  12. RISK FACTORS FOR AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASE VIRUS (LPDV) IN WILD TURKEYS (MELEAGRIS GALLOPAVO) IN NEW YORK STATE, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alger, Katrina; Bunting, Elizabeth; Schuler, Krysten; Whipps, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is an oncogenic avian retrovirus that was previously thought to exclusively infect domestic turkeys but was recently shown to be widespread in Wild Turkeys ( Meleagris gallopavo ) throughout most of the eastern US. In commercial flocks, the virus spreads between birds housed in close quarters, but there is little information about potential risk factors for infection in wild birds. Initial studies focused on distribution of LPDV nationally, but investigation of state-level data is necessary to assess potential predictors of infection and detect patterns in disease prevalence and distribution. We tested wild turkey bone marrow samples (n=2,538) obtained from hunter-harvested birds in New York State from 2012 to 2014 for LPDV infection. Statewide prevalence for those 3 yr was 55% with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 53-57%. We evaluated a suite of demographic, anthropogenic, and land cover characteristics with logistic regression to identify potential predictors for infection based on odds ratio (OR). Age (OR=0.16, 95% CI=0.13-0.19) and sex (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.03-1.24) were strong predictors of LPDV infection, with juveniles less likely to test positive than adults, and females more likely to test positive than males. The number of birds released during the state's 40-yr translocation program (OR=0.993, 95% CI=0.990-0.997) and the ratio of agriculture to forest cover (OR=1.13, 95% CI=1.03-1.19) were also predictive of LPDV infection. Prevalence distribution was analyzed using dual kernel density smoothing to produce a risk surface map, combined with Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic and the Anselin Local Moran's I to identify statistically significant geographic clusters of high or low prevalence. These methods revealed the prevalence of LPDV was high (>50%) throughout New York State, with regions of variation and several significant clusters. We revealed new information about the risk factors and distribution of LPDV in New

  13. Very late relapse of PTLD 10 yrs after allogeneic HSCT and nine yrs after stopping immunosuppressive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgestad, Jon; Rosthøj, Steen; Pedersen, Morten Høgild

    2014-01-01

    the fever settled, the PET scan normalized, and the M-component disappeared. Without any ongoing immunosuppressive therapy, PTLD relapsed nine yr later with large intra-abdominal lymph node masses causing ureteric obstruction with bilateral hydronephrosis. Pathological features were identical to the primary...

  14. The radiographic findings of lymphoproliferative disorders of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Wei; Li Liping; Yan Hongzhen

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the radiographic findings of lymphoproliferative disorders of the lung. Methods: Twenty-five patients with lymphoproliferative disorders of the lung were examined by X-ray film, tomography, and CT. Results: Multiple and mediastinal lymphadenopathy were observed in 2 patients with pulmonary pseudolymphoma. Multiple nodules or masses were observed in 4 patients with pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis. Hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy was observed in each patient with angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy, 2 patients had multiple nodules or masses, 8 patients had single or multiple patchy infiltrations, 10 had diffuse interstitial infiltrations. 3 patients with Castlemen' disease had a mass in the mediastinum, and another patient had mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Conclusion: Radiographic findings of lymphoproliferative disorders of the lung are varied, and the final diagnosis relies on pathology

  15. Cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorder complicating infectious mononucleosis in an immunosuppressed patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Cindy England; Callen, Jeffrey P; Bahrami, Soon

    2011-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is the syndrome produced by primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus during adolescence or early adulthood. In immunosuppressed individuals, depressed T-cell function allows the Epstein-Barr virus-driven B-cell proliferation to continue unabated, potentially leading to a lymphoproliferative disorder. A 15-year-old girl with a history of ulcerative colitis treated with 6-mercaptopurine and mesalamine presented with the acute onset of a rapidly enlarging, ulcerative nodule on her left lower eyelid 4 weeks following recovery from infectious mononucleosis. The biopsy revealed an Epstein-Barr virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorder. Systemic disease was absent. Following discontinuation of 6-mercaptopurine, the patient was treated with two courses of intravenous cyclophosphamide. The lesion resolved completely and she remains disease free at 14 months following diagnosis. We report a solitary cutaneous lesion of an immunosuppression-related lymphoproliferative disorder (IR-LPD) occurring as a complication of infectious mononucleosis, and review the pathogenesis and reported cases of Epstein-Barr virus-related immunosuppression-related lymphoproliferative disorder arising in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It is important for dermatologists and dermatopathologists to be aware of the occurrence of IR-LPD in patients being treated for inflammatory conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease. Given the role of primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus in the development of IR-LPD, consideration may be given to assessing Epstein-Barr virus status prior to initiating immunosuppressive therapy in young patients. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Characterization of primary cutaneous CD8+/CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martires, Kathryn J; Ra, Seong; Abdulla, Farah; Cassarino, David S

    2015-11-01

    CD30 primary cutaneous lymphoproliferative diseases include both lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PCALCL). The neoplastic cell of most primary CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders is CD4 positive. The terminology LyP "type D" has been used to describe a growing number of cases of LyP with a predominantly CD8 infiltrate. PCALCL with a CD8 phenotype has also been described, which presents a particularly difficult diagnostic and management challenge, given the difficulty in distinguishing it histologically from other cytotoxic lymphomas such as primary cutaneous aggressive epidermotropic CD8 cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and CD8 gamma/delta and natural killer/T-cell lymphoma. We report 7 additional cases of these rare cutaneous CD8/CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders. We also present a unique case of CD8/CD30 LyP with histologic similarities to LyP type B. In all 7 of our cases of CD8 LyP and CD8 anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we found focal to diffuse MUM-1 positivity. We propose that MUM-1 may represent an adjunctive marker for CD8 lymphoproliferative disease. Finally, we review the current literature on cases of CD8 LyP and PCALCL. For the 106 cases examined, we found similar clinical and histologic features to those reported for traditional CD4CD30 LyP and PCALCL.

  17. Mapping the x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skare, J.C.; Milunsky, A.; Byron, K.S.; Sullivan, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection and results in fatal mononucleosis, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This study shows that the mutation responsible for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is genetically linked to a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with the DXS42 probe (from Xq24-q27). The most likely recombination frequency between the loci is 4%, and the associated logarithm of the odds is 5.26. Haplotype analysis using flanking restriction fragment length polymorphism markers indicates that the locus for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is distal to probe DXS42 but proximal to probe DXS99 (from Xq26-q27). It is now possible to predict which members of a family with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome are carrier females and to diagnose the syndrome prenatally

  18. Mapping the x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skare, J.C.; Milunsky, A.; Byron, K.S.; Sullivan, J.L.

    1987-04-01

    The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection and results in fatal mononucleosis, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This study shows that the mutation responsible for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is genetically linked to a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with the DXS42 probe (from Xq24-q27). The most likely recombination frequency between the loci is 4%, and the associated logarithm of the odds is 5.26. Haplotype analysis using flanking restriction fragment length polymorphism markers indicates that the locus for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is distal to probe DXS42 but proximal to probe DXS99 (from Xq26-q27). It is now possible to predict which members of a family with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome are carrier females and to diagnose the syndrome prenatally.

  19. CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorder with spindle-cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martires, Kathryn J; Cohen, Brandon E; Cassarino, David S

    2016-11-01

    Lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) is classified as a CD30+ primary cutaneous lymphoproliferative disease. The phenotypic variability along the spectrum of CD30+ lymphoproliferative diseases is highlighted by the distinct histologic subtypes of LyP types A, B, C, and the more recently described types D, E, and F. We report the case of an elderly woman with a clinical presentation and histopathologic findings consistent with LyP, whose atypical CD30+ infiltrate uniquely demonstrated a spindle-cell morphology. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of LyP characterized by CD30+ spindle-shaped cells, and may represent a new and distinct histologic variant of LyP. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Bronchial-Associated Lymphoid Tissue in the Posttransplant Setting: An Immunodeficiency-Related (Posttransplant) Lymphoproliferative Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Daniel P; Vega, Francisco; Chapman, Jennifer R

    2017-12-20

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous group of hematolymphoid proliferations arising in the context of chronic immunosuppression. The common and indolent B-cell lymphomas, including extranodal marginal zone lymphomas (ENMZLs) of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), are excluded from the category of PTLD in the current World Health Organization classification. We report a case of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive bronchial-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) lymphoma involving the lungs of a transplant patient. Aside from history of cardiac transplant, young patient age, and EBV positivity, the histopathologic findings were indistinguishable from usual BALT lymphoma. We review the literature of ENMZL occurring in immunocompromised patients and present this case for consideration that this specific entity is a PTLD. We believe that additional studies might lend strength to the hypothesis that this particular group of EBV-positive, posttransplant ENMZLs merits classification and management as PTLDs. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Umbilical cord blood as an alternative source of reduced-intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic Epstein-Barr virus-associated T or natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Akihisa; Inoue, Masami; Koyama-Sato, Maho; Kondo, Osamu; Yamada, Kayo; Shimizu, Mariko; Isaka, Kanako; Kimoto, Tomiko; Kikuchi, Hiroaki; Tokimasa, Sadao; Yasui, Masahiro; Kawa, Keisei

    2014-02-01

    Chronic Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases represented by chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection are lethal but are curable with several courses of chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Recently, we reported that reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) provided better outcomes than myeloablative conditioning because RIC was less toxic. However, it was unclear whether cord blood transplantation (CBT) works in the context of RIC. We retrospectively analyzed 17 patients who underwent RIC followed by bone marrow transplantation (RIC-BMT) and 15 patients who underwent RIC followed by CBT (RIC-CBT). The representative regimen was fludarabine and melphalan based. The overall survival rates with RIC-BMT and RIC-CBT were 92.9% ± 6.9% and 93.3% ± 6.4%, respectively (P = .87). One patient died of lung graft-versus-host disease after RIC-BMT, and 1 patient died of multiple viral infections after RIC-CBT. Although cytotoxic chemotherapy was also immunosuppressive and might contribute to better donor cell engraftment after RIC-HSCT, the rate of engraftment failure after RIC-CBT was still higher than that after RIC-BMT (not significant); however, patients who had experienced graft failure were successfully rescued with a second HSCT. Unrelated cord blood can be an alternative source for RIC-HSCT if a patient has no family donor. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rabbit model for human EBV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS): sequential autopsy analysis and characterization of IL-2-dependent cell lines established from herpesvirus papio-induced fatal rabbit lymphoproliferative diseases with HPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Jin, Zaishun; Onoda, Sachiyo; Joko, Hiromasa; Teramoto, Norihiro; Ohara, Nobuya; Oda, Wakako; Tanaka, Takehiro; Liu, Yi-Xuan; Koirala, Tirtha Raj; Oka, Takashi; Kondo, Eisaku; Yoshino, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Akagi, Tadaatsu

    2003-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (EBV-AHS) is often associated with fatal infectious mononucleosis or T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD). To elucidate the true nature of fatal LPD observed in Herpesvirus papio (HVP)-induced rabbit hemophagocytosis, reactive or neoplastic, we analyzed sequential development of HVP-induced rabbit LPD and their cell lines. All of the seven Japanese White rabbits inoculated intravenously with HVP died of fatal LPD 18 to 27 days after inoculation. LPD was also accompanied by hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) in five of these seven rabbits. Sequential autopsy revealed splenomegaly and swollen lymph nodes, often accompanied by bleeding, which developed in the last week. Atypical lymphoid cells infiltrated many organs with a "starry sky" pattern, frequently involving the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. HVP-small RNA-1 expression in these lymphoid cells was clearly demonstrated by a newly developed in situ hybridization (ISH) system. HVP-ISH of immunomagnetically purified lymphoid cells from spleen or lymph nodes revealed HVP-EBER1+ cells in each CD4+, CD8+, or CD79a+ fraction. Hemophagocytic histiocytosis was observed in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus. HVP-DNA was detected in the tissues and peripheral blood from the infected rabbits by PCR or Southern blot analysis. Clonality analysis of HVP-induced LPD by Southern blotting with TCR gene probe revealed polyclonal bands, suggesting polyclonal proliferation. Six IL-2-dependent rabbit T-cell lines were established from transplanted scid mouse tumors from LPD. These showed latency type I/II HVP infection and had normal karyotypes except for one line, and three of them showed tumorigenicity in nude mice. These data suggest that HVP-induced fatal LPD in rabbits is reactive polyclonally in nature.

  3. Pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders with affinity to lymphoma: a clinicopathoradiologic study of 16 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cruz, J.; Gonzalez Garcia, A.; Escobar Casas, P.; Gomez Benitez, S.; Gonzalez Guirao, M.A.; Borderas, F.

    1993-01-01

    Pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders include plasma cell granuloma, Castleman's disease, pseudolymphoma, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy and lymphomatoid granulomatosis. We carried out a retrospective study for the purpose of analysing the clinical and radiological findings of 16 cases of pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders seen during the decade 1980-1990. The cases comprised 8 lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, 5 lymphomatoid granulomatosis, 2 plasma cell granuloma and 1 angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Owing to the overlap and low specificity of the radiological patterns in these processes, histopathological examination is required. In view of the frequent evolution of pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders to malignant lymphoma (4 cases, 1 of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia and 3 of lymphomatoid granulomatosis, in our series) we provide a description of the radiological changes that occur during this process. (orig.)

  4. Development of an Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient treated with azacitidine for chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, T; Schlageter, M; Bastian, L; Haberthür, R; Rätz Bravo, A E; Tzankov, A

    2014-03-01

    Some chemotherapeutic agents can cause iatrogenic lymphoproliferative disorders. In analogy to what has been observed with other nucleoside analogues such as cladribine and fludarabine, we document the first case of an Epstein-Barr virus-positive, iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated, lymphoproliferative disease, formally resembling polymorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in a patient treated with azacitidine (Vidaza) for chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML). A 78-year-old female patient was diagnosed with CMML in January 2012, and treatment with azacitidine was initiated, which lasted for five cycles from February until June 2012. The patient was hospitalized in June 2012 under the suspicion of pneumonia. Transformation of the CMML was suspected at that time too. During hospitalization, a generalized enlargement of the lymph nodes and the spleen was noticed. The patient rapidly deteriorated and finally died of respiratory insufficiency. At autopsy, an Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder, resembling polymorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease with involvement of the lymph nodes, the spleen and the lung and causing necrotizing pneumonia, was diagnosed. Diagnostic criteria for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or infectious mononucleosis-like lymphoproliferative disease were not met. This is the first documented case of an azacitidine-associated lymphoproliferative disease, raising awareness for possible not yet known side effects of this drug, which should be kept in mind by oncologists and pathologists. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Interleukin-10 and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, S.A.; Bendtzen, K.; Moller, B.

    1999-01-01

    , and the type and duration of immunosuppression. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a pleiotropic cytokine, produced primarily by T-helper 2 (Th2) lymphocytes in the later stages of T-cell activation, suggested to play a role in EBV-associated PTLD, We recently reported preliminary findings on IL-10 in relation...... human recombinant IL-10 was employed; the assay is specific for human natural and viral IL-10, Results, Three patients experienced primary EBV infection, five reactivated EBV infections, and one did not change EBV status. Three patients had a fulminant course and died with EBV-associated PTLD; confirmed...... immunosuppression and are now in a state of operational tolerance. In three of four cases with initial lymphoma, EBV infection (primary or reactivation) preceded the increase in IL-10, In all four cases, the IL-10 increase preceded the PTLD diagnosis. In six cases, IL-10 could be followed after treatment showing...

  6. Therapeutic trials for a rabbit model of EBV-associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome (HPS): effects of vidarabine or CHOP, and development of Herpesvirus papio (HVP)-negative lymphomas surrounded by HVP-infected lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K; Joko, H; Koirala, T R; Onoda, S; Jin, Z-S; Munemasa, M; Ohara, N; Oda, W; Tanaka, T; Oka, T; Kondo, E; Yoshino, T; Takahashi, K; Yamada, M; Akagi, T

    2003-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (EBV-AHS), which is often associated with fatal infectious mononucleosis or T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD), is a distinct disease characterized by high mortality. Treatment of patients with EBV-AHS has proved challenging. To develop some therapeutic interventions for EBV-AHS, we examined the effectiveness of an antiviral agent (vidarabine) or chemotherapy (CHOP), using a rabbit model for EBV-AHS. Fourteen untreated rabbits were inoculated intravenously with cell-free virions of the EBV-like virus Herpesvirus papio (HVP). All of the rabbits died of HVP-associated (LPD) and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) between 21 and 31 days after inoculation. Furthermore, three HVP-infected rabbits treated with vidarabine died between days 23 and 28 after inoculation, and their clinicopathological features were no different from those of untreated rabbits, indicating that this drug is not effective at all to treat HVP-induced rabbit LPD and HPS. Three of the infected rabbits that were treated with one course, with an incomplete set of three courses, or with three full courses of CHOP treatment died of HVP-induced LPD and HPS with a bleeding tendency and/or with opportunistic infections. They died on the 26th, 62nd and 105th day after virus inoculation, respectively. CHOP treatment transiently suppressed the HVP-induced LPD and contributed to the prolonged survival time of two infected rabbits. However, it did not remove all of the HVP-infected cells from the infected rabbits, and residual HVP-infected lymphocytes caused recurrences of rabbit LPD and HPS. The most interesting finding of this experiment was observed in the infected rabbit with the longest survival time of 105 days: HVP-negative lymphomas surrounded by HVP-induced LPD developed in the larynx and ileum of this rabbit, causing an obstruction of the lumen. We concluded that these were not secondary lymphomas caused by CHOP treatment, because no suspicious

  7. Partial Least Squares Based Gene Expression Analysis in EBV- Positive and EBV-Negative Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sa; Zhang, Xin; Li, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Yan-Xia; Huang, Jia-Jia; Xia, Yi; Yang, Hang; Jiang, Wen-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a common complication of therapeutic immunosuppression after organ transplantation. Gene expression profile facilitates the identification of biological difference between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive and negative PTLDs. Previous studies mainly implemented variance/regression analysis without considering unaccounted array specific factors. The aim of this study is to investigate the gene expression difference between EBV positive and negative PTLDs through partial least squares (PLS) based analysis. With a microarray data set from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, we performed PLS based analysis. We acquired 1188 differentially expressed genes. Pathway and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified significantly over-representation of dysregulated genes in immune response and cancer related biological processes. Network analysis identified three hub genes with degrees higher than 15, including CREBBP, ATXN1, and PML. Proteins encoded by CREBBP and PML have been reported to be interact with EBV before. Our findings shed light on expression distinction of EBV positive and negative PTLDs with the hope to offer theoretical support for future therapeutic study.

  8. Lacrimal sac lymphoproliferative lesion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloma-González, I; Ruíz-García, L; Ceriotto, A; Corredor-Casas, S; Salcedo-Casillas, G

    2015-03-01

    The case is presented of a 51 year-old woman with a firm mass at the medial canthus of the right eye of five years onset. A low-grade lymphoproliferative lesion (reactive lymphoid hyperplasia) was diagnosed from an excisional biopsy Lacrimal sac tumors are rare, with a peak incidence in the fifth decade of life. The initial clinical features are epiphora and medial canthus swelling. As it mimics nasolacrimal duct obstruction, up to 40% of these tumors are misdiagnosed until undergoing surgery. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Granulomatous Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Granulomatous Slack Skin and Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangar, Pamela; Venkatarajan, Sangeetha

    2015-07-01

    Granulomatous cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) and lymphomatoid granulomatosis are considered granulomatous lymphoproliferative disorders. The most common types of granulomatous CTCL are granulomatous mycosis fungoides and granulomatous slack skin. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a rare Epstein-Barr virus driven lymphoproliferative disorder. This article reviews the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, systemic associations, and management of both granulomatous slack skin syndrome and lymphomatoid granulomatosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE SYNDROMES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN HERPESVIRUS-6A AND HUMAN HERPESVIRUS-6B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Eliassen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B (HHV-6A and HHV-6B have been noted since their discovery for their T-lymphotropism. Although it has proven difficult to determine the extent to which HHV-6A and HHV-6B are involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, evidence suggests that primary infection and reactivation of both viruses may induce or contribute to the progression of several lymphoproliferative disorders, ranging from benign to malignant and including infectious mononucleosis-like illness, drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DIHS/DRESS, and nodular sclerosis Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Herein, we discuss the conditions associated with the lymphoproliferative capacity of HHV-6, as well as the potential mechanisms behind them. Continued exploration on this topic may add to our understanding of the interactions between HHV-6 and the immune system and may open the doors to more accurate diagnosis and treatment of certain lymphoproliferative disorders.

  11. Treatment with sirolimus results in complete responses in patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachey, David T.; Greiner, Robert; Seif, Alix; Attiyeh, Edward; Bleesing, Jack; Choi, John; Manno, Catherine; Rappaport, Eric; Schwabe, Dirk; Sheen, Cecilia; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Zhuang, Hongming; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We hypothesized that sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, may be effective in patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and treated patients who were intolerant to or failed other therapies. Four patients were treated for autoimmune cytopenias; all had a rapid complete or near complete response. Two patients were treated for autoimmune arthritis and colitis, demonstrating marked improvement. Three patients had complete resolution of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly and all patients had a reduction in double negative T cells, a population hallmark of the disease. Based on these significant responses, we recommend that sirolimus be considered as second-line therapy for patients with steroid-refractory disease. PMID:19208097

  12. Advances in Understanding the Pathogenesis of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Nishida, Naonori; Zhao, Xiaodong; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2015-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was discovered 50 years ago from an african Burkitt lymphoma cell line. EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) are life- threatening diseases, especially in children. In this article, we review EBV-associated LPDs, especially in the area of primary immunodeficiency disease (PID). We searched PubMed for publications with key words including EBV infection, lymphoma, LPDs and PID, and selected the manuscripts written in English that we judged to be relevant to the topic of this review.On the basis of the data in the literature, we grouped the EBV-associated LPDs into four categories: nonmalignant disease, malignant disease, acquired immunodeficiency disease and PID. Each category has its own risk factor for LPD development. EBV-associated LPD is a complex disease, creating new challenges for diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Clinical Utility of Epstein-Barr Virus Viral Load Monitoring and Risk Factors for Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders After Kidney Transplantation: A Single-Center, 10-Year Observational Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Franceschini, MD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions. Our results suggest that the keystone of PTLD diagnosis is the clinical suspicion. Our study suggests that, in line with guidelines, EBV-VL assays may be avoided in low-risk patients in the absence of a strong clinical PTLD suspicion without increasing patients' risk of developing PTLD. This represents a safe and cost-saving clinical strategy for our center.

  14. Management of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in adult solid organ transplant recipients - BCSH and BTS Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Anne; Bowles, Kristin; Bradley, J Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Featherstone, Carrie; Gupte, Girish; Marcus, Robert; Parameshwar, Jayan; Ramsay, Alan; Newstead, Charles

    2010-06-01

    A joint working group established by the Haemato-oncology subgroup of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) and the British Transplantation Society (BTS) has reviewed the available literature and made recommendations for the diagnosis and management of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in adult recipients of solid organ transplants. This review details the therapeutic options recommended including reduction in immunosuppression (RIS), transplant organ resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Effective therapy should be instituted before progressive disease results in declining performance status and multi-organ dysfunction. The goal of treatment should be a durable complete remission with retention of transplanted organ function with minimal toxicity.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disease after solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockop, Susan E; Vatsayan, Anant

    2017-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was the first identified human oncovirus and is also one of the most ubiquitous viral infections known with established infections in more than 90% of individuals by early adulthood. EBV establishes latency by controlling expression of the viral genome making it silent to immune surveillance. In immunocompetent individuals, up to 1% of circulating T cells are directed at maintaining control over EBV replication. In addition to being involved in oncogenesis of lymphoid and epithelial tumors in immune-competent individuals, loss of immune surveillance over EBV predisposes individuals to EBV malignancies. Lymphoid proliferations from EBV-infected B cells arise in up to 20% of recipients of solid organ transplants (SOTs). One question not answered is why, when EBV requires such active immune surveillance, EBV malignancies are not even more prevalent in severely immune-compromised individuals. A better understanding of who develops complications related to EBV and what the immunologic risks are will ultimately make it feasible to perform prophylactic trials in those at highest risk. This review summarizes our current understanding of factors in SOT recipients that predispose them to the development of an EBV malignancy and that predict response to initial therapy. We then review the current landscape of those therapies, focusing on the goal of restoring long-term EBV-directed immunity to patients at risk. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Yersinia enterocolitica Infection Simulating Lymphoproliferative Disease, after Liver Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jakobovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 14-year-old girl, who was 13 y after liver transplantation for biliary atresia with an unremarkable postoperative course. She presented with fever of up to 40°C, extreme fatigue, malaise, anorexia, and occasional vomiting. On physical examination the only finding was splenomegaly. Lab results showed hyperglobulinemia and an elevated sedimentation rate. Liver function tests were normal except for mild elevation of γGTP. Abdominal U/S and CT demonstrated an enlarged spleen with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes enlargement. An exhaustive evaluation for infectious causes, autoimmune conditions, and malignancy was negative. A full recovery after 5 months prompted testing for self-limited infectious etiologies. Yersinia enterocolitica infection was diagnosed.

  17. Quantification of Epstein-Barr virus-DNA load in lung transplant recipients : A comparison of plasma versus whole blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Verschuuren, Erik A.; Veeger, Nic J.; van der Bij, Wim; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.; Kallenberg, Cees G.; Hepkema, Bouke G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Monitoring of the Epstein-Barr virus-DNA load is frequently used to identify patients at risk for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Epstein-Barr virus DNA can be measured in the plasma and whole blood serum compartments. Methods: We compared levels of Epstein-Barr virus

  18. Imaging of Kaposi sarcoma in a transplanted liver: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In post-transplant patients, de novo malignancies such as post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD, lung carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, cutaneous malignancies, and Kaposi sarcoma are now seen. The immunotherapy used to prevent graft failure indirectly increases their risk. We present a rare case of visceral Kaposi sarcoma in a patient with orthotopic liver transplant.

  19. Notch-deficient skin induces a lethal systemic B-lymphoproliferative disorder by secreting TSLP, a sentinel for epidermal integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadmehr Demehri

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal keratinocytes form a highly organized stratified epithelium and sustain a competent barrier function together with dermal and hematopoietic cells. The Notch signaling pathway is a critical regulator of epidermal integrity. Here, we show that keratinocyte-specific deletion of total Notch signaling triggered a severe systemic B-lymphoproliferative disorder, causing death. RBP-j is the DNA binding partner of Notch, but both RBP-j-dependent and independent Notch signaling were necessary for proper epidermal differentiation and lipid deposition. Loss of both pathways caused a persistent defect in skin differentiation/barrier formation. In response, high levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP were released into systemic circulation by Notch-deficient keratinocytes that failed to differentiate, starting in utero. Exposure to high TSLP levels during neonatal hematopoiesis resulted in drastic expansion of peripheral pre- and immature B-lymphocytes, causing B-lymphoproliferative disorder associated with major organ infiltration and subsequent death, a previously unappreciated systemic effect of TSLP. These observations demonstrate that local skin perturbations can drive a lethal systemic disease and have important implications for a wide range of humoral and autoimmune diseases with skin manifestations.

  20. Relative adrenal insufficiency in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinclair R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is treated with rapid decrement of immunosuppressive therapy. This cannot be achieved with ease in patients on long-term glucocorticoid therapy, as chronically suppressed adrenal glands may not be capable of mounting adequate response to stress. A 52-year-old Caucasian male presented with fever, orthostatic hypotension, lymphadenopathy and hyponatraemia. Serum cortisol levels were within normal levels with a sub optimal response to stimulation by ACTH. Hyponatraemia and orthostasis responded poorly to fluid restriction, saline and salt repletion but corrected after increasing the steroid dose. The normal baseline cortisol levels represented a stimulated adrenal gland, however, the ACTH stimulation had inadequate response. This sub optimal stimulation and a good response to increased steroids suggest the presence of relative or occult adrenal insufficiency. Relative adrenal insufficiency must be considered in patients who have received prolonged glucocorticoid therapy and have symptoms such as hypotension and/or hyponatraemia.

  1. Notch signalling in primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders: a new therapeutic approach?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M R; Biskup, E; Gniadecki, R

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of deregulated Notch signalling has been described in several haematopoietic malignancies. We have previously reported an increased expression of Notch1 in primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large...

  2. EBV-Negative Monomorphic B-Cell Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder with Marked Morphologic Pleomorphism and Pathogenic Mutations in ASXL1, BCOR, CDKN2A, NF1, and TP53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, Agata M

    2017-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a diverse group of lymphoid or plasmacytic proliferations frequently driven by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV-negative PTLDs appear to represent a distinct entity. This report describes an unusual case of a 33-year-old woman that developed a monomorphic EBV-negative PTLD consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) 13 years after heart-lung transplant. Histological examination revealed marked pleomorphism of the malignant cells including nodular areas reminiscent of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) with abundant large, bizarre Hodgkin-like cells. By immunostaining, the malignant cells were immunoreactive for CD45, CD20, CD79a, PAX5, BCL6, MUM1, and p53 and negative for CD15, CD30, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), and EBV-encoded RNA (EBER). Flow cytometry demonstrated lambda light chain restricted CD5 and CD10 negative B-cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies (FISH) were negative for cMYC , BCL2, and BCL6 rearrangements but showed deletion of TP53 and monosomy of chromosome 17. Next-generation sequencing studies (NGS) revealed numerous genetic alterations including 6 pathogenic mutations in ASXL1, BCOR, CDKN2A, NF1, and TP53 (x2) genes and 30 variants of unknown significance (VOUS) in ABL1, ASXL1, ATM, BCOR, BCORL1, BRNIP3, CDH2, CDKN2A, DNMT3A, ETV6, EZH2, FBXW7, KIT, NF1, RUNX1, SETPB1, SF1, SMC1A, STAG2, TET2, TP53, and U2AF2.

  3. EBV-Negative Monomorphic B-Cell Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder with Marked Morphologic Pleomorphism and Pathogenic Mutations in ASXL1, BCOR, CDKN2A, NF1, and TP53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata M. Bogusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs are a diverse group of lymphoid or plasmacytic proliferations frequently driven by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. EBV-negative PTLDs appear to represent a distinct entity. This report describes an unusual case of a 33-year-old woman that developed a monomorphic EBV-negative PTLD consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL 13 years after heart-lung transplant. Histological examination revealed marked pleomorphism of the malignant cells including nodular areas reminiscent of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL with abundant large, bizarre Hodgkin-like cells. By immunostaining, the malignant cells were immunoreactive for CD45, CD20, CD79a, PAX5, BCL6, MUM1, and p53 and negative for CD15, CD30, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1, and EBV-encoded RNA (EBER. Flow cytometry demonstrated lambda light chain restricted CD5 and CD10 negative B-cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies (FISH were negative for cMYC, BCL2, and BCL6 rearrangements but showed deletion of TP53 and monosomy of chromosome 17. Next-generation sequencing studies (NGS revealed numerous genetic alterations including 6 pathogenic mutations in ASXL1, BCOR, CDKN2A, NF1, and TP53(x2 genes and 30 variants of unknown significance (VOUS in ABL1, ASXL1, ATM, BCOR, BCORL1, BRNIP3, CDH2, CDKN2A, DNMT3A, ETV6, EZH2, FBXW7, KIT, NF1, RUNX1, SETPB1, SF1, SMC1A, STAG2, TET2, TP53, and U2AF2.

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders: experimental and clinical developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Lingyun; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the first human virus related to oncogenesis, was initially identified in a Burkitt lymphoma cell line in 1964. EBV infects over 90% of the world’s population. Most infected people maintain an asymptomatic but persistent EBV infection lifelong. However, in some individuals, EBV infection has been involved in the development of cancer and autoimmune disease. Nowadays, oncogenic potential of EBV has been intensively studied in a wide range of human neoplasms, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma (GC), etc. EBV encodes a series of viral protein and miRNAs, promoting its persistent infection and the transformation of EBV-infected cells. Although the exact role of EBV in the oncogenesis remains to be clarified, novel diagnostic and targeted therapeutic approaches are encouraging for the management of EBV-related malignancies. This review mainly focuses on the experimental and clinical advances of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26628948

  5. Hairy B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and its differential diagnosis: a case with long-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Matsuda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hairy B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (HBLD is one of chronic polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis. We report a 47-year-old female Japanese patient diagnosed as having HBLD based on lymphocytosis with hairy cell appearance and characteristic phenotypes including CD11c+, and without B-cell monoclonalities. She was a non-smoker, and possessed HLA-DR4. She has been closely followed up without treatment and lymphoma development for over five years. Although this disease is quite rare and has been reported, to our knowledge, in only 13 Japanese cases, an accurate diagnosis, particularly differential diagnosis from persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis or hairy cell leukemia-Japanese variant is essential for the prevention of unnecessary treatments.

  6. Development of lymphoma in Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) and its relationship to Fas gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppema, Sibrand; Maggio, Ewerton; van den Berg, Anke

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is generally the result of a mutation in genes associated with apoptosis, like Fas, Fas ligand, Casp 8 and Casp 10. As a result, the normal homeostasis of T- and B-lymphocytes is disturbed and a proliferation of polyclonal T lymphocytes occurs. This

  7. Clinicopathologic Assessment of Ocular Adnexal Lymphoproliferative Lesions at a Tertiary Eye Hospital in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Amoli, Fahimeh; Nozarian, Zohreh; Bonaki, Hirbod Nasiri; Mehrtash, Vahid; Entezari, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    The most common type of ocular lymphoma is non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), categorized into two groups: indolent (slow growing) and aggressive (rapid growing). Differentiating benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) from malignant ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL) is challenging. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and ow cytometry have been used as diagnostic tools in such cases. In this retrospective case series, from 2002 to 2013 at Farabi Eye Center, 110 patients with ocular lymphoproliferative disease were enrolled. Prevalence, anatomical locations, mean age at diagnosis and the nal diagnosis of the disease with IHC were assessed. Comparison between previous pathologic diagnoses and results of IHC was made. Immunoglobulin light chains and B-cell and T-cell markers and other immuno-phenotyping markers including CD20, CD3, CD5, CD23, CD10, CYCLIND1 and BCL2 were evaluated to determine the most accurate diagnosis. The lymphomas were categorized based on revised European-American lymphoma (REAL) classi cation. Mean age±SD (years) of the patients was 55.6 ±19.3 and 61% were male. Patients with follicular lymphoma, large B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small cell lymphoma (CLL/SLL) tended to be older. Nine patients with previous diagnoses of low grade B-cell lymphoma were re-evaluated by IHC and the new diagnoses were as follows: extranodal marginal zone lymphoma(EMZL) (n=1), SLL(n=1), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (n=3), reactive lymphoid hyperplasia RLH (n=2). Two cases were excluded due to poor blocks. Flow cytometry reports in these seven patients revealed SLL with positive CD5 and CD23, MCL with positive CD5 and CyclinD1 and negative CD23, EMZL with negative CD5,CD23 and CD10. One RLH patient was negative for Kappa/Lambda and positive for CD3 and CD20 and the other was positive for all of the light chains, CD3 and CD20. Orbit (49.1%), conjunctiva (16.1%) and lacrimal glands (16.1%) were the most common sites of involvement. Accurate

  8. Suppressed peripheral and placental blood lymphoproliferative responses in first pregnancies: relevance to malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasheed, F N; Bulmer, J N; Dunn, D T

    1993-01-01

    protein derivative [PPD]) were examined in the peripheral and placental blood of 102 Gambian women at the time of delivery. The lymphoproliferative responses of placental cells were poor to all antigens compared with those of peripheral blood (Candida P PPD P ....003, and 190N P = 0.10). Reduced proliferative capacity of placental mononuclear cells may contribute to heavy parasite colonization of this organ. Proliferation to malarial and PPD but not Candida antigens was selectively suppressed in peripheral and placental blood of primiparae relative to multiparae (F32 P...... = 0.07, 190L P = 0.09, 190N P = 0.007, PPD P = 0.09). Autologous plasma contained factors that suppressed lymphoproliferative responses to the same series of antigens to which the primiparae responded poorly (F32 P PPD P = 0.03). Malarial antibody levels were...

  9. Risk of Hematopoietic and Lymphoproliferative Malignancies among U. S. Radiologic Technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linet, M. S.; Fredman, D. M.; Mohan, A.; Morin Doody, M.; Ron, E.; Mabuchi, K.; Alexander, B. B.; Sigurdson, A.; Matanoski, G.; Hauptmann, M.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate risks of hematopoietic and lymphoproliferative malignancies among medical workers exposed to protracted low-to-moderate-dose radiation exposures, a follow-up investigation was conducted in a nation wide cohort of U. S. radiologic technologists. eligible for this study were 71.894 technologists (78% female) certified for at least 2 years during 1926-82, who had responded to a baseline mail questionnaire during 1983-89, were cancer-free except for non-melanoma skin cancer at completion of the questionnaire, and completed a second questionnaire during 1994-98 or died through August 1998. There were 241 technologists with hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative malignancies, including 41 with leukemia subtypes associated with radiation exposures (specifically acute myeloid, acute lymphoid and chronic myeloid leukemias, hereafter designated radiogenic leukemias), 23 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 28 with multiple myeloma, 118 with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and 31 with Hodgkin lymphoma. Of the 241 hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative malignancies identified among radiologic technologists, 85 percent were confirmed by medical records or death certificates, including 98 percent of radiogenic leukemia. Risks of the hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative malignancies were evaluated in relation to questionnaire-derived information on employment as a radiologic technologist, including procedures, work practices, and protective measures. cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to compute relative risks and 95% confidence intervals, using age at diagnosis as the response, stratifying at baseline for birth cohort in 5-year intervals, and adjusting for potential confounding. Risks were not increased for any of the hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative neoplasms according to year first worked or total duration of years worked as radiologic technologist. For the combined radiogenic leukemias, risks rose significantly with an increasing number of years worked

  10. Patogenetic correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in lymphoproliferative disorders (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Romanenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Literature review of anemia pathogenesis in patients with lymphatic system malignancies is presented. Advantages and disadvanta ges of eritropoiesis-stimulating preparations (ESP used for anemia correction are shown. Efficacy of anemia treatment with ESP in various types of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD is presented. Prognostic factors that predict positive response on ESP in LPD pati ents and reduce treatment cost are identified.

  11. Patogenetic correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in lymphoproliferative disorders (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Romanenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature review of anemia pathogenesis in patients with lymphatic system malignancies is presented. Advantages and disadvanta ges of eritropoiesis-stimulating preparations (ESP used for anemia correction are shown. Efficacy of anemia treatment with ESP in various types of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD is presented. Prognostic factors that predict positive response on ESP in LPD pati ents and reduce treatment cost are identified.

  12. Lymphoproliferative disorders in non-AIDS- associated Kaposi's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    proliferative disorders are mostly of B-cell origin and include non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphatic leukaemia and multiple .... Bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed ... transplants, patients with auto-immune diseases and patients with ...

  13. Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomics and Immunogenetics Use of genomics to identify QTL, genes, and proteins associated with resistance to Marek’s disease. Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the p...

  14. Prevention of Human Lymphoproliferative Tumor Formation in Ovarian Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina A. Butler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Interest in preclinical drug development for ovarian cancer has stimulated development of patient-derived xenograft (PDX or tumorgraft models. However, the unintended formation of human lymphoma in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV–infected human lymphocytes can be problematic. In this study, we have characterized ovarian cancer PDXs which developed human lymphomas and explore methods to suppress lymphoproliferative growth. Fresh human ovarian tumors from 568 patients were transplanted intraperitoneally in SCID mice. A subset of PDX models demonstrated atypical patterns of dissemination with mediastinal masses, hepatosplenomegaly, and CD45-positive lymphoblastic atypia without ovarian tumor engraftment. Expression of human CD20 but not CD3 supported a B-cell lineage, and EBV genomes were detected in all lymphoproliferative tumors. Immunophenotyping confirmed monoclonal gene rearrangements consistent with B-cell lymphoma, and global gene expression patterns correlated well with other human lymphomas. The ability of rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, to suppress human lymphoproliferation from a patient's ovarian tumor in SCID mice and prevent growth of an established lymphoma led to a practice change with a goal to reduce the incidence of lymphomas. A single dose of rituximab during the primary tumor heterotransplantation process reduced the incidence of CD45-positive cells in subsequent PDX lines from 86.3% (n = 117 without rituximab to 5.6% (n = 160 with rituximab, and the lymphoma rate declined from 11.1% to 1.88%. Taken together, investigators utilizing PDX models for research should routinely monitor for lymphoproliferative tumors and consider implementing methods to suppress their growth.

  15. The splenomegaly of myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disorders: splenic cellularity and vascularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B (Capital Hospital, Peking University Medical College, Beijing (China)); Lewis, S.M. (Department of Haematology, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (UK))

    1989-01-01

    Employing radionuclide scanning, the volume of the spleen, its red cell pool and plasma pool have been measured in vivo, and the relative proportions of cellularity and vascularity of the spleen have been calcualted in 51 patients with myeloproliferactive and lymphoproliferative disorders. In primary proliferative polycythaemia (polycythaemia vera), the increase of spleen size was attributed mainly to the increase of splenic vascularity; in myelofibrosis and in hairy cell leukaemia, the increase of spleen size was associated with increase in both splenic vascularity and cellularity, whilst in size was associated with increase in both splenic vascularity and cellularity, whilst in CGL and CLL the increase was attributed more to cellularity than to vascularity. (author).

  16. Treatment of Primary Cutaneous CD4 Small/Medium T cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder with Intralesional Triamcinolone Acetonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-15

    12. REPORT TYPE 02/15/2018 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treatment of Primary Cutaneous CD4+ Small/Medium T- cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder with...cutaneous CD4+ small/medium T- cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) is a generally indolent cutaneous T- cell proliferation. Most cases follow a benign...lmmunohistochemistry showed diffuse CD3+ CD4+ T- cells without CD30, TIA1 or CD10. A subset of medium to large cells expressed BCL-6. Small subsets of B- cells and CDB

  17. Intracranial Castleman's disease presenting as hypopituitarism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, L.T.; Simao, G.N.; Matos, A.L.M.; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Carlotti, C.G. Jr.; Colli, B.O.; Neder, L.; Ribeiro-Silva, A.; Castro, M. de; Rego, E.

    2004-01-01

    Castleman's disease is an atypical lymphoproliferative disorder that may present as a localized or multicentric form. The involvement of the central nervous system is rare. We describe here a case of Castleman's disease with involvement of the hypothalamus and meninges, presenting as hypopituitarism. Radiological and clinical pathological features are emphasized and a review of the literature is presented. (orig.)

  18. Efficacy of Low-Dose Protocol in Follow-Up of Lymphoproliferative Disorders - Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popic-Ramac, J.; Brnic, Z.; Klasic, B.; Hebrang, A.; Knezevic, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Most medically-related radiation is caused by diagnostic examinations, in particular by computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this research is to reduce radiation doses faced by the population frequently exposed to such procedures-those with lymphoproliferative disorders. The research was conducted comparing radiation-exposition doses received by the radiosensitive organs (thyroid, lens, breast and gonad) using the standard thoracic CT protocol with the radiation received using the low-dose protocol, while maintaining display quality. The standard-dose thoracic protocol implies 120 kV and 150 mAs. The low-dose protocol was conducted on the same device using 120 kV and 30 mAs. We confirmed the hypothesis that the use of the low-dose thoracic CT protocol leads to a reduction in radiation dose without compromising display quality. It is further expected that a reduction in doses will reduce the risk of radiation-related mutations. (author)

  19. Busulfan, Fludarabine, and Thiotepa Conditioning Regimen for Non Malignant Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-19

    Bone Marrow Failure Syndrome; Thalassemia; Sickle Cell Disease; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Acquired Neutropenia in Newborn; Acquired Anemia Hemolytic; Acquired Thrombocytopenia; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytoses; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; Common Variable Immunodeficiency; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Hurler Syndrome; Mannosidosis; Adrenoleukodystrophy

  20. Associations among Epstein-Barr virus subtypes, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in bone marrow transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görzer, Irene; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; van Esser, Joost W J; Niesters, Hubert G M; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    The association between Epstein-Barr virus subtype, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder was examined in a group of 25 bone marrow transplant recipients. A highly statistically significant correlation was observed between

  1. Large-area electron irradiation in lymphoproliferative diseases; Velkoplosne elektronove ozarovani u lymfoproliferativnich onemocneni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doleckova, M; Kutova, J; Sabatka, J; Kralova, D [Onkologicke Oddeleni, Nemocnice Ceske Budejovice, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    1998-12-31

    The authors` experience in the treatment of skin lymphomas by using a betatron and a linear accelerator is highlighted. Special attention is paid to the technique where the patient is rotated in order to improve the dose distribution. (P.A.). 2 tabs., 3 graphs, 15 photos.

  2. Study Provides Insights into Diagnosis, Treatment of Rare Immune Disease: Autoimmmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the blood. While DNT cells are a hallmark of ALPS, scientists do not fully understand their ... higher-than-average risk of developing lymphoma, or cancer of the lymph nodes. In the current study, ...

  3. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia harbors a unique proteome where Ku70 is severely underexpressed as compared with other B-lymphoproliferative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrot, A; Pionneau, C; Azar, N; Baillou, C; Lemoine, F M; Leblond, V; Merle-Béral, H; Béné, M-C; Herbrecht, R; Bahram, S; Vallat, L

    2012-01-01

    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a clonal B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) of post-germinal center nature. Despite the fact that the precise molecular pathway(s) leading to WM remain(s) to be elucidated, a hallmark of the disease is the absence of the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we compared proteomic profiles of WM cells with that of other LPDs. We were able to demonstrate that WM constitutes a unique proteomic entity as compared with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and marginal zone lymphoma. Statistical comparisons of protein expression levels revealed that a few proteins are distinctly expressed in WM in comparison with other LPDs. In particular we observed a major downregulation of the double strand repair protein Ku70 (XRCC6); confirmed at both the protein and RNA levels in an independent cohort of patients. Hence, we define a distinctive proteomic profile for WM where the downregulation of Ku70—a component of the non homologous end-joining pathway—might be relevant in disease pathophysiology

  4. Treatment of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplant with rituximab and conversion to m-TOR inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Rios, John Fredy; Gómez de Los Ríos, Sandra Milena; Serna-Higuita, Lina María; Ocampo-Kohn, Catalina; Aristizabal-Alzate, Arbey; Gálvez-Cárdenas, Kenny Mauricio; Zuluaga-Valencia, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-12-30

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders are serious complications of organ transplantation which treatment is not yet standardized. To describe the clinical response, overall and graft survival of patients in our center with this complication after kidney transplantation, which received rituximab as part of their treatment as well as conversion to m-TOR. Retrospective study, which included patients, diagnosed with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation from January 2011 to July 2014. Eight cases were found with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Most had monomorphic histology, 85% were associated with Epstein-Barr virus, 25% of patients had tumor involvement of the renal graft, and 12.5% ​​had primary central nervous system lymphoma. All patients were managed with reduction of immunosuppression, conversion to m-TOR (except one who lost the graft at diagnosis) and rituximab-based therapy. The overall response rate was 87.5% (62.5% complete response, 25% partial response). Survival was 87.5% with a median follow-up of 34 months. An additional patient lost the graft, with chronic nephropathy already known. All the remaining patients had stable renal function. There are no standardized treatment regimens for lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation, but these patients can be managed successfully with reduction of immunosuppression, conversion to m-TOR and rituximab-based schemes.

  5. Influence of Marek’s disease virus on the core-gut microbiome of chickens resistant or susceptible to Marek’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an a-herpesvirus and the causative agent for the lymphoproliferative disease of chickens known as Marek’s disease (MD). Worldwide poultry industry losses due to MD amount to $1-2 billion per year. Presently, there is limited knowledge on the potential influence of MDV ...

  6. In Vitro Evaluation of Colloidal Silver on Immune Function: Anti lymphoproliferative Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Molina, M. A.; Mendoza-Gamboa, E.; Zarate-Trivino, D. G.; Coronado-Cerda, E.E.; Alcocer-Gonzalez, J. M.; Resendez-Perez, D.; Rodriguez-Salazar, M.C.; Rivera-Morales, L.G.; Tamez-Guerra, R.; Rodriguez-Padilla, C.

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal silver (AgC) is currently used by humans and it can be internalized through inhalation, injection, ingestion, and dermal contact. However, there is limited information about immunological activity; more investigations using colloidal silver are needed. In the present study, the effects of AgC (17.5 ng/m L) on immunological parameters (proliferation and immuno phenotyping) using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages (phagocytosis) and cytotoxicity on leukemia and lymphoma cancer cell lines (1.75 to 17.5 ng/m L) were investigated. AgC was observed to significantly ρ) decrease interleukin-2 (I L-2) production and proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin or concanavalin A in PBMC without affecting its cell viability but with cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, INF-γ, and IL_-17 A cytokines production and CD3"+, CD3"-CD19"+, CD3"+CD4"+, CD3"+CD8"+, and CD16"+CD56"+ PBMC phenotypes were not affected by AgC. The present study demonstrates that colloidal silver is harmless and nontoxic to the immune system cells and its ability to interfere with the immune response by decreasing cell proliferation when stimulated with mitogens demonstrated the anti lymphoproliferative potential of AgC

  7. Clonality assessment of lymphoproliferative lesions using the polymerase chain reaction: An analysis of two methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Moorchung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lymphoid malignancies are a heterogeneous group of disorders which may be difficult to differentiate from reactive proliferations even after immunohistochemistry. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR is believed to be a good adjunct tool for diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We examined 24 cases of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lymphoproliferative lesions in this study and evaluated the PCR as an additional tool in the confirmation of the diagnosis. Two different PCR methodologies were evaluated. Results: In the evaluation of the T-cell PCR, it was seen that the correlation using both the commercial kits and the custom-synthesized primers was highly significant at a P value of 0.05. Conclusions: Both the methods showed an excellent concordance for T-cell γ gene rearrangements, However, the same was not seen in the B-cell receptor rearrangements. This may be because of the small sample size or the inability of consensus V primers to recognize complementary DNA sequences in all of the V segments.

  8. Somatic FAS mutations are common in patients with genetically undefined autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, Kennichi C; Niemela, Julie E; Price, Susan; Davis, Joie; Hornung, Ronald L; Oliveira, João Bosco; Puck, Jennifer M; Jaffe, Elaine S; Pittaluga, Stefania; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Fleisher, Thomas A; Rao, V Koneti

    2010-06-24

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by childhood onset of lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias, elevated numbers of double-negative T (DNT) cells, and increased risk of lymphoma. Most cases of ALPS are associated with germline mutations of the FAS gene (type Ia), whereas some cases have been noted to have a somatic mutation of FAS primarily in their DNT cells. We sought to determine the proportion of patients with somatic FAS mutations among a group of our ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and to further characterize them. We found more than one-third (12 of 31) of the patients tested had somatic FAS mutations, primarily involving the intracellular domain of FAS resulting in loss of normal FAS signaling. Similar to ALPS type Ia patients, the somatic ALPS patients had increased DNT cell numbers and elevated levels of serum vitamin B(12), interleukin-10, and sFAS-L. These data support testing for somatic FAS mutations in DNT cells from ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and a similar clinical and laboratory phenotype to that of ALPS type Ia. These findings also highlight the potential role for somatic mutations in the pathogenesis of nonmalignant and/or autoimmune hematologic conditions in adults and children.

  9. Oncogenic Notch signaling in T-cell and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Mark Y; Radojcic, Vedran; Maillard, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    This article highlights recent discoveries about Notch activation and its oncogenic functions in lymphoid malignancies, and discusses the therapeutic potential of Notch inhibition. NOTCH mutations arise in a broad spectrum of lymphoid malignancies and are increasingly scrutinized as putative therapeutic targets. In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), NOTCH1 mutations affect the extracellular negative regulatory region and lead to constitutive Notch activation, although mutated receptors remain sensitive to Notch ligands. Other NOTCH1 mutations in T-ALL and NOTCH1/2 mutations in multiple B-cell malignancies truncate the C-terminal proline (P), glutamic acid (E), serine (S), threonine (T)-rich (PEST) domain, leading to decreased Notch degradation after ligand-mediated activation. Thus, targeting Notch ligand-receptor interactions could provide therapeutic benefits. In addition, we discuss recent reports on clinical testing of Notch inhibitors in T-ALL that influenced contemporary thinking on the challenges of targeting Notch in cancer. We review advances in the laboratory to address these challenges in regards to drug targets, the Notch-driven metabolome, and the sophisticated protein-protein interactions at Notch-dependent superenhancers that underlie oncogenic Notch functions. Notch signaling is a recurrent oncogenic pathway in multiple T- and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Understanding the complexity and consequences of Notch activation is critical to define optimal therapeutic strategies targeting the Notch pathway.

  10. X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome and Common Variable Immunodeficiency May Not Be Differentiated by SH2D1A and XIAP/BIRC4 Genes Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Gulez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP is a rare, inherited immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent episodes of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, hypogammaglobulinemia, and/or lymphomas. Recently, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP/BIRC4 gene defects, in families with XLP but without SH2D1A gene defects, has been defined. The distinction from primary immunodeficiencies with a defined genetic cause is mandatory. A six-year-old male patient was admitted with the complaints of persistent general lymphadenopathy, for two years had fever, bilateral cervical multiple microlymphadenopathy, hepatic/splenic enlargement with laboratory findings as decreased serum immunoglobulins, negative EBV VCA IgM (viral capsid antigen and anti-EBV EA (antibody to early D antigen, positive EBV VCA IgG (viral capsid antigen and EBV EBNA (antibody to nuclear antigen. SH2D1A gene analysis was negative. XIAP/BIRC4 sequencing revealed two novel single nucleotide variants (exon 7, 1978G > A, and 1996T > A in the 3′UTR of the gene in both patient and mother which were not disease causing. XIAP protein expression was found to be normal. The clinical and laboratory resemblance, no gene mutations, and normal XIAP protein expression led us to think that there may be another responsible gene for XLP. The patient will to be followed up as CVID until he presents new diagnostic signs or until the identification of a new gene.

  11. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of lymphoproliferative disorders--interpretations based on morphologic criteria alone: results from the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Nongynecologic Cytopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nancy A; Moriarty, Ann T; Haja, Jennifer C; Wilbur, David C

    2006-12-01

    Diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders is one of the most challenging tasks faced by the cytologist. The initial cytomorphologic evaluation of lymphoproliferative lesions directs the choice of ancillary studies that ultimately lead to a diagnosis based on the World Health Organization classification system using a composite of clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular features. To evaluate the ability of participating laboratories in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Non-Gynecologic Cytopathology to appropriately categorize lymphoproliferative lesions based solely on cytomorphologic criteria. Laboratory responses for lymph node aspirates were examined. All responses were based on review of glass slides without ancillary immunologic or molecular data available. The benchmarking data provided for each specific diagnosis were analyzed, with a focus on the performance for evaluation of lymphoproliferative lesions. Based on morphology alone, responses for lymph node aspirates in the Non-Gynecologic Cytopathology program were correct to the exact reference diagnosis for 87.1% of Hodgkin lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma was identified in 69.5% of the large cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases, of which 66.8% were correctly classified as large cell type. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma was identified in 68.1% of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, other than large cell cases, and of these, 94.7% were identified as other than large cell type. The spectrum of specific responses was consistent for lymphoproliferative lesions, with a reasonable differential diagnosis based on cytomorphology alone, which, in practice, facilitates the appropriate choice of immunophenotypic markers and other ancillary studies.

  12. Fine needle aspiration cytology of ALK1(-), CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma post renal transplantation: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Indra; Walker, Joe W; Broman, Jerry

    2010-03-01

    Post transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) complicates the course of 0.3 to 3% of renal transplant patients receiving immunosuppression. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) related non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of B-cell type is more common than those of T-cell origin. CD30 positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) is a Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B or T cell type) that accounts for a small percentage of PTLD's. ALCL of T-cell type are a spectrum of disease ranging from primary cutaneous to systemic nodal ALCL. The systemic nodal ALCL is further subdivided into anaplastic lymphoma kinase-1 (ALK-1) positive or negative. ALK-1 protein is a gene fusion product of translocation (2;5) and carries prognostic implications. We present an unusual manifestation of ALK-1 negative CD30 positive ALCL in a post renal transplant patient in FNA cytology with all supportive adjuvant studies and differential diagnoses and review the cytology literature on this topic.

  13. Steroid-free immunosuppression after renal transplantation-long-term experience from a single centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Faramawi, Mohamad; Rohr, Nils; Jespersen, Bente

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A steroid-free immunosuppressive protocol may improve the general well-being of patients, but long-term renal graft survival has been a concern. METHODS: In a retrospective clinical study, 329 consecutive transplantations with renal grafts at our centre during the period 1995-2004, were......, for instance because of primary kidney disease or when calcineurin inhibitor toxicity was suspected. RESULTS: About 71% of the patients did not take steroids at all. Nevertheless, graft survival rates at 1, 5 and 7 years were 95, 77 and 72% for all grafts, including 27% living donor transplants and 27% second...... or subsequent grafts. Ten patients (3.2%) died with functioning grafts. Within the first year of transplantation there were 69 acute rejections in 63 patients (19%). Four cases (1.3%) of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) occurred with one graft loss and no deaths. Owing to a high PTLD rate...

  14. Usefullness of IGH/TCR PCR studies in lymphoproliferative disorders with inconclusive clonality by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, Jordi; Zamora, Lurdes; Juncà, Jordi; Rodríguez, Inés; Marcé, Silvia; Cabezón, Marta; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-07-25

    In up to 5-15% of studies of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) flow cytometry (FCM) or immunomorphologic methods cannot discriminate malignant from reactive processes. The aim of this work was to determine the usefulness of PCR for solving these diagnostic uncertainties. We analyzed IGH and TCRγ genes by PCR in 106 samples with inconclusive FCM results. A clonal result was registered in 36/106 studies, with a LPD being confirmed in 27 (75%) of these cases. Specifically, 9/9 IGH clonal and 16/25 TCRγ clonal results were finally diagnosed with LPD. Additionally, 2 clonal TCRγ samples with suspicion of undefined LPD were finally diagnosed with T LPD. Although polyclonal results were obtained in 47 of the cases studied (38 IGH and 9 TCRγ), hematologic neoplasms were diagnosed in 4/38 IGH polyclonal and in 1/9 TCRγ polyclonal studies. There were also 14 PCR polyclonal results (4 IGH, 10 TCRγ), albeit non-conclusive. Of these, 2/4 were eventually diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma and 3/10 with T-cell LPD. In 8 IGH samples the results of PCR techniques were non-informative but in 3/8 cases a B lymphoma was finally confirmed. We concluded that PCR is a useful technique to identify LPD when FCM is inconclusive. A PCR clonal B result is indicative of malignancy but IGH polyclonal and non-conclusive results do not exclude lymphoid neoplasms. Interpretation of T-cell clonality should be based on all the available clinical and analytical data. © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society. Copyright © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  15. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning 2.5 Mbp in Xq25, the critical region for the X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanyi, A.; Li, B.F.; Li, S. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is characterized by a marked vulnerability in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Infection of XLP patients with EBV invariably results in fatal mononucleosis, agammaglobulinemia or B-cell lymphoma. The XLP gene lies within a 10 cM region in Xq25 between DXS42 and DXS10. Initial chromosome studies revealed an interstitial, cytogenetically visible deletion in Xq25 in one XLP family (43-004). We estimated the size of the Xq25 deletion by dual laser flow karyotyping to involve 2% of the X chromosome, or approximately 3 Mbp of DNA sequences. To further delineate the deletion we performed a series of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analyses which showed that DXS6 and DXS100, two Xq25-specific markers, are missing from 45-004 DNA. Five yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from a chromosome X specific YAC library containing sequences deleted in patient`s 43-004 DNA were isolated. These five YACs did not overlap, and their end fragments were used to screen the CEPH MegaYAC library. Seven YACs were isolated from the CEPH MegaYAC library. They could be arranged into a contig which spans between DXS6 and DXS100. The contig contains a minimum of 2.5 Mbp of human DNA. A total of 12 YAC end clone, lambda subclones and STS probes have been used to order clones within the contig. These reagents were also used in Southern blot and patients showed interstitial deletions in Xq25. The size of these deletions range between 0.5 and 2.5 Mbp. The shortest deletion probably represents the critical region for the XLP gene.

  16. A Phase I Trial of Epstein-Barr Virus Gp350 Vaccine for Children With Chronic Kidney Disease Awaiting Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rees, L.; Tizard, E.J.; Morgan, A.J.; Cubitt, W.D.; Finerty, S.; Oyewole-Eletu, T.A.; Owen, K.; Royed, C.; Stevens, S.J.C.; Shroff, R.C.; Tanday, M.K.; Wilson, A.; Middeldorp, J.M.; Amlot, P.L.; Steven, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Vaccination against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), inducing an antibody response to the envelope glycoprotein gp350, might protect EBV-negative children with chronic kidney disease from lymphoproliferative disease after transplantation. Methods. A phase I trial recruited children with chronic

  17. Castleman′s Disease Presenting as Localized Abdominal Mass and Paraneoplastic Pemphigus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman′s disease is a rare, benign lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown origin. Paraneoplastic pemphigus is a common association which presents as oral mucosal ulcerations. Abdominal and retroperitoneal Castleman′s disease present either as a localized disease or as a systemic disease. We hereby present a 15-year-old male patient with oral mucosal lesions with localized vague right lower abdominal mass who was diagnosed to have Castleman′s disease with paraneoplastic pemphigus which was surgically excised.

  18. Castleman's disease associated with a cerebellar chordoid meningioma and intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Chul Jin; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Jong Seung; Lee, Ji Hyuk; Kong, Doo-Sik; Shin, Hyung Jin; Suh, Yeon Lim; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Choe, Yon Ho

    2010-11-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare nonneoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology. It is characterized by enlarged hyperplastic lymph nodes, usually presenting as a localized mass. Although an intracranial location is very uncommon, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a chordoid meningioma. We describe a pediatric case of CD with a cerebellar chordoid meningioma and intestinal lymphangiectasia.

  19. Lymphoproliferative and gamma interferon responses to stress-regulated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johne’s disease in ruminants is a chronic infection of the intestines caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Economic losses associated with Johne’s disease arise due to premature culling, reduced production of milk and wool and mortalities. The disease is characterised by a long inc...

  20. Frequency of a FAS ligand gene variant associated with inherited feline autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in British shorthair cats in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberdein, D; Munday, J S; Dittmer, K E; Heathcott, R W; Lyons, L A

    2017-11-01

    AIMS To determine the frequency of the FAS-ligand gene (FASLG) variant associated with feline autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (FALPS) and the proportion of carriers of the variant in three British shorthair (BSH) breeding catteries in New Zealand. METHODS Buccal swabs were collected from all cats in two BSH breeding catteries from the South Island and one from the North Island of New Zealand. DNA was extracted and was tested for the presence of the FASLG variant using PCR. Cats with the FASLG variant were identified and the frequency of the FASLG variant allele calculated. Pedigree analysis was performed and inbreeding coefficients were calculated for cats with the FASLG variant. RESULTS Of 32 BSH cats successfully tested for the presence of the FASLG variant, one kitten (3%) was homozygous (FALPS-affected), and seven (22%) cats were heterozygous (carriers) for the FASLG variant allele, and 24 (75%) cats were homozygous for the wild type allele. The overall frequency of the FASLG variant allele in these 32 cats was 0.14. Cats carrying the FASLG variant were from all three breeding catteries sampled, including two catteries that had not previously reported cases of FALPS. Pedigree analysis revealed common ancestry of FALPS-affected and carrier cats within six generations, as well as frequent inbreeding, with inbreeding coefficients >0.12 for five cats with the FASLG variant. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE There was a high frequency of the FASLG variant allele (0.14) in this small sample of BSH cats, with 22% of healthy cats identified as carriers of the FASLG variant. For an inherited disease, lethal at a young age, in a small population in which inbreeding is common, these results are significant. To prevent future cases of disease and stop further spread of the FASLG variant allele within the BSH population in New Zealand, it is recommended that all BSH and BSH-cross cats be tested for the presence of the FASLG variant before mating. Cats identified as

  1. Castleman disease (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Melikyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (angiofollicular hyperplasia of lymph nodes – a rare benign lymphoproliferative disease with prolonged asymptomatic course, associated with a wide variety of autoimmune and oncological diseases and the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The rare occurrence of this disease and a variety of clinical course did not allow for a complete and consistent research on the etiology and pathogenesis and the standard therapies development. In recent years, the number of patients with Castleman disease in the Russian Federation has increased, which requires its recognition among non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphadenopathy. The article provides an overview about clinical and histological variants of Castleman’s disease, its pathogenesis concepts, classification and treatment.

  2. Severe necrotic dermatitis in the combs of line 6-3 chickens is associated with Marek's disease virus-induced immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disorder of domestic chickens is characterized by bursal–thymic atrophy and rapid onset of T-cell lymphomas that infiltrate lymphoid tissues, visceral organs, and peripheral nerves. Marek’s disease virus (MDV), the etiological agent of MD, is a highly cel...

  3. Construction and Characterization of a Humanized Anti-Epstein-Barr Virus gp350 Antibody with Neutralizing Activity in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome E. Tanner

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection in immunosuppressed transplant patients can give rise to a malignant B-cell proliferation known as post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD. The EBV major virion surface glycoprotein (gp350 is a principal target of naturally occurring neutralizing antibodies and is viewed as the best target to prevent acute infection and PTLD in at-risk transplant recipients. We have constructed a humanized (hu version of the murine anti-gp350 neutralizing monoclonal antibody 72a1. The hu72a1 IgG1 antibody displayed no significant anti-mouse activity, recognized both gp350 and its splice variant gp220 as well as a gp350 peptide that was shown to constitute the principal EBV gp350 neutralizing epitope when tested in immunoassays. Hu72a1 antibody blocked in vitro EBV infection of B cells at a level which equaled that of a mouse-human chimeric 72a1 antibody construct. This work provides a further structural and immunological understanding of the 72a1 antibody interaction with EBV gp350, and constitutes a launch point for future anti-EBV therapeutic antibodies designed to block EBV infection and prevent PTLD while eliminating the deleterious antigenic murine features of the original 72a1 antibody.

  4. [Cardiac transplantation and neoplasms: experiences at Escola Paulista de Medicina of the Federal University of São Paulo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello Junior, Walter Teixeira de; Branco, João Nelson R; Catani, Roberto; Aguiar, Luciano de Figueiredo; Paez, Rodrigo Pereira; Buffolo, Enio

    2006-02-01

    To study the occurrence and types of neoplasms developed by patients who underwent an orthotopic cardiac transplantation under the Program of Cardiac Transplantation of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Federal University of São Paulo. This is an observational study of 106 patients who underwent orthotopic cardiac transplantation from November 1986 to September 2002 and survived at least thirty days following the procedure. The triple immunosuppressive regimen given included cyclosporin A, azathioprine and a corticosteroid agent. Only two patients received OKT3 in addition to the regimen established. Mean follow-up was 61.4 months (ranging from two months to 192 months). Twenty-three patients (21.3%) developed neoplasms--56.5% of these were skin neoplasm, 30.1%, solid tumors, and 13.4% of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Mean interval between transplantation and diagnosis of neoplasm was: 54.9 months for skin neoplasm; 24.8 months for solid tumors and 70.3 months for PTLD. Malignant neoplasms are relatively common in the population studied. Skin cancer was the most common type compared to the other types of neoplasms. Solid tumors were more frequently diagnosed than the lymphoproliferative diseases in the population examined.

  5. Rituximab therapy in a patient with low grade B-cell lymphoproliferative disease and concomitant acquired angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ravdeep Kaur, Aerik Anthony Williams, Catherine Baker Swift, Jason W Caldwell Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Acquired angioedema is often associated with significant morbidity. An underlying lymphatic malignancy, autoimmune disorder, adenocarcinoma, or other malignancy may be present. Screening for these disorders should occur in all patients with acquired angioedema as treatment may result in resolution of angioedema. Keywords: complement, C1-INH deficiency, ecallantide, hemopathy

  6. Visceral Marek's disease in white-peafowl (Pavo cristatus)

    OpenAIRE

    Blume, G.R.; Cardoso, S.P.; Oliveira, M.L.B.; Matiolli, M.P.; Gómez, S.Y.M.; Reis Júnior, J.L.; Sant'Ana, F.J.F.; Martins, N.R.S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder caused by Gallid herpesvirus 2 (MDV) that infects mainly domestic gallinaceous birds although wild birds may occasionally be affected. The current report describes the anatomopathological and molecular findings of a case of MD in a white-peafowl (Pavo cristatus). The signs included apathy, hyporexia, and diarrhea. Grossly, 0.5 to 1.5cm in diameter, yellow, soft nodules were observed in the skeletal muscle, lung, kidney, air sacs,...

  7. Castleman's disease: A rare indication for endovascular therapy for hemoptysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Husainy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman's disease (CD is a rare lympho-proliferative disorder due to faulty immune regulation resulting in proliferation of lymphatic tissue. The vascular supply to these lesions have been reported to arise from the bronchial, internal mammary and the intercostal arteries. We report a case of hemoptysis secondary to intrathoracic CD with vascular supply arising from the left inferior phrenic artery which was successfully embolised with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA particles.

  8. FDG uptake in cervical lymph nodes in children without head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vali, Reza; Bakari, Alaa A.; Marie, Eman; Kousha, Mahnaz; Shammas, Amer [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada); Charron, Martin [Brampton Nuclear Services, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-06-15

    Reactive cervical lymphadenopathy is common in children and may demonstrate increased {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). We sought to evaluate the frequency and significance of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake by neck lymph nodes in children with no history of head and neck cancer. The charts of 244 patients (114 female, mean age: 10.4 years) with a variety of tumors such as lymphoma and post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (PTLD), but no head and neck cancers, who had undergone {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT were reviewed retrospectively. Using the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake by neck lymph nodes was recorded and compared with the final diagnosis based on follow-up studies or biopsy results. Neck lymph node uptake was identified in 70/244 (28.6%) of the patients. In 38 patients, the lymph nodes were benign. In eight patients, the lymph nodes were malignant (seven PTLD and one lymphoma). In 24 patients, we were not able to confirm the final diagnosis. Seven out of the eight malignant lymph nodes were positive for PTLD. The mean SUVmax was significantly higher in malignant lesions (4.2) compared with benign lesions (2.1) (P = 0.00049). {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in neck lymph nodes is common in children and is frequently due to reactive lymph nodes, especially when the SUVmax is <3.2. The frequency of malignant cervical lymph nodes is higher in PTLD patients compared with other groups. (orig.)

  9. FDG uptake in cervical lymph nodes in children without head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, Reza; Bakari, Alaa A; Marie, Eman; Kousha, Mahnaz; Charron, Martin; Shammas, Amer

    2017-06-01

    Reactive cervical lymphadenopathy is common in children and may demonstrate increased 18 F-fluoro-deoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). We sought to evaluate the frequency and significance of 18 F-FDG uptake by neck lymph nodes in children with no history of head and neck cancer. The charts of 244 patients (114 female, mean age: 10.4 years) with a variety of tumors such as lymphoma and post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (PTLD), but no head and neck cancers, who had undergone 18 F-FDG PET/CT were reviewed retrospectively. Using the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), increased 18 F-FDG uptake by neck lymph nodes was recorded and compared with the final diagnosis based on follow-up studies or biopsy results. Neck lymph node uptake was identified in 70/244 (28.6%) of the patients. In 38 patients, the lymph nodes were benign. In eight patients, the lymph nodes were malignant (seven PTLD and one lymphoma). In 24 patients, we were not able to confirm the final diagnosis. Seven out of the eight malignant lymph nodes were positive for PTLD. The mean SUVmax was significantly higher in malignant lesions (4.2) compared with benign lesions (2.1) (P = 0.00049). 18 F-FDG uptake in neck lymph nodes is common in children and is frequently due to reactive lymph nodes, especially when the SUVmax is cervical lymph nodes is higher in PTLD patients compared with other groups.

  10. Immunoglobulin heavy-chain fluorescence in situ hybridization-chromogenic in situ hybridization DNA probe split signal in the clonality assessment of lymphoproliferative processes on cytological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppa, Pio; Sosa Fernandez, Laura Virginia; Cozzolino, Immacolata; Ronga, Valentina; Genesio, Rita; Salatiello, Maria; Picardi, Marco; Malapelle, Umberto; Troncone, Giancarlo; Vigliar, Elena

    2012-12-25

    The human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) locus at chromosome 14q32 is frequently involved in different translocations of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and the detection of any breakage involving the IGH locus should identify a B-cell NHL. The split-signal IGH fluorescence in situ hybridization-chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH-CISH) DNA probe is a mixture of 2 fluorochrome-labeled DNAs: a green one that binds the telomeric segment and a red one that binds the centromeric segment, both on the IGH breakpoint. In the current study, the authors tested the capability of the IGH FISH-CISH DNA probe to detect IGH translocations and diagnose B-cell lymphoproliferative processes on cytological samples. Fifty cytological specimens from cases of lymphoproliferative processes were tested using the split-signal IGH FISH-CISH DNA probe and the results were compared with light-chain assessment by flow cytometry (FC), IGH status was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and clinicohistological data. The signal score produced comparable results on FISH and CISH analysis and detected 29 positive, 15 negative, and 6 inadequate cases; there were 29 true-positive cases (66%), 9 true-negative cases (20%), 6 false-negative cases (14%), and no false-positive cases (0%). Comparing the sensitivity of the IGH FISH-CISH DNA split probe with FC and PCR, the highest sensitivity was obtained by FC, followed by FISH-CISH and PCR. The split-signal IGH FISH-CISH DNA probe is effective in detecting any translocation involving the IGH locus. This probe can be used on different samples from different B-cell lymphoproliferative processes, although it is not useful for classifying specific entities. Cancer (Cancer Cytopathol) 2012;. © 2012 American Cancer Society. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  11. Nodular Regenerative Hyperplasia and Portal Hypertension in a Patient with Coeliac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Biecker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodular regenerative hyperplasia (NRH of the liver is often associated with rheumatologic or lymphoproliferative disorders and a cause of portal hypertension in some patients. We report the case of a 71-year-old patient with celiac disease and unexplained portal hypertension. Biopsy of the liver revealed NRH as the underlying cause. The patient did not suffer from an autoimmune, rheumatologic or lymphoproliferative disease. A thrombophilic disorder that might cause NRH was ruled out. Celiac disease is often associated with mild elevation of liver enzymes and steatosis of the liver, but the association with NRH was described in only a few patients. We discuss the possible relationship of celiac disease and NRH.

  12. Tumor Microenvironment and Immune Effects of Antineoplastic Therapy in Lymphoproliferative Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro, Tomás; de la Cruz-Merino, Luis; Henao-Carrasco, Fernando; Villar Rodríguez, José Luis; Vicente Baz, David; Codes Manuel de Villena, Manuel; Provencio, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    Lymphomas represent a wide group of heterogenic diseases with different biological and clinical behavior. The underlying microenvironment-specific composition seems to play an essential role in this scenario, harboring the ability to develop successful immune responses or, on the contrary, leading to immune evasion and even promotion of tumor growth. Depending on surrounding lymphoid infiltrates, lymphomas may have different prognosis. Moreover, recent evidences have emerged that confer a significant impact of main lymphoma's treatment over microenvironment, with clinical consequences. In this review, we summarize these concepts from a pathological and clinical perspective. Also, the state of the art of lymphoma's anti-idiotype vaccine development is revised, highlighting the situations where this strategy has proven to be successful and eventual clues to obtain better results in the future. PMID:20814546

  13. Localised prostate cancer and hemophilia A (AHA: Case report and management of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Celestino

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquired Hemophilia A (AHA is a rare bleeding diathesis characterized by the development of autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII. About half of the cases are idiopathic and the other half are associated with autoimmune diseases, postpartum problems, infections, inflammatory bowel disease, drugs, lymphoproliferative disorders or solid tumors . AHA is associated with malignancies in 7-15% of cases. We report a case of AHA in a 65 year old patient with prostatic carcinoma, who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy (RP.

  14. A rare association of Castleman′s disease and nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Tazi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman′s Disease (CD is an uncommon and poorly understood disorder of lymph node hyperplasia of unknown etiology. This entity belongs to the atypical lymphoproliferative disorders, a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by a hyperplastic reactive process involving the immune system. The association of the nephrotic syndrome and CD is extremely rare and their interrelation remains enigmatic. We report a case of CD of the hyaline-vascular type with unicentric localization complicated by nephrotic syndrome.

  15. Castleman's Disease: An Interesting Cause of Hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolofari, Sotonye Karl; Chow, Wai-Man; Hussain, Basharat

    2015-03-01

    Castleman's disease is a rare benign lymphoproliferative disorder, characterized by benign growths of the lymph node tissue. It is associated with a number of malignancies, including Kaposi sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkins lymphoma, and POEMS syndrome. This report describes the case of a 38 year old gentleman, presenting with painless hematuria. Initial investigations, including flexible cystoscopy were unremarkable. However, subsequent imaging including CT Urogram and MR pelvis revealed multiple prevesical lesions. Histology obtained from excision biopsy revealed histological features consistent with Castleman's disease. In this report we discuss the nature, presentation and treatment modalities of this rare condition.

  16. Síndrome linfoproliferativo ligado al cromosoma X, infección por el virus EBV y defectos en la regulación de la citotoxicidad linfocitaria X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, EBV infection and impaired regulation of cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Malbrán

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available La deficiencia del gen SH2D1A que codifica para la proteína reguladora SAP trae aparejada la activación incontrolada de la vía de activación linfocitaria señalizada por SLAM (molécula señaladora de la activación linfocitaria. Es una inmunodeficiencia ligada al cromosoma X (XLP que se pone en evidencia cuando los pacientes portadores de mutaciones en el gen se enfrentan con el virus de Epstein Barr, desarrollando una mononucleosis infecciosa fulminante. Algunos pacientes desarrollan un síndrome linfoproliferativo fatal; los que sobreviven pueden presentar hipogammaglobulinemia severa y mayor frecuencia de neoplasia hematológica que la población normal. En esta revisión se discuten los mecanismos inmuno-regulatorios involucrados en el desarrollo de la patología mencionada, así como la participación de diferentes células efectoras de la respuesta inmune (linfocitos CD8 citotóxicos, células NK.Mutations in SH2D1A, a gene that codifies for the regulatory protein SAP, result in uncontrolled activation of the SLAM (signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule pathway. This X-linked immunodeficiency becomes evident when the patients are infected with Epstein Barr virus (EBV and develop a fulminant form of infectious mononucleosis leading to a lymphoproliferative syndrome that is often fatal (X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, XLP. In those who survive, hypogammaglobulinemia and oncohematologic diseases are frequently observed. In this revision, the immuno-regulatory mechanisms involved in XLP immunopathology and the role of different effector cells (CD8 T lymphocytes, NK cells are discussed.

  17. Outpatient management of steroid-induced hyperglycaemia and steroid-induced diabetes in people with lymphoproliferative disorders treated with intermittent high dose steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Vidler

    2017-09-01

    Eighty-three people were diagnosed with a lymphoproliferative disorder, of whom 6 had known Type 2 diabetes. Fifty-three people without known diabetes were screened by HbA1c and random venous plasma glucose. All patients (n = 34 subsequently prescribed HDS checked capillary blood glucose (CBG pre-breakfast and pre-evening meal. Treatment algorithms used initiation and/or dose titration of gliclazide or human NPH insulin, aiming for pre-meal CBG 5–11 mmol/l. Type 2 diabetes was identified in 4/53 people screened (7.5%. Of 34 people treated with HDS, 17 (44% developed SIH/SID. All 7 people with Type 2 diabetes developed SIH and 3 required insulin. Of 27 people without known diabetes, 8 (30% developed SID and 1 required insulin. Pre-treatment HbA1c was higher in people who developed SID compared to those that did not (p = 0.002. This is the first report of a SID/SIH detection and treatment protocol for use in people with lymphoproliferative disorders receiving intermittent HDS, demonstrating its feasibility and safety.

  18. Orbital benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders: Differentiation using semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Liu, Hu; Hong, Xun-Ning; Shi, Hai-Bin; Wu, Fei-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) in differentiating benign from malignant orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (OLPDs). Methods: Thirty-nine patients with orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (21 malignant and 18 benign) underwent DCE-MRI scan for pre-treatment evaluation from March 2013 to December 2015. Both semi-quantitative (TTP, AUC, Slope max ) and quantitative (K trans , k ep , v e ) parameters were calculated, and compared between two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were used to determine the diagnostic value of each significant parameter. Results: Malignant OLPDs showed significantly higher k ep , lower v e , and lower AUC than benign OLPDs, while no significant differences were found on K trans , TTP and Slope max . ROC analyses indicated that v e exhibited the best diagnostic performance in predicting malignant OLPDs (cutoff value, 0.211; area under the curve, 0.896; sensitivity, 76.2%; specificity, 94.9%), followed by k ep (cutoff value, 0.853; area under the curve, 0.839; sensitivity, 85.7%; specificity, 89.9%). Conclusion: DCE-MRI and specially its derived quantitative parameters of k ep and v e are promising metrics for differentiating malignant from benign OLPDs.

  19. Orbital benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders: Differentiation using semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Quan [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Liu, Hu [Department of Ophthalmology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Hong, Xun-Ning; Shi, Hai-Bin [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wu, Fei-Yun, E-mail: wfydd_njmu@163.com [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2017-03-15

    Objectives: To assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) in differentiating benign from malignant orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (OLPDs). Methods: Thirty-nine patients with orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (21 malignant and 18 benign) underwent DCE-MRI scan for pre-treatment evaluation from March 2013 to December 2015. Both semi-quantitative (TTP, AUC, Slope{sub max}) and quantitative (K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, v{sub e}) parameters were calculated, and compared between two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were used to determine the diagnostic value of each significant parameter. Results: Malignant OLPDs showed significantly higher k{sub ep}, lower v{sub e}, and lower AUC than benign OLPDs, while no significant differences were found on K{sup trans}, TTP and Slope{sub max}. ROC analyses indicated that v{sub e} exhibited the best diagnostic performance in predicting malignant OLPDs (cutoff value, 0.211; area under the curve, 0.896; sensitivity, 76.2%; specificity, 94.9%), followed by k{sub ep} (cutoff value, 0.853; area under the curve, 0.839; sensitivity, 85.7%; specificity, 89.9%). Conclusion: DCE-MRI and specially its derived quantitative parameters of k{sub ep} and v{sub e} are promising metrics for differentiating malignant from benign OLPDs.

  20. Spectrum and immunophenotyping of 653 patients with B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders in China: A single-centre analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yi; Cao, Lei; Sun, Qian; Li, Xiao-Tong; Wang, Yan; Qiao, Chun; Wang, Li; Wang, Rong; Qiu, Hai-Rong; Xu, Wei; Li, Jian-Yong; Wu, Yu-Jie; Fan, Lei

    2018-02-01

    The incidence of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (B-CLPDs) is significantly lower in China than that in western countries. There have been studies involving small cohorts with conflicting results regarding the spectrum of B-CLPDs in China, and the types and immunophenotyping of B-CLPDs in China remain largely unexplored. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 653 cases of B-CLPDs seen in our centre from 2011 to 2015. Four-colour flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of each immunological marker, and the diagnostic values of the immunological markers were also investigated. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) was the most common type of B-CLPD, which was consistent with that in west countries. However, the proportions of CLL (55.9%), follicular lymphoma (2.6%), and hairy cell leukaemia (0.2%) were lower, while the proportion of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/WaldenstrÖm macroglobulinaemia (5.4%) was higher in China, as compared with western countries. With respect to immunophenotypic characteristics, CD23 (31.7%) was more frequently expressed in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) in our cohort than that in western countries. Immunophenotyping was useful in differentiating MCL from CLL or B-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/WaldenstrÖm macroglobulinaemia from splenic marginal zone lymphoma. CD200 was of better diagnostic performance (accuracy: 94.6%) in differentiating CLL from MCL compared with CD23 (accuracy: 93.3%). Some cases of B-CPLDs, however, had no definite diagnoses, which were diagnosed as CD5 + B-CPLDs unclassified (7.7%) and CD5 - B-CPLDs unclassified (15.8%). This is the largest study that systematically explores the spectrum and immunophenotyping of B-CLPDs in Asia, confirming that spectrum of B-CLPDs in China was different from that in western countries. The immunophenotypic features of B-CLPDs were similar between China and western countries, although a few disparities exist. Cases with no definite

  1. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Alok R.; Peirce, Susan K.; Joshi, Shweta; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    kinase inhibitors reverse the lymphoproliferative phenotype in vivo. - Highlights: • First genetic evidence that PTEN controls LPS/TLR4 signaling in B lymphocytes. • Evidence that PTEN regulates LPS induced lymphoproliferation in vivo. • PI-3 kinase inhibitors block LPS induced lymphoproliferation in vivo

  2. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Alok R. [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Peirce, Susan K. [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Joshi, Shweta [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Durden, Donald L., E-mail: ddurden@ucsd.edu [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, UCSD Rady Children' s Hospital, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-09-10

    -3 kinase inhibitors reverse the lymphoproliferative phenotype in vivo. - Highlights: • First genetic evidence that PTEN controls LPS/TLR4 signaling in B lymphocytes. • Evidence that PTEN regulates LPS induced lymphoproliferation in vivo. • PI-3 kinase inhibitors block LPS induced lymphoproliferation in vivo.

  3. Primary and secondary cutaneous CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders: a report from the Dutch Cutaneous Lymphoma Group on the long-term follow-up data of 219 patients and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkenk, M. W.; Geelen, F. A.; van Voorst Vader, P. C.; Heule, F.; Geerts, M. L.; van Vloten, W. A.; Meijer, C. J.; Willemze, R.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate our diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines, clinical and long-term follow-up data of 219 patients with primary or secondary cutaneous CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders were evaluated. The study group included 118 patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP; group 1), 79 patients with

  4. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Relations Cyber Infrastructure Computational Biology Equal Employment Opportunity Ethics Global Research Office of Mission Integration and Financial Management Strategic Planning Workforce Effectiveness Workplace Solutions Technology Transfer Intellectual Property Division of AIDS ...

  5. HIV-associated multicentric Castleman’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzia de Fátima Naime

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. It is found with higher frequency in patients with HIV infection, with systemic symptoms and poor prognosis. We present the case of a 32-year old man with HIV disease, Kaposi’s sarcoma, lymphadenopathy, fever and hemolytic anemia. A diagnosis of Castleman’s disease is confirmed through biopsy and treatment is often based only on published case reports. Systemic treatments for MCD have included chemotherapy, anti-herpes virus, highly active antiretroviral therapy and, more recently, monoclonal antibodies against both IL6 and CD20.

  6. Castleman's disease presenting as a pleural tumor: a case report with CT findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Kim, Bomi

    2018-02-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is an uncommon benign lymphoproliferative disorder which most commonly involves the mediastinum but rarely affects the pleura. We report a case of unicentric CD that presents as a pleural mass in a 45-year-old man, which was subsequently resected followed by an unexpected diagnosis on histologic examination. Although rare, CD should be included in the differential diagnosis of well-enhancing pleural mass.

  7. T-Cell lymphoproliferative disorder of hand-mirror cell morphology presenting in an eosinophilic loculated peritoneal effusion, with omental "caking"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufankjian Dearon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cells with "hand mirror" morphology have not, to the best of our knowledge, been described in a primary effusion sample. This paper describes a case of T-cell lymphoma with eosinophilia in a patient with suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis. Rarely, a T-cell lymphoproliferative process may mimic primary peritoneal carcinomatosis, clinically suggested by a presentation in CT imaging of omental caking with bilateral massive loculated effusions in a patient without lymphadenopathy or splenomegaly. Methods A 60 year old caucasian male presented with vague abdominal discomfort and increasing abdominal girth. Computed tomography showed a two centimeter thick omental cake and a small loculated effusion. The clinical presentation and imaging findings were most consistent with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Cytologic evaluation of the effusion was undertaken for diagnostic study. Results Rapid intraprocedural interpretation of the effusion sample showed a monomorphic population of cells with "hand-mirror" cell morphology exhibiting cytoplasmic extensions (uropodia with 3–5 course dark cytoplasmic granules and a rim of vacuolated cytoplasm capping the opposing "mirror head" side. These cells were seen within a background of mature eosinophils. Flow cytometric evaluation of the ascites fluid demonstrated an atypical T-cell population with the following immunophenotype: CD2-, CD3+, CD4-, CD5-, CD7-, CD8+, CD56+. T-cell receptor (TCR gene rearrangement was positive for clonal TCR-gamma gene rearrangement, supporting the diagnosis of a T-lymphoprolifereative disorder. Conclusion A T-cell lymphoproliferative process may present with "hand mirror" morphology in an effusion sample. These cells may show polar cytoplasmic vacuolization and 3–5 course granules within the "handle" of these unique cells. Cytoplasm shows peripheral constriction around the nucleus.

  8. Castleman s Disease with an Unusual Radiological Presentation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Ocal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Castleman%u2019s disease is a rare lymphoproliferative pathology which has two clinicoradiological forms; localized disease and disseminated disease. Histopathologically, Castleman%u2019s disease is evaluated in three groups; hyaline-vascular type, plasma cell type and mixed type. Patients are often asymptomatic and are diagnosed by radiological findings. The most common radiological presentation is huge lymph nodes in mediastinal area. Lymphadenopathy is most frequently observed in paratracheal lymph nodes. We wanted to emphasize this very rare entity and remind you this disease by the mean of a case with different radiological appearance.

  9. Current diagnosis and treatment of Castleman's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González García, A; Moreno Cobo, M Á; Patier de la Peña, J L

    2016-04-01

    Castleman's disease is not just a single disease but rather an uncommon, heterogeneous group of nonclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, which have a broad spectrum of clinical expression. Three histological types have been reported, along with several clinical forms according to clinical presentation, histological substrate and associated diseases. Interleukin-6, its receptor polymorphisms, the human immunodeficiency virus and the human herpes virus 8 are involved in the etiopathogenesis of Castleman's disease. The study of this disease has shed light on a syndrome whose incidence is unknown. Despite recent significant advances in our understanding of this disease and the increasing therapeutic experience with rituximab, tocilizumab and siltuximab, there are still difficult questions concerning its aetiology, prognosis and optimal treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  10. Pre-emptive rituximab for Epstein-Barr virus reactivation after haplo-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shogo; Sano, Hideki; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Nobuhisa; Ohto, Hitoshi; Kikuta, Atsushi

    2017-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-PTLD) is a serious complication in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate the incidence and potential risk factors for EBV reactivation and to assess the efficacy of the management of EBV reactivation with pre-emptive rituximab in children who had T-cell-replete haploidentical HSCT (TCR-haplo-SCT) with low-dose anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG). EBV-DNA level in peripheral blood (PB) was measured when suspected EBV reactivation were observed. When the EBV-DNA level in PB increased to >1,000 copies/10 6 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), patients were pre-emptively treated with rituximab (375 mg/m 2 /dose). A total of 19 (50%) of 38 patients received rituximab infusion at a median time of 56 days after HSCT (range, 17-270 days). The median viral load at initiation of therapy was 2,900 copies/10 6 PBMC (range, 1,000-650 000). Pre-emptive therapy was started after a median of 2 days (range, 0-7 days). The median number of weekly treatment cycles was 2 (range, 1-3). None of the patients developed PTLD or other EBV-associated diseases. Pre-emptive rituximab therapy could be a useful strategy for EBV-PTLD in TCR-haplo-SCT recipients with low-dose ATG. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  12. An animal model for human EBV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome: herpesvirus papio frequently induces fatal lymphoproliferative disorders with hemophagocytic syndrome in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K; Ohara, N; Teramoto, N; Onoda, S; Chen, H L; Oka, T; Kondo, E; Yoshino, T; Takahashi, K; Yates, J; Akagi, T

    2001-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (EBV-AHS) is often associated with fatal infectious mononucleosis. However, the animal model for EBV-AHS has not been developed. We reported the first animal model for EBV-AHS using rabbits infected with EBV-related herpesvirus of baboon (HVP). Eleven of 13 (85%) rabbits inoculated intravenously with HVP-producing cells developed fatal lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) between 22 and 105 days after inoculation. LPD was also accompanied by hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) in nine of these 11 rabbits. The peroral spray of cell-free HVP induced the virus infection with increased anti-EBV-viral capsid antigen-IgG titers in three of five rabbits, and two of these three infected rabbits died of LPD with HPS. Autopsy revealed hepatosplenomegaly and swollen lymph nodes. Atypical lymphoid T cells expressing EBV-encoded small RNA-1 infiltrated diffusely in many organs, frequently involving the lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Hemophagocytic histiocytosis was observed in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus. HVP-DNA was detected in the tissues and peripheral blood from the infected rabbits by polymerase chain reaction or Southern blot analysis. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed both HVP-EBNA1 and HVP-EBNA2 transcripts, suggesting latency type III infection. These data indicate that the high rate of rabbit LPD with HPS induction is caused by HVP. This system is useful for studying the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of human EBV-AHS.

  13. Automated quantification of apoptosis in B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a prognostic variable obtained with the Cell-Dyn Sapphire (Abbott) automated hematology analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumi, M; Martins, D; Pancione, Y; Sale, S; Rocco, V

    2014-12-01

    B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia CLL, a neoplastic clonal disorder with monomorphous small B lymphocytes with scanty cytoplasm and clumped chromatin, can be morphologically differentiated in typical and atypical forms with different prognosis: Smudge cells (Gumprecht's shadows) are one of the well-known features of the typical CLL and are much less inconsistent in other different types CLPD. Abbott Cell-Dyn Sapphire uses the fluorescence after staining with the DNA fluorochrome propidium iodide for the measurement of nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) and nonviable cells (FL3+ cell fraction): We have studied the possible correlation between presence and number of morphologically identifiable smudge cells on smears and the percentage of nonviable cells produced by Cell-Dyn Sapphire. 305 blood samples from 224 patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and 40 healthy blood donors were analyzed by CBC performed by Cell-Dyn Sapphire, peripheral blood smear, and immunophenotype characterization. FL3+ fraction in CLPD directly correlated with the percentage of smudge cells and is significantly increased in patients with typical B-CLL. This phenomenon is much less evident in patients with atypical/mixed B-CLL and B-NHL. In small laboratories without FCM and cytogenetic, smudge cells%, can be utilized as a preliminary diagnostic and prognostic tool in differential diagnosis of CLPD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Variable EBV DNA Load Distributions and Heterogeneous EBV mRNA Expression Patterns in the Circulation of Solid Organ versus Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Greijer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV driven post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD is a heterogeneous and potentially life-threatening condition. Early identification of aberrant EBV activity may prevent progression to B-cell lymphoma. We measured EBV DNA load and RNA profiles in plasma and cellular blood compartments of stem cell transplant (SCT; n=5, solid organ transplant recipients (SOT; n=15, and SOT having chronic elevated EBV-DNA load (n=12. In SCT, EBV DNA was heterogeneously distributed, either in plasma or leukocytes or both. In SOT, EBV DNA load was always cell associated, predominantly in B cells, but occasionally in T cells (CD4 and CD8 or monocytes. All SCT with cell-associated EBV DNA showed BARTs and EBNA1 expression, while LMP1 and LMP2 mRNA was found in 1 and 3 cases, respectively. In SOT, expression of BARTs was detected in all leukocyte samples. LMP2 and EBNA1 mRNA was found in 5/15 and 2/15, respectively, but LMP1 mRNA in only 1, coinciding with severe PTLD and high EBV DNA. Conclusion: EBV DNA is differently distributed between white cells and plasma in SOT versus SCT. EBV RNA profiling in blood is feasible and may have added value for understanding pathogenic virus activity in patients with elevated EBV-DNA.

  15. Sirolimus for rescue and primary immunosuppression in transplanted children receiving tacrolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhi, R; Webber, S; Venkataramanan, R; McGhee, W; Phillips, S; Smith, A; Baird, C; Iurlano, K; Mazariegos, G; Cooperstone, B; Holt, D W; Zeevi, A; Fung, J J; Reyes, J

    2001-09-15

    The role of sirolimus (SRL) as a rescue agent (n=42) and as a component of primary immunosuppression (n=8) was evaluated in a mixed population of 50 transplanted children receiving tacrolimus (liver: 26, heart: 5, intestinal: 5, liver-intestine: 9, lung: 1, bone marrow: 1, liver-kidney: 1, multivisceral: 1). Rescue indications for tacrolimus (TAC) failure were recurrent acute rejection and acute rejection complicating withdrawal of immunosuppression in posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Rescue indications for TAC toxicity were nephrotoxicity, pancreatitis, seizures, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and graft-versus-host disease. Mean age at rescue was 11.5 years and mean follow-up was 204 (range 18-800) days. As primary immunosuppression, SRL+TAC prevented early acute rejection in 7/8 children. The indication for rescue resolved in 33/42 children. In children with TAC toxicity, this was associated with decrease in TAC doses by 50%, significant improvements in renal function, and continuing decline in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viral load in PTLD patients. Serious adverse events led to discontinuation of SRL in 9/42 rescue patients, 3 of them also experienced acute rejection. Three additional children also experienced acute rejection on SRL therapy (overall incidence 6/50, 12%). Pharmacokinetic analysis in the first week of SRL administration suggested a short half-life (11.8+/-5.5 hr, n=21). SRL and reduced-dose TAC may achieve adequate immunosuppression without compromising renal function or enhancing EBV viremia significantly.

  16. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Monotherapy for Granulomatous Lymphocytic Interstitial Lung Disease in Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Okabayashi, Asako; Sato, Akitoshi; Yokohori, Naoko; Katsura, Hideki; Asano, Chihiro; Kamata, Toshiko; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Ogura, Takashi; Takemura, Tamiko

    2017-11-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous subset of immunodeficiency disorders. Recurrent bacterial infection is the main feature of CVID, but various non-infectious complications can occur. A 42-year-old woman presented with cough and abnormal chest X-ray shadows. Laboratory tests showed remarkable hypogammaglobulinemia. Computed tomography revealed multiple consolidation and nodules on the bilateral lung fields, systemic lymphadenopathy, and splenomegaly. A surgical lung biopsy specimen provided the final diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disease in CVID, which was grouped under the term granulomatous lymphocytic interstitial lung disease. Interestingly, the lung lesions of this case resolved immediately after the initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin monotherapy.

  17. [Multicentric hyaline vascular Castleman's disease. A POEMS type variant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Ramos, Abraham Edgar; Cruz-Domínguez, María del Pilar; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Castleman's disease is an atypical lymphoproliferative disorder which may be compatible with paraneoplastic manifestations of POEMS syndrome. a 53 year old man with a history of type 2 diabetes, hypothyroidism and Addison's disease presented with numbness and weakness in limbs, dyspnea, skin hardening, Raynaud's phenomenon, weight loss and fatigue. A physical exam showed tachypnea, generalized cutaneous hyperpigmentation and skin hardening of extremities, muscle weakness, hypoesthesia and hyporeflexia. Laboratory showed hyperprolactinemia, low testosterone, hypothyroidism and Addison's disease. Electrophoresis of proteins showed polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Somatosensory evoked potentials reported peripheral neuropathy and severe axonal polyneuropathy by electromyography. Chest X-rays showed bilateral reticular infiltrates and mediastinal widening. An echocardiogram displayed moderate pulmonary hypertension. Skin biopsy had no evidence of scleroderma. CT reported axillar, mediastinal and retroperitoneal nodes. The mediastinal lesion biopsy reported hyaline vascular Castleman's disease, multicentric variety. He was treated with rituximab. the case meet criteria for multicentric hyaline vascular Castleman's disease, POEMS variant, treated with rituximab.

  18. Humanized Mouse Models of Epstein-Barr Virus Infection and Associated Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi; Matsuda, Go; Imadome, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus infecting more than 90% of the adult population of the world. EBV is associated with a variety of diseases including infectious mononucleosis, lymphoproliferative diseases, malignancies such as Burkitt lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). EBV in nature infects only humans, but in an experimental setting, a limited species of new-world monkeys can be infected with the virus. Small animal models, suitable for evaluation of novel therapeutics and vaccines, have not been available. Humanized mice, defined here as mice harboring functioning human immune system components, are easily infected with EBV that targets cells of the hematoimmune system. Furthermore, humanized mice can mount both cellular and humoral immune responses to EBV. Thus, many aspects of human EBV infection, including associated diseases (e.g., lymphoproliferative disease, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and erosive arthritis resembling RA), latent infection, and T-cell-mediated and humoral immune responses have been successfully reproduced in humanized mice. Here we summarize recent achievements in the field of humanized mouse models of EBV infection and show how they have been utilized to analyze EBV pathogenesis and normal and aberrant human immune responses to the virus. PMID:25436886

  19. Case report of Mikulicz`s disease: A modern concept of an old entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božić Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Modern knowlegde defines Mikulicz´s disease as a part of immunoglobulin G4-related disease. The main feature is the presence of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, immunoglobulin G4 plasma cells positivity, distinctive storiform fibrosis and moderate eosinophilia. Case report. A 59-years old male presented with a mild keratoconjuctivitis sicca and enlarged lacrimal and salivary glands during the last two years. Althought clinical presentation of the patient was typical, earlier testing did not pinpoint Mikulicz ´s disease. By typical clinical presentation, elevated serum immunoglobulin G4 level and histopathological finding of lacrimal glands tissue we diagnosed Mikulicz´s disease successfully treated with corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion. We reported the first case of IgG4-related Mikulicz´s disease in Serbia. Our report highlights IgG4-related Mikulicz` s disease as an important differential diagnosis with Sjögren`s syndrome and lymphoproliferative disease in rheumatological practice.

  20. HRCT of the lung in collagen vascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederich, S.; Roos, N.; Schmitz-Linneweber, B.; Gaubitz, M.; Peters, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Collagen vascular diseases, representing systemic soft tissue disorders, may cause a broad spectrum of pathologic changes of the respiratory tract. The type and extent of manifestations can vary considerably among individuals and entities. This survey describes the chest radiographic and, in particular, high-resolution computed tomographic and, in particular, high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) findings of individual lesions of the respiratory tract. It includes fibrosing alveolitis (alveolitis, interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary fibrosis) and bronchial (bronchitis/bronchiolitis, bronchiectasis), pleural and vascular manifestations, as well as lymphadenopathy and abnormalities related to therapy. We present typical patterns of changes in progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS, scleroderma), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD, Sharp syndrome), Sjoegren syndrome, overlap syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Furthermore, we describe findings which are specific for individual entities such as esophageal involvement in PSS, acute pneumonitis and pulmonary hemorrhage in SLE, lymphoproliferative disease in Sjoegren syndrome and necrobiotic nodules in RA. (orig.) [de

  1. Epstein-Barr viral load before a liver transplant in children with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibazad, Nader; Honar, Naser; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2014-12-01

    Many children with chronic liver disease require a liver transplant. These patients are prone to various infections, including Epstein-Barr virus infection. This study sought to measure the Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before a liver transplant. This cross-sectional study was done at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, in 2011. All patients were aged younger than 18 years with chronic liver disease and were candidates for a liver transplant at the Shiraz Nemazee Hospital Organ Transplant Center. They had been investigated regarding their demographic characteristics, underlying disease, laboratory findings, and Epstein-Barr viral load by real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. Ninety-eight patients were studied and the mean age was 6.5 ± 5.9 years. Cryptogenic cirrhosis was the most-prevalent reason for liver transplant, and the death rate before a transplant was 15%. Among the study subjects, 6 had measurable Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before the transplant, and 4 of them had considerably higher Epstein-Barr viral loads (more than 1000 copies/mL). With respect to the close prevalence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (6%) and the high Epstein-Barr viral load in the patients before a transplant (4%), high pretransplant Epstein-Barr viral load can be considered a risk factor for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  2. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and non-Hodgkin lymphoma: what 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography can do in the management of these patients? Suggestions from a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistaro, A; Pazè, F; Durando, S; Cogoni, M; Faletti, R; Vesco, S; Vallero, S; Quartuccio, N; Treglia, G; Ramenghi, U

    2014-01-01

    A young patient with undefined autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS-U) and low back pain underwent a CT and MRI study that showed enhancing vertebral lesions, some pulmonary nodules and diffuse latero-cervical lymphadenopathy. A (18)F-FDG-PET/CT scan showed many areas of intense (18)F-FDG uptake in multiple vertebrae, in some ribs, in the sacrum, in the liver, in both lungs, in multiple lymph nodes spread in the cervical, thoracic and abdominal chains. A bone marrow biopsy showed a "lymphomatoid granulomatosis", a rare variant of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). After the treatment, the (18)F-FDG-PET/CT scan showed a complete metabolic response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  3. Composite cutaneous lymphoma (iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder) in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate: Staging and evaluation of response to therapy with "1'8F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Gonzalez-Verdecia, Milene; Wang, Beatrice; Probst, Stehan

    2017-01-01

    A 67 year old woman with a 10 year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate and prednisone, presented with a 2 year history of worsening multiple cutaneous plaques of variable appearance. Two distinct skin lesions were biopsied to reveal a composite cutaneous lymphoma, possibly caused by long term methotrexate therapy. An [18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ("1"8F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to stage the malignancy, and was later repeated to evaluate response to chemotherapy, which guided subsequent management. We present the PET/CT imaging findings of this very rare iatrogenic (methotrexate induced) immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder

  4. Composite cutaneous lymphoma (iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder) in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate: Staging and evaluation of response to therapy with {sup 1}'8F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makis, William [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, CCI, Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton (Canada); Ciarallo, Anthony; Gonzalez-Verdecia, Milene [MUHC Glen Site, Montreal (Canada); Wang, Beatrice [MUHC, Dermatology, Westmount (Canada); Probst, Stehan [MUHC Jewish General Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Montreal (Canada)

    2017-09-15

    A 67 year old woman with a 10 year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate and prednisone, presented with a 2 year history of worsening multiple cutaneous plaques of variable appearance. Two distinct skin lesions were biopsied to reveal a composite cutaneous lymphoma, possibly caused by long term methotrexate therapy. An [18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to stage the malignancy, and was later repeated to evaluate response to chemotherapy, which guided subsequent management. We present the PET/CT imaging findings of this very rare iatrogenic (methotrexate induced) immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder.

  5. MIXED HYALINE VASCULAR AND PLASMA CELL TYPE CASTLEMAN’S DISEASE: REPORT OF A CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Asgarani

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease (angiofollicular lymphoid hyperplasia includes a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders. The cause of this disease remains uncertain. There are two types of localized Castleman’s disease: the more common hyaline vascular and the plasma cell types. Mixed variant is an uncommon localized lesion in general population. The lesions can occur in any part of the body that contains lymphoid tissue, although seventy percent are found in the anterior mediastinum. We report a thirty years old boy with Castleman’s disease who presented with fever, anorexia, weight loss,sweating, anemia and abdominal mass. The histologic examination of the biopsy specimens revealed a mixed hyaline vascular and plasma cell type of Castleman’s disease.

  6. A Rare Presentation of a Rare Disease: Pulmonary Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Rehman Mohyuddin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old female presented with a 4-week history of dry cough and wheezing. Chest radiograph showed a 10.5 cm mass-like density in the anterior mediastinum which had not been previously visualized. Computed tomography scan (CT of the chest showed a right hilar mass encasing and narrowing right upper lobe bronchus and right mainstem bronchus and secondary atelectatic changes. Biopsy was consistent with a diagnosis of lymphomatoid granulomatosis Grade 3. She responded well clinically and radiologically to therapy. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a rare EBV-associated disorder which is considered a lymphoproliferative disease. The most common radiographic feature is multiple lung nodules. An isolated hilar mass is an exceptionally rare presentation of this rare disease.

  7. Cytotoxic drug sensitivity of Epstein-Barr virus transformed lymphoblastoid B-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olah Eva

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is the causative agent of immunosuppression associated lymphoproliferations such as post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD, AIDS related immunoblastic lymphomas (ARL and immunoblastic lymphomas in X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP. The reported overall mortality for PTLD often exceeds 50%. Reducing the immunosuppression in recipients of solid organ transplants (SOT or using highly active antiretroviral therapy in AIDS patients leads to complete remission in 23–50% of the PTLD/ARL cases but will not suffice for recipients of bone marrow grafts. An additional therapeutic alternative is the treatment with anti-CD20 antibodies (Rituximab or EBV-specific cytotoxic T-cells. Chemotherapy is used for the non-responding cases only as the second or third line of treatment. The most frequently used chemotherapy regimens originate from the non-Hodgkin lymphoma protocols and there are no cytotoxic drugs that have been specifically selected against EBV induced lymphoproliferative disorders. Methods As lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs are well established in vitro models for PTLD, we have assessed 17 LCLs for cytotoxic drug sensitivity. After three days of incubation, live and dead cells were differentially stained using fluorescent dyes. The precise numbers of live and dead cells were determined using a custom designed automated laser confocal fluorescent microscope. Results Independently of their origin, LCLs showed very similar drug sensitivity patterns against 29 frequently used cytostatic drugs. LCLs were highly sensitive for vincristine, methotrexate, epirubicin and paclitaxel. Conclusion Our data shows that the inclusion of epirubicin and paclitaxel into chemotherapy protocols against PTLD may be justified.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus-positive mucocutaneous ulcer in Crohn's disease. A condition to consider in immunosuppressed IBD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Alba; Lobatón, Triana; Tapia, Gustavo; Mañosa, Míriam; Cabré, Eduard; Domènech, Eugeni

    2017-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-positive mucocutaneous ulcer (EBVMCU) is a little known entity that can affect the oropharyngeal mucosa, the gastrointestinal tract and the skin. The main risk factor for the development of this lesion is immunosuppression. Because its features are similar to other Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders, a differential diagnosis can sometimes prove challenging. Here, we report the case of a man diagnosed with Crohn's disease and treated with azathioprine and infliximab who developed ulceration at the rectum that was refractory to conventional medical treatment. Although the histological characteristics were suggestive of an EBVMCU, lymphoproliferative disease could not be ruled out. The patient did not improve after discontinuation of the treatment, a proctectomy was performed and the diagnosis of this disease was confirmed. Although very few cases of EBVMCU affecting the colon have been reported, its diagnosis should be always considered in refractory cases of inflammatory bowel disease with patients undergoing immunosuppressive treatment. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Primary immunodeficiencies predisposed to Epstein-Barr virus-driven haematological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvaneh, Nima; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Borkhardt, Arndt

    2013-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, maintains lifelong subclinical persistent infections in humans. In the circulation, EBV primarily infects the B cells, and protective immunity is mediated by EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells. However, EBV has been linked to several devastating diseases, such as haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and lymphoproliferative diseases in the immunocompromised host. Some types of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are characterized by the development of EBV-associated complications as their predominant clinical feature. The study of such genetic diseases presents an ideal opportunity for a better understanding of the biology of the immune responses against EBV. Here, we summarize the range of PIDs that are predisposed to EBV-associated haematological diseases, describing their clinical picture and pathogenetic mechanisms. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Rituximab: An emerging therapeutic agent for kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kahwaji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Kahwaji, Chris Tong, Stanley C Jordan, Ashley A VoComprehensive Transplant Center, Transplant immunology Laboratory, HLA Laboratory, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Rituximab (anti-CD20, anti-B-cell is now emerging as an important drug for modification of B-cell and antibody responses in solid-organ transplant recipients. Its uses are varied and range from facilitating desensitization and ABO blood group-incompatible transplantation to the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD, and recurrent glomerular diseases in the renal allograft. Despite these uses, prospective randomized trials are lacking. Only case reports exist in regards to its use in de novo and recurrent diseases in the renal allograft. Recent reports suggests that the addition of rituximab to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG may have significant benefits for desensitization and treatment of AMR and chronic rejection. Current dosing recommendations are based on data from United States Food and Drug Administration-approved indications for treatment of B-cell lymphomas and rheumatoid arthritis. From the initial reported experience in solid organ transplant recipients, the drug is well tolerated and not associated with increased infectious risks. However, close monitoring for viral infections is recommended with rituximab use. The occurrence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML has been reported with rituximab use. However, this is rare and not reported in the renal transplant population. Here we will review current information regarding the effectiveness of rituximab as an agent for desensitization of highly human leukocyte antigen-sensitized and ABO-incompatible transplant recipients and its use in treatment of AMR. In addition, the post-transplant use of rituximab for treatment of PTLD and for recurrent and de novo glomerulonephritis in the allograft will be discussed. In

  11. The benefits of cancer screening in kidney transplant recipients: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taigo; Kakuta, Yoichi; Abe, Toyofumi; Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Imamura, Ryoichi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Takahara, Shiro; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-02-01

    The frequency of malignancy is increasing in kidney transplant recipients. Posttransplant malignancy (PTM) is a major cause of long-term graft survival inhibition. In this study, we evaluated the frequency and prognosis of PTM at our center and examined the efficacy of cancer screening. Between 1972 and 2013, 750 patients were followed-up at our center. Annual physical examinations and screenings were performed to detect PTM. We investigated the detail of two distinctive cancer groups: screening-detected cancers and symptom-detected cancers. Seventy-seven PTM were identified during the follow-up period. The mean age at the initial PTM detection was 43.6 ± 12.8 years. The mean interval from transplantation to cancer diagnosis was 134.5 ± 11.3 months. Among the 77 patients, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) was the most common cancer (19.5%, 15/77), followed by renal cell carcinoma (15.6%, 12/77). Of the cancer cases, 46.8% (36/77) were detected via screening. The most frequently screening-detected cancer was renal cell carcinoma of the native kidney and breast cancer (22.2%, 8/36). However, it was difficult to detect PTLD, urothelial carcinoma, and colorectal cancer via screening. Interestingly, Cox proportional regression analyses revealed nonscreened recipients to be a significant prognostic factor for PTM (P kidney transplant recipients. These findings support the provision of long-term appropriate screening for kidney transplant recipients. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Castleman's Disease: Report of Four Cases and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Fattahi Masoum

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease (CD is a rare benign lymphoproliferative disorder with unknown etiology and pathogenesis. It presents in two identified clinical forms of unicentric or multicentric. The disease is usually found incidentally in the mediastinal or hilar region in asymptomatic patients. In unicentric CD, constitutional symptoms are uncommon, and they can be misdiagnosed as lung infections or malignancy. Although imaging studies are helpful, but definitive diagnosis can be made with pathologic examination. Complete surgical resection is the method of choice for treatment of localized CD, and the prognosis is excellent. In this study, we elucidate clinical features and therapeutic consequences of four cases of unicentric CD referred to our department and review the literature on the diagnosis and management of this relatively rare disorder. Because of the rarity of the disease and nonspecific signs and symptoms of CD it must be considered in differential diagnosis of pulmonary and mediastinal masses.

  13. [Sinus histiocytosis (Destombes-Rosai-Dorfman disease) revealed by extranodal spinal involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, F; Sarran, N; Serre, I; Baldet, P; Callamand, P; Margueritte, G; Astruc, J

    1999-02-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive cervical lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease) is a non-neoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder. Extranodal involvement, especially of the nervous system, is unusual. We report a case revealed by neurological symptoms. A 10-year-old girl presented with paraparesis due to a dural extramedullary mass on magnetic resonance imaging. Massive cervical lymphadenopathy appeared secondarily. Radiological investigations showed mediastinal, paranasal sinus and lower eyelid involvement. The diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease was established histologically and by immunohistochemical studies of nodal lesions by the demonstration of characteristic sinus histiocytosis with sheets of S-100 protein and CD-68 positive large histiocytes displaying lymphocyte phagocytosis. A dramatic response occurred with complete resolution of all clinical findings after treatment with corticosteroids and etoposide, although neurological lesions were unchanged on magnetic resonance imaging. Despite its rarity, this case underlines the unknown pathogenesis of this disease (immune dysfunction?) and the difficulties of treatment (choice of chemotherapeutic agents, duration).

  14. [Premature immunosenescence in triple-transgenic mice for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mate, Ianire; Cruces, Julia; Vida, Carmen; Sanfeliu, Coral; Manassra, Rashed; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    A deterioration of the neuroimmunoendocrine network has been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the peripheral immune response has hardly been investigated in this pathology. Since some immune function parameters have been established as good markers of the rate of ageing, and can predict longevity, the aim of the present work was to study some of these functions in splenic leucocytes in transgenic mice for AD of different ages. Young female (4 ± 1 months), adult (9 ± 1 months), and mature (12 ± 1 months) triple-transgenic mice for AD (3 xTgAD) and non-transgenic (NTg) control mice of the same ages were used. The chemotaxis, the anti-tumour activity of « natural killer » (NK) cells and the lymphoproliferative response in the presence of the mitogens concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide, functions that decrease with age, were determined in splenic leucocytes. In addition, the differences in lifespan between 3 xTgAD and NTg were studied in parallel using other animals, until their death through natural causes. In 3 xTgAD, with respect to NTg, chemotaxis decreased at all ages studied, whereas in lymphoproliferative response this reduction was shown at 4 months and 9 months. NK activity was diminished only in young 3 xTgAD with respect to NTg. The 3 xTgAD showed a shorter lifespan than the NTg control group. The 3 xTgAD mice show a premature immunosenescence, which could explain their early mortality. The determination of these immune functions at peripheral level could serve as a marker of the progression of the Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Spectrum of Epstein-Barr virus-related diseases. A pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Eriko; Akahane, Masaaki; Kiryu, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) prevails among more than 90% of the adult population worldwide. Most primary infections occur during young childhood and cause no or only nonspecific symptoms; then the virus becomes latent and resides in lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. Inactive latent EBV usually causes no serious consequences, but once it becomes active it can cause a wide spectrum of malignancies: epithelial tumors such as nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas; mesenchymal tumors such as follicular dendritic cell tumor/sarcoma; and lymphoid malignancies such as Burkitt lymphoma, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, pyothorax-associated lymphoma, immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorders, extranodal natural killer (NK) cell/T-cell lymphoma, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. The purpose of this article is to describe the spectrum of EBV-related diseases and their key imaging findings. EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders and lymphomas are especially common in immunocompromised patients. Awareness of their clinical settings and imaging spectrum contributes to early detection and early treatment of possibly life-threatening disorders. (author)

  16. Epstein-Barr virus: general factors, virus-related diseases and measurement of viral load after transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cristina Fagundes Gequelin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus is responsible for infectious mononucleosis syndrome and is also closely associated to several types of cancer. The main complication involving Epstein-Barr virus infection, both in recipients of hematopoietic stem cells and solid organs, is post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. The importance of this disease has increased interest in the development of laboratory tools to improve post-transplant monitoring and to detect the disease before clinical evolution. Viral load analysis for Epstein-Barr virus through real-time polymerase chain reaction is, at present, the best tool to measure viral load. However, there is not a consensus on which sample type is the best for the test and what is its predictive value for therapeutic interventions.

  17. HRCT of the lung in collagen vascular diseases; HRCT der Lunge bei Kollagenosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederich, S. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ., Muenster (Germany); Roos, N. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ., Muenster (Germany); Schmitz-Linneweber, B. [Medizinische Klinik B, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ., Muenster (Germany); Gaubitz, M. [Medizinische Klinik B, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ., Muenster (Germany); Peters, P.E. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ., Muenster (Germany)

    1996-07-01

    Collagen vascular diseases, representing systemic soft tissue disorders, may cause a broad spectrum of pathologic changes of the respiratory tract. The type and extent of manifestations can vary considerably among individuals and entities. This survey describes the chest radiographic and, in particular, high-resolution computed tomographic and, in particular, high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) findings of individual lesions of the respiratory tract. It includes fibrosing alveolitis (alveolitis, interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary fibrosis) and bronchial (bronchitis/bronchiolitis, bronchiectasis), pleural and vascular manifestations, as well as lymphadenopathy and abnormalities related to therapy. We present typical patterns of changes in progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS, scleroderma), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD, Sharp syndrome), Sjoegren syndrome, overlap syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Furthermore, we describe findings which are specific for individual entities such as esophageal involvement in PSS, acute pneumonitis and pulmonary hemorrhage in SLE, lymphoproliferative disease in Sjoegren syndrome and necrobiotic nodules in RA. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Kollagenosen koennen als systemische Bindegewebserkrankungen auch zu einem breiten Spektrum pathologischer Veraenderungen am Respirationstrakt fuehren, wobei sich Art und Ausmass der Manifestationen innerhalb einzelner Entitaeten und zwischen verschiedenen Krankheitsbildern erheblich unterscheiden koennen. In der vorliegenden Uebersicht werden die entsprechenden Befunde von Thoraxuebersichtsaufnahme und insbesondere hochaufloesender Computertomographie (HRCT) beschrieben. Beruecksichtigt werden dabei die fibrosierende Alveolitis (Alveolitis, interstitielle Pneumonie, Lungenfibrose), bronchiale (Bronchitis/Bronchiolitis, Bronchiektasen), pleurale und vaskulaere Manifestationen sowie Lymphadenopathie und therapie-induzierte Befunde. Typische Befundmuster

  18. Lack of evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection in patients with Castleman's disease: Molecular genetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.; Kamel-Reid, S.; Bailey, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with a diverse group of malignancies and many lymphoproliferative disorders. Castleman's disease (CD) is a typical lymphoproliferative disorder. The role of EBV in the pathogenesis of CD is not clear yet. The objective of this study is to investigate the EBV status in CD. We searched medical records for cases of CD at the Toronto General Hospital, Canada and King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Twenty cases were found. The presence of EBV was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. Polymerase chain reaction was performed at the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Toronto General Hospital. The study started in 2001 and completed in 2005. The age range was 16-90 years. Seventeen patients manifested the localized form of CD. There were 11 males 9 females. Epstein-Barr virus genome was detected only in 2 cases; both were males and have plasma cell type. One is a localized type and other is of multicentric type. One patient revealed colonel rearrangement of the immunoglobulin H. The number of cases is small; however it appears that EBV is less likely to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of CD; however, it seems to be associated colonel progression. (author)

  19. Original Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    series to find new perspectives on the disease. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive search for the available data through PubMed and Google Scholar for reports of PTLD ..... to study a large number of patients to analyze the potential.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus type 8 infections of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Antonio

    2004-06-01

    In developing guidelines for the improved management of herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS), the International Herpes Management Forum (IHMF) has studied Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8)- related diseases. EBV has been associated with numerous CNS diseases including meningitis, encephalitis and post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). The pathogenesis of EBV-associated CNS disorders is not completely understood but may be due to direct virus invasion of the CNS. Alternatively, damage may be immunologically mediated by infiltration of cytotoxic CD8+ lymphocytes into neural tissue or deposition of antibody-antigen complexes. The IHMF recommends that diagnosis of EBV infections of the CNS may involve polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for EBV DNA but the sensitivity and specificity of the technique remains to be determined. Furthermore, the value of PCR in this context may be limited as EBV DNA is often detected in patients without neurological symptoms. Antiviral therapy has not demonstrated clinical efficacy in the treatment of EBV-related CNS disorders. CNS complications of HHV-8 infection are rare, but the virus has been associated with AIDS-dementia complex, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and primary CNS lymphoma; however these links remain to be proven.

  1. Biological therapy and development of neoplastic disease in patients with juvenile rheumatic disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Patricia L. Pereira

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile rheumatic diseases affect the musculoskeletal system and begin before the age of 18. These conditions have varied, identifiable or unknown etiologies, but those of an autoimmune inflammatory nature have been associated with an increased risk of development of cancer, regardless of treatment. This study aims to assess, through a systematic review of the literature according to Prisma (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses quality criteria, the risk of cancer in patients with juvenile rheumatic disease, and its association with biological agents. The criteria described by the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology initiative were used in order to assess the methodological quality of those individual items selected in this study. We analyzed nine publications, from a total of 251 papers initially selected. There was an increase in cancer risk in the population with juvenile rheumatic disease versus the general population. Most specified cancers were of a lymphoproliferative nature. Seven studies did not specify the treatment or not defined an association between treatment and cancer risk. Only one study has suggested this association; in it, their authors observed high risk in patients diagnosed in the last 20 years, a period of the advent of new therapies. One study found an increased risk in a population not treated with biological agents, suggesting a disease in its natural course, and not an adverse effect of therapy. Studies have shown an increased risk of malignancy associated with juvenile rheumatic disease, and this may be related to disease activity and not specifically to the treatment with biological agents.

  2. Belatacept-based, ATG-Fresenius-induction regimen for kidney transplant recipients: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicora, Federico; Mos, Fernando; Petroni, Jorgelina; Casanova, Matías; Reniero, Liliana; Roberti, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Belatacept provides effective immunosuppression while avoiding the nephrotoxicities associated with calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). However, existing belatacept-based regimens still have high rates of acute rejection. We hypothesized that therapy with belatacept, mycophenolic acid (MMA), steroids and induction therapy with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin Fresenius (ATGF), rejection rate could be reduced. Prospective, single center, proof-of-concept study including males and females aged ≥18years, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-seropositive recipients of a first, HLA non-identical, live or deceased donor kidney allograft. Only patients with a calculated panel reactive antibody score of 0% were included. Three donors were positive for Chagas disease. Six of twelve patients had at least one infection and five were readmitted to the hospital for treatment. One patient had a Trypanosoma cruzi infection via the graft treated successfully. Median cold ischemia time for the transplant patients with a deceased donor was 21.5h. Mean serum creatinine levels at 1, 3 and 6months were 1.76±0.59, 1.55±0.60 and 1.49±0.60mg/dl, respectively. Two of twelve patients experienced clinical, biopsy-proven rejection, successfully treated with methylprednisolone. No patient developed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) or any other malignancy and no patient lost their graft or died during follow-up. The potential of this approach makes it worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Outcome and late complications of radiotherapy in patients with unicentric Castleman disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhof, Dirk; Debus, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Castleman disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. Surgery is considered standard therapy for the unicentric type. However, case reports have documented favorable responses to radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical outcomes of five patients with unicentric Castleman disease treated with radiotherapy between 1991 and 2005. Mediastinal lymph nodes were the most common site of disease (four patients). Three patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, two patients with surgery and radiotherapy. Patients were treated with radiotherapy doses ranging from 40 Gy to 50 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-175 months). During follow-up only one patient had progressive disease and died of Castleman disease. At the time of last follow-up two patients were in complete remission, one patient in partial remission, and one patient had stable disease. One patient showed serious acute and late toxicities. At the end of radiotherapy a paraneoplastic pemphigus vulgaris occurred, and eight to 11 months after radiotherapy a stenosis of the esophagus, of the left bronchus, and of the trachea due to scars. The study shows that unicentric Castleman disease is successfully treated with radiotherapy. However, for detection of possible complications as pemphigus vulgaris or stenosis of the esophagus or trachea an accurate follow-up is necessary

  4. Impaired Control of Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in B-Cell Expansion with NF-κB and T-Cell Anergy Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunaraja, Swadhinya; Angelus, Pamela; Su, Helen C; Snow, Andrew L

    2018-01-01

    B -cell e xpansion with N F-κB and T -cell a nergy (BENTA) disease is a B-cell-specific lymphoproliferative disorder caused by germline gain-of-function mutations in CARD11 . These mutations force the CARD11 scaffold into an open conformation capable of stimulating constitutive NF-κB activation in lymphocytes, without requiring antigen receptor engagement. Many BENTA patients also suffer from recurrent infections, with 7 out of 16 patients exhibiting chronic, low-grade Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia. In this mini-review, we discuss EBV infection in the pathogenesis and clinical management of BENTA disease, and speculate on mechanisms that could explain inadequate control of viral infection in BENTA patients.

  5. Acute or chronic life-threatening diseases associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Motohiko; Gross, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Infectious mononucleosis (IM) is one of the representative, usually benign, acute diseases associated with primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. IM is generally self-limiting and is characterized mostly by transient fever, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. However, very rarely primary EBV infection results in severe or fatal conditions such as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis together with fulminant hepatitis designated as severe or fatal IM or EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis alone. In addition, chronic EBV-associated diseases include Burkitt's lymphoma, undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD)/lymphoma, natural killer-cell LPD including leukemia or lymphoma, gastric carcinoma, pyothorax-associated lymphoma and senile B-cell LPD as well as chronic active EBV infection and LPD/lymphoma in patients with immunodeficiency. The number of chronic life-threatening diseases linked to the EBV infection is increasingly reported and many of these diseases have a poor prognosis. This review will focus on the historical, pathogenetic, diagnostic, therapeutic and prophylactic issues of EBV-associated life-threatening diseases.

  6. Farber's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Research on lipid storage diseases within the Network includes ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Research on lipid storage diseases within the Network includes ...

  7. Marek’s disease in the holland white crested chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spalević Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Marek’s disease is a viral lymphoproliferative disease of poultry characterized by the creation of lymphoma in muscle, skin, eye or internal organs. Virus maturing into infective forms in follicular epithelium from where enters in the external environment where long time remains infectious. Poultry are infected by dust and remains the holder of the virus throughout their lives. The virus is transmitted vertically. The disease can occur in three forms: nervous, visceral and skin. Affected poultry may have any shape or combination of these. The aim of this study was to determine the cause of the disorder the health status in the flock of holland white crested chickens. Flock had 25 chickens whose ages ranged from 4-16 weeks. Observation, we noticed that the chickens are cachectic, showing signs of sporadic diarrhea and died 3 hens and 2 roosters. Pathoanatomical examination is ascertained changes in certain internal organs. The liver was enlarged with lymphoid proliferate on the surface and in the parenchyma, spleen increased several times and marbled, glandular stomach (proventriculus dilated with petechial hemorrhages on mucose. Changed organs was examination histopathological. In the liver were observed multifocal lymphoid infiltration with subsequent atrophy of the parenchyma, in addition to spleen lymphoid proliferation heterophyllus and histiocytic infiltrates, in proventriculus lymphoblastic infiltration with congestion of capillaries and small haemorrhages. In samples pathologically altered organs PCR method proved the genome of Marek’s disease virus serotype 1 . Based on these results we concluded that the livestock were sick from Marek’s disease, which is expressed in visceral form.

  8. Seroprevalence of Epstein-Barr Virus, Cytomegalovirus, and Polyomaviruses in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hradsky, Ondrej; Copova, Ivana; Zarubova, Kristyna; Durilova, Marianna; Nevoral, Jiri; Maminak, Miroslav; Hubacek, Petr; Bronsky, Jiri

    2015-11-01

    Young age and thiopurine therapy are risk factors for lymphoproliferative disease among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of seropositivity for the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human cytomegalovirus (CMV) among children and adolescents with IBD, to assess the viral load of EBV, CMV, and BK and JC polyomaviruses (BKV, JCV) in these patients, and to assess the influence of different therapeutic regimens on seroprevalence and viral load. Children who had been followed in our center were tested for EBV, CMV, BKV, and JCV in a cross-sectional study. One hundred and six children were included who had Crohn's disease (68%), ulcerative colitis (29%), and unclassified IBD (3%). We found that 64% of patients were EBV seropositive. The proportion of EBV seropositive patients increased during childhood. Azathioprine therapy (p = 0.003) was associated with EBV seropositivity in a multiple logistic regression model, after adjusting for gender, age, and disease activity at determination. We found a significant association between the number of polymerase chain reaction copies and infliximab dose (p = 0.023). We did not find any significant association between CMV serology and CMV, BKV, or JCV viral load, or any other therapeutic regimen or clinical characteristics. Treatment with azathioprine appears to be a risk factor for early EBV seropositivity in children with IBD, and the infliximab dose was associated with a higher EBV viral load.

  9. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis caused by primary Epstein-Barr virus in patient with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdis, Francesco; Tacci, Sara; Messina, Federico; Varcada, Massimo

    2013-11-27

    We present a case of a 19-year-old man with a 6-year history of Crohn's disease (CD), previously treated with 6-mercaptopurine, who was admitted to our department for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and subsequently developed a hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). HLH is a rare disease which causes phagocytosis of all bone marrow derived cells. It can be a primary form as a autosomic recessive disease, or a secondary form associated with a variety of infections; EBV is the most common, the one with poorer prognosis. The incidence of lymphoproliferative disorders was increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with thiopurines. Specific EBV-related clinical and virological management should be considered when treating a patient with IBD with immunosuppressive therapy. Moreover EBV infection in immunosuppressed patient can occur with more aggressive forms such as encephalitis and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Our case confirms what is described in the literature; patients with IBD, particularly patients with CD receiving thiopurine therapy, who present 5 d of fever and cervical lymphadenopathy or previous evidence of lymphopenia should be screened for HLH.

  10. Discovery of innovative therapies for rare immune-mediated inflammatory diseases via off-label prescription of biologics: the case of IL-6 receptor blockade in Castleman’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eMusters

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biologics have revolutionized the field of clinical immunology and proven to be both effective and safe in common immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, and various haematological disorders. However, in patients with rare, severe IMIDs failing on standard therapies it is virtually impossible to conduct randomized controlled trials. Therefore, biologics are usually prescribed off-label in these often severely ill patients. Unfortunately, off-label prescription is sometimes hampered in these diseases due to a lack of reimbursement that is often based on a presumed lack of evidence for effectiveness. In the present article will discuss that off-label prescription of biologics can be a good way to discover new treatments for rare diseases. This will be ilustrated using a case of multicentric Castleman’s disease, an immune-mediated lymphoproliferative disorder, in which off-label tocilizumab (humanized anti-IL-6 receptor blocking antibody treatment resulted in remarkable clinical improvement. Furthermore, we will give recommendations for monitoring efficacy and safety of biologic treatment in rare IMIDs, including the use of registries. In conclusion, we put forward that innovative treatments for rare IMIDs can be discovered via off-label prescription of biologicals, provided that this is based on rational arguments including knowledge of the pathophysiology of the disease.

  11. TAFRO syndrome: New subtype of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordan Srkalovic

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (CD describes a group of three rare and poorly understood lymphoproliferative disorders that have heterogeneous clinical symptoms and common lymph node histopathological features. Unicentric CD (UCD involves a single region of enlarged nodes. Multicentric CD (MCD involves multiple regions of enlarged lymph nodes, constitutional symptoms, and organ dysfunction due to a cytokine storm often including interleukin 6. MCD is further divided into Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8-associated MCD, which occurs in immunocompromised individuals, and HHV-8-negative/idiopathic MCD (iMCD. Recently, iMCD has been further sub-divided into patients with TAFRO syndrome, which involves thrombocytopenia (T, anasarca (A, fevers (F, reticulin myelofibrosis (R, organomegaly (O, and normal or only slightly elevated immunoglobulin levels, and those who do not have TAFRO syndrome. Non-TAFRO iMCD patients typically have thrombocytosis, less severe fluid accumulation, and hypergammaglobulinemia. iMCD patients with TAFRO syndrome may have a worse prognosis, but more research is needed.

  12. Visceral Marek's disease in white-peafowl (Pavo cristatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R. Blume

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Marek's disease (MD is a lymphoproliferative disorder caused by Gallid herpesvirus 2 (MDV that infects mainly domestic gallinaceous birds although wild birds may occasionally be affected. The current report describes the anatomopathological and molecular findings of a case of MD in a white-peafowl (Pavo cristatus. The signs included apathy, hyporexia, and diarrhea. Grossly, 0.5 to 1.5cm in diameter, yellow, soft nodules were observed in the skeletal muscle, lung, kidney, air sacs, small intestine, heart, ovary, ventriculus, and proventriculus. Microscopically, numerous atypical round neoplastic cells were noted. The molecular detection of MDV DNA was implemented to amplify part of the meq gene and products were sequenced for the phylogenetic analysis. Template DNA was obtained from tissues of the affected bird and from blood of all the gallinaceous birds of the Zoo. The expected amplicon for the partial amplification of MDV meq gene was obtained and the amplicons were sequenced. Sequences obtained enabled grouping the strain (accession no. KT768121 with MDV serotype 1 strains from the GenBank. Based on the anatomopathological and molecular findings, the diagnosis of MD in a white-peafowl was reached, and to the authors' knowledge, no previous report regarding MD was published in Pavo cristatus.

  13. Endocrine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome (PCOS) Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Primary Hyperparathyroidism Prolactinoma Thyroid Tests Turner Syndrome Contact Us The National ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la ...

  14. A Comprehensive Review of Celiac Disease/Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Brian P; Williams, Emmanuelle; Clarke, Kofi

    2018-06-02

    . Simple algorithms for care based on a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach are proposed. Refractory and non-responsive celiac diseases in the setting of a gluten-free diet are examined as are novel non-dietary therapies. Finally, the association of other disease states including psychiatric illness, infertility, lymphoproliferative malignancy, and mortality is explored with special attention paid to autoimmune and atopic disease.

  15. Phase II Study Evaluating Busulfan and Fludarabine as Preparative Therapy in Adults With Hematopoietic Disorders Undergoing MUD SCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-22

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplasia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Severe Aplastic Anemia; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Advanced Myeloproliferative Disease

  16. Ribbing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukkada, Philson J; Franklin, Teenu; Rajeswaran, Rangasami; Joseph, Santhosh

    2010-01-01

    Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc

  17. Human NF-κB1 Haploinsufficiency and Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Disease-Molecular Mechanisms and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeger, Birgit; Serwas, Nina Kathrin; Boztug, Kaan

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells 1 (NF-κB1)-related human primary immune deficiencies have initially been characterized as defining a subgroup of common variable immunodeficiencies (CVIDs), representing intrinsic B-cell disorders with antibody deficiency and recurrent infections of various kind. Recent evidence indicates that NF-κB1 haploinsufficiency underlies a variable type of combined immunodeficiency (CID) affecting both B and T lymphocyte compartments, with a broadened spectrum of disease manifestations, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced lymphoproliferative disease and immediate life-threatening consequences. As part of this review series focused on EBV-related primary immunodeficiencies, we discuss the current clinical and molecular understanding of monoallelic NFKB1 germline mutations with special focus on the emerging context of EBV-associated disease. We outline mechanistic implications of dysfunctional NF-κB1 in B and T cells and discuss the fatal relation of impaired T-cell function with the inability to clear EBV infections. Finally, we compare common and suggested treatment angles in the context of this complex disease.

  18. Epstein-Barr virus myelitis and Castleman's disease in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balderacchi Jasminka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Few cases of Epstein-Barr virus myelitis have been described in the literature. Multi-centric Castleman's disease is a lymphoproliferative disorder that is well known for its associations with the human immunodeficiency virus, human herpes virus 8, and Kaposi's sarcoma. The concurrent presentation of these two diseases in a patient at the same time is extremely unusual. Case Presentation We describe the case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man with acquired immune deficiency syndrome who presented with fever, weight loss and diffuse lymphadenopathy, and was diagnosed with multi-centric Castleman's disease. He presented three weeks later with lower extremity weakness and urinary retention, at which time cerebrospinal fluid contained lymphocytic pleocytosis and elevated protein. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal spinal cord signal intensity over several cervical and thoracic segments, suggesting the diagnosis of myelitis. Our patient was ultimately diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus myelitis, as Epstein-Barr virus DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of multi-centric Castleman's disease followed by acute Epstein-Barr virus myelitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient. Clinicians caring for human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients should be vigilant about monitoring patients with increasing lymphadenopathy, prompting thorough diagnostic investigations when necessary.

  19. Prevalence of Epstein Barr Virus Infection and Effecting Factors in Renal Allograft Recipients for Controlling Ptld in Imam Khomeini Hospital from 2001 to 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Salari lak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: EBV is categorized as Herpesviridans and by nature is a Lymph crypto Virus. Studies have demonstrated that EBV will infect 80 to 90 percent of patients during the first year and there is a close relation between kidney malfunction and EBV infection. Reactivation of the virus excites the immune system, and ultimately leads to rejection of kidney. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and identify the affecting factors of EBV infection among renal allograft recipients. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 68 renal allograft recipients hospitalized in Imam Khomeini medical center from 2001 to 2004. Blood sample was taken from subjects before kidney transplantation and it was being taken every 3 months during the first year after transplantation. Elisa Serologic tests were implemented to determine the antibody virus EBV antigens, such as VCAIgM, VCAIgG and EBNAIgG. Information about patients was obtained from their medical records and necessary forms were filled. Types of prescribed immunosuppressive agents and the status of kidney rejection was closely observed to identify the factors affecting rejection. Results: This study showed that EBV infection was previously developed in 85.3 %of subjects (58 patients and Active Infection was found in14.7 % of subjects (10 patients. EBV Seronegativity and Primary infection was not found in this sturdy. Active infection and secondary EBV was detected in 58.8% of subjects (40 patients during the first year after transplantation. 95.6 % (65 of recipients before transplantation were seropositive for EBNAIgG and after transplantation, 100% (All of them were positive. 92.6 % (63 of recipients before transplantation were seropositive forVCAIgG and after transplantation, 96.9% (66 of them were positive. 95.6% of recipients (65 of them were seropositive for EBNAIgG before transplantation, while after transplantation the rate was 100% (all of the recipients. Active and secondary infection was detected in 65.8% of recipients (23 patients receiving Cyclosporine, Prednisolone and Azatioprine and in 33.3 %of patients receiving Cyclosporine, Prednisolone and MMF and in 57.9 %of patients receivingCyclosporine and Prednisolone. During the first year after transplantation 19 of patients developed an acute rejection of which 6 (31.5% had history of previous infection and the rest 13 (68.5% were infected by active virus. On comparison of this group with those who did not develop acute rejection, there was no statistical significant relation between type of infection and the rate of the acute rejection. Although reactivated EBV was detected in 53.9 % of recipients (14 of them who were treated by ALG, there was no statistical significant difference from those 27 recipients who did not get ALG. Conclusion: Just like other countries, this study indicates the activity pattern, in which this virus develops from hidden to active and then secondary during the time axis after transplantation. To determine the cause of reactivation of virus and secondary EBV, all related affecting factors such as ALG, acute rejection and immunosuppressive drugs were studied, but none of them played an effective role in reactivation of the virus

  20. Atypical presentation of multicentric Castleman disease in a pediatric patient: pleural and pericardial effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Alkim Oden; Basaran, Ozge; Ozyoruk, Derya; Han, Unsal; Sayli, Tulin; Cakar, Nilgun

    2016-06-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare poorly understood lymphoproliferative disorder. Pediatric onset CD has been reported before. However, most of them have benign unicentric pattern. Multicentric CD (MCD) is quite rare in children. Herein, we report a 13-year-old adolescent boy with MCD of the hyaline vascular variant presenting with pleural and pericardial effusion, which is an uncommon presentation. MCD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pleural and/or pericardial effusion with unexplained lymph nodes in children. What is Known •Pediatric Castleman disease (CD) most commonly occurs in the unicentric form, which typically is asymptomatic and cured by lymph node excision. •The diagnosis of MCD can be difficult owing to the heterogeneity of presentation and potential for nonspecific multisystem involvement. What is New •A 13-year-old adolescent boy was diagnosed with MCD of the hyaline vascular variant presenting with pleural and pericardial effusion, which is an uncommon presentation. •In a pediatric patient with fever, pleural-pericardial effusion and multiple lymph nodes, MCD should be considered in differantial diagnosis.

  1. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... body. Approximately 3 million American men have some type of prostate disease. The most common prostate diseases ...

  2. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But some of them can make you sick. Infectious diseases are diseases that are caused by germs. There ... many different ways that you can get an infectious disease: Through direct contact with a person who is ...

  3. Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semantic dementia; Dementia - semantic; Frontotemporal dementia; FTD; Arnold Pick disease; 3R tauopathy ... doctors tell Pick disease apart from Alzheimer disease. (Memory loss is often the main, and earliest, symptom ...

  4. Prion Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Prion Diseases Prion diseases are a related group of ... deer and elk. Why Is the Study of Prion Diseases a Priority for NIAID? Much about TSE ...

  5. Periodontal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases. The primary research focus was on oral bacteria. Periodontal diseases were thought to begin when chalky white ... tools to target their treatment specifically to the bacteria that trigger periodontal disease. At the same time, because biofilms form ...

  6. [Acute Chagas' disease: transmission routes, clinical aspects and response to specific therapy in diagnosed cases in an urban center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikanai-Yasuda, M A; Lopes, M H; Tolezano, J E; Umezawa, E; Amato Neto, V; Barreto, A C; Higaki, Y; Moreira, A A; Funayama, G; Barone, A A

    1990-01-01

    The authors report clinical features and therapeutic response of 24 outpatients with acute Chagas' disease, and 3 in the initial chronic phase, referred to the Clinic for Infectious and Parasitic Diseases of the FMUSP "Clínicas" Hospital between 1974 and 1987. The following transmission routes were involved: triatominae in 7 cases, blood transfusion in 9, kidney transplantation and/or blood transfusion in 4, accidental in 1, oral route in 3, probably breast feeding in 1, congenital or breast feeding in 1, and congenital or blood transfusion in 1. Six patients infected by triatominac acquired the disease between 1974 and 1980 and one in 1987. The blood transfusion infected patients acquired the disease in Greater São Paulo, seven of whom after 1983. The acute phase Chagas' disease was oligosymptomatic in 4 patients: three of such patients being immunocompromised by drugs or other diseases. Another two adult immunocompromised patients developed myocarditis and congestive heart failure. Clinical features were severe in 5 from 6 children under two years, irrespective of the transmission route. Evaluation of the acute phase patients treated with benznidazol (4-10 mg/kg/day) showed: therapeutic failure in 4/16 (25.0%); possible cure in 9/16 (53.2%) and inconclusive results in 3/16 (18.8%). The antibody and complement-mediated lysis reaction was in keeping with the xenodiagnosis in 18/22 cases, having shown negative results after treatment earlier than classical serological reactions. One aplastic anaemia patient receiving corticosteroid presented lymphoproliferative disease 6 years after being treated with benznidazol for acute Chagas' disease.

  7. Plasma EBV microRNAs in paediatric renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Jaythoon; Dean, Jonathan; De Gascun, Cillian F; Riordan, Michael; Sweeney, Clodagh; Connell, Jeff; Awan, Atif

    2018-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was the first human virus identified to express microRNA (miRNA). To date, 44 mature miRNAs are encoded for within the EBV genome. EBV miRNAs have not been profiled in paediatric renal transplant recipients. In this study, we investigated circulating EBV miRNA profiles as novel biomarkers in paediatric renal transplant patients. Forty-two microRNAs encoded within 2 EBV open reading frames (BART and BHRF) were examined in renal transplant recipients who resolved EBV infection (REI) or maintained chronic high viral loads (CHL), and in non-transplant patients with acute infectious mononucleosis (IM). Plasma EBV-miR-BART2-5p was present in higher numbers of IM (7/8) and CHL (7/10) compared to REI (7/12) patients. A trend was observed between the numbers of plasma EBV miRNAs expressed and EBV viral load (p < 0.07). Several EBV-miRs including BART7-3p, 15, 9-3p, 11-3p, 1-3p and 3-3p were detected in IM and CHL patients only. The lytic EBV-miRs, BHRF1-2-3p and 1-1, indicating active viral replication, were detected in IM patients only. One CHL patient developed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) after several years and analysis of 10 samples over a 30-month period showed an average 24-fold higher change in plasma EBV-miR-BART2-5p compared to the CHL group and 110-fold higher change compared to the REI group. Our results suggest that EBV-miR-BART2-5p, which targets the stress-induced immune ligand MICB to escape recognition and elimination by NK cells, may have a role in sustaining high EBV viral loads in CHL paediatric kidney transplant recipients.

  8. Impact of siltuximab on patient-related outcomes in multicentric Castleman’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitenga J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jenna Sitenga,1 Gregory Aird,1 Aabra Ahmed,1 Peter T Silberstein2 1Division of Education, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, USA; 2Division of Hematology/Oncology, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, USA Abstract: Multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD is a rare, widespread lymphoproliferative disorder and a life-threatening disease involving hyperactivity of the immune system, excessive proinflammatory cytokine release, immune cell proliferation, and organ system dysfunction. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a cytokine that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of MCD, as it is involved in the synthesis of acute-phase reactants and aids in the induction of B-cell proliferation. Siltuximab is an anti-IL-6 chimeric monoclonal antibody that acts as a novel treatment modality to bind to IL-6 with high affinity, thus neutralizing the cytokine bioactivity and inhibiting B-cell proliferation. Clinical trials with siltuximab have shown early clinical promise for patients with MCD for many years, leading to recent US Food and Drug Administration approval as a novel agent for the treatment of MCD. Here, a systematic review was conducted to include 171 cases of MCD patients treated with siltuximab. While traditional treatment methods were able to achieve a 5-year survival rate of only 55%–77%, results of siltuximab treatment demonstrated 5-year survival rates of nearly 96.4% (only 2 deaths reported out of 55 patients with follow-up data. Ultimately, the results from multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that siltuximab is extremely efficacious in alleviating disease symptoms (fatigue, pain, and lymphadenopathy while simultaneously achieving disease remission, thus extending progression-free survival for years longer than the average 5-year survival rates for MCD. Keywords: Castleman’s disease, angiofollicular lymph node hyperplasia, giant lymph node hyperplasia, siltuximab, IL-6 receptor

  9. Addison's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of potassium and low levels of sodium. What causes Addison’s disease? Addison’s disease is caused by injury to your ... example, a problem with your pituitary gland can cause secondary Addison’s disease. Or, you may develop Addison’s disease if you ...

  10. Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 survey of clinical practice patterns in the management of Graves' disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2012 Dec;97( ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  11. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  12. Imaging findings in children with proliferative disorders following multivisceral transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L. [Tufts Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Kim, Heung Bae [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Harris, Marian H.; Vargas, Sara O. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Edward Y. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Multivisceral transplantation represents an important treatment option for children with intestinal failure. The attendant immunosuppression can lead to a spectrum of cellular proliferations including benign and malignant smooth muscle tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders, many related to cellular dysregulation from Epstein-Barr virus infection. The purpose of this study is to investigate the rates of post-transplantation proliferative disorders among children with multivisceral transplantation and to characterize the imaging and pathological features of these disorders. We identified all consecutive children who underwent multivisceral transplant from August 2004 to October 2011 with at least 27 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. We reviewed medical records to determine the underlying causes of the multivisceral transplant, age at transplantation, onset of neoplasm development, and outcome. Two pediatric radiologists reviewed all imaging studies independently and diagnosis of disease was made by consensus interpretation. Pathological specimens were reviewed for histopathological findings of post-transplantation neoplasm in this pediatric patient population. The study population consisted of 14 consecutive pediatric patients (7 boys and 7 girls; mean age 26 months, range 4-113 months). Of these 14 children, 4 (29%) developed histologically confirmed post-transplant neoplasms at a mean time of 2.4 years after multivisceral transplantation. Types of neoplasms included post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in three (21%) and Epstein-Barr-virus-associated smooth muscle tumor in two (14%). (One child developed both neoplasms following transplantation). Both children with smooth muscle tumor associated with Epstein-Barr virus presented with characteristic hypointense solid masses with peripheral rim enhancement on cross-sectional imaging studies. The mortality rate of children who developed post-transplant neoplasms was higher than that of those

  13. Imaging findings in children with proliferative disorders following multivisceral transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L.; Kim, Heung Bae; Harris, Marian H.; Vargas, Sara O.; Zurakowski, David; Lee, Edward Y.

    2015-01-01

    Multivisceral transplantation represents an important treatment option for children with intestinal failure. The attendant immunosuppression can lead to a spectrum of cellular proliferations including benign and malignant smooth muscle tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders, many related to cellular dysregulation from Epstein-Barr virus infection. The purpose of this study is to investigate the rates of post-transplantation proliferative disorders among children with multivisceral transplantation and to characterize the imaging and pathological features of these disorders. We identified all consecutive children who underwent multivisceral transplant from August 2004 to October 2011 with at least 27 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. We reviewed medical records to determine the underlying causes of the multivisceral transplant, age at transplantation, onset of neoplasm development, and outcome. Two pediatric radiologists reviewed all imaging studies independently and diagnosis of disease was made by consensus interpretation. Pathological specimens were reviewed for histopathological findings of post-transplantation neoplasm in this pediatric patient population. The study population consisted of 14 consecutive pediatric patients (7 boys and 7 girls; mean age 26 months, range 4-113 months). Of these 14 children, 4 (29%) developed histologically confirmed post-transplant neoplasms at a mean time of 2.4 years after multivisceral transplantation. Types of neoplasms included post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in three (21%) and Epstein-Barr-virus-associated smooth muscle tumor in two (14%). (One child developed both neoplasms following transplantation). Both children with smooth muscle tumor associated with Epstein-Barr virus presented with characteristic hypointense solid masses with peripheral rim enhancement on cross-sectional imaging studies. The mortality rate of children who developed post-transplant neoplasms was higher than that of those

  14. Reduced Intensity Preparative Regimen Followed by Stem Cell Transplant (FAB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-29

    Myelodysplastic and Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Multiple Myeloma; Plasma Cell Dyscrasia; Lymphoproliferative Disorders; Hematologic Diseases

  15. A Challenging Diagnosis of IgG4-Related Disease When Understanding Limitations of Laboratory Testing Was Pivotal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Y. Y. Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old man was incidentally found on a CT scan to have lymphadenopathy and bilateral kidney enlargement suggestive of infiltrative renal disease. He was largely asymptomatic but had bilateral salivary and lacrimal gland enlargement. A grossly elevated serum IgG (>70 g/L with concomitant suppression of other immunoglobulins, a small IgG restriction, and a parotid biopsy revealing lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with slight kappa light chain excess all suggested a lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD. The diagnostic workup was further confounded by a normal serum IgG4 concentration. Moreover, bone marrow and renal biopsies did not reveal evidence of LPD. Discussion with the laboratory not only clarified that the markedly increased total IgG could not be accounted for by the small IgG restriction, but also identified a discrepancy in the IgG4 measurement. Repeat analysis of a follow-up sample revealed an elevated IgG4 of 5.94 (reference interval: 0.039–0.864 g/L, which prompted a repeat parotid biopsy that showed predominant IgG4+ lymphocytic infiltrates. Despite the deluding presentations, a final diagnosis of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD was made based on elevated serum IgG4 concentrations and histopathological findings. This case highlights the importance of recognizing limitations of laboratory testing and the benefit of close communications among clinical subspecialties and the laboratory.

  16. First Occurrence of Plasmablastic Lymphoma in Adenosine Deaminase-Deficient Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease Patient and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Migliavacca

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency disease (ADA-SCID is a primary immune deficiency characterized by mutations in the ADA gene resulting in accumulation of toxic compounds affecting multiple districts. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT from a matched donor and hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy are the preferred options for definitive treatment. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT is used to manage the disease in the short term, while a decreased efficacy is reported in the medium-long term. To date, eight cases of lymphomas have been described in ADA-SCID patients. Here we report the first case of plasmablastic lymphoma occurring in a young adult with ADA-SCID on long-term ERT, which turned out to be Epstein–Barr virus associated. The patient previously received infusions of genetically modified T cells. A cumulative analysis of the eight published cases of lymphoma from 1992 to date, and the case here described, reveals a high mortality (89%. The most common form is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which predominantly occurs in extra nodal sites. Seven cases occurred in patients on ERT and two after haploidentical HSCT. The significant incidence of immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorders and poor survival of patients developing this complication highlight the priority in finding a prompt curative treatment for ADA-SCID.

  17. Differential Disease Susceptibilities in Experimentally Reptarenavirus-Infected Boa Constrictors and Ball Pythons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, David; Garcia, Valentina E.; Layton, Marylee L.; Hoon-Hanks, Laura L.; Boback, Scott M.; Keel, M. Kevin; Drazenovich, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inclusion body disease (IBD) is an infectious disease originally described in captive snakes. It has traditionally been diagnosed by the presence of large eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions and is associated with neurological, gastrointestinal, and lymphoproliferative disorders. Previously, we identified and established a culture system for a novel lineage of arenaviruses isolated from boa constrictors diagnosed with IBD. Although ample circumstantial evidence suggested that these viruses, now known as reptarenaviruses, cause IBD, there has been no formal demonstration of disease causality since their discovery. We therefore conducted a long-term challenge experiment to test the hypothesis that reptarenaviruses cause IBD. We infected boa constrictors and ball pythons by cardiac injection of purified virus. We monitored the progression of viral growth in tissues, blood, and environmental samples. Infection produced dramatically different disease outcomes in snakes of the two species. Ball pythons infected with Golden Gate virus (GoGV) and with another reptarenavirus displayed severe neurological signs within 2 months, and viral replication was detected only in central nervous system tissues. In contrast, GoGV-infected boa constrictors remained free of clinical signs for 2 years, despite high viral loads and the accumulation of large intracellular inclusions in multiple tissues, including the brain. Inflammation was associated with infection in ball pythons but not in boa constrictors. Thus, reptarenavirus infection produces inclusions and inclusion body disease, although inclusions per se are neither necessarily associated with nor required for disease. Although the natural distribution of reptarenaviruses has yet to be described, the different outcomes of infection may reflect differences in geographical origin. IMPORTANCE New DNA sequencing technologies have made it easier than ever to identify the sequences of microorganisms in diseased tissues, i

  18. Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. If you ... affected. It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types ...

  19. Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread to the nervous system, causing facial paralysis ( Bell's palsy ), or meningitis. The last stage of Lyme disease ... My Lyme Disease Risk? Bug Bites and Stings Bell's Palsy Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Meningitis View more About ...

  20. Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stargardt disease, lipofuscin accumulates abnormally. The Foundation Fighting Blindness supports research studying lipofuscin build up and ways to prevent it. A decrease in color perception also occurs in Stargardt disease. This is ...

  1. Refsum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ...

  2. Addison Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... A problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  3. Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely need to plan for their loved one's future care. The final phase of the disease may ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  4. Menkes Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Menkes disease is caused by a defective gene named ATPTA ... arteries. Weakened bones (osteoporosis) may result in fractures. × Definition Menkes disease is caused by a defective gene named ATPTA ...

  5. Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Fabry disease is caused by the lack of or faulty ... severe symptoms similar to males with the disorder. × Definition Fabry disease is caused by the lack of or faulty ...

  6. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  7. Liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  8. Digestive Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lactose Intolerance Liver Disease Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel Pancreatitis Peptic Ulcers (Stomach ... and outreach materials. Clinical Trials Clinical trials offer hope for many people and opportunities to help researchers ...

  9. Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Kidney Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Kidney Disease What's in ... Coping With Kidney Conditions Print What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  10. Sandhoff Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which had been particularly high in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent, but Sandhoff disease ... which had been particularly high in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent, but Sandhoff disease ...

  11. Fifth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and mouth ...

  12. Cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazunori

    1992-01-01

    This paper is aimed to discuss the involvement of delayed radiation effects of A-bomb exposure in cardiovascular diseases. First, the relationship between radiation and cardiovascular diseases is reviewed in the literature. Animal experiments have confirmed the relationship between ionizing radiation and vascular lesions. There are many reports which describe ischemic heart disease, cervical and cerebrovascular diseases, and peripheral disease occurring after radiation therapy. The previous A-bomb survivor cohort studies, i.e., the RERF Life Span Study and Adult Health Study, have dealt with the mortality rate from cardiovascular diseases, the prevalence or incidence of cardiovascular diseases, pathological findings, clinical observation of arteriosclerosis, ECG abnormality, blood pressure abnormality, and cardiac function. The following findings have been suggested: (1) A-bomb exposure is likely to be involved in the mortality rate and incidence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases; (2) similarly, the involvement of A-bomb exposure is considered in the prevalence of the arch of aorta; (3) ECG abnormality corresponding to ischemic heart disease may reflect the involvement of A-bomb exposure. To confirm the above findings, further studies are required on the basis of more accurate information and the appropriate number of cohort samples. Little evidence has been presented for the correlation between A-bomb exposure and both rheumatic heart disease and congenital heart disease. (N.K.) 88 refs

  13. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penaranda P, Edgar; Spinel B, Nestor; Restrepo, Jose F; Rondon H, Federico; Millan S, Alberto; Iglesias G Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We present a review article on the autoinflammatory diseases, narrating its historical origin and describing the protein and molecular structure of the Inflammasome, the current classification of the autoinflammatory diseases and a description of the immuno genetics and clinical characteristics more important of every disease.

  14. Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  15. Gaucher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please enable JavaScript. Gaucher disease is a rare genetic disorder in which a person lacks an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase (GBA). Causes Gaucher disease is rare in the general population. People of Eastern and Central European (Ashkenazi) Jewish heritage are more likely to have this disease. It ...

  16. X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia disease: a combined immune deficiency with magnesium defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravell, Juan; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Lenardo, Michael

    2014-12-01

    To describe the role of the magnesium transporter 1 (MAGT1) in the pathogenesis of 'X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, and neoplasia' (XMEN) disease and its clinical implications. The magnesium transporter protein MAGT1 participates in the intracellular magnesium ion (Mg) homeostasis and facilitates a transient Mg influx induced by the activation of the T-cell receptor. Loss-of-function mutations in MAGT1 cause an immunodeficiency named 'XMEN syndrome', characterized by CD4 lymphopenia, chronic EBV infection, and EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders. Patients with XMEN disease have impaired T-cell activation and decreased cytolytic function of natural killer (NK) and CD8 T cells because of decreased expression of the NK stimulatory receptor 'natural-killer group 2, member D' (NKG2D). Patients may have defective specific antibody responses secondary to T cell dysfunction, but B cells have not been shown to be directly affected by mutations in MAGT1. XMEN disease has revealed a novel role for free intracellular magnesium in the immune system. Further understanding of the MAGT1 signaling pathway may lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  17. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection and disease in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendoza, Carmen; Caballero, Estrella; Aguilera, Antonio; Requena, Silvia; de Lejarazu, Raúl Ortiz; Pirón, María; González, Rocío; Jiménez, Ana; Roc, Lourdes; Treviño, Ana; Benito, Rafael; Fernández-Alonso, Miriam; Aguinaga, Aitziber; Rodríguez, Carmen; García-Costa, Juan; Blanco, Lidia; Ramos, José M; Calderón, Enrique; Eirós, José M; Sauleda, Silvia; Barreiro, Pablo; Soriano, Vicente

    2017-07-31

    : Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is a neglected disease despite roughly 15 million people are chronically infected worldwide. Lifelong less than 10% of carriers develop life-threatening diseases, mostly a subacute myelopathy known as tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) and a lymphoproliferative disorder named adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). HTLV-1 is efficiently transmitted perinatally (breastfeeding), sexually (more from men to women) and parenterally (transfusions, injection drug user (IDU), and transplants). To date there is neither prophylactic vaccine nor effective antiviral therapy. A total of 327 cases of HTLV-1 infection had been reported at the HTLV-1 Spanish registry until December 2016, of whom 34 had been diagnosed with TSP and 25 with ATL. Overall 62% were Latin American immigrants and 13% were persons of African origin. The incidence of HTLV-1 in Spain has remained stable for nearly a decade with 20-25 new cases yearly. Of the 21 newly diagnosed HTLV-1 cases during year 2016, one was a native Spaniard pregnant woman, and four presented with symptomatic disease, including three with ATL and one with TSP. Underdiagnosis of HTLV-1 in Spain must be high (iceberg model), which may account for the disproportionate high rate of symptomatic cases (almost 20%) and the late recognition of preventable HTLV-1 transmissions in special populations, such as newborns and transplant recipients. Our current estimate is of 10 000 persons living with HTLV-1 infection in Spain. Given the large flux of immigrants and visitors from HTLV-1 endemic regions to Spain, the expansion of HTLV-1 screening policies is warranted. At this time, it seems worth recommending HTLV testing to all donor/recipient organ transplants and pregnant women regardless place of birth. Although current leukoreduction procedures largely prevent HTLV-1 transmission by blood transfusions, HTLV testing of all first-time donors should be cost-effective contributing to unveil

  18. A de novo whole gene deletion of XIAP detected by exome sequencing analysis in very early onset inflammatory bowel disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Dawany, Noor; Martinez, Alejandro; Martinez, Alejuandro; Grochowski, Christopher M; Maurer, Kelly; Rappaport, Eric; Piccoli, David A; Baldassano, Robert N; Mamula, Petar; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Devoto, Marcella

    2015-11-18

    Children with very early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEO-IBD), those diagnosed at less than 5 years of age, are a unique population. A subset of these patients present with a distinct phenotype and more severe disease than older children and adults. Host genetics is thought to play a more prominent role in this young population, and monogenic defects in genes related to primary immunodeficiencies are responsible for the disease in a small subset of patients with VEO-IBD. We report a child who presented at 3 weeks of life with very early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEO-IBD). He had a complicated disease course and remained unresponsive to medical and surgical therapy. The refractory nature of his disease, together with his young age of presentation, prompted utilization of whole exome sequencing (WES) to detect an underlying monogenic primary immunodeficiency and potentially target therapy to the identified defect. Copy number variation analysis (CNV) was performed using the eXome-Hidden Markov Model. Whole exome sequencing revealed 1,380 nonsense and missense variants in the patient. Plausible candidate variants were not detected following analysis of filtered variants, therefore, we performed CNV analysis of the WES data, which led us to identify a de novo whole gene deletion in XIAP. This is the first reported whole gene deletion in XIAP, the causal gene responsible for XLP2 (X-linked lymphoproliferative Disease 2). XLP2 is a syndrome resulting in VEO-IBD and can increase susceptibility to hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). This identification allowed the patient to be referred for bone marrow transplantation, potentially curative for his disease and critical to prevent the catastrophic sequela of HLH. This illustrates the unique etiology of VEO-IBD, and the subsequent effects on therapeutic options. This cohort requires careful and thorough evaluation for monogenic defects and primary immunodeficiencies.

  19. Dent disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina R Rus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dent disease is an x-linked disorder of proximal renal tubular dysfunction that occurs almost exclusively in males. It is characterized by significant, mostly low molecular weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, and chronic kidney disease. Signs and symptoms of this condition appear in early childhood and worsen over time. There are two forms of Dent disease, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and pattern of signs and symptoms (type 1 and type 2. Dent disease 2 is characterized by the features described above and also associated with extrarenal abnormalities (they include mild intellectual disability, hypotonia, and cataract. Some researchers consider Dent disease 2 to be a mild variant of a similar disorder called Lowe syndrome.We represent a case of a 3-year old boy with significant proteinuria in the nephrotic range and hypercalciuria. We confirmed Dent disease type 1 by genetic analysis.

  20. Morgellons Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-01-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination sho...

  1. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  2. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  3. Peyronie's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick L; Levine, Laurence A

    2007-11-01

    Peyronie's disease is a psychologically and physically devastating disorder that is manifest by a fibrous inelastic scar of the tunica albuginea, resulting in palpable penile scar in the flaccid condition and causing penile deformity, including penile curvature, hinging, narrowing, shortening, and painful erections. Peyronie's disease remains a considerable therapeutic dilemma even to today's practicing physicians.

  4. Parasitogenic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Radiological semiotics of parasitogenic diseases of the intestinal tract is presented. The problem of radiological examination in the case of the diseases consists in the determination of the large intestine state, depth and extension of lesions, and also in solution of treatment efficiency problem

  5. Batten Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the country. NIH is the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. Much of NINDS’ research on Batten disease and the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses focuses on gaining a better understanding of the disease, gene therapy, and developing novel drugs to treat the disorders. ...

  6. Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ridding your body of toxic substances. Liver disease can be inherited (genetic) or caused by a variety of factors that damage the ... that you can't stay still. Causes Liver disease has many ... or semen, contaminated food or water, or close contact with a person who is ...

  7. Leigh's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-linked form of Leigh’s disease, a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet may be recommended. View Full Treatment Information Definition Leigh's disease is a rare inherited neurometabolic disorder that affects the central nervous system. This progressive disorder begins in infants between the ...

  8. Meniere's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ears and head) special tests that check your balance and how well your ears work. Can Meniere’s disease be prevented or avoided? Because ... find ways to limit the stress in your life or learn how to deal with stress ... Let your family, friends, and co-workers know about the disease. Tell ...

  9. Parasitic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    Foundations of roentgenological semiotics of parasitic diseases of lungs, w hich are of the greatest practical value, are presented. Roentgenological pictu res of the following parasitic diseases: hydatid and alveolar echinococcosis, pa ragonimiasis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiasis, bilharziasis (Schistosomias is) of lungs, are considered

  10. Angara disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... 1988). Since the disease emerged in this specific geographic area, HHS was initially referred to as “Angara. Disease”. The disease is caused by an avian adenovirus serotype-iv in Pakistan. This virus is responsible for development of intranuclear inclusion bodies in the cells of liver, pancreas and kidneys.

  11. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... monitor a disease) for HD. A large and related NINDS-supported study aims to identify additional genetic factors in people that influence the course of the disease. Other research hopes to identify variations in the genomes of individuals with HD that may point to new targets ...

  12. Coeliac disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-08

    Mar 8, 2013 ... Two factors are involved in the development of coeliac disease, namely the ... degradation by gastric, pancreatic and intestinal brush ... epithelial layer with chronic inflammatory cells in patients ... Coeliac disease increases the risk of malignancies, such as small bowel adenocarcinoma and enteropathy-.

  13. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  14. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It

  15. Thyroid diseases and cerebrovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, A.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Stam, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Acute cerebral ischemia has been described in different diseases of the thyroid gland, and not only as a result of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation and cardioembolic stroke. The purpose of this review is to summarize the studies on the relationship between thyroid diseases and

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus negative Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoproliferative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fossati, S; Boneschi, [No Value; Ferrucci, S; Brambilla, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The concomitant occurrence of more than one primary neoplasm in the same individual has led researchers to seek possible common etiopathogenetic factors. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a multicentric neoplasm of vascular origin and perhaps viral etiology. Four forms of KS are known: classic or

  17. Lymphoproliferative disorders in non-AIDS associated Kaposi's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The association of the non-AIDS-related, classic fonn of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) with secondary malignancies, especially Iymphoproliferative disorders, has frequently been noted. However, in endemic: African-type KS, such an association has been reported only rarely. A review of 62 non-AIDS-related cases of KS treated ...

  18. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies...

  19. Morgellons Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-04-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination showed only mild lymphocytic infiltration, and failed to reveal evidence of any microorganism. The polymerase chain reaction for Borrelia burgdorferi was negative in her serum.

  20. [Infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis-Taillard, Caroline; de Vallière, Serge; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-07

    In 2008, several publications have highlighted the role of climate change and globalization on the epidemiology of infectious diseases. Studies have shown the extension towards Europe of diseases such as Crimea-Congo fever (Kosovo, Turkey and Bulgaria), leismaniosis (Cyprus) and chikungunya virus infection (Italy). The article also contains comments on Plasmodium knowlesi, a newly identified cause of severe malaria in humans, as well as an update on human transmission of the H5NI avian influenza virus. It also mentions new data on Bell's palsy as well as two vaccines (varicella-zoster and pneumococcus), and provides a list of recent guidelines for the treatment of common infectious diseases.

  1. Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Ramanath N; Georgeson, Keith E

    2008-11-01

    Hirschsprung disease is a relatively common condition managed by pediatric surgeons. Significant advances have been made in understanding its etiologies in the last decade, especially with the explosion of molecular genetic techniques and early diagnosis. The surgical management has progressed from a two- or three-stage procedure to a primary operation. More recently, definitive surgery for Hirschsprung disease through minimally invasive techniques has gained popularity. In neonates, the advancement of treatment strategies for Hirschsprung disease continues with reduced patient morbidity and improved outcomes.

  2. Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Crohn\\'s disease is a disorder mediated by T lymphocytes which arises in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of a breakdown in the regulatory constraints on mucosal immune responses to enteric bacteria. Regulation of immune reactivity to enteric antigens has improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of Crohn\\'s disease, and has expanded therapeutic options for patients with this disorder. Disease heterogeneity is probable, with various underlying defects associated with a similar pathophysiological outcome. Although most conventional drug treatments are directed at modification of host response, therapeutic manipulation of the enteric flora is becoming a realistic option.

  3. Norries disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini J

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-month-old male infant was found to have Norrie′s disease. The clinical presentation and detailed histological features diagnostic of the disease are discussed. This is the first authentic, histologically proven case of Norrie′s disease from India. The absence of hearing loss and mental retardation at the time of presentation at the early stage of infancy and the fact that the case was sporadic do not detract from the diagnosis. However the child at the age of one year developed hearing loss.

  4. Retrospective TREC testing of newborns with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and other primary immunodeficiency diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jilkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Manitoba, Canada, the overall incidence of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID is three-fold higher than the national average, with SCID overrepresented in two population groups: Mennonites and First Nations of Northern Cree ancestries. T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC assay is being used increasingly for neonatal screening for SCID in North America. However, the majority of SCID patients in Manitoba are T-cell-positive. Therefore it is likely that the TREC assay will not identify these infants. The goal of this study was to blindly and retrospectively perform TREC analysis in confirmed SCID patients using archived Guthrie cards. Thirteen SCID patients were tested: 5 T-negative SCID (3 with adenosine deaminase deficiency, 1 with CD3δ deficiency, and 1 unclassified and 8 T-positive SCID (5 with zeta chain-associated protein kinase (ZAP70 deficiency and 3 with inhibitor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells, kinase beta (IKKβ deficiency. As a non-SCID patient group, 5 Primary Immunodeficiency Disease (PID patients were studied: 1 T-negative PID (cartilage-hair hypoplasia and 4 T-positive PID (2 common immune deficiency (CID, 1 Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome, and 1 X-linked lymphoproliferative disease. Both patient groups required hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In addition, randomly-selected de-identified controls (n = 982 were tested. Results: all T-negative SCID and PID had zero TRECs. Low-TRECs were identified in 2 ZAP70 siblings, 1 CID patient as well as 5 preterm, 1 twin, and 4 de-identified controls. Conclusions: TREC method will identify T-negative SCID and T-negative PID. To identify other SCID babies, newborn screening in Manitoba must include supplemental targeted screening for ethnic-specific mutations.

  5. Blount disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unlike bowlegs , which tend to straighten as the child develops, Blount disease slowly gets worse. It can cause severe bowing of one or both legs. This condition is more common among African American children. It is also associated with obesity ...

  6. Pneumococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pneumococcal disease kills one in every four to five people over the age of 65 who gets it. ... A second PPSV23 vaccine is recommended for these persons five years after the first PPSV23. CDC recommends only ...

  7. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  8. Coeliac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilly, Norelle R; Husby, Steffen; Sanders, David S

    2018-01-01

    Coeliac disease is increasingly recognized as a global problem in both children and adults. Traditionally, the findings of characteristic changes of villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytosis identified in duodenal biopsy samples taken during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy have...... been required for diagnosis. Although biopsies remain advised as necessary for the diagnosis of coeliac disease in adults, European guidelines for children provide a biopsy-sparing diagnostic pathway. This approach has been enabled by the high specificity and sensitivity of serological testing. However......, these guidelines are not universally accepted. In this Perspective, we discuss the pros and cons of a biopsy-avoiding pathway for the diagnosis of coeliac disease, especially in this current era of the call for more biopsies, even from the duodenal bulb, in the diagnosis of coeliac disease. In addition, a contrast...

  9. Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms of Addison disease include: Chronic diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting Darkening of the skin in some places Dehydration Dizziness when standing up Low-grade fever Extreme weakness , fatigue , and slow, sluggish movement Darker ...

  10. Alpers' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... underlying liver disease, failure to thrive, infection-associated encephalopathy, spasticity, myoclonus (involuntary jerking of a muscle or group of muscles), seizures, or liver failure. An increased protein level is seen in ...

  11. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it may be caused by diseases, such as connective tissue disorders, excessive iron buildup in your body (hemochromatosis), the buildup of abnormal proteins (amyloidosis) or by some cancer treatments. Causes of heart infection A heart infection, ...

  12. Alexander Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Neurosurgery Research Fellowships Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research ... Disease Information Page What research is being done? Recent discoveries show that most individuals (approximately 90 percent) with ...

  13. Retinal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... central portion of the retina called the macula. Usher Syndrome Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  14. Sever's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... boys 10 years to 12 years of age. Soccer players and gymnasts often get Sever’s disease, but ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  15. Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The disease leads to shaking ( tremors ) and trouble walking and moving . ... include: Difficulty starting movement, such as starting to walk or ... are not moving. This is called resting tremor. Occur when your ...

  16. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organs and affect the central nervous system, causing memory loss and impaired speech, balance, and movement. The effects of the disease may include blindness, stroke, swelling of the spinal cord, and intestinal ...

  17. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010380 Evaluation non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and its influence on ability of daily living. WANG Rongfei(王荣飞),et al. Dept Neurol,1st Hosp,Guangzhou Med Coll,Guangzhou 510000. Chin J Neurol 2010;43(4):273-276. Objective To evaluate the non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD),and its influence on ability of daily living (ADL) in PD

  18. Menkes disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar 'kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority...... of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms....

  19. Elm diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Peacock

    1989-01-01

    Dutch elm disease was found in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1930, and is now in most of the contiguous 48 states. The disease is caused by a fungus that has killed millions of wild and planted elms. Losses have been the greatest in the eastern United States. The fungus attacks all elms, but our native species, American, slippery, and rock elm have little or no resistance to the...

  20. Ollier disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüppner Harald

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enchondromas are common intraosseous, usually benign cartilaginous tumors, that develop in close proximity to growth plate cartilage. When multiple enchondromas are present, the condition is called enchondromatosis also known as Ollier disease (WHO terminology. The estimated prevalence of Ollier disease is 1/100,000. Clinical manifestations often appear in the first decade of life. Ollier disease is characterized by an asymmetric distribution of cartilage lesions and these can be extremely variable (in terms of size, number, location, evolution of enchondromas, age of onset and of diagnosis, requirement for surgery. Clinical problems caused by enchondromas include skeletal deformities, limb-length discrepancy, and the potential risk for malignant change to chondrosarcoma. The condition in which multiple enchondromatosis is associated with soft tissue hemangiomas is known as Maffucci syndrome. Until now both Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome have only occurred in isolated patients and not familial. It remains uncertain whether the disorder is caused by a single gene defect or by combinations of (germ-line and/or somatic mutations. The diagnosis is based on clinical and conventional radiological evaluations. Histological analysis has a limited role and is mainly used if malignancy is suspected. There is no medical treatment for enchondromatosis. Surgery is indicated in case of complications (pathological fractures, growth defect, malignant transformation. The prognosis for Ollier disease is difficult to assess. As is generally the case, forms with an early onset appear more severe. Enchondromas in Ollier disease present a risk of malignant transformation of enchondromas into chondrosarcomas.

  1. Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy & Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Diseases with the potential to affect ... control. What are the effects of pregnancy on rheumatic disease? The effects of pregnancy on rheumatic diseases vary ...

  2. Anti-TNFα therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases is associated with Epstein-Barr virus lytic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsia, Sameer; Koganti, Siva; Spadaro, Salvatore; Rajapakse, Ramona; Chawla, Anupama; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita

    2016-02-01

    Anti-TNFα therapy, known to suppress T-cell immunity, is increasingly gaining popularity for treatment of autoimmune diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). T-cell suppression increases the risk of B-cell EBV-lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas. Since EBV-lytic activation is essential for development of EBV-lymphomas and there have been reports of EBV-lymphomas in patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy, we investigated if patients treated with anti-TNFα antibodies demonstrate greater EBV-lytic activity in blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 10 IBD patients solely on anti-TNFα therapy compared to 3 control groups (10 IBD patients not on immunosuppressive therapy, 10 patients with abdominal pain but without IBD, and 10 healthy subjects) were examined for the percentage of T-cells, EBV load and EBV-lytic transcripts. Patients on anti-TNFα therapy had significantly fewer T-cells, greater EBV load, and increased levels of transcripts from EBV-lytic genes of all kinetic classes compared to controls. Furthermore, exposure of EBV-infected B-cell lines to anti-TNFα antibodies resulted in increased levels of BZLF1 mRNA; BZLF1 encodes for ZEBRA, the viral latency-to-lytic cycle switch. Thus, IBD patients treated with anti-TNFα antibodies have greater EBV loads likely due to enhanced EBV-lytic gene expression and anti-TNFα antibodies may be sufficient to activate the EBV lytic cycle. Findings from this pilot study lay the groundwork for additional scientific and clinical investigation into the effects of anti-TNFα therapy on the life cycle of EBV, a ubiquitous oncovirus that causes lymphomas in the setting of immunocompromise. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Roon, Alexander C; Reese, George E; Orchard, Timothy R; Tekkis, Paris P

    2007-11-07

    Crohn's disease is a long-term chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments in adults to induce remission in Crohn's disease? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions in adults with Crohn's disease to maintain remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with colonic Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to March 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 60 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty.

  4. Dent's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakker Rajesh V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dent's disease is a renal tubular disorder characterized by manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and progressive renal failure. These features are generally found in males only, and may be present in early childhood, whereas female carriers may show a milder phenotype. Prevalence is unknown; the disorder has been reported in around 250 families to date. Complications such as rickets or osteomalacia may occur. The disease is caused by mutations in either the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1 or OCRL1 (Dent disease 2 genes that are located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic Cl-/H+ exchanger ClC-5, which belongs to the CLC family of Cl- channels/transporters. OCRL1 encodes a phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 5-phosphatase and mutations are also associated with Lowe Syndrome. The phenotype of Dent's disease is explained by the predominant expression of ClC-5 in the proximal tubule segments of the kidney. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been described thus far, and there is considerable intra-familial variability in disease severity. A few patients with Dent's disease do not harbour mutations in CLCN5 and OCRL1, pointing to the involvement of other genes. Diagnosis is based on the presence of all three of the following criteria: low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria and at least one of the following: nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, hematuria, hypophosphatemia or renal insufficiency. Molecular genetic testing confirms the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes other causes of generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubules (renal Fanconi syndrome, hereditary, acquired, or caused by exogenous substances. Antenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic testing is not advised. The care of patients with Dent's disease is supportive, focusing on the treatment of hypercalciuria and

  5. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  6. Hashimoto's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnosed with hypothyroidism or had not yet started treatment for hypothyroidism. 4 Problems during pregnancy. The unborn baby's brain ... can last up to a year and requires treatment. Most often, thyroid function returns to normal as the ... from Hashimoto's disease treated during pregnancy? During pregnancy, ...

  7. Prionic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q-C Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative illnesses due to the accumulation of small infectious pathogens containing protein but apparently lacking nucleic acid, which have long incubation periods and progress inexorably once clinical symptoms appear. Prions are uniquely resistant to a number of normal decontaminating procedures. The prionopathies [Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD and its variants, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI] result from accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein in the brains of normal animals on both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The accumulation of this protein or fragments of it in neurons leads to apoptosis and cell death. There is a strong link between mutations in the gene encoding the normal prion protein in humans (PRNP - located on the short arm of chromosome 20 – and forms of prion disease with a familial predisposition (familial CJD, GSS, FFI. Clinically a prionopathy should be suspected in any case of a fast progressing dementia with ataxia, myoclonus, or in individuals with pathological insomnia associated with dysautonomia. Magnetic resonance imaging, identification of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, tonsil biopsy and genetic studies have been used for in vivo diagnosis circumventing the need of brain biopsy. Histopathology, however, remains the only conclusive method to reach a confident diagnosis. Unfortunately, despite numerous treatment efforts, prionopathies remain short-lasting and fatal diseases.

  8. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a long and relatively healthy life. What Causes Parkinson's Disease? In the very deep parts of the brain, there is a collection of nerve cells that help control movement, known as the basal ganglia (say: BAY-sul GAN-glee-ah). In a ...

  9. Grover's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for Authors Information for Reviewers Human & Animal Rights Job Postings Sections of the ... dermatosis) is a condition that appears suddenly as itchy red spots on the trunk, most often in older men. Minor cases of Grover's disease may be rather common. ...

  10. Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Law, Ian; Jønch, Aia

    2011-01-01

    In this open-label pilot study, the authors evaluated the effect of memantine on the distribution of brain glucose metabolism in four Huntington's disease (HD) patients as determined by serial 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose [F(18)]FDG-PET scans over a period of 3-4 months (90-129 days, with one patient...

  11. Canavan disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affects how the body breaks down and uses aspartic acid . ... scan Head MRI scan Urine chemistry for elevated aspartic acid ... Matalon KM, Matalon RK. Aspartic acid (Canavan disease). In: ... JW III, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. ...

  12. DEVIC'S DISEASE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    had been poor in the right eye and he had found it hard to pass urine. ... right optic:-nerve disease, and was followed in 1880 by mention pupil was large and reacted very sluggishly to light, and the left .... The enzyme theory is that an enzyme-.

  13. Wilson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eye (jaundice) Golden-brown eye discoloration (Kayser-Fleischer rings) Fluid buildup ... is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, which means that to develop the disease you must inherit one copy of the ...

  14. FDG-PET/CT imaging in the management of HIV-associated multicentric Castleman's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, Rob; Kazmi, Fahrad; Stebbing, Justin; Chinn, Roger; Ngan, Sarah; Bower, Mark; Nelson, Mark; O'Doherty, Michael

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the role of FDG-PET/CT scanning in the management of HIV-associated multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) a rare lymphoproliferative disorder associated with infection by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8). Nine patients with histologically confirmed MCD underwent fused FDG-PET/CT scans at initial MCD diagnosis (n = 3), at MCD relapse (n = 4), or during remission (n = 2). All seven patients with active MCD had markedly elevated plasma HHV8 viral loads, but the patients in remission had no HHV8 viraemia. The three patients with newly diagnosed MCD were not on antiretroviral therapy at the time of imaging, but the other six were all on fully suppressive antiretroviral regimens. In the seven patients with active MCD (newly diagnosed or relapse) 33/91 lymph node groups (36%) included radiologically enlarged nodes on the CT scan, whilst 57/91 lymph node groups (63%) showed enhanced FDG uptake on the PET scan. In scans from patients in remission, there were no enlarged lymph nodes on the CT scan but 3 lymph nodes (11%) demonstrated enhanced FDG uptake. The median SUV recorded for the seven patients with active MCD was 4.8 (range 2.6-9.3) which was significantly higher than the median value of 2.5 recorded for the patients in remission (Mann-Whitney U test, p = 0.011). Despite the small number of patients, in HIV-positive individuals with active MCD, FDG-PET scans more frequently detected abnormal uptake than CT scans detected enlarged lymph nodes. FDG-PET scanning has a useful role in the management of HIV-associated MCD in selecting appropriate sites for biopsy, and in staging and monitoring these lymphoproliferations. (orig.)

  15. Morgellons disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients.

  16. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers......, and identification of specific HLA haplotypes may contribute to CD diagnosis. Classical CD presents with diarrhoea and weight loss, but non-classical CD with vague or extraintestinal symptoms is common. The treatment for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD), which, in the majority of patients, normalises...

  17. disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Mamishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is an inherited disorder of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase complex. This disorder results in recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Aspergillus species are the most common fungal infections in these patients. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of fungal infection in a girl with CGD. We confirmed aspergillosis through the positive microscopic and macroscopic examinations, as well as radiology results. Invasive aspergillosis in this patient with pneumonia, lung abscess, and osteomyelitis of the ribs was not initially treated with amphotericin B (Am B and recombinant interferon-gamma. Conclusion: Among infectious diseases, fungal infections, in particular aspergillosis, remain a serious problem in CGD patients. Considering poor clinical response and deficient immune system, rapid diagnosis of fungal infection and optimizing the treatment of these patients are recommended.

  18. [Addison's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinkler, M

    2012-09-01

    The clinical signs and symptoms of primary adrenal insufficiency are unspecific often causing a delayed diagnosis or even misdiagnosis. In the diagnostic work-up the short synacthen test is regarded as the gold standard. Hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone are the preferred therapy for Addison's disease. The management and surveillance of therapy requires experience and several aspects need to be followed to prevent side effects which might occur due to overtreatment or undertreatment. Very important aspects in therapy are the repeated teaching of the patient and relatives, the issuing of an emergency steroid card and the prescription of a glucocorticoid emergency set. Acute adrenal failure (adrenal crisis), which might be the first manifestation of adrenal insufficiency, is a life-threatening situation requiring immediate glucocorticoid administration and fluid substitution. The most common causes for an adrenal crisis are gastrointestinal infections and fever and discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy. This article gives an up-to-date overview of diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of Addison's disease.

  19. Joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how x-ray examination is essential in the diagnosis and evaluation of the arthritides. Most arthritides are first suspected by the clinician, and x-ray evaluation of these entities along with laboratory testing is important for confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in staging of the disease process. Several arthritides are often diagnosed first by the podiatrist on x-ray evaluation, including pseudogout, ankylosing spondylitis, early rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, and tuberculosis of bone. The joint responds to insult in only a limited number of ways that become apparent on x-ray. The soft tissues surrounding the joint, the articulating bones, and alignment of the joint space may all be involved by the arthritic process. On roentgenographic examination, the soft tissues must be examined for edema, masses, calcifications, and atrophy. The articulating bones must be examined for demineralization, erosions, osteophytes, periosteal reaction, cysts and sclerosis

  20. Thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  1. Thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications

  2. Gaucher's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainaux, B.; Christophe, C.; Hanquinet, S.; Perlmutter, N.

    1992-01-01

    We report our observations made by conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a 3 1/2-year-old girl with Gaucher's disease. The interest of the case consists in the exceptional lungs involvement, the demonstration by MRI of the bone marrow involvement and the necrosis and fibrosis of the liver, as shown by CT. This liver complication has been previously reported only once. (orig.)

  3. Mitochondrial Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent Kurt; Turgut Topal

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major energy source of cells. Mitochondrial disease occurs due to a defect in mitochondrial energy production. A valuable energy production in mitochondria depend a healthy interconnection between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. A mutation in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA may cause abnormalities in ATP production and single or multiple organ dysfunctions, secondarily. In this review, we summarize mitochondrial physiology, mitochondrial genetics, and clinical expression and ...

  4. Cushing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Esteche, V.; Menafra Prieto, M.; Ormaechea Gorricho, R.; Vignolo Scalone, G.; Larre Borges, A.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the Cushings disease in its various aspects. It highlights the importance of early diagnosis to avoid repercussions hypercortisolism secondary to parenchymal. We describe the findings in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), noting that the pituitary adenoma is often of small size and sometimes not visible on MRI. The treatment of choice remains surgical treatment other contingencies exist for particular cases (Author) [es

  5. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  6. Heavy Chain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of heavy chain produced: Alpha Gamma Mu Alpha Heavy Chain Disease Alpha heavy chain disease (IgA heavy ... the disease or lead to a remission. Gamma Heavy Chain Disease Gamma heavy chain disease (IgG heavy ...

  7. Primary "cutaneous" T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma, CD30+, neutrophil-rich variant with subcutaneous panniculitic lesions, in a post-renal transplant patient: report of unusual case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, S

    2005-06-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) presenting clinically in the skin are rare and usually of B-cell phenotype. Only 7 cases of cutaneous T-cell PTLD have been previously reported, mostly mycosis fungoides type, with no known cases of "cutaneous" presentation by CD30 (Ki-1) anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). The case reported is a 59-year-old male who developed multiple skin nodules on the right leg, 6 years following renal transplantation. Initial biopsy showed ALCL involving the dermis with a background rich in neutrophils. The neoplastic cells were of T-cell phenotype, strongly CD30 with typical staining, and BCL-2 positive, but P53 negative. No EBV was detected by IHC, ISH, or DNA analysis. One year later, he developed painful subcutaneous nodules with surrounding erythema, resembling deep pustules or panniculitis, which on biopsy showed preferential involvement of the subcutaneous fat and prominent component of neutrophils. Twenty-two months following diagnosis, he died of cardiac failure with terminal myocardial infarct. There was however no clinical evidence of systemic spread of the lymphoma.This report adds to the clinical and morphologic spectrum of these rare "cutaneous" lymphomas of T-cell lineage arising in the posttransplantation setting, and suggests that EBV does not play a role in their pathogenesis.

  8. Thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noma, Koji

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reviews the correlation between thyroid disease, other than cancer, and radiation in the literature. Radiation-induced thyroid disturbance is discussed in the context of external and internal irradiation. External irradiation of 10 to 40 Gy may lower thyroid function several months or years later. Oral administration of I-131 is widely given to patients with Basedow's disease; it may also lower thyroid function with increasing radiation doses. When giving 70 Gy or more of I-131, hypothyroidism has been reported to occur in 20-30% and at least 10%. Thyroiditis induced with internal I-131 irradiation has also been reported, but no data is available concerning external irradiation-induced thyroiditis. The incidence of nodular goiter was found to be several ten times higher with external irradiation than internal irradiation. Thyroid disturbance is correlated with A-bomb survivors. A-bomb radiation can be divided into early radiation within one minute after A-bombing and the subsequent residual radiation. Nodular goiter was significantly more frequent in the exposed group than the non-exposed group; it increased with increasing radiation doses and younger age (20 years or less) at the time of exposure. The incidence of decrease in thyroid function was higher with increasing radiation doses. However, in the case of Nagasaki, the incidence of hypothyroidism was significantly higher in the low-dose exposed group, especially A-bomb survivors aged 10-39 at the time of exposure and women. (N.K.)

  9. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  10. Diseases of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Different forms of skull diseases viz. inflammatory diseases, skull tumors, primary and secondary bone tumors, are considered. Roentgenograms in some above-mentioned diseases are presented and analysed

  11. Hirayama disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul T Tayade

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old male, who gave up his favorite sport cricket and started playing football, presented with one-year history of slowly progressive atrophic weakness of forearms and hands. Neurological examination showed weak and wasted arms, forearms and hand but no evidence of pyramidal tract, spinothalmic tract and posterior column lesions. Plain cervical spine radiographs showed no abnormal findings. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed asymmetric cord atrophy; images obtained with neck flexed showed the anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the lower cervical dural sac resulting in cord compression. These findings suggest Hirayama disease, a kind of cervical myelopathy related to the flexion movements of the neck.

  12. Disease Evolution and Response to Rapamycin in Activated Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase δ Syndrome: The European Society for Immunodeficiencies-Activated Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase δ Syndrome Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Maccari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Activated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K δ Syndrome (APDS, caused by autosomal dominant mutations in PIK3CD (APDS1 or PIK3R1 (APDS2, is a heterogeneous primary immunodeficiency. While initial cohort-descriptions summarized the spectrum of clinical and immunological manifestations, questions about long-term disease evolution and response to therapy remain. The prospective European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID-APDS registry aims to characterize the disease course, identify outcome predictors, and evaluate treatment responses. So far, 77 patients have been recruited (51 APDS1, 26 APDS2. Analysis of disease evolution in the first 68 patients pinpoints the early occurrence of recurrent respiratory infections followed by chronic lymphoproliferation, gastrointestinal manifestations, and cytopenias. Although most manifestations occur by age 15, adult-onset and asymptomatic courses were documented. Bronchiectasis was observed in 24/40 APDS1 patients who received a CT-scan compared with 4/15 APDS2 patients. By age 20, half of the patients had received at least one immunosuppressant, but 2–3 lines of immunosuppressive therapy were not unusual before age 10. Response to rapamycin was rated by physician visual analog scale as good in 10, moderate in 9, and poor in 7. Lymphoproliferation showed the best response (8 complete, 11 partial, 6 no remission, while bowel inflammation (3 complete, 3 partial, 9 no remission and cytopenia (3 complete, 2 partial, 9 no remission responded less well. Hence, non-lymphoproliferative manifestations should be a key target for novel therapies. This report from the ESID-APDS registry provides comprehensive baseline documentation for a growing cohort that will be followed prospectively to establish prognostic factors and identify patients for treatment studies.

  13. Diagnostic values for the viral load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Michio; Kawada, Jun-ichi; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease (CAEBV) is a distinct EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease with a poor prognosis. Although the viral load in blood samples has been widely used for diagnosing CAEBV, well-defined viral load thresholds to guide clinicians are currently lacking. The aim of the present study was to determine standardized diagnostic values for EBV load in blood samples of CAEBV patients using the World Health Organization international standard for reporting. Levels of EBV DNA in 103 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and 95 plasma/serum samples from 107 cases with CAEBV were quantified and expressed in international units. Receiver operating characteristic curves were analyzed to assess the most appropriate cut-off values for levels of EBV DNA to distinguish CAEBV from EBV-associated infectious mononucleosis (IM) and controls with past EBV infection. Levels of EBV DNA in PBMCs were significantly higher in the CAEBV group (median, 10(4.2) IU/μgDNA) compared to the IM (median, 10(2.1) IU/μgDNA) and control groups. An inconsistent qualitative result was seen in 13 of 86 CAEBV patients; in these, EBV-DNA was positive in PBMCs, but negative in plasma. Diagnostic cut-off values for viral load in PBMCs from CAEBV patients, as compared to those of healthy controls and IM patients, were 10(2.0) IU/μgDNA and 10(3.2) IU/μgDNA, respectively. For diagnostic purposes, the viral load of PBMCs was better than of plasma/serum. A diagnostic cut-off EBV load for CAEBV may be useful for the management of CAEBV patients. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus-infected cells in IgG4-related lymphadenopathy with comparison with extranodal IgG4-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Mai; Sato, Yasuharu; Yasui, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Ohno, Kyotaro; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Gion, Yuka; Orita, Yorihisa; Tachibana, Tomoyasu; Itoh, Tomoo; Asano, Naoko; Nakamura, Shigeo; Swerdlow, Steven H; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    IgG4-related lymphadenopathy with increased numbers of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells has been reported but not fully described. We analyzed 31 cases of IgG4-related lymphadenopathy and 24 cases of extranodal IgG4-related diseases for their possible relationship with EBV. Other types of reactive lymph nodes (22) and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) (10) were also studied for comparison. EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization revealed EBER(+) cells in 18 of 31 cases (58%) of IgG4-related lymphadenopathy. Increased EBER(+) cells were found in only 4 of 22 (18.1%) non-IgG4-related reactive lymphoid hyperplasia in patients of a similar age (P=0.002) and in only 5 of 24 (21%) extranodal IgG4-related biopsies (P=0.006). Interestingly, all patients with EBER(+) progressively transformed germinal center-type IgG4-related lymphadenopathy had systemic lymphadenopathy and/or extranodal involvement. AITL also is associated with EBV, and IgG4-related lymphadenopathy sometimes mimics the morphology of AITL; however, the number of IgG4(+) cells in AITL was significantly less than that in IgG4-related lymphadenopathy (Pdisease; however, there was not a significant difference between the EBER(+) and EBER(-) cases. In conclusion, the presence of increased numbers of EBV-infected cells in IgG4-related lymphadenopathy, compared with other reactive lymphadenopathy or extranodal IgG4-related disease, suggests that there may be a relationship at least between nodal IgG4-related disease and EBV. It is important to avoid overdiagnosing these cases as malignant lymphomas or EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders.

  15. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  16. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

  17. What Is Celiac Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  18. Celiac Disease Changes Everything

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  19. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... by Barbara Goldstein, MD (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  20. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gland in the neck, thick and coarse hair. Addison’s Disease Arare disease involving the adrenal gland. The prevalence of celiac disease in people with addison’s disease is significant. Symptoms of Addison’s may include weight ...

  1. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  2. Mad Cow Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Mad Cow Disease What's ... are people to get it? What Is Mad Cow Disease? Mad cow disease is an incurable, fatal ...

  3. Niemann-Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    NPD; Sphingomyelinase deficiency; Lipid storage disorder - Niemann-Pick disease; Lysosomal storage disease - Niemann-Pick ... lipofuscinoses or Batten disease (Wolman disease, cholesteryl ... metabolism of lipids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  4. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infectious Diseases, 35: 451-464, 2002) What is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease (LD) is an infection caused by ... mission with your own tax-deductible contribution. American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. PO Box 466 Lyme, CT 06371 ...

  5. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  6. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  7. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  8. Heart disease and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  9. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  10. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  11. Osler's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Mueller, U.; Lieb, J.; Schneider, G.; Ulmer, S.

    2013-01-01

    Osler's disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder leading to abnormal blood vessel formation in the skin, mucous membranes and often in organs, such as the lungs, liver and brain (arteriovenous malformations AVM). Various types are known. Patients may present with epistaxis. Teleangiectasia can be identified by visual inspection during physical examination of the skin or oral cavity or by endoscopy. Diagnosis is made after clinical examination and genetic testing based on the Curacao criteria. Modern imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become more important as they can depict the AVMs. Pulmonary AVMs can be depicted in CT imaging even without the use of a contrast agent while other locations including the central nervous system (CNS) usually require administration of contrast agents. Knowledge of possible clinical manifestations in various organs, possible complications and typical radiological presentation is mandatory to enable adequate therapy of these patients. Interventional procedures are becoming increasingly more important in the treatment of HHT patients. (orig.) [de

  12. Renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonpheng, Boonphiphop; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Wijarnpreecha, Karn

    2018-04-01

    Celiac disease, an inflammatory disease of small bowel caused by sensitivity to dietary gluten and related protein, affects approximately 0.5-1% of the population in the Western world. Extra-intestinal symptoms and associated diseases are increasingly recognized including diabetes mellitus type 1, thyroid disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and ataxia. There have also been a number of reports of various types of renal involvement in patients with celiac disease including diabetes nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome related to malabsorption, oxalate nephropathy, and associations of celiac disease with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease. This review aims to present the current literature on possible pathologic mechanisms underlying renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

  13. A rare case of massive hepatosplenomegaly due to acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    massive hepatosplenomegaly include chronic lymphoproliferative malignancies, infections (malaria, leishmaniasis) and glycogen storage diseases (Gaucher's disease).[4] In our case the probable causes of the massive hepatosplenomegaly were a combination of late presentation after symptom onset, leukaemic infiltration.

  14. Chidamide Combined With R-GDP in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-12

    Chidamide; Lymphoma, B-Cell; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Neoplasm by Histology; Neoplasms; Lymphoproliferative Disorders; Lymphatic Diseases; Immunoproliferative Disorders; Immune System Diseases; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Cyclophosphamide; Rituximab; Gemcitabine; Cisplatin; Dexamethasone; HDAC Inhibitor

  15. Atopic dermatitis-like disease and associated lethal myeloproliferative disorder arise from loss of Notch signaling in the murine skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Dumortier

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Notch pathway is essential for proper epidermal differentiation during embryonic skin development. Moreover, skin specific loss of Notch signaling in the embryo results in skin barrier defects accompanied by a B-lymphoproliferative disease. However, much less is known about the consequences of loss of Notch signaling after birth.To study the function of Notch signaling in the skin of adult mice, we made use of a series of conditional gene targeted mice that allow inactivation of several components of the Notch signaling pathway specifically in the skin. We demonstrate that skin-specific inactivation of Notch1 and Notch2 simultaneously, or RBP-J, induces the development of a severe form of atopic dermatitis (AD, characterized by acanthosis, spongiosis and hyperkeratosis, as well as a massive dermal infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells. Likewise, patients suffering from AD, but not psoriasis or lichen planus, have a marked reduction of Notch receptor expression in the skin. Loss of Notch in keratinocytes induces the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a cytokine deeply implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. The AD-like associated inflammation is accompanied by a myeloproliferative disorder (MPD characterized by an increase in immature myeloid populations in the bone marrow and spleen. Transplantation studies revealed that the MPD is cell non-autonomous and caused by dramatic microenvironmental alterations. Genetic studies demontrated that G-CSF mediates the MPD as well as changes in the bone marrow microenvironment leading to osteopenia.Our data demonstrate a critical role for Notch in repressing TSLP production in keratinocytes, thereby maintaining integrity of the skin and the hematopoietic system.

  16. FDG-PET/CT imaging in the management of HIV-associated multicentric Castleman's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Rob; Kazmi, Fahrad; Stebbing, Justin; Chinn, Roger [Imperial College School of Medicine, The Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Ngan, Sarah; Bower, Mark [Imperial College School of Medicine, The Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Department of Oncology, London (United Kingdom); Nelson, Mark [Imperial College School of Medicine, The Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Department of HIV Medicine, London (United Kingdom); O' Doherty, Michael [St. Thomas' Hospital, Clinical PET Centre, Guys and St. Thomas Hospital Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    To evaluate the role of FDG-PET/CT scanning in the management of HIV-associated multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) a rare lymphoproliferative disorder associated with infection by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8). Nine patients with histologically confirmed MCD underwent fused FDG-PET/CT scans at initial MCD diagnosis (n = 3), at MCD relapse (n = 4), or during remission (n = 2). All seven patients with active MCD had markedly elevated plasma HHV8 viral loads, but the patients in remission had no HHV8 viraemia. The three patients with newly diagnosed MCD were not on antiretroviral therapy at the time of imaging, but the other six were all on fully suppressive antiretroviral regimens. In the seven patients with active MCD (newly diagnosed or relapse) 33/91 lymph node groups (36%) included radiologically enlarged nodes on the CT scan, whilst 57/91 lymph node groups (63%) showed enhanced FDG uptake on the PET scan. In scans from patients in remission, there were no enlarged lymph nodes on the CT scan but 3 lymph nodes (11%) demonstrated enhanced FDG uptake. The median SUV recorded for the seven patients with active MCD was 4.8 (range 2.6-9.3) which was significantly higher than the median value of 2.5 recorded for the patients in remission (Mann-Whitney U test, p = 0.011). Despite the small number of patients, in HIV-positive individuals with active MCD, FDG-PET scans more frequently detected abnormal uptake than CT scans detected enlarged lymph nodes. FDG-PET scanning has a useful role in the management of HIV-associated MCD in selecting appropriate sites for biopsy, and in staging and monitoring these lymphoproliferations. (orig.)

  17. Hematopoietic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohi, Hiroo

    1992-01-01

    A-bombing panicked many people with anxiety because they suffered from various symptoms after A-bombing (ie, they generally called them A-bomb disease). In this chapter, major two conditions (ie, leukopenia and anemia), which caused their symptoms, are reviewed based on the early data soon after A-bombing. According to the chronological changes in both white blood cell (WBC) and red blood cell (RBC) counts, both leukopenia and anemia are discussed. The findings can be divided into acute (one week or at least 10 days), subacute (2 weeks to one month), and delayed (thereafter) periods. During an acute period, some exposed even at ≤200 m from the hypocenter showed WBC count of 6,000/mm 3 or more one week after exposure but others exposed at 1,500-2,000 m showed WBC count of less than 3,000/mm 3 , suggesting the influence of shielding on WBC count. WBC count sometimes became the lowest during a subacute period, although it was normal during an acute period. A survey for WBC count during a delayed period (one year later) showed that WBC count of less than 4,000/mm 3 was more frequent in the exposed group (78/523 A-bomb survivors, 14.9%) than the non-exposed group (6/173 persons, 3.5%). In the exposed group, leukopenia was independent of distance and symptoms at the time of exposure. For anemia, there was no data available during an acute period. Anemia frequently occurred during a subacute period. Morphological abnormality of RBC tended to be high in death cases. A delayed survey on anemia 10 years after exposure showed that there was no statistically significant difference in any of the factors, such as hemoglobin, RBC count, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin, between the exposed and non-exposed groups. (N.K.)

  18. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Weidlich

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease may be associated with systemic diseases. This paper reviewed the published data about the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes and respiratory diseases, focusing on studies conducted in the Brazilian population. Only a few studies were found in the literature focusing on Brazilians (3 concerning cardiovascular disease, 7 about pregnancy outcomes, 9 about diabetes and one regarding pneumonia. Although the majority of them observed an association between periodontitis and systemic conditions, a causal relationship still needs to be demonstrated. Further studies, particularly interventional well-designed investigations, with larger sample sizes, need to be conducted in Brazilian populations.

  19. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  20. Epstein - Barr virus expression in Hodgkin's disease: Correlation withhistologic subtypes and T and B lymphocyte distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourad, W.; Bazerbashi, S.; Alsohaibani, Mohamed O.; Saddik, M.

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Hodgkin's disease is linked to Epstein-Barr virus(EBV). Some histologic subtypes show a high level of viral expression. Theseinclude mixed cellularity (MCHD) and nodular sclerosis (NSHD) subtypes. GradeII NSHD is a more aggressive variant of HD. Lymphocyte predominant (LPHD) isa B cell lymphoproliferative disorder that has not been associated with EBVexpression. Infiltrating lymphocytes in HD are predominantly T lymphocytes,with minor component of B lymphocytes. In the current study, EBV expressionwas tested in cases of HD in relation to histologic subtypes. An attempt wasmade at correlating EBV expression with T and B lymphocyte distribution inlymph nodes involved by HD. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from 62cases of HD were tested for EBV and mRNA expression, using the EBER-1 probeand in situ hybridization. T and B lymphocyte distribution and their ratioswere evaluated using antibodies to T and B lymphocytes (UCHL-1 [CD45RO] andCD20, respectively), and the immunoperoxidase technique. The cases were seenin 38 male and 24 female patients, with an age range of 3 to 72 years (median25 years). There were 30 cases of grade I and 15 cases of grade II NSHD, 9cases of MCHD and 8 cases of LPHD. EBV mRNA expression was seen in 29 cases(46%). This expression was seen in 8 cases of grade I NSHD (26%), 13 cases ofgrade II NSHD (86%) and 8 cases of MCHD (88%). None of the cases of LPHDshowed viral expression. T to B lymphocytes ratios in EBV-positive casesranged from 1/6 to 8/1 and ranged from 2/1 to 20/1 in EBV-negative cases(P=0.06). Nine of the 29 positive cases (31%) showed equal T/B lymphocyteratios (n=4), or predominance of B lymphocytes (n=5). None of theEBV-negative cases showed predominance of B lymphocytes. Our study confirmedpreviously reported findings of the prevalence of EBV expression in MCHD andNSHD. Our findings also suggest that EBV expression may be more commonly seenin aggressive forms of HD. Decreased number of T lymphocytes in

  1. Lysosomal storage disease 2 - Pompe's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also

  2. Huntington's disease: a perplexing neurological disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huntington's disease is an inherited intricate brain illness. It is a neurodegenerative, insidious disorder; the onset of the disease is very late to diagnose. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the Huntingtin gene, which encodes an abnormally long polyglutamine repeat in the Huntingtin protein. Huntington's disease ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ... Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: ...

  4. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis How Is Parkinson's Disease ...

  6. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  7. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: ...

  9. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  10. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is a rare and deadly disease ...

  11. Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed connective tissue disease Overview Mixed connective tissue disease has signs and symptoms of a combination of disorders — primarily lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. For this reason, mixed connective tissue disease ...

  12. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 29,2018 The following ... clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent ...

  13. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. Who Gets ALS? Although this disease can strike anyone, ALS is extremely rare in kids. According ... home to provide care that the family cannot handle alone. Living With Lou Gehrig's Disease Living with ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Does Caregiving Change from Day to Day? Unconditional Love How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? ... Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation Sleep: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease ...

  15. Lyme Disease Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... materials Why is CDC concerned about Lyme disease? Data and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... sixth most common Nationally Notifiable disease . Lyme Disease Data File To facilitate the public health and research ...

  16. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Overview of Parkinson's ... Disease? What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? CareMAP: Dealing ...

  18. Chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disease, together with other related non -communicable diseases. (NCDs), poses not only a threat ... but because if we do not act against NCDs we will also be increasing individual and ... respiratory diseases and cancer. This is in recognition ...

  19. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disease. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. It causes too ... cells, causing mental and physical problems. . Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first few ...

  20. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  1. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  2. Lyme disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  3. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... How many Americans over age 65 may have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5 million as many ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Under-recognized Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ...

  5. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  6. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  7. Doença de Castleman localizada abdominal Abdominal Castleman's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio V. C. Oliveira

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Castleman é um distúrbio linfoproliferativo raro. Há três tipos histológicos: hialino-vascular (mais comum, variante de células plasmáticas e forma mista. A forma hialino-vascular é caracterizada tipicamente por apresentar uma evolução clínica benigna, sem sintomas constitucionais (doença localizada. É geralmente tratada com cirurgia e/ou radioterapia. A doença multicêntrica apresenta sintomas sistêmicos. Ainda não há um consenso sobre qual a melhor abordagem terapêutica. Nós reportamos o caso de um homem de 47 anos de idade com uma massa abdominal e sintomas compressivos. Após ressecção cirúrgica parcial, os exames histopatológico e imuno-histoquímico revelaram doença de Castleman variante hialino vascular. Como as células foliculares eram CD20+, administramos rituximab (anticorpo monoclonal anti-CD20. A maioria dos casos revisados não consideram este tipo de abordagem, exceto no caso de doença de Castleman multicêntrica associada a infecção pelo HHV-8 e sarcoma de Kaposi. Geralmente considera-se o paciente curado após retirada cirúrgica da massa na doença localizada, mas realmente há um risco do paciente desenvolver um linfoma não-Hodgkin no seguimento a longo prazo. O objetivo deste relato é apresentar um caso raro que deve ser incluído no diagnóstico diferencial de desordens linfóides e discutir o tratamento desta doença.Castleman's disease is an uncommon lymphoproliferative disorder. There are three histologic types, hyaline vascular (the most common, plasma cell variant and mixed form. The hyaline vascular variant is typically characterized by a benign clinical course without constitutional symptoms (localized disease. It is usually managed with surgery and/or radiotherapy. Multicentric disease is a systemic disorder. An optimal management is still unknown. We report a case of a 47-year-old man with an abdominal mass and compressive symptom. After partial surgical resection

  8. Cold agglutinin disease (CADwith autoimmune haemolytic anaemia: a case report of a coronary artery disease patient Doença por aglutininas a frio (DAC com anemia hemolítica auto-imune: relato de caso de um coronariopata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro A. Barbosa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Cold agglutinin disease (CAD with autoimmune haemolytic anemia is characterized by the production of harmful cold autoantibodies associated with increased red cell destruction during exposure to cold. The treatment of CAD is very difficult and a great effort is required to obtain therapeutic success. Cyclophosphamide is a potent immunosuppressive agent which is widely used in all bone marrow transplantation conditioning regimens for patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia. In this report, we describe the case of a coronary artery disease patient with severe CAD, but without lymphoproliferative disease, in which general measures and immunosuppressive therapies were adopted, there by avoiding blood transfusions.A doença por aglutininas a frio (CAD cursando com anemia hemolítica auto-imune (AHAI é decorrente da produção de autoanticorpos que reagem muito bem a baixas temperaturas, dirigidos contra hemácias autólogas. A habilidade desses anticorpos em destruir as hemácias encontra-se diretamente relacionada à sua capacidade em fixar complemento durante a exposição do paciente a baixas temperaturas. A AHAI por anticorpos frios pode ser idiopática - ausência de doença de base - ou secundária, geralmente associada a desordens linfoproliferativas de células B ou determinados processos infecciosos. A hemólise é intravascular, através de aglutininas da classe IgM, com teste direto da antiglobulina humana positivo para complemento. O tratamento da CAD é difícil, exigindo um esforço contínuo, necessário para se obter sucesso terapêutico. A ciclofosfamida é um agente imunossupressor potente, amplamente utilizado em transplantes de medula óssea, particularmente nos portadores de anemia aplástica. Descrevemos o caso de um coronariopata portador de CAD severa, cuja exploração diagnóstica excluiu doença linfoproliferativa. Adotamos medidas gerais de suporte e terapia imunossupressora, coibindo o uso de hemotransfusões.

  9. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  10. Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some in the family will have celiac disease. • Symptoms of celiac disease vary widely, but are often absent in persons ... Abnormal labs XX Diabetes and Celiac Disease | continued CELIAC DISEASE Classic symptoms... Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, weight loss, anemia. ...

  11. Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Celiac Disease Understanding Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Symptoms Screening and Diagnosis Treatment and Follow-Up Dermatitis ... Schuppan D, Kelly CP. Etiologies and predictors of diagnosis in nonresponsive celiac disease. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5 : 445–50. Finding ...

  12. The integrated disease network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Buchan, Natalie; Larminie, Chris; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-11-01

    The growing body of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic and genomic data generated from disease states provides a great opportunity to improve our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving diseases and shared between diseases. The use of both clinical and molecular phenotypes will lead to better disease understanding and classification. In this study, we set out to gain novel insights into diseases and their relationships by utilising knowledge gained from system-level molecular data. We integrated different types of biological data including genome-wide association studies data, disease-chemical associations, biological pathways and Gene Ontology annotations into an Integrated Disease Network (IDN), a heterogeneous network where nodes are bio-entities and edges between nodes represent their associations. We also introduced a novel disease similarity measure to infer disease-disease associations from the IDN. Our predicted associations were systemically evaluated against the Medical Subject Heading classification and a statistical measure of disease co-occurrence in PubMed. The strong correlation between our predictions and co-occurrence associations indicated the ability of our approach to recover known disease associations. Furthermore, we presented a case study of Crohn's disease. We demonstrated that our approach not only identified well-established connections between Crohn's disease and other diseases, but also revealed new, interesting connections consistent with emerging literature. Our approach also enabled ready access to the knowledge supporting these new connections, making this a powerful approach for exploring connections between diseases.

  13. Epigenetics of kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Nicola; Bechtel-Walz, Wibke

    2017-07-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications determine renal programming and the development and progression of renal disease. The identification of the way in which the renal cell epigenome is altered by environmental modifiers driving the onset and progression of renal diseases has extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of kidney disease progression. In this review, we focus on current knowledge concerning the implications of epigenetic modifications during renal disease from early development to chronic kidney disease progression including renal fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy and the translational potential of identifying new biomarkers and treatments for the prevention and therapy of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

  14. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Occupational skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, V; Aalto-Korte, K; Alfonso, J H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal...... diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe. OBJECTIVE: To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment...... in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu). RESULTS: Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks...

  16. Pregnancy and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sağlam, Ebru; Saruhan, Nesrin; Çanakçı, Cenk Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Some maternal immunological changes due to pregnancy increases susceptibility to infections. Periodontal disease, the main cause is plaque, is a common disease which is seen multifactorial and varying severity. There are many clinical criteria for diagnosis of periodontal disease. Correlation between pregnancy and periodontal inflammation is known for many years. Periodontal disease affects pregnant’s systemic condition and also has negative effects on fetus. Periodontal disease increases the...

  17. Usefulness of Flow Cytometry in Diagnosis of IgG4-Related Ophthalmic Disease and Extranodal Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma of the Ocular Adnexa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Satoru; Ishijima, Kan; Uraki, Takehiko; Suimon, Yuka; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kase, Manabu; Ishida, Susumu

    2017-09-01

    Although flow cytometry (FCM) is used to evaluate cell surface markers of various leucocyte populations quantitatively, little is known about the usefulness of FCM in lymphoproliferative disorders of the ocular adnexa. The aim of this study was to disclose results of FCM, which were compared among IgG4-related ophthalmic disease (IgG4-ROD), idiopathic orbital inflammation (IOI), and extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (EMZL). This is a retrospective observational study. Sixty-nine tumors comprising of 16 IgG4-ROD, 24 IOI, and 29 EMZL were enrolled in the study. All tumors, surgically excised, were diagnosed based on histopathology, immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain gene rearrangement, and FCM. In FCM, the percentage of T-cell markers (CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8), B-cell markers (CD10, CD19, CD20, CD23), NK cell marker (CD56) and cell surface kappa/lambda was searched based on medical records. Ig light chain restriction was evaluated from results in kappa/lambda deviation by FCM. The percentage of CD2, CD3, CD4, CD7, and CD10 was significantly higher in IgG4-ROD/IOI than EMZL (pIgG4-ROD/IOI (pIgG4-ROD and IOI. Kappa-positive cells were significantly greater in EMZL than IgG4-ROD/IOI (pIgG4-ROD/IOI and false-negative was observed in 10 (34.5%) EMZL cases. Sensitivity and specificity of Ig light chain restriction were 65.5 and 92.5%, respectively. Analyses of cell surface markers using FCM were useful in differentiating EMZL from IgG4-ROD/IOI. Sensitivity of Ig light chain restriction was relatively low in diagnosis of EMZL using FCM. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. T Cell Depletion for Recipients of HLA Haploidentical Related Donor Stem Cell Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-29

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non Hodgkins Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH); Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (FLH); Viral-associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome (VAHS); X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease (XLP)

  19. Egress of CD19(+)CD5(+) cells into peripheral blood following treatment with the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib in mantle cell lymphoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Betty Y.; Francesco, Michelle; de Rooij, Martin F. M.; Magadala, Padmaja; Steggerda, Susanne M.; Huang, Min Mei; Kuil, Annemieke; Herman, Sarah E. M.; Chang, Stella; Pals, Steven T.; Wilson, Wyndham; Wiestner, Adrian; Spaargaren, Marcel; Buggy, Joseph J.; Elias, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is a highly potent oral Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor in clinical development for treating B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) often show marked, transient increases of circulating CLL cells following ibrutinib

  20. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease and prion disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Bate, C.; van Gool, W. A.; Hoozemans, J. J. M.; Rozemuller, J. M.; Veerhuis, R.; Williams, A.

    2002-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and prion disease are characterized neuropathologically by extracellular deposits of Abeta and PrP amyloid fibrils, respectively. In both disorders, these cerebral amyloid deposits are co-localized with a broad variety of inflammation-related proteins (complement factors,

  1. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...... and their disease relationships from the reported TDDB database. The resulting human EDN takes into consideration the level of evidence of the toxicant-disease relationships allowing including some degrees of significance in the disease-disease associations. Such network can be used to identify uncharacterized...

  2. Menopause and Rheumatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsania, Mitali; Scofield, Robert Hal

    2017-05-01

    Menopause occurs naturally in women at about 50 years of age. There is a wealth of data concerning the relationship of menopause to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis; there are limited data concerning other rheumatic diseases. Age at menopause may affect the risk and course of rheumatic diseases. Osteoporosis, an integral part of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, is made worse by menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has been studied; its effects vary depending on the disease and even different manifestations within the same disease. Cyclophosphamide can induce early menopause, but there is underlying decreased ovarian reserve in rheumatic diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Wilson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Hanağası

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is a autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. Clinical phenotypes include hepatic, haemolytic, neurologic and psychiatric diseases. Wilson’s disease is caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene. ATP7B encodes a hepatic copper-transporting protein, which is important for copper excretion into bile. Neurological symptoms in Wilson’s disease include variable combinations of dysathria, ataxia, parkinsonism, dystonia and tremor. Wilson’s disease is lethal if untreated. This review discusses the epidemiology, genetics, clinical features, etiopathophysiology, diagnostic tests, and treatment of Wilson’s disease

  4. Avoiding steroids in pediatric renal transplantation: long-term experience from a single centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Bo; El-Faramawi, Mohamad; Foged, Nils

    2007-01-01

    We report our experience in pediatric renal transplantation avoiding steroids whenever possible. Immunosuppression consisted of an initial induction with antithymocyte globulin followed by maintenance therapy with a calcineurin inhibitor and MMF. Steroids were only given to selected patients......). Unfortunately PTLD occurred in three patients, but all survived with functioning grafts. Accordingly, our findings indicate that steroid avoidance in pediatric renal transplantation is possible with good results with respect to acute graft rejection as well as long-term graft survival....... because of the primary disease, recurrence, rejection, or PTLD. Thirty-four transplants grafted into 32 recipients between 1995 and 2005 were followed for a median of 3.5 yr (range 1-9.8). All patients survived. Graft rejection occurred in 10 cases during the first year post-transplantation and graft...

  5. Lysosomal storage diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carlos R.; Gahl, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are cytoplasmic organelles that contain a variety of different hydrolases. A genetic deficiency in the enzymatic activity of one of these hydrolases will lead to the accumulation of the material meant for lysosomal degradation. Examples include glycogen in the case of Pompe disease, glycosaminoglycans in the case of the mucopolysaccharidoses, glycoproteins in the cases of the oligosaccharidoses, and sphingolipids in the cases of Niemann-Pick disease types A and B, Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Krabbe disease, and metachromatic leukodystrophy. Sometimes, the lysosomal storage can be caused not by the enzymatic deficiency of one of the hydrolases, but by the deficiency of an activator protein, as occurs in the AB variant of GM2 gangliosidosis. Still other times, the accumulated lysosomal material results from failed egress of a small molecule as a consequence of a deficient transporter, as in cystinosis or Salla disease. In the last couple of decades, enzyme replacement therapy has become available for a number of lysosomal storage diseases. Examples include imiglucerase, taliglucerase and velaglucerase for Gaucher disease, laronidase for Hurler disease, idursulfase for Hunter disease, elosulfase for Morquio disease, galsulfase for Maroteaux-Lamy disease, alglucosidase alfa for Pompe disease, and agalsidase alfa and beta for Fabry disease. In addition, substrate reduction therapy has been approved for certain disorders, such as eliglustat for Gaucher disease. The advent of treatment options for some of these disorders has led to newborn screening pilot studies, and ultimately to the addition of Pompe disease and Hurler disease to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) in 2015 and 2016, respectively. PMID:29152458

  6. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - A multisystem disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Milic, Sandra; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Grgic, Ivana; Jakopcic, Ivan; Stimac, Davor; Wensveen, Felix; Orlic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common comorbidities associated with overweight and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Importantly, NAFLD is one of its most dangerous complications because it can lead to severe liver pathologies, including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Given the increasing worldwide prevalence of obesity, NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease and therefore is a major global health problem. Currently, NAFLD is predominantly regarded as a hepatic manifestation of MetS. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of NAFLD extend beyond the liver and are negatively associated with a range of chronic diseases, most notably cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is becoming increasingly clear that these diseases are the result of the same underlying pathophysiological processes associated with MetS, such as insulin resistance, chronic systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia. As a result, they have been shown to be independent reciprocal risk factors. In addition, recent data have shown that NAFLD actively contributes to aggravation of the pathophysiology of CVD, T2DM, and CKD, as well as several other pathologies. Thus, NAFLD is a direct cause of many chronic diseases associated with MetS, and better detection and treatment of fatty liver disease is therefore urgently needed. As non-invasive screening methods for liver disease become increasingly available, detection and treatment of NAFLD in patients with MetS should therefore be considered by both (sub-) specialists and primary care physicians. PMID:27920470

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Library is an extensive collection of books, fact sheets, videos, podcasts, and more. To get started, use ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PD Library Search library Topic Type Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse ... Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation Sleep: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease ...

  9. Lyme Disease Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not known to transmit Lyme disease include Lone star ticks ( Amblyomma americanum ), the American dog tick ( Dermacentor ... of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Beckham Leads Stretches Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? What Are Some Practical Strategies ...

  11. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... help understand the role of genetic factors in cardiovascular disease . However, the testing is sometimes used in clinical ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? Why Is It Important to Continue Self-Care ...

  14. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because they disproportionately affect impoverished people. More on: Neglected Tropical Diseases Prevention One of the most important ways to help prevent these parasitic diseases is to teach children the importance of washing hands correctly with soap ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... with Advanced Parkinson's How Does the DBS Device Work? What Are the Strategies for Managing Problems with ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... 2016: Coping Strategy: Yoga & Stretching CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 Expert Briefings: Depression and PD: ...

  17. Celiac Disease: Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Greg; Feighery, Conleth F

    2015-01-01

    Historically the diagnosis of celiac disease has relied upon clinical, serological, and histological evidence. In recent years the use of sensitive serological methods has meant an increase in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The heterogeneous nature of the disorder presents a challenge in the study and diagnosis of the disease with patients varying from subclinical or latent disease to patients with overt symptoms. Furthermore the related gluten-sensitive disease dermatitis herpetiformis, while distinct in some respects, shares clinical and serological features with celiac disease. Here we summarize current best practice for the diagnosis of celiac disease and briefly discuss newer approaches. The advent of next-generation assays for diagnosis and newer clinical protocols may result in more sensitive screening and ultimately the possible replacement of the intestinal biopsy as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis.

  18. Celiac Disease Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diet When To Get Tested? When you have symptoms suggesting celiac disease, such as chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, anemia , and ... Celiac tests are usually ordered for people with symptoms suggesting celiac disease, including anemia and abdominal pain. Sometimes celiac testing ...

  19. Addison's Disease: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison's disease Diagnosis Your doctor will talk to you first about your medical history and your signs and ... If your doctor thinks that you may have Addison's disease, you may undergo some of the following tests: ...

  20. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Cambios para Realizar en Casa, Parte 1 ...

  4. Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is fatty liver disease? Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Fatty liver disease is a condition in which fat builds ...

  5. Gum Disease and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Club Program Perio Store Education & Careers Careers in Periodontics Perio Exam for Dental Licensure Recommended Competencies Periodontal ... your risk of cardiovascular disease. Both diseases are chronic inflammatory conditions, and researchers believe that inflammation is ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ... to Know? Why Is Comprehensive Care or Team Approach Important? 2013 PSA Featuring Katie Couric What Are ...

  7. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... for Following a Medication Schedule? CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 What Is Patient-Centered Care? ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Changes Around the ...

  10. Valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parkinson's Care Partners OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Is the Progression ... Disease? What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? Hallucinations and ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... the Helpline? What are some strategies to prevent falls in PD patients? How Does Speech Therapy Help ...

  13. Machado-Joseph Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Machado-Joseph Disease Fact Sheet What is Machado-Joseph disease? What are the ... the repeat is in a protein-producing or coding region of the gene. Modifications of the mutant ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... or Exercise Programs Are Recommended? CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 1 Expert Briefings: Depression and PD: Treatment ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patients with Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Movimientos y Caídas, Parte 2 What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? Caregiver ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Getting Dressed What ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Excessive Daytime Sleepiness? Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? CareMAP: Putting Things in Place ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bringing Care to You Expert Care Programs Professional Education Expert Care Research shows people with Parkinson’s who ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: ... and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model ... Disease Psychosis: Hallucinations, Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Understanding Fatigue and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease ...

  2. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People Who Were Treated with hGH Thyroid Disease & Pregnancy Thyroid disease is a group of disorders that ... prescribes. What role do thyroid hormones play in pregnancy? Thyroid hormones are crucial for normal development of ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... your quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  4. Glomerular Disease in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Wiles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gender differences exist in the prevalence of glomerular diseases. Data based on histological diagnosis underestimate the prevalence of preeclampsia, which is almost certainly the commonest glomerular disease in the world, and uniquely gender-specific. Glomerular disease affects fertility via disease activity, the therapeutic use of cyclophosphamide, and underlying chronic kidney disease. Techniques to preserve fertility during chemotherapy and risk minimization of artificial reproductive techniques are considered. The risks, benefits, and effectiveness of different contraceptive methods for women with glomerular disease are outlined. Glomerular disease increases the risk of adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including preeclampsia; yet, diagnosis of preeclampsia is complicated by the presence of hypertension and proteinuria that precede pregnancy. The role of renal biopsy in pregnancy is examined, in addition to the use of emerging angiogenic biomarkers. The safety of drugs prescribed for glomerular disease in relation to reproductive health is detailed. The impact of both gender and pregnancy on long-term prognosis is discussed.

  5. Genetic Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has used its fundraising efforts to help further research programs at Mount Sinai. Spotlight: Gaucher Gaucher Disease is the most common of the lipid storage diseases. Learn about its symptoms, how it ...

  6. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better understanding of how neurological deficits arise in lipid storage diseases and on the development of new treatments targeting disease mechanisms. Specific research on the gangliodisoses including expanding the use of ...

  7. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ...

  8. Maple syrup urine disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000373.htm Maple syrup urine disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a disorder in ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help with Cognitive Impairment? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Las Actividades en ...

  10. [Emerging noninfectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Ezequiel

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, emerging diseases were defined as being infectious, acquiring high incidence, often suddenly, or being a threat or an unexpected phenomenon. This study discusses the hallmarks of emerging diseases, describing the existence of noninfectious emerging diseases, and elaborating on the advantages of defining noninfectious diseases as emerging ones. From the discussion of various mental health disorders, nutritional deficiencies, external injuries and violence outcomes, work injuries and occupational health, and diseases due to environmental factors, the conclusion is drawn that a wide variety of noninfectious diseases can be defined as emergent. Noninfectious emerging diseases need to be identified in order to improve their control and management. A new definition of "emergent disease" is proposed, one that emphasizes the pathways of emergence and conceptual traits, rather than descriptive features.

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... What Medications Help with Cognitive Impairment? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Help is just a click away. ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Misconceptions About Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Pensamiento y el Comportamiento, Parte 2 CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Jose Maria Lobo: Musica en vivo ...

  14. Motor Neuron Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other neurodegenerative diseases to better understand the function of neurons and other support cells and identify candidate therapeutic ... and other neurodegenerative diseases to better understand the function of neurons and other support cells and identify candidate therapeutic ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this disease. Learn more In your area About Shop A A ... Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model Interventions Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease Psychosis: ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Overview of Parkinson's Disease OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Is There a Cure ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Understanding Fatigue and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary ... Missing? Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Cognitive Impairment? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Freezing Episodes? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Overview of Parkinson's Disease ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... With Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? Caregiver Summit 2016: Maintaining Dignity & Identity What to Expect Emotionally Walking for ... Around the House: Part 2 What Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? Tips for Caregivers ...