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Sample records for lymphoma stage iii

  1. Intravenous Chemotherapy or Oral Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage III-IV HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma

  2. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Stage II Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

  3. Advanced-stage III/IV follicular lymphoma. Treatment strategies for individual patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzelmann, Frank; Bamberg, Michael; Weinmann, Martin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Ottinger, Hellmut [Dept. of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Univ. of Essen (Germany); Engelhard, Marianne [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Essen (Germany); Soekler, Martin [Dept. of Internal Medicine II, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Background: in patients with advanced-stage III/IV follicular lymphoma (FL), there are many treatment options available. The current challenge is to choose the optimal strategy for the individual patient. Methods: the literature was reviewed with respect to treatment strategies in patients with advanced FL by screening the PubMed databank. Results: in advanced-stage III/IV FL, median survival may approach 8-10 years. Treatment strategies include a watch-and-wait strategy, chemoimmunotherapy, monotherapy with rituximab, and - as an experimental approach so far - radioimmunotherapy. The use of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for patients in first remission or chemosensitive relapse prolongs progression-free survival while the effect on overall survival remains unclear compared to standard chemotherapy. However, long-term results are flawed by high relapse rates and risk of secondary malignancies. In patients with relapsed/chemoresistant disease, allogeneic HSCT constitutes the only curative approach but is associated with high treatment-related mortality. In the palliative setting, low-dose involved-field irradiation constitutes an effective treatment option in order to control local symptoms with potential long-lasting response. Conclusion: in case of advanced-disease FL, asymptomatic patients can be managed expectantly. In symptomatic patients, chemoimmunotherapy is regarded as standard therapy. In symptomatic elderly patients with relevant comorbidities, rituximab {+-} single-agent chemotherapy, or low-dose involved-field radiotherapy might be appropriate. For younger patients with chemoresistant/relapsed disease, allogeneic HSCT might be considered, since advances in supportive care and better patient selection have resulted in improved outcomes. (orig.)

  4. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Mohamed A.; Hamza, Hesham M.; Sayd, Heba A.; Ali, Amany M.

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI), Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient include...

  5. Combined modality treatment for stage I-II non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: CVP versus BACOP chemotherapy

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    Bajetta, E.; Valagussa, P.; Bonadonna, G.; Lattuada, A.; Buzzoni, R.; Rilke, F.; Banfi, A.

    1988-07-01

    This paper reports the 5-year results of a prospective randomized study beginning in 1976 on 177 evaluable patients with pathologic Stage I-IE and II-IIE non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with diffuse histology according to the Rappaport classification. Treatment consisted of either CVP or BACOP chemotherapy (3 cycles) followed by regional radiotherapy (40 to 50 Gy) and further cycles of either combination. In both arms, complete remission at the end of combined treatment was high (CVP 93%, BACOP 98%) regardless of age, stage or bulky disease. At 5 years, the comparative freedom from first progression was 62% for CVP vs 78% for BACOP (p = 0.02), respectively. Clinically relevant differences favoring BACOP chemotherapy were essentially documented in patients with large cell lymphomas (International Working Formulation), those with Stage II having more than three involved anatomical sites, bulky disease and age over 60 years. Recurrence within radiation fields was documented in only 5% of complete responders. Combined treatment was, in general, well tolerated particularly when BACOP was used. In only 2 patients given CVP post radiation cutaneous fibrosis was documented. Second solid tumors were detected in 4 patients. One patient started on CVP died because of brain stem necrosis after 45 Gy. We conclude that in Stage I-II patients with nodal and extranodal diffuse non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, particularly large cell lymphomas, combined modality approach with primary Adriamycin and bleomycin containing regimen, such as BACOP, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy offers high chances of cure with minimal toxicity.

  6. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Salem

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI, Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient included: Age, sex, and presentation, staging work up to determine extent of the disease and the type of resection performed, histopathological examination, details of chemotherapy, disease free survival and overall survival. The study included 25 boys and 10 girls with a median age of six years (range: 2.5:15. Thirty patients (86% presented with abdominal pain, 23 patients (66% presented with abdominal mass and distention, 13 patients (34% presented with weight loss, and intestinal obstruction occurred in six patients (17%. The ileo-cecal region and abdominal lymph nodes were the commonest sites (48.5%, 21% respectively. Burkitt's lymphoma was the most common histological type in 29 patients (83%. Ten (28.5% stage II (group A and 25 (71.5% stage III (group B. Complete resections were performed in 10 (28.5%, debulking in 6 (17% and imaging guided biopsy in 19 (54%. A11 patients received systemic chemotherapy. The median follow up duration was 63 months (range 51-78 months. The parameters that significantly affect the overall survival were stage at presentation complete resection for localized disease. In conclusion, the extent of disease at presentation is the most important prognostic factor in pediatric abdominal NHL. Surgery is restricted to defined situations such as; abdominal emergencies, diagnostic biopsy and total tumor extirpation in localized disease. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone in the management of pediatric abdominal NHL.

  7. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amany M; Sayd, Heba A; Hamza, Hesham M; Salem, Mohamed A

    2011-03-29

    Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI), Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient included: Age, sex, and presentation, staging work up to determine extent of the disease and the type of resection performed, histopathological examination, details of chemotherapy, disease free survival and overall survival. The study included 25 boys and 10 girls with a median age of six years (range: 2.5:15). Thirty patients (86%) presented with abdominal pain, 23 patients (66%) presented with abdominal mass and distention, 13 patients (34%) presented with weight loss, and intestinal obstruction occurred in six patients (17%). The ileo-cecal region and abdominal lymph nodes were the commonest sites (48.5%, 21% respectively). Burkitt's lymphoma was the most common histological type in 29 patients (83%). Ten (28.5%) stage II (group A) and 25 (71.5%) stage III (group B). Complete resections were performed in 10 (28.5%), debulking in 6 (17%) and imaging guided biopsy in 19 (54%). A11 patients received systemic chemotherapy. The median follow up duration was 63 months (range 51-78 months). The parameters that significantly affect the overall survival were stage at presentation complete resection for localized disease. In conclusion, the extent of disease at presentation is the most important prognostic factor in pediatric abdominal NHL. Surgery is restricted to defined situations such as; abdominal emergencies, diagnostic biopsy and total tumor extirpation in localized disease. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone in the management of pediatric abdominal NHL.

  8. Sequential chemoradiotherapy for stage I/II nasal natural killer/T cell lymphoma

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    Noh, Young Joo [Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young Hyeh [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-15

    Authors would report the results of sequential CHOP chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone) and involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) for early stage nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL). Fourteen among 17 patients, who were registered at the Samsung Medical Center tumor registry with stage I and II nasal NKTCL from March 1995 to December 1999 received this treatment protocol. Three to four cycles of CHOP chemotherapy were given at 3 weeks' interval, which was followed by local IFRT including the known tumor extent and the adjacent draining lymphatics. Favorable responses after chemotherapy (before IFRT) were achievable only in seven patients (5 CR's + 2 PR's: 50%), while seven patients showed disease progression. There were six patients with local failures, two with distant relapses, and none with regional lymphatic failure. The actuarial overall survival and progression-free survival at 3 years were 50.0% and 42.9%. All the failures and deaths occurred within 13 months of the treatment start. The factors that correlated with the improved survival were the absence of 'B' symptoms, the favorable response to chemotherapy and overall treatment, and the low risk by international prognostic index on univariate analyses. Compared with the historic treatment results by IFRT either alone or followed by chemotherapy, the current trial failed to demonstrate advantages with respect to the failure pattern and survival. Development of new treatment strategy in combining IFRT and chemotherapy is required for improving outcomes.

  9. Omitting radiotherapy in early positron emission tomography-negative stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma is associated with an increased risk of early relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raemaekers, John M M; André, Marc P E; Federico, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Combined-modality treatment is standard treatment for patients with clinical stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We hypothesized that an early positron emission tomography (PET) scan could be used to adapt treatment. Therefore, we started the randomized EORTC/LYSA/FIL Intergroup H10 trial ...

  10. Improved five year survival after combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy for Stage I-II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

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    Monfardini, S.; Banfi, A.; Bonadonna, G.; Rilke, F.; Milani, F.; Valagussa, P.; Lattuada, A.

    1980-02-01

    In order to improve the prognosis of patients with localized non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) who are treated with radiotherapy (RT), a prospective controlled study utilizing a combined modality approach was carried out in patients with pathologic Stage I-II NHL. After treatment with regional RT, patients in complete remission were randomized to receive either no further therapy or 6 cycles of cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone (CVP). At 5 years from completion of irradiation, the relapse-free survival was 46.3% after RT and 72.1% after RT plus CVP (P=0.005). The corresponding findings for the overall survival calculated from the beginning of irradiation were 55.8 and 82.8% respectively (P=0.03). The favorable effects of adjuvant chemotherapy on relapse-free survival were statistically significant only in the subgroup with diffuse histology. In patients who relapsed after RT alone, the salvage therapy failed to induce a high incidence of second durable remission. Adjuvant chemotherapy is indicated to improve the curve rate in pathologic stage I-II NHL with diffuse histology when regional RT is utilized.

  11. Radiotherapy alone for stage I-III low grade follicular lymphoma: long-term outcome and comparison of extended field and total nodal irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guckenberger Matthias

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze long-term results of radiotherapy alone for stage I-III low grade follicular lymphoma and to compare outcome after extended field irradiation (EFI and total nodal irradiation (TNI. Methods and materials Between 1982 and 2007, 107 patients were treated with radiotherapy alone for low grade follicular lymphoma at Ann Arbor stage I (n = 50, II (n = 36 and III (n = 21; 48 and 59 patients were treated with EFI and TNI, respectively. The median total dose in the first treatment series of the diaphragmatic side with larger lymphoma burden was 38 Gy (25 Gy – 50 Gy and after an interval of median 30 days, a total dose of 28 Gy (12.6 Gy – 45 Gy was given in the second treatment series completing TNI. Results After a median follow-up of 14 years for living patients, 10-years and 15-years overall survival (OS were 64% and 50%, respectively. Survival was not significantly different between stages I, II and III. TNI and EFI resulted in 15-years OS of 65% and 34% but patients treated with TNI were younger, had better performance status and higher stage of disease compared to patients treated with EFI. In multivariate analysis, only age at diagnosis (p  Conclusions Radiotherapy alone for stage I and II follicular lymphoma resulted in long-term OS with high rates of disease control; no benefit of TNI over EFI was observed. For stage III follicular lymphoma, TNI achieved promising OS and FFP and should be considered as a potentially curative treatment option.

  12. Radiation Therapy Administration and Survival in Stage I/II Extranodal Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Adam J., E-mail: adam_olszewski@brown.edu; Desai, Amrita

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the factors associated with the use of radiation therapy and associated survival outcomes in early-stage marginal zone lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Methods and Materials: We extracted data on adult patients with stage I/II MALT lymphoma diagnoses between 1998 and 2010 recorded in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. We studied factors associated with radiation therapy administration in a logistic regression model and described the cumulative incidence of lymphoma-related death (LRD) according to receipt of the treatment. The association of radiation therapy with survival was explored in multivariate models with adjustment for immortal time bias. Results: Of the 7774 identified patients, 36% received radiation therapy as part of the initial course of treatment. Older patients; black or Hispanic men; white, Hispanic, and black women; and socioeconomically disadvantaged and underinsured patients had a significantly lower chance of receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy administration was associated with a lower chance of LRD in most sites. In cutaneous, ocular, and salivary MALT lymphomas, the 5-year estimate of LRD after radiation therapy was 0%. The association of radiation therapy with overall survival in different lymphoma sites was heterogeneous, and statistically significant in cutaneous (hazard ratio 0.45, P=.009) and ocular (hazard ratio 0.47, P<.0001) locations after multivariate adjustment. Conclusions: Demographic factors are associated with the use of radiation therapy in MALT lymphoma. Clinicians should be sensitive to those disparities because the administration of radiation therapy may be associated with improved survival, particularly in cutaneous and ocular lymphomas.

  13. Persistent improved results after adding vincristine and bleomycin to a cyclophosphamide/hydroxorubicin/Vm-26/prednisone combination (CHVmP) in stage III-IV intermediate- and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, J H; Carde, P; Somers, R; Thomas, J; Kluin-Nelemans, J C; Bron, D; Noordijk, E M; Cosset, J M; Bijnens, L; Teodorovic, I; Hagenbeek, A

    1997-01-01

    CHOP has been and still is regarded by many as the 'standard' treatment of advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In 1980 the EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group started a study to evaluate the addition of vincristine and bleomycin to its standard four-drug combination chemotherapy, CHVmP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxorubicin, Vm-26, prednisone). Eligible patients were stage III or IV, intermediate- to high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Working Formulation E-I). One-hundred-eighty-nine patients were entered, of whom 140 were eligible and evaluable. A previous report showed an improved response rate and failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival for the combination CHVmP-VB. At ten years, the outcome still favors the addition of vincristine and bleomycin. The FFS was 34% vs. 23% and the overall survival 34% vs 22%. This difference was mainly due to a difference in CR rate (74% vs. 49%), Relapse-free survival for patients reaching a CR was the same in both arms. When the patients were grouped according to the International Prognostic Factor Index, no statistically significant difference could be observed in favor of one treatment within either group. This trial clearly demonstrates the benefit gained by the addition of vincristine and bleomycin to 'standard' chemotherapy for intermediate and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  14. Anti-CD22 CAR-T Therapy for CD19-refractory or Resistant Lymphoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-22

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  15. Predictors of Local Recurrence After Rituximab-Based Chemotherapy Alone in Stage III and IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Guiding Decisions for Consolidative Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegadeesh, Naresh; Rajpara, Raj; Esiashvili, Natia; Shi, Zheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Yuan [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Shared Resource, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Okwan-Duodu, Derrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Flowers, Christopher R. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K., E-mail: drkhurram2000@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The role of consolidative radiation therapy (RT) for stage III and IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the era of rituximab is not well defined. There is evidence that some patients with bulky disease may benefit, but patient selection criteria are not well established. We sought to identify a subset of patients who experienced a high local failure rate after receiving rituximab-based chemotherapy alone and hence may benefit from the addition of consolidative RT. Methods and Materials: Two hundred eleven patients with stage III and IV DLBCL treated between August 1999 and January 2012 were reviewed. Of these, 89 had a complete response to systemic therapy including rituximab and received no initial RT. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed, with local recurrence (LR) as the primary outcome. Results: The median follow-up time was 43.9 months. Fifty percent of patients experienced LR at 5 years. In multivariate analysis, tumor ≥5 cm and stage III disease were associated with increased risk of LR. The 5-year LR-free survival was 47.4% for patients with ≥5-cm lesions versus 74.7% for patients with <5-cm lesions (P=.01). In patients with <5-cm tumors, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was ≥15 in all patients with LR. The 5-year LR-free survival was 100% in SUV<15 versus 68.8% in SUV≥15 (P=.10). Conclusions: Advanced-stage DLBCL patients with stage III disease or with disease ≥5 cm appear to be at an increased risk for LR. Patients with <5-cm disease and SUVmax ≥15 may be at higher risk for LR. These patients may benefit from consolidative RT after chemoimmunotherapy.

  16. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by GDP chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Shengyu; Gui, Lin; He, Xiaohui; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Changgong; Yang, Sheng; Xing, Puyuan; Sun, Yan; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-09-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the majority of ENKTL cases are diagnosed at the localized stage. Radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has been used for localized ENKTL, but the optimal combination treatment modality and the best first-line chemotherapy regimen have not been defined. In this retrospective study, 44 patients with newly diagnosed, stages I/II ENKTL were enrolled and received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 50-56 Gy) followed by GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) chemotherapy. The median number of chemotherapy cycles per patient was 4 (range, 2-6 cycles). At the end of treatment, the overall response rate was 95% (42/44), including 39 patients (89%) who attained complete response. Two patients developed systemic progression after IMRT. With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were 85% (95% CI, 74 to 96%) and 77% (95% CI, 64 to 91%), respectively. Locoregional and systemic failure rates for this treatment were 9% (4/44) and 14% (6/44), respectively. The most common grades 3 to 4 adverse events included leukopenia (37%), neutropenia (34%), and mucositis (25%). No treatment-related deaths were observed. This study suggested high efficacy and low toxicity of IMRT followed by GDP regimen chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II ENKTL patients. These results require further investigation in prospective trials.

  17. Stages of Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ...

  18. Stages of Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ...

  19. Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorth, Jennifer A., E-mail: jennifer.dorth@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Coleman, R. Edward [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

  20. Phase III intergroup study of fludarabine phosphate compared with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy in newly diagnosed patients with stage II and IV low-grade malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hagenbeek; H. Eghbali; S. Monfardini; U. Viloto; P.J. Hoskin; C. de Wolf-Peeters; K. MacLennan; E. Staab-Renner; J. Kalmus; A. Schott; I. Teodorovic; A. Negrouk; M. van Glabbeke; R. Marcus

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy and safety of fludarabine phosphate with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (CVP) in 381 previously untreated, advanced-stage, low-grade (lg) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients in a phase III, multicenter study. Patients and Methods Between 1993 and 1997

  1. Memory-enriched CAR-T Cells Immunotherapy for B Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-25

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  2. Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-15

    HIV Infection; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  3. Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH-R) in Treating Patients With MYC-Associated B-Cell Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic

  4. A phase II prospective study of the "Sandwich" protocol, L-asparaginase, cisplatin, dexamethasone and etoposide chemotherapy combined with concurrent radiation and cisplatin, in newly diagnosed, I/II stage, nasal type, extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming; Zhang, Li; Xie, Li; Zhang, Hong; Jiang, Yu; Liu, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Rong; Deng, Yao-Tiao; Zhao, Sha; Zou, Li-Qun

    2017-07-25

    Nasal-type, extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKTCL) is a special type of lymphomas with geographic and racial specificity. Up to now, the standard first-line treatment is still not unified. In our previous report, the "sandwich" protocol produced good results. Continuing to use the "sandwich" mode, a new chemotherapy composed of L-asparaginase, cisplatin, etoposide and dexamethasone (LVDP) plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was conducted in more patients with newly diagnosed, I/II stage ENKTCL. The results showed that 66 patients were enrolled. Overall response rate was 86.4% including 83.3% complete response and 3.0% partial remission. With the median follow-up of 23.5 months, 3-year overall survival and 3-year progression-free survival were 70.1% and 67.4%, respectively. The survival rate in stage II and extra-cavity stage I was significantly less than that in limited stage I (p < 0.05). Therefore, we thought that the "sandwich" mode was worthy of being generalized and LVDP combined with CCRT was an effective protocol for I/II stage ENKTCL. But this regimen was not suitable for all stage I/II patients and warrants larger sample and layering investigation. This study was a registered clinical trial with number ChiCTR-TNC-12002353.

  5. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  6. Rituximab With or Without Yttrium Y-90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma

  7. Superiority of second over first generation chemotherapy in a randomized trial for stage III-IV intermediate and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL): the 1980-1985 EORTC trial. The EORTC Lymphoma Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carde, P; Meerwaldt, J H; van Glabbeke, M; Somers, R; Monconduit, M; Thomas, J; de Wolf-Peeters, C; de Pauw, B; Tanguy, A; Kluin-Nelemans, J C

    1991-06-01

    A first-generation CHOP-like cyclic combination chemotherapy (CT) regimen using cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 IV d1, hydroxorubicin (doxorubicin) 50 mg/m2 IV d1, VM26 60 mg/m2 IV d1, and prednisone 40 mg/m2 PO d1-5 (CHVmP) was compared to a second-generation combination wherein vincristine 1.4 mg/m2 IV and bleomycin 6 mg/m2 IM/IV were added at mid-interval (d15) to the former drugs (CHVmP + VB) in the treatment of intermediate- and high-grade malignant NHL. From April 1980 to January 1986, 141 eligible patients with stage III-IV unfavorable histologies (except T lymphoblastic NHL) entered this EORTC randomized trial. In both arms adjuvant radiotherapy (30 Gy) was given in instances of bulky or residual disease. In all patient subsets the outcome favored the second-generation regimen. The difference was even greater in patients with Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma (DLCL). At 5 years, overall survival was 53% with CHVmP + VB versus 29% (p = 0.002). The advantage was due to a higher complete remission (CR) rate (80% versus 50%, p = 0.01). Indeed, once CR was achieved the relapse-free survival (RFS) was not significantly influenced (59% versus 49%). No significant additional toxicity could be attributed to vincristine and bleomycin. This study demonstrates a clear benefit for intermediate- and high-risk malignant NHL and particularly DLCL from intercalating non-myelotoxic drugs at mid-cycle intervals, without adverse effects.

  8. Stages of Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lymphoma Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (small lymphocytic lymphoma) Mycosis Fungoides (Including Sézary Syndrome) Treatment (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma) Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment Non-Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  9. Radiotherapy Compared to Other Strategies in the Treatment of Stage I/II Follicular Lymphoma: A Study of 404 Patients with a Median Follow-Up of 15 Years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dlawer Abdulla Barzenje

    Full Text Available To investigate outcome for patients with follicular lymphoma (FL stage I-II treated at a population-based referral institution with a median follow-up of 15 years. Overall and cause-specific survival was compared to that of a sex, age and residency matched individuals from normal population.404 patients with early stage FL treated between 1980 and 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. Two of three patients had stage I disease. Based on clinical characteristics, first line treatments were radiotherapy (RT (48% of patients, chemotherapy (CT (16%, combined chemo-and radiotherapy (CRT (16% or observation (OBS (15%. Survival was modeled with Kaplan-Meier methodology. Multivariate analyses were performed with the Cox model.Fifteen years overall survival (OS, progression free survival (PFS and time to next treatment (TNT were 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 45-55, 42% (95% CI: 36-47 and 48% (95% CI, 42-54, respectively. For patients treated with RT 97% achieved a complete remission, and 15 year OS, PFS and TNT were 57% (95% CI, 50-64, 46% (95% CI, 39-54 and 49% (95% CI, 42-57, respectively. Relapse rate after RT and CRT was 49% and 36%, respectively. Only 2% of patients who received RT or CRT relapsed inside the radiation field and 5% had isolated near-field relapse. No statistical differences were found between treatment groups regarding death from cardiovascular disease or incidence of second cancer. Compared to a matched normal population, non-lymphoma cancer mortality was higher among patients given RT, hazard ratio 1.66 (95% CI: 1.14-2.42; P<0.01. Compared to other treatment modalities, patients selected for observation without treatment did not have inferior outcome.A differentiated treatment strategy in early stage FL results in long term survival for the majority of patients. OBS is a valid initial choice for selected patients without lymphoma-related symptoms.

  10. Clinical presentation and staging of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallamini, Andrea; Hutchings, Martin; Ramadan, Safaa

    2016-01-01

    . The main body of the review will be dedicated to the recently published guidelines for lymphoma staging (including HL) agreed by the experts during the 12th International Congress for Malignant Lymphoma in Lugano. The recommendations of the panel on how to integrate flurodeoxyglucose positron emission......, sometimes HL is a subtle disease, difficult to diagnose for the paucity of symptoms, the absence of physical findings, or for concomitant immunologic disorders: a compete overview of the common and rare patterns of HL clinical presentation will be also offered. The future perspective of PET scan use...

  11. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  12. Stages of Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ...

  13. Ofatumumab, Pentostatin, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  14. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  15. Bortezomib and Filgrastim in Promoting Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular

  16. Alvocidib in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  17. A comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy and sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of Stage I-II nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianfeng; Yang, Yong; Jin, Fu; He, Yanan; Zhong, Mingsong; Luo, Huanli; Qiu, Da; Li, Chao; Yang, Han; He, Guanglei; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This article is aimed to compare the dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Stage I-II nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NNKTL). Ten patients with Stage I-II NNKTL treated with IMRT were replanned with VMAT (2 arcs). The prescribed dose of the planning target volume (PTV) was 50Gy in 25 fractions. The VMAT plans with the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (Version 8.6.15) were based on an Eclipse treatment planning system; the monitor units (MUs) and treatment time (T) were scored to measure the expected treatment efficiency. All the 10 patients under the study were subject to comparisons regarding the quality of target coverage, the efficiency of delivery, and the exposure of normal adjacent organs at risk (OARs). The study shows that VMAT was associated with a better conformal index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) (both p delivery time. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy and sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of Stage I-II nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xianfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chongqing Cancer Institute, Chongqing (China); Yang, Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Jin, Fu; He, Yanan; Zhong, Mingsong; Luo, Huanli; Qiu, Da; Li, Chao; Yang, Han; He, Guanglei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chongqing Cancer Institute, Chongqing (China); Wang, Ying, E-mail: zjajf@126.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chongqing Cancer Institute, Chongqing (China)

    2016-04-01

    This article is aimed to compare the dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Stage I-II nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NNKTL). Ten patients with Stage I-II NNKTL treated with IMRT were replanned with VMAT (2 arcs). The prescribed dose of the planning target volume (PTV) was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The VMAT plans with the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (Version 8.6.15) were based on an Eclipse treatment planning system; the monitor units (MUs) and treatment time (T) were scored to measure the expected treatment efficiency. All the 10 patients under the study were subject to comparisons regarding the quality of target coverage, the efficiency of delivery, and the exposure of normal adjacent organs at risk (OARs). The study shows that VMAT was associated with a better conformal index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) (both p < 0.05) but slightly higher dose to OARs than IMRT. The MUs with VMAT (650.80 ± 24.59) were fewer than with IMRT (1300.10 ± 57.12) (relative reduction of 49.94%, p = 0.00) when using 2-Gy dose fractions. The treatment time with VMAT (3.20 ± 0.02 minutes) was shorter than with IMRT (7.38 ± 0.18 minutes) (relative reduction of 56.64%, p = 0.00). We found that VMAT and IMRT both provide satisfactory target dosimetric coverage and OARs sparing clinically. Likely to deliver a bit higher dose to OARs, VMAT in comparison with IMRT, is still a better choice for treatment of patients with Stage I-II NNKTL, thanks to better dose distribution, fewer MUs, and shorter delivery time.

  19. Radiation therapy planning for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Filippi, Andrea R

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements...

  20. Anti-ICOS Monoclonal Antibody MEDI-570 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Follicular Variant or Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Follicular Variant Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3a Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Recurrent Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides; Stage III Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides; Stage IV Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides

  1. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  2. Cyclophosphamide, Alvocidib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With High Risk B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  3. Curcumin and Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage 0-II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  4. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  6. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-27

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Competitive Transfer of αCD19-TCRz-CD28 and αCD19-TCRz-CD137 CAR-T Cells for B-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-22

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  8. Fludarabine Phosphate, Radiation Therapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Rituximab for High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  9. Management of Early-stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herst, J; Crump, M; Baldassarre, F G; MacEachern, J; Sussman, J; Hodgson, D; Cheung, M C

    2017-01-01

    In the past, treatment for patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma consisted mainly of radiotherapy. Now, chemotherapy alone and chemoradiotherapy are treatment options. These guidelines aim to provide recommendations on the optimal management of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma. We conducted a systematic review searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and other literature sources from 2003 to 2015, and applied the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). Two authors independently reviewed and selected studies, and appraised the evidence quality. The document underwent internal and external review by content, methodology experts, a patient representative and clinicians in Ontario. We have issued recommendations for patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma and with nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma; with favourable and unfavourable prognosis; and for the use of positron emission tomography to direct treatment. We have provided our interpretation of the evidence and considerations for implementation. Examples of recommendations are: 'Patients with early-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma should not be treated with radiotherapy alone'; 'chemotherapy plus radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone are recommended treatment options for patients with early-stage non-bulky Hodgkin lymphoma'; 'The Working Group does not recommend the use of a negative interim positron emission tomography scan alone to identify patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma for whom radiotherapy can be omitted without a reduction in progression-free survival'. Through the use of GRADE, recommendations were geared towards patient important outcomes and their strength reflected the available evidence and its interpretation from the patients' point of view. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation Plus Chemotherapy in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adding radiation therapy to chemotherapy may improve outcomes in patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, according to a paper published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in February 2011, but the long-term effects of this regimen are not

  11. Recommendations for initial evaluation, staging, and response assessment of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma: the Lugano classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheson, Bruce D; Fisher, Richard I; Barrington, Sally F; Cavalli, Franco; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Zucca, Emanuele; Lister, T Andrew

    2014-09-20

    The purpose of this work was to modernize recommendations for evaluation, staging, and response assessment of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). A workshop was held at the 11th International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma in Lugano, Switzerland, in June 2011, that included leading hematologists, oncologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, and nuclear medicine physicians, representing major international lymphoma clinical trials groups and cancer centers. Clinical and imaging subcommittees presented their conclusions at a subsequent workshop at the 12th International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma, leading to revised criteria for staging and of the International Working Group Guidelines of 2007 for response. As a result, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)–computed tomography (CT) was formally incorporated into standard staging for FDG-avid lymphomas. A modification of the Ann Arbor descriptive terminology will be used for anatomic distribution of disease extent, but the suffixes A or B for symptoms will only be included for HL. A bone marrow biopsy is no longer indicated for the routine staging of HL and most diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. However, regardless of stage, general practice is to treat patients based on limited (stages I and II, nonbulky) or advanced (stage III or IV) disease, with stage II bulky disease considered as limited or advanced disease based on histology and a number of prognostic factors. PET-CT will be used to assess response in FDG-avid histologies using the 5-point scale. The product of the perpendicular diameters of a single node can be used to identify progressive disease. Routine surveillance scans are discouraged. These recommendations should improve evaluation of patients with lymphoma and enhance the ability to compare outcomes of clinical trials.

  12. Radiation Therapy Planning for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Departments of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Dabaja, Bouthaina S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas (United States); Filippi, Andrea R. [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Illidge, Tim [Department of Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Tsang, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Petersen, Peter M.; Schut, Deborah A. [Departments of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Garcia, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas (United States); Headley, Jayne [Department of Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Specht, Lena [Departments of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Results: Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. Conclusions: RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs.

  13. Radiation therapy planning for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Filippi, Andrea R; Illidge, Tim; Tsang, Richard; Ricardi, Umberto; Petersen, Peter M; Schut, Deborah A; Garcia, John; Headley, Jayne; Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit; Ragona, Riccardo; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  15. Silicon Phthalocyanine 4 and Photodynamic Therapy in Stage IA-IIA Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-03

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  16. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, poorly differentiated lymphocytic and mixed cell types. Results of sequential staging procedures, response to therapy, and survival of 100 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitran, J.D.; Golomb, H.M.; Ultmann, J.E.

    1978-07-01

    The results of sequential staging procedures including laparotomy, radiotherapy, and combination chemotherapy are reported for 100 patients with poorly differentiated lymphocytic (PDL) and mixed cell (MC) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Twelve patients were found to have localized disease, pathologic stage (PS) I or II; 88 patients had PS III or IV disease. Bone marrow biopsy showed a high incidence of involvement and advanced 34% of the patients from PS I, II, and III to PS IV. Staging laparotomy has a very limited role in the evaluation of these patients. All of 12 patients with PS I and II NHL were treated with radiotherapy; at 5 years, they had 100% survival, 80% being disease-free. Fifteen patients with PS III disease were treated with total nodal radiotherapy (TNRT) alone and had a median disease-free survival of 41 months. The remaining patients with PS III and IV disease were treated with chemotherapy consisting of vincristine and prednisone (V and P); cyclophosphamide, vincristine (Oncovin), procarbazine, and prednisone (COPP); cyclophosphamide, vincristine (Oncovin), adriamycin, and prednisone (COPA); or palliative therapy consisting of chlorambucil and prednisone. Two-year and 4-year survivals for patients with diffuse lymphoma were 93% and 60%, respectively; for patients with +2 nodular lymphoma, 80% and 30%; and for patients with nodular lymphomas, 76 to 93% and 50%, respectively. Treatment with COPP showed no advantage over V and P, palliative therapy, or TNRT for patients with +2 nodular and nodular disease. The likelihood of cure appears most promising for patients in complete remission (CR) with diffuse lymphoma; patients in CR with nodular lymphoma show a high rate of relapse over 5 years of observation. We conclude that staging laparotomy in PDL and MC NHL is of limited value, and that the role of aggressive chemotherapy for patients with +2 nodular and nodular lymphoma needs to be redefined.

  17. A population-based study of prognosis in advanced stage follicular lymphoma managed by watch and wait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Bilgrau, Anders E; de Nully Brown, Peter; Mylam, Karen J; Ahmad, Syed A; Pedersen, Lars M; Gang, Anne O; Bentzen, Hans H; Juul, Maja B; Bergmann, Olav J; Pedersen, Robert S; Nielsen, Berit J; Johnsen, Hans E; Dybkaer, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Hutchings, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Watch and wait (WAW) is a common approach for asymptomatic, advanced stage follicular lymphoma (FL), but single-agent rituximab is an alternative for these patients. In this nationwide study we describe the outcome of patients selected for WAW. A cohort of 286 out of 849 (34%) stage III-IVA FL patients seen between 2000 and 2011, were managed expectantly and included. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 35% [95% confidence interval (CI) 29-42]. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 65% (95%CI 54-78), and the cumulative risk of dying from lymphoma within 10 years of diagnosis was 13% (95%CI 7-20). Elevated lactate dehydrogenase and > four nodal regions involved were associated with a higher risk of lymphoma treatment and death from lymphoma. The WAW patients and a matched background population had similar OS during the first 50 months after diagnosis (P = 0·7), but WAW patients had increased risk of death after 50 months (P < 0·001). The estimated loss of residual life after 10 years was 6·8 months. The 10-year cumulative risk of histological transformation was 22% (95%CI 15-29) and the 3-year OS after transformation was 71% (95%CI 58-87%). In conclusion, advanced stage FL managed by WAW had a favourable outcome and abandoning this strategy could lead to overtreatment in some patients.

  18. Bevacizumab, Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage III, Stage IVA, or Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-21

    Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  19. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  20. Sperm quality before treatment in patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma enrolled in EORTC-GELA Lymphoma Group trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaalj, Marleen A. E.; Heutte, Natacha; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Raemaekers, John M. M.; Carde, Patrice; Noordijk, Evert M.; Ferme, Christophe; Thomas, Jose; Eghbali, Houchingue; Brice, Pauline; Bonmati, Caroline; Henry-Amar, Michel; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although widely recommended, cryopreservation of sperm is sometimes not performed for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma because of presumed poor sperm quality related to the disease. We investigated sperm quality and factors determining it in untreated patients with early stage Hodgkin's l

  1. Treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engert, Andreas; Raemaekers, John

    2016-07-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has become one of the best curable malignancies today. This is particularly true for patients with early-stage disease. Today, most patients in this risk group are treated with a combination of chemotherapy followed by small-field radiotherapy. More recent clinical trials such as the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) HD10 study demonstrated, that even two cycles of ABVD followed by 20 Gy involved-field radiation therapy (IF-RT) are sufficient and result in more than 90% of patients being cured. The current treatment for early unfavorable patients is either four cycles of ABVD plus 30 Gy IF-RT or two cycles of BEACOPPbaseline followed by two cycles of ABVD plus IF-RT. Here, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) demonstrated that in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive patients after two cycles of ABVD, treatment switched to two cycles of BEACOPPbaseline plus radiotherapy results in significantly improved outcomes. Other aspects including attempts to further reduce intensity of treatment will be discussed.

  2. Chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Christine; Rehan, Fareed Ahmed; Skoetz, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combined modality treatment (CMT) consisting of chemotherapy followed by localised radiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). However, due to long term adverse effects such as secondary malignancies, the role of radiotherapy has been...... questioned recently and some clinical study groups advocate chemotherapy only for this indication. OBJECTIVES: We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing chemotherapy alone with CMT in patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma with respect...

  3. Results of simultaneous combination therapy with radiation and chemotherapeutics in stage I. II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yutaka

    1989-01-01

    From October 1973 through August 1986, 100 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (Male 61, Female 39, Mean age 56 yr) were treated in our department. Diffuse large cell type was the most predominant histologic type (63 patients). There were 29 Stage I, 45 Stage II, 14 Stage III and 12 Stage IV patients. Since Aug. 1981, simultaneous therapy combinations involving radiation and chemotherapeutic techniques in Stage I,II patients were used. Complication such as leucopenia, mucositis and fever were encounterd occasionally, but the therapy was completed when the administration of drugs had been stopped for a few weeks. Treatment results of combination therapy were quite excellent compared to previous ones; 5 year survival was 100% vs 67% in Stage I (not significant) and 92% vs 44% in Stage II (p<0.01). As for radiologic examination for staging, it was concluded that CT-scans, lymphography, /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and GI study are indispensable, bone scintigraphy is desirable and liver-spleen scitigraphy is not necessary.

  4. GLASS COMPOSITION AND SOLUTION SPECIATION EFFECTS ON STAGE III DISSOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantano, Carlo G; Trivelpiece, Cory L; Rice, Jarret A

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  5. Position emission tomography with or without computed tomography in the primary staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Hansen, Mads;

    2006-01-01

    In order to receive the most appropriate therapy, patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) must be accurately stratified into different prognostic staging groups. Computed tomography (CT) plays a pivotal role in the conventional staging. The aim of the present study was to investigate the value...

  6. Does Radiation Have a Role in Advanced Stage Hodgkin’s or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the most effective agents available in the treatment of lymphomas. However, it is a local treatment, and today, with systemic treatments assuming a primary role for induction of response, RT is primarily used for consolidation. For advanced stage lymphomas, the in...... and indication for RT to residual masses has not been tested in randomized trials. In advanced indolent NHL, very low dose RT offers excellent palliation with very few side effects. Modern RT in advanced lymphomas warrants further evaluation in randomized trials.......Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the most effective agents available in the treatment of lymphomas. However, it is a local treatment, and today, with systemic treatments assuming a primary role for induction of response, RT is primarily used for consolidation. For advanced stage lymphomas...... treatment of larger and anatomically more challenging target volumes with much less radiation to normal tissues and consequently much lower risks of long-term complications. The modern concept of involved site radiation therapy (ISRT) has now been accepted as standard in lymphomas. In advanced Hodgkin...

  7. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Lenalidomide-bendamustine-rituximab in untreated mantle cell lymphoma > 65 years, the Nordic Lymphoma Group phase I+II trial NLG-MCL4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsson-Lindblad, Alexandra; Kolstad, Arne; Laurell, Anna;

    2016-01-01

    For elderly patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), there is no defined standard therapy. In this multicenter open-label phase I/II trial we evaluated the addition of lenalidomide (LEN) to rituximab-bendamustine (R-B) as first-line treatment to elderly MCL patients. Patients >65 years with untr......For elderly patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), there is no defined standard therapy. In this multicenter open-label phase I/II trial we evaluated the addition of lenalidomide (LEN) to rituximab-bendamustine (R-B) as first-line treatment to elderly MCL patients. Patients >65 years...

  9. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino;

    2012-01-01

    were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...... correctly predicted as stage IV-like, and the remaining patients were predicted as stage I-like and unclassifiable, respectively. Stage II patients could not be stratified. CONCLUSIONS: The 128-gene signature showed reproducibility in stage III colon cancer, but could not predict recurrence in stage II...

  10. Interobserver delineation uncertainty in involved-node radiation therapy (INRT) for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne C; Girinsky, Theodore; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In early-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) the target volume nowadays consists of the volume of the originally involved nodes. Delineation of this volume on a post-chemotherapy CT-scan is challenging. We report on the interobserver variability in target volume definiti...

  11. Do we need an early unfavorable (intermediate) stage of Hodgkin's lymphoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Raemaekers, John

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of patients who have early unfavorable or intermediate-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma has greatly improved. The increasing efficacy of chemotherapy and late toxic effects of wide-field radiotherapy justify the careful testing of the new involved-node radiotherapy principle in the combined-m...

  12. Impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT Staging in Newly Diagnosed Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin; Mylam, Karen Juul

    2013-01-01

    F-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a highly accurate staging method in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). We retrospectively compared the staging results obtained in two large cohorts of patients with cHL diagnosed before (n = 324) and after (n = 406......%, p Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) risk classification (early, intermediate, advanced disease) predicted outcome in PET...

  13. The effect on esophagus after different radiotherapy techniques for early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anni; Maraldo, M.; Brodin, Nils Patrik

    2013-01-01

    The cure rate of early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is excellent; investigating the late effects of treatment is thus important. Esophageal toxicity is a known side effect in patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the mediastinum, although little is known of this in HL survivors. This study inv...... investigates the dose to the esophagus in the treatment of early stage HL using different RT techniques. Estimated risks of early esophagitis, esophageal stricture and cancer are compared between treatments....

  14. Morphology and staging of primary gastric non-Hodgkin lymphoma (MALT) in hydro-CT imaging; Morphologie und Staging primaerer mukosaassoziierter Lymphome des Magens in der Hydro-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenacher, L.; Duex, M.; Hallscheidt, P.; Libicher, M.; Richter, G.M.; Kauffmann, G.W. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radiodiagnostik

    1998-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluation by hydro-CT in diagnosing and staging of primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the stomach (MALT). Material and methods: 15 patients with MALT lymphoma underwent imaging by hydro-CT (helical CT scanning optimised for parenchymal and vessel contrast with distension of the gastric wall by water). The CT scans were evaluated for the site, morphology, extent and contrast enhancement of gastric lymphoma; in addition, the number and location of abdominal lymph nodes were examined. The results of CT imaging were compared with the findings at endoscopy + biopsy and endosonography and in case of gastrectomy also with the histopathological results. Results: All lymphomas were correctly diagnosed and were mostly located in the distal parts of the stomach. MALT lymphoma typically grew submucosally, infiltration of the mucosa was rare. Most tumours showed marked contrast enhancement of the mucosa and poor enhancement of the submucosa. Hydro-CT and endosonography had similar accuracies in respect of staging of compartment I and II lymph nodes. Staging of distant nodal groups was more accurate by hydro-CT. Conclusion: Hydro-CT is non-invasive and may be used for diagnosis and staging of primary gastric lymphoma with a typical morphology of gastric lymphoma. Hydro-CT may be regarded as complementary to endosonography and is well suited for the initial diagnosis of gastric lymphoma as well as for the diagnosis of recurrent tumour. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Wertigkeit der Hydro-CT bei Diagnostik und Staging von primaeren mukosaassoziierten Lymphomen des Magens (MALT-Lymphom). Material und Methode: 15 Patienten mit MALT-Lymphom des Magens wurden mittels kontrastoptimiertem Spiral-CT des wassergefuellten Magens (Hydro-CT) untersucht. Die Lokalisation, Morphologie, Ausdehnung, das Kontrastverhalten der Lymphome und der abdominelle Lymphknotenstatus wurden evaluiert. Die Ergebnisse wurden mit der Endosonographie, der endoskopischen Biopsie und bei Operation mit der

  15. Prolonged Survival in Stage III Melanoma with Ipilimumab Adjuvant Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermont, Alexander M M; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Grob, Jean-Jacques;

    2016-01-01

    Background On the basis of data from a phase 2 trial that compared the checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab at doses of 0.3 mg, 3 mg, and 10 mg per kilogram of body weight in patients with advanced melanoma, this phase 3 trial evaluated ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram in patients who had...... undergone complete resection of stage III melanoma. Methods After patients had undergone complete resection of stage III cutaneous melanoma, we randomly assigned them to receive ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram (475 patients) or placebo (476) every 3 weeks for four doses, then every 3 months...... patients (1.1%) died owing to immune-related adverse events. Conclusions As adjuvant therapy for high-risk stage III melanoma, ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram resulted in significantly higher rates of recurrence-free survival, overall survival, and distant metastasis-free survival than placebo...

  16. Prolonged Survival in Stage III Melanoma with Ipilimumab Adjuvant Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermont, Alexander M M; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Grob, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Background On the basis of data from a phase 2 trial that compared the checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab at doses of 0.3 mg, 3 mg, and 10 mg per kilogram of body weight in patients with advanced melanoma, this phase 3 trial evaluated ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram in patients who had...... undergone complete resection of stage III melanoma. Methods After patients had undergone complete resection of stage III cutaneous melanoma, we randomly assigned them to receive ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram (475 patients) or placebo (476) every 3 weeks for four doses, then every 3 months...... patients (1.1%) died owing to immune-related adverse events. Conclusions As adjuvant therapy for high-risk stage III melanoma, ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram resulted in significantly higher rates of recurrence-free survival, overall survival, and distant metastasis-free survival than placebo...

  17. Lymphoma diagnosis in histopathology using a multi-stage visual learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codella, Noel; Moradi, Mehdi; Matasar, Matt; Sveda-Mahmood, Tanveer; Smith, John R.

    2016-03-01

    This work evaluates the performance of a multi-stage image enhancement, segmentation, and classification approach for lymphoma recognition in hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained histopathology slides of excised human lymph node tissue. In the first stage, the original histology slide undergoes various image enhancement and segmentation operations, creating an additional 5 images for every slide. These new images emphasize unique aspects of the original slide, including dominant staining, staining segmentations, non-cellular groupings, and cellular groupings. For the resulting 6 total images, a collection of visual features are extracted from 3 different spatial configurations. Visual features include the first fully connected layer (4096 dimensions) of the Caffe convolutional neural network trained from ImageNet data. In total, over 200 resultant visual descriptors are extracted for each slide. Non-linear SVMs are trained over each of the over 200 descriptors, which are then input to a forward stepwise ensemble selection that optimizes a late fusion sum of logistically normalized model outputs using local hill climbing. The approach is evaluated on a public NIH dataset containing 374 images representing 3 lymphoma conditions: chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), follicular lymphoma (FL), and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Results demonstrate a 38.4% reduction in residual error over the current state-of-art on this dataset.

  18. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumpers Harvey L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. Methods To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. Results For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91, but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64, examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87 and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26 decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p Conclusions Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  19. TNM staging system may be superior to Lugano and Ann Arbor systems in predicting the overall survival of patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shujian; Shi, Xin; Xu, Zhenyu; Liu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    To assess the survival predicting value of TNM, Lugano, and Ann Arbor staging systems in patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma (PGL). 101 patients with PGL were reviewed. All of them were staged according to TNM, Lugano, or Ann Arbor staging system. Five-year survival overall survival/OS rate was used as major clinical outcome. The prognostic value of different variables like depth of tumor infiltration (T), lymph node status (N), metastasis (M), sex, age, LDH, ECOG performance status (PS), subtypes, and tumor sites were assessed in relation to clinical outcome. The median follow-up time was 46.6 months (range 1.3-158.6). The estimated 5-year OS rate was 74.22%. In gastric lymphoma ,the 5-year OS rate was well correlated with stage in the TNM system (stage I 100.00%, stage II 87.18%, stage III 75.17%, and stage IV 16.67%. pTNM stage I, stage II, stage III , and stage IV was 100.00%, 81.34%, 63.52%, and 16.00%, respectively (p=0.0002), but there were overlapped survival curves in Lugano and Ann Arbor systems. The 5-year OS of patients with T1 or T2 was significantly superior compared to patients with T3 or T4 (96.15 vs 67.92%, p=0.0087), and multivariate Cox analysis showed that T (p=0.0181) and M (p=0.0031) were the covariates prognostically significant for OS. TNM staging system may be superior to Lugano and Ann Arbor system in predicting OS of patients with PGL.

  20. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Improving Well-Being in Patients With Stage III-IV Cancer and Their Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-21

    Malignant Female Reproductive System Neoplasm; Malignant Hepatobiliary Neoplasm; Partner; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Cervical Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  1. 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron-emission tomography in staging, response evaluation, and treatment planning of lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena

    2007-01-01

    2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) is used increasingly in the clinical management of lymphomas. With regard to staging, FDG-PET is more sensitive and specific than conventional staging methods in FDG avid lymphomas (ie, Hodgkin lymphoma and most aggressive non-Ho...

  2. The effect on esophagus after different radiotherapy techniques for early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Anni Y. S. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)], e-mail: an9dk@hotmail.com; Maraldo, Maja V.; Vogelius, Ivan R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brodin, Nils Patrik; Aznar, Marianne C; Af Rosenschoeld, Per Munck [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Inst., Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Petersen, Peter M.; Specht, Lena [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-15

    Introduction: The cure rate of early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is excellent; investigating the late effects of treatment is thus important. Esophageal toxicity is a known side effect in patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the mediastinum, although little is known of this in HL survivors. This study investigates the dose to the esophagus in the treatment of early stage HL using different RT techniques. Estimated risks of early esophagitis, esophageal stricture and cancer are compared between treatments. Material and methods: We included 46 patients {>=}15 years with supra diaphragmatic, clinical stage I-II HL, who received chemotherapy followed by involved node RT (INRT) to 30.6 Gy at our institution. INRT was planned with three-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT). For each patient a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), proton therapy (PT) and mantle field (MF) treatment plan was simulated. Mean, maximum and minimum dose to the esophagus were extracted from the treatment plans. Risk estimates were based on dose-response models from clinical series with long-term follow-up. Statistical analyses were performed with repeated measures ANOVA using Bonferroni corrections. Results: Mean dose to the esophagus was 16.4, 16.4, 14.7 and 34.2 Gy (p < 0.001) with 3DCRT, VMAT, PT and MF treatment, respectively. No differences were seen in the estimated risk of developing esophagitis, stricture or cancer with 3DCRT compared to VMAT (p = 1.000, p = 1.000, p = 0.356). PT performed significantly better with the lowest risk estimates on all parameters compared to the photon treatments, except compared to 3DCRT for stricture (p = 0.066). On all parameters the modern techniques were superior to MF treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The estimated dose to the esophagus and the corresponding estimated risks of esophageal complications are decreased significantly with highly conformal RT compared to MF treatment. The number of patients presenting with late esophageal side

  3. Combined modality treatment improves tumor control and overall survival in patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Christine; Rehan, Fareed A; Brillant, Corinne;

    2010-01-01

    Combined modality treatment (CMT) of chemotherapy followed by localized radiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, the role of radiotherapy has been questioned recently and some clinical study groups advocate chemotherapy only for this indication...

  4. Controversies on the prognostic value of interim FDG-PET in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Hugo J A; Kwee, Thomas C

    2016-12-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma, even in advanced-stage, is a highly curable malignancy, but treatment is associated with short-term toxicity and long-term side effects. Early predictive markers are required to identify those patients who do not require the full-length standard therapy (and thus qualify for therapy de-escalation) and those patients who will not be cured by standard therapy (and thus qualify for therapy escalation). Multiple trials have assessed the value of (18) F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) after a few cycles of chemotherapy (also known as 'interim FDG-PET') in predicting outcome in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma. Furthermore, multiple interim FDG-PET-adapted trials, in which patients with positive interim FDG-PET scans are assigned to escalated therapies, and patients with negative interim FDG-PET scans are assigned to de-escalated therapies, have recently been published or are currently ongoing, with generally heterogeneous results. The present article reports the currently available evidence (and controversies) on the prognostic value of interim FDG-PET in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma in patients with positive and negative interim FDG-PET findings following continuation of standard chemotherapy or escalated/de-escalated therapy.

  5. Position emission tomography with or without computed tomography in the primary staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Loft, Annika; Hansen, Mads

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In order to receive the most appropriate therapy, patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) must be accurately stratified into different prognostic staging groups. Computed tomography (CT) plays a pivotal role in the conventional staging. The aim of the present study...... standard limits the reliability of accuracy calculations. RESULTS: FDG-PET would have upstaged 19% of patients and downstaged 5% of patients, leading to a different treatment in 9% of patients. For FDG-PET/CT, the corresponding figures are 17%, 5%, and 7%. In nodal regions, the sensitivity of FDG...

  6. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin [Kosin University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  7. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  8. Whole-body MRI vs. CT for staging lymphoma: Patient experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Hugo J.A. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kwee, Thomas C., E-mail: thomaskwee@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vermoolen, Malou A. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Ludwig, Inge [Department of Hematology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bierings, Marc B. [Department of Pediatric Hematology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-01-15

    Objective: To assess and compare patient experience of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to that of computed tomography (CT) for staging newly diagnosed lymphoma. Materials and methods: A total of 36 patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma prospectively underwent whole-body MRI and CT for staging purposes. Patients were asked to fill in a short questionnaire with regard to the burden and experience of the examination on a Likert scale (range 1–4). Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to determine statistically significant differences in patient (dis)comfort between the two examinations. Results: Patients reported to be significantly (P = 0.007) less worried before undergoing whole-body MRI compared to CT. Patients also experienced whole-body MRI as significantly (P = 0.010) less unpleasant and felt significantly (P = 0.003) better shortly after the scan. The necessary preparations before CT scanning (i.e. insertion of intravenous line, drinking of contrast fluid), which are not required for whole-body MRI, were reported to be a considerable burden. Conclusion: In this study in patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma, whole-body MRI was experienced as a more patient-friendly technique than CT.

  9. Cetuximab and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-21

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Tongue Cancer

  10. Exercise in Targeting Metabolic Dysregulation in Stage I-III Breast or Prostate Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    Cancer Survivor; No Evidence of Disease; Obesity; Overweight; Prostate Carcinoma; Sedentary Lifestyle; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Metabolic tumour volumes measured at staging in lymphoma: methodological evaluation on phantom experiments and patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignan, Michel [Hopital Henri Mondor and Paris-Est University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Paris-Est University, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, EAC CNRS 7054, Hopital Henri Mondor AP-HP, Creteil (France); Sasanelli, Myriam; Itti, Emmanuel [Hopital Henri Mondor and Paris-Est University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Casasnovas, Rene Olivier [CHU Le Bocage, Department of Hematology, Dijon (France); Luminari, Stefano [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Diagnostic, Clinic and Public Health Medicine, Modena (Italy); Fioroni, Federica [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Medical Physics, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Coriani, Chiara [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Radiology, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Masset, Helene [Henri Mondor Hospital, Department of Radiophysics, Creteil (France); Gobbi, Paolo G. [University of Pavia, Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia (Italy); Merli, Francesco [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Hematology, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Versari, Annibale [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    The presence of a bulky tumour at staging on CT is an independent prognostic factor in malignant lymphomas. However, its prognostic value is limited in diffuse disease. Total metabolic tumour volume (TMTV) determined on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT could give a better evaluation of the total tumour burden and may help patient stratification. Different methods of TMTV measurement established in phantoms simulating lymphoma tumours were investigated and validated in 40 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Data were processed by two nuclear medicine physicians in Reggio Emilia and Creteil. Nineteen phantoms filled with {sup 18}F-saline were scanned; these comprised spherical or irregular volumes from 0.5 to 650 cm{sup 3} with tumour-to-background ratios from 1.65 to 40. Volumes were measured with different SUVmax thresholds. In patients, TMTV was measured on PET at staging by two methods: volumes of individual lesions were measured using a fixed 41 % SUVmax threshold (TMTV{sub 41}) and a variable visually adjusted SUVmax threshold (TMTV{sub var}). In phantoms, the 41 % threshold gave the best concordance between measured and actual volumes. Interobserver agreement was almost perfect. In patients, the agreement between the reviewers for TMTV{sub 41} measurement was substantial (ρ {sub c} = 0.986, CI 0.97 - 0.99) and the difference between the means was not significant (212 ± 218 cm{sup 3} for Creteil vs. 206 ± 219 cm{sup 3} for Reggio Emilia, P = 0.65). By contrast the agreement was poor for TMTV{sub var}. There was a significant direct correlation between TMTV{sub 41} and normalized LDH (r = 0.652, CI 0.42 - 0.8, P <0.001). Higher disease stages and bulky tumour were associated with higher TMTV{sub 41}, but high TMTV{sub 41} could be found in patients with stage 1/2 or nonbulky tumour. Measurement of baseline TMTV in lymphoma using a fixed 41% SUVmax threshold is reproducible and correlates with the other parameters for tumour mass evaluation

  12. Role of imaging in the staging and response assessment of lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrington, Sally F; Mikhaeel, N George; Kostakoglu, Lale;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recent advances in imaging, use of prognostic indices, and molecular profiling techniques have the potential to improve disease characterization and outcomes in lymphoma. International trials are under way to test image-based response–adapted treatment guided by early interim positron...... emission tomography (PET)–computed tomography (CT). Progress in imaging is influencing trial design and affecting clinical practice. In particular, a five-point scale to grade response using PET-CT, which can be adapted to suit requirements for early- and late-response assessment with good interobserver...... agreement, is becoming widely used both in practice- and response-adapted trials. A workshop held at the 11th International Conference on Malignant Lymphomas (ICML) in 2011 concluded that revision to current staging and response criteria was timely. METHODS: An imaging working group composed...

  13. [Attitude to the illness of patients with malignant lymphomas on various stages of disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestereva, E V; Chulkova, V A; Vinogradova, Iu N; Il'in, N V

    2013-01-01

    In 138 patients with malignant lymphomas on different stages of the disease there were considered attitude to the illness and treatment, which included relation to the diagnosis, the subjective perception of the disease and attitude to treatment. Using a technique of studying psychological attitude to the disease there were studied details of personal response to the disease. Along with the general trends in relation to the disease, specific to cancer patients of different tumor sites, there have been identified particular features related to attitude of malignant lymphoma patients: a long period of denial of a malignant nature of the disease and their greatest psychological trauma during relapse. The necessity of professional psychological support was showed.

  14. Immunochemotherapy with levamisole for stage III gastric cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa,Hiroaki

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Levamisole (LMS was given to stage III gastric cancer patients starting three days before gastrectomy, at a does of 150 mg/day for three consecutive days every other week. Survival rates of these patients were compared with those of stage III gastric cancer patients previously operated in our Department who had not received levamisole. The background factors of both groups were matched as closely as possible. Both groups were concomitantly treated with mitomycin C and FT-207. The survival rate of the LMS group was significantly higher than that of the control group when the tumor had a diameter of 4.0-8.0 cm, cancer cells infiltrated to the gastric serosa, there were metastases within the regional lymph nodes, cancer cells slightly invaded the venous capillaren and there was moderate infiltration of the stroma.

  15. Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Progressive, Refractory, or Recurrent Stage II or Stage III Testicular or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Seminoma

  16. Early-Stage Primary Bone Lymphoma: A Retrospective, Multicenter Rare Cancer Network (RCN) Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Ling [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne, VD (Switzerland); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Stauder, Michael C. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Zhang Yujing [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Poortmans, Philip [Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Li Yexiong [Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Constantinou, Nicolaos [Theagenio Cancer Hospital, Thessaloniki, Macedonia (Greece); Thariat, Juliette [Centre Anti-Cancereux Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice, Cote d' Azur (France); Kadish, Sidney P. [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States); Nguyen, Tan Dat [Institut Jean-Godinot, Reims, Champagne-Ardenne (France); Kirova, Youlia M. [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Ghadjar, Pirus [Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Weber, Damien C. [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve (Switzerland); Bertran, Victoria Tuset [Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona (Spain); Ozsahin, Mahmut [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne, VD (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier, E-mail: Rene-Olivier.Mirimanoff@chuv.ch [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne, VD (Switzerland)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Primary bone lymphoma (PBL) represents less than 1% of all malignant lymphomas. In this study, we assessed the disease profile, outcome, and prognostic factors in patients with Stages I and II PBL. Patients and Methods: Thirteen Rare Cancer Network (RCN) institutions enrolled 116 consecutive patients with PBL treated between 1987 and 2008 in this study. Eighty-seven patients underwent chemoradiotherapy (CXRT) without (78) or with (9) surgery, 15 radiotherapy (RT) without (13) or with (2) surgery, and 14 chemotherapy (CXT) without (9) or with (5) surgery. Median RT dose was 40 Gy (range, 4-60). The median number of CXT cycles was six (range, 2-8). Median follow-up was 41 months (range, 6-242). Results: The overall response rate at the end of treatment was 91% (complete response [CR] 74%, partial response [PR] 17%). Local recurrence or progression was observed in 12 (10%) patients and systemic recurrence in 17 (15%). The 5-year overall survival (OS), lymphoma-specific survival (LSS), and local control (LC) were 76%, 78%, and 92%, respectively. In univariate analyses (log-rank test), favorable prognostic factors for OS and LSS were International Prognostic Index (IPI) score {<=}1 (p = 0.009), high-grade histology (p = 0.04), CXRT (p = 0.05), CXT (p = 0.0004), CR (p < 0.0001), and RT dose >40 Gy (p = 0.005). For LC, only CR and Stage I were favorable factors. In multivariate analysis, IPI score, RT dose, CR, and CXT were independently influencing the outcome (OS and LSS). CR was the only predicting factor for LC. Conclusion: This large multicenter retrospective study confirms the good prognosis of early-stage PBL treated with combined CXRT. An adequate dose of RT and complete CXT regime were associated with better outcome.

  17. [Retrospective analysis for 104 cases of early-stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma treated with different modality therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ting-Ting; Xiao, Xiu-Bin; Su, Hang; Da, Yong; Chen, Xin-Lin; Zhong, Kai-Li; Zhao, Shi-Hua; Lu, Yun; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Wei-Jing

    2012-04-01

    This paper explored the curative effect of combined modality therapy and extended field radiotherapy for early-stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma. 104 cases of early-stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma from Jan 1987 to Dec 2010 in PLA Hospital 307 were retrospectively analyzed, including 76 cases in combined modality therapy group and 28 cases in extended field radiotherapy group, and the long-term efficacy and toxicity of two therapy modalities were evaluated. The results showed that the median survival time of 104 cases was 85.42 months, the complete remission rates of combined modality therapy and extended field radiotherapy groups were 72.4 and 71.4 respectively (P = 0.924); the overall response rates of combined modality therapy and extended field radiotherapy groups were 97.4 and 96.4 respectively (P = 0.779); the 5-year overall survival (OS) rates in the 2 groups were 89.5 and 89.1 respectively, and the 8-year OS rates of the 2 groups were 81.3 and 70.6. No statistical difference was found in above-mentioned 2 groups. Moreover, the 5-year progression free survival (PFS) rates of these 2 groups were 84.2 and 69.0 (P = 0.04), and 8-year PFS rates of these 2 groups were 80.0 and 55.5 (P = 0.04) respectively, the 5-year relapse rates of these 2 groups were 28.1 and 45.6 (P = 0.023) respectively. It is concluded that the combined modality therapy can raise the PFS rate and reduce the relapse rate as compared with extended field radiotherapy for early-stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma, but there is no difference in the overall survival rate between the 2 groups.

  18. Stage IE Primary Bone Lymphoma:Limb Salvage for Local Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodamorad Jamshidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Primary bone lymphoma or non-Hodgkin lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There are only a few case series of stage IE of this condition in medical literature. The aim of this study is to determine the rate of survival   for stage IE after combined modality treatment, the rate of local recurrence, and the results of limb salvage in cases   of local recurrence.     Methods:   We collected data from 61 patients with histologically confirmed PBL treated at the Musculoskeletal   Oncology Department of our hospital from 2000 to 2010. Retrospective evaluation included demographics, symptoms, tumor locations, outcomes of surgical treatment for local recurrence and survival rates. Results:   All patients received Combined Modality Therapy. Overall,five year survival was 89% and five year disease free survival rate was 78%. Local recurrence occurred in 6 patients during follow up period, which was treated surgically     by wide excision and reconstruction. The mean follow-up for the local recurrence group was 36(24-54 months and mortality rate in this group was 17%. Conclusions:   Combined Modality Therapy for stage IE primary bone lymphomaresults in good survival rate. In case   of local recurrence, wide excision and reconstruction improves the outcomes.

  19. Stage IE Primary Bone Lymphoma:Limb Salvage for Local Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodamorad Jamshidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Primary bone lymphoma or non-Hodgkin lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There are only a few case series of stage IE of this condition in medical literature. The aim of this study is to determine the rate of survival   for stage IE after combined modality treatment, the rate of local recurrence, and the results of limb salvage in cases   of local recurrence.     Methods:   We collected data from 61 patients with histologically confirmed PBL treated at the Musculoskeletal   Oncology Department of our hospital from 2000 to 2010. Retrospective evaluation included demographics, symptoms, tumor locations, outcomes of surgical treatment for local recurrence and survival rates. Results:   All patients received Combined Modality Therapy. Overall,five year survival was 89% and five year disease free survival rate was 78%. Local recurrence occurred in 6 patients during follow up period, which was treated surgically     by wide excision and reconstruction. The mean follow-up for the local recurrence group was 36(24-54 months and mortality rate in this group was 17%. Conclusions:   Combined Modality Therapy for stage IE primary bone lymphomaresults in good survival rate. In case   of local recurrence, wide excision and reconstruction improves the outcomes.

  20. Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  1. Radiation therapy for early stage unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma: is dose reduction feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, Siddhartha; Kumar, Deepak P; Khanna, Nehal; Menon, Hari; Sengar, Manju; Arora, Brijesh; Gujral, Sumeet; Shet, Tanuja; Sridhar, Epari; Rangarajan, Venkatesh; Muckaden, Mary Ann; Nair, Reena; Banavali, Shripad

    2014-10-01

    One hundred and fifty-one patients aged between 3 and 70 years with early stage unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma were included. Patients received 4-6 cycles of ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine) chemotherapy and involved field radiation therapy (IFRT). The most common histology was mixed cellularity (43%). The majority had stage IIAX disease. IFRT doses were 25.2 Gy/14 fractions and 34.2 Gy/19 fractions for adults with a complete response (CR) and partial response (PR), respectively, while the doses were 19.8 Gy/11 fractions and 30.6 Gy/17 fractions, respectively, for children. After 60 months (median), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 88.4% and 93.2%, respectively. On univariate analysis, prognostic factors with significant impact on PFS were age ≥ 18 years, nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) histology, extranodal disease and response to treatment. Extranodal disease had a significant impact on OS. On multivariate analysis, NLPHL histology (p = 0.001) and response at 3 months (p = 0.000) had a significant impact on PFS. There were no in-field relapses in patients with bulky disease receiving RT doses > 25.2 Gy. Chemotherapy related acute pulmonary toxicity was documented in 21.4% and 4.8% of patients after six and four cycles of ABVD chemotherapy (p = 0.041). Four cycles of ABVD and reduced dose IFRT resulted in optimal outcomes.

  2. Asymptomatic Multiple Lymphomatous Polyposis Identified during Staging Bidirectional Endoscopy of Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja P. Dawsey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple lymphomatous polyposis (MLP as an extranodal manifestation of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL in the gastrointestinal tract is rare and not often reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 63-year-old female with asymptomatic MLP found during staging bidirectional endoscopy of MCL. The patient presented only with dyspnea, but was found on physical exam to have diffuse lymphadenopathy, and subsequent positron emission tomography (PET CT showed extensive lymph node adenopathy consistent with lymphoma. Excisional lymph node biopsy revealed high-risk MCL. Prior to therapy, staging bidirectional endoscopy was performed, which revealed duodenal bulb polyps and diffuse polyposis in the colon. Biopsies showed atypical lymphoid infiltrate identical to the initial excisional lymph node biopsy. The patient underwent aggressive induction therapy, chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Four months later, repeat colonoscopy and biopsies showed normal mucosa, and repeat PET CT showed no evidence of systemic disease. Eight months later, the patient began having symptoms consistent with cauda equina syndrome, and she was found to have leptomeningeal recurrence of MCL. In spite of other medical treatment, the patient’s MCL progressed and she passed away 3 years after the initial presentation.

  3. Abdomen/pelvis computed tomography in staging of pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma: is it always necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farruggia, Piero; Puccio, Giuseppe; Sala, Alessandra; Todesco, Alessandra; Terenziani, Monica; Mura, Rosamaria; D'Amico, Salvatore; Casini, Tommaso; Mosa, Clara; Pillon, Marta; Boaro, Maria Paola; Bottigliero, Gaetano; Burnelli, Roberta; Consarino, Caterina; Fedeli, Fausto; Mascarin, Maurizio; Perruccio, Katia; Schiavello, Elisabetta; Trizzino, Angela; Ficola, Umberto; Garaventa, Alberto; Rossello, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if abdomen/pelvis computed tomography (CT) can be safety omitted in the initial staging of a subgroup of children affected by Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL). Every participating center of A.I.E.O.P (Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica) sent local staging reports of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and abdominal ultrasound (US) along with digital images of staging abdomen/pelvis CT to the investigation center where the CT scans were evaluated by an experienced pediatric radiologist. The local radiologist who performed the US was unaware of local CT and PET reports (both carried out after US), and the reviewer radiologist examining the CT images was unaware of local US, PET and CT reports. A new abdominal staging of 123 patients performed on the basis of local US report, local PET report, and centralized CT report was then compared to a simpler staging based on local US and PET. No additional lesion was discovered by CT in patients with abdomen/pelvis negativity in both US and PET or isolated spleen positivity in US (or US and PET), and so it seems that in the initial staging, abdomen/pelvis CT can be safety omitted in about 1/2 to 2/3 of children diagnosed with HL.

  4. Ocular Adnexal Follicular Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter K; Coupland, Sarah E; Finger, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    , and 31 (45%) had stage IIE lymphoma. Patients with disseminated lymphoma had stage IIIE (9 of 19 [47%]) and stage IV (10 of 19 [53%]) disease, whereas patients with a relapse of systemic lymphoma presented with stage IE (8 of 10 [80%]), stage IIE (1 of 10 [10%]), and stage IIIE (1 of 10 [10%]) disease...

  5. Upgrading a Stage III A engine for Stage IV; Ertuechtigung eines Stufe-III-A-Motors fuer Stufe IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrewe, Klaus; Lamotte, Dominik; Zirka, Ingo [HJS Emission Technology GmbH und Co. KG, Menden (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    In the field of construction and agricultural machinery proven simple technique is estimated especially in countries with lower development standards as in Central Europe. A 4.4 l, 65 to 95 kW diesel engine that is certified in line with Stage III A, equipped with a fully mechanical injection system and open loop-controlled exhaust-gas recirculation system has now been upgraded from HJS through a low-maintenance and fully autarkic exhaust aftertreatment system that complies with the Stage IV standard. The reduction of nitrogen oxides by selective catalytic reduction is carried out with a NO{sub x} reduction greater than 90 %. The particulate emissions are reduced by a maintenance-free bypass filter with a particle reduction rate exceeds by more than 60 %. (orig.)

  6. Proliferation in Non-Hodgkin’S Lymphomas and Its Prognostic Value Related to Staging Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Lorand‐Metze

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In malignant lymphomas, cell kinetics has shown to be related with histologic type as well as with the clinical behaviour. The aim of our study was to investigate the relevance of cell proliferation parameters on overall survival in non‐Hodgkin's lymphomas as well as their relationship with prognostic factors such as International Prognostic Index (IPI. We performed DNA‐flow‐cytometry (S‐phase fraction and detection of DNA‐aneuploidy as well as cytologic examination and the AgNOR technique in material obtained by fine needle aspiration of lymph nodes at diagnosis. The majority of the patients were stage IV by Ann Arbor and intermediate risk by IPI (42/55. When analyzing all patients together, histologic type by the WHO classification, IPI and the presence of a DNA‐aneuploid clone could not separate well patients with a different survival. For all patients, univariate Cox analysis revealed S‐phase (SPF and AgNOR parameters to be of prognostic value. In the multivariate analysis, however, only SPF remained in the final model. Yet, when stratifying for DNA‐ploidy, only the total number of AgNORs/nucleus was an independent parameter. Looking only at the DNA‐diploid cases, the AgNOR pattern remained the most important parameter, whereas for the DNA‐aneuploid cases this was true for SPF. When studying patients with B large cell lymphoma separately, only DNA‐ploidy was a prognostic factor. In summary, cell kinetic parameters reveal important prognostic information in NHL patients. Furthermore, DNA‐aneuploidy seems to interfere with the analysis of the AgNOR pattern.

  7. The development and validation of a CT-based radiomics signature for the preoperative discrimination of stage I-II and stage III-IV colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Zelan; Dong, Di; Tian, Jie; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigative the predictive ability of radiomics signature for preoperative staging (I-IIvs.III-IV) of primary colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods This study consisted of 494 consecutive patients (training dataset: n=286; validation cohort, n=208) with stage I–IV CRC. A radiomics signature was generated using LASSO logistic regression model. Association between radiomics signature and CRC staging was explored. The classification performance of the radiomics signature was explored with respect to the receiver operating characteristics(ROC) curve. Results The 16-feature-based radiomics signature was an independent predictor for staging of CRC, which could successfully categorize CRC into stage I-II and III-IV (p <0.0001) in training and validation dataset. The median of radiomics signature of stage III-IV was higher than stage I-II in the training and validation dataset. As for the classification performance of the radiomics signature in CRC staging, the AUC was 0.792(95%CI:0.741-0.853) with sensitivity of 0.629 and specificity of 0.874. The signature in the validation dataset obtained an AUC of 0.708(95%CI:0.698-0.718) with sensitivity of 0.611 and specificity of 0.680. Conclusions A radiomics signature was developed and validated to be a significant predictor for discrimination of stage I-II from III-IV CRC, which may serve as a complementary tool for the preoperative tumor staging in CRC. PMID:27120787

  8. Routine Bone Marrow Biopsy Has Little or No Therapeutic Consequence for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Staged Treatment-Naive Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; d´Amore, Francesco; Juul Mylam, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Routine Bone Marrow Biopsy Has Little or No Therapeutic Consequence for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Staged Treatment-Naive Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma......Routine Bone Marrow Biopsy Has Little or No Therapeutic Consequence for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Staged Treatment-Naive Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma...

  9. Barriers and facilitators to effective communication experienced by patients with malignant lymphoma at all stages after diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruinessen, Inge Renske; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn M; Gouw, Hans; Zijlstra, Josée M; Albada, Akke; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to gain insight into patient-perceived communication barriers and facilitators at different stages after the diagnosis of malignant lymphoma. We have detected patterns to explain when these factors influence communication predominantly. A qualitative approach was applied, derived from the context mapping framework. A total of 28 patients completed a set of assignments about their experiences with provider-patient communication during medical consultations. Subsequently, these patients and nine companions shared their experiences during a semistructured (group) interview, which was recorded on audiotape. The audiotapes and assignments were analysed with MAXQDA software. From the patients' viewpoint, communicating effectively appears to depend on their own attributes (e.g. emotions), the health care professionals' attributes (e.g. attitude) and external factors (e.g. time pressure). Three patient communication states were identified: (i) overwhelmed, passive; (ii) pro-active, self-motivated; and (iii) proficient, empowered. Patients seem to behave differently in the three communication states. This study lists patient-perceived communication barriers and facilitators and identifies three different communication states, which indicate when certain barriers and facilitators are encountered. These findings may support health care professionals to tailor the provision of support and information and remove communication barriers accordingly. Additionally, they provide input for interventions to support patients in effective communication. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Results of radiotherapy in patients with stage I orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letschert, J.G.J.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, D.; Oskam, J.; Koornneef, L.; Dijk, J.D.P. van; Boukes, R.; Bras, J. (Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Heerde, P. van; Bartelink, H. (Nederlands Kanker Inst. ' Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis' , Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1991-09-01

    The results of radiotherapy in early stage orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are described. From 1970-1985, 33 orbital localizations in 30 patients were treated. Total dose applied ranged from 21-57 Gy (2 Gy/fraction), 2/3 off all patients received a 40 Gy dose. Complete response rate was 94% and 10 years actuarial survival was 90%; between patients with low grade or intermediate grade lymphoma no significant difference in survival was observed. No local recurrence was detected during follow up and 20% of the patients developed generalized disease. Two optic nerve neuropathies and 3 retinopathies were observed in 5 patients, 4 of these occurred at a dose level of less than 43 Gy. Keratitis occurred in 58% of the patients treated, a sicca syndrome in 30% and cataract of different grades in 58%. Although local control was excellent, severe complications were observed in 13% of the patients who received a dose of less than 43 Gy. (author). 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  12. Barriers and facilitators to effective communication experienced by patients with malignant lymphoma at all stages after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinessen, I.R. van; Weel-Baumgarten, E.M. van; Gouw, H.; Zijlstra, J.M.; Albada, A.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to gain insight into patient-perceived communication barriers and facilitators at different stages after the diagnosis of malignant lymphoma. We have detected patterns to explain when these factors influence communication predominantly. METHOD: A qualitative approach was

  13. Barriers and facilitators to effective communication experienced by patients with malignant lymphoma at all stages after diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinessen, I.R. van; Weel, E.M. van; Gouw, H.; Zijlstra, J.M.; Albada, A.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to gain insight into patient-perceived communication barriers and facilitators at different stages after the diagnosis of malignant lymphoma. We have detected patterns to explain when these factors influence communication predominantly. Method: A qualitative approach was

  14. Barriers and facilitators to effective communication experienced by patients with malignant lymphoma at all stages after diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinessen, I.R. van; Weel, E.M. van; Gouw, H.; Zijlstra, J.M.; Albada, A.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to gain insight into patient-perceived communication barriers and facilitators at different stages after the diagnosis of malignant lymphoma. We have detected patterns to explain when these factors influence communication predominantly. Method: A qualitative approach was a

  15. Follicular lymphoma (in situ) pattern in the bone marrow: does it indicate an early stage in disease evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobeid, Bachir; Mears, John Gregory; Bhagat, Govind

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Bone marrow involvement by an isolated interstitial lymphoid aggregate exhibiting the pattern and phenotype described for follicular lymphoma in situ (FLIS) has not been reported before. The detection of clinically silent FL in this case highlights the necessity of complete staging workup when such lesions are encountered in biopsies. PMID:26185645

  16. NICOTINAMIDE IN COMPLEX TREATMENT OF LARGE-PLAQUE PARAPSORIASIS AND EARLY STAGES OF MALIGNANT T-CELL SKIN LYMPHOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Khamaganova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess clinical efficacy of nicotinamide in 2 the treatment of patients with early stages of malignant T-cell skin lymphomas and large-plaque parapsoriasis. Materials and methods: 12 patients with erythematous stage of mycosis fungoides and 14 patients with large-plaque parapsoriasis were treated by nicotinamide 15 mg twice daily during 2 weeks. Treatment cycles were repeated 4–5 times per year; topical therapy was also administrated. Results: Nicotinamide demonstrated high therapeutic effect and good tolerability in patients with early stage of mycosis fungoides and large-plaque parapsoriasis. Stable remission was achieved in 1  woman with malignant T-cell lymphoma and 12  patients with large-plaque parapsoriasis; significant clinical improvement was shown in 8 and 12 patients, respectively. Conclusion: Thus, nicotinamide is recommended for comprehensive treatment of large-plaque parapsoriasis and early stages of mycosis fungoides.

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Promoter Genotype as a Marker of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Early Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vasku

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the DNA polymorphic genotype in MMP-2 promoter gene as a potential candidate region for the development of the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL and/or its progression. A total of 89 Czech patients with CTCL (including 23 patients with large plaque parapsoriasis were compared to 198 controls of similar age and sex distribution, without personal or family history of chronic skin diseases and without personal history of malignancy. The three selected polymorphisms in the promoter of MMP-2 gene (−1575G/A, −1306C/T, and −790T/G were determined using the PCR-based methodology with RFLP. In our cohort, the associated GGCCTT MMP-2 promoter genotype was highly significantly more frequent in CTCL-Ia stage patients compared to patients with parapsoriasis, the tests having high sensitivity and specificity (78%, 83%, resp.. To conclude, use of associated MMP-2 promoter genotype as a DNA marker might make it possible to distinguish between the patients with parapsoriasis and those with CTCL stage Ia, which could substantially improve possibilities of clinical diagnostics, therapy design, and prognosis of this serious condition in the early stages.

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 promoter genotype as a marker of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma early stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasku, Anna; Vasku, Julie Bienertova; Necas, Miroslav; Vasku, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the DNA polymorphic genotype in MMP-2 promoter gene as a potential candidate region for the development of the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and/or its progression. A total of 89 Czech patients with CTCL (including 23 patients with large plaque parapsoriasis) were compared to 198 controls of similar age and sex distribution, without personal or family history of chronic skin diseases and without personal history of malignancy. The three selected polymorphisms in the promoter of MMP-2 gene (-1575G/A, -1306C/T, and -790T/G) were determined using the PCR-based methodology with RFLP. In our cohort, the associated GGCCTT MMP-2 promoter genotype was highly significantly more frequent in CTCL-Ia stage patients compared to patients with parapsoriasis, the tests having high sensitivity and specificity (78%, 83%, resp.). To conclude, use of associated MMP-2 promoter genotype as a DNA marker might make it possible to distinguish between the patients with parapsoriasis and those with CTCL stage Ia, which could substantially improve possibilities of clinical diagnostics, therapy design, and prognosis of this serious condition in the early stages.

  19. State-of-the-Art research on "Lymphomas: role of molecular imaging for staging, prognostic evaluation and treatment response"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lale eKostakoglu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lymphomas are heterogeneous but potentially curable group of neoplasms. Treatment of lymphomas has rapidly evolved overtime with significant improvement in the cure rate and reductions in treatment-related toxicities. Despite excellent results, treatment programs are continued to be developed to achieve better curative and safety profiles. In these patients individualized therapy schemes can be devised based on a well-defined risk categorization. The therapy efficacy can be increased early during therapy in non-responding patients with escalated therapy protocols or with the addition of radiation therapy, particularly, in advanced stage or unfavorable risk patients. The increasing availability of positron emission tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, particularly fused with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT has lead to the integration of this modality into the routine staging and restaging for lymphoma with convincing evidence that it is a more accurate imaging modality compared with conventional imaging techniques. FDG PET/CT is also is a promising surrogate for tumor chemosensitivity early during therapy. This review will summarize published data on the utility of FDG-PET/CT imaging in the staging, restaging, and predicting therapy response in patients with lymphoma.

  20. Interactive Tailored Website to Promote Sun Protection and Skin Self-Check Behaviors in Patients With Stage 0-III Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Stage 0 Skin Melanoma; Stage I Skin Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage II Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma

  1. Low-Dose Consolidation Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Unfavorable Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torok, Jordan A., E-mail: jordan.torok@dm.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Wu, Yuan [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Kim, Grace J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Beaven, Anne W.; Diehl, Louis F. [Division of Hematologic Malignancy and Cellular Therapy, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) trial HD11 established 4 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) and 30 Gy of radiation therapy (RT) as a standard for early stage (I, II), unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Additional cycles of ABVD may allow for a reduction in RT dose and improved toxicity profile. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with combined modality therapy at the Duke Cancer Institute for early stage, unfavorable HL by GHSG criteria from 1994 to 2012 were included. Patients who did not undergo post-chemotherapy functional imaging (positron emission tomography or gallium imaging) or who failed to achieve a complete response were excluded. Clinical outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Late effects were also evaluated. Results: A total of 90 patients met inclusion criteria for analysis. Median follow-up was 5 years. Chemotherapy consisted primarily of ABVD (88%) with a median number of 6 cycles. The median dose of consolidation RT was 23.4 Gy. Four patients had relapses, 2 of which were in-field. Ten-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 93% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.82-0.97) and 98% (95% CI: 0.92-0.99), respectively. For the subset of patients (n=46) who received 5 to 6 cycles of chemotherapy and ≤24 Gy, the 10-year PFS and OS values were 88% (95% CI: 70%-96%) and 98% (95% CI: 85% - 99%), respectively. The most common late effect was hypothyroidism (20%) with no cardiac complications. Seven secondary malignancies were diagnosed, with only 1 arising within the RT field. Conclusions: Lower doses of RT may be sufficient when combined with more than 4 cycles of ABVD for early stage, unfavorable HL and may result in a more favorable toxicity profile than 4 cycles of ABVD and 30 Gy of RT.

  2. HLA-G Expression and Role in Advanced-Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caocci, G.; Greco, M.; Fanni, D.; Senes, G.; Littera, R.; Lai, S.; Risso, P.; Carcassi, C.; Faa, G.; La Nasa, G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  3. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  4. Computed tomography of the liver in newly diagnosed Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Staging implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, C.H.; Hussain, S.; Seltzer, S.E.; Chiles, C.; Castellino, R.A.

    1986-02-01

    In newly diagnosed patients with Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the value of computed tomography (CT) of the liver was assessed as regards impact on the staging process. 201 patients at two medical centers had pretreatment abdominal CT within two weeks of liver biopsy. CT sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in both groups were determined and sensitivity in both groups was very low (8%). If liver biopsy results had been omitted, reliance on CT and other clinical staging procedures alone would have led to important staging errors in 18 of these 201 patients (9%) - overstaging would have occurred twice and understaging 16 times. In 7 additional patients, the lack of demonstration by CT of documented liver disease was without clinical consequence because disseminated extranodal lymphoma was visible at other sites or at extrahepatic regions of the same CT scan. In patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, CT is an unreliable indicator of liver status and cannot replace liver biopsy in supplying the data required for optimal management.

  5. Definition of bulky disease in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma in computed tomography era: prognostic significance of measurements in the coronal and transverse planes

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Anita; Burger, Irene A.; Zhang, Zhigang; Drill, Esther N; Migliacci, Jocelyn C.; Ng, Andrea; LaCasce, Ann; Wall, Darci; Thomas E Witzig; Ristow, Kay; Yahalom, Joachim; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Disease bulk is an important prognostic factor in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma, but its definition is unclear in the computed tomography era. This retrospective analysis investigated the prognostic significance of bulky disease measured in transverse and coronal planes on computed tomography imaging. Early stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients (n=185) treated with chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy from 2000–2010 were included. The longest diameter of the largest lymph node mass was measured...

  6. Definition of bulky disease in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma in computed tomography era: prognostic significance of measurements in the coronal and transverse planes

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Anita; Burger, Irene A.; Zhang, Zhigang; Drill, Esther N; Migliacci, Jocelyn C.; Ng, Andrea; LaCasce, Ann; Wall, Darci; Thomas E Witzig; Ristow, Kay; Yahalom, Joachim; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Disease bulk is an important prognostic factor in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma, but its definition is unclear in the computed tomography-era. This retrospective analysis investigated the prognostic significance of bulky disease measured in transverse and coronal planes on computed tomography imaging. Early stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients (n=185) treated with chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy from 2000-2010 were included. The longest diameter of the largest lymph node mass was measured...

  7. The relation between lymph node status and survival in Stage I-III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, J.; Roikjær, Ole; Jess, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study involved a large nationwide Danish cohort to evaluate the hypothesis that a high lymph node harvest has a positive effect on survival in curative resected Stage I-III colon cancer and a low lymph node ratio has a positive effect on survival in Stage III colon cancer. Method......: Analysis of overall survival was conducted using a nationwide Danish cohort of patients treated with curative resection of Stage I-III colon cancer. All 8901 patients in Denmark diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the colon and treated with curative resection in the period 2003-2008 were identified from...... independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: High lymph node count was associated with improved overall survival in colon cancer. Lymph node ratio was superior to N-stage in differentiating overall survival in Stage III colon cancer. Stage migration was observed....

  8. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  9. Analyses of patterns-of-failure and prognostic factors according to radiation fields in early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, Lorraine; Guillerm, Sophie; Menard, Jean; Hennequin, Christophe; Quero, Laurent [Saint Louis Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Paris (France); Amorin, Sandy; Brice, Pauline [Saint Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Hematooncology Department, Paris (France)

    2017-02-15

    Doses and volumes of radiation therapy (RT) for early stages of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have been reduced over the last 30 years. Combined modality therapy (CMT) is currently the standard treatment for most patients with early-stage HL. The aim of this study was to analyze the site of relapse after RT according to the extent of radiation fields. Between 1987 and 2011, 427 patients were treated at our institution with RT ± chemotherapy for stage-I/II HL. Among these, 65 patients who experienced a relapse were retrospectively analyzed. Most patients had nodular sclerosis histology (86 %) and stage-II disease (75.9 %). Bulky disease was present in 21 % and 56 % of patients belonged to the unfavorable risk group according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/The Lymphoma Study Association (LYSA) definitions. CMT was delivered to 91 % of patients. All patients received RT with doses ranging from 20 to 45 Gy (mean = 34 ± 5.3 Gy). The involved-field RT technique was used in 59 % of patients. The mean time between diagnosis and relapse was 4.2 years (range 0.3-24.5). Out-of-field relapses were suffered by 53 % of patients. Relapses occurred more frequently at out-of-field sites in patients with a favorable disease status, whereas in-field relapses were associated with bulky mediastinal disease. Relapses occurred later for favorable compared with the unfavorable risk group (3.5 vs. 2.9 years, p = 0.5). From multivariate analyses, neither RT dose nor RT field size were predictive for an in-field relapse (p = 0.25 and p = 0.8, respectively), only bulky disease was predictive (p = 0.018). In patients with bulky disease, RT dose and RT field size were not predictive for an in-field relapse. In this subgroup of patients, chemotherapy should be intensified. We confirmed the bad prognosis of early relapses. (orig.) [German] Waehrend der letzten 30 Jahre wurden die Strahlentherapie-(RT-)Dosis und die RT-Volumina fuer die Behandlung der Fruehstadien

  10. HLA-G expression and role in advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Caocci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL, in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp deletion-insertion (del-ins polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.

  11. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia;

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas...... showed that many of the tumors/cell proliferations induced by each virus were polyclonal. Our results indicate that enhancer mutations weaken the ability of Akv to induce mature B-cell lymphomas prior to the plasma cell stage, whereas development of plasma cell proliferations is less dependent of viral......, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid...

  12. Sirtuin and pan-class I/II deacetylase (DAC) inhibition is synergistic in preclinical models and clinical studies of lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amengual, Jennifer E; Clark-Garvey, Sean; Kalac, Matko; Scotto, Luigi; Marchi, Enrica; Neylon, Ellen; Johannet, Paul; Wei, Ying; Zain, Jasmine; O'Connor, Owen A

    2013-09-19

    Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of lymphoma has led to paradigm-changing treatment opportunities. One example involves tailoring specific agents based on the cell of origin in aggressive lymphomas. Germinal center (GC)-derived diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is known to be driven by an addiction to Bcl6, whereas the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype is driven by nuclear factor κB. In the GC subtype, there is a critical inverse relationship between Bcl6 and p53, the functional status of which is linked to each transcription factor's degree of acetylation. Deacetylation of Bcl6 is required for its transcriptional repressor effects allowing for the oncogene to drive lymphomagenesis. Conversely, acetylation of p53 is activating when class III deacetylases (DACs), or sirtuins, are inhibited by niacinamide. Treatment of DLBCL cell lines with pan-DAC inhibitors in combination with niacinamide produces synergistic cytotoxicity in GC over ABC subtypes. This correlated with acetylation of both Bcl6 and p53. This combination also produced remissions in a spontaneous aggressive B-cell lymphoma mouse model expressing Bcl6. In a phase 1 proof-of-principle clinical trial, 24% of patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma attained a response to vorinostat and niacinamide, and 57% experienced disease stabilization. We report herein on the preclinical and clinical activity of this targeted strategy in aggressive lymphomas. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00691210.

  13. Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Damien [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Mishra, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Onn, Amir [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: yaacovla@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

  14. International validation study for interim PET in ABVD-treated, advanced-stage hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biggi, Alberto; Gallamini, Andrea; Chauvie, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    At present, there are no standard criteria that have been validated for interim PET reporting in lymphoma. In 2009, an international workshop attended by hematologists and nuclear medicine experts in Deauville, France, proposed to develop simple and reproducible rules for interim PET reporting...... in lymphoma. Accordingly, an international validation study was undertaken with the primary aim of validating the prognostic role of interim PET using the Deauville 5-point score to evaluate images and with the secondary aim of measuring concordance rates among reviewers using the same 5-point score....... This paper focuses on the criteria for interpretation of interim PET and on concordance rates....

  15. Whole-body CT for lymphoma staging: Feasibility of halving radiation dose and risk by iterative image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M., E-mail: mathias.meyer@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Klein, S.A., E-mail: stefan.klein@umm.de [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Brix, G., E-mail: gbrix@bfs.de [Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Fink, C., E-mail: Christian.Fink@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Pilz, L., E-mail: lothar.pilz@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Jafarov, H., E-mail: Hashim.Jafarov@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Hofmann, W.K., E-mail: w.k.hofmann@umm.de [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O., E-mail: Stefan.Schoenberg@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); and others

    2014-02-15

    Objectives: Patients with lymphoma are at higher-risk of secondary malignancies mainly due to effects of cancer therapy as well as frequent radiological surveillance. We thus aimed to investigate the objective and subjective image quality as well as radiation exposure and risk of full-dose standard (FDS), full-dose iterative (FDI), and half-dose iterative (HDI) image reconstruction in patients with lymphoma. Material and methods: In 100 lymphoma patients, contrast-enhanced whole-body staging was performed on a dual-source CT. To acquire full-dose and half-dose CT data simultaneously, the total current-time product was equally distributed on both tubes operating at 120 kV. HDI reconstructions were calculated by using only data from one tube. Quantitative image quality was assessed by measuring image noise in different tissues of the neck, thorax, and abdomen. Overall diagnostic image quality was assessed using a 5-point Likert scale. Radiation doses and risks were estimated for a male and female reference person. Results: For all anatomical regions apart from the lungs image noise was significantly lower and the overall subjective image quality significantly better when using FDI and HDI instead of FDS reconstruction (p < 0.05). For the half-dose protocol, the risk to develop a radiation-induced cancer was estimated to be less than 0.11/0.19% for an adult male/female. Conclusions: Image quality of FDI and more importantly of HDI is superior to FDS reconstruction, thus enabling to halve radiation dose and risk to lymphoma patients.

  16. Outcomes of patients with unresected stage III and stage IV non-small cell lung cancer: A single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manpreet Singh Tiwana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To report on the demographic profile and survival outcomes of North Indian population affected with stage III and stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Materials and Methods: From November 2008 to January 2012, 138 consecutively diagnosed NSCLC patients were included in this study. The patient, tumor and treatment related factors were analyzed. Median overall survival (OS, Kaplan-Meier survival plots, t-test, Cox proportional hazards models were generated by multivariate analysis [MVA] and analyzed on SPSS software (version 19.0; SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL. Results: Median OS of stage III patients was 9.26 ± 1.85 months and 2-year survival rate of 13% while stage IV patients had median OS of 5 ± 1.5 months with a 2-year survival rate of 8%. Cox regression modeling for MVA demonstrated higher biologically equivalent dose (BED ( P = 0.01 in stage III while in stage IV non-squamous histology ( P = 0.01, administration of chemotherapy ( P = 0.02, partial responders to chemotherapy ( P = 0.001, higher BED ( P = 0.02, and those with skeletal metastasis alone ( P = 0.17 showed a better OS. Conclusion: Our data showed that a higher BED is associated with favorable outcomes, indicating a role of dose escalated radiation therapy to the primary lesion in both stage III and essentially in stage IV NSCLC. Additionally, optimal use of chemotherapy relates to better survival. The developing, resource restrained nations need to follow an economically feasible multimodality approach.

  17. Theory of work-hardening applied to stages III and IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, D.; Hansen, N.

    1989-11-01

    Stage IV has become the accepted name for that work-hardening stage within which large plastic strains can occur at a very low, virtually constant work-hardening rate, as exemplified by cold rolling and wire drawing. By contrast, in the preceding stage III, the work-hardening rate decreases sharply with strain, whereas in the still earlier stage II, the work-hardening rate is also almost constant but has a high value. The classical paper by Langford and Cohen on drawn iron wire is now recognized as one of the earliest studies of stage IV. Already in 1970, a detailed theoretical analysis of that work based on the mesh length theory was presented[2] which has stood the test of time, although in it the Langford and Cohen experiments were considered to represent stage II on account of the operation of similitude and the almost constant work-hardening rate. The present paper re-examines the 1970 theoretical interpretation in terms of stage IV behavior, which necessitates reinterpretation of stage III. Included in the present interpretation are more recent insights regarding dislocation behavior in so-called LEDS, low-energy dislocation structures. It is concluded that stages II and IV differ, because in stage II, cross slip is insignificant, while in stage IV, it is unlimited. Accordingly, cross slip is gradually established in the course of stage III. However, similitude appears to operate in all three stages. By extension of the argument regarding stages III and IV, it is seen that stages V and VI could follow, including similitude, through the establishment of climb.

  18. Doses to head and neck normal tissues for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma after involved node radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M. V.; Brodin, N. P.; Aznar, M. C.;

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate dose plans for head and neck organs at risk (OARs) for classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients using involved node radiotherapy (INRT) delivered as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and intensity modulated proton therapy (PT), in comparison t...... to the past mantle field (MF)....

  19. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  20. Entolimod in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Mucositis; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  1. Walking Versus Jogging in Stages III and IV of the Bruce Treadmill Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundiff, D.; Schwane, J.

    Observations during research involving the Bruce Treadmill Test (BTMT) indicating that Stage III for females and Stage IV for males represented speeds which are intermediate between comfortable walking and confortable jogging for many subjects, prompted this study to determine ways to obtain more consistent group results. Twenty-eight subjects…

  2. Risk of recurrence in patients with colon cancer stage II and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockelman, C.; Engelmann, Bodil E.; Kaprio, T.;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adjuvant chemotherapy is established routine therapy for colon cancer (CC) patients with radically resected stage III and 'high-risk' stage II disease. The decision on recommending adjuvant chemotherapy, however, is based on data from older patient cohorts not reflecting improvements...

  3. A prognostic analysis of 895 cases of stage III colon cancer in different colon subsites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Junli; Zhang, Sai; Deng, Ganlu; Wu, Xiaoling; He, Jingxuan; Pei, Haiping; Shen, Hong; Zeng, Shan

    2015-09-01

    Stage III colon cancer is currently treated as an entity with a unified therapeutic principle. The aim of the retrospective study is to explore the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of site-specific stage III colon cancers and the influences of tumor location on prognosis. Eight hundred ninety-five patients with stage III colon cancer treated with radical operation and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin) were divided into seven groups according to colon segment (cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, and sigmoid colon). Expression of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and thymidylate synthase (TS) was examined by immunohistochemistry. We assessed if differences exist in patient characteristics and clinic outcomes between the seven groups. There were significant differences in tumor differentiation (P Cancer (AJCC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P colon. Cox regression analyses identified that tumor location was an independent prognostic factor for RFS and OS. Stage III colon cancer located proximally carried a poorer survival than that located distally. Different efficacies of FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy may be an important factor affecting survival of site-specific stage III colon cancers.

  4. A Decade of Comparative Dose Planning Studies for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: What Can We Learn?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-12-01

    During the past 4 decades, the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma has changed dramatically, and combined modality treatment is now considered the standard of care for patients with early-stage disease. However, the risk of late effects has led to concerns regarding the use of radiation therapy, especially in young patients with a long life expectancy. In this study, we review the current evidence for modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma with a focus on a reduced delivered dose, a reduced irradiated volume, and a more conformal dose distribution. Although studies are difficult to compare because of differences in field technique, prescribed dose, target volumes, patient population, and reported dosimetric and plan evaluation parameters, modern radiation therapy significantly reduces exposure to normal tissues and thereby the estimated risk of late effects. However, there is no such thing as a single best modern delivery technique when multiple organs at risk are considered simultaneously because of the heterogeneity in patient anatomy and disease location, and the choice of radiation therapy technique should be made individually for each patient.

  5. Modified cervicopexy: a novel, less-invasive technique for Stages III and IV uterine prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaman, Ali M; Salem, Hosam T; Amin, Magdy; Fetih, Ahmed N; Othman, Essam-Edin R; Zahran, Kamal M

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate modified anterior abdominal wall cervicopexy (AWC) as a less invasive (via 3-cm minilaparotomy) and more augmented (via securing posterior vaginal wall to uterosacral ligaments) technique. Case series of 30 women with Stages III and IV apical uterine prolapse assessed by the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system. The modified AWC procedure was performed successfully for 17 cases with Stage III uterovaginal prolapse and 13 cases with Stage IV uterovaginal prolapse. The procedure was conducted safely with no operative or postoperative complications, apart from two cases with postoperative urinary retention. Operative time ranged from 45 to 70min. Follow-up was available for 1-3 years. Overall, 27 cases were satisfied with the procedure, and three cases developed recurrence after caesarean section due to cutting the supporting sutures. The modified AWC procedure is less invasive, simple and effective for Stages III and IV uterine prolapse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stage I-IIA Non-Bulky Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Is Further Distinction Based on Prognostic Factors Useful? The Stanford Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Advani, Ranjana H., E-mail: radvani@stanford.edu [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Maeda, Lauren S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Baer, David M. [Northern California Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California (United States); Mason, Joseph [Northern California Kaiser Permanente, San Jose, California (United States); Rosenberg, Saul A.; Horning, Sandra J. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: In the United States, early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is defined as asymptomatic stage I/II non-bulky disease. European groups stratify patients to more intense treatment by considering additional unfavorable factors, such as age, number of nodal sites, sedimentation rate, extranodal disease, and elements of the international prognostic score for advanced HL. We sought to determine the prognostic significance of these factors in patients with early-stage disease treated at Stanford University Medical Center. Methods and Materials: This study was a retrospective analysis of 101 patients treated with abbreviated Stanford V chemotherapy (8 weeks) and 30-Gy (n = 84 patients) or 20-Gy (n = 17 patients) radiotherapy to involved sites. Outcomes were assessed after applying European risk factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 8.5 years, freedom from progression (FFP) and overall survival (OS) rates were 94% and 97%, respectively. From 33% to 60% of our patients were unfavorable per European criteria (i.e., German Hodgkin Study Group [GHSG], n = 55%; European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, n = 33%; and Groupe d'Etudes des Lymphomes de l'Adulte, n = 61%). Differences in FFP rates between favorable and unfavorable patients were significant only for GHSG criteria (p = 0.02) with there were no differences in OS rates for any criteria. Five of 6 patients who relapsed were successfully salvaged. Conclusions: The majority of our patients deemed unfavorable had an excellent outcome despite undergoing a significantly abbreviated regimen. Application of factors used by the GHSG defined a less favorable subset for FFP but with no impact on OS. As therapy for early-stage disease moves to further reductions in therapy, these factors take on added importance in the interpretation of current trial results and design of future studies.

  7. Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Who Have Undergone Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Spindle Cell Variant; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  8. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Promoter Genotype as a Marker of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Early Stage

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Vasku; Julie Bienertova Vasku; Miroslav Nečas; Vladimir Vasku

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the DNA polymorphic genotype in MMP-2 promoter gene as a potential candidate region for the development of the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and/or its progression. A total of 89 Czech patients with CTCL (including 23 patients with large plaque parapsoriasis) were compared to 198 controls of similar age and sex distribution, without personal or family history of chronic skin diseases and without personal history of malignancy. The three selected poly...

  9. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT in the planning of radiotherapy for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Hansen, Mads

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has excellent survival rates but carries a high risk of late treatment-related adverse effects. Modern, individualised therapeutic strategies require an accurate determination of the extent of the disease. This study investigated the potential impact...... of 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computerised tomogrpahy (FDG-PET/CT) in the planning of involved field radiotherapy (IFRT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty patients received staging FDG-PET/CT before therapy, and IFRT after a short course of ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin......, vinblastine, dacarbazine) chemotherapy. IFRT planning was performed using only the CT data from the FDG-PET/CT scan. Later, the IFRT planning was performed anew using the FDG-PET/CT data as basis for contouring. RESULTS: In 20 out of 30 patients, the radiotherapy (RT) course was unaffected by the addition...

  10. Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... behavior. Your type determines your treatment options. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is the more common ... Hodgkin's lymphoma Lymphocyte-rich Hodgkin's lymphoma Lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma This much rarer type of Hodgkin's lymphoma ...

  11. Expression of CD86 and increased infiltration of NK cells are associated with Helicobacter pylori-dependent state of early stage high-grade gastric MALT lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Hsin Kuo; Jaw-Town Lin; Ann-Lii Cheng; Li-Tzong Chen; Chi-Long Chen; Shin-Lian Doong; Kun-Huei Yeh; Ming-Shiang Wu; Tsui-Lien Mao; Hui-Chen Hsu; Hsiu-Po Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A high percentage of early-stage high-grade gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas remain Helicobacter pylori(H pylori)-dependent. However,unlike their low-grade counterparts, high-grade gastric MALT lymphomas may progress rapidly if unresponsive to H pylori eradication. It is mandatory to identify markers that may predict the H pylori-dependent status of these tumors. Proliferation of MALT lymphoma cells depends on cognate help and cell-to-cell contact of H pylori-specific intratumoral T-cells. To examine whether the expression of co-stimulatory marker CD86 (B7.2) and the infiltration of CD56 (+) natural killer (NK) cells can be useful markers to predict Hpylori-dependent status of high-grade gastric MALT lymphoma.METHODS: Lymphoma biopsies from 26 patients who had participated in a prospective study of H pylori-eradication for stage IE high-grade gastric MALT lymphomas were evaluated. Tumors that resolved to Wotherspoon grade Ⅱ or less after H pylorieradication were classified as H pyloridependent; others were classified as H pylori-independent.The infiltration of NK cells and the expression of CD86 in pre-treatment paraffin-embedded lymphoma tissues were determined by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: There were 16 H pylori-dependent and 10H pylori-independent cases. CD86 expression was detected in 11 (68.8%) of 16 Hpyiori-dependent cases but in none of 10 Hpylori-independent cases (P = 0.001).H pylori-dependent high-grade gastric MALT lymphomas contained significantly higher numbers of CD56 (+) NK cells than H pylori-independent cases (2.8±1.4% vs 1.1±0.8%; P = 0.003). CD86 positive MALT lymphomas also showed significantly increased infiltration of CD56 (+)NK cells compared to CD86-negative cases (2.9±1.1% vs1.4±1.3%; P= 0.005).CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the expression of co-stimulatory marker CD86 and the increased infiltration of NK cells are associated with H pylori-dependent state of early-stage high-grade gastric MALT

  12. A modified varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gaohong; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Conventionally, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are carried out with a strict two-stage design. Recently, a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design has been developed. In this design, following the first stage, an intermediate stage can be adaptively added to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision can be made. Therefore, the number of further investigational stages is determined based upon data accumulated to the interim analysis. This design considers two plausible study endpoints, with one of them initially designated as the primary endpoint. Based on interim results, another endpoint can be switched as the primary endpoint. However, in many therapeutic areas, the primary study endpoint is well established. Therefore, we modify this design to consider one study endpoint only so that it may be more readily applicable in real clinical trial designs. Our simulations show that, the same as the original design, this modified design controls the Type I error rate, and the design parameters such as the threshold probability for the two-stage setting and the alpha allocation ratio in the two-stage setting versus the three-stage setting have a great impact on the design characteristics. However, this modified design requires a larger sample size for the initial stage, and the probability of futility becomes much higher when the threshold probability for the two-stage setting gets smaller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Long-term results of the randomized phase III trial EORTC 18991 of adjuvant therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b versus observation in resected stage III melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); S. Suciu (Stefan); A. Testori (Alessandro); M. Santinami (Mario); W.H.J. Kruit (Wim); J. Marsden; C.J.A. Punt (Cornelis); F. Salès (François); R. Dummer (Reinhard); C. Robert (Caroline); D. Schadendorf (Dirk); P. Patel (Poulam); G. de Schaetzen (Gaetan); A. Spatz (Alan); U. Keilholz (Ulrich)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Adjuvant pegylated interferon alfa-2b (PEG-IFN-α-2b) was approved for treatment of resected stage III melanoma in 2011. Here, we present long-term follow-up results of this pivotal trial. Patients and Methods: In all, 1,256 patients with resected stage III melanoma were randomly

  14. Interobserver delineation uncertainty in involved-node radiation therapy (INRT) for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: on behalf of the Radiotherapy Committee of the EORTC lymphoma group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Marianne C; Girinsky, Theodore; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Aleman, Berthe; Beijert, Max; Hutchings, Martin; Lievens, Yolande; Meijnders, Paul; Meidahl Petersen, Peter; Schut, Deborah; Maraldo, Maja V; van der Maazen, Richard; Specht, Lena

    2017-04-01

    In early-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) the target volume nowadays consists of the volume of the originally involved nodes. Delineation of this volume on a post-chemotherapy CT-scan is challenging. We report on the interobserver variability in target volume definition and its impact on resulting treatment plans. Two representative cases were selected (1: male, stage IB, localization: left axilla; 2: female, stage IIB, localizations: mediastinum and bilateral neck). Eight experienced observers individually defined the clinical target volume (CTV) using involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) as defined by the EORTC-GELA guidelines for the H10 trial. A consensus contour was generated and the standard deviation computed. We investigated the overlap between observer and consensus contour [Sørensen-Dice coefficient (DSC)] and the magnitude of gross deviations between the surfaces of the observer and consensus contour (Hausdorff distance). 3D-conformal (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were calculated for each contour in order to investigate the impact of interobserver variability on each treatment modality. Similar target coverage was enforced for all plans. The median CTV was 120 cm(3) (IQR: 95-173 cm(3)) for Case 1, and 255 cm(3) (IQR: 183-293 cm(3)) for Case 2. DSC values were generally high (>0.7), and Hausdorff distances were about 30 mm. The SDs between all observer contours, providing an estimate of the systematic error associated with delineation uncertainty, ranged from 1.9 to 3.8 mm (median: 3.2 mm). Variations in mean dose resulting from different observer contours were small and were not higher in IMRT plans than in 3D-CRT plans. We observed considerable differences in target volume delineation, but the systematic delineation uncertainty of around 3 mm is comparable to that reported in other tumour sites. This report is a first step towards calculating an evidence-based planning target volume margin for INRT in HL.

  15. Prognostic factors in non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Zattar Cecyn

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: In Hodgkin's disease, each clinical or pathologic stage can be related to the extent of the area involved and predicts the next anatomical region at risk for tumor dissemination. OBJECTIVE: To determine the best prognostic factors that could predict survival in non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases. DESIGN: A retrospective study. LOCATION: Department of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Universidade Federal de São Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina. PARTICIPANTS: 142 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed between February 1988 and March 1993. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Histological subset, Sex, Age, Race, B symptoms, Performance status, Stage, Extranodal disease, Bulk disease, Mediastinal disease, CNS involvement, BM infiltration, Level of DHL, Immunophenotype. RESULTS: In the first study (113 patients, the following variables had a worse influence on survival: yellow race (P<0.1; ECOG II, III e IV (P<0.1 and extranodal disease (P<0.1 for high grade lymphomas; constitutional symptoms (P<0.1, ECOG II, III e IV (P<0.1 and involvement of CNS (P<0.1 for intermediate grade and the subtype lymphoplasmocytoid (P=0.0186 for low grade lymphomas. In the second survey (93 patients, when treatment was included, the variables related to NHL survival were: CNS involvement (P<0.1 for high grade lymphomas, constitutional symptoms (P<0.1, ECOG II, III, IV (P=0.0185 and also CNS involvement (P<0.1 for the intermediate group. There were no variables related to the survival for low-grade lymphomas. CONCLUSIONS: The intermediate grade lymphomas were more compatible with data found in the literature, probably because of the larger number of patients. In this specific case, the treatment did not have an influence on the survival.

  16. The value of routine bone marrow biopsy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma staged with PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzahrani, M; El-Galaly, T C; Hutchings, M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The added diagnostic and prognostic value of routine bone marrow biopsy (BMB) in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) undergoing positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) staging is controversial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with newly d...

  17. Two sides of the medallion: poor treatment tolerance but better survival by standard chemotherapy in elderly patients with advanced-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, S.A. van de; Wymenga, A.N.; Spronsen, D.J. van; Schouten, H.C.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Janssen-Heijnen, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated treatment of unselected elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and its subsequent impact on treatment tolerance and survival. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data from all 419 advanced-stage DLBCL patients, aged 75 or older and newly diagnosed between 1997 and

  18. Whole-body positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose for staging of lymphoma: effectiveness and comparison with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpe, K.D.M.; Urbinelli, M.; Steinert, H.C.; Glanzmann, C.; Buck, A.; von Schulthess, G.K. [Department of Medical Radiology, University Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whole-body positron emission tomography (WB-PET) as a staging modality in Hodgkin`s disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and to compare it with computed tomography (CT) in a retrospective study. Seventy-one WB-PET studies using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 49 CT examinations were performed in 19 women and 31 men. Transaxial images were acquired and reformatted coronally and sagittally in PET. CT sections were obtained from the skull base to the pelvic floor. The written reports of the imaging data were compared with a reference standard constructed on the basis of all the data on the individual patients, including clinical follow-up of at least 6 months. The sensitivity and specificity of PET were, respectively, 86% and 96% for HD (n=53), and 89% and 100% for NHL (n=18). For CT sensitivity and specificity were 81% and 41% for HD (n=33) and 86% and 67% for NHL (n=16). Differences between PET and CT sensitivities were not significant, while in HD there was a significant difference in the specificity of PET and CT examinations, mainly because CT was unable to distinguish between active or recurrent disease and residual scar tissue after therapy. FDG tumour uptake was found in high- as well as low-grade NHL patients. In conclusion, PET appears to be highly sensitive and specific for staging of lymphoma. It is at least as sensitive as CT, and more specific, particularly in patients undergoing restaging, where a well-recognized diagnostic dilemma in CT is the presence of a post-therapeutic residual mass. (orig.) With 4 figs., 3 tabs., 23 refs.

  19. Prognostic classification of Hodgkin disease in pathologic stage III, based on anatomic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desser, R.K.; Golomb, H.M.; Ultmann, J.E.; Ferguson, D.J.; Moran, E.M.; Griem, M.L.; Vardiman, J.; Miller, B.; Oetzel, N.; Sweet, D.

    1977-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with pathologic stage III Hodgkin's disease were studied in an effort to determine whether location of involved abdominal nodes influenced survival. Treatment consisted of total nodal radiotherapy with or without subsequent combination chemotherapy. The initial radiation field was the ''extended mantle,'' which included supradiaphragmatic nodes, the splenic hilar area, and paraaortic nodes to the level of L2-L4. Subsequently, lower paraaortic and iliac regions were treated (''lower inverted Y''). Patients with disease limited to the spleen and/or splenic, celiac, or portal nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 1/) had a more favorable 5-yr survival than did patients with involvement of paraaortic, iliac, or mesenteric nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 2/) : 93% versus 57%, respectively (p < 0.05). The addition of combination chemotherapy to total nodal irradiation was associated with improved survival of patients in stage III/sub 2/, but not of those in stage III/sub 1/.

  20. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  1. A proteomics panel for predicting optimal primary cytoreduction in stage III/IV ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Signe; Høgdall, Estrid; Engelholm, Svend A;

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate CA-125 and a 7-marker panel as predictors of incomplete primary cytoreduction in patients with stage III/IV ovarian cancer (OC). From September 2004 to January 2008, serum from 201 patients referred to surgery for a pelvic tumor was analyzed...

  2. Cost analysis of surgically treated pressure sores stage III and IV.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filius, A.; Damen, T.H.; Schuijer-Maaskant, K.P.; Polinder, S.; Hovius, S.E.; Walbeehm, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Health-care costs associated with pressure sores are significant and their financial burden is likely to increase even further. The aim of this study was to analyse the direct medical costs of hospital care for surgical treatment of pressure sores stage III and IV. We performed a retrospective chart

  3. Impact of Weight Changes After the Diagnosis of Stage III Colon Cancer on Survival Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergidis, Joanna; Gresham, Gillian; Lim, Howard J; Renouf, Daniel J; Kennecke, Hagen F; Ruan, Jenny Y; Chang, Jennifer T; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-03-01

    Weight modification after a diagnosis of colon cancer and its impact on outcomes remain unclear. Thus we aimed to examine the association of obesity and weight changes from baseline oncology consultation with recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with stage III colon cancer. Patients aged ≥ 18 years who were diagnosed with stage III colon cancer in British Columbia from 2008 to 2010 and who received adjuvant chemotherapy were included in the study. Cox proportional hazards regression models were fitted to evaluate the impact of different body compositions and degree of weight changes from baseline assessment with outcomes while controlling for potentially confounding covariates, such as age and sex. A total of 539 patients with stage III colon cancer were included: median age was 69 years (range, 26-94 years), 52% were men, and 53% had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1. Those with weight gains of ≥ 10% had a median RFS of 37 months compared with 49 months in those with weight gains of  .05). Weight losses of ≥ 10% from baseline evaluation bodes a worse prognosis among patients with stage III colon cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost analysis of surgically treated pressure sores stage III and IV.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filius, A.; Damen, T.H.; Schuijer-Maaskant, K.P.; Polinder, S.; Hovius, S.E.; Walbeehm, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Health-care costs associated with pressure sores are significant and their financial burden is likely to increase even further. The aim of this study was to analyse the direct medical costs of hospital care for surgical treatment of pressure sores stage III and IV. We performed a retrospective chart

  5. Palliative Local Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Tumor-stage Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma/Mycosis Fungoides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-chen Xu; Tao Zhang; Tao Wang; Jie Liu; Yue-hua Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of palliative radiotherapy in treating tumor-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma/mycosis fungoides (MF). Methods From January 2008 to January 2013, a total of 11 patients with tumor-stage MF were treated with local radiation therapy in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. The median age of these patients was 53.36±14.45 years. Female-male ratio was 1:1.2. The average course of disease was 10.82±3.37 years. All the patients were treated with local electronic beam irradiation with a total median dosage of 48.55±9.51 (40-74) Gy in an average of 24.55±5.57 (20-40) fractions, 5 fractions per week. Results The median follow-up time was 55.27±29.3 (13-103) months. No severe acute or chronic side effects of irradiation were observed. Complete clinical response (CR) rate of the radiated sites was 54.5%(6/11), partial response (PR) rate was 36.4%(4/11), and the overall response rate (CR+PR) was 90.9%. One patient showed no response. Conclusion Local radiotherapy with psolaren plus ultraviolet A and/or interferon maintaining treatment is an effective palliative therapy in the treatment of tumor-stage MF patients.

  6. [Update to the recommendations for management of melanoma stages I to III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, B; Dalac, S; Denis, M G; Dupuy, A; Emile, J-F; De La Fouchardière, A; Hindie, E; Jouary, T; Lassau, N; Mirabel, X; Piperno Neumann, S; De Raucourt, S; Vanwijck, R

    2016-10-01

    As knowledge continues to develop, regular updates are necessary concerning recommendations for practice. The recommendations for the management of melanoma stages I to III were drawn up in 2005. At the request of the Société Française de Dermatologie, they have now been updated using the methodology for recommendations proposed by the Haute Autorité de Santé. In practice, the principal recommendations are as follows: for staging, it is recommended that the 7th edition of AJCC be used. The maximum excision margins have been reduced to 2cm. Regarding adjuvant therapy, the place of interferon has been reduced and no validated emerging medication has yet been identified. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients in stage III at high risk of relapse. The sentinel lymph node technique remains an option. Initial examination includes routine ultrasound as of stage II, with other examinations being optional in stages IIC and III. A shorter strict follow-up period (3years) is recommended for patients, but with greater emphasis on imaging.

  7. Protein signatures correspond to survival outcomes of AJCC stage III melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mactier, Swetlana; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Wang, Penghao; Crossett, Ben; Pupo, Gulietta M; Kohnke, Philippa L; Thompson, John F; Scolyer, Richard A; Yang, Jean Y; Mann, Graham J; Christopherson, Richard I

    2014-11-01

    Outcomes for melanoma patients with stage III disease differ widely even within the same subcategory. Molecular signatures that more accurately predict prognosis are needed to stratify patients according to risk. Proteomic analyses were used to identify differentially abundant proteins in extracts of surgically excised samples from patients with stage IIIc melanoma lymph node metastases. Analysis of samples from patients with poor (n = 14, 4 yr) survival outcomes identified 84 proteins that were differentially abundant between prognostic groups. Subsequent selected reaction monitoring analysis verified 21 proteins as potential biomarkers for survival. Poor prognosis patients are characterized by increased levels of proteins involved in protein metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, angiogenesis, deregulation of cellular energetics and methylation processes, and decreased levels of proteins involved in apoptosis and immune response. These proteins are able to classify stage IIIc patients into prognostic subgroups (P < 0.02). This is the first report of potential prognostic markers from stage III melanoma using proteomic analyses. Validation of these protein markers in larger patient cohorts should define protein signatures that enable better stratification of stage III melanoma patients.

  8. Routine use of ancillary investigations in staging diffuse large B-cell lymphoma improves the International Prognostic Index (IPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadbolt Bruce

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The International Prognostic Index (IPI is used to determine prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. One of the determinants of IPI is the stage of disease with bone marrow involvement being classified as stage IV. For the IPI, involvement on bone marrow is traditionally defined on the basis of histology with ancillary investigations used only in difficult cases to aid histological diagnosis. This study aimed to determine the effect of the routine use of flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and molecular studies in bone marrow staging upon the IPI. Results Bone marrow trephines of 156 histologically proven DLBCL cases at initial diagnosis were assessed on routine histology, and immunohistochemistry using two T-cell markers (CD45RO and CD3, two B-cell markers (CD20 and CD79a and kappa and lambda light chains. Raw flow cytometry data on all samples were reanalysed and reinterpreted blindly. DNA extracted from archived paraffin-embedded trephine biopsy samples was used for immunoglobulin heavy chain and light chain gene rearrangement analysis. Using immunophenotyping (flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, 30 (19.2% cases were upstaged to stage IV. A further 8 (5.1% cases were upstaged using molecular studies. A change in IPI was noted in 18 cases (11.5% on immunophenotyping alone, and 22 (14.1% cases on immunophenotyping and molecular testing. Comparison of two revised IPI models, 1 using immunophenotyping alone, and 2 using immunophenotyping with molecular studies, was performed with baseline IPI using a Cox regression model. It showed that the revised IPI model using immunophenotyping provides the best differentiation between the IPI categories. Conclusion Improved bone marrow staging using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry improves the predictive value of the IPI in patients with DLBCL and should be performed routinely in all cases.

  9. Lymphoma in 3 related Rottweilers from a single household : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. Lobetti

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Over a period of approximately 1 year, 2 sibling Rottweilers and their dam in the same household developed stage IV and stage III lymphoma, respectively. All 3 initially responded to doxorubicin chemotherapy but relapsed after approximately 3 months and were subsequently euthanased. As no obvious environmental trigger could be identified in these dogs, it is speculated that an underlying genetic predisposition could have played a role in the development of lymphoma in these related dogs.

  10. Extended surgical resections of advanced thymoma Masaoka stages III and IVa facilitate outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, Michael; Potzger, Tobias; Sziklavari, Zsolt; Diez, Claudius; Neu, Reiner; Schalke, Berthold; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Extended thymoma resections including adjacent structures and pleurectomy/decortication (P/D) with hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy (HITHOC) perfusion were performed in a multidisciplinary treatment regime. Between July 2000 and February 2012, 22 patients with Masaoka stage III (n = 9; 41%) and Masaoka stage IVa (n = 13; 59%) thymic tumors were included. Mean age was 55 years (25-84 years) and 50% (11 out of 22) of patients were female. World Health Organization histological classification was as follows: B2 (n = 15), A (n = 1), B1 (n = 1), B3 (n = 2), and thymic carcinoma (C; n = 3). Radical thymectomy and partial resection of the mediastinal pleura and pericardium were performed. Of the 13, 9 patients with pleural involvement (stage IVa) received radical P/D followed by HITHOC (cisplatin). Macroscopic complete resection (R0/R1) was achieved in 19 (86%) patients. All patients received multimodality treatment depending on tumor stage, histology, and completeness of resection. Thirty-day mortality was 0% and three (13.6%) patients needed operative revision. Recurrence of thymoma was documented in five (22.7%) patients (stage III, n = 1; stage IVa, n = 4). Mean disease-free interval of patients with complete resection (n = 14 out of 22) was 30.2 months. After a mean follow-up of 29 months, 18 out of the 22 (82%) patients are alive. After P/D and HITHOC, 89% (8 out of 9 patients) are alive (current median survival is 25 months) without recurrence. Extended surgical resection of advanced thymic tumors infiltrating adjacent structures (stage III) or with pleural metastases (stage IVa) is safe and feasible. It provides a low recurrence rate and an acceptable survival. Additional HITHOC in patients with pleural thymoma spread seems to offer a better local tumor control. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Radiation Therapy With Cisplatin, Docetaxel, or Cetuximab After Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-18

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  12. Effects of interleukin-3 following chemotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. A prospective, controlled phase I/II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovgaard, D J; Nissen, N I

    1995-02-01

    The effect of rhIL-3 was investigated in 32 patients with newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a phase I/II trial. All patients received 6 cycles of standard CHOP chemotherapy, and each patient was his own control where rhIL-3 was given as a daily s.c. injection for 14 days (day 2-15) in cycle 2 and 4, while cycle 1 and 3 were control cycles. Five dose levels were examined (0.5 - 1 - 5 - 7.5 - 10 micrograms/kg). Compared to the other more lineage-specific hemopoietic growth factors G- and GM-CSF, the effect of rhIL-3 on the hemopoiesis was less dramatic and more delayed, i.e. the most apparent effect was observed in the 2 weeks of treatment. Thus, the neutrophil counts from days 15 to 22 following CHOP were significantly raised and the duration of neutropenia was shorter (significantly only at 10 micrograms/kg), while the nadir values were unaffected. Platelet recovery from days 12-22 was significantly increased and nadir values occurred earlier compared to control cycles, but were only increased in some subsets. Other cell populations affected moderately in the recovery period were eosinophils and monocytes. Reticulocytes increased, but no effect on hemoglobin or RBC transfusion requirement was noted. Only moderate adverse reactions occurred such as fever, chills, flushing of the face and flu-like symptoms. There was no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth. Most significant, the rhIL-3 treatment at all but the lowest dose levels led to an improved tolerance to chemotherapy, as indicated by a decline in number of delayed cycles. A conclusion concerning the role of rhIL-3 as post-chemotherapy adjuvant should await studies using rhIL-3 in combination with more lineage-restricted hemopoietic growth factors.

  13. Primary early-stage intestinal and colonic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Clinical features, management, and outcome of 37 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Lian Wang; Ye-Xiong Li; Zhong-Xing Liao; Xin-Fan Liu; Zi-Hao Yu; Da-Zhong Gu; Tu-Nan Qian; Yong-Wen Song; Jing Jin; Wei-Hu Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical features, management, and outcome of treatment of patients with primary intestinal and colonic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (PICL).METHODS: A retrospective study was performed in 37 patients with early-stage PICL who were treated in our hospital from 1958 to 1998. Their clinical features,management, and outcome were assessed. Prognostic factors for survival were analyzed by univariate analysis using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method and log-rank test.RESULTS: Twenty-five patients presented with Ann Arbor stage I PICL and 12 with Ann Arbor stage Ⅱ PICL. Thirty-five patients underwent surgery (including 31 with complete resection), 22 received postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy or both. Two patients with rectal tumors underwent biopsy and chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy. The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 51.9% and 44.5%. The corresponding diseasefree survival (DFS) rates were 42.4% and 37.7%. In univariate analysis, multiple-modality treatment was associated with a better DFS rate compared to single treatment (P = 0.001).While age, tumor size, tumor site, stage, histology, or extent of surgery were not associated with OS and DFS,use of adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved DFS (P = 0.031) for the 31 patients who underwent complete resection. Additional radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy led to a longer survival than chemotherapy alone in six patients with gross residual disease after surgery or biopsy.CONCLUSION: Combined surgery and chemotherapy is recommended for treatment of patients with PICL.Additional radiotherapy is needed to improve the outcome of patients who have gross residual disease after surgery.

  14. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  15. Prognostic and predictive value of YKL-40 in stage IIB-III melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Merete; Christensen, Ib; Bouwhuis, Marna

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the prognostic and predictive value of YKL-40 in stage IIB-III melanoma patients who were randomized to adjuvant interferon α-2b (IFN) or observation. Serum YKL-40 was determined postoperatively in patients from the Nordic IFN Trial (n=602), EORTC 18952 (n=246), and EORTC...... 18991 (n=386) (EORTC, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer). YKL-40 protein expression was determined in 300 tissue sections of primary melanoma or lymph node metastases from 204 Danish patients from the Nordic IFN Trial. Multivariate Cox analysis (including sex, age, stage...

  16. Intraovarian transplantation of stage I-II follicles results in viable zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csenki, Zsolt; Zaucker, Andreas; Kovács, Balázs; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Hegyi, Arpád; Lefler, Katalin-Kinga; Müller, Tamás; Kovács, Robert; Urbányi, Béla; Váradi, László; Müller, Ferenc

    2010-01-01

    Maternal gene products drive early embryogenesis almost exclusively until the mid blastula transition (MBT) in many animal models including fish. However, the maternal contribution to embryogenesis does not stop at MBT, but continues to be an essential regulator of key developmental processes. The extent to which maternal effects contribute to embryonic and larval development is hard to estimate due to the technical difficulty of interfering with maternal gene products by conventional forward and reverse genetic tools. Therefore, novel methods to manipulate maternal factors in oocytes need to be developed. Here, we provide a proof of principle protocol for transplanting stage I-II zebrafish follicles into recipient mothers where donor stage I oocytes can develop to stage IV in 2 weeks and in 3 weeks they develop into mature eggs and produce viable offspring. Moreover, we show that simple microinjection of stage I-II follicles with RNA results in reporter gene expression in oocytes and paves the way for developing tools for interfering with maternal gene activity. This early stage oocyte transplantation protocol provides a means to study cellular and molecular aspects of oocyte development in the zebrafish.

  17. ABVD chemotherapy with reduced radiation therapy rates in children, adolescents and young adults with all stages of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, K C; Connors, J M; Savage, K J; Goddard, K J; Deyell, R J

    2017-04-01

    We adopted ABVD chemotherapy with risk-adapted radiation therapy (RT) as first-line therapy for children, adolescents and young adults with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) in British Columbia in 2004. Patients ≤ 25 years diagnosed from 2004 to 2013 with all stages of HL who received ABVD as initial therapy were included. Among 55 children (age adults (18-25 year), there were no significant differences among age groups for sex, histologic subtype, tumour bulk, B symptoms, prognostic risk groups or treatment received. The rates of complete response, partial response and progressive disease were 84%, 7% and 10% for children and 95%, 4% and 1% for young adults (P=0.01), respectively. Treatment failures in children all occurred within one year of completion, while 8/21 (38%) relapses in young adults occurred later (P=0.04). With a median follow-up of 66 months the 5-year progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 85 ± 3% and 97 ± 1%, respectively. For limited stage disease, PFS was 90 ± 7% for children and 93 ± 3% for young adults (P=0.65); OS was 100% for both. For advanced stage patients, PFS and OS were also similar for the children and young adults (77 ± 7% versus 81 ± 4%; P=0.38 and OS 90 ± 6% versus 97 ± 2%; P=0.17). The rate of consolidative RT was low (21%) and did not differ between age groups. ABVD is an effective treatment in children, adolescents and young adults with HL. Children were less likely to achieve complete response and demonstrated earlier relapses compared to young adults. RT may be omitted for the majority of patients while maintaining excellent 5-year OS.

  18. Optimized Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Versus 3D-CRT for Early Stage Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma Without Axillary Involvement: A Comparison of Second Cancers and Heart Disease Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ragona, Riccardo; Piva, Cristina; Scafa, Davide; Fiandra, Christian [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Fusella, Marco; Giglioli, Francesca Romana [Medical Physics, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, Torino (Italy); Lohr, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks of second cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with an optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning solution in a selected cohort of stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with either involved-node or involved-site radiation therapy in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-eight patients (13 males and 25 females) were included. Disease extent was mediastinum alone (n=8, 21.1%); mediastinum plus unilateral neck (n=19, 50%); mediastinum plus bilateral neck (n=11, 29.9%). Prescription dose was 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Only 5 patients had mediastinal bulky disease at diagnosis (13.1%). Anteroposterior 3D-CRT was compared with a multiarc optimized VMAT solution. Lung, breast, and thyroid cancer risks were estimated by calculating a lifetime attributable risk (LAR), with a LAR ratio (LAR{sub VMAT}-to-LAR{sub 3D-CRT}) as a comparative measure. Cardiac toxicity risks were estimated by calculating absolute excess risk (AER). Results: The LAR ratio favored 3D-CRT for lung cancer induction risk in mediastinal alone (P=.004) and mediastinal plus unilateral neck (P=.02) presentations. LAR ratio for breast cancer was lower for VMAT in mediastinal plus bilateral neck presentations (P=.02), without differences for other sites. For thyroid cancer, no significant differences were observed, regardless of anatomical presentation. A significantly lower AER of cardiac (P=.038) and valvular diseases (P<.0001) was observed for VMAT regardless of disease extent. Conclusions: In a cohort of patients with favorable characteristics in terms of disease extent at diagnosis (large prevalence of nonbulky presentations without axillary involvement), optimized VMAT reduced heart disease risk with comparable risks of thyroid and breast cancer, with an increase in lung cancer induction probability. The results are however strongly influenced by

  19. Comparative analysis between RQ-PCR and digital droplet PCR of BCL2/IGH gene rearrangement in the peripheral blood and bone marrow of early stage follicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Marzia; De Novi, Lucia Anna; Della Starza, Irene; Cappelli, Luca Vincenzo; Nunes, Vittorio; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2017-05-01

    BCL2/IGH rearrangements were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at diagnosis in paired peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) samples from 67 patients with stage I/II follicular lymphoma (FL). Real time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) and digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) were performed in cases with a major breakpoint region (MBR+) at diagnosis and after localized radiotherapy and rituximab administration in order to investigate the applicability of ddPCR. The overall ddPCR/RQ-PCR concordance was 81·9% (113/138 samples) and 97·5% in the 40/138 with quantifiable disease (RQ-PCR≥10(-5) ). At baseline, ddPCR allowed the recovery of a MBR+ marker in 8/18 (44·4%) samples that resulted MBR-negative/minor cluster region-negative/minor BCL2-negative by qualitative PCR. Moreover, the tumour burden at diagnosis significantly predicted progression-free survival (PSF) only when quantified by ddPCR. Paired PB and BM samples analysis demonstrated a high concordance in the detection of BCL2/IGH+ cells by qualitative and quantitative methods; in particular, 40/62 samples were positive by ddPCR (25 PB+/BM+; 9 PB+/BM-; 6 PB-/BM+), with 34/40 (85%) identified by the study of PB only. In conclusion, in localized FL, ddPCR is a promising tool for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) that is at least comparable to RQ-PCR and potentially more accurate. PB is a suitable source for serial BCL2/IGH MRD assessments, regardless of the methodology utilized. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy versus 3D-CRT for early stage mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma without axillary involvement: a comparison of second cancers and heart disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ragona, Riccardo; Piva, Cristina; Scafa, Davide; Fiandra, Christian; Fusella, Marco; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Lohr, Frank; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks of second cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with an optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning solution in a selected cohort of stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with either involved-node or involved-site radiation therapy in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Thirty-eight patients (13 males and 25 females) were included. Disease extent was mediastinum alone (n=8, 21.1%); mediastinum plus unilateral neck (n=19, 50%); mediastinum plus bilateral neck (n=11, 29.9%). Prescription dose was 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Only 5 patients had mediastinal bulky disease at diagnosis (13.1%). Anteroposterior 3D-CRT was compared with a multiarc optimized VMAT solution. Lung, breast, and thyroid cancer risks were estimated by calculating a lifetime attributable risk (LAR), with a LAR ratio (LAR(VMAT)-to-LAR(3D-CRT)) as a comparative measure. Cardiac toxicity risks were estimated by calculating absolute excess risk (AER). The LAR ratio favored 3D-CRT for lung cancer induction risk in mediastinal alone (P=.004) and mediastinal plus unilateral neck (P=.02) presentations. LAR ratio for breast cancer was lower for VMAT in mediastinal plus bilateral neck presentations (P=.02), without differences for other sites. For thyroid cancer, no significant differences were observed, regardless of anatomical presentation. A significantly lower AER of cardiac (P=.038) and valvular diseases (Pdisease extent. In a cohort of patients with favorable characteristics in terms of disease extent at diagnosis (large prevalence of nonbulky presentations without axillary involvement), optimized VMAT reduced heart disease risk with comparable risks of thyroid and breast cancer, with an increase in lung cancer induction probability. The results are however strongly influenced by the different anatomical presentations, supporting an individualized approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  1. Survival after Pneumonectomy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibu P. Saha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has a poor prognosis. Reports suggest that five-year survival after current treatment is between 14 to 24 percent. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the morbidity and mortality of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC and treated with pneumonectomy at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington, KY. Methods: We reviewed the medical record and tumor registry follow-up data on 100 consecutive patients who underwent pneumonectomy for lung cancer at the University of Kentucky. Results: We identified thirty-six patients in stage III who underwent pneumonectomy. Ten patients had surgery only, eight patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, and eighteen patients received neoadjuvant therapy. There was one surgical death in this series. Mean follow-up was 2.9 years. One-, three-, and five-year survival was 66%, 38%, and 38%, respectively. Five-year survival for the group with adjuvant therapy was 60%. Conclusion: Most lung cancer patients present with advanced disease and the prognosis remains poor. Our experience indicates resection offers an above average chance of long-term survival when supplemented with neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy.

  2. Standard treatment option in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: case against trimodal therapy and consolidation drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremić, Branislav

    2015-03-01

    Prospective randomized trials and meta-analyses established concurrent radiochemotherapy (RT-CHT) as standard treatment approach in patients with inoperable, locally advanced (stage IIIA and B) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In patients with either clinically (c) or pathologically (p) staged disease (stage IIIA), including those with pN2 disease, trimodal therapy was also frequently practiced in the past and is currently still advocated by large cooperative groups and organizations. Similarly, consolidation CHT provided after concurrent RT-CHT was suggested to be feasible and effective in inoperable stage III NSCLC. Contrasting these practices and suggestions, there is no evidence that trimodal therapy in stage IIIA (clinically or pathologically staged) or consolidation CHT in inoperable stage III NSCLC plays any role in its treatment. In both cases, evidence clearly demonstrates that concurrent RT-CHT is of similar efficacy and less toxic, and it should be considered a standard treatment option for all patients with stage III NSCLC.

  3. A population-based study of prognosis in advanced stage follicular lymphoma managed by watch and wait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Bilgrau, Anders E; de Nully Brown, Peter

    2015-01-01

    % (95%CI 7-20). Elevated lactate dehydrogenase and > four nodal regions involved were associated with a higher risk of lymphoma treatment and death from lymphoma. The WAW patients and a matched background population had similar OS during the first 50 months after diagnosis (P = 0·7), but WAW patients...

  4. Impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography staging in newly diagnosed classical Hodgkin lymphoma: fewer cases with stage I disease and more with skeletal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin; Mylam, Karen Juul; Brown, Peter de Nully; Bukh, Anne; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Kamper, Peter; Loft, Annika; Iyer, Victor; Gormsen, Lars Christian; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Bøgsted, Martin; d'Amore, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT) is a highly accurate staging method in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). We retrospectively compared the staging results obtained in two large cohorts of patients with cHL diagnosed before (n = 324) and after (n = 406) the introduction of PET/CT staging in a retrospective study. In PET/CT staged patients, stage I disease was less frequent (16% vs. 27%, p disease was more frequent (17% vs. 10%, p = 0.02). Imaging-detected skeletal involvement was recognized more often in PET/CT staged patients (17% vs. 2%, p Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) risk classification (early, intermediate, advanced disease) predicted outcome in PET/CT staged patients. In conclusion, PET/CT led to higher disease stages, and the more frequently diagnosed skeletal lesions may be an adverse prognostic factor.

  5. Cutaneous Lymphoma International Consortium Study of Outcome in Advanced Stages of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: Effect of Specific Prognostic Markers on Survival and Development of a Prognostic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarisbrick, Julia J.; Prince, H. Miles; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Quaglino, Pietro; Horwitz, Steven; Porcu, Pierluigi; Stadler, Rudolf; Wood, Gary S.; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Pham-Ledard, Anne; Foss, Francine; Girardi, Michael; Bagot, Martine; Michel, Laurence; Battistella, Maxime; Guitart, Joan; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Martinez-Escala, Maria Estela; Estrach, Teresa; Papadavid, Evangelia; Antoniou, Christina; Rigopoulos, Dimitis; Nikolaou, Vassilki; Sugaya, Makoto; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Gniadecki, Robert; Sanches, José Antonio; Cury-Martins, Jade; Miyashiro, Denis; Servitje, Octavio; Muniesa, Cristina; Berti, Emilio; Onida, Francesco; Corti, Laura; Hodak, Emilia; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Rodríguez-Peralto, Jose L.; Knobler, Robert; Porkert, Stefanie; Bauer, Wolfgang; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Grandi, Vieri; Cowan, Richard; Rook, Alain; Kim, Ellen; Pileri, Alessandro; Patrizi, Annalisa; Pujol, Ramon M.; Wong, Henry; Tyler, Kelly; Stranzenbach, Rene; Querfeld, Christiane; Fava, Paolo; Maule, Milena; Willemze, Rein; Evison, Felicity; Morris, Stephen; Twigger, Robert; Talpur, Rakhshandra; Kim, Jinah; Ognibene, Grant; Li, Shufeng; Tavallaee, Mahkam; Hoppe, Richard T.; Duvic, Madeleine; Whittaker, Sean J.; Kim, Youn H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advanced-stage mycosis fungoides (MF; stage IIB to IV) and Sézary syndrome (SS) are aggressive lymphomas with a median survival of 1 to 5 years. Clinical management is stage based; however, there is wide range of outcome within stages. Published prognostic studies in MF/SS have been single-center trials. Because of the rarity of MF/SS, only a large collaboration would power a study to identify independent prognostic markers. Patients and Methods Literature review identified the following 10 candidate markers: stage, age, sex, cutaneous histologic features of folliculotropism, CD30 positivity, proliferation index, large-cell transformation, WBC/lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and identical T-cell clone in blood and skin. Data were collected at specialist centers on patients diagnosed with advanced-stage MF/SS from 2007. Each parameter recorded at diagnosis was tested against overall survival (OS). Results Staging data on 1,275 patients with advanced MF/SS from 29 international sites were included for survival analysis. The median OS was 63 months, with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 77% and 52%, respectively. The median OS for patients with stage IIB disease was 68 months, but patients diagnosed with stage III disease had slightly improved survival compared with patients with stage IIB, although patients diagnosed with stage IV disease had significantly worse survival (48 months for stage IVA and 33 months for stage IVB). Of the 10 variables tested, four (stage IV, age > 60 years, large-cell transformation, and increased lactate dehydrogenase) were independent prognostic markers for a worse survival. Combining these four factors in a prognostic index model identified the following three risk groups across stages with significantly different 5-year survival rates: low risk (68%), intermediate risk (44%), and high risk (28%). Conclusion To our knowledge, this study includes the largest cohort of patients with advanced-stage MF/SS and

  6. Hodgkin Lymphoma: the Changing Role of Radiation Therapy in Early-Stage Disease—the Role of Functional Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iberri, David J; Hoppe, Richard T; Advani, Ranjana H

    2015-09-01

    Early-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) is a highly curable malignancy. Historically, extended-field radiotherapy (EFRT) alone showed excellent cure rates, but the risk of radiotherapy (RT)-associated toxicities led to combined modality therapy (CMT) replacing RT alone. RT has subsequently evolved further with significant reductions of dose and field size, and is currently restricted to involved sites only (ISRT). Contemporary CMT yields cure rates in excess of 85%, and most studies do not have adequate follow-up required to evaluate the risk reduction in late effects. In an effort to avoid RT altogether, response-adapted treatment approaches utilizing results of interim [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with fused computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging have been studied. Results from two studies in favorable-risk (UK RAPID and EORTC H10F) and one in unfavorable-risk patients (EORTC H10U) suggest that omission of RT in patients with a negative interim PET/CT response (Deauville score ≤2) yields slightly inferior progression-free survival (PFS) compared to conventional CMT, but with no difference in overall survival (OS) albeit with short-term follow-up. In order to extrapolate results to daily practice, it is critical to understand the selection of patients entered on trials since definitions of favorable and unfavorable disease vary between study groups. Currently, CMT continues to be the standard of care for the vast majority of patients with early-stage CHL and RT is an integral part of therapy in patients with bulky disease. However, for selected patients with favorable characteristics, emerging data suggest that a chemotherapy-alone approach is reasonable.

  7. Prognostic implications of cell kinetics, histopathology and pathologic stage in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrini, R; Costa, A; Giardini, R; Boracchi, P; Del Bino, G; Marubini, E; Rilke, F

    1989-01-01

    Cell kinetics ([3H]-thymidine labelling index, [3H]-Thy LI) were determined on pathologic lymph nodes from 175 untreated adult patients. [3H]-Thy LI significantly differed in low-grade and high-grade malignancy groups according to the Kiel classification (median values, 1.8 per cent and 10.4 per cent, respectively) and in low, intermediate, high grade according to the Working Formulation (median values: 1.7 per cent, 4.8 per cent and 14.2 per cent, respectively) but was unrelated to pathologic stage or patient's age. Cell kinetics, histopathology, pathologic stage and patient's age were significant discriminants of 6-year survival. Multivariate analysis was performed by Cox's proportional hazard model to investigate the role of [3H]-Thy LI after making allowance for the other prognostic factors. When [3H]-Thy LI was added to the model, a large increase (chi square = 29.94) contributed by the cell kinetic variable in identifying patients at different risk was revealed.

  8. Whole-body MRI for initial staging of paediatric lymphoma: prospective comparison to an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littooij, Annemieke S. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Kwee, Thomas C.; Vermoolen, Malou A.; Keizer, Bart de; Beek, Frederik J.A.; Hobbelink, Monique G.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Barber, Ignasi; Enriquez, Goya [Hospital Materno-Infantil Vall d' Hebron, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Granata, Claudio [IRCCS Giannina Gaslini Hospital, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Zsiros, Jozsef [University of Amsterdam, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Emma Children' s Hospital, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soh, Shui Yen [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Haematology and Oncology service, Department of Paediatric Subspecialities, Singapore (Singapore); Bierings, Marc B. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Haematology-Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    To compare whole-body MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (whole-body MRI-DWI), with FDG-PET/CT for staging newly diagnosed paediatric lymphoma. A total of 36 children with newly diagnosed lymphoma prospectively underwent both whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT. Whole-body MRI-DWI was successfully performed in 33 patients (mean age 13.9 years). Whole-body MRI-DWI was independently evaluated by two blinded observers. After consensus reading, an unblinded expert panel evaluated the discrepant findings between whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT and used bone marrow biopsy, other imaging data and clinical information to derive an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard. Interobserver agreement of whole-body MRI-DWI was good [all nodal sites together (κ = 0.79); all extranodal sites together (κ = 0.69)]. There was very good agreement between the consensus whole-body MRI-DWI- and FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard for nodal (κ = 0.91) and extranodal (κ = 0.94) staging. The sensitivity and specificity of consensus whole-body MRI-DWI were 93 % and 98 % for nodal staging and 89 % and 100 % for extranodal staging, respectively. Following removal of MRI reader errors, the disease stage according to whole-body MRI-DWI agreed with the reference standard in 28 of 33 patients. Our results indicate that whole-body MRI-DWI is feasible for staging paediatric lymphoma and could potentially serve as a good radiation-free alternative to FDG-PET/CT. (orig.)

  9. [Primary colorectal lymphoma of diffuse large B-cells: an experience at a general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran Gárate, Brady; Morales Luna, Domingo; Quiñones Avila, Pilar; Hurtado de Mendoza, Fernando; Riva Gonzales, Luis; Yabar, Alejandro; Portugal Meza, Karem

    2008-01-01

    Primary colorectal lymphoma is a very rare disease. Primary colorectal lymphoma of diffuse large B-cells is a more frequent subtype representing 1% of all colon diseases. In a retrospective study, the clinical characteristics and treatment course of primary colorectal lymphoma of diffuse large B-cells between 1997 and 2003 were reviewed. According to Dawson's criteria, fourteen cases were identified. The average age was 65 and the ratio of men to women was 1:3. The most frequent signs and symptoms were abdominal pain (78%), diarrhea (49%) and abdominal tumor (35%). The most frequently involved regions were the cecum (42%), ascending colon (21%) and rectum (21%). Six were in Stage I, four in Stage II and four in Stage III. The 5-year survival per stage was 26, 11 and 5 months, respectively. Primary colorectal lymphoma of diffuse large B-cells usually affects the right part of the colon in an aggressive manner.

  10. Radiotherapy for stage II and stage III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after preoperative chemotherapy and mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A; de la Lande, Brigitte; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciammella, Patrizia [Radiation Therapy Unit, Department of Oncology and Advanced Technology, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Botto, Barbara [Hematology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Gavarotti, Paolo [Hematology, University of Torino and Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Merli, Francesco [Hematology Unit, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Vitolo, Umberto [Hematology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Iotti, Cinzia [Radiation Therapy Unit, Department of Oncology and Advanced Technology, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete

  12. Interim PET After Two ABVD Cycles in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Outcomes Following the Continuation of Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simontacchi, Gabriele [Radiotherapy Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciammella, Patrizia [Radiation Oncology Unit, Department of Advanced Technology, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Buglione, Michela [Radiation Oncology Department, University and Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Saieva, Calogero [Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute, Florence (Italy); Magrini, Stefano Maria [Radiation Oncology Department, University and Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Livi, Lorenzo [Radiotherapy Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Iotti, Cinzia [Radiation Oncology Unit, Department of Advanced Technology, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Botto, Barbara [Hematology Unit, Città della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, Torino (Italy); Vaggelli, Luca [Nuclear Medicine Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Re, Alessandro [Hematology Unit, University and Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Merli, Francesco [Hematology Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: This multicenter retrospective study was designed to evaluate the prognostic role of interim fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (i-FDG-PET) in a cohort of patients affected with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated initially with adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy, and to assess the role of chemotherapy continuation plus radiation therapy for i-FDG-PET-positive patients. Methods and Materials: Data from 257 patients were retrieved from 4 hematology and radiation oncology departments. Inclusion criteria were stage I to IIAB HL, “intention-to-treat” AVBD plus radiation therapy, and FDG-PET at diagnosis and after the first 2 ABVD cycles. All i-FDG-PET scans underwent blinded local review by using the Deauville 5-point scoring system; patients were stratified as negative or positive using 2 Deauville score cutoff values, ≥3 or ≥4. Results: Median follow-up time was 56 months (range: 9-163 months); 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) for the whole cohort were 97.5% and 98.3%, respectively. Five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 95.6%. After i-FDG-PET revision, 43 of 257 patients (16.7%) had a positive i-FDG-PET (Deauville scores: 3-5). Five-year PFS rates for i-FDG-PET-negative and i-FDG-PET-positive patients were 98.1% and 83.7%, respectively, if using a Deauville score cutoff of 3, and 97.7% and 78.6%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 4 (P=.0001). Five-year OS for i-FDG-PET-negative and i-FDG-PET-positive patients was 98.5% and 93.0%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 3, and 98.6% and 89.3%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 4 (P=.029 and P=.002). At univariate regression analysis, i-FDG-PET positivity was associated with worse OS and PFS. At multivariate analysis, performed only for PFS, i-FDG-PET positivity confirmed its negative impact (P=.002). Conclusions: i-FDG-PET is prognostic for PFS and OS in early-stage HL

  13. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sölétormos, György

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  14. Improved survival with early adjuvant chemotherapy after colonic resection for stage III colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Azaquoun, Najah; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In stage III colonic cancer, time from surgery to start of adjuvant chemotherapy may influence survival. In this study, we evaluated the effect of timing of adjuvant therapy on survival. METHODS: Database study from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's national database....... RESULTS: The final population included 1,827 patients scheduled for adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant therapy started within 4 and 8 weeks improved survival when compared to start later than 8 weeks (HR [95%CI]: 1.7 [1.1-2.6]; P = 0.024 and 1.4 [1.07-1.8]; P = 0.013, respectively), whereas...

  15. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib J; Sölétormos, György;

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  16. Advanced stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents: clinical characteristics and treatment outcome - a report from the SFCE & CCLG groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Ananth G; Roques, Gaelle; Kirkwood, Amy A; Lambilliotte, Anne; Freund, Katja; Leblanc, Thierry; Hayward, Janis; Abbou, Samuel; Ramsay, Alan D; Schmitt, Claudine; Gorde-Grosjean, Stephanie; Pacquement, Hélène; Haouy, Stephanie; Boudjemaa, Sabah; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Hall, Georgina W; Landman-Parker, Judith

    2017-04-01

    Advanced stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (nLPHL) is extremely rare in children and as a consequence, optimal treatment for this group of patients has not been established. Here we retrospectively evaluated the treatments and treatment outcomes of 41 of our patients from the UK and France with advanced stage nLPHL. Most patients received chemotherapy, some with the addition of the anti CD20 antibody rituximab or radiotherapy. Chemotherapy regimens were diverse and followed either classical Hodgkin lymphoma or B non-Hodgkin lymphoma protocols. All 41 patients achieved a complete remission with first line treatment and 40 patients are alive and well in remission. Eight patients subsequently relapsed and 1 patient died of secondary cancer (9 progression-free survival events). The median time to progression for those who progressed was 21 months (5·9-73·8). The median time since last diagnosis is 87·3 months (8·44-179·20). Thirty-six (90%), 30 (75%) and 27 (68%) patients have been in remission for more than 12, 24 and 36 months, respectively. Overall, the use of rituximab combined with multi-agent chemotherapy as first line treatment seems to be a reasonable therapeutic option. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Stage III-IV Uterine Prolapse Risk Factors: Sacrouterine Ligaments High Estrogen Receptor Alpha and Collagen III Expression and Low Elastin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Megadhana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uterine prolapse is common, non-life-threatening, but has a negative impact on women psychosocial and economic life. Damage to levator ani muscle is the early onset of uterine prolapse, while the damage of sacrouterine ligaments aggravates the stage. The strength of sacrouterine ligament depends on tissue cellularity, the formation of collagen I/III ratio, and the decreased expression of elastin. The lower the ratio of collagen I/III, the higher the risk of stage III-IV uterine prolapse. The ratio of collagen I/III formation is allegedly influencing through the expression of estrogen receptor alpha, by increasing collagen III synthesis and decreasing the degradation. Objective: We aimed to investigate whether high estrogen receptor alpha and collagen III expression, and the low elastin expression in the sacrouterine ligaments were stage III-IV uterine prolapse risk factors. Method: In March to August 2014, a non-matching case control study was conducted in 3 hospitals in Denpasar, and the materials were processed in the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Laboratory of Udayana University. The case was uterine prolapse stage III-IV, the control was the non-uterine prolapse. We collected 1.5 cm residual sacrouterine ligaments from the edge of the cervix fixed with 10% buffered formalin from patients who underwent a total hysterectomy. They were examined immunohistochemically to identify estrogen receptor alpha expression, collagen III, and elastin. Results: Our sample was 44, divided equally between the case and control group. Compared to the control, in the case group, the proportion was significantly higher for the high estrogen receptor alpha expression (OR=5.71, 95%CI 1.56-20.93, p=0.007, high collagen III (OR=6.50, 95% CI 1.64- 25.76, p=0.005, and low elastin (OR=5.40, 95%CI 1.37-21.26, p=0.012. Conclusion: the high expression of estrogen receptor alpha and collagen III and low expressions of elastin in sacrouterine ligaments served as

  18. Causes of death after therapy for early stage Hodgkin's disease entered on EORTC protocols. EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry-Amar, M; Hayat, M; Meerwaldt, J H; Burgers, M; Carde, P; Somers, R; Noordijk, E M; Monconduit, M; Thomas, J; Cosset, J M

    1990-11-01

    The risk of dying from different causes after Hodgkin's disease (HD) therapy has been quantified from a series of 1,449 patients with early stages included in four successive clinical trials conducted by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Lymphoma Cooperative Group since 1963. Overall, 240 patients died and the 15-year survival rate was 69% whereas the expected rate was 95%. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) technique was used to quantify excess deaths as a function of time since first therapy. At each interval, SMR was significantly increased, giving: 0-3 year, 8.86 (p less than 0.001); 4-6 year, 9.25 (p less than 0.001); 7-9 year, 7.08 (p less than 0.001); 10-12 year, 9.53 (p less than 0.001); 13-15 year, 4.37 (p less than 0.01); and 16+ years, 3.80 (p less than 0.05). While the proportion of deaths as a consequence of HD progression, treatment side-effect, and intercurrent disease decreased with time, that of second cancer and cardiac failure peaked during the 10-12 year post-treatment interval. After 15 years of follow-up, the risk of dying from causes other than HD continued to increase. These findings indicate that although probably cured from HD, patients are at higher risk for death than expected, a risk that might be a consequence of therapy.

  19. Proliferation kinetics of the dermal infiltrate in cutaneous malignant lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterry, W.; Pullmann, H.; Steigleder, G.K.

    1981-01-01

    To obtain information about the role of local proliferation in the pathogenesis of dermal infiltrate in malignant cutaneous lymphomas, we determined the percentage of /sup 3/H-thymidine-labeled infiltrating cells (/sup 3/H-index). A linear correlation was found between proliferative activity and clinical stage in mycosis fungoides, i.e., the /sup 3/H-index is moderately elevated in stage I and high in stage III. The /sup 3/H-index is within normal range in dermal infiltrate of Sezary syndrome, diffuse lymphocytic lymphoma, as well as in lymphocytoma benigna cutis. In parapsoriasis en plaques two groups can be distinguished: in the small plaque variant (chronic superficial dermatitis) the /sup 3/H-index is low, whereas the large-plaque variant (prereticulotic poikiloderma) shows strong proliferative activity. Thus, determination of proliferative activity seems to give new insights into the pathogenesis of dermal infiltrate in cutaneous lymphomas.

  20. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Before Radiation Therapy With Paclitaxel in Treating HPV-Positive Patients With Stage III-IV Oropharynx, Hypopharynx, or Larynx Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-19

    Human Papilloma Virus Infection; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx

  1. Survival after recurrence of stage I-III breast, colorectal, or lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Michael J; Uno, Hajime; Cronin, Angel M; Carroll, Nikki M; Hornbrook, Mark C; Fishman, Paul; Ritzwoller, Debra P

    2017-08-01

    The experiences of patients with recurrent cancer are assumed to reflect those of patients with de novo stage IV disease; yet, little is truly known because most registries lack recurrence status. Using two databases with excellent recurrence and death information, we examined determinants of survival duration after recurrence of breast (BC), colorectal (CRC), and lung cancers (LC). Recurrence status was abstracted from the medical records of patients who participated in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance study and who received care at two Cancer Research Network sites-the Colorado and Northwest regions of Kaiser Permanente. The analysis included 1653 patients who developed recurrence after completing definitive therapy for stages I-III cancer. Multivariable modeling identified independent determinants of survival duration after recurrence, controlling for other factors. Through 60 months' average follow-up, survival after recurrence for BC, CRC, and LC were 28.4, 23.1 and 16.1 months, respectively. Several factors were independently associated with shorter survival for all three cancers, including higher initial stage (III vs. I: BC -9.9 months; CRC -6.9 months; LC -7.4 months; P≤0.01). Factors associated with shorter survival for selected cancers included: distant/regional recurrence for BC and CRC; current/former smoker for LC; high grade for CRC; and recurrence for BC. Initial stage predicts survival duration after recurrence, whereas time-to-recurrence usually does not. The impact of biologic characteristics (e.g., grade, hormone-receptor status) on survival duration after recurrence needs further study. Predictors of survival duration after recurrence may help facilitate patient decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The favorable role of homozygosity for killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR A haplotype in patients with advanced-stage classic Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio La Nasa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interim positron emission tomography after 2 cycles of ABVD (iPET-2 is a good predictor of outcome in advanced-stage classic Hodgkin lymphoma. So far, there are no other prognostic biomarkers capable of identifying chemotherapy refractory patients with comparable accuracy. Despite the considerable amount of evidence suggesting that antitumor immune surveillance is downregulated in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL, few data exist on the impairment of natural killer cell function and the role of their killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs. Methods We investigated KIR gene frequencies, KIR haplotypes, and KIR-ligand combinations in a cohort of 135 patients with advanced-stage classic Hodgkin lymphoma and 221 healthy controls. We furthermore evaluated the correlation of KIR genes and KIR haplotypes with the achievement of negative iPET-2. Results In the cohort of patients, the 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival were 93.6 and 79 %, respectively. Homozygosity for KIR A haplotype and the HLA-C1 KIR ligand (KIR-AA/C1C1 was significantly higher in healthy controls (15.7 vs. 4.8 %, p = 0.001. The KIR-AA genotype resulted to have a significant predictive power for achieving iPET-2 negativity (p = 0.039. Conclusions Homozygosity for KIR A haplotype offers protection against classic Hodgkin lymphoma. The association found for the KIR-AA genotype and achievement of negative iPET-2 suggests that KIR-AA could be used in clinical practice to enhance the chemosensitivity predictive power of iPET-2. Our results point to the possibility of adapting treatment strategies based on the combination of KIR biomarkers and PET scan.

  3. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  4. [STT arthrodesis for treatment of stage III semilunar bone necrosis: functional outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tränkle, M; Sauerbier, M; Linsner, G; Bickert, B; Germann, G

    2000-11-01

    Scapho-trapezio-trapezoid arthrodesis for the treatment of Kienböck's disease is recommended as a salvage procedure for Stage III A and B in the Lichtman classification. This study reviews the results of 26 patients with stage III of Kienböck's disease treated by STT-arthrodesis. 26 patients (16 male, 10 female) were treated by STT-arthrodesis between 1993 and 1998. Fusion was established after seven weeks average. All patients were examined, the mean follow-up time was 35 (10 to 72) months. Active range of motion showed 63% of extension/flexion and 51% of radial/ulnar deviation on average, compared to the uninjured hand. Mean preoperative and postoperative pain scores were 58.4 (non-stress) vs. 82.5 (stress) and 16.4 (non-stress) vs. 33.7 (stress), eight patients claimed complete pain relief. Grip strength improved to 71% of the opposite side. Total DASH score reached 24.8. 20 of the 26 patients were satisfied with the final result and would undergo the operation again. We found a significant reduction of pain, a slightly reduced grip strength and a satisfying functional wrist mobility after STT-arthrodesis. Carpal height was unchanged and the carpal collapse did not progress. The mid-term data support that STT-arthrodesis will stand the test of time.

  5. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose-escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation; and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife). Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL) outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After 5 years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  6. Alopecia universalis, hypothyroidism and pituitary hyperplasia: polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III in a patient in remission from treated Hodgkin lymphoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quintyne, K I

    2010-10-01

    We herein report a case of a 33-year-old man in remission from Hodgkin lymphoma, who presented with reduced potency and hair loss. Initial endocrine tests revealed autoimmune hypothyroidism. An MRI of his pituitary gland at onset revealed hyperplasia. He tolerated replacement endocrine therapy with good response, but with no improvement in his alopecia universalis. A repeat MRI, 6 months after his initial endocrine manipulation, showed resolution of his pituitary hyperplasia.

  7. Regulatory T cells in dogs with multicentric lymphoma: peripheral blood quantification at diagnosis and after initial stage chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Munhoz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic malignancy in dogs and one of the most frequent among all neoplastic diseases in this species. It can occur in several anatomical locations with distinct histological and immunophenotypes. Depending on the host immune response towards the tumor, prognosis information could be collected. Because its well established immunosuppressant, antitumor activity, the function of regulatory T cells (Tregs in canine neoplasias has been investigated. In this study, we sought to quantify, using flow cytometry, the Tregs subpopulation in peripheral blood of healthy dogs (10 and in those diagnosed with type-B (14 and type-T (8 multicentric lymphoma before (at diagnosis and after the first cycle (5-week of 19-week Madison-Wisconsin (MW protocol of chemotherapy. Our results indicated that dogs with lymphoma showed higher percentage of Tregs (18,84±2,56 when compared to healthy dogs (4,70±0,50 (P0,05. There was no difference in Tregs percentage between B-type (17,45±2,77 and T-type (21,27±5,27 lymphoma (P>0,05. With this, we conclude that canine lymphoma increases Tregs in the peripheral blood and the MW protocol of chemotherapy reduces this cell subpopulation to control values.

  8. Heterogeneity of Disease Classified as Stage III in Wilms Tumor: A Report From the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreafico, Filippo, E-mail: filippo.spreafico@istitutotumori.mi.it [Pediatric Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Gandola, Lorenza [Department of Radiology/Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); D' Angelo, Paolo [Pediatric Oncology, Ospedale dei Bambini G. di Cristina, Palermo (Italy); Terenziani, Monica [Pediatric Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Collini, Paola [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Bianchi, Maurizio [Pediatric Department, Ospedale Infantile Regina Margherita, Torino (Italy); Provenzi, Massimo [Pediatric Unit, Ospedali Riuniti Bergamo, Bergamo (Italy); Indolfi, Paolo [Pediatric Oncology, Pediatric Department, II University, Napoli (Italy); Pession, Andrea [Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Unit ' Lalla Seragnoli' , Bologna University, Bologna (Italy); Nantron, Marilina [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Istituto G. Gaslini, Genova (Italy); Di Cataldo, Andrea [Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Catania University, Catania (Italy); Marchiano, Alfonso [Department of Radiology/Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Catania, Serena; Fossati Bellani, Franca [Pediatric Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Piva, Luigi [Pediatric Surgery Unit, Urology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed whether the prognosis can differ among Wilms tumors (WT) labeled as Stage III according to currently adopted classification systems. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonanaplastic Stage III WT consecutively registered in two Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) trials (CNR-92, TW-2003) were the subjects in the present analysis. The steady mainstay of therapy was primary nephrectomy, followed by three-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, doxorubicin, and abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Results: Ninety-nine WT patients met the criteria for classification as Stage III according to a revised version of the National Wilms Tumor Study-3 staging system (51 patients in CNR-92, 48 patients in TW-2003). Regional lymph nodes (LN) were not biopsied in 16 patients. After a median follow-up of 66 months, the 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 85% {+-} 4% and 92% {+-} 3%, respectively, for the whole group. For 38 children with positive LN, the 4-year DFS rate was 73% {+-} 7%, as opposed to 98% {+-} 2% for the 45 children with Stage III WT according to the other criteria but with negative biopsied LN (p = 0.001). The subgroup with the worst prognosis consisted of children more than 2 years old with positive LN (DFS 67% {+-} 8%). A delay between surgery and RT > 30 days had an adverse impact on the abdominal tumor relapse rate. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence that Stage III tumors with LN metastases might be distinguished from WTs meeting the other criteria for classification as Stage III. The worse outcome of the former may warrant a prospective study on the effects of intensified therapy. A subclassification of Stage III tumors is discussed.

  9. Heterogeneity of disease classified as stage III in Wilms tumor: a report from the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreafico, Filippo; Gandola, Lorenza; D'Angelo, Paolo; Terenziani, Monica; Collini, Paola; Bianchi, Maurizio; Provenzi, Massimo; Indolfi, Paolo; Pession, Andrea; Nantron, Marilina; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Marchianò, Alfonso; Catania, Serena; Fossati Bellani, Franca; Piva, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed whether the prognosis can differ among Wilms tumors (WT) labeled as Stage III according to currently adopted classification systems. Patients with nonanaplastic Stage III WT consecutively registered in two Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) trials (CNR-92, TW-2003) were the subjects in the present analysis. The steady mainstay of therapy was primary nephrectomy, followed by three-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, doxorubicin, and abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Ninety-nine WT patients met the criteria for classification as Stage III according to a revised version of the National Wilms Tumor Study-3 staging system (51 patients in CNR-92, 48 patients in TW-2003). Regional lymph nodes (LN) were not biopsied in 16 patients. After a median follow-up of 66 months, the 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 85% ± 4% and 92% ± 3%, respectively, for the whole group. For 38 children with positive LN, the 4-year DFS rate was 73% ± 7%, as opposed to 98% ± 2% for the 45 children with Stage III WT according to the other criteria but with negative biopsied LN (p = 0.001). The subgroup with the worst prognosis consisted of children more than 2 years old with positive LN (DFS 67% ± 8%). A delay between surgery and RT > 30 days had an adverse impact on the abdominal tumor relapse rate. This study provides further evidence that Stage III tumors with LN metastases might be distinguished from WTs meeting the other criteria for classification as Stage III. The worse outcome of the former may warrant a prospective study on the effects of intensified therapy. A subclassification of Stage III tumors is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus cystectomy in management of stages II, and III urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Osman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This phase III trial was de - signed to compare the survival benefit, surgical respectability, and toxicities among patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy (arm A, with those treated by radical cystectomy (arm B in the management of stage II, III urinary bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: For inclusion, patients should have pathologically proven urothelial carcinoma in urinary bladder, clinical stages from T2N0M0 to T4aN0M0, patient age less than 65 years, and performance state ≤ 2. Additionally, patients should have adequate hematological, renal, and liver functions. Arm A patients underwent 3 cycles of neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine followed by radical cystectomy, while arm B patients underwent radical cystectomy directly. Results: Thirty patients had been enrolled in each arm between September 2009 and April 2014 in 3 educational institutes in Egypt. The 3 year OS (overall survival for arm A, and B were 60% and 50% respectively. The median OS for arm A was 36+ months and that for arm B was 32.5 months. The 3 year progression-free survival (PFS for arm A, and B were 57% and 43% respectively. The median PFS for arm A was 36+ months and for arm B was 28 months. A subgroup analysis was performed to correlate between 3 year OS and predetermined prognostic factors including age, tumor size, pathological stage, and the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The later was performed only in arm A. Both treatment arms were tolerated well with mild toxicities profiles. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy achieved better survival, surgical respectability, with nearly equivalent toxicities when compared with radical cystectomy.

  11. [Cytological finding in the pre- and early stages of cervix carcinoma--a contribution to the evaluation of Papanicolau III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, G; Büttner, H H; Neumann, H G; Rhode, E; Beust, M

    1977-01-01

    Cytologic findings and the histologic diagnosis are compared in 326 cervical cones. We have found following ratio of the groups Papanicolaou (Pap) III: Pap IV--in dysplasia 1: 1: 1, in "more dysplasia than carcinoma in situ (CIS)" 1:2:2. The Pap IV dominates in "pure" CIS and in cones with "more CIS than dysplasia". We take out of the Pap III ("with cytologic control") cases named "Pap III with necessity for histologic diagnosis". We have found in this subgroup of Pap III prestages or early stages of cervical carcinoma.

  12. Complete or partial trisomy 3 in gastro-intestinal MALT lymphomas co-occurs with aberrations at 18q21 and correlates with advanced disease stage: A study on 25 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jens Krugmann; Alexandar Tzankov; Stephan Dirnhofer; Falko Fend; Dominik Wolf; Reiner Siebert; Pensiri Probst; Martin Erdel

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR Taji et al.[1] have reported in their study on 13 patients with gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas an aggressive tumor course in trisomy 3 positive cases. The authors analyzed only stage I patients with classical low-grade marginal zone lymphoma of the MALT type and detected the trisomy 3 using an alphasatellite DNA probe directed to the centromere. Their data support the observation that trisomy 3 is the most frequent cytogenetic aberration in MALT lymphomas[2,3].

  13. Mn(II) Oxidation by the Multicopper Oxidase Complex Mnx: A Coordinated Two-Stage Mn(II)/(III) and Mn(III)/(IV) Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, Alexandra V; Romano, Christine A; Tao, Lizhi; Stich, Troy A; Casey, William H; Britt, R David; Tebo, Bradley M; Spiro, Thomas G

    2017-08-23

    The bacterial manganese oxidase MnxG of the Mnx protein complex is unique among multicopper oxidases (MCOs) in carrying out a two-electron metal oxidation, converting Mn(II) to MnO2 nanoparticles. The reaction occurs in two stages: Mn(II) → Mn(III) and Mn(III) → MnO2. In a companion study , we show that the electron transfer from Mn(II) to the low-potential type 1 Cu of MnxG requires an activation step, likely forming a hydroxide bridge at a dinuclear Mn(II) site. Here we study the second oxidation step, using pyrophosphate (PP) as a Mn(III) trap. PP chelates Mn(III) produced by the enzyme and subsequently allows it to become a substrate for the second stage of the reaction. EPR spectroscopy confirms the presence of Mn(III) bound to the enzyme. The Mn(III) oxidation step does not involve direct electron transfer to the enzyme from Mn(III), which is shown by kinetic measurements to be excluded from the Mn(II) binding site. Instead, Mn(III) is proposed to disproportionate at an adjacent polynuclear site, thereby allowing indirect oxidation to Mn(IV) and recycling of Mn(II). PP plays a multifaceted role, slowing the reaction by complexing both Mn(II) and Mn(III) in solution, and also inhibiting catalysis, likely through binding at or near the active site. An overall mechanism for Mnx-catalyzed MnO2 production from Mn(II) is presented.

  14. Multivariate Analysis of Prognostic Factors Among 2,313 Patients With Stage III Melanoma: Comparison of Nodal Micrometastases Versus Macrometastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, Charles M.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Soong, Seng-jaw; Thompson, John F.; Ding, Shouluan; Byrd, David R.; Cascinelli, Natale; Cochran, Alistair J.; Coit, Daniel G.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Johnson, Timothy; Kirkwood, John M.; Leong, Stanley P.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Mihm, Martin C.; Morton, Donald L.; Ross, Merrick I.; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the survival rates and independent predictors of survival using a contemporary international cohort of patients with stage III melanoma. Patients and Methods Complete clinicopathologic and follow-up data were available for 2,313 patients with stage III disease in an updated and expanded American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) melanoma staging database. Kaplan-Meier and Cox multivariate survival analyses were performed. Results Among all 2,313 patients with stage III disease, 81% had micrometastases, and 19% had clinically detectable macrometastases. The 5-year overall survival was 63%; it was 67% for patients with nodal micrometastases, and it was 43% for those with nodal macrometastases (P Multivariate analysis demonstrated that in patients with nodal micrometastases, number of tumor-containing lymph nodes, primary tumor thickness, patient age, ulceration, and anatomic site of the primary independently predicted survival (all P < .01). When added to the model, primary tumor mitotic rate was the second-most powerful predictor of survival after the number of tumor-containing nodes. In contrast, for patients with nodal macrometastases, the number of tumor-containing nodes, primary ulceration, and patient age independently predicted survival (P < .01). Conclusion In this multi-institutional analysis, we demonstrated remarkable heterogeneity of prognosis among patients with stage III melanoma, especially among those with nodal micrometastases. These results should be incorporated into the design and interpretation of future clinical trials involving patients with stage III melanoma. PMID:20368546

  15. Long-Term Outcomes and Patterns of Relapse of Early-Stage Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy With Curative Intent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teckie, Sewit; Qi, Shunan; Lovie, Shona [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Navarrett, Scott [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Hsu, Meier [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Noy, Ariela; Portlock, Carol [Lymphoma Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yahalom, Joachim, E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcome and patterns of relapse of a large cohort of marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) patients treated with curative-intent radiation therapy (RT) alone. Patients and Methods: We reviewed the charts of 490 consecutive patients with stage IE or IIE MZL referred between 1992 and 2012 to our institution. Of those, 244 patients (50%) were treated with RT alone. Pathology was confirmed by hematopathologists at our institution. Patient and disease factors were analyzed for association with relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Median age of the cohort was 59 years, and median follow-up was 5.2 years. Ann Arbor stage was IE in 92%. Most common disease sites were stomach (50%), orbit (18%), non-thyroid head-and-neck (8%), skin (8%), and breast (5%). Median RT dose was 30 Gy. Five-year OS and RFS were 92% and 74%, respectively. Cumulative incidence of disease-specific death was just 1.1% by 5 years. Sixty patients (24%) developed relapse of disease; 10 were in the RT field. Crude rate of transformation to pathologically confirmed large-cell lymphoma was 1.6%. On multivariable analysis, primary disease site (P=.007) was independently associated with RFS, along with age (P=.04), presence of B-symptoms (P=.02), and International Prognostic Index risk group (P=.03). All disease sites except for head-and-neck had worse RFS relative to stomach. Conclusion: Overall and cause-specific survival are high in early-stage extra-nodal MZL treated with curative RT alone. In this large cohort of 244 patients, most patients did not experience relapse of MZL after curative RT; when relapses did occur, the majority were in distant sites. Stomach cases were less likely to relapse than other anatomic sites. Transformation to large-cell lymphoma was rare.

  16. Routine Bone Marrow Biopsy Has Little or No Therapeutic Consequence for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Staged Treatment-Naive Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; d'Amore, Francesco; Mylam, Karen Juul

    2012-01-01

    disease by PET/CT staging. BMB upstaged five patients, assessed as being stage III before BMB; none of the 454 patients would have been allocated to another treatment on the basis of BMB results. Focal skeletal PET/CT lesions identified positive and negative BMBs with a sensitivity and specificity of 85...

  17. Reduction of the treated volume to involved node radiation therapy as part of combined modality treatment for early stage aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhappen, M.H.; Poortmans, P.M.; Raaijmakers, E.; Raemaekers, J.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This retrospective study investigated whether focused involved node radiation therapy (INRT) can safely replace involved field RT (IFRT) in patients with early stage aggressive NHL. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included 258 patients with stage I/II aggressive NHL who received com

  18. Staging Primary CNS Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reflexes work. This may also be called a neuro exam or a neurologic exam. Slit-lamp eye ... Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & Copyright Syndication Services Website Linking U.S. Department ...

  19. Adjuvant therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b versus observation alone in resected stage III melanoma: final results of EORTC 18991, a randomised phase III trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, A.M.; Suciu, S.; Santinami, M.; Testori, A.; Kruit, W.H.; Marsden, J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Sales, F.; Gore, M.; Mackie, R.; Kusic, Z.; Dummer, R.; Hauschild, A.; Musat, E.; Spatz, A.; Keilholz, U.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Any benefit of adjuvant interferon alfa-2b for melanoma could depend on dose and duration of treatment. Our aim was to determine whether pegylated interferon alfa-2b can facilitate prolonged exposure while maintaining tolerability. METHODS: 1256 patients with resected stage III melanoma

  20. Definition of bulky disease in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma in computed tomography era: prognostic significance of measurements in the coronal and transverse planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Burger, Irene A; Zhang, Zhigang; Drill, Esther N; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Ng, Andrea; LaCasce, Ann; Wall, Darci; Witzig, Thomas E; Ristow, Kay; Yahalom, Joachim; Moskowitz, Craig H; Zelenetz, Andrew D

    2016-10-01

    Disease bulk is an important prognostic factor in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma, but its definition is unclear in the computed tomography era. This retrospective analysis investigated the prognostic significance of bulky disease measured in transverse and coronal planes on computed tomography imaging. Early stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients (n=185) treated with chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy from 2000-2010 were included. The longest diameter of the largest lymph node mass was measured in transverse and coronal axes on pre-treatment imaging. The optimal cut off for disease bulk was maximal diameter greater than 7 cm measured in either the transverse or coronal plane. Thirty patients with maximal transverse diameter of 7 cm or under were found to have bulk in coronal axis. The 4-year overall survival was 96.5% (CI: 93.3%, 100%) and 4-year relapse-free survival was 86.8% (CI: 81.9%, 92.1%) for all patients. Relapse-free survival at four years for bulky patients was 80.5% (CI: 73%, 88.9%) compared to 94.4% (CI: 89.1%, 100%) for non-bulky; Cox HR 4.21 (CI: 1.43, 12.38) (P=0.004). In bulky patients, relapse-free survival was not impacted in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy; however, it was significantly lower in patients treated with chemotherapy alone. In an independent validation cohort of 38 patients treated with chemotherapy alone, patients with bulky disease had an inferior relapse-free survival [at 4 years, 71.1% (CI: 52.1%, 97%) vs 94.1% (CI: 83.6%, 100%), Cox HR 5.27 (CI: 0.62, 45.16); P=0.09]. Presence of bulky disease on multidimensional computed tomography imaging is a significant prognostic factor in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma. Coronal reformations may be included for routine Hodgkin lymphoma staging evaluation. In future, our definition of disease bulk may be useful in identifying patients who are most appropriate for chemotherapy alone.

  1. Peripartum Primary Prophylaxis Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement in a Patient with Stage IV B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with a Pathologic Femur Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Sherer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background  -Pulmonary embolus (PE remains a leading etiology of maternal mortality in the developed world. Increasing utilization of retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC filter placement currently includes pregnant patients. Case - A 22-year-old woman at 27 weeks' gestation was diagnosed with Stage IV high-grade malignant B cell lymphoma following pathologic femur fracture. Significant risk factors for PE led to placement of primary prophylaxis IVC filter before cesarean delivery, open reduction and internal fixation of the fractured femur, and chemotherapy. Conclusion - This case supports that primary prophylaxis placement of IVC filters in highly selected pregnant patients may assist in decreasing PE-associated maternal mortality.

  2. Definition of bulky disease in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma in computed tomography era: prognostic significance of measurements in the coronal and transverse planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Burger, Irene A.; Zhang, Zhigang; Drill, Esther N.; Migliacci, Jocelyn C.; Ng, Andrea; LaCasce, Ann; Wall, Darci; Witzig, Thomas E.; Ristow, Kay; Yahalom, Joachim; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Disease bulk is an important prognostic factor in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma, but its definition is unclear in the computed tomography era. This retrospective analysis investigated the prognostic significance of bulky disease measured in transverse and coronal planes on computed tomography imaging. Early stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients (n=185) treated with chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy from 2000–2010 were included. The longest diameter of the largest lymph node mass was measured in transverse and coronal axes on pre-treatment imaging. The optimal cut off for disease bulk was maximal diameter greater than 7 cm measured in either the transverse or coronal plane. Thirty patients with maximal transverse diameter of 7 cm or under were found to have bulk in coronal axis. The 4-year overall survival was 96.5% (CI: 93.3%, 100%) and 4-year relapse-free survival was 86.8% (CI: 81.9%, 92.1%) for all patients. Relapse-free survival at four years for bulky patients was 80.5% (CI: 73%, 88.9%) compared to 94.4% (CI: 89.1%, 100%) for non-bulky; Cox HR 4.21 (CI: 1.43, 12.38) (P=0.004). In bulky patients, relapse-free survival was not impacted in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy; however, it was significantly lower in patients treated with chemotherapy alone. In an independent validation cohort of 38 patients treated with chemotherapy alone, patients with bulky disease had an inferior relapse-free survival [at 4 years, 71.1% (CI: 52.1%, 97%) vs. 94.1% (CI: 83.6%, 100%), Cox HR 5.27 (CI: 0.62, 45.16); P=0.09]. Presence of bulky disease on multidimensional computed tomography imaging is a significant prognostic factor in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma. Coronal reformations may be included for routine Hodgkin lymphoma staging evaluation. In future, our definition of disease bulk may be useful in identifying patients who are most appropriate for chemotherapy alone. PMID:27390360

  3. Corneal cross-linking in a 10-year-old child with stage III keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbondanza, Marco; Felice, Valentina De; Abbondanza, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    Keratoconus is a corneal dystrophy characterized by progressive thinning, conical shape of the cornea and irregular astigmatism. It is particularly insidious when it occurs in very young patients. We report the case of a 10-year-old child with an aggressive stage III keratoconus, who was suggested to undergo a Penetrating Keratoplasty. We performed Corneal Collagen Cross-linking with epithelium removal instead, which was successful in arresting the rapid progression of keratoconus. Eighteen months later, Kmax had decreased by 1.3 D, astigmatism by 0.8 D, thinnest pachimetry had improved by 69 μm and CDVA was 20/32. This case confirms that Corneal Collagen Cross-linking is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of keratoconus even in its aggressive forms. We encourage ophthalmic surgeons to favor conservative treatments when dealing with very young patients. © NEPjOPH.

  4. Estimated risk of cardiovascular disease and secondary cancers with modern highly conformal radiotherapy for early-stage mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M V; Brodin, N P; Aznar, M C;

    2013-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased morbidity and mortality from secondary cancers and cardiovascular disease (CD). We evaluate doses with involved node radiotherapy (INRT) delivered as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), or proton therapy (PT...

  5. Talimogene Laherparepvec and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Refractory Lymphomas or Advanced or Refractory Non-melanoma Skin Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Adnexal Carcinoma; Apocrine Carcinoma; Eccrine Porocarcinoma; Extraocular Cutaneous Sebaceous Carcinoma; Hidradenocarcinoma; Keratoacanthoma; Malignant Sweat Gland Neoplasm; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Microcystic Adnexal Carcinoma; NK-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable; Non-Melanomatous Lesion; Paget Disease; Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Primary Cutaneous Mucinous Carcinoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma; Skin Basal Cell Carcinoma; Skin Basosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Spiradenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin; Stage III Skin Cancer; Stage IV Skin Cancer; Sweat Gland Carcinoma; Trichilemmocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  6. Distribution of lymph node metastasis is a prognostic index in patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirotoshi; Ueno, Hideki; Hashiguchi, Yojiro; Mochizuki, Hidetaka

    2006-04-01

    In the TNM classification of colorectal carcinoma, N-staging is dependent on the number of metastases; in the Japanese classification system, staging usually has been based on the distribution of metastases (N1, paracolic; N2, along the major vessels; N3, at the root of major vessels). The aim of our study was to examine whether the concept of the distribution of nodal metastasis could improve the TNM classification for colorectal cancer. We studied the survival rates of 485 and 136 patients with stage III colonic and rectal cancer, respectively, who underwent curative surgery between 1979 and 1998. The patients were categorized into 4 groups: group 1, TNM-N1 classified in J-N1; group 2, TNM-N2 in J-N1; group 3, TNM-N1 in J-N2-3; and group 4, TNM-N2 in J-N2-3. In the colon cancer arm, the 5-year survival rates of the patients in groups 1 to 4 were 74%, 51%, 52%, and 54%, respectively. There was a significant difference in survival rate between groups 1 and 3 (P = .0002). Thus, in colon cancer, nodal metastasis along the major vessels was a bad prognostic factor, even though the number of nodes that were involved was cancer arm, the 5-year survival rates of the patients in each group were 65%, 39%, 60%, and 32%, respectively. Only the number of nodal metastases was an independently significant prognostic variable. This study suggests that adding the concept of nodal distribution to the conventional TNM staging of colon cancer will improve the accuracy in the evaluation of the nodal status.

  7. Coffee Intake, Recurrence, and Mortality in Stage III Colon Cancer: Results From CALGB 89803 (Alliance)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guercio, Brendan J.; Sato, Kaori; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Ye, Xing; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Mowat, Rex B.; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Benson, Al; Atienza, Daniel; Messino, Michael; Kindler, Hedy; Venook, Alan; Hu, Frank B.; Ogino, Shuji; Wu, Kana; Willett, Walter C.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Observational studies have demonstrated increased colon cancer recurrence in states of relative hyperinsulinemia, including sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and increased dietary glycemic load. Greater coffee consumption has been associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes and increased insulin sensitivity. The effect of coffee on colon cancer recurrence and survival is unknown. Patients and Methods During and 6 months after adjuvant chemotherapy, 953 patients with stage III colon cancer prospectively reported dietary intake of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and nonherbal tea, as well as 128 other items. We examined the influence of coffee, nonherbal tea, and caffeine on cancer recurrence and mortality using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Patients consuming 4 cups/d or more of total coffee experienced an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for colon cancer recurrence or mortality of 0.58 (95% CI, 0.34 to 0.99), compared with never drinkers (Ptrend = .002). Patients consuming 4 cups/d or more of caffeinated coffee experienced significantly reduced cancer recurrence or mortality risk compared with abstainers (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.91; Ptrend = .002), and increasing caffeine intake also conferred a significant reduction in cancer recurrence or mortality (HR, 0.66 across extreme quintiles; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.93; Ptrend = .006). Nonherbal tea and decaffeinated coffee were not associated with patient outcome. The association of total coffee intake with improved outcomes seemed consistent across other predictors of cancer recurrence and mortality. Conclusion Higher coffee intake may be associated with significantly reduced cancer recurrence and death in patients with stage III colon cancer. PMID:26282659

  8. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  9. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prasanna Ghimire; Guang-Yao Wu; Ling Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma with the majority being non-Hodgkin type. Although lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent sites in order of its occurrence are the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. Gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is usually secondary to the widespread nodal diseases and primary gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is relatively rare. Gastrointestinal lymphomas are usually not clinically specific and indistinguishable from other benign and malignant conditions. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common pathological type of gastrointestinal lymphoma in essentially all sites of the gastrointestinal tract, although recently the frequency of other forms has also increased in certain regions of the world. Although some radiological features such as bulky lymph nodes and maintenance of fat plane are more suggestive of lymphoma, they are not specific,thus mandating histopathological analysis for its definitive diagnosis. There has been a tremendous leap in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastrointestinal lymphoma in the last two decades attributed to a better insight into its etiology and molecular aspect as well as the knowledge about its critical signaling pathways.

  10. Adjuvant 5FU plus levamisole in colonic or rectal cancer: improved survival in stage II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, B G; Van Tinteren, H; Zoetmulder, F A

    2001-11-16

    Based on the first favourable results of adjuvant therapy of 5FU plus levamisole in Dukes C colonic cancer in 1990, we conducted a prospective trial. 1029 patients were randomised to receive one year 5FU plus levamisole or no further treatment following curative surgery for stage II or III colon (n = 730) or rectal cancer (n = 299). 45% were in stage II and 55% in stage III. With a median follow-up of 4 years and 9 months a significant reduction in odds of death (25%, SD 9%, P = 0.007) was observed for those with adjuvant treatment (65% at 5 year) compared to the observation group (55%). Improved relative survival was present in stage III (56% vs 44%), and in stage II patients (78% vs 70%). In rectal cancer a non-significant difference in disease-free or overall survival was observed. Distant metastases developed in 76%, while local recurrence alone occurred in 14%. An early start of adjuvant treatment (5FU plus levamisole was 69%. Severe toxicity did not occur. In conclusion, one year 5FU plus levamisole was of benefit in stage II and III colonic cancer; in rectal cancer a significant positive effect could not be demonstrated.

  11. [Is there alternative to FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colorectal cancer patients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Anouk; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Brezault, Catherine; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2012-01-01

    Being the second cancer for men and the third cancer for women in France, colorectal cancer represents a serious public health issue. Its incidence has increased these last years and despite new therapeutics being developed, it still has a bad prognostic. Thanks in part to Hemoccult national mass screening program, its diagnosis is made possible at an earlier stage, which makes a surgical curative resection and the carrying out of adjuvant chemotherapy possible. For stage III colic cancer that has been surgically removed, adjuvant chemotherapy by FOLFOX 4 has to be offered. Nevertheless, because of its toxicities, the patient's high age, important comorbidities or post-surgical complications, this chemotherapy occasionally cannot be done. What are the colorectal cancer prognostic factors which would guide the chemotherapy? TNM classification, number of examined lymph nodes, MSI status, and presence or not of a perforation or a perinervous, lymphatic or venous invasion is recognized prognostic factors. Also, what are the alternatives of FOLFOX 4 regimen as colorectal cancer adjuvant treatment?

  12. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan, Fludarabine, Radiation Therapy, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-21

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Management of stage III colon cancer in the elderly: Practice patterns and outcomes in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Shaila J; Nanji, Sulaiman; Brennan, Kelly; Karim, Safiya; Patel, Sunil V; Biagi, James J; Booth, Christopher M

    2017-08-01

    Clinical trials have established surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) as the standard management for stage III colon cancer; however, the extent to which these results apply to elderly patients in routine practice is unclear. This article describes the management and outcomes of elderly patients with stage III colon cancer. All cases of surgically resected colon cancer from 2002 to 2008 were identified with the population-based Ontario Cancer Registry. Pathology reports were obtained for a random sample (25% of all cases); those with stage III disease constituted the study population. The utilization of ACT, cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) in elderly patients (≥70 years) and nonelderly patients (colon cancer do not receive ACT. Although the effect size is smaller than that in younger patients, ACT is associated with improved long-term survival. Cancer 2017;123:2840-49. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  14. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  15. Genetically Modified T-cell Infusion Following Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Recurrent or High-Risk Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-27

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. The role of induction chemotherapy before radiation therapy in non-operative management of stage III NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M R

    1994-11-01

    Radiation therapy alone has been 'standard' management of patients with Stage III non-small cell lung cancer for several decades. Palliative benefits are routinely achieved but significant survival benefits have not been documented. Patterns of failure in Stage III patients emphasize the need to pursue better treatment for both local macroscopic disease and distant micrometastatic sites. Improved control in both areas will be necessary to meaningfully enhance outcome for the universe of Stage III NSCLC patients. Several randomized trials show a significant survival benefit when cisplatin-containing induction chemotherapy is administered prior to locoregional treatment. In the favorable subset of Stage III patients selected for study by CALGB, the surviving fraction at 2-5 years post-therapy was > or = 2-fold larger in the chemoradiation group than in the cohort treated with radiation alone. The French trial documented a significant decrease in distant metastases rate among the chemotherapy treated patients. In all the trials where patterns of failure are discussed, local disease persistence is the overwhelming rule. Future trials must evaluate improved induction chemotherapy approaches. Stage III patients are an ethical population in which to test induction therapy with new drug combinations randomized against already 'active' regimens for comparative efficacy. End points would be initial response rates, patterns of failure, and overall survival. The feasibility of high-dose chemotherapy regimens with growth factor and hematopoietic support followed by aggressive radiation must be tested. If feasible, trials randomizing high dose versus conventional dose induction programs within the context of sequential multimodality therapy should follow. Intensified radiation approaches such as hyperfractionation or CHART should be paired with active concurrent chemotherapy following induction chemotherapy alone. Pursuit of these approaches over the next several years will

  17. FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: association with disease stage and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum, L M; Woetmann, A; Odum, Niels

    2007-01-01

    numbers of FOXP3+ Tregs than CTCL unspecified or advanced MF with tumours or transformation to large cell lymphoma. An analysis of all patients demonstrated that increasing numbers of FOXP3+ Tregs were associated with improved survival in both MF and CTCL unspecified. In conclusion, our data indicate......FOXP3 is a unique marker for CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). In solid tumours, high numbers of Tregs are associated with a poor prognosis. Knowledge about the implications of Tregs for the behaviour of haematological malignancies is limited. In this study, skin biopsies from 86 patients...... with mycosis fungoides (MF) and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) unspecified were analysed for the expression of FOXP3 on tumour cells and tumour-infiltrating Tregs. Labelling of above 10% of the neoplastic cells was seen in one case classified as an aggressive epidermotropic CD8+ cytotoxic CTCL...

  18. Endoscopic staging of low-grade gastric malt lymphoma Estadificación por ecoendoscopia en el linfoma gástrico tipo malt de bajo grado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Varas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS has already proven useful in the assessment of submucosal lesions, and the staging of gastrointestinal cancer, particularly gastric MALT-type lymphoma. The goal of this paper was EUS staging. Patients and method: 24 patients (10 females, 14 males with a median age of 56 years and possibly gastric MALT lymphoma (25 cases were studied using videoendoscopy, biopsies, and echoendoscopy with 7.5- and 20-MHz radial EUS, and also with 12- and 20-MHz miniprobes (MPs. Nineteen patients were definitely evaluated (7 females, 12 males as having 20 MALT-type lymphomas, as five patients were post-hoc disregarded when an invasive, high-grade gastric lymphoma (3c or plasmocytoma (2c was subsequently demonstrated. Of these 19 patients, all had T1 lesions except for two with T2 lesions; one patient had a gastroduodenal T1 lymphoma. Echographic findings with MPs were compared to EUS (gold standard and histology both before and after eradication. Then, patients were followed up every 1-3-6 months using videoendoscopy and MPs. Results: echoendoscopy correctly identified T stages in 90% of cases. MPs identified T stages in 88% of cases, and N stages in 33% of cases, with results being slightly inferior to those obtained with conventional EUS (91 vs. 45%; they were consequently used for follow-up. After eradication, all but two patients are in complete remission and have been followed every 1-3-6 months using MPs without echographic abnormalities, except for a patient who relapsed.Introducción: la ultrasonografía endoscópica (USE ha demostrado ya su utilidad en la evaluación de las lesiones submucosas, en la estadificación del cáncer digestivo en general, y del linfoma gástrico tipo MALT en particular. El objetivo de este trabajo fue la estadificación por USE. Pacientes y método: veinticuatro enfermos (10 mujeres y 14 varones con edad media de 56 años y con posible linfoma gástrico tipo MALT (25 casos fueron

  19. Macrophage markers in serum and tumor have prognostic impact in American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I/II melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.O.; Schmidt, H.; Moller, H.J.;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages, and it is s......PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages...

  20. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiation, concurrent paclitaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy and surgery for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, David J; Rice, Thomas W; Rybicki, Lisa A; Greskovich, John F; Ciezki, Jay P; Carroll, Marjorie A; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2002-05-01

    The low surgical cure rate in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer has prompted an exploration of multimodality treatment strategies. Mature results are presented from a phase II trial of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy, concurrent paclitaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy and surgery for these patients. Between 1994 and 1997, 45 patients with surgically demonstrated stage III non-small cell lung cancer underwent induction treatment with a 96 h continuous cisplatin infusion (20 mg/m(2) per day) and a 24 h infusion of paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2)) given concurrently with accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (1.5 Gy twice daily) to a total dose of 30 Gy. Induction was completed in ten treatment (12 total) days. Surgical resection was scheduled 4 weeks later with a second identical course of chemoradiotherapy given 4-6 weeks post-operatively, to a total radiation dose of 60-63 Gy. Thirty-five patients had stage III(A) disease and ten had stage III(B) disease (eight with N(3) tumors). Induction toxicity included nausea in 89%, dysphagia in 89%, and neutropenia tolerable despite significant myelosuppression. Locoregional control is excellent and survival is better than historical expectations. Patients downstaged to mediastinal node negativity have a prognosis similar to those with de novo stage I(B) and II disease. Distant metastases are the major cause of treatment failure.

  1. High-Dose Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2B, Ipilimumab, or Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV High Risk Melanoma That Has Been Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Metastatic Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Stage III Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVB Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVC Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck

  2. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino [Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Cao, Wenhua [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions

  3. Outcome of patients with stage II and III nonseminomatous germ cell tumors: Results of a single center

    OpenAIRE

    Ataergin S; Ozet A; Arpaci F; Kilic S; Beyzadeoglu M; Komurcu S

    2007-01-01

    Background: The prognostic factors in nonseminomatous germ cell tumors have been mainly derived from the analysis of stage I tumors. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate some prognostic factors and the outcome of patients with stage II and III nonseminomatous germ cell tumors according to risk groups treated between 1993 and 2002. Settings and Design: Patients were retrospectively classified as good, intermediate and poor risk groups according to International Germ Cell Cancer Con...

  4. Identification of differentially expressed genes using an annealing control primer system in stage III serous ovarian carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bae Dong-Han

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients with ovarian cancer are diagnosed with advanced stage disease (i.e., stage III-IV, which is associated with a poor prognosis. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs in stage III serous ovarian carcinoma compared to normal tissue were screened by a new differential display method, the annealing control primer (ACP system. The potential targets for markers that could be used for diagnosis and prognosis, for stage III serous ovarian cancer, were found by cluster and survival analysis. Methods The ACP-based reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR technique was used to identify DEGs in patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma. The DEGs identified by the ACP system were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Cluster analysis was performed on the basis of the expression profile produced by quantitative real-time PCR and survival analysis was carried out by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards multivariate model; the results of gene expression were compared between chemo-resistant and chemo-sensitive groups. Results A total of 114 DEGs were identified by the ACP-based RT PCR technique among patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma. The DEGs associated with an apoptosis inhibitory process tended to be up-regulated clones while the DEGs associated with immune response tended to be down-regulated clones. Cluster analysis of the gene expression profile obtained by quantitative real-time PCR revealed two contrasting groups of DEGs. That is, a group of genes including: SSBP1, IFI6 DDT, IFI27, C11orf92, NFKBIA, TNXB, NEAT1 and TFG were up-regulated while another group of genes consisting of: LAMB2, XRCC6, MEF2C, RBM5, FOXP1, NUDCP2, LGALS3, TMEM185A, and C1S were down-regulated in most patients. Survival analysis revealed that the up-regulated genes such as DDAH2, RNase K and TCEAL2 might be associated with a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the prognosis of patients with chemo

  5. [Analysis of prognostic factors after radical resection in 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiong; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Ai-ping; Sun, Yong-kun; Song, Yan; DU, Feng; Wang, Jin-wan

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the clinicopathologic factors related to recurrence and metastasis of stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection. The clinical and pathological data of 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008 in our hospital were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The overall recurrence and metastasis rate was 28.5% (179/628). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 70.3% and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 78.5%. Univariate analysis showed that age, smoking intensity, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, gross classification, histological differentiation, blood vessel tumor embolus, tumor gross pathology, multiple primary tumors, preoperative and postoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, and the regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy were correlated to recurrence and metastasis of colon cancer after radical resection. Multivariate analysis showed that regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, and preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9 were independent factors affecting the prognosis of colon cancer patients. Regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, elevated preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with single fluorouracil type drug are independent risk factors of recurrence and metastasis in patients with stage II-III colon cancer after radical resection.

  6. Non-invasive detection of genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in early and advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma by sequencing of circulating cell-free DNA: a technical proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Tousseyn, Thomas; Dehaspe, Luc; Dierickx, Daan; Verheecke, Magali; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Bechter, Oliver; Delforge, Michel; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Brison, Nathalie; Verhoef, Gregor E G; Legius, Eric; Amant, Frederic; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2015-02-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is one of the most common lymphoid neoplasms in young adults, but the low abundance of neoplastic Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in the tumour hampers the elucidation of its pathogenesis, biology, and diversity. After an incidental observation that genomic aberrations known to occur in Hodgkin's lymphoma were detectable in circulating cell-free DNA, this study was undertaken to investigate whether circulating cell-free DNA can be informative about genomic imbalances in Hodgkin's lymphoma. We applied massive parallel sequencing to circulating cell-free DNA in a prospective study of patients with biopsy proven nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma. Genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells were investigated by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH) on tumour specimens. By non-invasive prenatal testing, we observed several genomic imbalances in circulating cell-free DNA of a pregnant woman, who was subsequently diagnosed with early-stage nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma stage IIA during gestation. FISH on tumour tissue confirmed corresponding genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells. We prospectively studied circulating cell-free DNA of nine nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma cases: eight at first diagnosis and one at first relapse. Seven patients had stage IIA disease and two had stage IVB disease. In eight, genomic imbalances were detected, including, among others, gain of chromosomes 2p and 9p, known to occur in Hodgkin's lymphoma. These gains and losses in circulating cell-free DNA were extensively validated by FISH on Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in biopsy samples. Initiation of chemotherapy induced normalisation of circulating cell-free DNA profiles within 2-6 weeks. The cell cycle indicator Ki67 and cleaved caspase-3 were detected in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells by immunohistochemistry, suggesting high turnover of Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells. In early and advanced stage nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma, genomic

  7. Late Closure of a Stage III Idiopathic Macular Hole after Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Afrashi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old female presented to our hospital with decreased vision in her right eye. Detailed ocular examination was performed, and a macular hole was detected in the right eye. The presence of a full-thickness stage III macular hole was confirmed with optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging. Pars plana vitrectomy followed by long-acting gas tamponade (C3F8 was performed as treatment. One month after surgery, clinical examination revealed a persistent macular hole, confirmed by an OCT scan. Although the patient was scheduled for reoperation, the surgery was postponed due to personal reasons of the patient. Surprisingly, after five months, a closure pattern with accompanying epiretinal membrane was observed in the macular hole area. The closure of the macular hole was completed without any further intervention 8 months post-surgery. In cases of unclosed macular hole after the first surgery, if a second surgery cannot be performed, follow-up with OCT recommended due to the possibility of spontaneous closure. However, spontaneous closure of a persistent macular hole following PPV is rare, so early diagnosis and surgical repair of unclosed macular holes must remain the primary goal.

  8. Trace elements and heavy metals in hair of stage III breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benderli Cihan, Yasemin; Sözen, Selim; Oztürk Yıldırım, Sema

    2011-12-01

    This prospective study was designed to compare the hair levels of 36 elements in 52 patients with stage III breast cancer to those of an equal number of healthy individuals. Principal component and cluster analysis were used for source of identification and apportionment of heavy metals and trace elements in these two groups. A higher average level of iron was found in samples from patients while controls had higher levels of calcium. Both patients and controls had elevated levels of tin, magnesium, zinc, and sodium. Almost all element values in cancer patients showed higher dispersion and asymmetry than in healthy controls. Between the two groups, there were statistically significant differences in the concentrations of silver, arsenic, gold, boron, barium, beryllium, calcium, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, cesium, gadolinium, manganese, nickel, lead, antimony, scandium, selenium, and zinc (p cancer group and between palladium and cobalt (r = 0.945) in the healthy individuals. Our results show that there are distinct patterns of heavy metals and trace elements in the hair of breast cancer patients in comparison to healthy controls. These results could be of significance in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  9. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Evaluation of NEXRDA Stage III precipitation data over Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge: a semiarid region in Central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Zhou, X.; Hendrickx, J.; Guan, H.

    2006-05-01

    This study examines NEXRAD Stage III product (hourly, cell size 4 km by 4 km) for its ability in estimating precipitation over Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge: a semiarid region in Central New Mexico. A GIS-based NEXRAD data processing and visualization method is also presented. A comparison between Stage III and a network of gauge precipitation estimates during 1995 to 2001 indicates that Stage III (1) overestimates the hourly conditional mean precipitation (CM) by 33 percent in monsoon season and 55 percent in non-monsoon season; (2) overestimates the hourly CM for concurrent radar-gauge pairs (non-zero value) by 13 percent in monsoon season and 6 percent in non-monsoon season; (3) overestimates the seasonal precipitation accumulation by 11 to 88 percent in monsoon season and underestimates by 18 to 89 percent in non- monsoon season; and (4) either overestimates annual precipitation accumulation up to 28.2 percent or underestimates it up to 11.9 percent. More caution is suggested in using Stage III data for nonmonsoonal (stratiform) rainfall events (prior to the truncation fixed algorithm deployed in 2002), as the truncation error can be a significant drawback. While overestimates may suppress the truncation caused underestimates in the monsoon seasons.

  11. Desmoplasia Influenced Recurrence of Disease and Mortality in Stage III Colorectal Cancer within Five Years after Surgery and Adjuvant Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippi, Maddalena; De Toma, Giorgio; Minervini, Giovanni; Cassieri, Claudio; Pica, Roberta; Colarusso, Diodoro; Stock, Simon; Crispino, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: In patients with colon cancer who undergo resection for potential cure, 40–60% have advanced locoregional disease (stage III). Those who are suitable for adjuvant treatment had a definite disease-free-survival benefit. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether the presence of desmoplasia influenced the mortality rate of stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) within 5 years from the surgery and adjuvant therapy. Patients and Methods: Sixty-five patients with stage III CRC underwent resection and adjuvant therapy. Qualitative categorization of desmoplasia was obtained using Ueno's stromal CRC classification. Desmoplasia was related to mortality using Spearman correlation and stratified with other histological variables (inflammation, grading) that concurred to the major determinant of malignancy (venous invasion and lymph nodes) using the Chi-square test. Result: The 5-year survival rate was 65% and the relapse rate was 37%. The mortality rate in patients with immature desmoplasia was 86%, 27% in intermediate desmoplasia, and 0% in mature desmoplasia (Spearman correlation coefficient: −0.572, P = 0.05). Conclusion: Immature desmoplasia appears to be associated with disease recurrence and mortality in stage III CRC patients. PMID:28139499

  12. Desmoplasia influenced recurrence of disease and mortality in stage III colorectal cancer within five years after surgery and adjuvant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Zippi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In patients with colon cancer who undergo resection for potential cure, 40–60% have advanced locoregional disease (stage III. Those who are suitable for adjuvant treatment had a definite disease-free-survival benefit. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether the presence of desmoplasia influenced the mortality rate of stage III colorectal cancer (CRC within 5 years from the surgery and adjuvant therapy. Patients and Methods: Sixty-five patients with stage III CRC underwent resection and adjuvant therapy. Qualitative categorization of desmoplasia was obtained using Ueno's stromal CRC classification. Desmoplasia was related to mortality using Spearman correlation and stratified with other histological variables (inflammation, grading that concurred to the major determinant of malignancy (venous invasion and lymph nodes using the Chi-square test. Result: The 5-year survival rate was 65% and the relapse rate was 37%. The mortality rate in patients with immature desmoplasia was 86%, 27% in intermediate desmoplasia, and 0% in mature desmoplasia (Spearman correlation coefficient: −0.572,P= 0.05. Conclusion: Immature desmoplasia appears to be associated with disease recurrence and mortality in stage III CRC patients.

  13. TS Gene Polymorphisms Are Not Good Markers of Response to 5-FU Therapy in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fariña-Sarasqueta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Although the predictive and prognostic value of thymidylate synthase (TS expression and gene polymorphism in colon cancer has been widely studied, the results are inconclusive probably because of methodological differences. With this study, we aimed to elucidate the role of TS gene polymorphisms genotyping in therapy response in stage III colon carcinoma patients treated with 5-FU adjuvant chemotherapy.

  14. Desmoplasia influenced recurrence of disease and mortality in stage III colorectal cancer within five years after surgery and adjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippi, Maddalena; De Toma, Giorgio; Minervini, Giovanni; Cassieri, Claudio; Pica, Roberta; Colarusso, Diodoro; Stock, Simon; Crispino, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    In patients with colon cancer who undergo resection for potential cure, 40-60% have advanced locoregional disease (stage III). Those who are suitable for adjuvant treatment had a definite disease-free-survival benefit. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether the presence of desmoplasia influenced the mortality rate of stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) within 5 years from the surgery and adjuvant therapy. Sixty-five patients with stage III CRC underwent resection and adjuvant therapy. Qualitative categorization of desmoplasia was obtained using Ueno's stromal CRC classification. Desmoplasia was related to mortality using Spearman correlation and stratified with other histological variables (inflammation, grading) that concurred to the major determinant of malignancy (venous invasion and lymph nodes) using the Chi-square test. The 5-year survival rate was 65% and the relapse rate was 37%. The mortality rate in patients with immature desmoplasia was 86%, 27% in intermediate desmoplasia, and 0% in mature desmoplasia (Spearman correlation coefficient: -0.572,P= 0.05). Immature desmoplasia appears to be associated with disease recurrence and mortality in stage III CRC patients.

  15. 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-desoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography initial staging impacts on survival in Hodgkin lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juliano; J; Cerci; Camila; C; G; Linardi; Luís; F; Pracchia; José; Soares; Junior; Evelinda; Trindade; Dominique; Delbeke; Rodrigo; J; Cerci; Robert; Carr; José; C; Meneghetti; Valeria; Buccheri

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To assess the prognostic value and risk classification improvement of metabolic staging(MS)with Initial2-[18F]-fluoro-2-desoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography(FDG-PET)in initial staging of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma(HL)patients to predict 5 years overall survival(5y-OS)and event free survival(EFS).METHODS:A total of 275 patients were included in this retrospective study,155 patients were staged with conventional anatomical staging(AS),and 120 also submitted to MS(FDG-PET).Prognostic analysis compared 5y-OS and 5y-EFS of patients staged with AS and MS.Risk-adjusted models incorporated clinical risk factors,computed tomography and FDG-PET staging.RESULTS:During the follow up of 267 evaluated patients,220(122 AS and 98 MS)achieved complete remission after first-line therapy(median follow-up:70±29 mo),treatment failure occurred in 79 patients and 34 died.The 5y-EFS for early vs advanced disease in AS patients was 79.3%and 66.7%,and 85.6%and53.6%in MS patients,respectively(P<0.01).The5y-OS for early and advanced disease with AS was91.3%and 81.5%,and 97.5%and 80.7%for patients staged with MS,respectively.Cox proportional hazards analysis demonstrated that FDG-PET added signifcant prognostic information and improved risk prediction(P=0.02).CONCLUSION:Initial staging FDG-PET could be used as an accurate and independent predictor of OS and EFS in HL,with impact in 5y-EFS and OS.

  16. [Stage III cancer of the cervix. The diagnosis, treatment and prognosis in a series of 92 patients (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, J

    1980-01-01

    This study is of 92 patients who were treated for Stage III carcinoma of the cervix in the Henri Becquerel Centre. We have ruled out the 11 patients who refused to complete their treatment or who died before treatment started. The average age was 63 years. The Stage III cases were divided into 40 Stage III A and 41 Stage III B, with 10 who had urinary tract involvement. These were epidermoid carcinomata. The treatment was by external radiotherapy followed by superimposed radium therapy in 66 cases. 15 patients were treated by external radiotherapy alone. The lumboartic nodes were treated in the area that was irradiated in 5 patients. The actuarial figures for survival work out at 51 per cent at 5 years for Stage III A cases and 34 per cent for Stage III B cases. Pelvic recurrences were responsible for 87 per cent of the failures. In fact, in almost 87 per cent of the cases the area was not completely sterilised. The percentage of failures was higher in the group that had altered lymphograms. The prognosis was worst when the upper urinary tract was affected. All patients who had positive lymphograms or those that were suspicious of having lumboaortic nodes involved died. In the 15 patients who did not have added radium therapy there were 13 cases who were not sterilised and 1 that recurred at 13 months. In 32 per cent of cases the failures in the pelvis were associated with pathology in distant lymph nodes and/or with visceral metastases. We found 13 per cent of solitary metastases. Between 5 and 10 years the failure rate is 9 per cent with a level of 6.3 per cent of pelvic recurrences associated or not associated with metastases or even with complications. Our patients had 8 rectosigmoid complications of which 2 needed a diversion colostomy. There were 7 cases of cystitis after X-ray, in the majority of a benign nature, and 2 bony complications that recovered spontaneously. After a study of the diagnosis and treatment of Stage III cancer of the cervix, the

  17. Site and Timing of First Relapse in Stage III Melanoma Patients: Implications for Follow-Up Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Emanuela; Scordo, Michael; Dusza, Stephen W.; Coit, Daniel G.; Chapman, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Stage III melanoma is associated with a high risk of relapse and mortality. Nevertheless, follow-up guidelines have largely been empirical rather than evidence-based. Patients and Methods Clinical records of stage III patients with no evidence of disease seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) between 1992 and 2004, who ultimately relapsed, were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate date of first relapse, time to first relapse, method of first relapse detection, and survival. We also determined overall 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) of all stage III patients seen at MSKCC during this period. Results The overall 5-year RFS for stage IIIA, IIIB, and IIIIC patients was 63%, 32%, and 11%, respectively. Among relapsing patients, 340 had adequate follow-up to be evaluable for all parameters. Site of first relapse was local/in-transit (28%), regional nodal (21%), or systemic (51%). First relapses were detected by the patient or family, physician, or by screening radiologic tests in 47%, 21%, and 32% of patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that better overall survival was associated with younger age and first relapse being local/in-transit or nodal, asymptomatic, or resectable. For each substage, we estimated site-specific risk of first relapse. Conclusion Patients detected almost half of first relapses. Our data suggest that routine physical examinations beyond 3 years for stage IIIA, 2 years for stage IIIB, and 1 year for stage IIIC patients and radiologic imaging beyond 3 years for stages IIIA and IIIB and 2 years for stage IIIC patients would be expected to detect few first systemic relapses. PMID:20479405

  18. Water-only fasting and an exclusively plant foods diet in the management of stage IIIa, low-grade follicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhamer, Alan C; Klaper, Michael; Foorohar, Afsoon; Myers, Toshia R

    2015-12-10

    Follicular lymphoma (FL), the second most common non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), is well characterised by a classic histological appearance and an indolent course. Current treatment protocols for FL range from close observation to immunotherapy, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapies. We report the case of a 42-year-old woman diagnosed by excisional biopsy with stage IIIa, grade 1 FL. In addition to close observation, the patient underwent a medically supervised, 21-day water-only fast after which enlarged lymph nodes were substantially reduced in size. The patient then consumed a diet of minimally processed plant foods free of added sugar, oil and salt (SOS), and has remained on the diet since leaving the residential facility. At 6 and 9-month follow-up visits, the patient's lymph nodes were non-palpable and she remained asymptomatic. This case establishes a basis for further studies evaluating water-only fasting and a plant foods, SOS-free diet as a treatment protocol for FL. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. Lymphadenectomy in locally advanced cervical cancer study (LiLACS): Phase III clinical trial comparing surgical with radiologic staging in patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumovitz, Michael; Querleu, Denis; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Morice, Philippe; Jhingran, Anuja; Munsell, Mark F; Macapinlac, Homer A; Leblanc, Eric; Martinez, Alejandra; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2014-01-01

    Radiation treatment planning for women with locally advanced cervical cancer (stages IB2-IVA) is often based on positron emission tomography (PET). PET, however, has poor sensitivity in detecting metastases in aortocaval nodes. We have initiated a study with the objective of determining whether pre-therapeutic laparoscopic surgical staging followed by tailored chemoradiation improves survival as compared with PET/computed tomography (CT) radiologic staging alone followed by chemoradiation. This international, multicenter phase III trial will enroll 600 women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer and PET/CT findings showing fluorodeoxyglucose-avid pelvic nodes and fluorodeoxyglucose-negative para-aortic nodes. Eligible patients will be randomized to undergo either pelvic radiotherapy with chemotherapy (standard-of-care arm) or surgical staging via a minimally invasive extraperitoneal approach followed by tailored radiotherapy with chemotherapy (experimental arm). The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points are disease-free survival, short- and long-term morbidity with pre-therapeutic surgical staging, and determination of anatomic locations of metastatic para-aortic nodes in relationship to the inferior mesenteric artery. We believe this study will show that tailored chemoradiation after pre-therapeutic surgical staging improves survival as compared with chemoradiation based on PET/CT in women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer.

  20. Direct variable cost of the topical treatment of stages III and IV pressure injuries incurred in a public university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Julieta M F; Blanes, Leila; Borba, Luis G; Rocha, Luis R M; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2017-05-01

    to estimate the direct variable costs of the topical treatment of stages III and IV pressure injuries of hospitalized patients in a public university hospital, and assess the correlation between these costs and hospitalization time. Forty patients of both sexes who had been admitted to the São Paulo Hospital, São Paulo, SP, Brazil, from 2011 to 2012, with pressure injuries in the sacral, ischial or trochanteric region were included. The patients had a total of 57 pressure injuries in the selected regions, and the lesions were monitored daily until patient release, transfer or death. The quantities and types of materials, as well as the amount of professional labor time spent on each procedure and each patient were recorded. The unit costs of the materials and the hourly costs of the professional labor were obtained from the hospital's purchasing and human resources departments, respectively. Spearman's correlation coefficient and the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for the statistical analyses. The mean topical treatment costs for stages III and IV PIs were significantly different (US$ 854.82 versus US$ 1785.35; p = 0.004). The mean topical treatment cost of stages III and IV pressure injuries per patient was US$ 1426.37. The mean daily topical treatment cost per patient was US$ 40.83. There was a significant correlation between hospitalization time and the total costs of labor and materials (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between hospitalization time periods for stages III and IV pressure injuries (40.80 days and 45.01 days, respectively; p = 0.834). The mean direct variable cost of the topical treatment for stages III and IV pressure injuries per patient in this public university hospital was US$ 1426.37. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy in stages III and IV head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripps, C; Winquist, E; Devries, M C; Stys-Norman, D; Gilbert, R

    2010-06-01

    What are the benefits associated with the use of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapies in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC)? Anti-EGFR therapies of interest included cetuximab, gefitinib, lapatinib, zalutumumab, erlotinib, and panitumumab. Head-and-neck cancer includes malignant tumours arising from a variety of sites in the upper aerodigestive tract. The most common histologic type is squamous cell carcinoma, and most common sites are the oral cavity, the oropharynx, the hypopharynx, and the larynx. Worldwide, HNSCC is the sixth most common neoplasm, and despite advances in therapy, long-term survival in HNSCC patients is poor. Primary surgery followed by chemoradiation, or primary chemoradiation, are the standard treatment options for patients with locally advanced (stages III-IVB) HNSCC; however, meta-analytic data indicate that the benefit of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy disappears in patients over the age of 70 years. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody approved for use in combination with radiation in the treatment of patients with untreated locally advanced HNSCC and as monotherapy for patients with recurrent or metastatic (stage IVC) HNSCC who have progressed on platinum-based therapy. Given the interest in anti-EGFR agents in advanced HNSCC, the Head and Neck Cancer Disease Site Group (DSG) of Cancer Care Ontario's Program in Evidence-Based Care (PEBC) chose to systematically review the literature pertaining to this topic so as to develop evidence-based recommendations for treatment. Outcomes of interest included overall and progression-free survival, quality of life, tumour response rate and duration, and the toxicity associated with the use of anti-EGFR therapies. The medline, embase, and Cochrane Library databases, the American Society of Clinical Oncology online conference proceedings, the Canadian Medical Association InfoBase, and the National Guidelines Clearinghouse were systematically searched to

  2. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy for stages II and III colon cancer after complete resection: a clinical practice guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, B.M.; Cosby, R.; Quereshy, F.; Jonker, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Updated practice guidelines on adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected colon cancer are lacking. In 2008, Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care developed a guideline on adjuvant therapy for stages ii and iii colon cancer. With newer regimens being assessed in this patient population and older agents being either abandoned because of non-effectiveness or replaced by agents that are more efficacious, a full update of the original guideline was undertaken. Methods Literature searches (January 1987 to August 2015) of medline, embase, and the Cochrane Library were conducted; in addition, abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress were reviewed (the latter for January 2007 to August 2015). A practice guideline was drafted that was then scrutinized by internal and external reviewers whose comments were incorporated into the final guideline. Results Twenty-six unique reports of eighteen randomized controlled trials and thirteen unique reports of twelve meta-analyses or pooled analyses were included in the evidence base. The 5 recommendations developed included 3 for stage ii colon cancer and 2 for stage iii colon cancer. Conclusions Patients with completely resected stage iii colon cancer should be offered adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5fu)–based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin (based on definitive data for improvements in survival and disease-free survival). Patients with resected stage ii colon cancer without “high-risk” features should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients with “high-risk” features, 5fu-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin should be offered, although no clinical trials have been conducted to conclusively demonstrate the same benefits seen in stage iii colon cancer. PMID:28050138

  3. Early postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT in high-risk stage III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserberg, Nir; Purim, Ofer; Bard, Vyacheslav; Kundel, Yulia; Gordon, Noa; Groshar, David; Goldberg, Natalia; Kashtan, Hanoch; Sulkes, Aaron; Brenner, Baruch

    2015-04-01

    PET/CT may contribute to staging modification in different phases of colorectal cancer (CRC) management. However, it is not routinely indicated for stage III CRC. This study sought to determine the role of early postoperative PET/CT in patients with high-risk stage III CRC. The tumor registry of a tertiary medical center was searched (2004-2011) for all patients with stage III CRC who underwent early postoperative PET/CT because of the presence of high-risk factors for systemic disease. Demographic and clinicopathological characteristics were compared between patients found/not found to have metastatic disease. The cohort included 91 patients with a median age of 67 years (range, 29-90 years). Pathological FDG uptake was observed in 38 (41%). Of these, 14 (15% of the whole cohort) were upstaged with alteration of their treatment protocol, 10 (11%) had local postoperative changes, and 14 (15%) had false-positive findings. The sensitivity and specificity of PET/CT for detecting metastatic disease were 100% and 69%, respectively. Elevated postoperative carcinoembryonic antigen and CA-19.9 levels correlated with a positive PET/CT (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively). The median follow-up time was 34 months (range, 4-85 months). The estimated 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in patients with a negative than a positive scan (70% vs 42%, P postoperative PET/CT may influence staging and treatment in 15% of selected patients with high-risk stage III CRC. Postoperative levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and CA-19.9 may serve as indications for PET/CT scanning in this setting. Prospective validation is warranted.

  4. [Lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract: a neoplastic disease of underdevelopment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solidoro, A; Casanova, L; Otero, J; Santillana, S; Carracedo, C; Misad, O; Ruiz, E

    1993-01-01

    458/3,495 malignant lymphomas seen at the Instituto de Enfermedades Neoplásicas between 1965-1992, had primary extranodal disease in the GI tract. This is one of the largest institutional series reported, which would suggest that this is a relatively frequent malignancy in Peruvian population. Fifty per cent of cases had a primary in the small bowel and 38.9 per cent in the stomach. The age at presentation, the clinical picture and the location at the intestine show similarities with the so called Mediterranean lymphoma. Cases were classified according to the TNM system, and patients in stages I-II were surgically resected; 80 per cent of them were alive and free of disease at 5 years. Gastric lymphomas with inoperable disease were treated with chemotherapy with a 5-year survival of 50 per cent.

  5. Etoposide, Filgrastim, and Plerixafor in Improving Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Compromised margins following mastectomy for stage I-III invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jennifer; Al Mushawah, Fatema; Taylor, Marie E; Cyr, Amy E; Gillanders, William E; Aft, Rebecca L; Eberlein, Timothy J; Gao, Feng; Margenthaler, Julie A

    2012-09-01

    We investigated factors associated with positive margins following mastectomy and the impact on outcomes. We identified 240 patients with stage I-III invasive breast cancer who underwent mastectomy from 1999 to 2009. Data included patient and tumor characteristics, pathologic margin assessment, and outcomes. Margin positivity was defined as the presence of in situ or invasive malignancy at any margin. Descriptive statistics were used for data summary and were compared using χ(2). Of the 240 patients, 132 (55%) had a simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy and 108 (45%) had a modified radical mastectomy. Overall, 21 patients (9%) had positive margins, including 12 (57%) with one positive margin, 3 (14%) with two positive margins, and 6 (29%) with three or more positive margins. The most commonly affected margin was the deep margin (48% of patients). Eight of the 21 patients (38%) received adjuvant chest wall irradiation. There were no differences between patients who had a positive margin and those who did not with respect to patient age, race, percentage of in situ component, tumor size, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, or immunostain profile (P > 0.05 for all). None of the patients with positive margins experienced a local recurrence. Positive margins following mastectomy occurred in nearly 10% of our patients. No specific patient or tumor characteristics predicted a risk for having a positive margin. Despite the finding that only approximately 40% of patients received adjuvant radiation in the setting of a positive margin, no local recurrences have been observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Surgical management and outcome analysis of stage III pediatric empyema thoracis

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    Menon Prema

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Report of 125 pediatric patients of empyema thoracis treated by open decortication, highlighting the presentation, delay in referral, operative findings, the response to surgical intervention and follow-up. Materials and Methods: All the children who underwent open decortication for stage III empyema thoracis during the study period were included. Preoperative workup included hemogram, serum protein, chest radiographs and contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CECT scan of the chest. Results: One hundred and twenty-five patients (81 males, 44 females (age 3 months-12 years, mean 4.9 years were operated during a 4.5-year period. Among them, two children underwent bilateral thoracotomies. Also, 81.6% patients were referred 3 weeks after the onset of disease (mean duration 9 weeks. Intercostal chest drainage (ICD had been inserted in (119 95% cases. Thickened pleura, multiloculated pus and lung involvement were invariably seen on CECT scan. Bronchopleural fistula was present in 10 patients and empyema necessitatis in 2. Decortication, removal of necrotic tissue and closure of air leaks was performed in all the patients. Necrotizing pneumonia was seen in (35 27.5% cases. Mean duration of postoperative ICD was 7 days. Follow-up ranged from 3 months to 4 years (mean 12 months. There was no mortality. Six patients had proven tuberculosis. Conclusions: The duration of the disease had a direct relationship with the thickness of the pleura and injury to the underlying lung. Delayed referral causes irreversible changes in the lung prolonging recovery. Only 18% presented within the early period of the disease. Meticulous open surgical debridement gives gratifying results. The status of the lung at the end of surgery is a major prognostic factor.

  8. Roles of chemoradio therapy for stage III or IV advanced head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Takuya; Iwai, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Minamino, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yukawa, Hisaya; Inoue, Toshiya; Yamashita, Toshio [Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    The effectiveness of chemoradio therapy (CRT), which was performed on 31 patients with advanced head and neck cancers of stage III or IV at Kansai Medical University between September 1999 and December 2000, was examined. The CRT consisted of continuous infusion of 5FU (500 mg/m{sup 2}) for 120 hours, prior to drip infusion of CDDP (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for 2 hours and conventional radiotherapy (2 Gy/day, 5 days/w). The 31 patients with these cancers were divided into two groups; a non-operative group (16 patients) and an operative group (15 patients). The patients in the non-operative group (16 patients) and an operative group (15 patients). The patients in the non-operative group underwent CRT (60-70 Gy of total radiation dose and two courses of chemotherapy) without surgery. The patients in the operative group received surgical treatment followed by CRT (40 Gy of total radiation dose and one course of chemotherapy). The results of CRT indicated 87.1% of the response rate (RR), and 29.0% of the complete response rate (CR) in the group. The CR rate was lower than in other reports. However, the combination of CRT and the subsequent operation indicated a disease-free survival rate of 61.3% and reduction of the recurrence rate to 17.4%. Eight of 9 patients of CR after CRT without surgery revealed NED. On the other hand, the results indicated that all 10 patients of PR after CRT showed tumor residue, 9 of 10 patients of PR showed NED after additional surgery. Therefore, it is likely that the patients of CR do not need the additional surgery, however, the patients of PR are strongly recommended the surgery to improve the local control rate as well as survival rate. Although adverse reactions of CRT on patients included mucositis, leucopenia, thrombopenia and dermatitis, the symptoms ranged within grade 3. (author)

  9. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymphoma - non-Hodgkin; Lymphocytic lymphoma; Histiocytic lymphoma; Lymphoblastic lymphoma; Cancer - non-Hodgkin lymphoma ... National Cancer Institute: PDQ adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Updated ... . Accessed ...

  10. Plasmablastic lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Duan, Minghui; Hu, Lixing; Zhou, Daobin; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a B-cell malignancy associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). PBL could also influence the HIV-negative patients. The study aimed to identify prognostic factors for survival among Chinese PBL patients. Materials and methods: Eligible patients from literature and Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) were included in this study. Clinical characteristics and immunophenotypic data were extracted. Kaplan–Meier curve was used to describe the survival status. Cox regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results: A total of 60 Chinese PBL patients were included, including 54 patients from 36 published articles and 6 new patients that have not been reported. The median overall survival was 7 months (95% confidence interval 3.853–10.147 months). An overwhelming majority (79.31%) of the included cases were Ann Arbor stage IV patients. All the Chinese PBL patients were HIV-negative; 46.81% were Epstein-Barr virus-positive. CD38, CD138, or MUM1 was positively expressed in more than 80% of patients; CD20 expression was also found in 22.03% of cases. Kaplan–Meier curve revealed obvious differences in patient survival between patients in primary stages and advanced stages, as well as between patients with kidney involvement and those without kidney involvement. Cox regression analysis indicated that stage and age were 2 prognostic factors for patient survival. Conclusions: Advanced stage might be associated with poor prognosis among PBL HIV-negative patients in Chinese. PMID:28248855

  11. Increased Levels of Plasma Epstein Barr Virus DNA Identify a Poor-Risk Subset of Patients With Advanced Stage Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkos, Bradley M.; Gru, Alejandro A.; Geyer, Susan M.; Bingman, Anissa K.; Hemminger, Jessica A.; Mishra, Anjali; Wong, Henry K.; Pancholi, Preeti; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Discovering prognostic factors that simultaneously describe tumor characteristics and improve risk stratification is a priority in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). More than a third of advanced stage CTCL patients in this cohort had detectable cell free plasma Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-DNA (pEBVd) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. An increased level of pEBVd was highly concordant with EBV (ie, Epstein–Barr virus RNAs) in tumor tissue and was associated with inferior survival. Introduction Outcomes in advanced stage (AS) cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are poor but with great variability. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a subset of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Frequency of plasma EBV-DNA (pEBVd) detection, concordance with EBV RNA (EBER) in tumor tissue, codetection of plasma cytomegalovirus DNA (pCMVd), and prognostic effect in AS CTCL are unknown. Patients and Methods Patients (n = 46; 2006–2013) with AS CTCL (≥IIB) were retrospectively studied. pEBVd and pCMVd were longitudinally measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. EBER in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed on tumor samples. Survival from time of diagnosis (ToD) and time of progression to AS was assessed. Results Plasma EBV-DNA and pCMVd were detected in 37% (17 of 46) and 17% (8 of 46) of AS CTCL patients, respectively. pCMVd detection was significantly more frequent in pEBVd-positive (pEBVd+) than pEBVd− patients (35% vs. 7%; P = .038). Tumor tissue for EBER-ISH was available in 14 of 17 pEBVd+ and 22 of 29 pEBVd− patients; 12 of 14 (85.7%) pEBVd+ patients were EBER+ versus 0 of 22 pEBVd− patients. Frequency of large cell transformation (LCT) tended to be greater in pEBVd+ patients, but was not significant (10 of 14 pEBVd+ vs. 10 of 23 pEBVd−; P = .17). No notable differences in rates of increased levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were observed (17 of 17 pEBVd+ vs. 27 of 29 pEBVd−). pEBVd detection was associated with

  12. Establishment of a biomarker model for predicting bone metastasis in resected stage III non-small cell lung cancer

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    Zhou Zhen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to establish a biomarker risk model for predicting bone metastasis in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods The model consists of 105 cases of stage III NSCLC, who were treated and followed up. The patients were divided into bone metastasis group (n = 45 and non-bone metastasis group (other visceral metastasis and those without recurrence (n = 60. Tissue microarrays were constructed for immunohistochemical study of 10 molecular markers associated with bone metastasis, based on which a model was established via logistic regression analysis for predicting the risk of bone metastases. The model was prospectively validated in another 40 patients with stage III NSCLC. Results The molecular model for predicting bone metastasis was logit (P = − 2.538 + 2.808 CXCR4 +1.629 BSP +0.846 OPN-2.939 BMP4. ROC test showed that when P ≥ 0.408, the sensitivity was up to 71% and specificity of 70%. Model validation in the 40 cases in clinical trial (NCT 01124253 demonstrated that the prediction sensitivity of the model was 85.7%, specificity 66.7%, Kappa: 0.618, with a high degree of consistency. Conclusion The molecular model combining CXCR4, BSP, OPN and BMP4 could help predict the risk of bone metastasis in stage IIIa and IIIb resected NSCLC.

  13. Improved lymph node harvest from resected colon cancer specimens did not cause upstaging from TNM stage II to III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storli, Kristian; Søndenaa, Karl; Furnes, Bjørg; Leh, Sabine; Nesvik, Idunn; Bru, Tore; Gudlaugsson, Einar; Bukholm, Ida; Norheim-Andersen, Solveig; Eide, Geir

    2011-12-01

    The number of lymph nodes retrieved and examined from a resected colon cancer specimen may be crucial for correct staging. We examined if efforts to increase the lymph node harvest to more than 12 lymph nodes per specimen would upstage some patients from TNM stage II to III. Three hospitals compared results from 2000 with those of 2007 in 421 resected patients with stage II and III colon cancer. Hospital A endeavored to improve the surgical procedure while the pathologists enhanced the quality of lymph node sampling. Hospital B did not make any marked changes, while hospital C introduced the GEWF lymph node solvent (glacial acetic acid, ethanol, distilled water, and formaldehyde) in their pathology method. In 2000, 12 or more lymph nodes were harvested in 39.6, 45.0, and 21.1% of the specimens from the three hospitals, while the figures for 2007 were 85.7, 42.0, and 90.3%, respectively. The significant increase in lymph node harvest in two of the hospitals in 2007 compared to 2000 (p TNM stage II to III.

  14. Intensity modulated radiotherapy in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients: Is it better than three dimensional conformal radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sanctis Vitaliana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cure rate of early Hodgkin Lymphoma are high and avoidance of late toxicities is of paramount importance. This comparative study aims to assess the normal tissue sparing capability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT versus standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT in terms of dose-volume parameters and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP for different organs at risk in supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL patients. Methods Ten HL patients were actually treated with 3D-CRT and all treatments were then re-planned with IMRT. Dose-volume parameters for thyroid, oesophagus, heart, coronary arteries, lung, spinal cord and breast were evaluated. Dose-volume histograms generated by TPS were analyzed to predict the NTCP for the considered organs at risk, according to different endpoints. Results Regarding dose-volume parameters no statistically significant differences were recorded for heart and origin of coronary arteries. We recorded statistically significant lower V30 with IMRT for oesophagus (6.42 vs 0.33, p = 0.02 and lungs (4.7 vs 0.1 p = 0.014 for the left lung and 2.59 vs 0.1 p = 0.017 for the right lung and lower V20 for spinal cord (17.8 vs 7.2 p = 0.02. Moreover the maximum dose to the spinal cord was lower with IMRT (30.2 vs 19.9, p Conclusions In HL male patients IMRT seems feasible and accurate while for women HL patients IMRT should be used with caution.

  15. Role of Postoperative Radiotherapy for Stage I/II/III Thymic Tumor - Results of the ChART Retrospective Database

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    Qianwen LIU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT for thymic tumor is still controversial. The object of the study is to evaluate the role of PORT for stage I/II/III thymic tumor. Methods The database of Chinese Alliance of Research for Thymomas (ChART was retrieved for patients with stage I/II/III thymic tumor who underwent surgical therapy without neoajuvant therapy between 1994 and 2012. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were performed. Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the hazard ratio for death. Results 1,546 stage I/II/III patients were identified from ChART database. Among these patients, 649 (41.98% underwent PORT. PORT was associated with gender, histologic type (World Health Organization, WHO, surgical extent, complete resection, Masaoka stage and adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-yr and 10-yr overall survival (OS rates and disease-free survival (DFS rate for patients underwent surgery followed by PORT were 90% and 80%, 81% and 63%, comparing with 96% and 95%, 92% and 90% for patients underwent surgery alone (P=0.001, P<0.001 respectively. In univariate analysis, age, histologic type (WHO, Masaoka stage, completeness of resection, and PORT were associated with OS. Multivariable analysis showed that histologic type (WHO(P=0.001, Masaoka stage (P=0.029 and completeness of resection (P=0.003 were independently prognostic factors of OS. In univariate analysis, gender, myasthenia gravis, histologic type (WHO, Masaoka stage, surgical approach, PORT and completeness of resection were associated with DFS. Multivariable analysis showed that histologic type (WHO (P<0.001, Masaoka stage (P=0.005 and completeness of resection (P=0.006 were independently prognostic factors of DFS. Subgroup analysis showed that patients with incomplete resection underwent PORT achieved the better OS and DFS (P=0.010, 0.017, respectively. However, patients with complete resection underwent PORT had the worse OS and DFS (P<0.001, P<0

  16. Patterns of Failure in Advanced Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients After Complete Response to R-CHOP Immunochemotherapy and the Emerging Role of Consolidative Radiation Therapy

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    Shi, Zheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Das, Satya; Okwan-Duodu, Derick [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Flowers, Christopher [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Zhengjia; Wang, Xiaojing [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Jiang, Kun [Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Nastoupil, Loretta J. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K., E-mail: drkhurram2000@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: The role of consolidative radiation therapy (RT) after complete response (CR) to rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) for stage III-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients is unclear. We aimed to evaluate our institutional experience when consolidative RT is delivered to initial presenting sites or bulky sites in these patients. Methods and Materials: We identified 211 histologically confirmed stage III-IV DLBCL patients who received R-CHOP from January 2000 to May 2012 at our institution. Patterns of failure for patients who achieved CR to R-CHOP were analyzed. Local control (LC), distant control (DC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier method and compared between patients who received R-CHOP alone versus R-CHOP plus consolidative RT using the log–rank test. Multivariate analyses were also performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Detailed treatment records were available for 163 patients. After a median 6 cycles of R-CHOP, 110 patients (67.5%) achieved CR and were entered for analysis. Fourteen patients (12.7%) received consolidative RT. After median follow-up of 32.9 months, 43.8% of patients who received R-CHOP alone failed at the initial sites with or without distant recurrence (DR), whereas isolated DR only occurred in 3.7% of these patients. Consolidative RT was associated with significantly improved LC (91.7% vs 48.8%), DC (92.9% vs 71.9%), PFS (85.1% vs 44.2%), and OS (92.3% vs 68.5%; all Ps<.0001) at 5 years compared with patients with R-CHOP alone. On multivariate analysis, consolidative RT and nonbulky disease were predictive of increased LC and PFS, whereas bone marrow involvement was associated with increased risk of DR and worse OS. Consolidative RT was also associated with marginal improved OS. Conclusions: Forty-four percent of patients with advanced stage DLBCL failed at initial presenting sites after

  17. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Additional Survival Benefit of Involved-Lesion Radiation Therapy After R-CHOP Chemotherapy in Limited Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jeanny [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il Han, E-mail: ihkim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung Hyuck [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Min; Heo, Dae Seog [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of involved-lesion radiation therapy (ILRT) after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy in limited stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by comparing outcomes of R-CHOP therapy alone with R-CHOP followed by ILRT. Methods and Materials: We identified 198 patients treated with R-CHOP (median, 6 cycles) for pathologically confirmed DLBCL of limited stage from July 2004 to December 2012. Clinical characteristics of these patients were 33% with stage I and 66.7% with stage II; 79.8% were in the low or low-intermediate risk group; 13.6% had B symptoms; 29.8% had bulky tumors (≥7 cm); and 75.3% underwent ≥6 cycles of R-CHOP therapy. RT was given to 43 patients (21.7%) using ILRT technique, which included the prechemotherapy tumor volume with a median margin of 2 cm (median RT dose: 36 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 40 months, 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 85.8% and 88.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed ≥6 cycles of R-CHOP (PFS, P=.004; OS, P=.004) and ILRT (PFS, P=.021; OS, P=.014) were favorable prognosticators of PFS and OS. A bulky tumor (P=.027) and response to R-CHOP (P=.012) were also found to be independent factors of OS. In subgroup analysis, the effect of ILRT was prominent in patients with a bulky tumor (PFS, P=.014; OS, P=.030) or an elevated level of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; PFS, P=.004; OS, P=.012). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ILRT after R-CHOP therapy improves PFS and OS in patients with limited stage DLBCL, especially in those with bulky disease or an elevated serum LDH level.

  19. Positron emission tomography with 2-[18F]-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose for initial staging of hodgkin lymphoma: a single center experience in Brazil

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    Juliano Julio Cerci

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 2-[18F]-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (FDG-PET is a well established functional imaging modality for the initial staging of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL in patients from Western Europe and North America. The reliability of FDG-PET in populations of different ethnic groups is unclear, as all investigations published to date have come from developed countries. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of FDG-PET in the initial staging of HL patients in a Brazilian population. METHODS: Eighty-two patients with newly diagnosed HL were prospectively included in the study. All patients were staged with both conventional clinical staging (CCS methods, including computed tomography (CT and whole-body FDG-PET methods. A standard of reference for the nodal regions and the extranodal organs was determined using all available information, including the CCS methods, FDG-PET, the diagnostic histology and the follow-up examinations. The results of the CCS were then compared to the FDG-PET results. RESULTS: The sensitivity of FDG-PET was higher for nodal staging than that of CT (87.8% vs. 61.6%, respectively. FDG-PET was also more sensitive than CT in regard to evaluating the extranodal organs for lymphomatous involvement (96.2% vs. 40.0%, respectively. FDG-PET detected all 16 patients who were characterized by a positive bone marrow biopsy and identified an additional 4 patients with bone marrow disease. The incorporation of FDG-PET coupled with CCS in the staging procedure upstaged 20% (17/82 of the patients and downstaged 11% (9/82 of the patients. As a result of these changes in staging, 15% (13/82 of the patients would have received a different therapeutic regimen. CONCLUSIONS: The FDG-PET method is superior to CT for the detection of nodal and extra-nodal HL. The observation that the FDG-PET method upstaged the disease was the most common result (20% of patients brought about by the addition of PET to the staging algorithm

  20. The Dynamics of an Impulsive Predator-Prey System with Stage Structure and Holling Type III Functional Response

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    Zhixiang Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the biological resource management of natural resources, a stage-structured predator-prey model with Holling type III functional response, birth pulse, and impulsive harvesting at different moments is proposed in this paper. By applying comparison theorem and some analysis techniques, the global attractivity of predator-extinction periodic solution and the permanence of this system are studied. At last, examples and numerical simulations are given to verify the validity of the main results.

  1. Impact of stage III-IV endometriosis on recipients of sibling oocytes: matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, I; Navarro, J; Blasco, L; Simón, C; Pellicer, A; Remohí, J

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of severe endometriosis on IVF-ET outcome in women receiving oocytes from the-same donor. A matched case-control study. Oocyte donation program at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. Fifty-eight recipients were included in a matched case-control study of IVF-ET in our oocyte donation program. Twenty-five patients were diagnosed by laparoscopy with stage III-IV endometriosis (group I), while the remaining 33 were free of the disease (group II). On the day of retrieval, oocytes from a single donor were donated to recipients from both groups. Some of the donors supplied oocytes for more than 2 patients. Recipients received steroid replacement therapy for endometrial preparation. Ovarian stimulation and oocyte retrieval in donors. Uterine embryo transfer (ET) in recipients after appropriate exogenous hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Pregnancy, implantation, miscarriage, and live birth rates. The number of oocytes donated and fertilized, as well as the number of available and transferred embryos, was not statistically different between the two groups. Pregnancy, implantation, and miscarriage rates were not affected by stage III-IV endometriosis when compared with the control group. The live birth rate was 28.0% in the group with endometriosis and 27.2% in the control group. These results show that implantation is not affected by stage III-IV endometriosis. Given the contemporary methods of endometrial preparation for transfer of embryos derived from donor oocytes, any potential negative effect of severe endometriosis on the uterine environment is undetectable.

  2. The relation of presenting symptoms with staging, grading, and postoperative 3-year mortality in patients with stage I-III non-metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedir, Osman; Kızıltaş, Şafak; Köstek, Osman; Özkanlı, Şeyma

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the association of presenting symptoms with staging, grading, and postoperative 3-year mortality in patients with colon cancer. A total of 132 patients-with a mean (standard deviation; SD) age of 63.0 (10.0) years and of whom 56.0% were males-with non-metastatic stage I-III colon cancer were included. Symptoms prior to diagnosis were evaluated with respect to tumor localization, tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage, histological grade, and postoperative 3-year mortality. Constipation and abdominal pain were the two most common symptoms appearing first (29.5% and 16.7%, respectively) and remained most predominant (25.0% and 20.0%, respectively) up to diagnosis. The frequency of admission symptoms significantly differed with respect to tumor location, TNM stage and histological grade. The postoperative 3-year survival rate was 61.4%. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that melena and rectal bleeding increased the likelihood of 3-year mortality by 13.6-fold (p=0.001) and 4.08-fold (p=0.011), respectively. Our findings revealed differences in presenting symptom profiles with respect to the time of manifestation and predominance as well as to the TNM stage, histological grade, and tumor location. Given that melena and rectal bleeding increased the 3-year mortality risk by 13.6-fold and 4.08-fold, respectively, our findings indicate the association of admission symptoms with outcome among patients with colon cancer.

  3. Imaging of non-hodgkin lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Optimal lymphoma management requires accurate pretreatment staging and reliable assessment of response, both during and after therapy. Positron emission tomography with computerized tomography (PET/CT) combines functional and anatomical imaging and provides the most sensitive and accurate methods...... for lymphoma imaging. New guidelines for lymphoma imaging and recently revised criteria for lymphoma staging and response assessment recommend PET/CT staging, treatment monitoring, and response evaluation in all FDG-avid lymphomas, while CT remains the method of choice for non-FDG-avid histologies. Since...... interim PET imaging has high prognostic value in lymphoma, a number of trials investigate PET-based, response-adapted therapy for non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). PET response is the main determinant of response according to the new response criteria, but PET/CT has little or no role in routine surveillance...

  4. Multimodality imaging of cardiothoracic lymphoma

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    Carter, Brett W., E-mail: bcarter2@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Section of Thoracic Imaging, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Unit 1478, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Wu, Carol C. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, FND-202, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Khorashadi, Leila [Department of Radiology, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Godoy, Myrna C.B.; Groot, Patricia M. de [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Section of Thoracic Imaging, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Unit 1478, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Abbott, Gerald F. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, FND-202, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Lichtenberger III, John P. [Department of Radiology, David Grant Medical Center, Travis AFB, CA 94535 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Lymphoma is the most common hematologic malignancy and represents approximately 5.3% of all cancers. The World Health Organization published a revised classification scheme in 2008 that groups lymphomas by cell type and molecular, cytogenetic, and phenotypic characteristics. Most lymphomas affect the thorax at some stage during the course of the disease. Affected structures within the chest may include the lungs, mediastinum, pleura, and chest wall, and lymphomas may originate from these sites as primary malignancies or secondarily involve these structures after arising from other intrathoracic or extrathoracic sources. Pulmonary lymphomas are classified into one of four types: primary pulmonary lymphoma, secondary pulmonary lymphoma, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma, and post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders. Although pulmonary lymphomas may produce a myriad of diverse findings within the lungs, specific individual features or combinations of features can be used, in combination with secondary manifestations of the disease such as involvement of the mediastinum, pleura, and chest wall, to narrow the differential diagnosis. While findings of thoracic lymphoma may be evident on chest radiography, computed tomography has traditionally been the imaging modality used to evaluate the disease and effectively demonstrates the extent of intrathoracic involvement and the presence and extent of extrathoracic spread. However, additional modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging of the thorax and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT have emerged in recent years and are complementary to CT in the evaluation of patients with lymphoma. Thoracic MRI is useful in assessing vascular, cardiac, and chest wall involvement, and PET/CT is more accurate in the overall staging of lymphoma than CT and can be used to evaluate treatment response.

  5. A prospective, randomized, multisite clinical evaluation of a transparent absorbent acrylic dressing and a hydrocolloid dressing in the management of Stage II and shallow Stage III pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Etris, Marie; Milne, Catherine; Orsted, Heather; Gates, Judy L; Netsch, Debra; Punchello, Marion; Couture, Nancy; Albert, Martine; Attrell, Edie; Freyberg, Julie

    2008-04-01

    To compare clinical performance of a transparent absorbent acrylic dressing (3M Tegaderm Absorbent Clear Acrylic Dressing ]TAAD[; 3M Company, St Paul, MN) and a hydrocolloid dressing (HD ]DuoDERM CGF, ConvaTec, ER Squibb & Sons, Princeton, NJ[) in the management of Stage II and shallow Stage III pressure ulcers. Prospective, open-label, randomized, comparative, multisite clinical evaluation. Patients were followed up for a maximum of 56 days or until their ulcer healed. At weekly intervals, investigators conducted wound assessments and dressing performance evaluations. Wound care clinics, home care, and long-term care. Thirty-five patients received the TAAD, and 37 received the HD. Dressing performance assessments, patient comfort, dressing wear time, and wound healing were measured. The majority of investigator assessments favored the TAAD. Considerations given included the ability to center dressings over the ulcer (P = .005), ability to assess the ulcer before (P < .001) and after (P < .001) absorption, barrier properties (P = .039), patient comfort during removal (P < .001), overall patient comfort (P = .048), conformability before (P = .026) and after (P = .001) absorption, ease of removal (P < .001), nonadherence to wound bed (P < .001), residue in the wound (P = .002), residue on periwound skin (P < .001), and odor after absorption (P = .016). Overall satisfaction favored the TAAD (P < .001), and a high value was placed on its transparent feature (P < .001). Mean (SD) wear time for the TAAD was 5.7 (2.55) days compared with 4.7 (2.29) days for the HD (P = .086). This 1-day difference in wear time was clinically noticeable by the investigators (P = .035). Wound closure for the 2 dressing groups was nearly identical (P = .9627). Performance results favored the TAAD over the HD as standard treatment for Stage II and shallow Stage III pressure ulcers.

  6. Improved polymerase chain reaction-based method to detect early-stage epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded skin biopsy specimens of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubert, Pascal; Baur Chaubert, Audrey S; Sattler, Ursula; Forster, Ursula; Bornand, Valérie; Suter, Maja; Welle, Monika

    2010-01-01

    In the dog, early-stage epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma (ETCL) can clinically and histologically mimic a large range of inflammatory dermatoses and often progresses rapidly to a more aggressive tumor stage. Early diagnosis of ETCL is essential to proceed with a specific oncologic therapy that is favorable for the prognosis. In the present study, an improved method for the detection of T-cell receptor gamma (TCRgamma) rearrangement was developed by designing a new set of consensus primers to amplify the different forms of rearranged canine TCRgamma gene sequences by polymerase chain reaction. The amplicons were analyzed by conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which requires minimal specific equipment and may be performed in almost every pathology laboratory at low costs. The method proved to be highly specific and sensitive to detect early ETCL in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens, providing an efficient tool for veterinary pathologists to distinguish early neoplastic from reactive cutaneous T-cell infiltrates (tumor-specific marker) or to discriminate T-cell lymphoma from B-cell lymphomas or nonlymphoid neoplasms (T-cell lineage marker). By direct sequencing analysis of amplified TCRgamma gene sequences, ETCL was found to rearrange exclusively the joining (J) 4 region, which suggests specific biology for primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Also, a novel (seventh) functional J region in the TCRgamma gene, localized approximately 2.3 kb upstream of J5, was identified.

  7. Radiation therapy of follicular lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, Masahiko; Nakamura, Naoki; Tsubokura, Takuji; Gomi, Koutarou; Yamashita, Takashi [Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital; Shikama, Naoto

    2001-09-01

    The follicular lymphoma, exactly, the cancer of follicular center and germinal center B lymphocytes, is reviewed on its immunological, pathological and genetic diagnoses, epidemiology, clinical symptoms, prognosis factors, therapy and assessment of therapy effects together with respective therapy of follicular small cleaved and follicular mixed small cleaved and large cell lymphoma of grade I, II; and of follicular large cell lymphoma of grade III. The therapy is essentially the radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy and others, of which effect is mainly assessed by CT. In clinical application grade II, III, irradiation of X- and electron rays and their combination is done in a fractionated manner with the maximal dose of around 35 Gy. In clinical disease grade II, III, regimen of irradiation is not fixed. In III, IV, chemotherapy and immunotherapy are major. In recurrence and malignant transformation, there is a report of large dose chemotherapy + whole body irradiation + bone marrow transplantation. (K.H.)

  8. Oncological safety of immediate rectus abdominis myocutaneous breast reconstruction in patients with locally advanced disease (stage IIb and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Mir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of locally advanced (Stage IIb and III breast cancer is challenging. It often includes multimodal treatment with systemic therapy and/or radiation therapy and surgery. Immediate breast reconstruction has not traditionally been performed in these patients. We review the results of immediate rectus abdominis musculo-cutaneous (TRAM/VRAM flap in 60 patients treated for Stage IIb and III breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Data were collected prospectively on 60 patients diagnosed with Stage IIb (32 patients and Stage III (28 patients breast cancer between May 2008 and May 2012. All patients had mastectomy and immediate rectus abdominis myocutaneous reconstruction (TRAM in 40 patients and VRAM in 20 patients. All patients received primary systemic therapy, and all patients received postoperative radiotherapy to the operative site. Results: Mean age was 40.13 (range 28-53 years, mean hospital stay was 8.86 days and mean follow-up for the group was 28 months. Neither of them developed local disease recurrence in the operative site till the last follow-up. Eight (13.3% patients had some delay in chemo-radiation therapy due to flap-related complications. Flap-related complications were present in eight patients (partial flap failure in four and superficial skin necrosis in four. There was no adverse effect of chemo-radiation therapy on reconstructed breast. Conclusion: Immediate TRAM/VRAM breast reconstruction for locally advanced breast cancer is not associated with a significant delay in adjuvant therapy or an increased risk of local relapse. Radiation therapy can be delivered to the reconstructed breast when indicated without difficulty. Breast reconstruction facilitates surgical resection of locally advanced breast cancer with primary closure and should be considered if the patient desires immediate breast reconstruction.

  9. The effect of laparoscopic surgery in stage II and III right-sided colon cancer: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kye Bong-Hyeon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study compared the clinicopathological results among three groups divided by time sequence to evaluate the impact of introducing laparoscopic surgery on long-term oncological outcomes for right-sided colon cancer. Methods From April 1986 to December 2006, 200 patients who underwent elective surgery with stage II and III right-sided colon cancer were analyzed. The period for group I referred back to the time when laparoscopic approach had not yet been introduced. The period for group II was designated as the time when first laparoscopic approach for right colectomy was carried out until we overcame its learning curve. The period for group III was the period after overcoming this learning curve. Results When groups I and II, and groups II and III were compared, overall survival (OS did not differ significantly whereas disease-free survival (DFS in groups I and III were statistically higher than in group II (P = 0.042 and P = 0.050. In group III, laparoscopic surgery had a tendency to provide better long-term OS ( P = 0.2036 and DFS ( P = 0.2356 than open surgery. Also, the incidence of local recurrence in group III (2.6% was significantly lower than that in groups II (7.4% and I (12.1% ( P = 0.013. Conclusions Institutions should standardize their techniques and then provide fellowship training for newcomers of laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. This technique once mastered will become the gold standard approach to colon surgery as it is both safe and feasible considering the oncological and technical aspects.

  10. Outcome of patients with stage II and III nonseminomatous germ cell tumors: Results of a single center

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    Ataergin S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prognostic factors in nonseminomatous germ cell tumors have been mainly derived from the analysis of stage I tumors. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate some prognostic factors and the outcome of patients with stage II and III nonseminomatous germ cell tumors according to risk groups treated between 1993 and 2002. Settings and Design: Patients were retrospectively classified as good, intermediate and poor risk groups according to International Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group. Materials and Methods: Biopsy specimens of 58 patients with stage II and III nonseminomatous germ cell tumors were analyzed by means of tumor histopathology, primary localization site of the tumor, relapse sites, initial serum tumor marker levels, the presence of persistent serum tumor marker elevation and the patients′ outcome. Statistical Analysis :0 Kruskall Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to determine the differences between the groups. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis and log rank test was used to compare the survival probabilities of groups. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to determine the prognostic factors in univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Five-year overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated as 85% and 75% in stage II; 44% and 29% in stage III cases, respectively. Fifty-seven percent of patients were classified in good risk, 9% in intermediate risk and 27% in poor risk groups. Five-year overall survival rates were 97%, 75% and 7% ( P < 0.001 and disease-free survival rates were 83%, 34% and 7% ( P < 0.001 in good, intermediate and poor risk groups, respectively. Analysis of the prognostic factors revealed that the localization site of the primary tumor ( P < 0.001, the initial stage of disease ( P < 0.001, the initial serum AFP level (p: 0.001, the initial β -HCG level (p: 0.0048, the presence of yolk sac and choriocarcinoma components in tumor (p: 0.003 and p: 0

  11. Concurrent IMRT and weekly cisplatin followed by GDP chemotherapy in newly diagnosed, stage IE to IIE, nasal, extranodal NK/T-Cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Q-H; Zhou, S-Q; Du, W; Liang, G; Lei, Y; Luo, F

    2014-12-12

    On the basis of the benefits of frontline radiation in early-stage, extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL), we conducted the trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by three cycles of gemcitabine, dexamethasone and cisplatin (GDP). Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed, stage IE to IIE, nasal ENKTL received CCRT (that is, all patients received intensity-modulated radiotherapy 56 Gy and cisplatin 30 mg/m(2) weekly, 3-5 weeks). Three cycles of GDP (gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) intravenously (i.v.) on days 1 and 8, dexamethasone 40 mg orally on days 1-4 and cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) i.v. on day 1 (GDP), every 21 days as an outpatient were scheduled after CCRT. All patients completed CCRT, which resulted in 100% response that included 24 complete responses (CRs) and eight partial responses. The CR rate after CCRT was 75.0% (that is, 24 of 32 responses). Twenty-eight of the 32 patients completed the planned three cycles of GDP, whereas four patients did not because they withdrew (n = 1) or because they had an infection (n = 3). The overall response rate and the CR rate were 90.6% (that is, 29 of 32 responses) and 84.4% (that is, 27 of 32 responses), respectively. Only two patient experienced grade 3 toxicity during CCRT (nausea), whereas 13 of the 30 patients experienced grade 4 neutropenia. The estimated 3-year overall survival and progression-free rates were 87.50% and 84.38%, respectively. In conclusion, CCRT followed by GDP chemotherapy can be a feasible and effective treatment strategy for stage IE to IIE nasal ENKTL.

  12. Dose-Response Relationship between Radiation Dose and Loco-regional Control in Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal Cancer Treated with Definitive Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Suh, Yang-Gun; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Sang Kil; Shin, Sung Kwan; Cho, Byung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol

    2017-07-01

    The correlation between radiation dose and loco-regional control (LRC) was evaluated in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Medical records of 236 stage II-III esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT at Yonsei Cancer Center between 1994 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 120 received a radiation dose of 60 Gy) is associated with increased LRC, PFS, and OS in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive CRT.

  13. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Hodgkin Lymphoma KidsHealth > For Teens > Hodgkin Lymphoma Print A ... to check for disease, including lymphoma. What Is Hodgkin Lymphoma? Hodgkin lymphoma is a type of cancer ...

  15. Cutaneous Lymphoma International Consortium Study of Outcome in Advanced Stages of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarisbrick, Julia J; Prince, H Miles; Vermeer, Maarten H

    2015-01-01

    , proliferation index, large-cell transformation, WBC/lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and identical T-cell clone in blood and skin. Data were collected at specialist centers on patients diagnosed with advanced-stage MF/SS from 2007. Each parameter recorded at diagnosis was tested against overall...... years, large-cell transformation, and increased lactate dehydrogenase) were independent prognostic markers for a worse survival. Combining these four factors in a prognostic index model identified the following three risk groups across stages with significantly different 5-year survival rates: low risk...

  16. Body mass index and body surface area and their associations with outcomes in stage II and III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Sina; Kennecke, Hagen F; Woods, Ryan; Lim, Howard J; Speers, Caroline; Brown, Carl J; Gill, Sharlene; Renouf, Daniel J; Cheung, Winson Y

    2013-06-01

    Our study aims were to measure the associations between body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA) with outcomes for stage II and III colon cancer and to evaluate if the effect of obesity is modified by disease stage and receipt of adjuvant therapy. Using a prospective cohort of stage II and III colon cancer patients who were referred between 2001 and 2005, we compared 3-year relapse-free survival (3-year RFS), 5-year cancer-specific survival (5-year CSS), and 5-year overall survival (5-year OS) rates among different BMI and BSA categories. Cox proportional-hazards models were constructed to explore the relationships between different body compositions and outcomes while adjusting for confounders. Postoperative height and weight were used to classify 913 patients as normal weight (n = 424, BMI obese (n = 170, BMI >30 kg/m(2)). Using Mosteller formula, 684 subjects had normal BSA (≤ 2.0 m(2)) and 229 had high BSA (>2.0 m(2)). Obese subjects experienced similar 3-year RFS (61.9 vs. 66.5 vs. 63.6 %, p = 0.51), 5-year CSS (65.6 vs. 72.4 vs. 68.0 %, p = 0.22), and 5-year OS (60.8 vs. 64.0 vs. 62.2 %, p = 0.69) when compared to overweight subjects and those with normal BMIs, respectively. Likewise, individuals with high BSA had similar outcomes as those with normal BSA (66.2 vs. 63.6 %, p = 0.64 for 3-year RFS, 70.3 vs. 68.6 %, p = 0.62 for 5-year CSS, and 64.5 vs. 61.9 %, p = 0.48 for 5-year OS). In Cox models, advanced age, male gender, stage III disease, and poor performance status correlated with inferior RFS, CSS, and OS, but BMI and BSA did not. Obesity as measured by either BMI or BSA was not associated with differences in outcomes in stage II and III colon cancer.

  17. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Robert eMeier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately a...

  18. Mitigation of effects of extreme drought during stage III of peach fruit development by summer pruning and fruit thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Gerardo; Mata, Mercè; Arbones, Amadeu; Solans, Josep R; Girona, Joan; Marsal, Jordi

    2006-04-01

    A water deficit during stage III of fruit growth was established with the aim of determining if it is possible to achieve an improvement in tree water status by summer pruning and fruit thinning. The experiment was set up as a randomized block split-plot design across trials (irrigation) where pruning was assigned to the main plot and fruit thinning to the sub-plots. The irrigation treatments were (1) standard full irrigation (FI), and (2) suppression of irrigation during stage III of fruit growth until leaves visibly withered (LWI); the pruning treatments were (1) experimental summer pruning (EP), and (2) standard summer pruning (CP); and three fruit thinning intensities were applied to facilitate analysis of the effects of the treatments in relation to fruit load. Changes in amount of light intercepted and in tree stem water potential (Psi stem) were evaluated. The EP treatment reduced the amount of light intercepted by the tree. In the FI treatment, there was a significant reduction in fruit growth measured as both water accumulation and dry mass accumulation. Under FI conditions, reductions in fruit load as a result of EP were not accompanied by a significant improvement in Psi stem. In the LWI treatment, EP produced a significant improvement of 0.17 MPa in Psi stem, but there was no improvement in fruit growth compared with CP trees. A reduction in fruit load from 350 (commercial load) to 150 per tree significantly improved Psi stem by 0.3 MPa at the end of stage III of fruit growth. These results indicate that improvements in water status in response to pruning may be insufficient to promote fruit growth if the pruned trees are unable to provide an adequate supply of assimilates to the developing fruits.

  19. [Postoperative Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage III Colon Cancer--Drug Selection, Tolerability, and Safety in Clinical Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kazutake; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Saito, Gota; Tanaka, Akira; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, oxaliplatin (L-OHP)-based chemotherapeutic regimens, including 5-fluorouracil, Leucovorin (LV), and L-OHP (FOLFOX); capecitabine and L-OHP (CapeOX); and 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid, and L-OHP (FLOX) are designated as category 1 recommendations for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage III colon cancer, followed by capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil plus LV as category 2A recommendations. We studied the selection of drugs for adjuvant chemotherapy and assessed the tolerability and safety of CapeOX and tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus LV (UFT/LV) in patients with Stage III colon cancer. The study group included 104 consecutive patients with Stage III colon cancer who underwent curative surgery. One patient changed hospitals immediately after surgery. Among the remaining 103 patients, 82 (80%) received adjuvant chemotherapy and 21 (20%) did not. CapeOX was administered to 32 patients (31%), UFT/LV to 49 patients (48%), and capecitabine to 1 patient (1%). In 59 patients, the treatment choice was determined according to the patient's preference; 32 patients (54%) selected CapeOX, 26 (44%) selected UFT/LV, and 1 (2%) selected no chemotherapy. The treatment completion rate was 80% for CapeOX and 84% for UFT/LV. Among patients who completed chemotherapy, dose reduction and drug withdrawal were not required in 22% of patients who received CapeOX and 80% of those who received UFT/LV. Neither CapeOX nor UFT/LV was associated with any serious adverse events. The tolerability and safety of CapeOX and UFT/LV were acceptable. However, CapeOX dose had to be carefully adjusted according to each patient's condition.

  20. Efficacy of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil Therapy for Patients with EMAST-Positive Stage II/III Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Hamaya

    Full Text Available Elevated Microsatellite Alterations at Selected Tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST is a genetic signature found in up to 60% of colorectal cancers (CRCs that is caused by somatic dysfunction of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR protein hMSH3. We have previously shown in vitro that recognition of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU within DNA and subsequent cytotoxicity was most effective when both hMutSα (hMSH2-hMSH6 heterodimer and hMutSβ (hMSH2-hMSH3 heterodimer MMR complexes were present, compared to hMutSα > hMutSβ alone. We tested if patients with EMAST CRCs (hMutSβ defective had diminished response to adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, paralleling in vitro findings. We analyzed 230 patients with stage II/III sporadic colorectal cancers for which we had 5-FU treatment and survival data. Archival DNA was analyzed for EMAST (>2 of 5 markers mutated among UT5037, D8S321, D9S242, D20S82, D20S85 tetranucleotide loci. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and multivariate analysis was used to determine contribution to risk. We identified 102 (44% EMAST cancers. Ninety-four patients (41% received adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, and median follow-up for all patients was 51 months. Patients with EMAST CRCs demonstrated improved survival with adjuvant 5FU to the same extent as patients with non-EMAST CRCs (P<0.05. We observed no difference in survival between patients with stage II/III EMAST and non-EMAST cancers (P = 0.36. There is improved survival for stage II/III CRC patients after adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy regardless of EMAST status. The loss of contribution of hMSH3 for 5-FU cytotoxicity may not adversely affect patient outcome, contrasting patients whose tumors completely lack DNA MMR function (MSI-H.

  1. Prognostic factors of melanoma patients with satellite or in-transit metastasis at the time of stage III diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Weide

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prognosis of patients with loco-regional skin metastases has not been analyzed in detail and the presence or absence of concurrent lymph node metastasis represents the only established prognostic factor thus far. Most studies were limited to patients already presenting with skin lesions at the time of initial diagnosis. We aimed to analyze the impact of a broad penal of prognostic factors in patients with skin metastases at the time of first metastatic spread, including patients with synchronous lesions already present at the time of initial diagnosis, stage I/II patients with loco-regional recurrence and patients initially presenting with skin metastasis but unknown primary melanoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We investigated disease-specific survival of 380 patients treated at our department between 1996 and 2010 using Kaplan Meier survival probabilities and Cox-proportional hazard analysis. RESULTS: Five-year survival probability was 60.1% for patients with skin metastases only and 36.3% for those with synchronous nodal metastases. The number of involved nodes and a tumor thickness of at least 3 mm had independent negative impact on prognosis. A strong relationship was identified between the risk of death and the number of involved nodes. Neither ulceration nor the timing of the first occurrence of metastases as either in stage I/II patients, at the time of excision of the primary melanoma or initially in patients with unknown primary tumor, had additional effects on survival. CONCLUSION: Lymph node involvement was confirmed as the most important prognostic factor for melanoma patients with loco-regional skin metastasis including those with unknown primary tumor and stage I/II patients with skin recurrence. Consideration of the tumor thickness and of the number of involved lymph nodes instead of the exclusive differentiation into presence vs. absence of nodal disease may allow a more accurate prediction of prognosis for patients with

  2. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jeremy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Science, University of California– San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, California (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  3. Efficacy of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil Therapy for Patients with EMAST-Positive Stage II/III Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaya, Yasushi; Guarinos, Carla; Tseng-Rogenski, Stephanie S.; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Das, Ritabrata; Jover, Rodrigo; Castells, Antoni; Llor, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Carethers, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated Microsatellite Alterations at Selected Tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) is a genetic signature found in up to 60% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) that is caused by somatic dysfunction of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein hMSH3. We have previously shown in vitro that recognition of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) within DNA and subsequent cytotoxicity was most effective when both hMutSα (hMSH2-hMSH6 heterodimer) and hMutSβ (hMSH2-hMSH3 heterodimer) MMR complexes were present, compared to hMutSα > hMutSβ alone. We tested if patients with EMAST CRCs (hMutSβ defective) had diminished response to adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, paralleling in vitro findings. We analyzed 230 patients with stage II/III sporadic colorectal cancers for which we had 5-FU treatment and survival data. Archival DNA was analyzed for EMAST (>2 of 5 markers mutated among UT5037, D8S321, D9S242, D20S82, D20S85 tetranucleotide loci). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and multivariate analysis was used to determine contribution to risk. We identified 102 (44%) EMAST cancers. Ninety-four patients (41%) received adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, and median follow-up for all patients was 51 months. Patients with EMAST CRCs demonstrated improved survival with adjuvant 5FU to the same extent as patients with non-EMAST CRCs (P<0.05). We observed no difference in survival between patients with stage II/III EMAST and non-EMAST cancers (P = 0.36). There is improved survival for stage II/III CRC patients after adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy regardless of EMAST status. The loss of contribution of hMSH3 for 5-FU cytotoxicity may not adversely affect patient outcome, contrasting patients whose tumors completely lack DNA MMR function (MSI-H). PMID:25996601

  4. Novel insights into the molecular pathogenesis of gastric MALT lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Gastric marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) represents a distinct class of extranodal lymphoma that evolves against a background of chronic inflammation induced by persistent infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. In its early stages, MALT lymphoma is an antigen-dependent disease characterised by an indolent clinical course and in most cases is treatable by antibiotic eradication therapy alone. Low grade MALT lymphomas c...

  5. Value of Surveillance Studies for Patients With Stage I to II Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in the Rituximab Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiniker, Susan M.; Pollom, Erqi L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Khodadoust, Michael S. [Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Kozak, Margaret M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Xu, Guofan; Quon, Andrew [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Advani, Ranjana H. [Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Hoppe, Richard T., E-mail: rhoppe@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Background: The role of surveillance studies in limited-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the rituximab era has not been well defined. We sought to evaluate the use of imaging (computed tomography [CT] and positron emission tomography [PET]-CT) scans and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in surveillance of patients with stage I to II DLBCL. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of patients who received definitive treatment between 2000 and 2013. Results: One hundred sixty-two consecutive patients with stage I to II DLBCL were treated with chemotherapy +/− rituximab, radiation, or combined modality therapy. The 5-year rates of overall survival (OS) and freedom from progression (FFP) were 81.2% and 80.8%, respectively. Of the 162 patients, 124 (77%) were followed up with at least 1 surveillance PET scan beyond end-of-treatment scans; of those, 94 of 124 (76%) achieved a complete metabolic response on PET scan after completion of chemotherapy, and this was associated with superior FFP (P=.01, HR=0.3) and OS (P=.01, HR 0.3). Eighteen patients experienced relapse after initial response to therapy. Nine relapses were initially suspected by surveillance imaging studies (8 PET, 1 CT), and 9 were suspected clinically (5 by patient-reported symptoms and 4 by symptoms and physical examination). No relapses were detected by surveillance LDH. The median duration from initiation of treatment to relapse was 14.3 months among patients with relapses suspected by imaging, and 59.8 months among patients with relapses suspected clinically (P=.077). There was no significant difference in OS from date of first therapy or OS after relapse between patients whose relapse was suspected by imaging versus clinically. Thirteen of 18 patients underwent successful salvage therapy after relapse. Conclusions: A complete response on PET scan immediately after initial chemotherapy is associated with superior FFP and OS in stage I to II DLBCL. The use of PET scans as

  6. Primary site and regional lymph node involvement are independent prognostic factors for early-stage extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShaoQing Niu; YuJing Zhang; Yong Yang; YiYang Li; Ge Wen; Liang Wang; ZhiMing Li; HanYu Wang; LuLu Zhang; YunFei Xia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nasal‑type extranodal natural killer/T‑cell lymphoma (ENKTCL) originates primarily in the nasal cavity or extra‑nasal sites within the upper aerodigestive tract. However, it is unclear whether the primary site can serve as an independent prognostic factor or whether the varying clinical outcomes observed with different primary sites can be attributed merely to their propensities of regional lymph node involvement. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic implications of the primary site and regional lymph node involvement in patients with early‑stage nasal‑type ENKTCL. Methods: To develop a nomogram, we reviewed the clinical data of 215 consecutively diagnosed patients with early‑stage nasal‑type ENKTCL who were treated in Sun Yat‑sen University Cancer Center with chemotherapy and radiotherapy between 2000 and 2011. The predictive accuracy and discriminative ability of the nomogram were determined using a concordance index (C‑index) and calibration curve. Results: The 5‑year overall survival (OS) and progression‑free survival (PFS) rates of patients with nasal ENKTCL were higher than those of patients with extra‑nasal ENKTCL (OS: 68.2% vs. 46.0%, P = 0.030; PFS: 53.4% vs. 26.6%, P = 0.010).The 5‑year OS and PFS rates of patients with Ann Arbor stage IE ENKTCL were higher than those of patients with Ann Arbor stage IIE ENKTCL (OS: 66.3% vs. 59.2%, P = 0.003; PFS: 51.4% vs. 40.3%, P = 0.009). Multivariate analysisshowed that age >60 years, ECOG performance status score nasal primary site, and regional lymph node involvement were significantly associated with lower 5‑year OS rate;≥2, elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, extra‑age >60 years, elevated LDH level, extra‑nasal primary site, and regional lymph node involvement were significantly associated with lower 5‑year PFS rate. The nomogram included the primary site and regional lymph node involve‑ment based on multivariate analysis. The

  7. Small noncleaved cell lymphoma in an adolescent with the XYY syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlund, J T; Raimondi, S C

    1997-04-01

    A 19-year-old male was diagnosed with stage III abdominal small noncleaved cell (SNCC) non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Cytogenetic evaluation of the tumor revealed a complex karyotype which included the t(8;14)(q24;q32), classically associated with this lymphoma histotype, and an extra Y chromosome. After remission was obtained, cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow cells and PHA-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes disclosed a normal karyotype except for the persistence of an extra Y chromosome, diagnostic of the XYY syndrome. This is the first reported case of SNCC NHL in an adolescent with the XYY syndrome.

  8. Stage IA non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the Waldeyer's ring; Limited chemotherapy and radiation therapy versus radiation therapy alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Minoru (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology Dept. of Radiology, National Defense Medical College, Saitama (Japan)); Kondo, Makoto (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology); Hiramatsu, Hideko (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology); Ikeda, Yasuo (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Hematology); Mikata, Sumio (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Katayama, Michiaki (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology); Ito, Hisao (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology); Kusano, Shoichi (Dept. of Radiology, National Defense Medical College, Saitama (Japan)); Kubo, Asuchishi (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-01-01

    Seventeen patients with stage IA non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the Waldeyer's ring were treated with radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy. All lesions were judged as having intermediate grade malignancy in the Working Formulation. Eight patients received combined treatment with three cycles of cylcophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednison (CHOP) and radiation therapy with 30 to 40 Gy. Another 9 patients were treated with radiation therapy 40 to 60 Gy alone. After a median follow-up of 69 months, all 8 patients, treated with combined modality were alive and relapse-free whereas 4 of the 9 treated with irradiation alone had relapsed. All relapses occurred transdiaphragmatically. Two of the 4 relapsing patients were saved, but the other two died of the disease. The 5-year relapse-free and cause-specific survival rates were 100% and 100% in the combined modality group, and 56% and 76% in the radiation therapy alone group (relapse-free: p=0.04, cause-specific: p=0.16). There were no serious complications related to treatment, although most patients complained of mouth dryness and most patients given CHOP had paresthesia. Our opinion was that the total impact of these two side-effects on quality of life was less pronounced after combined modality than after radiation therapy alone. Limited chemotherapy and radiation therapy seemed to be more beneficial than radiation therapy alone not only in relapse-free survival but also in quality of life after treatment. (orig.).

  9. Postmastectomy radiation in supraclavicular and internal mammary regions of patients with breast cancer of stage II/III

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Xin; GUO Xiao-mao; ZHANG Zhen; CHEN Jia-yi

    2009-01-01

    @@ Adjuvant radiotherapy plays a vital role in the treatment of breast cancer, but irradiated area was not standardized. The ipsilateral chest wall and supraclavicular regions with or without internal mammary lymph nodes were reported in patients receiving postmastectomy radiotherapy.1,2 In our study, 133 consecutive patients with breast cancer of stage II/III who had received postmastectomy radiotherapy of supraclavicular and internal mammary regions at Cancer Hospital of Fudan University were analyzed for their survival and locoregional control as well as their relative prognostic predicator.

  10. 早期鼻腔NK/T细胞淋巴瘤放疗模式的研究现状%Current study status of radiotherapy modality on early stage nasal NK/T cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩宝林

    2012-01-01

    鼻腔NK/T细胞淋巴瘤属于结外非霍奇金淋巴瘤的一种少见特殊类型,目前研究已经确立了放疗在其治疗中的地位和作用,但对于具体的放疗模式,如适宜的放疗靶区、放疗剂量以及颈部预防照射等问题仍存在着较大的争议.多数研究表明扩大野放疗和较高的放疗剂量是取得较好放疗疗效的关键;局限期病例多不主张颈部预防照射,但对于病变范围广泛者仍有较大争论.%Nasal NK/T cell lymphoma is a rare and distinct type of extranodal Non-Hodgkin' s lymphoma. Current study has proved that Radiotherapy is the most effective treatment method in the early stage nasal NK/T cell lymphoma, but there is no universal standard for concrete radiotherapy modality, such as the radiation target, the radiation dose and preventive neck radiation. Most studies have proved that radiotherapy of extended field and higher dose achieved good effect in early stage nasal NK/T cell lymphoma.And the studies also do not suggested preventive neck radiation in local stage patients, but it need further study in the extensive stage patients.

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Assessing Affect Reactivity and Regulation in Patients With Stage 0-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    Healthy Subject; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Development of symptomatic brain metastases after chemoradiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Does the type of chemotherapy regimen matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, L.E.; Brouns, A.J.; Amini, M.; Uyterlinde, W.; Wijsman, R.; Bussink, J.; Biesma, B.; Oei, S.B.; Stigt, J.A.; Bootsma, G.P.; Belderbos, J.S.; Ruysscher, D.K. De; Heuvel, M.M. Van den; Dingemans, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Symptomatic brain metastases (BM) occur frequently after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for stage III NSCLC. Aim of the current study was to determine whether the specific chemotherapy used in a CRT regimen influences BM development. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective multicenter study

  13. Lymphoma of the Cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanita Parnis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary non-Hodgkins lymphoma of the uterine cervix is a very rare diagnosis. A 54-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of postmenopausal bleeding per vaginum. On examination, a friable, fungating lesion was seen on the cervix. Histology revealed a CD 20 positive high-grade non-Hodgkin’s diffuse large B cell lymphoma from cervical biopsies and endometrial curettage. She was diagnosed as stage IE after workup and subsequently treated with six cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy of the involved field.

  14. Hodgkin Lymphoma: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansell, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare B-cell malignant neoplasm affecting approximately 9000 new patients annually. This disease represents approximately 11% of all lymphomas seen in the United States and comprises 2 discrete disease entities--classical Hodgkin lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Within the subcategorization of classical Hodgkin lymphoma are defined subgroups: nodular sclerosis, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte depletion, and lymphocyte-rich Hodgkin lymphoma. Staging of this disease is essential for the choice of optimal therapy. Prognostic models to identify patients at high or low risk for recurrence have been developed, and these models, along with positron emission tomography, are used to provide optimal therapy. The initial treatment for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma is based on the histologic characteristics of the disease, the stage at presentation, and the presence or absence of prognostic factors associated with poor outcome. Patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma commonly receive combined-modality therapies that include abbreviated courses of chemotherapy followed by involved-field radiation treatment. In contrast, patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma commonly receive a more prolonged course of combination chemotherapy, with radiation therapy used only in selected cases. For patients with relapse or refractory disease, salvage chemotherapy followed by high-dose treatment and an autologous stem cell transplant is the standard of care. For patients who are ineligible for this therapy or those in whom high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplant have failed, treatment with brentuximab vedotin is a standard approach. Additional options include palliative chemotherapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors, nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplant, or participation in a clinical trial testing novel agents.

  15. Toward comprehensive management tailored to prognostic factors of patients with clinical stages I and II in Hodgkin's disease. The EORTC Lymphoma Group controlled clinical trials: 1964-1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, M; Henry-Amar, M; Carde, P; Burgers, J M; Hayat, M; Van der Schueren, E; Noordijk, E M; Tanguy, A; Meerwaldt, J H; Thomas, J

    1989-01-01

    From 1964 to 1987, the EORTC Lymphoma Group conducted four consecutive controlled clinical trials on clinical stages I and II Hodgkin's disease in which 1,579 patients were entered. From the onset the main aim of these trials was to identify the subsets of patients who could be treated safely by regional radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, several prognostic indicators were prospectively registered and progressively used in the trial protocols for the delineation of the favorable and unfavorable subgroups as soon as they were recognized of high predictive value. In the H2 trial (1972 to 1976), the histologic subtype was the only variable taken into account for the therapeutic strategy and the staging laparotomy findings were found to be of prognostic value only in patients with favorable prognostic indicators. In the H5 trial (1977 to 1982), patients were subdivided into two subgroups according to six prognostic indicators. Patients with favorable features were submitted to a staging laparotomy (lap); lap negative patients were randomized between mantle field RT and mantle field plus paraaortic RT. Disease free survival (DFS) and total survival (S) were similar in the two arms. Among patients with unfavorable features, DFS and S were significantly higher in the arm treated by combination of mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone (MOPP) chemotherapy (CT) and RT than in the arm treated by total nodal irradiation. Nevertheless, in patients below the age of 40, the overall survival rates were equivalent in the two arms. In the H6 trial, the delineation of the favorable subgroup was based on (a) absence of systemic symptoms and elevated ESR, (b) no more than one or two lymph node areas involved. The aim of the study was to assess the impact on survival of a therapeutic strategy including staging laparotomy. At a 4-year follow-up, no difference in survival was evidenced. In patients with unfavorable prognostic indicators, 3 MOPP-RT-3 MOPP were compared with 3

  16. Recurrences and toxicity after adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy in Stage I-II endometrial cancer: A monoinstitutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrucci, Elisabetta; Lancellotta, Valentina; Bini, Vittorio; Zucchetti, Claudio; Mariucci, Cristina; Montesi, Giampaolo; Saccia, Stefano; Palumbo, Isabella; Aristei, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the incidences of vaginal recurrence and toxicity after vaginal brachytherapy in Stage I-II endometrial cancer. Between 2003 and 2012, 150 high-intermediate-risk Stage I and 7 Stage II patients, median age 64 years, underwent surgery, with or without lymphadenectomy, and 3D brachytherapy: 7 Gy, at 5 mm depth from applicator surface, for 3-week fractions. The effects of age, grading, number of excised lymph nodes and pathologic stage on loco-regional relapse (LRR), metastases, and tumor-related death were investigated. Vaginal toxicity was evaluated during followup visits. At 83 months of median followup, 144 patients were disease free, 2 in relapse, 7 deceased from disease, and 4 from other causes. One vaginal (0.6%), five nodal (3.2%), three pelvic over the vaginal cuff (1.9%), and one distant recurrences were seen (0.6%). The 5-year probability of LRR-free, distant metastasis-free and cause-specific survivals for all patients were 93.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 88.1-96.7), 97.8% (95% CI: 93.2-99.3), and 96.5% (95% CI: 93.5-99.5) and for Stage I 95.7% (95% CI: 92.2-9.1), 99.3% (95% CI: 98.0-100), and 97.7% (95% CI: 95.2-100), respectively. At multivariate analysis, Stage II disease and more than 12 lymph nodes sampled were associated with LRR (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.88; 95% CI: 1.390-10.878; p = 0.010 and HR: 6.952; 95% CI: 1.591-30.385; p = 0.010) and Stage II with metastasis and tumor-related death (HR: 23.057; 95% CI: 2.296-231.485; p = 0.008 and HR: 4.324; 95% CI: 1.223-15.290; p = 0.023). Vaginal acute and chronic toxicity was 16% and 55.4%, respectively, all only Grades 1-2. For high-to-intermediate-risk Stage I endometrial cancer, 3D vaginal brachytherapy achieved good local control and low toxicity. In Stage II, patients brachytherapy could be administered after complete surgical staging. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiological aspects of diagnosis and staging of small bowel lymphoma - a case report; Aspectos radiologicos no diagnostico e estadiamento do linfoma de intestino delgado - relato de um caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Luciano Magrini; Medeiros, Sergio Cainelli; Fraga, Rafael [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Friedrich, Mariangela Gheller; Todeschini, Luiz Alberto; Furtado, Alvaro Porto Alegre [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1999-12-01

    The authors report a case of a non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the small bowel, presenting with ulcerative lesions on radiological studies. primary intestinal lymphoma is considered a rare entity and its diagnosis criteria are quiet strict. The secondary form of the disease - involvement of the small bowel by systemic lymphoma - constitutes an infrequent clinical presentation of these neoplasms and must be considered when the criteria for primary disease are not fulfilled. Diagnosis is based on small bowel series studies and/or computed tomography findings, but the definitive diagnosis is established by biopsy. (author)

  18. The Formation of Population III Stars in Gas Accretion Stage: Effects of Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Machida, Masahiro N

    2013-01-01

    The formation of Population III stars is investigated using resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Starting from a magnetized primordial prestellar cloud, we calculate the cloud evolution several hundreds of years after first protostar formation, resolving the protostellar radius. When the natal minihalo field strength is weaker than B \\lesssim 10^-13 (n/1 cm^-3)^-2/3 G (n is the hydrogen number density), magnetic effects can be ignored. In this case, fragmentation occurs frequently and a stellar cluster forms, in which stellar mergers and mass exchange between protostars contribute to the mass growth of these protostars. During the early gas accretion phase, the most massive protostar remains near the cloud centre, whereas some of the less massive protostars are ejected. The magnetic field significantly affects Population III star formation when B_amb \\gtrsim 10^-12 (n/1 cm^-3)^-2/3 G. In this case, because the angular momentum around the protostar is effectively transferred by both magnetic braking and ...

  19. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingguang Shi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83–0.91]. The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17–26.8]; P < 0.001 than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively. Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response.

  20. Dosimetric Feasibility of Dose Escalation Using SBRT Boost for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Peter, Justin; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Patel, Salil; Osibanjo, Oluwademilade; Safran, Howard; Curran, Bruce; DiPetrillo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Standard chemoradiation therapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLCa) results in suboptimal outcomes with a high rate of local failure and poor overall survival. We hypothesize that dose escalation using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost could improve upon these results. We present here a study evaluating the dosimetric feasibility of such an approach. Methods: Anonymized CT data sets from five randomly selected patients with stage III NSCLCa undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy in our department with disease volumes appropriate for SBRT boost were selected. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) plans to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions were generated follow by SBRT plans to two dose levels, 16 Gy in two fractions and 28 Gy in two fractions. SBRT plans and total composite (3D-CRT and SBRT) were optimized and evaluated for target coverage and dose to critical structures; lung, esophagus, cord, and heart. Results: All five plans met predetermined target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints. PTV V95 was equal to or greater than 95% in all cases. The cumulative lung V20 and V5 of the combined 3D-CRT and SBRT plans were less than or equal to 30 and 55%, respectively. The 5 cc esophageal dose was less than 12 Gy for all low and high dose SBRT plans. The cumulative dose to the esophagus was also acceptable with less than 10% of the esophagus receiving doses in excess of 50 Gy. The cumulative spinal cord dose was less than 33 Gy and heart V25 was less than 5%. Conclusion: The combination of chemoradiation to 50.4 Gy followed by SBRT boost to gross disease at the primary tumor and involved regional lymph nodes is feasible with respect to normal tissue dose constraints in this dosimetric pilot study. A phase I/II trial to evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of this approach is being undertaken. PMID:23057009

  1. Age-related differences among patients with follicular lymphoma and the importance of prognostic scoring systems : analysis from a population-based non-Hodgkin's lymphoma registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maartense, E; le Cessie, S; Kluin-Nelemans, HC; Kluin, PM; Snijder, S; Wijermans, PW; Noordijk, EM

    2002-01-01

    Background: The influence of age on the outcome of follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (FL) was studied in a population-based non-Hodgkin's lymphoma registry. Patients and methods: This study comprised 214 follicular lymphoma patients. Grade I/II was considered separately from grade III FL. The data w

  2. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  3. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas......, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid...... receptor, Ets, Runx, or basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the proviral U3 region, however, shifted disease induction to almost exclusively PCPs, but had no major influence on tumor latency periods. Southern analysis of immunoglobulin rearrangements and ecotropic provirus integration patterns...

  4. FDG PET evaluation of early axillary lymph node response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, Caroline [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, IRCNA, Nuclear Medicine Department, Saint Herblain (France); Nantes University, INSERM UMR 892, Cancer Research Center CRCNA, Nantes (France); Centre Rene Gauducheau, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint Herblain Cedex (France); Devillers, Anne [Eugene Marquis Cancer Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rennes (France); Campone, Mario [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Medical Oncology Department, Saint Herblain (France); Campion, Loic [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Statistic Department, Saint Herblain (France); Ferrer, Ludovic [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Medical Physics Department, Saint Herblain (France); Sagan, Christine [University Hospital, Pathology Department, Nantes (France); Ricaud, Myriam [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Radiology Department, Saint Herblain (France); Bridji, Boumediene [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, IRCNA, Nuclear Medicine Department, Saint Herblain (France); Kraeber-Bodere, Francoise [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, IRCNA, Nuclear Medicine Department, Saint Herblain (France); Nantes University, INSERM UMR 892, Cancer Research Center CRCNA, Nantes (France)

    2011-06-15

    Regional axillary lymph node status has remained the single most independent variable to predict prognosis both in terms of disease recurrence and survival. This study aimed to prospectively assess sequential [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) findings as early predictors of axillary lymph node response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer patients. Images were acquired with a PET/CT scanner in 52 patients after administration of FDG (5 MBq/kg) at baseline and after the first, second, third and sixth course of chemotherapy before surgery. Clinical examination and ultrasound (US) were used to assess the size of axillary nodes. Decrease in the standardized uptake value (SUV) with PET corrected or not for partial volume effects was compared to the pathological response. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of axillary node staging was higher with PET (75, 87 and 80%) than with US (50, 83 and 65%), and even more so when PET images were corrected for partial volume effects (86, 83 and 84%). While FDG uptake did not vary much in non-responders, as confirmed by histopathological analysis, it markedly decreased to baseline levels in responders (p < 10{sup -5}). Fifty per cent of baseline SUV was considered the best cutoff value to distinguish responders from non-responders. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy of FDG PET after one course of chemotherapy were, respectively, 96, 75, 95 and 84%. The pathological status of regional axillary lymph nodes in stage II and III breast cancer patients could be accurately predicted after one course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on FDG PET images. (orig.)

  5. Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18(q21: 21. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment.

  6. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wang Ping, E-mail: Doctorwang66@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  7. Can we eradicate gastric MALT-lymphoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Zullo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of primary gastric lymphoma in Italy is considerably higher than that observed in the rest of Europe. It is widely accepted that gastric B-cell, low-grade mucosalassociated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma is caused by specific host-bacterial interactions that occur during Helicobacter pylori infection. This review examines recent findings on the origins, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of gastric MALT lymphomas. Clinical and endoscopic findings at diagnosis vary widely. In a substantial number of cases, the patient presents only vague dyspeptic symptoms or poorly defined abdominal pain with no macroscopic lesions on the gastric mucosa. Review of data from 32 trials in which a total of 1,387 MALT-lymphoma patients of the stomach were treated solely with H. pylori eradication revealed high remission rates when the disease is treated early (stage I-II1. Neoplasia confined to the submucosa, antral localization of tumors, and negativity for the API2-MALT1 translocation were associated with a high probability of remission following H. pylori eradication. When the latter approach is not sufficient, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and, in selected cases, surgery are associated with high success rates; data on the efficacy of monoclonal antibody therapy (rituximab are still limited. Five-year survival rates are higher than 90%. Patients whose tumors have been eliminated require close, long-term endoscopic follow-up since recurrence has been reported in some cases. Broader clinical follow-up is also advisable because the incidence of other solid tumors and of cardiovascular events is reportedly increased in these patients.

  8. Evaluation of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for stage III and IV esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, J; Kunisaki, C; Makino, H; Oshima, T; Ota, M; Oba, M; Takagawa, R; Kosaka, T; Ono, H A; Akiyama, H; Endo, I

    2016-11-01

    High Glasgow Prognostic scores (GPSs) have been associated with poor outcomes in various tumors, but the values of GPS and modified GPS (mGPS) in patients with advanced esophageal cancer receiving chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has not yet been reported. We have evaluated these with respect to predicting responsiveness to CRT and long-term survival. Between January 2002 and December 2011, tumor responses in 142 esophageal cancer patients (131 men and 11 women) with stage III (A, B and C) and IV receiving CRT were assessed. We assessed the value of the GPS as a predictor of a response to definitive CRT and also as a prognostic indicator in patients with esophageal cancer receiving CRT. We found that independent predictors of CRT responsiveness were Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, GPS and cTNM stage. Independent prognostic factors were ECOG performance status and GPS for progression-free survival and ECOG performance status, GPS and cTNM stage IV for disease-specific survival. GPS may be a novel predictor of CRT responsiveness and a prognostic indicator for progression-free and disease-specific survival in patients with advanced esophageal cancer. However, a multicenter study as same regime with large number of patients will be needed to confirm these outcomes. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. Treatment options for ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Mary Lendrum Cohen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Victoria Mary Lendrum CohenSt. Bartholomew’s and Moorfields Eye Hospital, London UKAbstract: Most lymphomas that involve the ocular adnexal structure are low grade, B cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The treatment depends upon the grade and stage of the disease. High grade lymhoma requires treatment with systemic chemotherapy whereas the localized low grade (extranodal marginal zone lymphoma can be successfully managed with local radiotherapy. Chlamydia psittaci infection is associated with low grade ocular lymphoma; however there is wide geographic variation in the strength of this association. Blanket antibiotic therapy is not advised unless there is proof of an infective agent. The monoclonal antibody, rituximab, may be successful for CD20 positive lymphoma, although it is likely that rituximab will have better long-term results when used in combination with systemic chemotherapy.Keywords: ocular adnexal lymphoma, mucosa associated lymphoid tissue, extranodal marginal zone lymphoma, Chlamydia psittaci, rituximab, radiotherapy, chemotherapy

  10. Rare case of Primary Pulmonary Extranodal Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in a Patient with Sjogrens Syndrome: Role of FDG-PET/CT in the Initial Staging and Evaluating Response to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca G. Bural

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year old woman with a long standing Sjogren’s syndrome was undergoing evaluation for renal transplant surgery when two pulmonary opacities were detected on chest CT. Subsequent biopsy revealed extranodal marginal B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. An FDG-PET/CT scan was then performed which demonstrated isolated FDG avid pulmonary involvement. After therapy, FDG-PET/CT scans showed good response to treatment with near complete resolution of FDG avidity. This rare case illustrates the rare pulmonary manifestation of extranodal lymphoma in a patient with Sjogren’s syndrome and emphasizes the value of FDG PET/CT in the initial staging and evaluation of response to treatment, which has not previously been published. (MIRT 2012;21:117-120

  11. Gastric lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sravani Padala

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent 5-20% of extra nodal lymphomas and mainly occur in the stomach and small intestine. Clinical findings are not specific, thus often determining a delay in the diagnosis. Imaging features at conventional and cross-sectional imaging must be known by the radiologist since he/she plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and disease assessment, thus assisting in the choice of the optimal treatment to patients. This review focuses on the wide variety of imaging presentation of esophageal, gastric, and small and large bowel lymphoma presenting their main imaging appearances at conventional and cross-sectional imaging, mainly focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, helping in the choice of the best imaging technique for the disease characterization and assessment and the recognition of potential complications. Gastrointestinal tract is the most common extra nodal site involved by lymphoma. Although lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract .The most frequent sites in order of its occurrence are the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. Gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is usually secondary to the widespread nodal diseases and primary gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is relatively rare. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2481-2486

  12. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Mathematical modeling of the heat treatment and combustion of a coal particle. III. Volatile escape stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhjargal, Kh.; Salomatov, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    The present paper is a continuation of previous publications of the authors in this journal in which two phases of the multistage process of combustion of a coal particle were considered in detail with the help of mathematical modeling: its radiation-convection heating and drying. In the present work, the escape dynamics of volatiles is investigated. The physico-mathematical model of the thermodestruction of an individual coal particle with a dominant influence of endothermal effects has been formulated. Approximate-analytical solutions of this model that are of paramount importance for detailed analysis of the influence of the physical and regime parameters on the escape dynamics of volatiles have been found. The results obtained form the basis for engineering calculations of the volatile escape stage and can be used successfully in the search for effective regimes of burning of various solid fuels, in particular, Shivé-Ovoos coal of Mongolia.

  15. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowble, Barbara L., E-mail: bfowble@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Einck, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Kim, Danny N. [Athena Breast Health Network, Program Management Office, San Francisco, CA (United States); McCloskey, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mayadev, Jyoti [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yashar, Catheryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Chen, Steven L. [Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Hwang, E. Shelley [Department of Surgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  16. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  17. TOP1 gene copy number and TOP1/CEN-20 ratio in stage III colorectal cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed; Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    AIM OF STUDY To investigate if TOP1 gene copy number and/or the TOP1/CEN-20 ratio in colorectal cancer (CRC) areassociated with prognosis. BACKGROUND TOP1, localized on chromosome 20, encodes topoisomerase I (TOP1), which is the sole molecular target of irinotecan. TOP1 immunoreactivity in formalin...... analyses on 50 FFPE primary CRC tissues. When compared with results from normal colorectal mucosa, 80 % of the tumors showed increased TOP1 gene copy number and 2/3 had increased TOP1/CEN-20 ratio. MATERIALS AND METHODS FFPE samples from 154 stage III CRC patients not receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were...... included. For each patient TOP1 gene copy number and CEN-20 reference number were determined in 60 nuclei from the malignant tumor by FISH using a TOP1/CEN-20 probe mix. Similarly, the TOP1 gene copy number and and CEN-20 reference number were dertermined in the normal colorectal mucosa in 105 of the 154...

  18. Hodgkin lymphoma - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymphoma - Hodgkin - children; Hodgkin disease - children; Cancer - Hodgkin lymphoma - children; Childhood Hodgkin lymphoma ... In children, Hodgkin lymphoma is more likely to occur between ages 15 to 19 years. The cause of this type of ...

  19. Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Too Tall or Too Short All About Puberty Hodgkin Lymphoma KidsHealth > For Kids > Hodgkin Lymphoma Print A ... of the cool things he's missed. What Is Hodgkin Lymphoma? Lymphoma (say: lim-FOH-mah) is cancer ...

  20. Laparoscopic versus open colectomy for TNM stage III colon cancer: results of a prospective multicenter study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, Mario; Campagnacci, Roberto; De Sanctis, Angelo; Lezoche, Giovanni; Massucco, Paolo; Summa, Massimo; Gesuita, Rosaria; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Spinoglio, Giuseppe; Lezoche, Emanuele

    2012-11-01

    There is still debate about the practicality of performing laparoscopic colectomy instead of open colectomy for patients with curable cancer, although laparoscopic surgery is now being performed even for patients with advanced colon cancer. We compared the long-term results of laparoscopic versus open colectomy for TNM stage III carcinoma of the colon in a large series of patients followed up for at least 3 years. The subjects of this prospective non-randomized multicentric study were 290 consecutive patients, who underwent open surgery (OS group; n = 164) or laparoscopic surgery (LS group; n = 126) between 1994 and 2005, at one of the four surgical centers. The same surgical techniques were used for the laparoscopic and open approaches to right and left colectomy. The distribution of TNM substages (III A, III B, IIIC) as well as the grading of carcinomas (G1, G2, G3) were similar in each arm of the study. The median follow-up periods were 76.9 and 58.0 months after OS and LS, respectively. There were 10 (6.1 %) versus 9 (7.1 %) deaths unrelated to cancer, 15 (9.1 %) versus 5 (4 %) cases of local recurrence, 7 (4.2 %) versus 5 (4 %) cases of peritoneal carcinosis, and 37 (22.5 %) versus 14 (11.1 %) cases of metastases in the OS and LS groups, respectively. There was also one case of port-site recurrence after LS (0.8 %). The OS group had a significantly higher probability of local recurrence and metastases (p cancer-related death (p = 0.001) than the LS group. These findings support that LS is safe and effective for advanced carcinoma of the colon. Although the LS group in this study had a significantly better long-term outcome than the OS group, further investigations are needed to draw a definitive conclusion.

  1. Prediction of overall survival in stage II and III colon cancer beyond TNM system: a retrospective, pooled biomarker study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienstmann, R; Mason, M J; Sinicrope, F A; Phipps, A I; Tejpar, S; Nesbakken, A; Danielsen, S A; Sveen, A; Buchanan, D D; Clendenning, M; Rosty, C; Bot, B; Alberts, S R; Milburn Jessup, J; Lothe, R A; Delorenzi, M; Newcomb, P A; Sargent, D; Guinney, J

    2017-05-01

    TNM staging alone does not accurately predict outcome in colon cancer (CC) patients who may be eligible for adjuvant chemotherapy. It is unknown to what extent the molecular markers microsatellite instability (MSI) and mutations in BRAF or KRAS improve prognostic estimation in multivariable models that include detailed clinicopathological annotation. After imputation of missing at random data, a subset of patients accrued in phase 3 trials with adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 3016)-N0147 (NCT00079274) and PETACC3 (NCT00026273)-was aggregated to construct multivariable Cox models for 5-year overall survival that were subsequently validated internally in the remaining clinical trial samples (n = 1499), and also externally in different population cohorts of chemotherapy-treated (n = 949) or -untreated (n = 1080) CC patients, and an additional series without treatment annotation (n = 782). TNM staging, MSI and BRAFV600E mutation status remained independent prognostic factors in multivariable models across clinical trials cohorts and observational studies. Concordance indices increased from 0.61-0.68 in the TNM alone model to 0.63-0.71 in models with added molecular markers, 0.65-0.73 with clinicopathological features and 0.66-0.74 with all covariates. In validation cohorts with complete annotation, the integrated time-dependent AUC rose from 0.64 for the TNM alone model to 0.67 for models that included clinicopathological features, with or without molecular markers. In patient cohorts that received adjuvant chemotherapy, the relative proportion of variance explained (R2) by TNM, clinicopathological features and molecular markers was on an average 65%, 25% and 10%, respectively. Incorporation of MSI, BRAFV600E and KRAS mutation status to overall survival models with TNM staging improves the ability to precisely prognosticate in stage II and III CC patients, but only modestly increases prediction accuracy in multivariable models that include

  2. The influence of micrometastases on prognosis and survival in stage I-II colon cancer patients: the Enroute⊕ Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruijt Hans FM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of lymph node metastases remains the most reliable prognostic predictor and the gold indicator for adjuvant treatment in colon cancer (CC. In spite of a potentially curative resection, 20 to 30% of CC patients testing negative for lymph node metastases (i.e. pN0 will subsequently develop locoregional and/or systemic metastases within 5 years. The presence of occult nodal isolated tumor cells (ITCs and/or micrometastases (MMs at the time of resection predisposes CC patients to high risk for disease recurrence. These pN0micro+ patients harbouring occult micrometastases may benefit from adjuvant treatment. The purpose of the present study is to delineate the subset of pN0 patients with micrometastases (pN0micro+ and evaluate the benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy in pN0micro+ CC patients. Methods/design EnRoute+ is an open label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial. All CC patients (age above 18 years without synchronous locoregional lymph node and/or systemic metastases (clinical stage I-II disease and operated upon with curative intent are eligible for inclusion. All resected specimens of patients are subject to an ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping procedure (SLNM following curative resection. The investigation for micrometastases in pN0 patients is done by extended serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for pan-cytokeratin in sentinel lymph nodes which are tumour negative upon standard pathological examination. Patients with ITC/MM-positive sentinel lymph nodes (pN0micro+ are randomized for adjuvant chemotherapy following the CAPOX treatment scheme or observation. The primary endpoint is 3-year disease free survival (DFS. Discussion The EnRoute+ study is designed to improve prognosis in high-risk stage I/II pN0 micro+ CC patients by reducing disease recurrence by adjuvant chemotherapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01097265

  3. TP53 Mutational Status and Prediction of Benefit from Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandioler, Daniela; Mittlböck, Martina; Kappel, Sonja; Puhalla, Harald; Herbst, Friedrich; Langner, Cord; Wolf, Brigitte; Tschmelitsch, Jörg; Schippinger, Walter; Steger, Günther; Hofbauer, Friedrich; Samonigg, Hellmut; Gnant, Michael; Teleky, Bela; Kührer, Irene

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that the varying treatment efficacy of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5FU) in stage III colon cancer is linked to the TP53 mutational status. ABCSG-90 was a prospective randomized trial in which effect of adjuvant 5FU was studied in stage III colon cancer patients. Tumor material of 70% of these patients (389/572) was available for analysis of the biomarker TP53 using a TP53-gene-specific Sanger sequencing protocol. Median follow-up was 88 months. TP53 mutation frequency was 33%. A significant interaction between TP53 status, outcomes and nodal category was found (P = 0.0095). In the N1 category, TP53 wildtype patients had significantly better overall survival than TP53 mutated (81.0% vs. 62.0% overall survival at 5 years; HR = 2.131; 95% CI: 1.344-3.378; P = 0.0010). In the N2 category, the TP53 status did not affect survival (P = 0.4992). In TP53 wildtype patients, the prognostic significance of N category was significantly enhanced (P = 0.0002). In TP53 mutated patients, survival curves of N1 and N2 patients overlapped and nodal category was no longer prognostic. The biomarker TP53 independently predicted effect of adjuvant 5FU in N1 colon cancer patients. TP53 was not predictive in N2 patients, in whom 5FU is known to have no effect.

  4. A predictive genetic signature for response to fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation in clinical Stage II and III rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eChan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available PurposePreoperative chemoradiation is currently the standard of care for patients with clinical stage II and III rectal cancer but only about 45% of patients achieve tumor downstaging and less than 20% of patients achieve a pathologic complete response. Better methods to stratify patients according to potential neoadjuvant treatment response are needed. We used microarray analysis to identify a genetic signature that correlates with a pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. We performed a gene network analysis to identify potential signaling pathways involved in determining response to neoadjuvant treatment.Patients and MethodsWe identified 31 T3-4 N0-1 rectal cancer patients who were treated with neoadjuvant fluorouracil-based chemoradiation. 8 patients were identified to have achieved a pathological complete response to treatment while 23 patients did not. mRNA expression was analyzed using cDNA microarrays. The correlation between mRNA expression and pathological complete response from pre-treatment tumor biopsies was determined. Gene network analysis was performed for the genes represented by the predictive signature.ResultsA genetic signature represented by expression levels of the 3 genes EHBP1, STAT1, and GAPDH was found to correlate with a pathological complete response to neoadjuvant treatment. The difference in expression levels between patients who achieved a pathological complete response and those who did not was greatest for EHBP1. Gene network analysis showed that the 3 genes can be connected by the gene UBC. ConclusionThis study identifies a 3-gene signature expressed in pre-treatment tumor biopsies that correlates with a pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with clinical stage II and III rectal cancer. These 3 genes can be connected by the gene UBC, suggesting that ubiquination is a molecular mechanism involved in determining response to treatment. Validating this genet

  5. Stage III Melanoma in the Axilla: Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Surgery With and Without Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkham, Mark B., E-mail: mark.pinkham@health.qld.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Foote, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Diamantina Institute, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Thomas, Janine [Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Meakin, Janelle [Clinical Trials Research Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Smithers, B. Mark [Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Burmeister, Bryan H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To describe the anatomic distribution of regionally recurrent disease in patients with stage III melanoma in the axilla after curative-intent surgery with and without adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, retrospective analysis of a prospective database of 277 patients undergoing curative-intent treatment for stage III melanoma in the axilla between 1992 and 2012 was completed. For patients who received radiation therapy and those who did not, patterns of regional recurrence were analyzed, and univariate analyses were performed to assess for potential factors associated with location of recurrence. Results: There were 121 patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy because their clinicopathologic features conferred a greater risk of regional recurrence. There were 156 patients who received no radiation therapy. The overall axillary control rate was 87%. There were 37 patients with regional recurrence; 17 patients had received adjuvant radiation therapy (14%), and 20 patients (13%) had not. The likelihood of in-field nodal recurrence was significantly less in the adjuvant radiation therapy group (P=.01) and significantly greater in sites adjacent to the axilla (P=.02). Patients with high-risk clinicopathologic features who did not receive adjuvant radiation therapy also tended to experience in-field failure rather than adjacent-field failure. Conclusions: Patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy were more likely to experience recurrence in the adjacent-field regions rather than in the in-field regions. This may not simply reflect higher-risk pathology. Using this data, it may be possible to improve outcomes by reducing the number of adjacent-field recurrences after adjuvant radiation therapy.

  6. Treatment patterns of advanced malignant melanoma (stage III-IV) - A review of current standards in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Mark; Malvehy, Josep; Lebbe, Céleste; Heron, Louise; Amelio, Justyna; Szabo, Zsolt; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    With the recent emergence of immunotherapies and novel targeted treatments for advanced and metastatic melanoma such as selective B-Raf inhibitors and checkpoint inhibitors, the treatment landscape in Europe has changed considerably. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of current treatment pathways in Europe for the treatment of advanced melanoma, unresectable stage III-IV. A literature search of four databases was conducted to identify publications reporting on the treatment patterns of advanced and metastatic melanoma (stage III-IV) in European populations. Seven full-text publications and two conference abstracts reported on observational studies of melanoma treatment practices in France, Italy and the United Kingdom. Treatment patterns were identified for two time periods: 2005-2009 and 2011-2012. Common treatments reported for both periods included chemotherapy with dacarbazine, fotemustine or temozolomide. The main differences between the two periods were the introduction and prescription of immunotherapy ipilimumab and targeted therapy vemurafenib between 2011 and 2012. Across the three countries studied, the types of treatments prescribed between 2005 and 2009 were relatively similar, however, with noticeable differences in the frequency and priority of administration. Treatment practices for advanced melanoma vary markedly across different European countries and continue to evolve with the introduction of new therapies. The results of this review highlight a considerable evidence gap with regards to recent treatment patterns for advanced melanoma in Europe, especially post-2011 after the introduction of novel therapeutic agents, and more recently with the introduction of programmed cell death 1 inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Primary lymphoma of the colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauro Leo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary lymphoma of the colon is a rare tumor of the gastrointestinal (GI tract and comprises only 0.2-1.2% of all colonic malignancies. The most common variety of colonic lymphoma is non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma (NHL. The GI tract is the most frequently involved site, accounting for 30-40% of all extra nodal lymphomas, approximately 4-20% of which are NHL. The stomach is the most common location of GI lymphomas, followed by the small intestine. Early diagnosis may prevent intestinal perforation; however, the diagnosis is often delayed in most cases. Therapeutic approaches described in two subsets include: Radical tumor resection (hemicolectomy plus multi-agent chemotherapy (polychemotherapy in early stage patients, biopsy plus multidrug chemotherapy in advanced stage patients. Radiotherapy is reserved for specific cases; surgery alone can be considered as an adequate treatment for patients with low-grade NHL disease that does not infiltrate beyond the sub mucosa. Although resection plays an important role in the local control of the disease and in preventing bleeding and/or perforation, it rarely eradicates the lymphoma by itself. Those with limited stage disease may enjoy prolonged survival when treated with aggressive chemotherapy.

  8. [Relationship between coagulation function and international prognostic index in lymphoma patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ya-Jun; Li, Xiu-Mei; Han, Xiu-Hua; Zhu, Gui-Hua; Zhuang, Wan-Chuan; Gu, Jian; Kang, Li-Li

    2010-12-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the clinical significance of coagulation function changes in lymphoma patients and to analyze the relationship between their changes and international prognostic index (IPI). The prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) and fibrinogen (FIB) were detected by magnetic bead method in 75 lymphoma patients and 20 healthy persons. The dehydrogenase (LDH) level was detected by rate method in all lymphoma patients and healthy persons. The results showed that (1) the APTT and FIB more obviously increased in lymphoma patients which displayed as hyperfibrinogenemia, as compared with control group (p 0.05, p LDH group were obviously higher than those in control group (p LDH group was higher than that in normal LDH group (p LDH group, PS 2 - 4 group and Ann Arbor stage III-IV group were much higher than those in counterparts (p LDH level, PS grades, Ann Arbor stages as well as risk grades respectively (p LDH level and PS grade. FIB is supposed to be an effective indication of prognosis in lymphoma patients.

  9. Breast lymphoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of oestrogen receptor protein as determined by ... lymphomas. While this classification has been fairly widely accepted, a ... minimum a full history and physical examination, chest radiographs ... and hepatic function. A number ...

  10. Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information in your local library and on the Internet. Start your information search with the National Cancer ... www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hodgkins-lymphoma/basics/definition/CON-20030667 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  11. Abdominal manifestations of extranodal lymphoma: pictorial essay*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Laís; Ramin, Guilherme de Araujo; Penachim, Thiago José; Martins, Daniel Lahan; Cardia, Patrícia Prando; Prando, Adilson

    2016-01-01

    In the appropriate clinical setting, certain aspects of extranodal abdominal lymphoma, as revealed by current cross-sectional imaging techniques, should be considered potentially diagnostic and can hasten the diagnosis. In addition, diagnostic imaging in the context of biopsy-proven lymphoma can accurately stage the disease for its appropriate treatment. The purpose of this article was to illustrate the various imaging aspects of extranodal lymphoma in the abdomen. PMID:28057966

  12. Abdominal manifestations of extranodal lymphoma: pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, Lais; Cardia, Patricia Prando; Prando, Adilson, E-mail: laisfajardo@gmail.com [Centro Radiologico Campinas/Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ramin, Guilherme de Araujo; Penachim, Thiago Jose; Martins, Daniel Lahan [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Campinas (PUC- Campinas), SP (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    In the appropriate clinical setting, certain aspects of extranodal abdominal lymphoma, as revealed by current cross-sectional imaging techniques, should be considered potentially diagnostic and can hasten the diagnosis. In addition, diagnostic imaging in the context of biopsy-proven lymphoma can accurately stage the disease for its appropriate treatment. The purpose of this article was to illustrate the various imaging aspects of extranodal lymphoma in the abdomen. (author)

  13. Telomere Length in Predicting Toxicity in Older Patients With Stage III-IV Colorectal Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-25

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  14. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  15. T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting the Facts T-Cell Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are Hodgkin lymphoma ... develop into lymphomas: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells). T-cell lymphomas account for ...

  16. A randomised phase III study comparing high-dose chemotherapy to conventionally dosed chemotherapy for stage III ovarian cancer: the Finnish Ovarian Cancer (FINOVA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grénman, Seija; Wiklund, Tom; Jalkanen, Jyrki; Kuoppala, Tapio; Mäenpää, Johanna; Kuronen, Arja; Leminen, Arto; Puistola, Ulla; Vuolo-Merilä, Päivi; Salmi, Tuula; Vuento, Maarit; Yliskoski, Merja; Itälä, Maija; Helenius, Hans; Joensuu, Heikki; Lehtovirta, Pentti

    2006-09-01

    Women with stage III ovarian cancer and with < or = 2 cm residual tumour were randomly assigned to receive either conventionally dosed chemotherapy (group A) or HDCT (group B). Patients allocated to group A received 6 cycles of paclitaxel (T) 135 mg/m2 and cisplatin (P) 75 mg/m2 every 3 weeks, and those allocated to HDCT received 3 TP cycles followed by peripheral blood stem cell mobilisation with cyclophosphamide (C) 3000 mg/m2 and T 175 mg/m2, and subsequently HDCT with carboplatin 1500 mg/m2, C 120 mg/kg, and mitoxantrone 75 mg/m2. The trial was closed early after 42 patients were entered due to slow accrual. The median follow-up time of patients who were alive was 81 months. The median progression-free survival time was 15.9 and 16.6 months (hazard ratio, HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.41-1.69, P = 0.61) and the median overall survival time was 43.7 and 64.3 months (HR, 0.74; 95% CI 0.34-1.61, P = 0.44) in groups A and B, respectively. Although one patient died of HDCT-related toxicity, the regimen was otherwise relatively well tolerated. We conclude that the HDCT regimen used was feasible, but did not result in significantly improved survival in this prematurely closed trial. A clinically important survival benefit cannot be excluded due to the small sample size.

  17. Different IMRT solutions vs. 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy in early stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: dosimetric comparison and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiandra Christian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy in Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (HL is currently evolving with new attempts to further reduce radiation volumes to the involved-node concept (Involved Nodes Radiation Therapy, INRT and with the use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Currently, IMRT can be planned and delivered with several techniques, and its role is not completely clear. We designed a planning study on a typical dataset drawn from clinical routine with the aim of comparing different IMRT solutions in terms of plan quality and treatment delivery efficiency. Methods A total of 10 young female patients affected with early stage mediastinal HL and treated with 30 Gy INRT after ABVD-based chemotherapy were selected from our database. Five different treatment techniques were compared: 3D-CRT, VMAT (single arc, B-VMAT (“butterfly”, multiple arcs, Helical Tomotherapy (HT and Tomodirect (TD. Beam energy was 6 MV, and all IMRT planning solutions were optimized by inverse planning with specific dose-volume constraints on OAR (breasts, lungs, thyroid gland, coronary ostia, heart. Dose-Volume Histograms (DVHs and Conformity Number (CN were calculated and then compared, both for target and OAR by a statistical analysis (Wilcoxon’s Test. Results PTV coverage was reached for all plans (V95% ≥ 95%; highest mean CN were obtained with HT (0.77 and VMAT (0.76. B-VMAT showed intermediate CN mean values (0.67, while the lowest CN were obtained with TD (0.30 and 3D-CRT techniques (0.30. A trend of inverse correlation between higher CN and larger healthy tissues volumes receiving low radiation doses was shown for lungs and breasts. For thyroid gland and heart/coronary ostia, HT, VMAT and B-VMAT techniques allowed a better sparing in terms of both Dmean and volumes receiving intermediate-high doses compared to 3D-CRT and TD. Conclusions IMRT techniques showed superior target coverage and OAR sparing, with, as an expected consequence, larger volumes of healthy

  18. Consolidative Involved-Node Proton Therapy for Stage IA-IIIB Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Preliminary Dosimetric Outcomes From a Phase II Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Latif, Naeem [University of Florida Hematology/Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James [University of Florida Hematology/Oncology, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose reduction to organs at risk (OARs) with proton therapy (PT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) enrolled on a Phase II study of involved-node radiotherapy (INRT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2009 and October 2010, 10 patients were enrolled on a University of Florida institutional review board-approved protocol for de novo 'classical' Stage IA-IIIB HL with mediastinal (bulky or nonbulky) involvement after chemotherapy. INRT was planned per European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. Three separate optimized plans were developed for each patient: 3D-CRT, IMRT, and PT. The primary end point was a 50% reduction in the body V4 with PT compared with 3D-CRT or IMRT. Results: The median relative reduction with PT in the primary end point, body V4, was 51% compared with 3D-CRT (p = 0.0098) and 59% compared with IMRT (p = 0.0020), thus all patients were offered treatment with PT. PT provided the lowest mean dose to the heart, lungs, and breasts for all 10 patients compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. The median difference in the OAR mean dose reduction with PT compared with 3D-CRT were 10.4 Gy/CGE for heart; 5.5 Gy/CGE for lung; 0.9 Gy/CGE for breast; 8.3 Gy/CGE for esophagus; and 4.1 Gy/CGE for thyroid. The median differences for mean OAR dose reduction for PT compared with IMRT were 4.3 Gy/CGE for heart, 3.1 Gy/CGE for lung, 1.4 Gy/CGE for breast, 2.8 Gy/CGE for esophagus, and 2.7 Gy/CGE for thyroid. Conclusions: All 10 patients benefitted from dose reductions to OARs with PT compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. It is anticipated that these reductions in dose to OAR will translate into lower rates of late complications, but long-term follow-up on this Phase II INRT study is needed.

  19. Effect of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor on Chemotherapy-Related Neutropenia in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas-A Phase I/II Study of Dose and Mode of Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovgaard, D J; Nissen, N I

    1991-01-01

    The effect of mammalian glycosylated recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was investigated in 24 patients with newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a phase I/II study. All patients received standard chemotherapy with CHOP. RhGM-CSF was administered after the first cycle for 5 days, and at one of four dose levels (2, 4, 8 and 16 μg/kg). Patients were randomized to receive the drug either by continuous intravenous infusion or twice daily as subcutaneous injection. No significant difference in results was observed between subcutaneous administration of rhGM-CSF and continuous i.v. infusion and these patient groups could therefore be combined in the analysis. Administration of rhGM-CSF resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase of total WBC, mainly neutrophils, eosinophils and monocytes. The increase was observed in 18/24 patients, reaching a peak 24-72 (median 24) hours after the start of rhGM-CSF. The CHOP chemotherapy-induced leucocyte nadir occurred on day 12 (mean) compared to day 14 for the 127 historical controls. The WBC nadir values were higher (2.4 ± 1.4) than for historical controls (1.8 ± 1.1) and the leucopenic/neutropenic period was of shorter duration. Following the chemotherapy nadir a more rapid recovery of WBC was seen than in controls. GM-CSF was well tolerated, the side effects were mild and transient, and included myalgias, low grade fever, headache, chest/bone discomfort, nausea, erythema at injection site and superficial phlebitis. The encouraging results of this phase I/II study indicate the need for a prospective controlled study of GM-CSF in chemotherapy of malignant lymphoma.

  20. Managing Risk in Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, James O; Chen, Robert W; Moskowitz, Craig H; Sweetenham, John

    2015-02-01

    Approximately 90% of patients with limited-stage Hodgkin lymphoma are cured. The cure rate in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma is dramatically better than it once was, but it is still lower than the rate in patients with limited disease. The choice of treatment is based on several factors, including symptoms, disease stage, extent of tumor burden, and prognosis. Positron emission tomography scanning can be used to assess the patient's stage of disease, which can allow further individualization of therapy. Traditional frontline treatment options include doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) and, for high-risk patients, bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (BEACOPP). Autologous stem cell transplantation cures approximately 50% of patients. The antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin is very active in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. Data presented at the 2014 meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) showed that brentuximab vedotin was beneficial in several settings, including as consolidation therapy posttransplant in patients at high risk for relapse, as first-line salvage therapy in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma prior to autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation, and in combination with bendamustine in relapsed/refractory disease. The ASH meeting also offered promising data on novel agents, such as the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) inhibitors. In this monograph, 4 experts in the management of Hodgkin lymphoma discuss various aspects of the disease and provide their perspectives on the new data presented at the ASH meeting.

  1. Quality of life after successful treatment of early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: 10-year follow-up of the EORTC-GELA H8 randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Heutte; H.H. Flechtner; N. Mounier; W.A.M. Mellink; J.H. Meerwaldt; H. Eghbali; M.B. van 't Veer; E.M. Noordijk; J.C. Kluin-Nelemans; E. Lampka; J. Thomas; P.J. Lugtenburg; L. Viterbo; P. Carde; A. Hagenbeek; R.W.M. van der Maazen; W.G.J.M. Smit; P. Brice; M. van Marwijk Kooy; J.W. Baars; P. Poortmans; U. Tirelli; O.C. Leeksma; R. Tomšič; P. Feugier; G. Salles; J. Gabarre; M.J. Kersten; E. van den Neste; G.J.M. Creemers; I. Gaillard; P. Meijnders; G. Tertian; O. Reman; H.P. Muller; J. Troncy; M. Blanc; W. Schroyens; P.J. Voogt; P. Wijermans; C. Rieux; C. Fermé; M. Henry-Amar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the longitudinal course of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma during their post-treatment follow-up and re-adaptation to normal life. We report on the HRQoL of patients treated in the randomised H8 trial of the European Organi

  2. Quality of life after successful treatment of early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: 10-year follow-up of the EORTC-GELA H8 randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heutte, N.; Flechtner, H.H.; Mounier, N.; Mellink, W.A.M.; Meerwaldt, J.H.; Eghbali, H.; Veer, M.B. van 't; Noordijk, E.M.; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.; Lampka, E.; Thomas, J.; Lugtenburg, P.J.; Viterbo, L.; Carde, P.; Hagenbeek, A.; Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Smit, W.G.; Brice, P.; Marwijk-Kooy, M. van; Baars, J.W.; Poortmans, P.; Tirelli, U.; Leeksma, O.C.; Tomsic, R.; Feugier, P.; Salles, G.; Gabarre, J.; Kersten, M.J.; Neste, E. van den; Creemers, G.J.; Gaillard, I.; Meijnders, P.; Tertian, G.; Reman, O.; Muller, H.P.; Troncy, J.; Blanc, M.; Schroyens, W.; Voogt, P.J.; Wijermans, P.; Rieux, C.; Ferme, C.; Henry-Amar, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the longitudinal course of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma during their post-treatment follow-up and re-adaptation to normal life. We report on the HRQoL of patients treated in the randomised H8 trial of the European Organi

  3. Intracranial manifestations of malignant lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanski, M.; Fahrendorf, G.; Urbanitz, D.; Beckmann, A.; Elger, C.

    1985-06-01

    Approximately 10% of patients with malignant lymphoma will show neurological symptoms at some time during the course of their illness. In non-Hodgkin lymphoma, CNS involvement is more frequent than in Hodgkin's disease. Diffuse histiocytic and poorly differentiated lymphomas, bone marrow involvement, advanced tumor stage and hematogenous spread are particular risk factors. Invasion of the spinal canal is the most common type of CNS involvement. Intracranial lesions, which are comparatively rare, may present as intracerebral metastases, epi- or subdural masses or focal or diffuse leptomeningeal disease. Lymphomatous leptomeningitis usually cannot be demonstrated by CT. On the other hand, dural and cerebral parenchymal lesions are sometimes highly characteristic of lymphoma as a result of their features and location.

  4. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  5. [Comparative estimation of results of remote and combined radiotherapy in patients with cancer of the cervix uteri of the III-IV stages of disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereslegin, I A; Makarov, O V; Semko, V F; Frolova, E L

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a procedure of teleradiotherapy in patients with stages III-IV cancer of the cervix uteri with significant concurrent pathology. Control patients with the similar disease stages underwent combined radiation therapy. If there are contraindications to combined radiation therapy, teleradiotherapy is possible and required as an independent treatment that prolongs and improves the patients' like quality irrespective of the extent of a tumorous process.

  6. Evaluation of the effectiveness of diabetic nephropathy stage III in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus therapy with sulodexide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kadzharyan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetes mellitus (DM - takes the main place in the structure of endocrine diseases, and the third after cardiovascular and cancer pathology. In Ukraine 1.2 million of people suffer from diabetes and type 2 diabetes occurs in 85-90% of them. In 2004, 3.4 million of people died from diabetes complications. Diabetic nephropathy (DN is a serious chronic complication of diabetes that leads to the formation of nodular or diffuse glomerulosclerosis. It is the most frequent cause of terminal chronic renal failure (CRF in the world, accounting for over 25% of all cases of CRF. The generally accepted classification is Moggensen`s classification (1983, WHO, according to which five stages of diabetic nephropathy are identified, the first two stages of them are preclinical. Leading role in the pathogenesis of DN takes hyperglycemia, which is implemented by the phenomenon of glucosetoxicity. A lot of facts underscore the importance of inflammatory mechanisms triggered by cytokines. There's immune and non-immune theory of DN. The basis of non-immune theory is a violation of the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs that are a major component of the glomerular basement membrane (GMB. GAGs create its negative charge, which prevents the passage through the renal filter small negatively charged molecules, including albumin. In hemodynamic regulation leading role belongs to the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS. The blockade of the RAAS system with ACE inhibitors is the basis of a treatment strategy of DN. All mentioned above became a reason for study of the possibility of a new direction in the treatment of DN using the drug sulodexid, which is a natural mixture of GAGs. Objective of the research. Evaluating the effectiveness of sulodexide therapy of DN stage III in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and methods. The patients were divided into 2 groups. Group I consisted of 24 patients aged 40 to 68 years. 5 of them were women and 19

  7. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Stage II/III rectal cancer with intermediate response to preoperative radiochemotherapy: Do we have indications for individual risk stratification?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Heinz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is very heterogeneous. Pathologic complete response (pCR is accompanied by a favorable outcome. However, most patients show incomplete response. The aim of this investigation was to find indications for risk stratification in the group of intermediate responders to RCT. Methods From a prospective database of 496 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, 107 patients with stage II/III cancers and intermediate response to preoperative 5-FU based RCT (ypT2/3 and TRG 2/3, treated within the German Rectal Cancer Trials were studied. Surgical treatment comprised curative (R0 total mesorectal excision (TME in all cases. In 95 patients available for statistical analyses, residual transmural infiltration of the mesorectal compartment, nodal involvement and histolologic tumor grading were investigated for their prognostic impact on disease-free (DFS and overall survival (OS. Results Residual tumor transgression into the mesorectal compartment (ypT3 did not influence DFS and OS rates (p = 0.619, p = 0.602, respectively. Nodal involvement after preoperative RCT (ypN1/2 turned out to be a valid prognostic factor with decreased DFS and OS (p = 0.0463, p = 0.0236, respectively. Persistent tumor infiltration of the mesorectum (ypT3 and histologic tumor grading of residual tumor cell clusters were strongly correlated with lymph node metastases after neoadjuvant treatment (p Conclusions Advanced transmural tumor invasion after RCT does not affect prognosis when curative (R0 resection is achievable. Residual nodal status is the most important predictor of individual outcome in intermediate responders to preoperative RCT. Furthermore, ypT stage and tumor grading turn out to be additional auxiliary factors. Future clinical trials for risk-adapted adjuvant therapy should be based on a synopsis of clinicopathologic parameters.

  9. [Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longchong Ramos, M; Castillo Otero, E; Hernández Amador, G; Marinello Vidaurreta, Z

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective study of 85 children with non-Hodgkin' s lymphoma diagnosed and treated in the period of 1963-1974 was undertaken to asses clinical characteristics, pronostic factors and survival. This malignancy was more frequent in males between ages 3 and 4. The histopathologic diagnosis revealed a lymphosarcoma lymphoblastic predominance (77.6%). The clinical extent at diagnosis was 14% for stage I disease, 48% for stage II, 10.6% for stage III and 38.4% for stage IV. The sites of origen were gastrointestinal tract, peripheral lymph nodes, mediastinum, Waldeyer's ring and extralymphatic sites. Leukemic picture developed in 20 children (23.5%) and central nervous system involvement occurred in 19 (23.3%). Survival was not dependant on age or sex. The prognostic value of the histologic type could not be clearly established in the present series. Survival was correlated with clinical stage and anatopmic presentation. The overall 5-year survival was 29%; survival prior to 1968 was 9% compared with 41% for children treated from 1968 to 1974. We conclude that the survival improvement in recent years is dependant on an aggressive multimodal therapeutic approach. Survival of children treated with this procedure reached 52%, compared to 25% for children who received a single agent therapy.

  10. Lymphoma cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Bhavana J; Nelson, Marilu; Sanger, Warren G

    2011-12-01

    Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with distinct morphologic, immunologic, and cytogenetic characteristics. Overlapping morphologic and immunophenotypic features often makes accurate diagnosis difficult. Cytogenetics helps simplify the diagnostic complexities presented in transforming and progressive lymphoid malignancies. Genetic studies using technical advances such as fluorescence in situ hybridization and the newer approaches of array comparative genomic hybridization and gene expression profiling play a critical and often defining role in the diagnosis, progression, prognosis, and therapeutic stratification. This article reviews characteristic cytogenetic abnormalities in specific subtypes of lymphomas at diagnosis, disease progression, and prognosis.

  11. A lymph node ratio of 10% is predictive of survival in stage III colon cancer: a French regional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Charles; Mauvais, François; Cosse, Cyril; Rebibo, Lionel; Joly, Jean-Paul; Dromer, Didier; Aubert, Christine; Carton, Sophie; Dron, Bernard; Dadamessi, Innocenti; Maes, Bernard; Perrier, Guillaume; Manaouil, David; Fontaine, Jean-François; Gozy, Michel; Panis, Xavier; Foncelle, Pierre Henri; de Fresnoy, Hugues; Leroux, Fabien; Vaneslander, Pierre; Ghighi, Caroline; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node ratio (LNR) (positive lymph nodes/sampled lymph nodes) is predictive of survival in colon cancer. The aim of the present study was to validate the LNR as a prognostic factor and to determine the optimum LNR cutoff for distinguishing between "good prognosis" and "poor prognosis" colon cancer patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, patients with TNM stage III colon cancer operated on with at least of 3 years of follow-up and not lost to follow-up were included in this retrospective study. The two primary endpoints were 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) as a function of the LNR groups and the cutoff. One hundred seventy-eight patients were included. There was no correlation between the LNR group and 3-year OS (P=0.06) and a significant correlation between the LNR group and 3-year DFS (P=0.03). The optimal LNR cutoff of 10% was significantly correlated with 3-year OS (P=0.02) and DFS (P=0.02). The LNR was not an accurate prognostic factor when fewer than 12 lymph nodes were sampled. Clarification and simplification of the LNR classification are prerequisites for use of this system in randomized control trials. An LNR of 10% appears to be the optimal cutoff.

  12. A qualitative focus group study to identify the needs of survivors of stage II and III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Maria Y; McBride, Mary L; Gotay, Carolyn; Grunfeld, Eva; Earle, Craig C; Relova, Sharon; Tsonis, Miranda; Ruan, Jenny Y; Chang, Jennifer T; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-12-01

    Prior survivorship research has largely focused on issues faced by survivors of childhood tumors, breast cancers, or hematologic malignancies. Relatively little is known about the needs of other prevalent survivor groups. Our aim was to identify the specific concerns of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors in the key domains of physical functioning, psychological wellbeing, and social relationships. We conducted focus groups with stage II and III CRC survivors who had completed their primary active anti-cancer treatments. Patients were asked to describe how their diagnosis and treatment impacted their lives, to outline deficiencies in the care that they received, and to suggest ways of addressing any unmet needs. A content analysis was subsequently conducted to identify major themes. Thirty CRC survivors participated in six focus groups. Individuals reported some degree of dissatisfaction with the amount and type of diagnostic and treatment information they received at their initial clinic visit. Distress from toxicities, such as peripheral neuropathy, was also common among the survivors. Similarly, the majority faced challenges adjusting to their lives and daily activities, especially in caring for their colostomy. Having survived CRC, many survivors expressed an interest in advocacy and health promotion of CRC. CRC survivors face many barriers after their cancer treatment. Issues with colostomy are unique to this survivor group. Interventions to improve CRC survivorship care should also incorporate opportunities for patient advocacy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Adjuvant Autologous Melanoma Vaccine for Macroscopic Stage III Disease: Survival, Biomarkers, and Improved Response to CTLA-4 Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lotem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is not yet an agreed adjuvant treatment for melanoma patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages III B and C. We report administration of an autologous melanoma vaccine to prevent disease recurrence. Patients and Methods. 126 patients received eight doses of irradiated autologous melanoma cells conjugated to dinitrophenyl and mixed with BCG. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH response to unmodified melanoma cells was determined on the vaccine days 5 and 8. Gene expression analysis was performed on 35 tumors from patients with good or poor survival. Results. Median overall survival was 88 months with a 5-year survival of 54%. Patients attaining a strong DTH response had a significantly better (p=0.0001 5-year overall survival of 75% compared with 44% in patients without a strong response. Gene expression array linked a 50-gene signature to prognosis, including a cluster of four cancer testis antigens: CTAG2 (NY-ESO-2, MAGEA1, SSX1, and SSX4. Thirty-five patients, who received an autologous vaccine, followed by ipilimumab for progressive disease, had a significantly improved 3-year survival of 46% compared with 19% in nonvaccinated patients treated with ipilimumab alone (p=0.007. Conclusion. Improved survival in patients attaining a strong DTH and increased response rate with subsequent ipilimumab suggests that the autologous vaccine confers protective immunity.

  14. Absence of TGF-βRII predicts bone and lung metastasis and is associated with poor prognosis in stage III breast tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Serrano, Sérgio Vicente; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    of TGF-βRII in BC samples. TGF-βRII protein expression was evaluated using immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing 110 TNM stage III BC samples obtained prior to doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Our results demonstrate that TGF-βRII did not predict the response to NAC...

  15. DPYD Genotyping to Predict Adverse Events Following Treatment With Flourouracil-Based Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boige, Valérie; Vincent, Marc; Alexandre, Philippe;

    2016-01-01

    , Setting, and Participants: Pharmacogenetic substudy of 1545 patients who participated from December 2005 to November 2009 in the European Pan-European Trials in Alimentary Tract Cancer (PETACC)-8 randomized phase 3 clinical trial. Interventions: Patients with resected stage III CC were randomized...

  16. Validating NEXRAD MPE and Stage III precipitation products for uniform rainfall on the Upper Guadalupe River Basin of the Texas Hill Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwei; Xie, Hongjie; Sharif, Hatim; Zeitler, Jon

    2008-01-01

    SummaryThis study examines the performance of the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) and Stage III precipitation products, using a high-density rain gauge network located on the Upper Guadalupe River Basin of the Texas Hill Country. As point-area representativeness error of gauge rainfall is a major concern in assessment of radar rainfall estimation, this study develops a new method to automatically select uniform rainfall events based on coefficient of variation criterion of 3 by 3 radar cells. Only gauge observations of those uniform rainfall events are used as ground truth to evaluate radar rainfall estimation. This study proposes a new parameter probability of rain detection (POD) instead of the conditional probability of rain detection (CPOD) commonly used in previous studies to assess the capability that a radar or gauge detects rainfall. Results suggest that: (1) gauge observations of uniform rainfall better represent ground truth of a 4 × 4 km 2 radar cell than non-uniform rainfall; (2) the MPE has higher capability of rain detection than either gauge-only or Stage III; (3) the MPE has much higher linear correlation and lower mean relative difference with gauge measurements than the Stage III does; (4) the Stage III tends to overestimate precipitation (20%), but the MPE tends to underestimate (7%).

  17. The value of pre operative S-100B and SUV in clinically stage III melanoma patients undergoing therapeutic lymph node dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, S.; Bastiaannet, E.; Speijers, M. J.; Kobold, A. C. M.; Brouwers, A. H.; Hoekstra, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: High preoperative serum S-100B values and Standardized Uptake Values (SUV) of Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in PET for clinically stage III melanoma patients could be indicators of recurrence after surgical treatment. Aim was to assess the correlation and the prognostic value of these marke

  18. Accelerated split-course (Type B) thoracic radiation therapy plus vinorelbine/carboplatin combination chemotherapy in Stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaffaioli, R.V.; Tortoriello, A.; Facchini, G.; Maccauro, M.; Dimitri, P. [Cagliari Univ. (Italy). Ist. Medicina Interna; Caponigro, F. [Istituto Medico Legale, Milan (Italy); Ravo, V.; Muto, P. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Ist. Scienze Radiologiche; Crovella, F. [Ospedale Oliveto, Citra (Italy). Div. Chirurgia Generale

    1996-10-01

    43 patients with stage III NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) entered a phase II study aimed at evaluating the toxicity and the activity of a combined modality programme including an accelerated split-course schedule (type B) of thoracic radiation therapy and a combination chemotherapy with vinorelbine and carboplatin. An objective response was achieved in 18/42 evaluable patients (5 complete and 13 partial responses), for an overall response rate of 43% (95% confidence interval, 28-58%). Four complete responses had a duration which exceeded 16 months. Treatment was well tolerated; grade III myelotoxicity occurred in only 14% of patients and treatment was delayed in only 2 cases because of grade 3 oesophagitis. Both tolerability and efficacy data suggest that this regimen holds promise for the treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC. (author).

  19. Analysis of treatment outcomes for primary tonsillar lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seok Goo; Jung, Seung Eun; Kim, Sung Hoon; O, Joo Hyun; Park, Gyeong Sin; Yang, Suk Woo; Lee, In Seok; Rhee, Chin; Kook; Choi, Byung Ock [Catholic University Lymphoma Group (CULG), Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Although each Waldeyer’s ring sub-site is considered an independent prognostic factor, few studies have assessed the prognosis and treatment of tonsillar lymphoma. Treatment outcomes were analyzed in patients with primary tonsillar lymphoma who were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT). Nineteen patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were evaluated, with a median follow-up of 53 months. Age, sex, and histology, amongst other factors, were reviewed. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were analyzed. Most patients had Ann Arbor stage I-II (94.7%), IPI score of 0 (89.5%), and complete remission after chemotherapy (89.5%). The 5-year PFS and OS rates were 74.6% and 80%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) regimen resulted in a better PFS than the cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) regimen (88.9% vs. 50.0%; p = 0.053). RT dose was related to the survival outcome (p = 0.010 for PFS, p = 0.044 for OS). Patients were classified into the CHOP + RT (>40 Gy) group and R-CHOP + RT (≤40 Gy) group. The 5-year PFS rates were 50% in the CHOP + RT group, and 100 % in the R-CHOP + RT group (p = 0.018). The 5-year OS rates were 66.7% and 100%, respectively (p = 0.087). Primary tonsillar lymphoma patients typically have favorable outcomes. Chemotherapy (R-CHOP) combined with relatively lower dose consolidative RT may be safe and effective for primary tonsillar lymphoma.

  20. FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Bansal, Abhishek; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, Rajendra Prashad

    2013-01-01

    Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin's disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique. PMID:24604942

  1. Diagnostic and prognostic impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in follicular lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Dortz, Ludovic; Garin, Etienne [Eugene Marquis Anticancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rennes (France); Inserm U991, Rennes (France); Guibert, Sophie de; Houot, Roch [CHU Pontchaillou, Haematological Department, Rennes (France); Bayat, Sahar; Cuggia, Marc [CHU Pontchaillou, Medical Information Department, Rennes (France); Devillers, Anne; Le Jeune, Florence; Bahri, Haifa; Barge, Marie-Luce [Eugene Marquis Anticancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rennes (France); Rolland, Yan [Eugene Marquis Anticancer Centre, Medical Imaging Department, Rennes (France); Lamy, Thierry [CHU Pontchaillou, Haematological Department, Rennes (France); Inserm U917, Rennes (France)

    2010-12-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in staging, prognosis evaluation and restaging of patients with follicular lymphoma. A retrospective study was performed on 45 patients with untreated biopsy-proven follicular lymphoma who underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) and CT before and after chemoimmunotherapy induction treatment (rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone). PET/CT detected more nodal (+51%) and extranodal (+89%) lesions than CT. PET/CT modified Ann Arbor staging in eight patients (18%). Five patients (11%) initially considered as being early stage (I/II) were eventually treated as advanced stage (III/IV). In this study, an initial PET/CT prognostic score was significantly more accurate than the Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index score in identifying patients with poor prognosis (i.e. patients with incomplete therapeutic response or early relapse). The accuracy of PET/CT for therapeutic response assessment was higher than that of CT (0.97 vs 0.64), especially due to its ability to identify inactive residual masses. In addition, post-treatment PET/CT was able to predict patients' outcomes. The median progression-free survival was 48 months in the PET/CT-negative group as compared with 17.2 months for the group with residual uptake (p < 10{sup -4}). FDG PET/CT is useful for staging and assessing the prognosis and therapeutic response of patients with follicular lymphoma. (orig.)

  2. Dexamethasone compared to prednisolone for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma: final results of the ALL-4 randomized, phase III trial of the EORTC Leukemia Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labar, Boris; Suciu, Stefan; Willemze, Roel; Muus, Petra; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Fillet, Georges; Berneman, Zwi; Jaksic, Branimir; Feremans, Walter; Bron, Dominique; Sinnige, Harm; Mistrik, Martin; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; De Bock, Robrecht; Nemet, Damir; Gilotay, Caroline; Amadori, Sergio; de Witte, Theo

    2010-01-01

    Background Corticosteroids are a standard component of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoblastic lymphoma. Our aim was to determine whether dexamethasone results in a better outcome than prednisolone. Design and Methods Adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma were randomized to receive, as part of their induction therapy on days 1–8 and 15–22, either dexamethasone 8 mg/m2 or prednisolone 60 mg/m2. Those who reached complete remission were given two courses of consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone and methotrexate and asparaginase. Subsequently patients younger than 50 years, with a suitable donor, were to undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation, whereas the others were planned to receive either an autologous stem cell transplant or high-dose maintenance chemotherapy with prophylactic central nervous system irradiation. Randomization was done with a minimization technique. The primary endpoint was event-free survival and the analyses was conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Results Between August 1995 and October 2003, 325 patients between 15 to 72 years of age were randomized to receive either dexamethasone (163 patients) or prednisolone (162 patients). After induction and the course of first consolidation therapy, 131 (80.4%) patients in the dexamethasone group and 124 (76.5%) in the prednisolone group achieved complete remission. No significant difference was observed between the two treatment groups with regards to 6-year event-free survival rates (±SE) which were 25.9% (3.6%) and 28.7% (3.5%) in the dexamethasone and prednisolone groups, respectively (P=0.82, hazard ratio 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.75–1.25). Disease-free survival after complete remission was also similar in the dexamethasone and prednisolone groups, the 6-year rates being 32.3% and 37.5%, respectively (hazard ratio 1.03; 95% confidence interval 0.76–1.40). The 6-year cumulative

  3. Oncotype DX(®) colon cancer assay for prediction of recurrence risk in patients with stage II and III colon cancer: A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y Nancy; Rustin, Rudolph B; Sullivan, James D

    2015-06-01

    Advances in molecular biology have enabled identification of tumor biomarkers that allow for individualized risk assessment for patients with cancer. Molecular predictors of clinical outcome can help inform discussion regarding the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with resected colon cancer, such as those with stage II colon cancer in which the benefit of adjuvant therapy is controversial or those with stage III colon cancer who may have a lower risk of recurrence and less absolute benefit from oxaliplatin therapy. This article summarizes the data surrounding the development, validation, and clinical and economic utility of the Oncotype DX(®) colon cancer assay, a multigene expression assay validated to independently predict recurrence risk in patients with stage II and III colon cancer beyond traditional factors.

  4. Burkitt lymphoma presenting as a mass in the thyroid gland: a clinicopathologic study of 7 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Andrés E; Liu, Huifei; Miranda, Roberto N; Golardi, Natalia; Billah, Shahreen; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Jaso, Jesse Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Burkitt lymphoma presenting in the thyroid gland is rare, and only a few cases have been reported. We retrospectively reviewed 7 patients diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma of the thyroid gland between 2000 and 2015. There were 4 men and 3 women with a median age of 41 years (range, 19-49 years). All patients presented with a rapidly growing neck mass associated with upper airway compression in 5 (71%) patients. Two patients presented with localized (stage I/II) and 5 patients with disseminated (stage III/IV) disease. All cases showed morphologic and immunophenotypic features of Burkitt lymphoma with MYC rearrangement in all 5 cases tested. One case showed evidence of concurrent Hashimoto thyroiditis. Six of 7 patients were treated primarily with rituximab, hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone. One patient was treated primarily with dose-adjusted rituximab, etoposide, prednisolone, vincristine, and cyclophosphamide. At the end of the study period, 5 patients were alive: 4 in complete remission and 1 with persistent disease. Two patients died with persistent disease (median follow-up, 25 months; range, 12-361 months). We conclude that Burkitt lymphoma of the thyroid gland shows clinicopathologic features similar to sporadic Burkitt lymphoma at other anatomic sites, but patients present at an older median age. The clinical course is aggressive with a high frequency of disseminated disease at diagnosis; however, a subset of patients responds well to aggressive chemotherapy.

  5. Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma of the Nasal Type with Skin Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al Akhrass

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENKL of the nasal type is a rare, clinically aggressive disease. ENKL of the nasal type is often localized in the upper aerodigestive tract, including the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, tonsils, hypopharynx and larynx, and usually presents as stage I/II. Extranasal involvement can occur, and a common site of extranasal involvement or metastatic disease includes the skin. Identifying skin metastases is important for the appropriate staging and treatment. We report a case of ENKL of the nasal type that presented with localized disease and subsequent skin lesions that were consistent with skin metastases.

  6. Preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging can identify good prognosis stage I, II, and III rectal cancer best managed by surgery alone: a prospective, multicenter, European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian; Sebag-Montefiore, David J; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2011-04-01

    To assess local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-predicted good prognosis tumors treated by surgery alone. The MERCURY study reported that high-resolution MRI can accurately stage rectal cancer. The routine policy in most centers involved in the MERCURY study was primary surgery alone in MRI-predicted stage II or less and in MRI "good prognosis" stage III with selective avoidance of neoadjuvant therapy. Data were collected prospectively on all patients included in the MERCURY study who were staged as MRI-defined "good" prognosis tumors. "Good" prognosis included MRI-predicted safe circumferential resection margins, with MRI-predicted T2/T3a/T3b (less than 5 mm spread from muscularis propria), regardless of MRI N stage. None received preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence were calculated. Of 374 patients followed up in the MERCURY study, 122 (33%) were defined as "good prognosis" stage III or less on MRI. Overall and disease-free survival for all patients with MRI "good prognosis" stage I, II and III disease at 5 years was 68% and 85%, respectively. The local recurrence rate for this series of patients predicted to have a good prognosis tumor on MRI was 3%. The preoperative identification of good prognosis tumors using MRI will allow stratification of patients and better targeting of preoperative therapy. This study confirms the ability of MRI to select patients who are likely to have a good outcome with primary surgery alone.

  7. Obinutuzumab in follicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Calle, N; Figueroa-Mora, R; Villar-Fernandez, S; Marcos-Jubilar, M; Panizo, C

    2016-12-01

    The CD20 marker continues to be exploited as a therapeutic target for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Obinutuzumab is part of a new generation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, which are synthesized using molecular engineering technology, resulting in novel target epitopes and unprecedented optimization of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis. Rituximab is the current gold standard for anti-CD20 therapy, yet despite outstanding results published over the past decade, many patients continue to relapse after anti-CD20 regimens. Obinutuzumab is slowly positioning itself in the treatment of CD20+ B-cell neoplasms. On the basis of favorable results from the phase III GADOLIN trial, obinutuzumab was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in combination with bendamustine followed by obinutuzumab maintenance, for the treatment of follicular lymphoma (FL) patients who relapsed or are refractory to a rituximab-containing regimen. Additional phase III trials are underway to test obinutuzumab as a first-line anti-CD20 agent in FL with good preliminary results (GALLIUM trial); thus, it is likely that obinutuzumab will soon achieve a first-line indication. It is plausible that obinutuzumab will replace rituximab as the gold standard for chemoimmunotherapy in FL, although some safety concerns still need to be resolved. This review will address the preclinical pharmacology and the main aspects of the clinical development of obinutuzumab for the treatment of FL.

  8. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

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    Oberije, Cary, E-mail: cary.oberije@maastro.nl [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven, KU Leuven (Belgium); Houben, Ruud [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deasy, Joseph O. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Lambin, Philippe [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  9. The clinical development of obinutuzumab for the treatment of follicular lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma B

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Ma,1 Chaitra Ujjani2 1Department of Medicine, 2Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Impressive progress has been made in recent decades for advanced-stage follicular lymphoma with the availability of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, initially rituximab and more recently obinutuzumab. Obinutuzumab is a unique, third-generation, fully humanized glycoengineered IgG1 type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. It has been shown to have increased antitumor activity compared to rituximab in preclinical studies, including whole-blood B-cell depletion assays, xenograft models, and primate models. This has spurred on the development of obinutuzumab through Phase I/II trials as monotherapy and in combination with chemotherapeutic agents and other targeted therapies. Its efficacy compared to rituximab and in rituximab-refractory disease has led to its continued development and eventual approval for the treatment of follicular lymphoma. Here in this review, we highlight the design and development of obinutuzumab in the treatment of advanced stage grade 1–3A follicular lymphoma and its future directions. Keywords: follicular lymphoma, obinutuzumab, anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody

  10. [Plasmablastic lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Álvarez, Rubén; Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-María

    2016-11-04

    Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare and aggressive subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that commonly occurs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals, and affects oral sites. Occasionally, it has been described in HIV-negative patients and involving non-oral sites. Pathologically, PBL is a high-grade B-cell lymphoma that displays the immunophenotype of a terminally differentiated B-lymphocyte with loss of B-cell markers (CD20) and expression of plasma-cell antigens. Epstein-Barr virus infection and MYC rearrangements are frequently observed. Treatment of PBL is challenging because of the lack of established treatment and poor outcomes, with median survival times shorter than one year. In this review, we discuss the clinical and epidemiologic spectrum of PBL as well as its distinct pathological features. Finally, we summarize the currently available approaches for the treatment of patients with PBL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging of Burkitt′s lymphoma-abdominal manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanuman Satishchandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkitt′s lymphoma is an uncommon form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in adults. The diagnostic workup for Burkitt′s lymphoma includes radiological imaging and like any other form of non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma definitive diagnosis is by histopathology. Imaging is necessary to determine the distribution and severity in terms of extent and organs of involvement to further assist in staging and thence to implement appropriate therapy. High incidence of intraabdominal involvement is seen in American Burkitt lymphoma.

  12. Lymphoma of the eyelid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Frederik H; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Lymphoma of the eyelid constitutes 5% of ocular adnexal lymphoma. In previously published cases, 56% of lymphomas of the eyelid are of B-cell origin and 44% are of T-cell origin. The most frequent B-cell lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (27 cases-14%) and diffuse large B-cell lymph......Lymphoma of the eyelid constitutes 5% of ocular adnexal lymphoma. In previously published cases, 56% of lymphomas of the eyelid are of B-cell origin and 44% are of T-cell origin. The most frequent B-cell lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (27 cases-14%) and diffuse large B...... chemotherapy with or without adjuvant treatment is the treatment of choice for high-grade or disseminated lymphomas. The majority of subtypes, especially low-grade subtypes, have a good prognosis with few recurrences or progression. Some subtypes, including mycosis fungoides, have a poorer prognosis...

  13. Neoadjuvant Doxorubicin/Cyclophosphamide Followed by Ixabepilone or Paclitaxel in Early Stage Breast Cancer and Evaluation of βIII-Tubulin Expression as a Predictive Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ling-Ming; Chan, Stephen; Chacko, Raju T.; Campone, Mario; Manikhas, Alexy; Nag, Shona M.; Leichman, Cynthia G.; Dasappa, Lokanatha; Fasching, Peter A.; Hurtado de Mendoza, Fernando; Symmans, W. Fraser; Liu, David; Mukhopadhyay, Pralay; Horak, Christine; Xing, Guan; Pusztai, Lajos

    2013-01-01

    Background. This randomized phase II trial was designed to compare the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) induced by neoadjuvant cyclophosphamide plus doxorubicin (AC) followed by ixabepilone or paclitaxel in women with early stage breast cancer (BC). Expression of βIII-tubulin as a predictive marker was also evaluated. Patients and Methods. Women with untreated, histologically confirmed primary invasive breast adenocarcinoma received four cycles of AC followed by 1:1 randomization to either ixabepilone 40 mg/m2 (3-hour infusion) every 3 weeks for four cycles (n = 148) or weekly paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 (1-hour infusion) for 12 weeks (n = 147). All patients underwent a core needle biopsy of the primary cancer for molecular marker analysis prior to chemotherapy. βIII-Tubulin expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results. There was no significant difference in the rate of pCR in the ixabepilone treatment arm (24.3%; 90% confidence interval [CI], 18.6–30.8) and the paclitaxel treatment arm (25.2%; 90% CI, 19.4–31.7). βIII-Tubulin-positive patients obtained higher pCR rates compared with βIII-tubulin-negative patients in both treatment arms; however, βIII-tubulin expression was not significantly associated with a differential response to ixabepilone or paclitaxel. The safety profiles of both regimens were generally similar, although neutropenia occurred more frequently in the ixabepilone arm (grade 3/4: 41.3% vs. 8.4%). The most common nonhematologic toxicity was peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions. Neoadjuvant treatment of early stage BC with AC followed by ixabepilone every 3 weeks or weekly paclitaxel was well tolerated with no significant difference in efficacy. Higher response rates were observed among βIII-tubulin-positive patients. PMID:23853246

  14. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  15. Concurrent pemetrexed and radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review of completed and ongoing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Hak; Gerber, David E; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Iyengar, Puneeth; Monberg, Matthew; Treat, Joseph; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Koustensis, Andrew; Barker, Scott; Obasaju, Coleman

    2015-03-01

    Current standard for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is combined concurrent therapy with a platinum-based regimen. Preclinical synergistic activity of pemetrexed with radiation therapy (RT) and favorable toxicity profile has led to clinical trials evaluating pemetrexed in chemoradiation regimens. This literature search of concurrent pemetrexed and RT treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC included MEDLINE database, meeting abstracts, and the clinical trial registry database. Nineteen unique studies were represented across all databases including 11 phase I studies and eight phase II studies. Of the six phase II trials with mature data available, median overall survival ranged from 18.7 to 34 months. Esophagitis and pneumonitis occurred in 0-16% and 0-23% of patients, respectively. Of the ongoing trials, there is one phase III and four phase II trials with pemetrexed in locally advanced NSCLC. Pemetrexed can be administered safely at full systemic doses with either cisplatin or carboplatin concomitantly with radical doses of thoracic radiation therapy. While results from the ongoing phase III PROCLAIM trial are needed to address definitively the efficacy of pemetrexed-cisplatin plus RT in stage III NSCLC, available results from phase II trials suggest that this regimen has promising activity with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  16. Semi-longitudinal Study of the Mcnamara Cephalometric Triangle in Class II and Class III Subjects Grouped by Cervical Vertebrae Maturation Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola-Guillén, Luis E; Fitzcarrald, Fernando D; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to compare the McNamara cephalometric triangle values in untreated normodivergent Class II and Class III malocclusion subjects of Latin American origin grouped by cervical vertebrae maturation stage to an untreated Class I malocclusion normodivergent control group. The study was conducted on a sample of 610 pretreatment lateral cephalograms (250 male, 360 female), examined and grouped according to their anteroposterior skeletal relationship (Class I, II or III), cervical vertebrae maturation stage (Pre Pubertal Peak P1 = CS1 and CS2, Pubertal Peak P2= CS3 and CS4, and Post Pubertal Peak P3 = CS5 and CS6) and sex. Co-A, Co-Gn and ENA-Me were measured in each lateral cephalogram. ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests were performed to determine differences between the groups. The results showed that in males, the greatest maxillary and mandibular dimensional increases occurred during the P3 stage (CS5 to CS6), while in females, they occurred in the P2 stage (CS3 to CS4). The Co-A and Co-Gn showed significant differences between the malocclusion classes (pClass II subjects and the mandibular lengths in Class III subjects were already higher at the beginning of the period evaluated (P1). A worsening trend for the Class II and III malocclusions was identified during the period evaluated. Finally, changes in the McNamara cephalometric triangle values were markedly different in the three normodivergent skeletal malocclusion classes. In these Latin American subjects the pubertal growth spurt occurred at different times with respect to the Caucasian and Asian norms.

  17. Detailed stratification of TNM stage III rectal cancer based on the presence/absence of extracapsular invasion of the metastatic lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Koji; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Kimura, Kenya; Sano, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2013-06-01

    The presence/absence of extracapsular invasion in metastatic lymph nodes has been reported as being significantly correlated with the prognosis in a wide variety of cancers. However, the influence of extracapsular invasion in the metastatic lymph nodes on the prognosis in patients with stage III rectal cancer has not yet been investigated. We investigated the presence/absence of extracapsular invasion in the metastatic nodes of the relevant main/lateral lymph node group in patients with rectal cancer to determine the usefulness of this parameter for stratifying the prognosis of patients with stage III rectal cancer. This was a single-institution study. This study was conducted at a single institution. We enrolled 101 consecutive patients with stage III rectal cancer who had undergone curative surgery with extended lymph node dissection and investigated the presence/absence of extracapsular invasion in the regional metastatic lymph nodes to determine the usefulness of such stratification for a more precise prediction of the patient prognosis. The main outcomes measured were the disease-free and overall survival rates. Univariate analysis revealed a significantly poorer prognosis, in terms of both the disease-free survival rate (p = 0.003) and overall survival rate (p = 0.008), of the pN3-extracapsular invasion-positive cases in comparison with the pN3-extracapsular invasion-negative cases. Multivariate analysis revealed the presence/absence of extracapsular invasion in the metastatic lymph nodes as the only variable that was statistically significantly associated with the disease-free survival rate (p = 0.011). This was a retrospective study in a small number of patients from a single institution. There were no comparator groups. Detailed stratification of pN3 cases based on the presence/absence of extracapsular invasion in metastatic lymph nodes has the potential to contribute significantly to more available prediction of the prognosis of patients with stage III

  18. [Diagnosis and treatment in patients with B-cell lymphoma unclassified that is intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt's lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryakh, E A; Misyurina, A E; Kovrigina, A M; Obukhova, T N; Gemdzhyan, E G; Vorobyev, V I; Mangasarova, Ya K; Polyakov, Yu Yu; Magomedova, A U; Klyasova, G A; Misyurin, V A; Yatsyk, G A; Shevelev, A A; Kostina, I E; Vorobyev, A I; Kravchenko, S K

    2015-01-01

    To characterize a group of patients with B-cell lymphoma (BCLU) unclassified that is intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt's lymphoma, to identify poor prognostic factors, and to evaluate therapeutic efficiency in patients with BCLU. Twenty-five patients with BCLU were examined. Double-hit lymphoma (DHL) was diagnosed in 8 (32%) patients. According to the Ann-Arbor classification of lymphoma, its stages II, III, and IV were diagnosed in 3 (12%), 2 (8%), and 20 (80%) patients, respectively. MYC rearrangement was observed in 11 (48%) out of 23 patients: single-hit lymphoma in 3 patients and DHL in 8 (BCL2+/MYC+ in 6 cases and BCL6+/MYC+ in 2). The expression of с-MYC (cut off ≥40%) was revealed in 17 (74%) out of 23 patients; that of BCL2 (cut off ≥50%) was detected in 14 (58%) out of 24 patients; coexpression of both proteins was seen in 12 (52%) out of 23 patients. The DHL group showed a correlation between the rearrangement of the BCL2+/MYC+ genes and the expression of MYC and BCL2 proteins in 5 out of 6 patients. Taking into account the heterogeneity of the entire patient group, DHL and non-DHL subgroups were considered separately. Both subgroups were comparable by clinical characteristics. BCLU patients younger than 60 years of age received treatment according to the LB-M-04 ± rituximab; those aged 60 or older had CHOP-like regimens ± rituximab. Autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT) was performed in 5 patients belonging to a high-risk group. The 3-year overall survival (OS) was 62% and the 3-year event-free survival (EFS) was 51%. The 3-year OS was lower for the DHL group than that for the non-DHL group (43 and 75%, respectively). In the DHL group, both OS and EFS are significantly lower (the risk of poor outcome, including death, is higher) than those in the non-DHL group. It is conceivable that intensified chemotherapy with auto-SCT increases treatment results in patients with BCLU; however, a larger number of

  19. Hard to heal pressure ulcers (stage III-IV): efficacy of injected activated macrophage suspension (AMS) as compared with standard of care (SOC) treatment controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuloff-Shani, Adi; Adunsky, Abraham; Even-Zahav, Aviva; Semo, Haim; Orenstein, Arie; Tamir, Jeremy; Regev, Eli; Shinar, Eilat; Danon, David

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare local injections of AMS with SOC treatments for stage III and IV pressure ulcers in elderly patients. It was designed as historically prospective 2-arms non-parallel open controlled trial, and conducted in a department of geriatric medicine and rehabilitation of a university affiliated tertiary hospital. We studied 100 consecutive elderly patients with a total of 216 stage III or IV pressure ulcers, 66 patients were assigned to the AMS group and had their wounds injected, while 38 patients were assigned to the SOC group. Primary outcome was rate of complete wound closure. Time to complete wound closure and 1-year mortality served as secondary outcomes. Statistical analyses were performed at both patient and wound levels. Percentage of completely closed wounds (wound level and patient level) were significantly better (pAMS, as well as in the subset of diabetic patients (pAMS proved significantly better for the subset of those with leg ulcers and with baseline wounds ≤15 cm(2), compared with SOC. There were no statistically significant differences with regard to time to complete closure or 1-year mortality rates in the two groups. It is concluded that there is a significant difference in favor of stage III and IV wound closure rates by AMS, as compared with SOC treatments.

  20. Predictors for locoregional recurrence for clinical stage III-N2 non-small cell lung cancer with nodal downstaging after induction chemotherapy and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Arya; Lou, Feiran; Correa, Arlene M; Baldassarre, Randall; Rimner, Andreas; Huang, James; Roth, Jack A; Swisher, Stephen G; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Lin, Steven H

    2013-06-01

    Pathologic downstaging following chemotherapy for stage III-N2 NSCLC is a well-known positive prognostic indicator. However, the predictive factors for locoregional recurrence (LRR) in these patients are largely unknown. Between 1998 and 2008, 153 patients with clinically or pathologically staged III-N2 NSCLC from two cancer centers in the United States were treated with induction chemotherapy and surgery. All had pathologic N0-1 disease, and none received postoperative radiotherapy. LRR were defined as recurrence at the surgical site, lymph nodes (levels 1-14 including supraclavicular), or both. Median follow-up was 39.3 months. Pretreatment N2 status was confirmed pathologically (18.2 %) or by PET/CT (81.8 %). Overall, the 5-year LRR rate was 30.8 % (n = 38), with LRR being the first site of failure in 51 % (22/+99877943). Five-year overall survival for patients with LRR compared with those without was 21 versus 60.1 % (p recurrence (p = 0.021, HR 1.91, 95 % CI 1.1-3.3) but only trended for poorer survival (p = 0.123, HR 1.48, 95 % CI 0.9-2.44). LRR remains high in resected stage III-N2 NSCLC patients after induction chemotherapy and nodal downstaging, particularly in patients with persistent N1 disease.

  1. Responses of the L51781Y tk/sup +//tk/sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay: III. 72 coded chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.; Cattanach, P.; Edwards, I.; McBride, D.; Riach, C.; Caspary, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-two chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L51781Y tk/sup +///sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay, using procedures based upon those described previously. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before planting in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 ..mu..g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Significant responses were obtained with allyl isothiocyanate, p-benzoquinone dioxime, benzyl acetate, 2-biphenylamine HCl, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl)ether, cadmium chloride, chlordane, chlorobenzene, chlorobenzilate, 2-chloroethanol, chlorothalonil, cytarabine x HCl, p,p'-DDE, diazinon, 2,6-dichloro-p-phenylenediamine, N,N-diethylthiourea, diglycidylresorcinol ether, 2,4-dimethoxy aniline x HCl, disperse yellow 3, endosulfan, 1,2-epoxyhexadecane, ethyl acrylate, ethyl benzene, ethylene thiourea, F D and C yellow Number 6, furan, heptachlor, isophorone, mercuric chloride, 4,4'-methylenedianiline x 2 HCl, methyl viologen, nickel sulfate x 6H/sub 2/O, 4,4'-oxydianiline, pentachloroethane, piperonyl butoxide, propyl gallate, quinoline, rotenone, 2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-4-nitro-anisole, 1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethane, trichlorfon, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde, 1,1,3-trimethyl-2-thiourea, 1-vinyl-3-cyclopetene dioxide, vinyl toluene, and ziram. The assay was incapable of providing a clear indication of whether some chemicals were mutagens; these benzyl alcohol, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, phenol, succinic acid-2,2-dimethyl hydrazide, and toluene.

  2. Could semiquantitative FDG analysis add information to the prognosis in patients with stage II/III breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant treatment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista, Laura; Cervino, Anna Rita [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Padua (Italy); Ghiotto, Cristina; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, Pierfranco [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Medical Oncology 2 Unit, Padua (Italy); Saibene, Tania; Michieletto, Silvia; Fernando, Bozza [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Breast Unit, Padua (Italy); Orvieto, Enrico [University Hospital of Padua, Department of Pathology, Padua (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    We investigated whether maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and whole-body (WB) SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG measured by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT could improve prognostic stratification in patients with stage II/III breast cancer (BC). We prospectively enrolled 99 consecutive women (median age 50 years, range 27 - 77 years) with pathologically proven stage II/III BC who underwent pretreatment FDG PET/CT. WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were measured in all malignant lesions. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to test for relationships among WB SUVmax, WB MTV, WB TLG, and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), after adjustment for age, and histopathological and immunohistochemical features (oestrogen/progesterone and HER2 expression, proliferation index and grade). The median values of WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were 16.2 (range 1.5 - 33.1), 14 cm{sup 3} (range 0.03 - 708.6 cm{sup 3}) and 62.5 (0.06 - 3869.4), respectively. All WB semiquantitative values were higher in patients with higher TNM stage, although not significantly (all p > 0.05). The median follow-up for surviving patients was 30 months, with a range of 13 - 45 months. Both PFS and OS of patients with low WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were longer than that of patients with high WB values for progression, although not statistically significant. However, stratifying the patients in accordance with the stage of disease, both PFS and OS were significantly lower in patients with high WB TLG and stage III than in patients with stage II (p < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, WB MTV and WB TLG were independent prognostic factors for PFS (hazard ratio 1.004, 95 % confidence interval 1.002 - 1.006, p < 0.001, and hazard ratio 1.001, 95 % confidence interval 1.000 - 1.001, p = 0.011, respectively). The addition of WB TLG to clinical data may provide a more detailed

  3. Vorinostat With or Without Isotretinoin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-16

    Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Testicular lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; d'Amore, F; Christensen, Bjarne Egelund

    1994-01-01

    In a Danish population-based non-Hodgkin's lymphoma registry, 2687 newly diagnosed patients were registered from 1983 to 1992. 39 had testicular involvement (TL) (incidence 0.26/10(5)/year). Median age was 71 years. 24 cases had localised and 15 had disseminated disease. Histologically, all cases...... were diffuse (65% diffuse centroblastic type). Of the 27 tested, 11% were of T- and 89% of B-immunophenotype. In localised cases, where surgery was supplemented by combination chemotherapy (CCT), the relapse rate was 15.4%. The relapse rate for cases with localised disease treated with other regimens...

  5. GDP (Gemcitabine, Dexamethasone, and Cisplatin) Is Highly Effective and Well-Tolerated for Newly Diagnosed Stage IV and Relapsed/Refractory Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Dong, Mei; He, Xiao-Hui; Li, Ye-Xiong; Wang, Wei-Hu; Liu, Peng; Yang, Jian-Liang; Gui, Lin; Zhang, Chang-Gong; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Sheng-Yu; Shi, Yuan-Kai

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) regimen in patients with newly diagnosed stage IV and relapsed/refractory extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL).The study enrolled 41 ENKTL patients who received GDP regimen at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College between January 2008 and January 2015.The disease status was newly diagnosed stage IV in 15 patients and relapsed/refractory in 26 patients. The median number of cycles of chemotherapy per patient was 6 (range, 2-8 cycles). The overall response rate and complete-remission rate were 83.0% (34/41) and 41.5% (17/41), respectively. After a median follow-up of 16.2 months, 1-year progression-free survival rate and 1-year overall survival rate for the whole cohort were 54.5% and 72.7%. Grade 3 to 4 adverse events included neutropenia (34.1%), thrombocytopenia (19.5%), and anemia (14.6%).Our study has suggested high efficacy and low toxicity profile of GDP regimen in patients with newly diagnosed stage IV and relapsed/refractory ENKTL.

  6. Performance of 15-Stage Experimental J71 Axial-Flow Compressor. III - Effects of Inlet-Guide-Vane Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, James G.; Filippi, Richard E.

    1955-01-01

    The stall-limit line at low speeds was improved somewhat by closing the inlet guide vanes 6 deg, while the design-speed maximum flow and pressure ratio were reduced. The first-stage characteristic curve was moved to lower values of both flog coefficient and equivalent pressure ratio. The second-stage pressure ratio was decreased slightly at high speeds, while the later stages were unaffected.

  7. Fibronectin gene polymorphisms and clinical manifestations of mixed cryoglobulinemic syndrome: increased risk of lymphoma associated to MspI DD and HaeIII AA genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fabro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse FN gene polymorphisms in type II mixed cryoglobulinemic syndrome (MCsn, an immune-complex mediated systemic vasculitis linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and characterized by rheumatoid factor (RF positive B-cell proliferation at high risk for the progression into non Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Methods: Samples from eighty-one patients, with MCsn (type II serum cryoglobulins and clinical signs of vasculitis were studied. Sixthy-five (65/81, 80.3% patients were HCV-positive. Twenty-one (25.9% patients had developed a B-cell NHL during the course of MCsn. Seventy-two patients with HCV-negative and MC-unrelated NHL and 110 healthy blood donors (HBDs were taken as controls. HaeIIIb and MspI FN gene polymorphisms were analysed by PCR and specific restriction enzyme digestions, following reported procedures. Plasma FN levels were analysed by ELISA, whenever possible. Results: HaeIIIb and MspI allele and genotype frequencies did not differ between MCsn patients and HBDs. Of note, the DD-MspI (OR=5.56; CI=1.67-18.51, p=0.0046 and the AA-HaeIIIb (OR=5.54; CI=1.64-18.76, p=0.0066 homozygosis appeared significantly and independently associated with the development of B-cell NHL in MCsn patients, with the HaeIIIb A allele possibly conferring an increased risk of NHL in the general population (OR=1.72, CI=1.128- 2.635, p=0.0133. In contrast, the major vasculitic manifestations, such as peripheral neuropathy, skin ulcers and glomerulonephritis tended to be associated with the counterpart MspI C allele. No association between FN plasma levels and FN genotypes was found. Conclusion: Genotyping for MspI and HaeIIIb FN gene polymorphisms may be clinically relevant to define the predisposition to the major clinical manifestations in MCsn.

  8. Salvage abdominal irradiation for refractory non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma

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    Akoum Riad

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal irradiation, as a part of treatment, is often ignored in the management of refractory non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma (NHL. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and the toxicity of this approach after failure of chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: 27 patients with intraabdominal lymphoma underwent salvage irradiation between 1982 and 2001. All patients were treated with a Cobalt-60 machine. The total dose administered to the abdomen was 18-20 Gy at the rate of 1.5-1.8 Gy per daily fraction, followed by a boost to gross disease up to 20 Gy. All patients had previously been heavily pretreated with chemotherapy. Fourteen patients, nine with follicular and five with diffuse lymphomas, had primary refractory tumors that had never achieved remission. Thirteen patients, six with follicular and seven with aggressive tumors, had refractory relapsed tumors after achieving one or more complete remissions. Results: The response rate was 77%. The median follow-up was 53 months. The 5-year and 10-year survival rates were 25 and 17%, respectively. The in-field and out-of-field recurrence rates were 22 and 33%, respectively. Survival rates were significantly better for patients with refractory relapse compared to those with primary refractory lymphoma (P < 0.01. There was no significant difference in terms of response, recurrence, or survival rates between follicular and aggressive types. Out-of-field recurrence occurred more frequently in initial stage III and IV disease. Toxic deaths occurred in three patients (11%. Conclusion: Salvage radiotherapy for refractory abdominal NHL is a feasible alternative for both follicular and diffuse subtypes and may provide significant palliation and prolongation of survival. It is less effective in patients with primary refractory NHL than in those with refractory relapsed NHL.

  9. FDG-PET in Follicular Lymphoma Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bodet-Milin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 18-Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerised tomography (FDG PET/CT is commonly used in the management of patients with lymphomas and is recommended for both initial staging and response assessment after treatment in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite the FDG avidity of follicular lymphoma (FL, FDG PET/CT is not yet applied in standard clinical practice for patients with FL. However, FDG PET/CT is more accurate than conventional imaging for initial staging, often prompting significant management change, and allows noninvasive characterization to guide assessment of high-grade transformation. For restaging, FDG PET/CT assists in distinguishing between scar tissue and viable tumors in residual masses and a positive PET after induction treatment would seem to predict a shorter progression-free survival.

  10. Central nervous system involvement in T-cell lymphoma: A single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurion, Ronit; Mehta, Neha; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Zelenetz, Andrew; Moskowitz, Alison; Lunning, Matthew; Moskowitz, Craig; Hamlin, Paul; Horwitz, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Background We characterized the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement, risk factors and outcome in a large single institution dataset of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). Methods Retrospective review of the PTCL database at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. We identified 231 patients with any subtype of PTCL between 1994-2011 with a minimum six months of follow-up or an event defined as relapse or death. Results Histologies included peripheral T-cell lymphoma-not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) (31.6%), angioimmunoblastic (16.9%), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), ALK- (12.1%), ALCL, ALK + (6.1%), extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (7.4%), adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) (7.4%), and transformed mycosis fungoides (8.7%). Seventeen patients had CNS disease (7%). Fifteen had CNS involvement with PTCL and two had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and glioblastoma. Median time to CNS involvement was 3.44 months (0.16-103.1). CNS prophylaxis was given to 24 patients (primarily intrathecal methotrexate). Rates of CNS involvement were not different in patients who received prophylaxis. Univariate analysis identified stage III-IV, bone marrow involvement, >1 extranodal site and ATLL as risk factors for CNS disease. On multivariate analysis, >1 extranodal site and international prognostic index (IPI) ≥ 3 were predictive for CNS involvement. The median survival of patients with CNS involvement was 2.63 months (0.10-75). Conclusions Despite high relapse rates, PTCL, except ATLL, carries a low risk of CNS involvement. Prognosis with CNS involvement is poor and risk factors include: >1 extra nodal site and IPI ≥3.

  11. Reduced expression of cyclin D2 is associated with poor recurrence-free survival independent of cyclin D1 in stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Park, Seong-Eun; Cho, Eun Yoon; Han, Jungho; Shim, Young Mog; Park, Joobae; Kim, Duk-Hwan

    2012-08-01

    Compared to well-known function of cyclin D1 in lung cancer, the role of cyclin D2 is not clear. This study was aimed at understanding the clinicopathological significance of cyclin D2 in primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively analyzed expression statuses of cyclin D1, cyclin D2, p16, p21, p27, Ki-67, and phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) using immunohistochemistry in 626 NSCLCs. Cyclin D2 was expressed in normal lung tissue, and its expression was reduced in 170 (27%) of 626 NSCLCs with a median duration of follow-up of 64 months. Mean phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) levels were not associated with expression levels of cyclin D2 (P=0.15). The relationship between recurrence and the reduced expression of cyclin D2 was not homogenous by stage (Breslow-Day test for homogeneity, P=0.04). Reduced expression of cyclin D2 was not associated with patient's prognosis in 370 stage I, 112 stage II, and 18 stage IV NSCLCs. However, for 126 stage III NSCLCs, reduced expression of cyclin D2 was adversely associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) (hazard ratio [HR]=3.71, 95% CI=1.54-13.17; P=0.01), independent of histology and expression of cyclin D1. The reduced expression of cyclin D2 was not associated with the overexpression of cyclin D1 (P=0.65). The present study suggests that reduced expression of cyclin D2 in stage III NSCLC may be associated with poor RFS. And, cyclin D2 may have a distinct role from cyclin D1 in NSCLC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcome Study of Cobalt Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients with Inoperable Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingjie; Lan, Fengming; Kang, Xiaoli; Shao, Yinjian; Li, Hongqi; Li, Ping; Wu, Weizhang; Wang, Jidong; Chang, Dongshu; Wang, Yong; Xia, Tingyi

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this paper is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of specialized Body Cobalt based system (BCBS) treatment in the senior patients group (.65 years) with Stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 49 patients (41 males and 8 females) with Stage III NSCLC according to UICC TNM classification (6(th) edition) were treated using OUR-QGD™ BCBS which was designed and manufactured in China. Post treatment evaluation with follow-up information was collected from April 2001 to December 2006 in our department. Median age of enrolled patients was 71 years old (65-85). Among those patients, 36 patients were pathologically identified with squamous cell carcinoma, and the other 13 patients were confirmed as adenocarcinoma. All patients were immobilized by vacuum based immobilization mold and then performed slow CT scan without any respiration gating devices. The daily radiation prescription dose was defined at 50% isodose line covering primary lesions and metastatic lymph nodes with doses from 2.5 to 6 Gy in 5 fractions per week according to the tumor stage and internally approved treatment protocols by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Median daily dose and total delivery dose of 50% isodose line were 4 Gy and 41 Gy, respectively. In this study group, total of 3 patients received neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Tumor response evaluated 12 weeks after radiation has demonstrated 13 complete responses (26.5%), 21 partial responses (42.9%). The overall survival (OS) rate of 1-year, 2-year and 3-year was 63.3%, 40.8% and 20.4%, respectively. The median and mean survival time was 22 and 24 months. All 49 patients tolerated the treatment well and have completed the planned therapy regiment. Body Cobalt based system treatment of those over 65 years old patients with Stage III NSCLC had reasonable and superior curative effect as well as local control, and at the same time without severe radiation side effects.

  13. Macaque homologs of EBV and KSHV show uniquely different associations with simian AIDS-related lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Gregory Bruce

    Full Text Available Two gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV (Lymphocryptovirus genus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV (Rhadinovirus genus have been implicated in the etiology of AIDS-associated lymphomas. Homologs of these viruses have been identified in macaques and other non-human primates. In order to assess the association of these viruses with non-human primate disease, archived lymphoma samples were screened for the presence of macaque lymphocryptovirus (LCV homologs of EBV, and macaque rhadinoviruses belonging to the RV1 lineage of KSHV homologs or the more distant RV2 lineage of Old World primate rhadinoviruses. Viral loads were determined by QPCR and infected cells were identified by immunolabeling for different viral proteins. The lymphomas segregated into three groups. The first group (n = 6 was associated with SIV/SHIV infections, contained high levels of LCV (1-25 genomes/cell and expressed the B-cell antigens CD20 or BLA.36. A strong EBNA-2 signal was detected in the nuclei of the neoplastic cells in one of the LCV-high lymphomas, indicative of a type III latency stage. None of the lymphomas in this group stained for the LCV viral capsid antigen (VCA lytic marker. The second group (n = 5 was associated with D-type simian retrovirus-2 (SRV-2 infections, contained high levels of RV2 rhadinovirus (9-790 genomes/cell and expressed the CD3 T-cell marker. The third group (n = 3 was associated with SIV/SHIV infections, contained high levels of RV2 rhadinovirus (2-260 genomes/cell and was negative for both CD20 and CD3. In both the CD3-positive and CD3/CD20-negative lymphomas, the neoplastic cells stained strongly for markers of RV2 lytic replication. None of the lymphomas had detectable levels of retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus (RFHV, the macaque RV1 homolog of KSHV. Our data suggest etiological roles for both lymphocryptoviruses and RV2 rhadinoviruses in the development of simian AIDS-associated lymphomas and indicate that

  14. A randomized phase III trial of adjuvant chemotherapy with irinotecan, leucovorin and fluorouracil versus leucovorin and fluorouracil for stage II and III colon cancer: A Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratiou Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer is a public health problem worldwide. Adjuvant chemotherapy after surgical resection for stage III colon cancer has been shown to improve both progression-free and overall survival, and is currently recommended as standard therapy. However, its value for patients with stage II disease remains controversial. When this study was designed 5-fluorouracil (5FU plus leucovorin (LV was standard adjuvant treatment for colon cancer. Irinotecan (CPT-11 is a topoisomerase I inhibitor with activity in metastatic disease. In this multicenter adjuvant phase III trial, we evaluated the addition of irinotecan to weekly 5FU plus LV in patients with stage II or III colon cancer. Methods The study included 873 eligible patients. The treatment consisted of weekly administration of irinotecan 80 mg/m2 intravenously (IV, LV 200 mg/m2 and 5FU 450 mg/m2 bolus (Arm A versus LV 200 mg/m2 and 5FU 500 mg/m2 IV bolus (Arm B. In Arm A, treatments were administered weekly for four consecutive weeks, followed by a two-week rest, for a total of six cycles, while in Arm B treatments were administered weekly for six consecutive weeks, followed by a two-week rest, for a total of four cycles. The primary end-point was disease-free survival (DFS at three years. Results The probability of overall survival (OS at three years was 0.88 for patients in Arm A and 0.86 for those in Arm B, while the five-year OS probability was 0.78 and 0.76 for patients in Arm A and Arm B, respectively (P = 0.436. Furthermore, the probability of DFS at three years was 0.78 and 0.76 for patients in Arm A and Arm B, respectively (P = 0.334. With the exception of leucopenia and neutropenia, which were higher in patients in Arm A, there were no significant differences in Grades 3 and 4 toxicities between the two regimens. The most frequently recorded Grade 3/4 toxicity was diarrhea in both treatment arms. Conclusions Irinotecan added to weekly bolus 5FU plus LV did not result

  15. Prognosis Factors in Patients with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Presenting with Gastrointestinal Tract Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Weinerman

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-one individuals who presented with symptoms referable to the gastrointestinal tract were extracted from the authors’ total review of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in Manitoba from 1968 through 1978. Only cases at stages I to III were included, and there were 22 males and 19 females. Sixteen non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas arose in the small bowel, 15 in the stomach and 10 in the colon. The natural history of this group of gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin’s disease is described, and univariate and multivariate analyses were done using the variables of sex, pathology, stage, resection, site of disease and initial chemotherapy. The median survival of the group was 28 months. Sex and stage appeared to be important prognostically, but after multivariate analysis, only the female sex appear to be a good prognostic variable. There was a suggestion that resection should be attempted in these lesions, but there was not a large sample size in this group. In addition, it was felt that this group of individuals followed the same survival pattern as did poor prognosis non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas of nongastrointestinal origin.

  16. Detection of internal mammary lymph node metastasis with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with stage III breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Min Jung; Lee, Jong Jin; Kim, Hye Ok; Chae, Sun-Young; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seol Hoon [Ulsan University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sei Hyun; Lee, Jong Won; Son, Byung Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gong, Gyung-Yub [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The present study assessed the positive predictive value (PPV) of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for the detection of internal mammary node (IMN) metastasis in patients with clinical stage III breast cancer. Patients who were diagnosed with clinical stage III breast cancer and underwent pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT were retrospectively analyzed. The {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were prospectively reviewed by two board-certified nuclear medicine physicians in a blinded manner. The intensities of IMNs were graded into four categories (no activity and lower, similar, and higher activities than that of the mediastinal blood pool). IMNs were measured from the combined CT (largest diameter of the short axis). Histologic data of the IMNs were obtained by ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy or surgical excision. The PPV was calculated for pathologically confirmed IMNs. Visual grade, maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}), and sizes were analyzed according to the pathology results. There were 249 clinical stage III breast cancer patients (age 48.0 ± 10.1 years, range 26-79 years) who had undergone initial {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment. Excluding 33 cases of stage IV breast cancer, 62 of 216 patients had visible IMNs on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, and histologic confirmation was obtained in 31 patients. There were 27 metastatic and four nonmetastatic nodes (PPV 87.1 %). Metastatic nodes mostly presented with visual grade 3 (83.9 %), and SUV{sub max} and size were 3.5 ± 4.3 and 5.6 ± 2.0 mm, respectively. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has a high PPV for IMN metastasis in clinical stage III breast cancer, indicating the possibility of metastasis in IMNs with FDG uptake similar to/lower than that of the blood pool or small-sized nodes. (orig.)

  17. Radioimmunotherapy using {sup 131}I-rituximab in patients with advanced stage B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: initial experience

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    Bienert, Maren; Reisinger, Ingrid; Humplik, Beatrice I.; Reim, Christel; Kroessin, Thomas; Avril, Norbert; Munz, Dieter L. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Srock, Stefanie; Pezzutto, Antonio [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Haematology and Oncology, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, toxicity and therapeutic response of non-myeloablative radioimmunotherapy using {sup 131}I-rituximab in previously heavily treated patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). Nine patients with relapsed, refractory or transformed B-NHL received ten radioimmunotherapies. Patients had a median of 5 (range 2-7) prior standard therapies. Four patients had received prior high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, and eight had received prior rituximab therapy. Histopathology consisted of four mantle cell, one follicular and four diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Rituximab, a monoclonal chimeric anti-CD20 antibody (IDEC-C2B8), was labelled with {sup 131}I using the Iodogen method. The administered activity (2,200{+-}600 MBq) was based on a dosimetrically calculated 45 cGy total-body radiation dose. All patients received an infusion of 2.5 mg/kg of rituximab prior to administration of the radiopharmaceutical. No acute adverse effects were observed after the administration of{sup 131}I-rituximab. Radioimmunotherapy was safe in our patient group and achieved one complete response ongoing at 14 months and two partial responses progressing at 12 and 13 months after treatment. One partial responder was re-treated with radioimmunotherapy and achieved an additional progression-free interval of 7 months. Four non-responders with bulky disease died 4.8{+-}2.0 months after therapy. Three patients had an elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level prior to radioimmunotherapy and none of the patients responded. Of two patients who received radioimmunotherapy as an additional treatment after salvage chemotherapy, one continues to be disease-free at 9 months and one relapsed at 5 months' follow-up. Reversible grade 3 or 4 haematological toxicity occurred in seven of nine patients. Median nadirs were 35 days for platelets, 44 days for leucocytes and 57 days for erythrocytes. (orig.)

  18. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plus concurrent DICE chemotherapy for early-stage nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma of Waldeyer’s ring:A single-institution study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Zhou; Daiyuan Ma; Yeqin Zhou; Xianfu Li; Bangxian Tan; Mi Liu; Tao Ren

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nasal-type natural kil er/T-cel lymphoma of Waldeyer’s ring (WR-NK/TL) has dif erent clinico-pathological characteristics from those of other subtypes of NK/T lymphoma; thus, the optimal treatment remains unclear. To find a more ef ective treatment model for WR-NK/TL, we conducted a single-center study of concurrent radiochemotherapy. Methods Forty-five patients with newly diagnosed stage IE to IIE WR-NKTL were randomly divided into two groups. The 23 cases in the concurrent radiochemotherapy group were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (48–52 Gy) and 2 courses of DICE (dexamethasone, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and etoposide) synchronous chemotherapy. The 22 cases in the radiotherapy group only received three-dimen-sional conformal radiotherapy (50–54 Gy). The primary end points were overal survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and toxicity. Results The 1-, 3-, and 4-year OS and PFS rates were 95.5%, 65.6%, and 45.9%, and 86.4%, 56.0%, and 46.7% in the radiotherapy group, and 100%, 88.5%, and 88.5%, and 100%, 82.0%, and 73.8% in the concurrent radiochemotherapy group, respectively. The OS (P = 0.0477) and PFS rates (P = 0.0488) were higher in the concurrent radiochemotherapy group than in the radiotherapy group. The overal re-sponse rate was 100% in both the radiotherapy group [complete response (CR), 18 cases] and concurrent radiochemotherapy group (CR, 22 cases). The concurrent radiochemotherapy group had more severe side ef ects, especial y grade 3 + 4 events, such as leukopenia, anorexia, and stomatitis. However, side ef ects benefiting from excel ent oral care were endurable. Conclusion Radiotherapy plus concurrent DICE chemotherapy may be an ef ective and safe compre-hensive treatment for patients with WR-NKTL.

  19. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy with carboplatin in patients with unresectable advanced head and neck tumors stages III and IV; Simultane Radiochemotherapie mit Carboplatin bei Patienten mit inoperablen fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren der Stadien UICC III und IV

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    Muecke, R.; Ziegler, P.G.; Libera, T.; Fietkau, R. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Blynow, M.; Dommerich, S.; Kramp, B. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). HNO-Klinik und Poliklinik; Kundt, G. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Informatik und Biometrie

    1999-05-01

    Background: The results of treating advanced tumors in the head and neck region with radiotherapy alone are disappointing. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy may improve this situation. The treatment results of concurrent radiochemotherapy at the University of Rostock were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six weeks after radiochemotherapy 56.5% of patients had a complete remission, 36% a partial remission and 7.5% `no change`. With a median follow-up of 42 months (6 to 74 months) overall survival, disease-free survival and local control were 24.3%, 28.9%, 18.0% 5 years after treatment. All these criteria were significantly better in patients with palliative tumor resection compared to no surgical treatment (uni- and multivariate) and in patients with Stage III than in patients with Stage IV carcinomas (univariate), overall survival was significantly better in patients with Stage III (multivariate). A pretherapeutic Hb level below 7.0 mmol/l (11.27 g/dl) reduced the local control significantly (uni- and multivariate). Grade III and IV mucositis was detected in 10%, Grade III leucopenia in 12% of treated patients. Grade IV leucopenia and Grade III thrombopenia were observed in 1 patient each. Conclusion: The toxicity of this treatment is tolerable. However, additional trials must be conducted before considering the palliative tumor resection as standard therapy. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Die Therapieergebnisse der Behandlung fortgeschrittener Tumoren der Kopf-Hals-Region mit alleiniger Bestrahlung sind unbefriedigend. Eine simultane Radiochemotherapie verbessert diese Resultate vermutlich. In einer retrospektiven Analyse wurden Ergebnisse nach simultaner Radiochemotherapie an der Universitaet Rostock ausgewertet. Ergebnisse: Sechs Wochen nach Radiochemotherapie erreichten 56,5% der Patienten eine komplette und 36% der Patienten eine partielle Remission, ein `no change` war bei 7,5% der Patienten festzustellen. Bei einer medianen Beobachtungszeit von

  20. Role of PET/CT in malignant pediatric lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riad, Raef; Omar, Walid; Hafez, Magdy [Cairo University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Children' s Cancer Hospital (CCH), Cairo (Egypt); Kotb, Magdy [National Cancer Institute, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cairo (Egypt); Sidhom, Iman; Zamzam, Manal [Cairo University, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Children' s Cancer Hospital (CCH), Cairo (Egypt); Zaky, Iman [Cairo University, Department of Radio-diagnosis, Children' s Cancer Hospital (CCH), Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Dayem, Hussein [New York Medical College, Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Section, St. Vincent' s Catholic Medical Centers of New York, Valhalla, NY (United States); St. Vincent' s Catholic Medical Centers of New York, Department of Radiology, New York Medical College, Nuclear Medicine Service, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Malignant pediatric lymphoma accounts for 10-15% of all pediatric cancers, (representing 2-3% of all malignancies), with a peak incidence between 5-9 years. Chemotherapy is usually the first and most common mode of treatment. The choice of treatment and prediction of prognosis depend on the histological type of tumor, initial staging, evaluating treatment response, and detection of early recurrence. Conventional imaging modalities have many limitations. PET/CT is more accurate, however so far the literature lacks the results of a large group of patients. To report the role of PET/CT in the above-mentioned objectives at the newly established Children's Cancer Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, which is one of the busiest dedicated pediatric oncology centers of such purposes in the world. All findings were proven by histopathology, clinically, and by clinical follow-up. A total of 152 patients (35 girls and 117 boys) with histologically proven malignant lymphoma (117 HD, 35 NHL) were included in this study. They were divided into four groups. Group I: 41 patients for initial staging. Group II: 51 patients for evaluating early treatment response after two to three cycles of chemotherapy. Group III: 42 patients for evaluating treatment response 4-8 weeks after the end of their treatment. Group IV: 18 patients evaluated for long-term follow-up. Results of PET/CT were compared with the other conventional imaging modalities (CIM). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of PET/CT and CIM were as follows: In Group I: PET/CT modified staging and treatment in 11 out of 41 cases (26.8%), upstaged 5(12.2%) patients and down-staged six (14.6%) patients. Group II: 100%, 97.7%, 98%, 85.7%, 100%, respectively, for PET/CT and 83%, 66.6%, 68.6%, 25%, 96.7% for CIM respectively Group III: At the end of chemotherapy 100%, 90.9%, 92.8%, 75%, 100%, respectively, for PET/CT and 55.5%, 57.5%, 57.1%, 26.3%, 82.6% for CIM, respectively. Group IV: For

  1. Proposal of new classification for stage III colon cancer based on the lymph node ratio: analysis of 4,172 patients from multi-institutional database in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kiichi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Tomiki, Yuichi; Goto, Michitoshi; Kotake, Kenjiro; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2015-02-01

    We retrospectively examined the optimal lymph node ratio (LNR) cutoff value and attempted to construct a new classification using the LNR in stage III colon cancer. The clinical and pathological data of 4,172 patients with histologically proven lymph node metastasis who underwent curative surgery for primary colon cancer at multiple institutions between 1995 and 2004 were derived from the multi-institutional database of the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR). We determined independent prognostic factors and constructed a new classification using these factors. Finally, we compared the discriminatory ability between the new classification and the TNM seventh edition (TNM 7th) classification. The optimal LNR cutoff value was 0.18. Multivariate analysis revealed that year of surgery, age, gender, histological type, TNM 7th T category, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, TNM 7th N category, and LNR were found to be significant independent prognostic factors. We attempted to construct a new classification based on the combination of TNM 7th T category and LNR. As a result, the cancer-specific survivals were well stratified (P TNM 7th classification with respect to both a better fit and lower complexity. The optimal LNR cutoff value that was found using the Japanese multi-institutional database and the new classification using LNR are considered to be extremely significant. Therefore, these findings strongly support the application of LNR in the stage classification in stage III colon cancer.

  2. Prognostic impact of clinicopathologic parameters in stage II/III breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel and doxorubicin chemotherapy: paradoxical features of the triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong-Wan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic factors in locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy differ from those of early breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical significance of potential predictive and prognostic factors in breast cancer patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods A total of 145 stage II and III breast cancer patients received neoadjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. We examined the clinical and biological factors (ER, PR, p53, c-erbB2, bcl-2, and Ki-67 by immunohistochemistry. We analyzed clinical outcome and their correlation with clinicopathologic parameters. Results Among the clinicopathologic parameters investigated, none of the marker was correlated with response rate (RR except triple negative phenotype. Patients with triple negative phenotype showed higher RR (83.0% in triple negative vs. 62.2% in non-triple negative, p = 0.012 and pathologic complete RR (17.0% in triple negative vs. 3.1% in non-triple negative, p = 0.005. However, relapse free survival (RFS and overall survival (OS were significantly shorter in triple negative breast cancer patients (p p = 0.021, respectively. Low histologic grade, positive hormone receptors, positive bcl-2 and low level of Ki-67 were associated with prolonged RFS. In addition, positive ER and positive bcl-2 were associated with prolonged OS. In our homogeneous patient population, initial clinical stage reflects RFS and OS more precisely than pathologic stage. In multivariate analysis, initial clinical stage was the only significant independent prognostic factor to impact on OS (hazard ratio 3.597, p = 0.044. Conclusion Several molecular markers provided useful predictive and prognostic information in stage II and III breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin chemotherapy. Triple negative phenotype was associated with shorter survival, even though it was associated

  3. Cause-specific effects of radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy in stage I-II endometrial cancer: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mell, Loren K; Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Lu, Tina; Wu, John; Saenz, Cheryl C; Vaida, Florin

    2013-11-06

    Radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy have been associated with improved survival in population-based studies of endometrial cancer, which is in contrast with findings from randomized trials and meta-analyses. The primary study aim was to estimate the cause-specific effects of adjuvant radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy on competing causes of mortality. We analyzed Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data from 1988 to 2006. The sample comprised 58172 patients with stage I and II endometrial adenocarcinoma. Patients were risk stratified by stage, grade, and age. Cumulative incidences and cause-specific hazards of competing causes of mortality were estimated according to treatment. All statistical tests were two-sided. Pelvic radiotherapy was associated with statistically significantly increased endometrial cancer mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.52 to 1.82) in all stage I and II patients and decreased noncancer mortality in intermediate and high-risk stage I and II patients (HR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.77 to 0.89). Lymphadenectomy was associated with increased endometrial cancer mortality in stage I patients (HR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.16 to 1.39), decreased endometrial cancer mortality in stage II patients (HR = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.52 to 0.72), and decreased noncancer mortality in both stage I and II patients (HR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.80 to 0.88). Effects of radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy on second cancer mortality varied according to risk strata. Radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy are associated with statistically significantly reduced noncancer mortality in stage I and II endometrial cancer. The improved overall survival associated with these treatments reported from SEER studies is largely attributable to their selective application in healthier patients rather than their effects on endometrial cancer.

  4. Predictive value of PET-CT for pathological response in stages II and III breast cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García-Esquinas, Marta A; Arrazola García, Juan; García-Sáenz, José A; Furió-Bacete, V; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel E; Ortega Candil, Aída; Cabrera Martín, María N; Carreras Delgado, José L

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively study the value of PET-CT with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to predict neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) response of locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients. A written informed consent and approval were obtained from the Ethics Committee. PET-CT accuracy in the prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) after NAC was studied in primary tumors and lymph node metastasis in 43 women (mean age: 50 years: range: 27-71 years) with histologically proven breast cancer between December 2009 and January 2011. PET-CT was performed at baseline and after NAC. SUV(max) percentage changes (ΔSUV(max)) were compared with pathology findings at surgery. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to discriminate between locoregional pCR and non-pCR. In patients not achieving pCR, it was investigated if ΔSUV(max) could accurately identify the residual cancer burden (RCB) classes: RCB-I (minimal residual disease (MRD)), RCB-II (moderate RD), and RCB-III (extensive RD). pCR was obtained in 11 patients (25.6%). Residual disease was found in 32 patients (74.4%): 16 (37.2%) RCB-I, 15 (35.6%) RCB-II and 2 (4.7%) RCB-III. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 90.9%, 90.6%, and 90.7%, respectively. Specificity was 94.1% in the identification of a subset of patients who had either pCR or MRD. Accuracy of ΔSUV(max) in the locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients after NAC is high for the identification of pCR cases. Its specificity is potentially sufficient to identify a subgroup of patients who could be managed with conservative surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  5. [Double Endobutto reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament combined with repairing acromioclavicular ligament at stage I for the treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-yue; Yu, Chong; Huang, Zhong-ming; Han, Lei

    2015-06-01

    To explore clinical efficacy of double Endobutto reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament combined with repairing acromioclavicular ligament in stage I in treating acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V . From January 2010 to September 2013, 56 patients with Rockwood type III - V acromioclavicular dislocation were treated by operation, including 20 males and 36 femlaes, aged from 32 to 52 years old with an average of 38.5 years old. Twenty-five patients were on the left side and 31 cases on the right side. The time from injury to operation was from 3 to 14 days, averaged 7 days. All patients were diagnosed as acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V, and double Endobutto were used to reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament, line metal anchors were applied for repairing acromioclavicular ligament. Postoperative complications were observed, Karlsson and Constant-Murley evaluation standard were used to evaluate clinical effects. All patients were followed up from 8 to 24 months with average of 11 months. According to Karlsson evaluation standard at 6 months after operation,42 cases were grade A, 13 were grade B and 1 was grade C. Constant-Murley score were improved from (42.80±5.43) before operation to (91.75±4.27) at 6 months after operation. All items at 6 months after operation were better than that of preoperative items. Forty-eight patients got excellent results, 7 were moderate and only 1 with bad result. No shoulder joint adhesion, screw loosening or breakage were occurred during following up. Double Endobutto reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament combined with repairing acromioclavicular ligament in stage I for the treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V could obtain early staisfied clinical effects, and benefit for early recovery of shoulder joint function.

  6. Lymphography and computed tomography of abdominal nodes in newly diagnosed patients with Hodgkin's disease in clinical stage I-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, C.H.

    1986-10-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, 80 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) in clinical Stage I-III had computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis and lymphography (LAG) prior to staging laparatomy with multiple lymph node biopsies at Stanford University Medical Center. There were 224 biopsied nodal sites. The sensitivity and specificity for CT to determine the status of biopsied paraortic and iliac nodes was .61 and .91 vs. .94 and .90 for LAG. CT appeared of even lower sensitivity (.13) in evaluating splenic hilar, celiac axis and portal nodes. Including all biopsy proven subdiaphragmatic nodal sites, CT's sensitivity to diagnose the presence of subdiaphragmatic adenopathy was .38 vs. .52 in LAG. Assessment of the final pathological stage was more successful by LAG (.61) than by CT (.49). Positive and negative predictive values of both tests indicate higher reliability of LAG results as regards individual intraabdominal nodes (LAG .71, .98 vs. CT .58, .86), the entire subdiaphragmatic nodal area (LAG .79, .77 vs. CT .61, .71) and prediction of final pathological stage. LAG appeared to be the more useful test during initial staging of newly diagnosed and untreated patients with HD. None of the test for itself or in combination can replace laparatomy when exact information is necessary for further clinical decisions.

  7. Two-Stage Separation of V(IV) and Al(III) by Crystallization and Solvent Extraction from Aluminum-Rich Sulfuric Acid Leaching Solution of Stone Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qihua; Zhang, Yimin; Liu, Tao; Huang, Jing; Liu, Hong

    2016-12-01

    To improve separation of V(IV) and Al(III) from aluminum-rich sulfuric acid leaching solution of stone coal, the two-stage separation by crystallization and solvent extraction methods have been developed. A co-extraction coefficient (k) was put forward to evaluate comprehensively co-extraction extent in different solutions. In the crystallization stage, 68.2% of aluminum can be removed from the solution. In the solvent extraction stage, vanadium was selectively extracted using di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid/tri-n-butyl phosphate from the crystalline mother solution, followed by H2SO4 stripped efficiently. A V2O5 product with purity of 98.39% and only 0.10% Al was obtained after oxidation, precipitation, and calcination. Compared with vanadium extraction from solution without crystallization, the counter-current extraction stage of vanadium can be decreased from 6 to 3 and co-extraction coefficient (k) decreased from 2.51 to 0.58 with two-stage separation. It is suggested that the aluminum removal by crystallization can evidently weaken the influence of aluminum co-extraction on vanadium extraction and improve the selectivity of solvent extraction for vanadium.

  8. Treatment Options for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lymphoma Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (small lymphocytic lymphoma) Mycosis Fungoides (Including Sézary Syndrome) Treatment (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma) Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment Non-Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  9. Long-term outcomes following post-operative radiotherapy for Stage I/II testicular seminoma - an Australasian single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Nazareth, Lester; Hindson, Benjamin; Matheson, Bronwyn; Millar, Jeremy L

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study is to review the long-term oncological outcomes and adverse effects of post-operative radiotherapy (PORT) for Stage I/II seminoma patients in an Australian radiation treatment centre. This is a retrospective study of 125 patients with Stage I/II seminoma treated with PORT at the Alfred Health Radiation Oncology Service between 1992 and 2013. Patients were linked to the Victorian Cancer Registry to enable confirmation of survival and diagnosis of secondary malignancies (SM). The relapse-free survival (RFS), testicular-cancer-specific survival (TCSS), overall survival (OS) and SM-free survival (SMFS) were estimated with Kaplan-Meier methods. The median age at diagnosis was 36 (range 20-62). The median time between diagnosis and PORT was 1.6 months (range: 0.5-4.5). Fifty patients (40%) had PORT to the para-aortic (PA) target alone, while the remaining had PORT to PA and ipsilateral or bilateral iliac lymph nodes. There were no acute adverse effects requiring admission. The median follow-up after PORT was 7.8 years (range = 0.1-19.1). There were two relapses, both of which occurred within 1 year of PORT (estimated 10-year RFS = 98.4%). Five deaths were reported, none of which were testicular cancer-related death (estimated 10-year TCSS = 100%, 10-year OS = 97.3%). There were seven SM (one lower lip cancer, one upper shoulder melanoma, one mesothelioma, two prostate cancer, one acute myeloid leukaemia and one contralateral testicular seminoma) reported in six patients, with estimated 10-year SMFS of 92.9%. Our series confirms excellent oncological outcomes among patients with Stage I/II seminoma treated with PORT, with uncommon occurrence of SM.

  10. Survival Benefit of Surgery after Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N0-2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Is Dependent on Pathologic Nodal Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziel, Ellis; Hermann, Gregory; Sen, Neilayan; Bonomi, Philip; Liptay, Michael J; Fidler, Mary Jo; Batus, Marta; Warren, William H; Chmielewski, Gary; Sher, David J

    2015-10-01

    The benefit of surgery (trimodality therapy [TMT]) after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, but nodal pathologic complete response (N-PCR) is accepted as a strong predictor of overall survival (OS). We compared the outcomes of patients treated with TMT versus CRT, focusing on the importance of N-PCR. Patients with stage III NSCLC treated with CRT or TMT from December 2004 through December 2012 were included; patients with N3 disease were excluded. Pathologic nodal response dichotomized surgical patients into N-PCR versus residual nodal disease (RND) groups. Actuarial OS, progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were compared between patients treated with CRT and TMT and between CRT and N-PCR/RND. The cohort was composed of 138 patients (52% CRT and 48% TMT). The median OS was significantly higher after TMT than after CRT (81 versus 31.8 mo, p = 0.0068). This benefit was restricted to N-PCR (n = 50, 83.2 versus 31.8 mo, p = 0.0004), as RND (n = 19) experienced poor OS (16.1 mo). On multivariable analyses, N-PCR had superior OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.38; p = 0.0012), PFS (HR, 0.42; p = 0.0005), and DMFS (HR, 0.42; p = 0.0007) compared with CRT. Conversely, there were trends for worse OS and PFS for RND versus CRT, although only inferior DMFS was significant (HR, 1.83; p = 0.04). Surgical patients with complete nodal clearance experienced superior survival, but those with RND fared no better than CRT alone. Mediastinal response may play an important role in the decision to proceed with surgical resection after CRT for stage III NSCLC.

  11. A Prospective Study of Comparing Multi-Gene Biomarker Chip and Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen in the Postoperative Surveillance for Patients with Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Tang; Huang, Ming-Yii; Yeh, Yung-Sung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Circulating biomarkers can predict clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of our multigene biomarker chip for detecting circulating tumor cells for postoperative surveillance of stage I-III colorectal cancer patients. In total, 298 stage I-III colorectal cancer patients were analyzed after curative resection between June 2010 and October 2014. During each follow-up, a postoperative surveillance strategy, including ESMO Guidelines Working Group recommendations and the biochip, was used. After a 28.4-month median follow-up, 48 (16.1%) patients had postoperative relapse. Univariate analysis revealed that the postoperative relapse risk factors were rectal tumor, perineural invasion, elevated preoperative and postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, and positive biochip results (all P postoperative relapse correlated significantly with elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (odds ratio = 4.136, P = 0.008) and positive biochip results (odds ratio = 66.878, P sensitivity (P = 0.003), specificity (P = 0.003), positive (P = 0.002) and negative (P = 0.006) predictive values, and accuracy (P postoperative relapse were significantly higher than those of elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. Moreover, the median lead time between positive biochip result and postoperative relapse detection was significantly earlier than that between elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and postoperative relapse detection (10.7 vs. 2.8 months, P postoperative relapse during stage I-III colorectal cancer patient surveillance. In clinical practice, this biochip may facilitate early postoperative relapse diagnosis in colorectal cancer patients.

  12. Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting the Facts Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are Hodgkin lymphoma and ... develop into lymphomas: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells). Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) ...

  13. A pilot study (SWOG S0429 of weekly cetuximab and chest radiotherapy for poor-risk stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhchyau eChen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with poor performance status (PS or co-morbidities are often not candidates for standard chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT due to poor tolerance to treatments. A pilot study for poor-risk stage III NSCLC patients was conducted combining cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, with chest radiation (RT. Methods: Stage III NSCLC patients with Zubrod PS 2, or Zubrod PS 0-1 with poor pulmonary function and co-morbidities prohibiting chemoRT were eligible. A loading dose of cetuximab (400 mg/m2 was delivered week one, followed by weekly cetuximab (250 mg/m2/RT to 64.5 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions, and maintenance weekly cetuximab (250 mg/m2 for two years or until disease progression. H-score for EGFR protein expression was conducted in available tumors.Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled. Twenty two were assessed for outcome and toxicity. Median survival was 14 months and median progression-free survival was 8 months. The response rate was 47% and disease control rate was 74%. Toxicity assessment revealed 22.7% overall ≥ Grade 3 non-hematologic toxicities. Grade 3 esophagitis was observed in one patient (5%. The skin reactions were mostly Grade 1 or 2 except two of 22 (9% had Grade 3 acne and 1/22 (5% had Grade 3 radiation skin burn. Grade 3-4 hypomagnesemia was seen in 4 (18% patients. One patient (5% had elevated cardiac troponin and pulmonary emboli. H-score did not reveal prognostic significance. An initially planned second cohort of the study did not commence due to slow accrual, which would have added weekly docetaxel to cetuximab/RT after completion of the first cohort of patients. Conclusions: Concurrent weekly cetuximab/chest RT followed by maintenance cetuximab for poor-risk stage III NSCLC was well tolerated. Further studies with larger sample sizes will be useful to establish the optimal therapeutic ratio of this regimen.

  14. DNA Topoisomerase I Gene Copy Number and mRNA Expression Assessed as Predictive Biomarkers for Adjuvant Irinotecan in Stage II/III Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Sune Boris; Vainer, Ben; Nielsen, Signe L;

    2016-01-01

    (PETACC3) where patients were randomized to 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid with or without additional irinotecan. TOP1 copy number status was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a TOP1/CEN20 dual-probe combination. TOP1 mRNA data were available from previous analyses. RESULTS: TOP1......RNA data were available from 580 patients with stage III disease. Benefit of irinotecan was restricted to patients characterized by TOP1 mRNA expression ≥ 3rd quartile (RFS: HRadjusted, 0.59; P = .09; OS: HRadjusted, 0.44; P = 0.03). The treatment by TOP1 mRNA interaction was not statistically significant...

  15. The Impact of Extent and Location of Mediastinal Lymph Node Involvement on Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xanthopoulos, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kucharczuk, John C. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Lilie; Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Several surgical series have identified subcarinal, contralateral, and multilevel nodal involvement as predictors of poor overall survival in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive resection. This retrospective study evaluates the impact of extent and location of mediastinal lymph node (LN) involvement on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 106 consecutive patients with T1-4 N2-3 Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy at University of Pennsylvania between January 2003 and February 2009. For this analysis, mediastinal LN stations were divided into four mutually exclusive groups: supraclavicular, ipsilateral mediastinum, contralateral mediastinum, and subcarinal. Patients' conditions were then analyzed according to the extent of involvement and location of mediastinal LN stations. Results: The majority (88%) of patients received sequential or concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 32.6 months. By multivariable Cox modeling, chemotherapy use (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.21 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07-0.63]) was associated with improved overall survival. Increasing primary tumor [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose avidity (HR: 1.11 [CI: 1.06-1.19]), and subcarinal involvement (HR: 2.29 [CI: 1.11-4.73]) were significant negative predictors of overall survival. On univariate analysis, contralateral nodal involvement (HR: 0.70 [CI: 0.33-1.47]), supraclavicular nodal involvement (HR: 0.78 [CI: 0.38-1.67]), multilevel nodal involvement (HR: 0.97 [CI: 0.58-1.61]), and tumor size (HR: 1.04 [CI: 0.94-1.14]) did not predict for overall survival. Patients with subcarinal involvement also had lower rates of 2-year nodal control (51.2% vs. 74.9%, p = 0.047) and 2-year distant control (28.4% vs. 61.2%, p = 0.043). Conclusions: These data suggest that the factors that determine oncologic outcome in Stage III

  16. Phase II proof-of-concept study of pazopanib monotherapy in treatment-naive patients with stage I/II resectable non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altorki, Nasser; Lane, Maureen E; Bauer, Thomas; Lee, Paul C; Guarino, Michael J; Pass, Harvey; Felip, Enriqueta; Peylan-Ramu, Nili; Gurpide, Alfonso; Grannis, Frederic W; Mitchell, John D; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Swann, R Suzanne; Huff, Anne; Roychowdhury, Debasish F; Reeves, Anthony; Ottesen, Lone H; Yankelevitz, David F

    2010-07-01

    Patients with early-stage, resectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are at risk for recurrent disease, and 5-year survival rates do not exceed 75%. Angiogenesis inhibitors have shown clinical activity in patients with late-stage NSCLC, raising the possibility that targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway in earlier-stage disease may be beneficial. This proof-of-concept study examined safety and efficacy of short-term, preoperative pazopanib monotherapy in patients with operable stage I/II NSCLC. Patients scheduled for resection received oral pazopanib 800 mg/d for 2 to 6 weeks preoperatively. Tumor response was measured by high-resolution computed tomography, permitting estimation of change in tumor volume and diameter. Gene-expression profiling was performed on 77 pre- and post-treatment lung samples from 34 patients. Of 35 patients enrolled, 33 (94%) had clinical stage I NSCLC and two (6%) had clinical stage II NSCLC. Median treatment duration was 16 days (range, 3 to 29 days). Thirty patients (86%) achieved tumor-volume reduction after pazopanib treatment. Two patients achieved tumor-volume reduction > or = 50%, and three patients had partial response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Pazopanib was generally well tolerated. The most common adverse events included grade 2 hypertension, diarrhea, and fatigue. One patient developed pulmonary embolism 11 days after surgery. Several pazopanib target genes and other angiogenic factors were dysregulated post-treatment. Short-duration pazopanib was generally well tolerated and demonstrated single-agent activity in patients with early-stage NSCLC. Several target genes were dysregulated after pazopanib treatment, validating target-specific response and indicating a persistent pazopanib effect on lung cancer tissue. Further clinical evaluation of pazopanib in NSCLC is planned.

  17. Hodgkin lymphoma: answers take time!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Jonathan W

    2011-05-19

    In this issue of Blood, Straus and colleagues on behalf of the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) present the outcome of a phase 2 trial of doxorubicin, vinblastine,and gemcitabine for patients with early-stage, non-bulky, Hodgkin lymphoma.The complete response rate and progression-free survival were inferior to comparable series, emphasizing the challenges of improving outcome in this highly curable population.

  18. Intratumoral Metabolic Heterogeneity for Prediction of Disease Progression After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Saeryung; Song, Hochun; Byun, Byung Hyun and others

    2014-03-15

    We evaluated the value of variable {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters for the prediction of disease progression after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). One hundred sixteen pretreatment FDG PET/CT scans of inoperable stage III NSCLC were retrospectively reviewed (stage IIIA: 51; stage IIIB: 65). The volume of interest was automatically drawn for each primary lung tumor, and PET parameters were assessed as follows: maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using the boundaries presenting SUV intensity exceeding 3.0, and the area under the curve of the cumulative SUV-volume histograms (AUC-CSH), which is known to reflect the tumor heterogeneity. Progression-free survival (PFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were compared with each PET and clinical parameters by univariate and multivariate survival analysis.In the ROC analysis, the optimal cutoff values of SUV{sub max}, MTV (cm{sup 3}), and AUC-CSH for prediction of PFS were determined as 21.5, 27.7, and 4,800, respectively. In univariate analysis, PFS was statistically significantly reduced in those with AUC-CSH<4,800 (p =0.004). In multivariate analysis, AUC-CSH and SUV{sub max} were statistically significant independent prognostic factors (HR 3.35, 95 % CI 1.79.6.28, p <0.001; HR 0.25, 95% CI 0.09.0.70, p =0.008, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that AUC-CSH was the most significant independent prognostic factor for LRFS and DMFS (HR 3.27, 95 % CI 1.54.6.94, p =0.002; HR 2.79, 95 % CI 1.42.5.50, p =0.003). Intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity of primary lung tumor in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT can predict disease progression after CCRT in inoperable stage III NSCLC.

  19. Study protocol of the SACURA trial: a randomized phase III trial of efficacy and safety of UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishiguro Megumi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer is internationally accepted as standard treatment with established efficacy, but the usefulness of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer remains controversial. The major Western guidelines recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for “high-risk stage II” cancer, but this is not clearly defined and the efficacy has not been confirmed. Methods/design SACURA trial is a multicenter randomized phase III study which aims to evaluate the superiority of 1-year adjuvant treatment with UFT to observation without any adjuvant treatment after surgery for stage II colon cancer in a large population, and to identify “high-risk factors of recurrence/death” in stage II colon cancer and predictors of efficacy and adverse events of the chemotherapy. Patients aged between 20 and 80 years with curatively resected stage II colon cancer are randomly assigned to a observation group or UFT adjuvant therapy group (UFT at 500–600 mg/day as tegafur in 2 divided doses after meals for 5 days, followed by 2-day rest. This 1-week treatment cycle is repeated for 1 year. The patients are followed up for 5 years until recurrence or death. Treatment delivery and adverse events are entered into a web-based case report form system every 3 months. The target sample size is 2,000 patients. The primary endpoint is disease-free survival, and the secondary endpoints are overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and incidence and severity of adverse events. In an additional translational study, the mRNA expression of 5-FU-related enzymes, microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability, and histopathological factors including tumor budding are assessed to evaluate correlation with recurrences, survivals and adverse events. Discussion A total of 2,024 patients were enrolled from October 2006 to July 2010. The results of this study will provide important information that help to improve the

  20. Oxaliplatin and Irinotecan in Treating Young Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Prognostic value of BRAF and KRAS mutation status in stage II and III microsatellite instable colon cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Cuba, E. M. V.; Snaebjornsson, P.; Heideman, D. A. M.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Bosch, L.J.W.; Fijneman, R. J. A.; Belt, E.; Bril, H.; Stockmann, H. B. A. C.; Hooijberg, E.; Punt, C. J. A.; Koopman, M.; Nagtegaal, I. D.; Coupe, V. H. M.; Carvalho, B.; Meijer, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) has been associated with favourable survival in early stage colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC. The BRAF V600E mutation has been associated with worse survival in MSS CRC. This mutation occurs in 40% of MSI CRC and it is unclear wheth

  2. Lymph Node Negative Colorectal Cancers with Isolated Tumor Deposits Should Be Classified and Treated As Stage III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, E.J.T.; van Stijn, M.F.M.; Bril, H.; de Lange-de Klerk, E.S.M.; Meijer, G.A.; Meijer, S.; Stockmann, H.B.A.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic role of pericolic or perirectal isolated tumor deposits (ITDs) in node-negative colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unclear. Rules to define ITDs as regional lymph node metastases changed in subsequent editions of the TNM staging without substantial evidence. Aim of this

  3. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  4. Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These include the lymphatic vessels, tonsils, adenoids, spleen, thymus and bone marrow. Occasionally, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involves ... understand the possible link between pesticides and the development of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Older age. Non-Hodgkin's ...

  5. Quality control of involved-field radiotherapy for patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma based on a central prospective review. Comparison of the results between two study generations of the German Hodgkin Study Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bangard, C. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Bongartz, R.; Baues, C.; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Engert, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Oncology

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Based on experience in trials HD10 and HD11 (1998-2003), the radiotherapy reference center of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) continued their central prospective radiation oncological review in trials HD13 and HD14. The purpose of this analysis was to identify the impact of this procedure on radiotherapeutic management and to compare findings with former trials. Methods: Between 2003 and 2009, 1,710 patients were enrolled in the HD13 trial (early favorable stages) and 2,039 patients in the HD14 trial (early unfavorable stages). All patients received a total of 30 Gy involved-field (IF) radiotherapy within a combined modality approach. Results: For patients in HD13, there was a correction of disease involvement in 847/1,518 patients (56%), and for patients in HD14 in 1,370/1,905 patients (72%). Most discrepancies were observed in the lower mediastinum (19.2%), infraclavicular (31.7%), upper cervical (12.7%), and supraclavicular (10.8%) lymph nodes. This resulted in a change of disease stage in 241 (7%) patients and a shift into another study protocol in 66 (2%) patients. Due to the incorrect lymph node documentation of the participating study centers, the IF radiotherapy volume had to be enlarged in 1,063/3,423 patients (31%) and reduced in 244/3,423 patients (7.1%). These findings are comparable to the results of the quality control in the trials HD10 and HD11 (2,611 patients reviewed). Conclusion: Central review of the diagnostic imaging and clinical findings of Hodgkin's lymphoma patients shows a considerable number of discrepancies compared with the local evaluation. Thus, meticulous evaluation of all imaging information in close collaboration between the radiation oncologist and diagnostic radiologist is mandatory. (orig.)

  6. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT bone/bone marrow findings in Hodgkin's lymphoma may circumvent the use of bone marrow trephine biopsy at diagnosis staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin-Romsee, Gerard [Universite Paris 7, Service de Medicine Nucleaire, Hopital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (France); Institut Curie, Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif; Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel; Moretti, Jean-Luc [Universite Paris 7, Service de Medicine Nucleaire, Hopital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (France); Cuenca, Xavier; Brice, Pauline; Sibon, David [Hopital Saint-Louis, Haemato-Oncology, Paris (France); Decaudin, Didier; Anitei, Marcela [Institut Curie, Haematology, Paris (France); Benamor, Myriam [Institut Curie, Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Briere, Josette [Hopital Saint-Louis, Pathology, Paris (France); Kerviler, Eric de [Hopital Saint-Louis, Radiology, Paris (France)

    2010-06-15

    Accurate staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is necessary in selecting appropriate treatment. Bone marrow trephine biopsy (BMB) is the standard procedure for depicting bone marrow involvement. BMB is invasive and explores a limited part of the bone marrow. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is now widely used for assessing response to therapy in HL and a baseline study is obtained to improve accuracy. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to assess whether routine BMB remains necessary with concomitant {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Data from 83 patients (newly diagnosed HL) were reviewed. All patients had received contrast-enhanced CT, BMB and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Results of BMB were not available at the time of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Seven patients had lymphomatous involvement on BMB. Four patients had bone involvement on conventional CT (two with negative BMB). All patients with bone marrow and/or bone lesions at conventional staging were also diagnosed on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan. PET/CT depicted FDG-avid bone/bone marrow foci in nine additional patients. Four of them had only one or two foci, while the other had multiple foci. However, the iliac crest, site of the BMB, was not involved on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Osteolytic/sclerotic lesions matching FDG-avid foci were visible on the CT part of PET/CT in three patients. MRI ordered in three other patients suggested bone marrow involvement. Interim and/or end-therapy {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT documented response of FDG-avid bone/bone marrow foci to chemotherapy in every patient. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT highly improves sensitivity for diagnosis of bone/bone marrow lesions in HL compared to conventional staging. (orig.)

  7. Multidisciplinary management of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in stage III: clinical case description. Recommendations and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Carnio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in industrialized countries with progressive increase of its mortality rate. Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC is approximately 80-85% of all lung cancers, being adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma the most common histologies. The majority of the patients with stage III clinical stage, presents a mediastinal lymph node involvement described with computed tomography (TC and/or positron emission tomography (PET. The current approach to patients with NSCLC is multidisciplinary, especially for those staged as potentially operable, both for staging and for a correct definition of best treatment strategy. Updated international and national Guidelines and recommendations can provide valuable support to the clinician.The case described concerns the accidental detection of a tumour in the lung in a 58-year-old man with arterial hypertension controlled with ACE inhibitors. The treatments agreed after a multidisciplinary approach are cisplatin and docetaxel, the surgical resection, and the radiotherapy. After three months the patient has neither metastasis nor relapse.

  8. Analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET diffuse bone marrow uptake and splenic uptake in staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma: a reflection of disease infiltration or just inflammation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaun, Pierre Y. [University Hospital of Brest, Nuclear Medicine Department, Brest (France); Rene Gauducheau Cancer Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); Gastinne, Thomas [University Hospital of Nantes, Department of Haematology, Nantes (France); Bodet-Milin, Caroline [University Hospital of Nantes, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); Campion, Loic [Rene Gauducheau Cancer Center, Biostatistics Unit, Nantes (France); INSERM UMR 892, CRCNA, Nantes (France); Cambefort, Pierre [University Hospital of Brest, Nuclear Medicine Department, Brest (France); Moreau, Anne [University Hospital of Nantes, Department of Histopathology, Nantes (France); Le Gouill, Steven; Moreau, Philippe [University Hospital of Nantes, Department of Haematology, Nantes (France); INSERM UMR 892, CRCNA, Nantes (France); Berthou, Christian [University Hospital of Brest, Department of Haematology, Brest (France); Kraeber-Bodere, Francoise [Rene Gauducheau Cancer Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); University Hospital of Nantes, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); INSERM UMR 892, CRCNA, Nantes (France)

    2009-11-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET has been successfully evaluated in the management of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and the most recent international guidelines recommended {sup 18}F-FDG PET for initial staging and final therapeutic assessment. However, {sup 18}F-FDG PET diffuse bone marrow uptake (BMU) and splenic uptake (SU) are frequently observed at the initial imaging and remain difficult to analyse. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the significance of {sup 18}F-FDG diffuse BMU and SU in initial staging of HL. A total of 106 patients (median age: 31 years, range: 9-81, 51 female, 55 male) underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging of HL. BMU level was assessed visually according to liver uptake (1 = below liver uptake, 2 = corresponding to liver uptake, 3 = above liver uptake) and semi-quantitatively using the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) measured in the sacral area. SU was assessed visually according to liver uptake (1 = below liver uptake, 2 = corresponding to liver uptake, 3 = above liver uptake). These data were compared with the patient's characteristics including sex, age, Ann Arbor staging, bulky disease (tumour burden > 10 cm), presence of B symptoms, bone foci on PET (n = 106), bone marrow involvement (BMI) on biopsy (n = 75), leukocyte count (n = 74), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) (n = 87), C-reactive protein (CRP) (n = 83) and fibrinogen (n = 60). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Multivariate analysis found an independent correlation between BMU visual grading and CRP level (p = 0.007). For semi-quantitative BMU evaluation, multivariate analysis found an independent correlation between sacral SUVs and CRP level (p = 0.032) and Ann Arbor stage (p = 0.005). No BMI was found in patients who presented with SUV{sub max} below 3.4. For splenic evaluation, multivariate analysis found an independent correlation between SU and splenic foci (p = 0.034). No statistical link was found between SU and

  9. The bacteriophage P1 hot gene, encoding a homolog of the E. coli DNA polymerase III theta subunit, is expressed during both lysogenic and lytic growth stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikova, Anna K; Schaaper, Roel M

    2007-11-01

    The bacteriophage P1 hot gene product is a homolog of the theta subunit of E. coli DNA polymerase III. Previous studies with hot cloned on a plasmid have shown that Hot protein can substitute for theta, as evidenced by its stabilizing effect on certain dnaQ mutator mutants carrying an unstable pol III proofreading subunit (epsilon subunit). These results are consistent with Hot, like theta, being a replication protein involved in stabilizing the intrinsically unstable epsilon proofreading function. However, the function of hot for the viral life cycle is less clear. In the present study, we show that the hot gene is not essential. Based on its promoter structure, hot has been previously classified as a "late" phage gene, a property that is not easily reconciled with a presumed replication function. Here, we clarify this issue by demonstrating that P1 hot is actively expressed both during the lysogenic state and in the early stages of a lytic induction, in addition to its expression in the late stage of phage development. The results indicate that P1 hot has a complex expression pattern, compatible with a model in which Hot may affect the host replication machinery to benefit overall phage replication.

  10. Dissection of immune gene networks in primary melanoma tumors critical for antitumor surveillance of patients with stage II-III resectable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Chang, Rui; Pham, Lisa; Phelps, Robert G; Harcharik, Sara T; Hall, Lawrence D; Bernardo, Sebastian G; Moskalenko, Marina M; Sivendran, Meera; Fu, Yichun; de Moll, Ellen H; Pan, Michael; Moon, Jee Young; Arora, Sonali; Cohain, Ariella; DiFeo, Analisa; Ferringer, Tammie C; Tismenetsky, Mikhail; Tsui, Cindy L; Friedlander, Philip A; Parides, Michael K; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Lebwohl, Mark G; Wolchok, Jedd D; Bhardwaj, Nina; Burakoff, Steven J; Oh, William K; Palucka, Karolina; Merad, Miriam; Schadt, Eric E; Saenger, Yvonne M

    2014-08-01

    Patients with resected stage II-III cutaneous melanomas remain at high risk for metastasis and death. Biomarker development has been limited by the challenge of isolating high-quality RNA for transcriptome-wide profiling from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) primary tumor specimens. Using NanoString technology, RNA from 40 stage II-III FFPE primary melanomas was analyzed and a 53-immune-gene panel predictive of non-progression (area under the curve (AUC)=0.920) was defined. The signature predicted disease-specific survival (DSS P<0.001) and recurrence-free survival (RFS P<0.001). CD2, the most differentially expressed gene in the training set, also predicted non-progression (P<0.001). Using publicly available microarray data from 46 primary human melanomas (GSE15605), a coexpression module enriched for the 53-gene panel was then identified using unbiased methods. A Bayesian network of signaling pathways based on this data identified driver genes. Final