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Sample records for lymphoid organ spheroids

  1. Innate lymphoid cells in secondary lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Ephraïm, Yotam E; Mebius, Reina E

    2016-05-01

    The family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) has attracted attention in recent years as its members are important regulators of immunity, while they can also cause pathology. In both mouse and man, ILCs were initially discovered in developing lymph nodes as lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. These cells form the prototypic members of the ILC family and play a central role in the formation of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). In the absence of LTi cells, lymph nodes (LN) and Peyer's Patches (PP) fail to form in mice, although the splenic white pulp can develop normally. Besides LTi cells, the ILC family encompasses helper-like ILCs with functional distinctions as seen by T-helper cells, as well as cytotoxic natural killer (NK) cells. ILCs are still present in adult SLOs where they have been shown to play a role in lymphoid tissue regeneration. Furthermore, ILCs were implicated to interact with adaptive lymphocytes and influence the adaptive immune response. Here, we review the recent literature on the role of ILCs in secondary lymphoid tissue from the formation of SLOs to mature SLOs in adults, during homeostasis and pathology.

  2. Bioengineering of Artificial Lymphoid Organs

    OpenAIRE

    Nosenko, M. A.; Drutskaya, M. S; M. M. Moisenovich; Nedospasov, S A

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of bioengineering of artificial lymphoid organs.Progress in this field may help to better understand the nature of the structure-function relations that exist in immune organs. Artifical lymphoid organs may also be advantageous in the therapy or correction of immunodefficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. The structural organization, development, and function of lymphoid tissue are analyzed with a focus on the role of intercellular contacts and on the cy...

  3. Bioengineering of Artificial Lymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosenko, M A; Drutskaya, M S; Moisenovich, M M; Nedospasov, S A

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of bioengineering of artificial lymphoid organs.Progress in this field may help to better understand the nature of the structure-function relations that exist in immune organs. Artifical lymphoid organs may also be advantageous in the therapy or correction of immunodefficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. The structural organization, development, and function of lymphoid tissue are analyzed with a focus on the role of intercellular contacts and on the cytokine signaling pathways regulating these processes. We describe various polymeric materials, as scaffolds, for artificial tissue engineering. Finally, published studies in which artificial lymphoid organs were generated are reviewed and possible future directions in the field are discussed.

  4. Effect of Copper Toxicity on Lymphoid Organs in Ducklings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Heng-min; CHEN Huai-tao; PENG Xi; YANG Guang; DENG Jun-liang; LI De-bing

    2004-01-01

    210 one-day-old Tianfu meat ducklings ware divided into three groups,and fed on diets as follows: (1) control (Cu 12.16 mg kg-1),(2) copper toxic Ⅰ (Cu 850 mg kg-1) and (3)copper toxic Ⅱ( Cu 1 050 mg kg-1) for studies on effects of copper toxicity on lymphoid organs in duckling with the methods of experimental pathology and flow cytometry (FCM).The weight and growth index of the thymus,spleen and bursa of Fabricius were markedly reduced (P< 0.05 or P< 0.01) in both copper toxic group Ⅰ and Cu toxic group Ⅱ when compared with control group.The G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle of the thymus,spleen and bursa of Fabricius was much higher,and S,G2+M phases lower in Cu toxic groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ than in the control group.There were lymphocyte degeneration and depletion of lymphoid organs,and the reticular cells of spleen and bursa of Fabricius proliferated and the reticular cells of thymus were also degenerate and necrotic in Cu toxic groups.The results demonstrated that Cu toxicity seriously impaired the progression of lymphocytes from the G0/G1 phase to S phase,inhibited the development of lymphoid organs and caused marked pathological injury in lymphoid organs.The results also showed that the effect of Cu toxicity on the primary lymphoid organs occurred stronger than on the secondary lymphoid organs.The effect of Cu toxicity was the greatest on the bursa of Fabricius,followed hy the thymus,and then the spleen.Potential mechanisms underlying aforementioned observation were also discussed.key words: Copper toxicity,Lesion,Cell cycle,Lymphoid organ,Duckling

  5. Effect of Zinc Toxicity on Lymphoid Organs in Chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Heng-min; ZHAO Cui-yan; LI De-bing; PENG Xi; DENG Jun-liang

    2004-01-01

    The experiment was conducted with the objective of studies on effects of zinc toxicity on lymphoid organs by the methods of experimental pathology and flow cytometry (FCM). 200one-day-old Avian broilers were divided into four groups randomly, and fed on diets as follows: controls (Zn 100mg kg-1)and zinc toxic (Zn 1 500mg kg-1, zinc toxic group Ⅰ; Zn 2 000 mg kg-1, zinc toxic group Ⅱ; Zn 2 500 mg kg-1, zinc toxic group Ⅲ) for seven weeks. The weight and growth index of the thymus, spleen and bursa of Fabricius were reduced in both zinc toxic group Ⅱ and zinc toxic group Ⅲ when compared with those of control group. The G0/G1 phase of the cell cycles of the lymphoid organs was higher, and S, G2+M phases lower in zinc toxic groups Ⅱ and Ⅲ than in control group. Lymphocytes were depleted and degenerate in the lymphoid organs. The reticular cells of the bursa of Fabricius proliferated and the reticular cells of the thymus were also degenerate and necrotic,particularly in zinc toxic groups Ⅱ and Ⅲ. The results demonstrated that more than 1 500 mg kg-1 impaired the progression of lymphocytes from the G0/G1 phase to S phase obviously, inhibited the development of lymphoid organs and caused marked pathological changes in the lymphoid organs. Potential mechanisms underlying these observations are also discussed.

  6. THE EXTENT OF CLONAL STRUCTURE IN DIFFERENT LYMPHOID ORGANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HERMANS, MHA; WUBBENA, A; KROESE, FGM; HUNT, SV; COWAN, R; OPSTELTEN, D

    1992-01-01

    To gain insight into the clonal organization of lymphoid organs, we studied the distribution in situ of donor-derived cells in near-physiological chimeras. We introduced RT7b fetal liver cells into nonirradiated congenic RT7a neonatal rats. The chimerism 6-20 wk after injection ranged from 0.3 to 20

  7. [Meningeal tertiary lymphoid organs: Major actors in intrathecal autoimmunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnan, M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by an intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulins synthesized by B-cell clones and by a brain infiltrate of clonal T-cells. The clonal maturation of these lymphocytes takes place in tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO) developed in the intrathecal compartment. TLO are acquired lymphoid organs able to develop in the vicinity of the inflammatory sites, where they mount a complete antigen-driven immune response. We here review TLO pathophysiology in animal models of MS and human MS. Several pieces of evidence suggest that intrathecal TLO may play a major role in the clinical impairment. Potential therapeutic applications are examined.

  8. Human Ia-like antigens in non-lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K; Fukunishi, T; Barcos, M; Tanigaki, N; Pressman, D

    1979-01-01

    Human Ia-like antigens in liver and kidney were shown by the immunofluorescence assay to be present mostly in the endothelial-mesenchymal cells of these organs. The parenchymal cells apparently contained no human Ia-like antigens. The antigens in liver and kidney were purified and shown to have the same subunit structure as human Ia-like antigens of cultured B-lymphoid cells. The human Ia-like antigens in non-lymphoid organs, not only in liver and kidney but also in testis, heart, muscle and brain, carried all the xenoantigenic characteristics of human Ia-like antigens expressed on lymphoid cells of B-cell lineage. Images Figure 1 PMID:389786

  9. Avian dendritic cells: Phenotype and ontogeny in lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Nándor; Bódi, Ildikó; Oláh, Imre

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are critically important accessory cells in the innate and adaptive immune systems. Avian DCs were originally identified in primary and secondary lymphoid organs by their typical morphology, displaying long cell processes with cytoplasmic granules. Several subtypes are known. Bursal secretory dendritic cells (BSDC) are elongated cells which express vimentin intermediate filaments, MHC II molecules, macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), and produce 74.3+ secretory granules. Avian follicular dendritic cells (FDC) highly resemble BSDC, express the CD83, 74.3 and CSF1R molecules, and present antigen in germinal centers. Thymic dendritic cells (TDC), which express 74.3 and CD83, are concentrated in thymic medulla while interdigitating DC are found in T cell-rich areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Avian Langerhans cells are a specialized 74.3-/MHC II+ cell population found in stratified squamous epithelium and are capable of differentiating into 74.3+ migratory DCs. During organogenesis hematopoietic precursors of DC colonize the developing lymphoid organ primordia prior to immigration of lymphoid precursor cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the ontogeny, cytoarchitecture, and immunophenotype of avian DC, and offers an antibody panel for the in vitro and in vivo identification of these heterogeneous cell types.

  10. Impaired Lymphoid Organ Development in Mice Lacking the Heparan Sulfate Modifying Enzyme Glucuronyl C5-Epimerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Reijmers; M.F.R. Vondenhoff; R. Roozendaal; A. Kuil; J.P. Li; M. Spaargaren; S.T. Pals; R.E. Mebius

    2010-01-01

    The development of lymphoid organs depends on cross talk between hematopoietic cells and mesenchymal stromal cells and on vascularization of the lymphoid primordia. These processes are orchestrated by cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic factors that require tight spatiotemporal regulation. Heparan

  11. Fibroblasts as Efficient Antigen-Presenting Cells in Lymphoid Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundig, Thomas M.; Bachmann, Martin F.; Dipaolo, Claudio; Simard, John J. L.; Battegay, Manuel; Lother, Heinz; Gessner, Andre; Kuhlcke, Klaus; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1995-06-01

    Only so-called "professional" antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of hematopoietic origin are believed capable of inducing T lymphocyte responses. However, fibroblasts transfected with viral proteins directly induced antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in vivo, without involvement of host APCs. Fibroblasts induced T cells only in the milieu of lymphoid organs. Thus, antigen localization affects self-nonself discrimination and cell-based vaccine strategies.

  12. Ontogeny of the Lymphoid Organs of Japanese Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yun; JIANG Guoliang; ZHANG Shicui

    2004-01-01

    Histological study on the ontogeny of the lymphoid organs, kidney, thymus and spleen of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, from hatching to 40 d was carried out. The pronephric kidney duct appeared early in hatching although the primordial haemopoietic stem cells were observed within a week after hatching. The spleen was first seen after 8 d of hatching. The thymus appeared after 15 d, situated near the pronephric kidney. Small lymphoid cells appeared during the later phase of the post-larval stage in the sequence of thymus, kidney and spleen. During the 40 d of observations, there were no distinct inner or outer zones in thymus and no red or white pulp in spleen. These results suggest that the nonspecific defense immune system plays a very important role in the early larval stage of Japanese flounder.

  13. Inducers & Organizers in Human Fetal and Adult Lymphoid Tissues : the characterization of RORC+ innate lymphoid cells and RANKL+ marginal reticular cells in human fetal and adult secondary lymphoid organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Hoorweg (Kerim)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human immune system harbors the potential to generate novel lymphoid organs within inflamed tissues during disease. These tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) resemble lymph nodes and can contain segregated T and B cell areas, germinal centers, high endothelial venules a

  14. Effect of Copper Toxicity on Lymphoid Organs in Broilers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Heng-min; YANG Guang; PENG Xi; DENG Jun-liang; LI De-bing

    2005-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to examine the effect of copper toxicity on lymphoid organs by experimental pathology and flow cytometry (FCM). 180 one-day-old Avian broilers were divided into three groups, and fed diets as follows: 1) Control(Cu 11.97 mg kg-1 diet), 2) Cu- toxic group Ⅰ (Cu 650 mg kg-1) and 3) Cu- toxic group Ⅱ (Cu 850 mg kg-1) for six weeks.Compared with the control, the growth index of the thymus, spleen and bursa of Fabricius were markedly reduced (P<0.05or P<0.01), the G0/G1 phase of cell cycles of the thymus, spleen and bursa of Fabricius was higher (P<0.05 or P<0.01), while the S phase and proliferating index were lower (P<0.05 or P<0.01)in both Cu-toxic group Ⅰ and Cu-toxic group Ⅱ. The results demonstrated that Cu toxicity seriously impaired the progression of lymphocytes from the G0/G1 phase to the S phase, inhibited the growth and development of lymphoid organs.

  15. Lymphoid organ-resident dendritic cells exhibit unique transcriptional fingerprints based on subset and site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutlu G Elpek

    Full Text Available Lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets are thought to play unique roles in determining the fate of T cell responses. Recent studies focusing on a single lymphoid organ identified molecular pathways that are differentially operative in each DC subset and led to the assumption that a given DC subset would more or less exhibit the same genomic and functional profiles throughout the body. Whether the local milieu in different anatomical sites can also influence the transcriptome of DC subsets has remained largely unexplored. Here, we interrogated the transcriptional relationships between lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets from spleen, gut- and skin-draining lymph nodes, and thymus of C57BL/6 mice. For this purpose, major resident DC subsets including CD4 and CD8 DCs were sorted at high purity and gene expression profiles were compared using microarray analysis. This investigation revealed that lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets exhibit divergent genomic programs across lymphoid organs. Interestingly, we also found that transcriptional and biochemical properties of a given DC subset can differ between lymphoid organs for lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets, but not plasmacytoid DCs, suggesting that determinants of the tissue milieu program resident DCs for essential site-specific functions.

  16. Prions and lymphoid organs: solved and remaining mysteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Tracy; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    Prion colonization of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) is a critical step preceding neuroinvasion in prion pathogenesis. Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which depend on both tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) and lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) signaling for maintenance, are thought to be the primary sites of prion accumulation in SLOs. However, prion titers in RML-infected TNFR1 (-/-) lymph nodes and rates of neuroinvasion in TNFR1 (-/-) mice remain high despite the absence of mature FDCs. Recently, we discovered that TNFR1-independent prion accumulation in lymph nodes relies on LTβR signaling. Loss of LTβR signaling in TNFR1 (-/-) lymph nodes coincided with the de-differentiation of high endothelial venules (HEVs)-the primary sites of lymphocyte entry into lymph nodes. These findings suggest that HEVs are the sites through which prions initially invade lymph nodes from the bloodstream. Identification of HEVs as entry portals for prions clarifies a number of previous observations concerning peripheral prion pathogenesis. However, a number of questions still remain: What is the mechanism by which prions are taken up by HEVs? Which cells are responsible for delivering prions to lymph nodes? Are HEVs the main entry site for prions into lymph nodes or do alternative routes also exist? These questions and others are considered in this article.

  17. Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in Central Nervous System Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Mitsdoerffer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS, which results in permanent neuronal damage and substantial disability in patients. Autoreactive T cells are important drivers of the disease, however, the efficacy of B cell depleting therapies uncovered an essential role for B cells in disease pathogenesis. They can contribute to inflammatory processes via presentation of autoantigen, secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and production of pathogenic antibodies. Recently, B cell aggregates reminiscent of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs were discovered in the meninges of MS patients, leading to the hypothesis that differentiation and maturation of autopathogenic B and T cells may partly occur inside the CNS. Since these structures were associated with a more severe disease course, it is extremely important to gain insight into the mechanism of induction, their precise function and clinical significance. Mechanistic studies in patiens are limited. However, a few studies in the MS animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE recapitulate TLO formation in the CNS and provide new insight into CNS TLO features, formation and function. This review summarizes what we know so far about CNS TLOs in MS and what we have learned about them from EAE models. It also highlights the areas that are in need of further experimental work, as we are just beginning to understand and evaluate the phenomenon of CNS TLOs.

  18. Development and Function of Secondary and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in the Small Intestine and the Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Manuela; Lochner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The immune system of the gut has evolved a number of specific lymphoid structures that contribute to homeostasis in the face of microbial colonization and food-derived antigenic challenge. These lymphoid organs encompass Peyer’s patches (PP) in the small intestine and their colonic counterparts that develop in a programed fashion before birth. In addition, the gut harbors a network of lymphoid tissues that is commonly designated as solitary intestinal lymphoid tissues (SILT). In contrast to PP, SILT develop strictly after birth and consist of a dynamic continuum of structures ranging from small cryptopatches (CP) to large, mature isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF). Although the development of PP and SILT follow similar principles, such as an early clustering of lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and the requirement for lymphotoxin beta (LTβ) receptor-mediated signaling, the formation of CP and their further maturation into ILF is associated with additional intrinsic and environmental signals. Moreover, recent data also indicate that specific differences exist in the regulation of ILF formation between the small intestine and the colon. Importantly, intestinal inflammation in both mice and humans is associated with a strong expansion of the lymphoid network in the gut. Recent experiments in mice suggest that these structures, although they resemble large, mature ILF in appearance, may represent de novo-induced tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO). While, so far, it is not clear whether intestinal TLO contribute to the exacerbation of inflammatory pathology, it has been shown that ILF provide the critical microenvironment necessary for the induction of an effective host response upon infection with enteric bacterial pathogens. Regarding the importance of ILF for intestinal immunity, interfering with the development and maturation of these lymphoid tissues may offer novel means for manipulating the immune response during intestinal infection or inflammation. PMID

  19. Stromal cells in chronic inflammation and tertiary lymphoid organ formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christopher D; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Bénézech, Cecile; Caamaño, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is an unstable state. It either resolves or persists. Why inflammation persists and the factors that define tissue tropism remain obscure. Increasing evidence suggests that tissue-resident stromal cells not only provide positional memory but also actively regulate the differential accumulation of inflammatory cells within inflamed tissues. Furthermore, at many sites of chronic inflammation, structures that mimic secondary lymphoid tissues are observed, suggesting that chronic inflammation and lymphoid tissue formation share common activation programs. Similarly, blood and lymphatic endothelial cells contribute to tissue homeostasis and disease persistence in chronic inflammation. This review highlights our increasing understanding of the role of stromal cells in inflammation and summarizes the novel immunological role that stromal cells exert in the persistence of inflammatory diseases.

  20. Homeostatic migration and distribution of innate immune cells in primary and secondary lymphoid organs with ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolich-Žugich, J; Davies, J S

    2017-03-01

    Ageing of the innate and adaptive immune system, collectively termed immune senescence, is a complex process. One method to understand the components of ageing involves dissociating the effects of ageing on the cells of the immune system, on the microenvironment in lymphoid organs and tissues where immune cells reside and on the circulating factors that interact with both immune cells and their microenvironment. Heterochronic parabiosis, a surgical union of two organisms of disparate ages, is ideal for this type of study, as it has the power to dissociate the age of the cell and the age of the microenvironment into which the cell resides or is migrating. So far, however, it has been used sparingly to study immune ageing. Here we review the limited literature on homeostatic innate immune cell trafficking in ageing in the absence of chronic inflammation. We also review our own recent data on trafficking of innate immune subsets between primary and secondary lymphoid organs in heterochronic parabiosis. We found no systemic bias in retention or acceptance of neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells or natural killer cells with ageing in primary and secondary lymphoid organs. We conclude that these four innate immune cell types migrate to and populate lymphoid organs (peripheral lymph nodes, spleen and bone marrow), regardless of their own age and of the age of lymphoid organs. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  1. Human secondary lymphoid organs typically contain polyclonally-activated proliferating regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jorieke H; Koenen, Hans J P M; Fasse, Esther; Tijssen, Henk J; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Joosten, Irma

    2013-09-26

    Immunomodulating regulatory T-cell (Treg) therapy is a promising strategy in autoimmunity and transplantation. However, to achieve full clinical efficacy, better understanding of in vivo human Treg biology is warranted. Here, we demonstrate that in contrast to blood and bone marrow Tregs, which showed a resting phenotype, the majority of CD4(pos)CD25(pos)CD127(neg)FoxP3(pos) Tregs in secondary lymphoid organs were proliferating activated CD69(pos)CD45RA(neg) cells with a hyperdemethylated FOXP3 gene and a broad T-cell receptor-Vβ repertoire, implying polyclonal activation. Activated CD69(pos) Tregs were distributed over both T-cell and B-cell areas, distant from Aire(pos) and CD11c(pos) cells. In contrast to the anergic peripheral blood Tregs, lymphoid organ Tregs had significant ex vivo proliferative capacity and produced cytokines like interleukin-2, while revealing similar suppressive potential. Also, next to Treg-expressing chemokine receptors important for a prolonged stay in lymphoid organs, a significant part of the cells expressed peripheral tissue-associated, functional homing markers. In conclusion, our data suggest that human secondary lymphoid organs aid in the maintenance and regulation of Treg function and homeostasis. This knowledge may be exploited for further optimization of Treg immunotherapy, for example, by ex vivo selection of Tregs with capacity to migrate to lymphoid organs providing an in vivo platform for further Treg expansion.

  2. The disks and spheroid of LTGs in the light of their early web-like organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Tenreiro, R.; Obreja, A.; Brook, C.; Martínez-Serrano, F. J.; Serna, A.

    2016-10-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations show that the baryonic elements that at z = 0 form the stellar populations of late-type galaxies (LTGs), display, at high z, a gaseous web-like organization, where different singular structures (walls, filaments, nodes) show up. The analysis also shows that the spheroid-to-be elements are the first to be involved in the singular structures, while thick and thin disk-to-be elements chronologically follow them. We discuss how these differences at high z can explain the differences among these three components at z = 0.

  3. Understanding Immune Cells in Tertiary Lymphoid Organ Development: It Is All Starting to Come Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth W.; Hill, David G.; Jones, Simon A.

    2016-01-01

    Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) are frequently observed in tissues affected by non-resolving inflammation as a result of infection, autoimmunity, cancer, and allograft rejection. These highly ordered structures resemble the cellular composition of lymphoid follicles typically associated with the spleen and lymph node compartments. Although TLOs within tissues show varying degrees of organization, they frequently display evidence of segregated T and B cell zones, follicular dendritic cell networks, a supporting stromal reticulum, and high endothelial venules. In this respect, they mimic the activities of germinal centers and contribute to the local control of adaptive immune responses. Studies in various disease settings have described how these structures contribute to either beneficial or deleterious outcomes. While the development and architectural organization of TLOs within inflamed tissues requires homeostatic chemokines, lymphoid and inflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules, our understanding of the cells responsible for triggering these events is still evolving. Over the past 10–15 years, novel immune cell subsets have been discovered that have more recently been implicated in the control of TLO development and function. In this review, we will discuss the contribution of these cell types and consider the potential to develop new therapeutic strategies that target TLOs.

  4. Multispectral imaging reveals the tissue distribution of tetraspanins in human lymphoid organs.

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    de Winde, Charlotte M; Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Vasaturo, Angela; van der Schaaf, Alie; Figdor, Carl G; van Spriel, Annemiek B

    2015-08-01

    Multispectral imaging is a novel microscopy technique that combines imaging with spectroscopy to obtain both quantitative expression data and tissue distribution of different cellular markers. Tetraspanins CD37 and CD53 are four-transmembrane proteins involved in cellular and humoral immune responses. However, comprehensive immunohistochemical analyses of CD37 and CD53 in human lymphoid organs have not been performed so far. We investigated CD37 and CD53 protein expression on primary human immune cell subsets in blood and in primary and secondary lymphoid organs. Both tetraspanins were prominently expressed on antigen-presenting cells, with highest expression of CD37 on B lymphocytes. Analysis of subcellular distribution showed presence of both tetraspanins on the plasma membrane and on endosomes. In addition, CD53 was also present on lysosomes. Quantitative analysis of expression and localization of CD37 and CD53 on lymphocytes within lymphoid tissues by multispectral imaging revealed high expression of both tetraspanins on CD20(+) cells in B cell follicles in human spleen and appendix. CD3(+) T cells within splenic T cell zones expressed lower levels of CD37 and CD53 compared to T cells in the red pulp of human spleen. B cells in human bone marrow highly expressed CD37, whereas the expression of CD53 was low. In conclusion, we demonstrate differential expression of CD37 and CD53 on primary human immune cells, their subcellular localization and their quantitative distribution in human lymphoid organs. This study provides a solid basis for better insight into the function of tetraspanins in the human immune response.

  5. CollagenVI-Cre mice: A new tool to target stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs.

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    Prados, Alejandro; Kollias, George; Koliaraki, Vasiliki

    2016-09-08

    Stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are non-hematopoietic cells involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Three major stromal populations have been identified in adult SLOs: fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and marginal reticular cells (MRCs). The properties of these individual populations are not clearly defined, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic tools, especially for MRCs. Here, we analyzed stromal cell targeting in SLOs from a transgenic mouse strain that expresses Cre recombinase under the CollagenVI promoter, using lineage tracing approaches. We show that these mice target specifically MRCs and FDCs, but not FRCs in Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles in the intestine. In contrast, stromal cells in lymph nodes and the spleen do not express the transgene, which renders ColVI-cre mice ideal for the specific targeting of stromal cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This funding further supports the hypothesis of organ-specific stromal precursors in SLOs. Interestingly, in all tissues analyzed, there was also high specificity for perivascular cells, which have been proposed to act as FDC precursors. Taken together, ColVI-Cre mice are a useful new tool for the dissection of MRC- and FDC-specific functions and plasticity in the GALT.

  6. Local glucocorticoid production in lymphoid organs of mice and birds: Functions in lymphocyte development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taves, Matthew D; Hamden, Jordan E; Soma, Kiran K

    2017-02-01

    Circulating glucocorticoids (GCs) are powerful regulators of immunity. Stress-induced GC secretion by the adrenal glands initially enhances and later suppresses the immune response. GC targets include lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system, which are well known for their sensitivity to GCs. Less appreciated, however, is that GCs are locally produced in lymphoid organs, such as the thymus, where GCs play a critical role in selection of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire. Here, we review the roles of systemic and locally-produced GCs in T lymphocyte development, which has been studied primarily in laboratory mice. By antagonizing TCR signaling in developing T cells, thymus-derived GCs promote selection of T cells with stronger TCR signaling. This results in increased T cell-mediated immune responses to a range of antigens. We then compare local and systemic GC patterns in mice to those in several bird species. Taken together, these studies suggest that a combination of adrenal and lymphoid GC production might function to adaptively regulate lymphocyte development and selection, and thus antigen-specific immune reactivity, to optimize survival under different environmental conditions. Future studies should examine how lymphoid GC patterns vary across other vertebrates, how GCs function in B lymphocyte development in the bone marrow, spleen, and the avian bursa of Fabricius, and whether GCs adaptively program immunity in free-living animals.

  7. Dendritic cell SIRPα regulates homeostasis of dendritic cells in lymphoid organs.

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    Washio, Ken; Kotani, Takenori; Saito, Yasuyuki; Respatika, Datu; Murata, Yoji; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Nishigori, Chikako; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα), an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that is expressed predominantly in myeloid lineage cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages, mediates cell-cell signaling. In the immune system, SIRPα is thought to be important for homeostasis of DCs, but it remains unclear whether SIRPα intrinsic to DCs is indeed indispensable for such functional role. Thus, we here generated the mice, in which SIRPα was specifically ablated in CD11c(+) DCs (Sirpa(Δ) (DC) ). Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice manifested a marked reduction of CD4(+) CD8α(-) conventional DCs (cDCs) in the secondary lymphoid organs, as well as of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Such reduction of cDCs in Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice was comparable to that apparent with the mice, in which SIRPα was systemically ablated. Expression of SIRPα in DCs was well correlated with that of either endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) or Epstein-Barr virus-induced molecule 2 (EBI2), both of which were also implicated in the regulation of DC homeostasis. Indeed, ESAM(+) or EBI2(+) cDCs were markedly reduced in the spleen of Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice. Thus, our results suggest that SIRPα intrinsic to CD11c(+) DCs is essential for homeostasis of cDCs in the secondary lymphoid organs and skin.

  8. Tertiary lymphoid organ development coincides with determinant spreading of the myelin-specific T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Schickel, Achim; Kerkloh, Christian; Recks, Mascha S; Addicks, Klaus; Ruddle, Nancy H; Lehmann, Paul V

    2012-12-01

    While the role of T cells has been studied extensively in multiple sclerosis (MS), the pathogenic contribution of B cells has only recently attracted major attention, when it was shown that B cell aggregates can develop in the meninges of a subset of MS patients and were suggested to be correlates of late-stage and more aggressive disease in this patient population. However, whether these aggregates actually exist has subsequently been questioned and their functional significance has remained unclear. Here, we studied myelin basic protein (MBP)-proteolipid protein (PLP)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is one of the few animal models for MS that is dependent on B cells. We provide evidence that B cell aggregation is reflective of lymphoid neogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS) in MBP-PLP-elicited EAE. B cell aggregation was present already few days after disease onset. With disease progression CNS B cell aggregates increasingly displayed the phenotype of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs). Our results further imply that these TLOs were not merely epiphenomena of the disease, but functionally active, supporting intrathecal determinant spreading of the myelin-specific T cell response. Our data suggest that the CNS is not a passive "immune-privileged" target organ, but rather a compartment, in which highly active immune responses can perpetuate and amplify the autoimmune pathology and thereby autonomously contribute to disease progression.

  9. Eye extract improves cell migration out of lymphoid organ explants of L. vannamei and viability of the primary cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Van Tuan, Vo; Van Thuong, Khuong; Bossier, Peter; Nauwynck, Hans

    2015-08-01

    Since no cell line from shrimp has been established up till now, an optimization of the primary cell culture protocol is necessary. In this context, the effect of extracts (supernatant of a 1:50 (w/v) suspension) from different shrimp organs (muscle, brain, ganglia, eyestalk, ovary, and eye) on the performance of primary lymphoid cell cultures was evaluated. Ten percent of eye extract and 3% of ovary extract enhanced maximally the migration and survival of cells of the lymphoid organ of Litopenaeus vannamei significantly at 48, 96, and 144 h post seeding. Extracts from the eyestalk (10%), muscle (10%), and brain (1%) significantly promoted the migration and survival of cells at 48 and 96 h post seeding but not anymore at 144 h post seeding. In conclusion, it may be advised to add 10% of eye extract or 3% of ovary extract to cells for the maximal health of primary cell cultures from the lymphoid organ of L. vannamei.

  10. Follicular dendritic cells, conduits, lymphatic vessels, and high endothelial venules in tertiary lymphoid organs: Parallels with lymph node stroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon eStranford

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this communication, the contribution of stromal, or non-hematopoietic, cells to the structure and function of lymph nodes (LNs, as canonical secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs, is compared to that of tertiary lymphoid tissue or organs (TLOs, also known as ectopic lymphoid tissues. TLOs can arise in non-lymphoid organs during chronic inflammation, as a result of autoimmune responses, graft rejection, atherosclerosis, microbial infection, and cancer. The stromal components found in SLOs including follicular dendritic cells, fibroblast reticular cells, lymphatic vessels, and high endothelial venules and possibly conduits are present in TLOs; their molecular regulation mimics that of LNs. Advances in visualization techniques and the development of transgenic mice that permit in vivo real time imaging of these structures will facilitate elucidation of their precise functions in the context of chronic inflammation. A clearer understanding of the inflammatory signals that drive non lymphoid stromal cells to reorganize into TLOs could allow the design of therapeutic interventions to impede the progression of autoimmune activity, or alternatively, to enhance anti-tumor responses.

  11. Choreography of cell motility and interaction dynamics imaged by two-photon microscopy in lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Michael D; Parker, Ian

    2008-01-01

    The immune system is the most diffuse cellular system in the body. Accordingly, long-range migration of cells and short-range communication by local chemical signaling and by cell-cell contacts are vital to the control of an immune response. Cellular homing and migration within lymphoid organs, antigen recognition, and cell signaling and activation are clearly vital during an immune response, but these events had not been directly observed in vivo until recently. Introduced to the field of immunology in 2002, two-photon microscopy is the method of choice for visualizing living cells deep within native tissue environments, and it is now revealing an elegant cellular choreography that underlies the adaptive immune response to antigen challenge. We review cellular dynamics and molecular factors that contribute to basal motility of lymphocytes in the lymph node and cellular interactions leading to antigen capture and recognition, T cell activation, B cell activation, cytolytic effector function, and antibody production.

  12. Effects of xenogeneic, allogeneic and isogeneic thymus grafts on lymphocyte populations in peripheral lymphoid organs of the nude rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Klausen, B; Stenvang, J P

    1987-01-01

    In order to gain information about the effect of xenografted, allografted and isografted thymic tissue on peripheral lymphoid organs of immune-deficient rats, athymic nude LEW rats of ninth backcross-intercross were grafted with fetal calf and neonatal BDIX and LEW thymus. Adrenalectomy was also...

  13. Comparing CDRH3 diversity captured from secondary lymphoid organs for the generation of recombinant human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venet, Sophie; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The plasticity of natural immunoglobulin repertoires can be exploited for the generation of phage display libraries. Secondary lymphoid organs, such as the spleen and the lymph nodes, constitute interesting sources of diversity because they are rich in B cells, part of which can be affinity matured. These organs, however, differ in their anatomical structure, reflecting the different fluids they drain, which affects the B cell repertoires. The CDRH3 repertoires from these organs, extracted from naïve or immunized mice, were compared in the context of phage display libraries using human antibody framework families. Deep sequencing analysis revealed that all libraries displayed different CDRH3 repertoires, but the one derived from lymph nodes of naïve mice was the most diverse. Library performance was assessed by in vitro selection. For both organs, immunization increased substantially the frequency of molecules able to bind to the immunogen. The library derived from lymph nodes from naïve mice, however, was the most effective in generating diverse and high affinity candidates. These results illustrate that the use of a biased CDRH3 repertoire increases the performance of libraries, but reduces the clonal diversity, which may be detrimental for certain strategies.

  14. The morphological changes in lymphoid organs and peripheral blood indicators in rats after peroral administration of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharskaya, A. B.; Pakhomy, S. S.; Zlobina, O. V.; Maslyakova, G. N.; Matveeva, O. V.; Bugaeva, I. O.; Navolokin, N. A.; Khlebtsov, B. N.; Bogatyrev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, N. G.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The wide application of nanotechnologies in medicine requires the careful study of various aspects of their potential safety. The effects of prolonged peroral administration of gold nanoparticles on morphological changes in lymphoid organs and indicators of peripheral blood of laboratory animals were investigated in experiment. The gold nanospheres functionalized with thiolated polyethylene glycol sizes 2, 15 and 50 nm were administered orally for 15 days to outbred white rats at a dosage of 190 μg/kg of animal body weight. The standard histological and hematological staining were used for morphological study of lymphoid organs and bone marrow smears. The size-dependent decrease of the number of neutrophils and lymphocytes was noted in the study of peripheral blood, especially pronounced after administration of gold nanoparticles with size of 50 nm. The stimulation of myelocytic germ of hematopoiesis was recorded at morphological study of the bone marrow. The signs of strengthening of the processes of differentiation and maturation of cellular elements were found in lymph nodes, which were showed as the increasing number of immunoblasts and large lymphocytes. The quantitative changes of cellular component morphology of lymphoid organs due to activation of migration, proliferation and differentiation of immune cells indicate the presence of immunostimulation effect of gold nanoparticles.

  15. A study of lymphoid organs and serum proinflammatory cytokines in pigs infected with African swine fever virus genotype II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaryan, Hovakim; Cholakyans, Victorya; Simonyan, Lusine; Misakyan, Alla; Karalova, Elena; Chavushyan, Andranik; Karalyan, Zaven

    2015-06-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV), the causative agent of one of the most important viral diseases of domestic pigs for which no vaccine is available, causes immune system disorders in infected animals. In this study, the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, as well as the histological and cellular constitution of lymphoid organs of pigs infected with ASFV genotype II were investigated. The results showed a high degree of lymphocyte depletion in the lymphoid organs, particularly in the spleen and lymph nodes, where ASFV infection led to a twofold decrease in the number of lymphocytes on the final day of infection. Additionally, ASFV-infected pigs had atypical forms of lymphocytes found in all lymphoid organs. In contrast to lymphocytes, the number of immature immune cells, particularly myelocytes, increased dramatically and reached a maximum on day 7 postinfection. The serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were evaluated. Proinflammatory cytokines showed increased levels after ASFV infection, with peak values at 7 days postinfection, and this highlights their role in the pathogenesis of ASFV. In conclusion, this study showed that ASFV genotype II, like other highly virulent strains, causes severe pathological changes in the immune system of pigs.

  16. Lymphoid organ cell culture system from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius) as a platform for white spot syndrome virus and shrimp immune-related gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, S; Jayesh, P; Sudheer, N S; Poulose, G; Mohandas, A; Philip, R; Singh, I S Bright

    2012-05-01

    Shrimp cell lines are yet to be reported and this restricts the prospects of investigating the associated viral pathogens, especially white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). In this context, development of primary cell cultures from lymphoid organs was standardized. Poly-l-lysine-coated culture vessels enhanced growth of lymphoid cells, while the application of vertebrate growth factors did not, except insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Susceptibility of the lymphoid cells to WSSV was confirmed by immunofluoresence assay using monoclonal antibody against the 28 kDa envelope protein of WSSV. Expression of viral and immune-related genes in WSSV-infected lymphoid cultures could be demonstrated by RT-PCR. This emphasizes the utility of lymphoid primary cell culture as a platform for research in virus-cell interaction, virus morphogenesis, up and downregulation of shrimp immune-related genes, and also for the discovery of novel drugs to combat WSSV in shrimp culture.

  17. Secondary Lymphoid Organ Homing Phenotype of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Disrupted by an Intracellular Oral Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Brodie; Zakhary, Ibrahim; El-Awady, Ahmed; Scisci, Elizabeth; Carrion, Julio; O'Neill, John C.; Rawlings, Aaron; Stern, J. Kobi; Susin, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    Several intracellular pathogens, including a key etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, infect blood myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs). This infection results in pathogen dissemination to distant inflammatory sites (i.e., pathogen trafficking). The alteration in chemokine-chemokine receptor expression that contributes to this pathogen trafficking function, particularly toward sites of neovascularization in humans, is unclear. To investigate this, we utilized human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and primary endothelial cells in vitro, combined with ex vivo-isolated blood mDCs and serum from chronic periodontitis subjects and healthy controls. Our results, using conditional fimbria mutants of P. gingivalis, show that P. gingivalis infection of MoDCs induces an angiogenic migratory profile. This profile is enhanced by expression of DC-SIGN on MoDCs and minor mfa-1 fimbriae on P. gingivalis and is evidenced by robust upregulation of CXCR4, but not secondary lymphoid organ (SLO)-homing CCR7. This disruption of SLO-homing capacity in response to respective chemokines closely matches surface expression of CXCR4 and CCR7 and is consistent with directed MoDC migration through an endothelial monolayer. Ex vivo-isolated mDCs from the blood of chronic periodontitis subjects, but not healthy controls, expressed a similar migratory profile; moreover, sera from chronic periodontitis subjects expressed elevated levels of CXCL12. Overall, we conclude that P. gingivalis actively “commandeers” DCs by reprogramming the chemokine receptor profile, thus disrupting SLO homing, while driving migration toward inflammatory vascular sites. PMID:24126519

  18. Destruction of lymphoid organ architecture and hepatitis caused by CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias S Matter

    Full Text Available Immune responses have the important function of host defense and protection against pathogens. However, the immune response also causes inflammation and host tissue injury, termed immunopathology. For example, hepatitis B and C virus infection in humans cause immunopathological sequel with destruction of liver cells by the host's own immune response. Similarly, after infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV in mice, the adaptive immune response causes liver cell damage, choriomeningitis and destruction of lymphoid organ architecture. The immunopathological sequel during LCMV infection has been attributed to cytotoxic CD8(+ T cells. However, we now show that during LCMV infection CD4(+ T cells selectively induced the destruction of splenic marginal zone and caused liver cell damage with elevated serum alanin-transferase (ALT levels. The destruction of the splenic marginal zone by CD4(+ T cells included the reduction of marginal zone B cells, marginal zone macrophages and marginal zone metallophilic macrophages. Functionally, this resulted in an impaired production of neutralizing antibodies against LCMV. Furthermore, CD4(+ T cells reduced B cells with an IgM(highIgD(low phenotype (transitional stage 1 and 2, marginal zone B cells, whereas other B cell subtypes such as follicular type 1 and 2 and germinal center/memory B cells were not affected. Adoptive transfer of CD4(+ T cells lacking different important effector cytokines and cytolytic pathways such as IFNγ, TNFα, perforin and Fas-FasL interaction did reveal that these cytolytic pathways are redundant in the induction of immunopathological sequel in spleen. In conclusion, our results define an important role of CD4(+ T cells in the induction of immunopathology in liver and spleen. This includes the CD4(+ T cell mediated destruction of the splenic marginal zone with consecutively impaired protective neutralizing antibody responses.

  19. Adventitial Tertiary Lymphoid Organs as Potential Source of MicroRNA Biomarkers for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Rafaelle; Boytard, Ludovic; Blervaque, Renaud; Chwastyniak, Maggy; Hot, David; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Staels, Bart; Lemoine, Yves; Lamblin, Nicolas; Pruvot, François-René; Haulon, Stephan; Amouyel, Philippe; Pinet, Florence

    2015-05-18

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an inflammatory disease associated with marked changes in the cellular composition of the aortic wall. This study aims to identify microRNA (miRNA) expression in aneurysmal inflammatory cells isolated by laser microdissection from human tissue samples. The distribution of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, B and T lymphocytes, mast cells) was evaluated in human AAA biopsies. We observed in half of the samples that adventitial tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs) with a thickness from 0.5 to 2 mm were located exclusively in the adventitia. Out of the 850 miRNA that were screened by microarray in isolated ATLOs (n = 2), 164 miRNAs were detected in ATLOs. The three miRNAs (miR-15a-3p, miR-30a-5p and miR-489-3p) with the highest expression levels were chosen and their expression quantified by RT-PCR in isolated ATLOs (n = 4), M1 (n = 2) and M2 macrophages (n = 2) and entire aneurysmal biopsies (n = 3). Except for the miR-30a-5p, a similar modulation was found in ATLOs and the two subtypes of macrophages. The modulated miRNAs were then evaluated in the plasma of AAA patients for their potential as AAA biomarkers. Our data emphasize the potential of miR-15a-3p and miR-30a-5p as biomarkers of AAA but also as triggers of ATLO evolution. Further investigations will be required to evaluate their targets in order to better understand AAA pathophysiology.

  20. Shape control synthesis of spheroid and rod-like silver nanostructures in organic-inorganic sol-gel composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraidarov, T.; Levchenko, V.; Popov, I.; Reisfeld, R.

    2009-07-01

    The synthesis of a variety of spheroid and rod-like silver nanoparticles in hybrid organic-inorganic sol-gel composite films was examined. The sol-gel matrix used in this work involves urethane terminated silica network which acts as a stabilizing and coupling agent and can complex with silver atoms through its secondary amine functionality and form stable colloid dispersions. The parameters determining the particles size and shape are the starting concentrations of silver ions, the coordination and reduction abilities of the solvent and the reaction kinetics and temperature. In this work the reduction process of silver ion was performed by DMF in sol-gel polyurethane precursor solution at two reaction temperatures: (a) 40 ∘C and (b) reflux at boiling temperature. The effects of concentration and temperature of solution on the morphology and uniformity of silver nanorods were investigated by UV-VIS spectroscopy, SEM and TEM. Spheroid nanoparticles size was as 10-12 nm. Electron diffraction shows that all nanoparticles have a silver face-centered cubic crystal lattice. The silver nanoparticles obtained in composite films exhibit a strong characteristic extinction peak, due to surface plasmon resonance occurring nearly 420-440 nm.

  1. Pairing experimentation and computational modelling to understand the role of tissue inducer cells in the development of lymphoid organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran eAlden

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of genetic tools, imaging technologies and ex vivo culture systems has provided significant insights into the role of tissue inducer cells and associated signalling pathways in the formation and function of lymphoid organs. Despite advances in experimental technologies, the molecular and cellular process orchestrating the formation of a complex 3-dimensional tissue is difficult to dissect using current approaches. Therefore, a robust set of simulation tools have been developed to model the processes involved in lymphoid tissue development. Specifically the role of different tissue inducer cell populations in the dynamic formation of Peyer's Patches has been examined. Utilising approaches from critical systems engineering an unbiased model of lymphoid tissue inducer cell function has been developed, that permits the development of emerging behaviours that are statistically not different from that observed in vivo. These results provide the confidence to utilise statistical methods to explore how the simulator predicts cellular behaviour and outcomes under different physiological conditions. Such methods, known as sensitivity analysis techniques, can provide insight into when a component part of the system (such as a particular cell type, adhesion molecule, or chemokine begins to have an influence on observed behaviour, and quantifies the effect a component part has on the end result: the formation of lymphoid tissue. Through use of such a principled approach in the design, calibration, and analysis of a computer simulation, a robust in silico tool can be developed which can both further the understanding of a biological system being explored, and act as a tool for the generation of hypotheses which can be tested utilising experimental approaches.

  2. Functional contributions of N- and O-glycans to L-selectin ligands in murine and human lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata-Kawai, Hanayo; Singer, Mark S; Bistrup, Annette; Zante, Annemieke van; Wang, Yang-Qing; Ito, Yuki; Bao, Xingfeng; Hemmerich, Stefan; Fukuda, Minoru; Rosen, Steven D

    2011-01-01

    L-selectin initiates lymphocyte interactions with high endothelial venules (HEVs) of lymphoid organs through binding to ligands with specific glycosylation modifications. 6-Sulfo sLe(x), a sulfated carbohydrate determinant for L-selectin, is carried on core 2 and extended core 1 O-glycans of HEV-expressed glycoproteins. The MECA-79 monoclonal antibody recognizes sulfated extended core 1 O-glycans and partially blocks lymphocyte-HEV interactions in lymphoid organs. Recent evidence has identified the contribution of 6-sulfo sLe(x) carried on N-glycans to lymphocyte homing in mice. Here, we characterize CL40, a novel IgG monoclonal antibody. CL40 equaled or surpassed MECA-79 as a histochemical staining reagent for HEVs and HEV-like vessels in mouse and human. Using synthetic carbohydrates, we found that CL40 bound to 6-sulfo sLe(x) structures, on both core 2 and extended core 1 structures, with an absolute dependency on 6-O-sulfation. Using transfected CHO cells and gene-targeted mice, we observed that CL40 bound its epitope on both N-glycans and O-glycans. Consistent with its broader glycan-binding, CL40 was superior to MECA-79 in blocking lymphocyte-HEV interactions in both wild-type mice and mice deficient in forming O-glycans. This superiority was more marked in human, as CL40 completely blocked lymphocyte binding to tonsillar HEVs, whereas MECA-79 inhibited only 60%. These findings extend the evidence for the importance of N-glycans in lymphocyte homing in mouse and indicate that this dependency also applies to human lymphoid organs.

  3. Effects of lactational exposure of olanzapine and risperidone on hematology and lymphoid organs histopathology: a comparative study in mice neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Akash C; Mohanty, Banalata

    2010-05-25

    Body weight gain, sexual/reproductive dysfunction and hematological abnormalities are serious consequences of atypical antipsychotics treatment. No attempts however have been made preclinically to elucidate the adverse hematological impacts. Presently, effects of lactational exposure of olanzapine (4, 8 and 10 mg/kg) and risperidone (1 and 2 mg/kg) on hematology as well as lymphoid organ histopathology of mice neonates were investigated. Both olanzapine and risperidone transfers through milk and make the neonates susceptible to their adverse side effects. Corticosterone elevation tendency of both the drugs further enhance the susceptibility for immune dysfunction. Analysis of total and differential leukocytes counts revealed neutropenia with all the doses of olanzapine but only with risperidone 2mg/kg. Weight analysis and histopathology of thymus and spleen indicated a state of suppression; less in the risperidone-exposed groups. Significant plasma corticosterone elevation occurred on 4 and 8 mg/kg olanzapine exposures but not with 10 mg/kg as well as with both the risperidone doses. Elevation of plasma prolactin levels occurred dose-dependently for both the drugs. Hematological toxicity (neutropenia) might be the direct toxic effects of the drugs/unstable metabolites on circulating neutrophils and/or on the bone marrow hemopoietic cells. Direct toxicity of the drugs might also have suppressed the lymphoid organs thymus and spleen. Further, it could be associated to hormonal imbalance induced by adverse pharmacological effects of the drugs on the endocrine system. Suppression of lymphoid organs in olanzapine groups might have resulted because of corticosteronemia and hyperprolactinemia, while in risperidone it could be mediated by pronounced hyperprolactinemic effect alone.

  4. Probiotic feeding affects T cell populations in blood and lymphoid organs in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, F; Madjd, Z; Falak, R; Bahar, M A; Nasrabadi, M Heydari; Raiani, M; Shekarabi, M

    2016-11-30

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria as a probiotic on chicken T cell subset populations in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues. Thirty chickens were divided into three groups and fed sterilised cow milk, a mixture of milk and L. acidophilus (probiotic), or neither, as the control group. Chickens were euthanised after 14 and 21 days, and whole blood and ileal, bursal, and caecal tonsillar tissues were collected. The populations of T cell subsets, including CD4(+), CD8(+), and TCR1(+) cells, were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. After 21 days of treatment the percentage of blood CD4(+), CD8(+), and TCR1(+) cells was significantly higher in the probiotic-fed group than in the control group. After 14 days of treatment, a significantly greater number of CD4(+) T cells were found in the ileum of probiotic-fed chickens than in chickens from the other two groups. This difference was even greater after 21 days. In addition, after 21 days, a significantly greater number of TCR1(+) cells were found in the caecal tonsils of milk-fed chickens than in chickens from the control group. The findings indicate that probiotics may alter the distribution of T cells in the blood and lymphoid tissues in young chickens; however, transient changes in lymphoid tissues indicate that probiotics likely do not permanently affect mucosal immunity.

  5. Total lymphoid irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, D.E.; Ferguson, R.M.; Simmons, R.L.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1983-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation by itself can produce sufficient immunosuppression to prolong the survival of a variety of organ allografts in experimental animals. The degree of prolongation is dose-dependent and is limited by the toxicity that occurs with higher doses. Total lymphoid irradiation is more effective before transplantation than after, but when used after transplantation can be combined with pharmacologic immunosuppression to achieve a positive effect. In some animal models, total lymphoid irradiation induces an environment in which fully allogeneic bone marrow will engraft and induce permanent chimerism in the recipients who are then tolerant to organ allografts from the donor strain. If total lymphoid irradiation is ever to have clinical applicability on a large scale, it would seem that it would have to be under circumstances in which tolerance can be induced. However, in some animal models graft-versus-host disease occurs following bone marrow transplantation, and methods to obviate its occurrence probably will be needed if this approach is to be applied clinically. In recent years, patient and graft survival rates in renal allograft recipients treated with conventional immunosuppression have improved considerably, and thus the impetus to utilize total lymphoid irradiation for its immunosuppressive effect alone is less compelling. The future of total lymphoid irradiation probably lies in devising protocols in which maintenance immunosuppression can be eliminated, or nearly eliminated, altogether. Such protocols are effective in rodents. Whether they can be applied to clinical transplantation remains to be seen.

  6. Gel-Trapped Lymphorganogenic Chemokines Trigger Artificial Tertiary Lymphoid Organs and Mount Adaptive Immune Responses In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We previously generated artificial lymph node-like tertiary lymphoid organs (artTLOs) in mice using lymphotoxin α-expressing stromal cells. Here, we show the construction of transplantable and functional artTLOs by applying soluble factors trapped in slow-releasing gels in the absence of lymphoid tissue organizer stromal cells. The resultant artTLOs were easily removable, transplantable, and were capable of attracting memory B and T cells. Importantly, artTLOs induced a powerful antigen-specific secondary immune response, which was particularly pronounced in immune-compromised hosts. Synthesis of functionally stable immune tissues/organs like those described here may be a first step to eventually develop immune system-based therapeutics. Although much needs to be learned from the precise mechanisms of action, they may offer ways in the future to reestablish immune functions to overcome hitherto untreatable diseases, including severe infection, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and various forms of immune deficiencies, including immune-senescence during aging.

  7. Protein deficiency alters impact of intestinal nematode infection on intestinal, visceral and lymphoid organ histopathology in lactating mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Lisa M; Odiere, Maurice R; Koski, Kristine G; Scott, Marilyn E

    2014-05-01

    Protein deficiency impairs local and systemic immune responses to Heligmosomoides bakeri infection but little is known about their individual and interactive impacts on tissue architecture of maternal lymphoid (thymus, spleen) and visceral (small intestine, kidney, liver, pancreas) organs during the demanding period of lactation. Using a 2 × 2 factorial design, pregnant CD1 mice were fed a 24% protein sufficient (PS) or a 6% protein deficient (PD) isoenergetic diet beginning on day 14 of pregnancy and were infected with 100 H. bakeri larvae four times or exposed to four sham infections. On day 20 of lactation, maternal organs were examined histologically and serum analytes were assayed as indicators of organ function. The absence of villus atrophy in response to infection was associated with increased crypt depth and infiltration of mast cells and eosinophils but only in lactating dams fed adequate protein. Infection-induced lobular liver inflammation was reduced in PD dams, however, abnormalities in the kidney caused by protein deficiency were absent in infected dams. Bilirubin and creatinine were highest in PD infected mice. Infection-induced splenomegaly was not due to an increase in the lymphoid compartment of the spleen. During lactation, infection and protein deficiency have interactive effects on extra-intestinal pathologies.

  8. Alterations of morphology of lymphoid organs and peripheral blood indicators under the influence of gold nanoparticles in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla B. Bucharskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, gold nanoparticles (GNPs are widely used in biomedical applications such as cancer diagnostics and therapy. Accordingly, the potential toxicity hazards of these nanomaterials and human safety concerns are gaining significant attention. Here, we report the effects of prolonged peroral administration of GNPs with different sizes (2, 15 and 50nm on morphological changes in lymphoid organs and indicators of peripheral blood of laboratory animals. The experiment was conducted on 24 white mongrel male rats weighing 180–220g, gold nanospheres sizes 2, 15 and 50nm were administered orally for 15 days at a dosage of 190μg/kg of animal body weight. The GNPs were conjugated with polyethylene glycol to increase their biocompatibility and bioavailability. The size-dependent decrease of the number of neutrophils and lymphocytes was noted in the study of peripheral blood, especially pronounced after administration of GNPs with size of 50nm. The stimulation of myelocytic germ of hematopoiesis was recorded at morphological study of the bone marrow. The signs of strengthening of the processes of differentiation and maturation of cellular elements were found in lymph nodes, which were showed as the increasing number of immunoblasts and large lymphocytes. The quantitative changes of cellular component morphology of lymphoid organs due to activation of migration, proliferation and differentiation of immune cells indicate the presence of immunostimulation effect of GNPs.

  9. Neuropilin-1 expression characterizes T follicular helper (Tfh) cells activated during B cell differentiation in human secondary lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renand, Amédée; Milpied, Pierre; Rossignol, Julien; Bruneau, Julie; Lemonnier, François; Dussiot, Michael; Coulon, Séverine; Hermine, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells play an essential role in the development of antigen-specific B cell immunity. Tfh cells regulate the differentiation and survival of activated B cells outside and inside germinal centers (GC) of secondary lymphoid organs. They act through cognate contacts with antigen-presenting B cells, but there is no current marker to specifically identify those Tfh cells which productively interact with B cells. Here we show that neuropilin 1 (Nrp1), a cell surface receptor, is selectively expressed by a subset of Tfh cells in human secondary lymphoid organs. Nrp1 expression on Tfh cells correlates with B cell differentiation in vivo and in vitro, is transient, and can be induced upon co-culture with autologous memory B cells in a cell contact-dependent manner. Comparative analysis of ex vivo Nrp1(+) and Nrp1(-) Tfh cells reveals gene expression modulation during activation. Finally, Nrp1 is expressed by malignant Tfh-like cells in a severe case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) associated with elevated terminal B cell differentiation. Thus, Nrp1 is a specific marker of Tfh cells cognate activation in humans, which may prove useful as a prognostic factor and a therapeutic target in neoplastic diseases associated with Tfh cells activity.

  10. Prion pathogenesis and secondary lymphoid organs (SLO): tracking the SLO spread of prions to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabbott, Neil A

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are subacute neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans and a range of domestic and free-ranging animal species. These diseases are characterized by the accumulation of PrP (Sc), an abnormally folded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrP (C)), in affected tissues. The pathology during prion disease appears to occur almost exclusively within the central nervous system. The extensive neurodegeneration which occurs ultimately leads to the death of the host. An intriguing feature of the prion diseases, when compared with other protein-misfolding diseases, is their transmissibility. Following peripheral exposure, some prion diseases accumulate to high levels within lymphoid tissues. The replication of prions within lymphoid tissue has been shown to be important for the efficient spread of disease to the brain. This article describes recent progress in our understanding of the cellular mechanisms that influence the propagation of prions from peripheral sites of exposure (such as the lumen of the intestine) to the brain. A thorough understanding of these events will lead to the identification of important targets for therapeutic intervention, or alternatively, reveal additional processes that influence disease susceptibility to peripherally-acquired prion diseases.

  11. Quantitative studies of lymphoid organs, blood and lymph in inbred athymic and euthymic LEW rats under germfree and specified-pathogen-free conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, B; Hougen, H P

    1987-01-01

    Four groups of inbred male LEW rats were examined: A, germfree athymic; B, specified pathogen free (SPF) athymic; C, germfree euthymic; D, SPF euthymic. All animals were killed at 18 weeks and compared with respect to body weight, histological appearance and cell density of the lymphoid organs......, haematological values and differential counts of bone marrow, peripheral blood and lymph. Athymic rats had a lower body weight, less densely populated lymphoid organs, and fewer lymphocytes in the blood and lymph compared with euthymic animals. No difference was seen between athymic rats under germfree and SPF...

  12. Context dependent development of lymphoid organ mesenchymal subsets fromBP3-Gp38+ PDGFRβ++CD34+ vascular adventitial precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Wendland, Kerstin; Weishaupt, Holger;

    Lymphoid associated mesenchymal stromal cells are believed to play essential roles in immune and organ homeostasis however our knowledge regarding the functional heterogenity and ontogeny of these cells remains limited.......Lymphoid associated mesenchymal stromal cells are believed to play essential roles in immune and organ homeostasis however our knowledge regarding the functional heterogenity and ontogeny of these cells remains limited....

  13. Virus replication cycle of white spot syndrome virus in secondary cell cultures from the lymphoid organ of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; De Gryse, Gaëtan M A; Theuns, Sebastiaan; Van Tuan, Vo; Van Thuong, Khuong; Bossier, Peter; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-09-01

    The replication cycle of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was investigated in secondary cell cultures from the lymphoid organ of Litopenaeus vannamei. The secondary cells formed a confluent monolayer at 24 h post-reseeding, and this monolayer could be maintained for 10 days with a viability of 90 %. Binding of WSSV to cells reached a maximum (73 ± 3 % of cells and 4.84 ± 0.2 virus particles per virus-binding cell) at 120 min at 4 °C. WSSV entered cells by endocytosis. The co-localization of WSSV and early endosomes was observed starting from 30 min post-inoculation (p.i.). Double indirect immunofluorescence staining showed that all cell-bound WSSV particles entered these cells in the period between 0 and 60 min p.i. and that the uncoating of WSSV occurred in the same period. After 1 h inoculation at 27 °C, the WSSV nucleocapsid protein VP664 and envelope protein VP28 started to be synthesized in the cytoplasm from 1 and 3 h p.i., and were transported into nuclei from 3 and 6 h p.i., respectively. The percentage of cells that were VP664- and VP28-positive in their nuclei peaked (50 ± 4 %) at 12 h p.i. Quantitative PCR showed that WSSV DNA started to be synthesized from 6 h p.i. In vivo titration of the supernatants showed that the progeny WSSV were released from 12 h p.i. and peaked at 18 h p.i. In conclusion, the secondary cell cultures from the lymphoid organ were proven to be ideal for examination of the replication cycle of WSSV.

  14. Atrophy of the lymphoid organs and suppression of antibody response caused by velogenic Newcastle disease virus infection in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezema, Wilfred Sunday; Eze, Didacus Chukwuemeka; Shoyinka, Shodeinde Vincent Olu; Okoye, John Osita Arinze

    2016-12-01

    This project was undertaken to study the immunosuppressive capabilities of velogenic viscerotropic pathotype of Newcastle disease virus (VVNDV) infection in cockerels. Two hundred six-week-old cockerels were divided into four groups. Groups B/VUC and C/VC were vaccinated with LaSota in drinking water at 6 weeks of age. Groups C/VC and D/UC were challenged with VVNDV at 8 weeks of age. Three days post challenge (PC), the cockerels in group D/UC came down with clinical signs which included depression and greenish diarrhoea. Total mortality was 74.6 %. The C/VC cockerels showed no clinical signs. But both challenged groups showed significant weight loss, significant loss of total serum proteins, globulin and albumen (P < 0.05). These losses were more severe in the D/UC than in the C/VC. There was severe atrophy of the bursa, spleen and thymus in both groups. Histopathology showed severe necrosis and depletion of the lymphocytes in the three lymphoid organs. However, the lesions were more severe in the D/UC than in C/VC cockerels. On day 28, PC groups B/VUC, C/VIC and D/UIC were revaccinated with LaSota. The haemagglutination inhibition antibody response on days 35, 42 and 49 PC was very low in groups C/VIC and D/UIC when compared with B/VUC cockerels. These observations show that VVNDV infection both clinical and subclinical can cause immunosuppression and vaccine failure due to severe destruction of the lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs. This will be a serious problem for poultry production in those countries where the disease is enzootic.

  15. IL-27 in human secondary lymphoid organs attracts myeloid dendritic cells and impairs HLA class I-restricted antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Fabio; Di Carlo, Emma; Ferrone, Soldano; Petretto, Andrea; Pistoia, Vito; Airoldi, Irma

    2014-03-15

    Different cytokines play crucial roles in inflammation and in polarizing immune responses, including IL-27 that exerts pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. Although the activity of IL-27 is well characterized in murine immune cells, only limited information is available regarding the natural cellular sources of IL-27 in humans and its effects on human immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional APCs that in the immature state are positioned throughout peripheral tissues by acting as sentinels, sensing the presence of Ags. Activated DCs migrate into the lymph nodes and direct Ag-specific T cell responses, thus acting as key players in both adaptive and innate immunity. In this study we asked whether IL-27 is produced by human secondary lymphoid organs and what is its functional role on human DCs. To our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that 1) in lymph nodes, macrophages are the major source for IL-27; 2) immature and mature human DCs express functional IL-27R; 3) IL-27 exerts immunosuppressive activity by crippling the Ag processing machinery in immature DCs under steady-state conditions and after pulsing with a viral Ag; and 4) IL-27 is chemotactic for human DCs. Our findings highlight novel mechanisms underlying the immunosuppressive activity of IL-27, suggesting that this cytokine may function as a homeostatic cytokine in secondary lymphoid organs by limiting duration and/or intensity of ongoing adaptive immune responses. The results presented in this study pave the way to future studies aimed at investigating whether dysregulation of IL-27 expression and function may be involved in pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

  16. Identification of stable reference genes for quantitative PCR in cells derived from chicken lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowska, D; Rothwell, L; Bailey, R A; Watson, K; Kaiser, P

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a powerful technique for quantification of gene expression, especially genes involved in immune responses. Although qPCR is a very efficient and sensitive tool, variations in the enzymatic efficiency, quality of RNA and the presence of inhibitors can lead to errors. Therefore, qPCR needs to be normalised to obtain reliable results and allow comparison. The most common approach is to use reference genes as internal controls in qPCR analyses. In this study, expression of seven genes, including β-actin (ACTB), β-2-microglobulin (B2M), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), β-glucuronidase (GUSB), TATA box binding protein (TBP), α-tubulin (TUBAT) and 28S ribosomal RNA (r28S), was determined in cells isolated from chicken lymphoid tissues and stimulated with three different mitogens. The stability of the genes was measured using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software. The results from both geNorm and NormFinder were that the three most stably expressed genes in this panel were TBP, GAPDH and r28S. BestKeeper did not generate clear answers because of the highly heterogeneous sample set. Based on these data we will include TBP in future qPCR normalisation. The study shows the importance of appropriate reference gene normalisation in other tissues before qPCR analysis.

  17. Scalable robotic biofabrication of tissue spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehesz, A Nagy; Hajdu, Z; Visconti, R P; Markwald, R R; Mironov, V [Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Center, Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Brown, J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Beaver, W [York Technical College, Rock Hill, SC (United States); Da Silva, J V L, E-mail: mironovv@musc.edu [Renato Archer Information Technology Center-CTI, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-06-15

    Development of methods for scalable biofabrication of uniformly sized tissue spheroids is essential for tissue spheroid-based bioprinting of large size tissue and organ constructs. The most recent scalable technique for tissue spheroid fabrication employs a micromolded recessed template prepared in a non-adhesive hydrogel, wherein the cells loaded into the template self-assemble into tissue spheroids due to gravitational force. In this study, we present an improved version of this technique. A new mold was designed to enable generation of 61 microrecessions in each well of a 96-well plate. The microrecessions were seeded with cells using an EpMotion 5070 automated pipetting machine. After 48 h of incubation, tissue spheroids formed at the bottom of each microrecession. To assess the quality of constructs generated using this technology, 600 tissue spheroids made by this method were compared with 600 spheroids generated by the conventional hanging drop method. These analyses showed that tissue spheroids fabricated by the micromolded method are more uniform in diameter. Thus, use of micromolded recessions in a non-adhesive hydrogel, combined with automated cell seeding, is a reliable method for scalable robotic fabrication of uniform-sized tissue spheroids.

  18. Age-associated alterations in sympathetic noradrenergic innervation of primary and secondary lymphoid organs in female Fischer 344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ThyagaRajan, Srinivasan; Madden, Kelley S; Teruya, Brian; Stevens, Suzanne Y; Felten, David L; Bellinger, Denise L

    2011-04-01

    Normal aging processes, as well as, psychological stress affect the immune system; each can act alone, or interact with each other, to cause dysregulation of immune function substantially altering physical and mental health. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS), a major mediator of stress effects on immune function, is significantly affected by normal aging process, and stress can affect aging of the SNS. Previously, we have shown age-associated changes in sympathetic noradrenergic (NA) innervation of lymphoid organs in male rodents that affect immune regulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate sympathetic innervation of lymphoid organs and associated alterations in immune responses in young and aging female Fischer 344 (F344) rats. Histofluorescence and immunocytochemistry for NA innervation, and neurochemistry for norepinephrine (NE) levels were performed in the thymus, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) isolated from 3-month-old young (normal estrous cycle), 8- to 9-month-old (onset of irregular estrous cycling), and 24-25 month, and 30-31 month female F344 rats (acyclic) at diestrus based on vaginal smears. Age-related alterations in natural killer (NK) cell activity, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production, T and B lymphocyte proliferation were examined in splenocytes. Sympathetic NA innervation and NE levels increased with aging in the thymus, declined in spleen and MLN, and was accompanied by significant reductions in NK cell activity, IL-2 and IFN-γ production, and T and B cell proliferation in old female rats. In 8-9 mo rats, NE levels in the hilar region of the spleen and IFN-γ production were unaltered, while NE levels in the end region of the spleen and IL-2 production were reduced. Collectively, these results suggest that aging is characterized by significant alterations in sympathetic NA innervation in the thymus, spleen, and MLN associated with immunosuppression, and that there is a marked shift in NA activity

  19. TLR activation excludes circulating naive CD8+ T cells from gut-associated lymphoid organs in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Simon; Kirchner, Sophie-Kathrin; Stephan, Nicolas; Bohn, Bernadette; Suhartha, Nina; Hotz, Christian; Anz, David; Sandholzer, Nadja; Stecher, Bärbel; Rüssmann, Holger; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole

    2013-05-15

    The trafficking of effector T cells is tightly regulated by the expression of site-specific sets of homing molecules. In contrast, naive T cells are generally assumed to express a uniform pattern of homing molecules and to follow a random distribution within the blood and secondary lymphoid organs. In this study, we demonstrate that systemic infection fundamentally modifies the trafficking of circulating naive CD8(+) T cells. We show that on naive CD8(+) T cells, the constitutive expression of the integrin α4β7 that effects their entry into GALT is downregulated following infection of mice with Salmonella typhimurium. We further show that this downregulation is dependent on TLR signaling, and that the TLR-activated naive CD8(+) T cells are blocked from entering GALT. This contrasts strongly with Ag-experienced effector T cells, for which TLR costimulation in the GALT potently upregulates α4β7 and enhances trafficking to intestinal tissues. Thus, TLR activation leads to opposite effects on migration of naive and effector CD8(+) T cells. Our data identify a mechanism that excludes noncognate CD8(+) T cells from selected immune compartments during TLR-induced systemic inflammation.

  20. Effects of dietary Fusarium mycotoxins on intestinal lymphocyte subset populations, cell proliferation and histological changes in avian lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, C K; Smith, T K; Boermans, H J; Anil Kumar, P; Girgis, G N

    2010-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary Fusarium mycotoxins on gut immunity, cell proliferation, and histology of avian lymphoid organs. The efficacy of a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GMA) was also determined. Seventy-two one-day-old male turkey poults were fed corn, wheat, and soybean meal-based diets for 21 days. Diets included control grains, contaminated grains and contaminated grains +0.2% GMA. The major contaminant was deoxynivalenol (3.9 μg/g) with lesser amounts of zearalenone (0.67-0.75 μg/g), 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (0.34 μg/g) and HT-2 toxin (0.078-0.085 μg/g). T- and B-lymphocyte populations and crypt cellular proliferation in duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecal tonsil were measured immunohistochemically on day 14 and 21. Histological changes were recorded after 14 and 21 days of feeding. Feeding contaminated grains significantly increased the percentage of B-lymphocytes in ileum on day 14, and reduced (Pcontaminated diets also caused a reduction (Pcontaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins results in adverse effects on gut immunity and mucosal cell proliferation.

  1. Distribution of lymphoid neoplasms in China: analysis of 4,638 cases according to the World Health Organization classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Yang, Qunpei; Lu, Zhaohui; He, Miaoxia; Gao, Li; Zhu, Minghua; Sun, Lu; Wei, Lixin; Li, Min; Liu, Cuiling; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Weiping; Li, Gandi; Chen, Jie

    2012-09-01

    To estimate the distribution of lymphoid neoplasms in China, we conducted a comprehensive analysis, based on subtype, age, sex, and lesion, of primary and resected biopsy specimens of 4,638 lymphoid neoplasms diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 at 5 large hospitals. Of the 4,638 patients, mature B-cell neoplasms accounted for 64.3% of all lymphoid neoplasms, mature T/NK-cell neoplasms for 23.3%, and Hodgkin lymphoma for 8.6%. The most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (36.2%), followed by extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (11.0%), classic Hodgkin lymphoma (8.4%), extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (7.7%), plasmacytic neoplasm (5.0%), and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (3.9%). For most lymphoid neoplasm subtypes, male subjects showed higher rates than female subjects. In summary, our study showed that the epidemiologic features of lymphoid neoplasms in China are distinct from those in Western countries and similar in many ways to those in other countries of the Far East.

  2. Lymph node and lymphoid organs fine needle aspiration cytology: historical background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Immacolata; Vigliar, Elena; Vetrani, Antonio; Zeppa, Pio

    2012-01-01

    Lymph node has probably been the first target of Fine Needle Cytology (FNC) and among the latest to be accepted as an affordable diagnostic procedure. In 1912, dr. Hirschfeld performed FNC to diagnose cutaneous lymphomas and other tumours. Subsequently FNC was used to diagnose lymphoblastoma and splenic FNC to diagnose leishmaniasis on Romanowsky-stained smears. One of the first systematic study on lymph node FNC was then performed at John Hopkins Hospital, in Baltimore (USA) using FNC and Romanowsky stain on air-dried smears. In the twenties, two independent groups from Memorial Hospital (New York, USA), worked on FNC of a large scale of different human pathologies. One of this study reported 1,405 diagnoses of cancer and other diseases by means of FNC, mainly performed on lymph nodes (662 cases). In the sixties, at the Karolinska Hospital (Stockholm, Sweden) a group of cytopathologists started a Cytopathology Service available to the whole Institution, which exploited all fields of FNC. Since then, the procedure spread all over the word and nowadays it is routinely used for the diagnosis of different organs and pathologies including lymph node. Distinguished cytopathologists have worked on lymph nodal FNC producing significant advances and highlighting advantages and inevitable limitations of the technique. Despite some persistent criticism, FNC is a generally accepted procedure in the first diagnosis of lymph nodes enlargement. Moreover, numerous studies have demonstrated that vital cells obtained by FNC are excellent samples suitable for molecular evaluation, offering new challenging application to lymph node FNC.

  3. Green Brazilian Propolis Action on Macrophages and Lymphoid Organs of Chronically Stressed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Missima

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a generic term that summarizes how psychosocial and environmental factors influence physical and mental well-being. The interaction between stress and immunity has been widely investigated, involving the neuroendocrine system and several organs. Assays using natural products in stress models deserve further investigation. Propolis immunomodulatory action has been mentioned and it has been the subject of scientific investigation in our laboratory. The aim of this study was to evaluate if and how propolis activated macrophages in BALB/c mice submitted to immobilization stress, as well as the histopathological analysis of the thymus, bone marrow, spleen and adrenal glands. Stressed mice showed a higher hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generation by peritoneal macrophages, and propolis treatment potentiated H2O2 generation and inhibited nitric oxide (NO production by these cells. Histopathological analysis showed no alterations in the thymus, bone marrow and adrenal glands, but increased germinal centers in the spleen. Propolis treatment counteracted the alterations found in the spleen of stressed mice. New research is being carried out in order to elucidate propolis immunomodulatory action during stress.

  4. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Heng Giap; Braun, Asolina; Li, Jane; Smith, Corey; Edwards, Jarem; Sierro, Frederic; Feng, Carl G; Khanna, Rajiv; Elliot, Michael; Bell, Andrew; Hislop, Andrew D; Tangye, Stuart G; Rickinson, Alan B; Gebhardt, Thomas; Britton, Warwick J; Palendira, Umaimainthan

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that were CD69+CD103+ and CD69+CD103-, and were retained within the spleen and tonsils in the absence of recent T cell stimulation. These two types of memory cells were distinct not only in their phenotype and transcriptional profile, but also in their anatomical localization within tonsils and spleen. The EBV-specific, but not CMV-specific, CD8+ memory T cells preferentially accumulated in the tonsils and acquired a phenotype that ensured their retention at the epithelial sites where EBV replicates. In vitro studies revealed that the cytokine IL-15 can potentiate the retention of circulating effector memory CD8+ T cells by down-regulating the expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, required for T cell exit from tissues, and its transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). Within the tonsils the expression of IL-15 was detected in regions where CD8+ T cells localized, further supporting a role for this cytokine in T cell retention. Together this study provides evidence for the compartmentalization of distinct types of resident memory T cells that could contribute to the long-term protection against persisting viral infections.

  5. HPV16-associated tumors control myeloid cell homeostasis in lymphoid organs, generating a suppressor environment for T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Simone Cardozo; Rossetti, Renata Ariza Marques; Bolpetti, Aline; Boccardo, Enrique; Souza, Patricia Savio de Araujo; Lepique, Ana Paula

    2014-10-01

    Tumors are complex structures containing different types of cells and molecules. The importance of the tumor microenvironment in tumor progression, growth, and maintenance is well-established. However, tumor effects are not restricted to the tumor microenvironment. Molecules secreted by, as well as cells that migrate from tumors, may circulate and reach other tissues. This may cause a series of systemic effects, including modulation of immune responses, and in some cases, leukocytosis and metastasis promotion. Leukocytosis has been described as a poor prognostic factor in patients with cervical cancer. The main etiological factor for cervical cancer development is persistent infection with high oncogenic risk HPV. Our laboratory has been exploring the effects of high oncogenic risk, HPV-associated tumors on lymphoid organs of the host. In the present study, we observed an increase in myeloid cell proliferation and alteration in cell signaling in APCs in the spleen of tumor-bearing mice. In parallel, we characterized the cytokines secreted in the inflammatory and tumor cell compartments in the tumor microenvironment and in the spleen of tumor-bearing mice. We show evidence of constitutive activation of the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway in the tumor, including TAMs, and in APCs in the spleen. We also observed that IL-10 is a central molecule in the tolerance toward tumor antigens through control of NF-κB activation, costimulatory molecule expression, and T cell proliferation. These systemic effects over myeloid cells are robust and likely an important problem to be addressed when considering strategies to improve anti-tumor T cell responses.

  6. Does disease-irrelevant intrathecal synthesis in multiple sclerosis make sense in the light of tertiary lymphoid organs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickael eBonnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although partly disease-irrelevant, intrathecal Ig synthesis is a typical feature of multiple sclerosis (MS and is driven by the tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO. A long-known hallmark of this non-specific intrathecal synthesis is the MRZ pattern, an intrathecal synthesis of Ig against measles, rubella and zoster viruses, which could also be involved in a wide range of pathogens. However, this non-specific synthesis is highly problematic since brain TLO should not be able to drive the clonal expansion of lymphocytes against alien antigens that are thought to be absent in MS brain.We propose to explain the paradox of non-specific intrathecal synthesis by discussing the natural properties of TLO. In fact, besides local antigen-driven clonal expansion, circulating plasmablasts and plasma cells (PC are non-specifically recruited from blood and gain access to survival niches in the inflammatory CNS. This mechanism, which has been described in other inflammatory disorders, takes place in the TLO. As a consequence, PCs recruited in brain mirror the individual’s history of immunization and intrathecal synthesis of IgG in MS may target a broad range of common infectious agents, a hypothesis in line with epidemiological data. Moreover, the immunization schedule and its timing may interfere with PC recruitment. If this hypothesis is correct, the reaction against EBV appears paradoxical: although early infection of MS patients is systematic, intrathecal synthesis is far lower than expected, suggesting a crucial interaction between MS onset and timing of EBV infection. A growing body of evidence suggests that the non-specific intrathecal synthesis observed in MS is also common in many chronic CNS inflammatory disorders. Assuming that cortical TLO in MS are associated with typical sub-pial lesions, we have coined the concept of ‘TLO-pathy’ to describe these lesions and take examples of them from non-MS disorders.

  7. Artery Tertiary Lymphoid Organs Control Multilayered Territorialized Atherosclerosis B-Cell Responses in Aged ApoE−/− Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikakulapu, Prasad; Hu, Desheng; Yin, Changjun; Mohanta, Sarajo K.; Bontha, Sai Vineela; Peng, Li; Beer, Michael; Weber, Christian; McNamara, Coleen A.; Grassia, Gianluca; Maffia, Pasquale; Manz, Rudolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective— Explore aorta B-cell immunity in aged apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice. Approach and Results— Transcript maps, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, immunofluorescence analyses, cell transfers, and Ig-ELISPOT (enzyme-linked immunospot) assays showed multilayered atherosclerosis B-cell responses in artery tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs). Aging-associated aorta B-cell–related transcriptomes were identified, and transcript atlases revealed highly territorialized B-cell responses in ATLOs versus atherosclerotic lesions: ATLOs showed upregulation of bona fide B-cell genes, including Cd19, Ms4a1 (Cd20), Cd79a/b, and Ighm although intima plaques preferentially expressed molecules involved in non–B effector responses toward B-cell–derived mediators, that is, Fcgr3 (Cd16), Fcer1g (Cd23), and the C1q family. ATLOs promoted B-cell recruitment. ATLO B-2 B cells included naive, transitional, follicular, germinal center, switched IgG1+, IgA+, and IgE+ memory cells, plasmablasts, and long-lived plasma cells. ATLOs recruited large numbers of B-1 cells whose subtypes were skewed toward interleukin-10+ B-1b cells versus interleukin-10− B-1a cells. ATLO B-1 cells and plasma cells constitutively produced IgM and IgG and a fraction of plasma cells expressed interleukin-10. Moreover, ApoE−/− mice showed increased germinal center B cells in renal lymph nodes, IgM-producing plasma cells in the bone marrow, and higher IgM and anti–MDA-LDL (malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein) IgG serum titers. Conclusions— ATLOs orchestrate dichotomic, territorialized, and multilayered B-cell responses in the diseased aorta; germinal center reactions indicate generation of autoimmune B cells within the diseased arterial wall during aging. PMID:27102965

  8. A Unique Cellular and Molecular Microenvironment Is Present in Tertiary Lymphoid Organs of Patients with Spontaneous Prostate Cancer Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de la Luz García-Hernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveMultiple solid cancers contain tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO. However, it is unclear whether they promote tumor rejection, facilitate tumor evasion, or simply whether they are a byproduct of chronic inflammation. We hypothesize that although chronic inflammation induces TLO formation, the tumor milieu can modulate TLO organization and functions in prostate cancer. Therefore, our study seeks to elucidate the cellular and molecular signatures in unique prostatectomy specimens from evanescent carcinoma patients to identify markers of cancer regression, which could be harnessed to modulate local immunosuppression or potentially enhance TLO function.MethodsWe used multicolor immunofluorescence to stain prostate tissues, collected at different stages of cancer progression (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intermediate and advanced cancer or from patients with evanescent prostate carcinoma. Tissues were stained with antibodies specific for pro-inflammatory molecules (cyclooxygenase 2, CXCL10, IL17, tumor-infiltrating immune cells (mature DC-LAMP+ dendritic cells, CD3+ T cells, CD3+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg, T bet+ Th1 cells, granzyme B+ cytotoxic cells, and stromal cell populations (lymphatic vessels, tumor neovessels, high endothelial venules (HEV, stromal cells, which promote prostate tumor growth or are critical components of tumor-associated TLO.ResultsGenerally, inflammatory cells are located at the margins of tumors. Unexpectedly, we found TLO within prostate tumors from patients at different stages of cancer and in unique samples from patients with spontaneous cancer remission. In evanescent prostate carcinomas, accumulation of Treg was compromised, while Tbet+ T cells and CD8 T cells were abundant in tumor-associated TLO. In addition, we found a global decrease in tumor neovascularization and the coverage by cells positive for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2. Finally, consistent with tumor regression, prostate stem cell antigen was

  9. Spheroidal wave functions

    CERN Document Server

    Flammer, Carson

    2005-01-01

    Intended to facilitate the use and calculation of spheroidal wave functions, this applications-oriented text features a detailed and unified account of the properties of these functions. Addressed to applied mathematicians, mathematical physicists, and mathematical engineers, it presents tables that provide a convenient means for handling wave problems in spheroidal coordinates.Topics include separation of the scalar wave equation in spheroidal coordinates, angle and radial functions, integral representations and relations, and expansions in spherical Bessel function products. Additional subje

  10. Nanoengineered implant as a new platform for regenerative nanomedicine using 3D well-organized human cell spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Laetitia; Idoux-Gillet, Ysia; Wagner, Quentin; Eap, Sandy; Brasse, David; Schwinté, Pascale; Arruebo, Manuel; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    In tissue engineering, it is still rare today to see clinically transferable strategies for tissue-engineered graft production that conclusively offer better tissue regeneration than the already existing technologies, decreased recovery times, and less risk of complications. Here a novel tissue-engineering concept is presented for the production of living bone implants combining 1) a nanofibrous and microporous implant as cell colonization matrix and 2) 3D bone cell spheroids. This combination, double 3D implants, shows clinical relevant thicknesses for the treatment of an early stage of bone lesions before the need of bone substitutes. The strategy presented here shows a complete closure of a defect in nude mice calvaria after only 31 days. As a novel strategy for bone regenerative nanomedicine, it holds great promises to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of living bone implants. PMID:28138241

  11. Does disease-irrelevant intrathecal synthesis in multiple sclerosis make sense in the light of tertiary lymphoid organs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnan, Mickael

    2014-01-01

    Although partly disease-irrelevant, intrathecal immunoglobulins (Ig) synthesis is a typical feature of multiple sclerosis (MS) and is driven by the tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO). A long-known hallmark of this non-specific intrathecal synthesis is the MRZ pattern, an intrathecal synthesis of Ig against measles, rubella, and zoster viruses. This non-specific intrathecal synthesis could also be directed against a wide range of pathogens. However, it is highly problematic since brain TLO should not be able to drive the clonal expansion of lymphocytes against alien antigens that are thought to be absent in MS brain. We propose to explain the paradox of non-specific intrathecal synthesis by discussing the natural properties of TLO. In fact, besides local antigen-driven clonal expansion, circulating plasmablasts and plasma cells (PC) are non-specifically recruited from blood and gain access to survival niches in the inflammatory CNS. This mechanism, which has been described in other inflammatory disorders, takes place in the TLO. As a consequence, PCs recruited in brain mirror the individual's history of immunization and intrathecal synthesis of IgG in MS may target a broad range of common infectious agents, a hypothesis in line with epidemiological data. Moreover, the immunization schedule and its timing may interfere with PC recruitment. If this hypothesis is correct, the reaction against EBV appears paradoxical: although early infection of MS patients is systematic, intrathecal synthesis is far lower than expected, suggesting a crucial interaction between MS onset and timing of EBV infection. A growing body of evidence suggests that the non-specific intrathecal synthesis observed in MS is also common in many chronic CNS inflammatory disorders. Assuming that cortical TLO in MS are associated with typical sub-pial lesions, we have coined the concept of "TLO-pathy" to describe these lesions and take examples of them from non-MS disorders. Lastly, we propose that

  12. Characterization of B and plasma cells in blood, bone marrow, and secondary lymphoid organs of rhesus macaques by multicolor flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Berit; Klippert, Antonina; Raue, Katharina; Sopper, Sieghart; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    B cells, as an important part of the humoral immune response, are generated in the BM, migrate to secondary lymphoid organs, and upon activation, differentiate into antibody-producing memory B cells or plasma cells. Despite the pivotal roles that they play in different diseases, a comprehensive characterization in healthy rhesus macaques, which serve as valuable models for a variety of human diseases, is still missing. With the use of multiparameter flow cytometry, we analyzed B cells in BM collected from two locations, i.e., the iliac crest (BMca) and the femur (BMfem), PB, as well as secondary lymphoid organs of healthy rhesus macaques. We assessed the frequencies of immature and mature B cells, as well as CD19(+) CD20(-) CD38(+/++) CD138(+/++) plasmablasts/plasma cells. Furthermore, we found site-specific differences in the expression of markers for B cell activation and proliferation, chemokine receptors and Igs, as well as the distribution of memory B cell subpopulations. As secondary lymphoid organs harbor the highest frequencies of naive B cells, expression of CD80, CD95, and Ki67 was lower compared with B cells in the periphery and BM, whereas expression of IgD, CXCR4 (CD184), and CCR7 (CD197) was higher. Interestingly, BMca differed from BMfem regarding frequencies of B cells, their expression of CD80 and CXCR4, T cells, and plasma cells. In summary, these data identify baseline values for the above-mentioned parameters and provide the foundation for future studies on B and plasma cells in different diseases.

  13. HIV-1 infected lymphoid organs upregulate expression and release of the cleaved form of uPAR that modulates chemotaxis and virus expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Nebuloni

    Full Text Available Cell-associated receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR is released as both full-length soluble uPAR (suPAR and cleaved (c-suPAR form that maintain ability to bind to integrins and other receptors, thus triggering and modulating cell signaling responses. Concerning HIV-1 infection, plasma levels of suPAR have been correlated with the severity of disease, levels of immune activation and ineffective immune recovery also in individuals receiving combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART. However, it is unknown whether and which suPAR forms might contribute to HIV-1 induced pathogenesis and to the related state of immune activation. In this regard, lymphoid organs represent an import site of chronic immune activation and virus persistence even in individuals receiving cART. Lymphoid organs of HIV-1(+ individuals showed an enhanced number of follicular dendritic cells, macrophages and endothelial cells expressing the cell-associated uPAR in comparison to those of uninfected individuals. In order to investigate the potential role of suPAR forms in HIV-1 infection of secondary lymphoid organs, tonsil histocultures were established from HIV-1 seronegative individuals and infected ex vivo with CCR5- and CXCR4-dependent HIV-1 strains. The levels of suPAR and c-suPAR were significantly increased in HIV-infected tonsil histocultures supernatants in comparison to autologous uninfected histocultures. Supernatants from infected and uninfected cultures before and after immunodepletion of suPAR forms were incubated with the chronically infected promonocytic U1 cell line characterized by a state of proviral latency in unstimulated conditions. In the contest of HIV-conditioned supernatants we established that c-suPAR, but not suPAR, inhibited chemotaxis and induced virus expression in U1 cells. In conclusion, lymphoid organs are an important site of production and release of both suPAR and c-suPAR, this latter form being endowed with the capacity of

  14. Nanoengineered implant as a new platform for regenerative nanomedicine using 3D well-organized human cell spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller L

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laetitia Keller,1,2,* Ysia Idoux-Gillet,1,2,* Quentin Wagner,1,2,* Sandy Eap,1,2,* David Brasse,3 Pascale Schwinté,1,2 Manuel Arruebo,4 Nadia Benkirane-Jessel1,2 1INSERM (French National Institute of Health and Medical Research, “Osteoarticular and Dental Regenerative Nanomedicine” Laboratory, UMR 1109, Faculté de Médecine, FMTS, 2University of Strasbourg, Faculté de Chirurgie Dentaire, 3CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7178, IPHC (Hubert Curien Multidisciplinary Institute, Strasbourg, France; 4Department of Chemical Engineering, INA (Aragon Nanoscience Institute, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In tissue engineering, it is still rare today to see clinically transferable strategies for tissue-engineered graft production that conclusively offer better tissue regeneration than the already existing technologies, decreased recovery times, and less risk of complications. Here a novel tissue-engineering concept is presented for the production of living bone implants combining 1 a nanofibrous and microporous implant as cell colonization matrix and 2 3D bone cell spheroids. This combination, double 3D implants, shows clinical relevant thicknesses for the treatment of an early stage of bone lesions before the need of bone substitutes. The strategy presented here shows a complete closure of a defect in nude mice calvaria after only 31 days. As a novel strategy for bone regenerative nanomedicine, it holds great promises to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of living bone implants. Keywords: bioengineering, implants, osteoblasts, matrix mineralization, microtissues

  15. Detection of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 and Viral Replication by In Situ Hybridization in Primary Lymphoid Organs From Naturally and Experimentally Infected Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sif; Segalés, J.; Fernandes, L.;

    2013-01-01

    affected by PMWS (n = 33), and age-matched healthy control animals (n = 29). In situ hybridization (ISH) techniques were used to detect PCV2 nucleic acid irrespective of replicative status (complementary probe, CP) or to detect only the replicative form of the virus (replicative form probe, RFP). PCV2...... was not detected in the experimentally PCV2-inoculated pigs or the control animals. Among the PMWS-affected pigs, 19 of 20 (95%) thymuses were positive for PCV2 by CP ISH, and 7 of 19 (37%) of these also supported viral replication. By CP ISH, PCV2 was detected in 16 of 33 (48%) bone marrow samples, and 5 of 16...... of PMWS. The aim of this study was to determine if primary lymphoid organ cells support viral replication during PCV2 infection. This was done by histopathological examination of thymus and bone marrow from pigs experimentally inoculated with PCV2 (n = 24), mock-infected pigs (n = 12), pigs naturally...

  16. Immunohistochemical evidences showing the presence of thymulin containing cells located in involuted thymus and in peripheral lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, Hugo; Villegas, Juana V; Leyan, Víctor; Barría, Miguel; Eller, Gisela; Esquivel, Patricio

    2010-01-01

    Thymulin is a well-characterized thymic hormone that exists as a nonapeptide coupled to equimolar amounts of Zn2+. Thymulin is known to have multiple biological roles, including T cell differentiation, immune regulation, and analgesic functions. It has been shown that thymulin is produced by the reticulo-epithelial cells of the thymus, and it circulates in the blood from the moment of birth, maintain its serum level until puberty diminishing thereafter in life. To study the localization of this hormone, we prepared polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against the commercial peptide and utilized immunocytochemical techniques for visualization. The results indicate that thymulin stains the thymic reticular cells, the outer layers of Hassall's corpuscles and a large round cellular type, which is keratin-negative and does not show affinity for the common leukocyte antigen (CD-45). In mice, this thymulin-positive cell remains in the thymus throughout life and even appears in relatively increased numbers in old involuted thymi. It also appears in thymus-dependent areas of the spleen and lymph nodes, demonstrating that at least one of the thymus cells containing this peptide can be found in peripheral lymphoid tissue.

  17. Dynamics of Lymphocyte Populations during Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: From Thymocyte Depletion to Differential Cell Expansion/Contraction in Peripheral Lymphoid Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Morrot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of the immune responses in infectious diseases is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we review current findings on the dynamics of lymphocyte subpopulations following experimental acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. In the thymus, although the negative selection process of the T-cell repertoire remains operational, there is a massive thymocyte depletion and abnormal release of immature CD4+CD8+ cells to peripheral lymphoid organs, where they acquire an activated phenotype similar to activated effector or memory T cells. These cells apparently bypassed the negative selection process, and some of them are potentially autoimmune. In infected animals, an atrophy of mesenteric lymph nodes is also observed, in contrast with the lymphocyte expansion in spleen and subcutaneous lymph nodes, illustrating a complex and organ specific dynamics of lymphocyte subpopulations. Accordingly, T- and B-cell activation is seen in subcutaneous lymph nodes and spleen, but not in mesenteric lymph nodes. Lastly, although the function of peripheral CD4+CD8+ T-cell population remains to be defined in vivo, their presence may contribute to the immunopathological events found in both murine and human Chagas disease.

  18. Effect of free-range days on a local chicken breed: growth performance, carcass yield, meat quality, and lymphoid organ index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, H B; Wang, Q; Lu, J; Zou, J M; Chang, L L; Fu, S Y

    2014-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of free-range days on growth performance, carcass yield, meat quality, and lymphoid organ index of a local chicken breed. In total, 1,000 one-day-old male Suqin yellow chickens were raised for 21 d. On d 21, 720 birds with similar BW (536 ± 36 g) were selected and randomly assigned to free-range treatment at 21, 28, 35, and 42 d of age (assigned to free-range treatment for 21, 14, 7, and 0 d, respectively). Each treatment was represented by 5 replicates (pens) containing 36 birds (180 birds per treatment). All the birds were raised in indoor floor pens measuring 1.42 × 1.42 m (2 m(2), 18 birds/m(2)) in conventional poultry research houses before free-range treatment. In the free-range treatment, the chickens were raised in indoor floor houses measuring 3 × 5 m (15 m(2), 2.4 birds/m(2)). In addition, they also had an outdoor free-range paddock measuring 3 × 8 m (24 m(2), 1.5 birds/m(2)). The BW of birds after being assigned to free-range treatment for 7 d decreased significantly compared with that in the conventional treatment (P 0.05). The daily weight gain, feed per gain, daily feed intake, and mortality from 21 to 42 d of age were unaffected by free-range days (P > 0.05). At 42 d of age, the breast yield increased linearly with increasing free-range days (P 0.05). The absolute thymus weight and thymus:BW ratio showed a significant increasing and then decreasing quadratic response to increasing free-range days (P < 0.05). The findings of this study suggest that increasing free-range days advantageously affects breast yield, but decreases thigh, leg, thigh bone, and foot yields as well as the water-holding capacity of thigh. No evidence was found that increasing free-range days caused changes in growth performance, meat quality, and lymphoid organs except for changes in water-holding capacity and thymus. © Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. CD56(bright)perforin(low) noncytotoxic human NK cells are abundant in both healthy and neoplastic solid tissues and recirculate to secondary lymphoid organs via afferent lymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrega, Paolo; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Di Carlo, Emma; Morandi, Barbara; Paul, Petra; Rizzello, Valeria; Cipollone, Giuseppe; Navarra, Giuseppe; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2014-04-15

    As limited information is available regarding the distribution and trafficking of NK cells among solid organs, we have analyzed a wide array of tissues derived from different human compartments. NK cells were widely distributed in most solid tissues, although their amount varied significantly depending on the tissue/organ analyzed. Interestingly, the distribution appeared to be subset specific, as some tissues were preferentially populated by CD56(bright)perforin(low) NK cells, with others by the CD56(dim)perforin(high) cytotoxic counterpart. Nevertheless, most tissues were highly enriched in CD56(bright)perforin(low) cells, and the distribution of NK subsets appeared in accordance with tissue gene expression of chemotactic factors, for which receptors are differently represented in the two subsets. Remarkably, chemokine expression pattern of tissues was modified after neoplastic transformation. As a result, although the total amount of NK cells infiltrating the tissues did not significantly change upon malignant transformation, the relative proportion of NK subsets infiltrating the tissues was different, with a trend toward a tumor-infiltrating NK population enriched in noncytotoxic cells. Besides solid tissues, CD56(bright)perforin(low) NK cells were also detected in seroma fluids, which represents an accrual of human afferent lymph, indicating that they may leave peripheral solid tissues and recirculate to secondary lymphoid organs via lymphatic vessels. Our results provide a comprehensive mapping of NK cells in human tissues, demonstrating that discrete NK subsets populate and recirculate through most human tissues and that organ-specific chemokine expression patterns might affect their distribution. In this context, chemokine switch upon neoplastic transformation might represent a novel mechanism of tumor immune escape.

  20. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone, E-mail: dhlin@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-15

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  1. Synoptic tool for reporting of hematological and lymphoid neoplasms based on World Health Organization classification and College of American Pathologists checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winters Sharon B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synoptic reporting, either as part of the pathology report or replacing some free text component incorporates standardized data elements in the form of checklists for pathology reporting. This ensures the pathologists make note of these findings in their reports, thereby improving the quality and uniformity of information in the pathology reports. Methods The purpose of this project is to develop the entire set of elements in the synoptic templates or "worksheets" for hematologic and lymphoid neoplasms using the World Health Organization (WHO Classification and the College of American Pathologists (CAP Cancer Checklists. The CAP checklists' content was supplemented with the most updated classification scheme (WHO classification, specimen details, staging as well as information on various ancillary techniques such as cytochemical studies, immunophenotyping, cytogenetics including Fluorescent In-situ Hybridization (FISH studies and genotyping. We have used a digital synoptic reporting system as part of an existing laboratory information system (LIS, CoPathPlus, from Cerner DHT, Inc. The synoptic elements are presented as discrete data points, so that a data element such as tumor type is assigned from the synoptic value dictionary under the value of tumor type, allowing the user to search for just those cases that have that value point populated. Results These synoptic worksheets are implemented for use in our LIS. The data is stored as discrete data elements appear as an accession summary within the final pathology report. In addition, the synoptic data can be exported to research databases for linking pathological details on banked tissues. Conclusion Synoptic reporting provides a structured method for entering the diagnostic as well as prognostic information for a particular pathology specimen or sample, thereby reducing transcription services and reducing specimen turnaround time. Furthermore, it provides accurate and

  2. Effect of Prevention and Treatment of Murine Acute Viral Myocarditisand Protection of Lymphoid Organ Atrophy withXinkang Oral Liquid (心康口服液)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万素君; 赵红; 李建农; 王丽霞; 黄霞珍; 陈鸿珊

    2002-01-01

    Objective:The effect of prevention and treatment of Xinkang oral liquid (心康口服液, XKOL) on experimental coxsackievirus B 3 (CVB 3) myocarditis mice model were investigated. Methods: The mice were inoculated intrap eritoneally with 0.3 ml of 10 5 TCID 50 of CVB 3 to in duce acute viral myocarditis model. These mice were divided into model control group (Group A), prevention high do sage group (Group B) and prevention low dosage grou p (Group C), treatment high dosage group (Group D) and treatm ent low dosage group (Group E), respectively. In addition, XKOL control group (Group F) and normal control grou p (Group G) were not infected with CVB 3 intraperitoneally. The administration of XKOL in Group B a nd C began 2 days before virus infection. All animals were sacrificed on day 20 for evaluation. Results: Histological examination showed extensive m yocardial necrosis and cell infiltration in most of Group A mice, but necrosis and cell infiltration were less severe in Group B,C,D and E mice. Thymus weight in Group B,C,D and E mice were heavier and less cell depletion occurred than those in Group A. Conclussion: The XKOL could effectively inhibit myoc ardial CVB 3 replication, reduce the myocardial inflammatory response, lower incidence rate of myocarditis and prevent the disease associated lymphoid organ atrophy in this animal models.

  3. [Morphological characteristics of the lymphoid tissues in the newborn children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminova, G G; Grigorenko, D E; Rusina, A K; Erofeeva, L M

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative analysis and statistical processing of thymus, trachea, duodenum ileum, coecum and appendix in newborns demonstrated that by the moment of birth peripheral immunogenesis organs were not equally formed due to peculiarities of their function in postnatal ontogenesis. Lymphoid nodules were absent in tracheal mucosa and adjacent lymph nodes showed loss of lymphoid noules aswell. However intensive formation of lymphoid structures took place in the walls of the gut, especially large intestine. The appendix, lymphoid tissue of which was not, in fact, developed at all, made an exception.

  4. CCR7 guides migration of mesenchymal stem cell to secondary lymphoid organs: a novel approach to separate GvHD from GvL effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Jiang, YanMing; Jiang, XiaoXia; Guo, XiMin; Ning, HongMei; Li, YuHang; Liao, Li; Yao, HuiYu; Wang, XiaoYan; Liu, YuanLin; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Hu; Mao, Ning

    2014-07-01

    Inefficient homing of systemically infused mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) limits the efficacy of existing MSC-based clinical graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) therapies. Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are the major niches for generating immune responses or tolerance. MSCs home to a wide range of organs, but rarely to SLOs after intravenous infusion. Thus, we hypothesized that targeted migration of MSCs into SLOs may significantly improve their immunomodulatory effect. Here, chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) gene, encoding a receptor that specifically guides migration of immune cells into SLOs, was engineered into a murine MSC line C3H10T1/2 by retrovirus transfection system (MSCs/CCR7). We found that infusion of MSCs/CCR7 potently prolonged the survival of GvHD mouse model. The infused MSCs/CCR7 migrate to SLOs, relocate in proximity with T lymphocytes, therefore, potently inhibited their proliferation, activation, and cytotoxicity. Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the early control of leukemia relapse. Although MSCs/CCR7 inhibited NK cell activity in vitro coculture, they did not impact on the proportion and cytotoxic capacities of NK cells in the peripheral blood of GvHD mice. In an EL4 leukemia cell loaded GvHD model, MSCs/CCR7 infusion preserved the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that CCR7 guides migration of MSCs to SLOs and thus highly intensify their in vivo immunomodulatory effect while preserving the GvL activity. This exciting therapeutic strategy may improve the clinical efficacy of MSC based therapy for immune diseases.

  5. Automated, Multiplexed Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy Platform for Continuous Monitoring of Microtissue Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgel, Sebastian C; Diener, Laurin; Frey, Olivier; Kim, Jin-Young; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2016-11-15

    Microtissue spheroids in microfluidic devices are increasingly used to establish novel in vitro organ models of the human body. As the spheroids are comparably sizable, it is difficult to monitor larger numbers of them by optical means. Therefore, electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) emerges as a viable alternative to probing spheroid properties. Current spheroid EIS systems are, however, not suitable for investigating multiple spheroids in parallel over extended time in an automated fashion. Here we address this issue by presenting an automated, multiplexed EIS (AMEIS) platform for impedance analysis in a microfluidic setting. The system was used to continuously monitor the effect of the anticancer drug fluorouracil (5-FU) on HCT116 cancer spheroids. Simultaneous EIS monitoring of up to 15 spheroids was performed in parallel over 4 days at a temporal resolution of 2 min without any need for pumps. The measurements were continuous in nature, and the setup was kept in a standard incubator under controlled conditions during the measurements. A baseline normalization method to improve robustness and to reduce the influence of slow changes in the medium conductivity on the spheroid EIS readings has been developed and validated by experiments and means of a finite-element model. The same method and platform was then used for online monitoring of cardiac spheroids. The beating frequency of each cardiac spheroid could be read out in a completely automated fashion. The developed system constitutes a promising method for simultaneously evaluating drug impact and/or toxic effects on multiple microtissue spheroids.

  6. Mycolactone diffuses from Mycobacterium ulcerans-infected tissues and targets mononuclear cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid organs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Hong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer (BU is a progressive disease of subcutaneous tissues caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The pathology of BU lesions is associated with the local production of a diffusible substance, mycolactone, with cytocidal and immunosuppressive properties. The defective inflammatory responses in BU lesions reflect these biological properties of the toxin. However, whether mycolactone diffuses from infected tissues and suppresses IFN-gamma responses in BU patients remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have investigated the pharmacodistribution of mycolactone following injection in animal models by tracing a radiolabeled form of the toxin, and by directly quantifying mycolactone in lipid extracts from internal organs and cell subpopulations. We show that subcutaneously delivered mycolactone diffused into mouse peripheral blood and accumulated in internal organs with a particular tropism for the spleen. When mice were infected subcutaneously with M. ulcerans, this led to a comparable pattern of distribution of mycolactone. No evidence that mycolactone circulated in blood serum during infection could be demonstrated. However, structurally intact toxin was identified in the mononuclear cells of blood, lymph nodes and spleen several weeks before ulcerative lesions appear. Importantly, diffusion of mycolactone into the blood of M. ulcerans-infected mice coincided with alterations in the functions of circulating lymphocytes. CONCLUSION: In addition to providing the first evidence that mycolactone diffuses beyond the site of M. ulcerans infection, our results support the hypothesis that the toxin exerts immunosuppressive effects at the systemic level. Furthermore, they suggest that assays based on mycolactone detection in circulating blood cells may be considered for diagnostic tests of early disease.

  7. Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le-Wei; Kang, Xiao-Kang; Leong, Mook-Seng

    2001-11-01

    The flagship monograph addressing the spheroidal wave function and its pertinence to computational electromagnetics Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory presents in detail the theory of spheroidal wave functions, its applications to the analysis of electromagnetic fields in various spheroidal structures, and provides comprehensive programming codes for those computations. The topics covered in this monograph include: Spheroidal coordinates and wave functions Dyadic Green's functions in spheroidal systems EM scattering by a conducting spheroid EM scattering by a coated dielectric spheroid Spheroid antennas SAR distributions in a spheroidal head model The programming codes and their applications are provided online and are written in Mathematica 3.0 or 4.0. Readers can also develop their own codes according to the theory or routine described in the book to find subsequent solutions of complicated structures. Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory is a fundamental reference for scientists, engineers, and graduate students practicing modern computational electromagnetics or applied physics.

  8. Lymphoid Tissue and Pathological Influences of Toxicants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaudien, D.; Harleman, H.; Bouallala, F.; Kuper, C. F.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicologic pathology plays a crucial role in the identification and interpretation of substance-induced health effects. Histology of lymphoid organs is quite sensitive, although it does not flag every model immunotoxic substance. Subtle interferences of toxic compounds, like transmembrane signaling

  9. Mapping of NKp46+ cells in healthy human lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eTomasello

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding Natural Killer (NK cell anatomical distribution is key to dissect the role of these unconventional lymphocytes in physiological and disease conditions. In mouse, NK cells have been detected in various lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, while in humans the current knowledge of NK cell distribution at steady state is mainly restricted to lymphoid tissues. The translation to humans of findings obtained in mice is facilitated by the identification of NK cell markers conserved between these two species. The Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor (NCR NKp46 is a marker of the NK cell lineage evolutionary conserved in mammals. In mice, NKp46 is also present on rare T cell subsets and on a subset of gut Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILCs expressing the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor t (RORt transcription factor. Here, we documented the distribution and the phenotype of human NKp46+ cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues isolated from healthy donors. Human NKp46+ cells were found in splenic red pulp, in lymph nodes, in lungs and gut lamina propria, thus mirroring mouse NKp46+ cell distribution. We also identified a novel cell subset of CD56dimNKp46low cells that includes RORt+ILCs with a lineage-CD94-CD117brightCD127bright phenotype. The use of NKp46 thus contributes to establish the basis for analyzing quantitative and qualitative changes of NK cell and ILC subsets in human diseases.

  10. Dwarf Spheroidals in MOND

    CERN Document Server

    Angus, Garry W

    2008-01-01

    We take the line of sight velocity dispersions as functions of radius for 8 Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies and use Jeans analysis to calculate the mass-to-light ratios (M/L) in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). Using the latest structural parameters, distances and variable velocity anisotropy, we find 6/8 dwarfs have sensible M/L using only the stellar populations. Sextans and Draco, however, have M/L=9.2_{-3.0}^{+5.3} and 43.9_{-19.3}^{+29.0} respectively, which poses a problem. Apart from the need for Sextans' integrated magnitude to be reviewed, we propose tidal effects intrinsic to MOND, testable with numerical simulations, but fully orbit dependant, which are disrupting Draco. The creation of the Magellanic Stream is also re-addressed in MOND, the scenario being the stream is ram pressure stripped from the SMC as it crosses the LMC.

  11. Upregulation of CC Chemokine Receptor 7 (CCR7) Enables Migration of Xenogeneic Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Rat Secondary Lymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian; Luan, Shao-Liang; Huang, Hong; Sun, Xing-Kun; Yang, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Hui; Han, Wei-Dong; Li, Hong; Han, Yan

    2016-12-30

    BACKGROUND CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expression is vital for cell migration to secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). Our previous work showed that inducing CCR7 expression enabled syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to migrate into SLOs, resulting in enhanced immunosuppressive performance in mice. Given that human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) are widely used in clinical therapy, we further investigated whether upregulation of CCR7 enables xenogeneic hASCs to migrate to rat SLOs. MATERIAL AND METHODS hASCs rarely express CCR7; therefore, hASCs were transfected with lentivirus encoding rat CCR7 (rCCR7) plus green fluorescence protein (GFP) or GFP alone. CCR7 mRNA and cell surface expression of rCCR7-hASCs and GFP-hASCs were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry (FCM), respectively. The phenotype, differentiation, and proliferation capacity of each cell type was also determined. To examine migration, rCCR7-hASCs and GFP-hASCs were injected intravenously into Lewis rats, and the proportion of GFP-positive cells in the spleen and lymph nodes was determined with FCM. RESULTS mRNA and cell surface protein expression of CCR7 was essentially undetectable in hASCs and GFP-ASCs; however, CCR7 was highly expressed in rCCR7-ASCs. rCCR7-hASCs, GFP-hASCs, and hASCs shared a similar immunophenotype, and maintained the ability of multilineage differentiation and proliferation. In addition, the average proportion of GFP-positive cells was significantly higher following transplantation of rCCR7-hASCs compared with GFP-hASCs (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that upregulation of rat CCR7 expression does not change the phenotype, differentiation, or proliferation capacity of hASCs, but does enable efficient migration of hASCs to rat SLOs.

  12. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Marchesi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic (or tertiary lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC. We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS. B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV. Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  13. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergomas, Francesca [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Laghi, Luigi [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Milan 20089 (Italy); Marchesi, Federica, E-mail: federica.marchesi@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2011-12-28

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21{sup +} follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  14. A Stromal Cell Niche for Human and Mouse Type 3 Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorweg, Kerim; Narang, Priyanka; Li, Zhi; Thuery, Anne; Papazian, Natalie; Withers, David R; Coles, Mark C; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive immunity critically depends on the functional compartmentalization of secondary lymphoid organs. Mesenchymal stromal cells create and maintain specialized niches that support survival, activation, and expansion of T and B cells, and integrated analysis of lymphocytes and their niche has been instrumental in understanding adaptive immunity. Lymphoid organs are also home to type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), innate effector cells essential for barrier immunity. However, a specialized stromal niche for ILC3 has not been identified. A novel lineage-tracing approach now identifies a subset of murine fetal lymphoid tissue organizer cells that gives rise exclusively to adult marginal reticular cells. Moreover, both cell types are conserved from mice to humans and colocalize with ILC3 in secondary lymphoid tissues throughout life. In sum, we provide evidence that fetal stromal organizers give rise to adult marginal reticular cells and form a dedicated stromal niche for innate ILC3 in adaptive lymphoid organs.

  15. Role of lymphotoxin and homeostatic chemokines in the development and function of local lymphoid tissues in the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Carragher, Damian; Randall, Troy D

    2007-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs are strategically placed to recruit locally activated antigen presenting cells (APCs) as well as naïve, recirculating T and B cells. The structure of secondary lymphoid organs - separated B and T zones, populations of specialized stromal cells, high endothelial venules and lymphatic vessles - has also evolved to maximize encounters between APCs and lymphocytes and to facilitate the expansion and differentiation of antigen-stimulated T and B cells. Many of the general mechanisms that govern the development and organization of secondary lymphoid organs have been identified over the last decade. However, the specific cellular and molecular interactions involved in the development and organization of each secondary lymphoid organ are slightly different and probably reflect the cell types available at that time and location. Here we review the mechanisms involved in the development, organization and function of local lymphoid tissues in the respiratory tract, including Nasal Associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT) and inducible Bronchus Associated Lymphoid Tissue (iBALT).

  16. Effects of outdoor access days on growth performance, carcass yield, meat quality, and lymphoid organ index of a local chicken breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, H B; Cai, J; Lu, J; Wang, Q; Shao, D; Zou, J M

    2015-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of outdoor access days on growth performance, carcass yield, meat quality, and lymphoid organ index of a local chicken breed. In total, 864 twenty one-day-old male Suqin yellow chickens, with similar body weight (536±36g), were selected and raised in indoor floor pens that measured 1.42×1.42 m (2 m2, 18 birds/m2) in conventional poultry research houses (36 birds per pen). Two hundred and sixteen birds were allowed outdoor access treatments at 21, 28, 35, and 42 d of age, respectively (access to outdoor for 35, 28, 21, and 14 days, respectively). Each treatment was represented by 6 replicates (pens) containing 36 birds (216 birds per treatment). In the outdoor access treatment, the birds had an outdoor free-range paddock that measured 3×8 m (24 m2, 1.5 birds/m2). The body weight of birds at 56 d of age increased linearly with increasing outdoor access days (P<0.001), but there was no effect of the outdoor access days on the body weight at 42 d of age (P=0.161). The daily weight gain, daily feed intake, and feed per gain from 21 to 42 d of age were unaffected by outdoor access days (P=0.401, P=0.463, P=0.223, respectively). However, the daily weight gain and daily feed intake from 42 to 56 and from 21 to 56 d of age increased linearly with increasing outdoor access days (P=0.002, P<0.001; P=0.001, P=0.004; respectively), while the feed per gain tended to decrease linearly from 21 to 56 d of age (P=0.060). The mortality from 21 to 56 d of age was unaffected by outdoor access days (P=0.261). At 56 d of age, the breast yield increased linearly with increasing outdoor access days (P<0.001), while the foot yield decreased linearly (P=0.016). The light (L*) and red (b*) values of leg meat color increased linearly with increasing outdoor access days (P=0.032, P=0.013, respectively). The spleen: the body weight ratio showed a decreasing and then increasing quadratic response to increasing outdoor access days (P=0

  17. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Targeting of CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T Cells in Secondary Lymphoid Organs Is Associated with Robust CXCL10 Expression in Monocyte/Macrophage Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Masayuki; Sato, Hirotaka; Okamura, Tomotaka; Uda, Akihiko; Takeda, Satoshi; Ahmed, Nursarat; Shichino, Shigeyuki; Shiino, Teiichiro; Saito, Yohei; Watanabe, Satoru; Sugimoto, Chie; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Ato, Manabu; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Izumo, Shuji; Matsushima, Kouji; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Ansari, Aftab A; Villinger, Francois; Mori, Kazuyasu

    2017-07-01

    Glycosylation of Env defines pathogenic properties of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We previously demonstrated that pathogenic SIVmac239 and a live-attenuated, quintuple deglycosylated Env mutant (Δ5G) virus target CD4(+) T cells residing in different tissues during acute infection. SIVmac239 and Δ5G preferentially infected distinct CD4(+) T cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) and within the lamina propria of the small intestine, respectively (C. Sugimoto et al., J Virol 86:9323-9336, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00948-12). Here, we studied the host responses relevant to SIV targeting of CXCR3(+) CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells in SLOs. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses revealed that Th1-polarized inflammatory responses, defined by expression of CXCR3 chemokines, were distinctly induced in the SIVmac239-infected animals. Consistent with robust expression of CXCL10, CXCR3(+) T cells were depleted from blood in the SIVmac239-infected animals. We also discovered that elevation of CXCL10 expression in blood and SLOs was secondary to the induction of CD14(+) CD16(+) monocytes and MAC387(+) macrophages, respectively. Since the significantly higher levels of SIV infection in SLOs occurred with a massive accumulation of infiltrated MAC387(+) macrophages, T cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and residential macrophages near high endothelial venules, the results highlight critical roles of innate/inflammatory responses in SIVmac239 infection. Restricted infection in SLOs by Δ5G also suggests that glycosylation of Env modulates innate/inflammatory responses elicited by cells of monocyte/macrophage/DC lineages.IMPORTANCE We previously demonstrated that a pathogenic SIVmac239 virus and a live-attenuated, deglycosylated mutant Δ5G virus infected distinct CD4(+) T cell subsets in SLOs and the small intestine, respectively (C. Sugimoto et al., J Virol 86:9323-9336, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00948-12). Accordingly, infections with SIVmac239, but not with Δ5G

  18. Expression of gene, protein and immunohistochemical localization of the estrogen receptor isoform ERα1 in male rainbow trout lymphoid organs; indication of the role of estrogens in the regulation of immune mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, Sophie; Milla, Sylvain; Kestemont, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    In vertebrates, estrogens act on the reproductive system but also affect the functioning of non-reproductive tissues such as the immune system. In teleost fish, effects of estrogens and xenoestrogens have been reported extensively, but the available information on targeted tissues and cells is still scarce. Moreover, a better knowledge of the distinct ER subtypes is required to find out the mechanistic pathways by which estrogen compounds are able to disrupt endogenous estrogen signaling in fish immunity. The present study aimed at characterizing, in male rainbow trout juveniles, multi-tissue gene expression pattern of one isoform of estrogen receptor (ER), ERα1, at the mRNA and protein levels. The mRNA levels for ERα1 were measured in various lymphoid organs by real-time RT-PCR and ERα1 protein level by Western blot. Furthermore, this protein was located by immunohistochemistry in the same organs. The transcripts were ubiquitously expressed, but at a higher level in testis and liver, while the protein was more abundant in testis and skin. Moreover, the ERα1 was detected in endothelial, Kupffer, mucous and chloride cells, hematopoietic tissues, proximal tubule, epithelia of the skin and intestine, in the lamina propria and in the stratum granulosum. This distribution backs the idea that, in male rainbow trout, estrogeno-mimetic compounds could be involved in different immune mechanisms such as inflammatory response, transport of Ig, mucus production, regulation of cellular immunity and development and maturation of lymphoid and myeloid cells.

  19. Blood microvascular organization of the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue of the guinea pig: a scanning electron microscopic study of corrosion casts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada,Satoko

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available It has previously been confirmed that the guinea pig has aggregations of 10-20 lymphoid follicles at the junction of the nasal cavity and the nasopharyngeal duct. The vascular architecture of this nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT was studied by the corrosion cast/scanning electron microscope method. The NALT was supplied by branches of the inferior nasal artery. These afferent arterial branches gave off arterioles to the follicles and the interfollicular regions, where the arterioles ramified into capillaries. Some of these arterioles reached the subepithelial region to form a single-layer dense capillary network. The subepithelial capillaries gathered into short collecting venules, which in turn drained into high endothelial venules (HEV in the interfollicular region. The HEV, which also receives tributaries from the follicular and interfollicular capillary plexuses, descended in the interfollicular regions and finally flowed into the efferent veins at the bottom of the NALT. Indentations impressed by high endothelial cells (HEC were prominent on the surface of the HEV casts, and their frequency was larger in the upper course or segments than in the lower. This suggests that the incidence of HEC in the upper segments is higher than in the lower segments, and these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that some substances which are taken up into the subepithelial capillaries and transported to the venules induce differentiation and maintain of HEVs.

  20. The Innate Lymphoid Cell Precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Constantinides, Michael G; Gudjonson, Herman; Bendelac, Albert

    2016-05-20

    The discovery of tissue-resident innate lymphoid cell populations effecting different forms of type 1, 2, and 3 immunity; tissue repair; and immune regulation has transformed our understanding of mucosal immunity and allergy. The emerging complexity of these populations along with compounding issues of redundancy and plasticity raise intriguing questions about their precise lineage relationship. Here we review advances in mapping the emergence of these lineages from early lymphoid precursors. We discuss the identification of a common innate lymphoid cell precursor characterized by transient expression of the transcription factor PLZF, and the lineage relationships of innate lymphoid cells with conventional natural killer cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. We also review the rapidly growing understanding of the network of transcription factors that direct the development of these lineages.

  1. SIZE AND SHAPE FACTOR EXTREMES OF SPHEROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hlubinka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we consider random prolate (oblate spheroids and their random profiles. The limiting distribution of the extremal characteristics of the spheroids is related to the limiting distribution of the corresponding extremal characteristics of the profiles. The difference between the analysis of the prolate and oblate spheroids is discussed. We propose the possible application of the theoretical results.

  2. Type 3 innate lymphoid cell depletion is mediated by TLRs in lymphoid tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Lackner, Andrew A; Veazey, Ronald S

    2015-12-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) type 3, also known as lymphoid tissue inducer cells, plays a major role in both the development and remodeling of organized lymphoid tissues and the maintenance of adaptive immune responses. HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection causes breakdown of intestinal barriers resulting in microbial translocation, leading to systemic immune activation and disease progression. However, the effects of HIV/SIV infection on ILC3 are unknown. Here, we analyzed ILC3 from mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues in chronically SIV-infected macaques and uninfected controls. ILC3 cells were defined and identified in macaque lymphoid tissues as non-T, non-B (lineage-negative), c-Kit(+)IL-7Rα(+) (CD117(+)CD127(+)) cells. These ILC3 cells highly expressed CD90 (∼ 63%) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor and produced IL-17 (∼ 63%), IL-22 (∼ 36%), and TNF-α (∼ 72%) but did not coexpress CD4 or NK cell markers. The intestinal ILC3 cell loss correlated with the reduction of total CD4(+) T cells and T helper (Th)17 and Th22 cells in the gut during SIV infection (P lymphoid tissues in SIV-infected macaques, further contributing to the HIV-induced impairment of gut-associated lymphoid tissue structure and function, especially in mucosal tissues.

  3. Age-related changes and distribution of T cell markers (CD3 and CD4) and toll-like receptors(TLR2, TLR3,TLR4 and TLR7) in the duck lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aiguo; Xu, Jiahua; Lai, Hanzhang; Huang, Wenke; Fang, Niran; Chen, Ruiai

    2017-03-10

    T lymphocytes and Toll-like receptors have been confirmed to have correlation with the ability to resistance to pathogenic challenges and play an important role in duck immune system. However, the information of ontogeny of T lymphocytes and Toll-like receptors is scarcely in duck. Therefore, to address these questions, we report the development and distribution of CD3 and CD4 by immunocytochemistry and the age-related mRNA level of duck T cell markers (CD3 and CD4) and Toll-like receptors (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7) by real time quantitative PCR in duck lymphoid organs (thymus, bursa of Fabricius and spleen). Results indicated that CD3 and CD4 positive cells can be observed in all test organs and partly change in an age-related way. CD4 positive T cell of duck spleen mainly distributed in periarterial lymphatic sheaths and red pulp, not in white pulp. Both of CD3 and CD4 were experienced significant increased wave twice in duck lymphoid organs and T cell dependent cellular immunity of duck may well established until 5 weeks old. The mRNA expression levels of duck TLRs were age and organ dependent, and duck TLR3 and TLR7 were significantly lower abundance in the spleen but higher in thymus and bursa of Fabricius, respectively. This study provide the essential knowledge of the ontogeny of T cells and Toll-like receptors in duck, which may shed lights on the T-cell mediate immunity and innate immunity in duck.

  4. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    North, P.; Cescutti, G.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Lemasle, B.; Venn, K. A.; Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Primas, F.; Francois, P.

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other

  5. The Fundamental Manifold of Spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Zaritsky, D; Zabludoff, A I; Zaritsky, Dennis; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2006-01-01

    We present a unifying empirical description of the structural and kinematic properties of all spheroids embedded in dark matter halos. We find that the stellar spheroidal components of galaxy clusters, which we call cluster spheroids (CSphs) and which are typically one hundred times the size of normal elliptical galaxies, lie on a "fundamental plane" as tight as that defined by ellipticals (rms in effective radius of ~0.07), but that has a different slope. The slope, as measured by the coefficient of the log(sigma) term, declines significantly and systematically between the fundamental planes of ellipticals, brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), and CSphs.We attribute this decline primarily to a continuous change in M_e/L_e, the mass-to-light ratio within the effective radius r_e, with spheroid scale. The magnitude of the slope change requires that it arises principally from differences in the relative distributions of luminous and dark matter, rather than from stellar population differences such as in age and m...

  6. Generation of Multicellular Breast Cancer Tumor Spheroids: Comparison of Different Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Karolin; Haeger, Jan-Dirk; Heger, Julia; Pastuschek, Jana; Photini, Stella Mary; Yan, Yan; Lupp, Amelie; Pfarrer, Christiane; Mrowka, Ralf; Schleußner, Ekkehard; Markert, Udo R; Schmidt, André

    2016-12-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are widely used models in tumor research. Because of their three dimensional organization they can simulate avascular tumor areas comprising proliferative and necrotic cells. Nonetheless, protocols for spheroid generation are still inconsistent. Therefore, in this study the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 have been used to compare different spheroid generation models including hanging drop, liquid overlay and suspension culture techniques, each under several conditions. Experimental approaches differed in cell numbers (400-10,000), media and additives (25 % methocel, 25 % methocel plus 1 % Matrigel, 3.5 % Matrigel). In total, 42 different experimental setups have been tested. Generation of spheroids was evaluated by light microscopy and the structural composition was assessed immunohistochemically by means of Ki-67, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (cPARP) and mucin-1 (MUC-1) expression. Although the tested cell lines diverged widely in their capacity of forming spheroids we recommend hanging drops supplemented with 25 % methocel as the most reliable and efficient method with regard to success of generation of uniform spheroids, costs, experimental complexity and time expenditure in the different cell lines. MCF-7 cells formed spheroids under almost all analyzed conditions, and MDA-MB-231 cells under only one protocol (liquid overlay technique, 3.5 % Matrigel), while SK-BR-3 did not under neither condition. Therefore, we outline specific methods and recommend the use of adapted and standardized spheroid generation protocols for each cell line.

  7. An optimized protocol for isolating lymphoid stromal cells from the intestinal lamina propria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stzepourginski, Igor; Eberl, Gérard; Peduto, Lucie

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells in lymphoid organs, also called lymphoid stromal cells (LSCs), play a pivotal role in immunity by forming specialized microenvironments that provide signals for leukocyte migration, positioning, and survival. Best characterized in lymphoid organs, LSCs are also abundant in the intestinal mucosa, which harbors a rich repertoire of immune cells. However, the lack of efficient procedures for isolation and purification of LSCs from the intestine has been a major limitation to their characterization. Here we report a new method to efficiently isolate, in addition to immune cells, viable lymphoid stromal cells and other stromal subsets from the intestinal lamina propria for subsequent phenotypic and functional analysis.

  8. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akitoshi, E-mail: akitoshi-tamura@ds-pharma.co.jp; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased

  9. Combined Effect of Low-Intensity Helium-Neon Laser and X-Ray Radiation on in Vivo Cellular Response of the Whole Blood and Lymphoid Organs in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaichkina, S I; Dyukina, A R; Rozanova, O M; Romanchenko, S P; Sirota, N P; Kuznetsova, E A; Simonova, N B; Sorokina, S S; Zakrzhevskaya, D T; Yusupov, V I; Bagratishvili, V N

    2016-09-01

    We studied the effect of exposure to helium-neon laser (dose range 0.16-50 mJ/cm(2)) on activation of natural protection reserve in mice using the adaptive response test. DNA comets method revealed a protective response manifested in DNA damage level in whole blood leukocytes of mice and in lymphoid organs by the thymus and spleen weight index; preexposure to laser did not induce the adaptive response. ROS level in the whole blood was assessed by the level of zymosan-induced luminol chemiluminescence. In mice subjected to adaptive laser irradiation in doses of 0.16-5 mJ/cm(2) followed by X-ray irradiation in a dose of 1.5 Gy, the activation index calculated as the ratio of induced to spontaneous area of luminescence was by 1.4 times lower than that in non-irradiated animals, which attested to reduced ROSgeneration reserve capacity of neutrophils.

  10. Histopathology of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, C.F.

    2006-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) is a generalized term incorporating a disseminated collection of lymphoid tissues in multiple sites throughout the body. MALT sites that have been/are primarily studied include bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT), gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT),

  11. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Akitoshi; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence.

  12. Expression of Toll-like receptors (TLR, in lymphoid organ of black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon in response to Vibrio harveyi infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundanda Muthappa Dechamma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptors (TLR, being pattern recognition molecules, are a powerful first line of defense in response to pathogen invasion. They are known to play a crucial role in detecting and binding to the microbial molecule and triggering a non-specific immune response. Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR expression of the TLR gene was studied in healthy and Vibrio harveyi infected black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon. Lymphoid tissue expression of TLR in V. harveyi infected animals 24 h post injection showed statistically significant up regulation of the gene as compared to the control animals sham injected with phosphate buffered saline (PBS. The qPCR expression pattern of TLR at different time points in shrimp administered with the immunostimulant glucan for 6 days by oral feeding followed by challenge with V. harveyi showed statistically significant level at 48 h post bacterial challenge as compared to the control (immunostimulant treated animals sham injected with PBS. The novelty of the study is that it elicits the role of TLRs as important response proteins of the innate immune system in the shrimp.

  13. Spheroidal Degeneration of the Cornea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Dinç

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A thirty-one-year-old male patient presented with bilateral epiphora and stinging sensation in the cornea. Detailed history revealed that a bilateral corneal scraping had been made regarding the initial diagnosis of fungal keratitis. His bestcorrected visual acuities were 20/20 and 20/30 in right and left eyes, respectively. Biomicroscopy showed bilateral amber colored spherules in the anterior stroma of the central cornea. The diagnosis of spheroidal corneal degeneration was established and symptomatic therapy with artificial tear drops was prescribed. Ultraviolet light is widely accepted to be the main etiological factor in the pathogenesis of spheroidal degeneration. Because of difficulties in the early stages of the diagnostic process of the disease, incorrect diagnoses can be made with inappropriate interventions. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2011; 41: 264-6

  14. Parametric Dwarf Spheroidal Tidal Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fleck, J J; Fleck, Jean-Julien; Kuhn, Jeff R.

    2003-01-01

    The time dependent tidal interaction of the Local Group Dwarf Spheroidal (dS) Galaxies with the Milky Way (MW) can fundamentally affect their dynamical properties. The model developed here extends earlier numerical descriptions of dS-MW tidal interactions. We explore the dynamical evolution of dS systems in circular or elliptical MW orbits in the framework of a parametric oscillator. An analytic model is developed and compared with more general numerical solutions and N-body simulation experiments.

  15. Localization of Distinct Peyer's Patch Dendritic Cell Subsets and Their Recruitment by Chemokines Macrophage Inflammatory Protein (Mip)-3α, Mip-3β, and Secondary Lymphoid Organ Chemokine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Akiko; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the anatomical localization of three distinct dendritic cell (DC) subsets in the murine Peyer's patch (PP) and explore the role of chemokines in their recruitment. By two-color in situ immunofluorescence, CD11b+ myeloid DCs were determined to be present in the subepithelial dome (SED) region, whereas CD8α+ lymphoid DCs are present in the T cell–rich interfollicular region (IFR). DCs that lack expression of CD8α or CD11b (double negative) are present in both the SED and IFR. By in situ hybridization, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α mRNA was dramatically expressed only by the follicle-associated epithelium overlying the SED, while its receptor, CCR6, was concentrated in the SED. In contrast, CCR7 was expressed predominantly in the IFR. Consistent with these findings, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and in vitro chemotaxis assays using freshly isolated DCs revealed that CCR6 was functionally expressed only by DC subsets present in the SED, while all subsets expressed functional CCR7. Moreover, none of the splenic DC subsets migrated toward MIP-3α. These data support a distinct role for MIP-3α/CCR6 in recruitment of CD11b+ DCs toward the mucosal surfaces and for MIP-3β/CCR7 in attraction of CD8α+ DCs to the T cell regions. Finally, we demonstrated that all DC subsets expressed an immature phenotype when freshly isolated and maintained expression of subset markers upon maturation in vitro. In contrast, CCR7 expression by myeloid PP DCs was enhanced with maturation in vitro. In addition, this subset disappeared from the SED and appeared in the IFR after microbial stimulation in vivo, suggesting that immature myeloid SED DCs capture antigens and migrate to IFR to initiate T cell responses after mucosal microbial infections. PMID:10770804

  16. Amount of cells of diffuse lymphoid tissue of uterine tube in women of different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Shadlinskaya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to study the amount of lymphoid cells of diffuse lymphoid tissue of uterine tube in women of different age. The transverse sections of one-third of each part of uterine tube from 116 women (from newborn to senile age were studied. The sections were colored by gematoksilin-eosin, by van Gizon, by Brashe, azur-2-eosine, by Qrimelius. The amount of lymphoid cells of diffuse lymphoid tissue of uterine tube increased till the age of 16-20 and remained at high level further on till the age of 35. The quantity of lymphoid cells of diffuse lymphoid tissue of uterine tube changed according to the age and localization throughout the organ. The presence of diffused lymphoid tissue of uterine tube depended on the state of reproductive function of female organism. In the phase of desquamation there was minimal quantity of lymphoid tissue and in the phase of secretion there was maximal quantity of lymphoid tissue

  17. Encapsulated multicellular tumor spheroids as a novel in vitro model to study small size tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markvicheva Elena

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Presently multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS are being widely used in various aspects of tumor biology, including studies in biology and photodynamic therapy. The cellular organization of spheroids allows the recreation of in vivo small tumors much better than all common two-dimensional in vitro models. The cell encapsulation method could be proposed as a novel technique to quickly and easily prepare a large number of spheroids with narrow size distribution within a desirable diameter range. Moreover, the proposed technique for spheroid generation using encapsulated growing tumor cells could provide entirely new avenues to develop a novel spheroid co-culture model (for instance, the in vitro co-cultvation of tumor cells and monocytes, or epithelial cells, or fibroblasts etc. The current research was aimed at developing a simple and reliable method to encapsulate tumor cells and to cultivate them in vitro. In order to generate spheroids, MCF-7 cells were encapsulated and cultivated in 200 ml T-flasks in a 5% CO2 atmosphere at 37°C for 4-5 weeks. The cell proliferation was easily observed using a light microscope. The cells grew in aggregates increasing in size with time. The cell growth resulted in the formation of large cell clusters (spheroids which filled the whole microcapsule volume in 4-5 weeks.

  18. Interactions between the intestinal microbiota and innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vincent L; Kasper, Dennis L

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestine must manage to contain 100 trillion intestinal bacteria without inducing inappropriate immune responses to these microorganisms. The effects of the immune system on intestinal microorganisms are numerous and well-characterized, and recent research has determined that the microbiota influences the intestinal immune system as well. In this review, we first discuss the intestinal immune system and its role in containing and maintaining tolerance to commensal organisms. We next introduce a category of immune cells, the innate lymphoid cells, and describe their classification and function in intestinal immunology. Finally, we discuss the effects of the intestinal microbiota on innate lymphoid cells.

  19. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallentin, Blandine; Barlogis, Vincent; Piperoglou, Christelle; Cypowyj, Sophie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Chéné, Matthieu; Navarro, Florent; Farnarier, Catherine; Vivier, Eric; Vély, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The world of lymphocytes has recently expanded. A group of cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC), has been defined. It includes lymphoid cells that have been known for decades, such as natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells. NK cells recognize a vast array of tumor cells, which they help to eliminate through cytotoxicity and the production of cytokines, such as IFNγ. Advances in our understanding of NK-cell biology have led to a growing interest in the clinical manipulation of these cells in cancer. The other ILCs are found mostly in the mucosae and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, where they rapidly initiate immune responses to pathogens without the need for specific sensitization. Here, we outline the basic features of ILCs and review the role of ILCs other than NK cells in cancer. Much of the role of these ILCs in cancer remains unknown, but several findings should lead to further efforts to dissect the contribution of different ILC subsets to the promotion, maintenance, or elimination of tumors at various anatomic sites. This will require the development of standardized reagents and protocols for monitoring the presence and function of ILCs in human blood and tissue samples.

  20. IL-12/IL-23p40 Is Highly Expressed in Secondary Lymphoid Organs and the CNS during All Stages of EAE, but Its Deletion Does Not Affect Disease Perpetuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, Petra D.; Hussain, Rehana Z.; Miller-Little, William A.; Ben, Li-Hong; Segal, Benjamin M.; Herndon, Emily; Stüve, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23 are heterodimers that share the p40 subunit, and both cytokines are critical in the differentiation of T helper (Th)1 and Th17 cells, respectively. Th1 and Th17 effector cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), an animal model of the human central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). However, ustekinumab, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against p40 failed to show efficacy over placebo in a phase II clinical trial in patients with MS. The role of p40 in initial T cell priming and maintenance in secondary lymphoid tissues is not yet well understood. Methods Active EAE was induced in the B6.129-IL12b strain of p40eYFP reporter mice (yet40 mice), and Th1 and Th17 polarized cells were adoptively transferred into p40-deficient mice. Cellular subsets were phenotyped by multi-parameter flow cytometry, and p40 tissue expression was identified by confocal microscopy. Results We show that yet40 mice are susceptible to EAE, and that p40 is highly expressed in secondary lymphoid organs and the CNS during all stages of the disease. Interestingly, p40 expression in the recipient is not required for EAE induction after adoptive transfer of activated and differentiated encephalitogenic Th1 and Th17 cells into p40-deficient mice. Peripheral antagonism of T helper cell trophic factors critical for the differentiation and maintenance of Th1 and Th17 cells ameliorates EAE, indicating that p40 may play a critical role in the induction of CNS autoimmunity but not in its perpetuation. Conclusion Our data may explain why ustekinumab did not ameliorate paraclinical and clinical disease in patients with MS. In patients with already established disease, activated antigen-specific encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells are likely already differentiated, and are not dependent on p40 for maintenance. A clinical trial of longer duration with anti-p40 mAbs or other forms of

  1. Dendritic cell-derived VEGF-A plays a role in inflammatory angiogenesis of human secondary lymphoid organs and is driven by the coordinated activation of multiple transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Valentina; Vermi, William; Gianello, Veronica; Lonardi, Silvia; Gagliostro, Vincenzo; Naldini, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Lymph node expansion during inflammation is essential to establish immune responses and relies on the development of blood and lymph vessels. Previous work in mice has shown that this process depends on the presence of VEGF-A produced by B cells, macrophages and stromal cells. In humans, however, the cell types and the mechanisms regulating the intranodal production of VEGF-A remain elusive. Here we show that CD11c+ cells represent the main VEGF-A-producing cell population in human reactive secondary lymphoid organs. In addition we find that three transcription factors, namely CREB, HIF-1α and STAT3, regulate the expression of VEGF-A in inflamed DCs. Both HIF-1α and STAT3 are activated by inflammatory agonists. Conversely, CREB phosphorylation represents the critical contribution of endogenous or exogenous PGE2. Taken together, these results propose a crucial role for DCs in lymph node inflammatory angiogenesis and identify novel potential cellular and molecular targets to limit inflammation in chronic diseases and tumors. PMID:27256980

  2. Dendritic cell-derived VEGF-A plays a role in inflammatory angiogenesis of human secondary lymphoid organs and is driven by the coordinated activation of multiple transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Valentina; Vermi, William; Gianello, Veronica; Lonardi, Silvia; Gagliostro, Vincenzo; Naldini, Antonella; Sozzani, Silvano; Bosisio, Daniela

    2016-06-28

    Lymph node expansion during inflammation is essential to establish immune responses and relies on the development of blood and lymph vessels. Previous work in mice has shown that this process depends on the presence of VEGF-A produced by B cells, macrophages and stromal cells. In humans, however, the cell types and the mechanisms regulating the intranodal production of VEGF-A remain elusive. Here we show that CD11c+ cells represent the main VEGF-A-producing cell population in human reactive secondary lymphoid organs. In addition we find that three transcription factors, namely CREB, HIF-1α and STAT3, regulate the expression of VEGF-A in inflamed DCs. Both HIF-1α and STAT3 are activated by inflammatory agonists. Conversely, CREB phosphorylation represents the critical contribution of endogenous or exogenous PGE2. Taken together, these results propose a crucial role for DCs in lymph node inflammatory angiogenesis and identify novel potential cellular and molecular targets to limit inflammation in chronic diseases and tumors.

  3. Constrained spheroids for prolonged hepatocyte culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wen Hao; Fang, Yu; Yan, Jie; Hong, Xin; Hari Singh, Nisha; Wang, Shu Rui; Nugraha, Bramasta; Xia, Lei; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Liver-specific functions in primary hepatocytes can be maintained over extended duration in vitro using spheroid culture. However, the undesired loss of cells over time is still a major unaddressed problem, which consequently generates large variations in downstream assays such as drug screening. In static culture, the turbulence generated by medium change can cause spheroids to detach from the culture substrate. Under perfusion, the momentum generated by Stokes force similarly results in spheroid detachment. To overcome this problem, we developed a Constrained Spheroids (CS) culture system that immobilizes spheroids between a glass coverslip and an ultra-thin porous Parylene C membrane, both surface-modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and galactose ligands for optimum spheroid formation and maintenance. In this configuration, cell loss was minimized even when perfusion was introduced. When compared to the standard collagen sandwich model, hepatocytes cultured as CS under perfusion exhibited significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions such as urea secretion, and CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 metabolic activity. We propose the use of the CS culture as an improved culture platform to current hepatocyte spheroid-based culture systems.

  4. Magnetic-directed patterning of cell spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Benjamin R; Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2014-05-01

    We have described an approach to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) cell-based structures using functionalized super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as patterning agents to guide the assembly of endothelial cell spheroids into 3D patterns using the magnetic forces generated by a prefabricated magnetic template. SPIONs were first uptaken by endothelial cells before they were assembled into uniform-sized spheroids through a home-made robotic spheroid maker. To guide the magnetic spheroids, a unique magnetic template was fabricated using computer-aided design and cut from a magnetic sheet. The spheroids were then guided to the prefabricated magnetic template through the attractive magnetic forces between the SPIONs inside the endothelial cells and the magnetic template. Fusion of endothelial cell spheroids over time while adhered to the magnetic template allowed for the formation of 3D cell-based structures. Subsequent removal of the prefabricated magnetic template left 3-D endothelial cell sheets, which may be stacked to fabricate complicated 3D multicellular tissue structures. To enhance the cytocompatibility, SPIONs were silica-coated before use. At low concentrations, the SPIONs did not adversely affect cell viability, proliferation, and phenotype stability. Light and confocal microscopy showed that endothelial cell spheroids could be reproducibly created with high uniformity. The endothelial cells were able to remain viable and maintain the 3D structure in vitro. We have proved the concept to use SPIONs as a patterning agent to direct the attachment and self assembly of SPION-loaded endothelial cell spheroids on a prefabricated magnetic template for the formation of 3D cell based structures. A magnetic-directed technique allows quick patterning of cell spheroids in accordance with desirable magnetic patterns, therefore, holding promise for scalable fabrication of complicated 3D multicellular tissue structures. By varying the cell types and the

  5. Bistable flows in precessing spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, D

    2015-01-01

    Precession driven flows are found in any rotating container filled with liquid, when the rotation axis itself rotates about a secondary axis that is fixed in an inertial frame of reference. Because of its relevance for planetary fluid layers, many works consider spheroidal containers, where the uniform vorticity component of the bulk flow is reliably given by the well-known equations obtained by Busse in 1968. So far however, no analytical result on the solutions is available. Moreover, the cases where multiple flows can coexist have not been investigated in details since their discovery by Noir et al. (2003). In this work, we aim at deriving analytical results on the solutions, aiming in particular at, first estimating the ranges of parameters where multiple solutions exist, and second studying quantitatively their stability. Using the models recently proposed by Noir \\& C{\\'e}bron (2013), which are more generic in the inviscid limit than the equations of Busse, we analytically describe these solutions, ...

  6. Peripheral Lymphoid Volume Expansion and Maintenance Are Controlled by Gut Microbiota via RALDH+ Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zongde; Li, Jianjian; Zheng, Wencheng; Zhao, Guang; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Xiaofei; Guo, Yaqian; Qin, Chuan; Shi, Yan

    2016-02-16

    Lymphocyte homing to draining lymph nodes is critical for the initiation of immune responses. Secondary lymphoid organs of germ-free mice are underdeveloped. How gut commensal microbes remotely regulate cellularity and volume of secondary lymphoid organs remains unknown. We report here that, driven by commensal fungi, a wave of CD45(+)CD103(+)RALDH(+) cells migrates to the peripheral lymph nodes after birth. The arrival of these cells introduces high amounts of retinoic acid, mediates the neonatal to adult addressin switch on endothelial cells, and directs the homing of lymphocytes to both gut-associated lymphoid tissues and peripheral lymph nodes. In adult mice, a small number of these RALDH(+) cells might serve to maintain the volume of secondary lymphoid organs. Homing deficiency of these cells was associated with lymph node attrition in vitamin-A-deficient mice, suggesting a perpetual dependence on retinoic acid signaling for structural and functional maintenance of peripheral immune organs.

  7. Conjunctival spheroid degeneration. Recurrence after excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, M S

    1982-06-01

    After excision of part of the conjunctiva in 15 eyes (14 subjects) due to spheroid degeneration, the author noticed only fairly small, varying numbers of autofluorescent and colourless spheroids-after an observation period of 18 months, only 6% of autofluorescent and 13% of colourless bodies were observed compared to the number before biopsy. Around the biopsy site only a few spheroids were seen, with a non-significant tendency to increase in number of the colourless bodies. In the cornea the band-shaped keratopathy had aggravated, with the formation of a small number of large, autofluorescent spheroids. A pinguecula recurred in a mild degree only in 3 out of 13 cases within 18 months.

  8. Scaffold-free Prevascularized Microtissue Spheroids for Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayaka, W L; Zhu, L; Hargreaves, K M; Jin, L; Zhang, C

    2014-12-01

    Creating an optimal microenvironment that mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural pulp and securing an adequate blood supply for the survival of cell transplants are major hurdles that need to be overcome in dental pulp regeneration. However, many currently available scaffolds fail to mimic essential functions of natural ECM. The present study investigated a novel approach involving the use of scaffold-free microtissue spheroids of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) prevascularized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in pulp regeneration. In vitro-fabricated microtissue spheroids were inserted into the canal space of tooth-root slices and were implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. Histological examination revealed that, after four-week implantation, tooth-root slices containing microtissue spheroids resulted in well-vascularized and cellular pulp-like tissues, compared with empty tooth-root slices, which were filled with only subcutaneous fat tissue. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that the tissue found in the tooth-root slices was of human origin, as characterized by the expression of human mitochondria, and contained odontoblast-like cells organized along the dentin, as assessed by immunostaining for nestin and dentin sialoprotein (DSP). Vascular structures formed by HUVECs in vitro were successfully anastomosed with the host vasculature upon transplantation in vivo, as shown by immunostaining for human CD31. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that prevascularized, scaffold-free, microtissue spheroids can successfully regenerate vascular dental pulp-like tissue and also highlight the significance of the microtissue microenvironment as an optimal environment for successful pulp-regeneration strategies. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  9. Stress-induced alterations in the programmed natural cycles of post-natal lymphoid organ development in C57BL/6 mice: Evidence for a regulatory feedback relationship between bone marrow and thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Gerpe, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated some effects of weaning and immobilization stress in C57BL/6 mice aged 22-68 days, i.e., over a period including activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and puberty. Specifically, the study evaluated the evolution, over the referred age interval, of a set of variables (body, thymus, spleen and axillary lymph nodes weights, the proportion of lymphoid cells in the bone marrow, the relative chemoattraction capacity of thymic supernatants for lymphoid cells and the migratory capacity of bone marrow lymphoid cells) in either weaned mice or weaned mice subjected to immobilization stress, compared to "non-stressed" unweaned mice. Cyclic patterns, observed for most variables in unweaned mice, were especially pronounced in two cases: the relative migratory capacity of bone marrow lymphoid cells collected at different ages towards neonatal thymic supernatant, and the relative chemoattraction capacity of thymic supernatants of different ages as tested against a sample of bone marrow lymphoid cells from mice aged 35 days. Weaning stress tended to intensify the involution stages of the cycles in thymus, spleen and lymph node weight, but increased the relative proportion of lymphoid cells in the bone marrow cell population. Both types of exogenous stress tended to affect cycle phase, i.e., cycle peaks and troughs were shifted in time. Correlations were observed between patterns seen in the thymus and bone marrow, suggesting the existence of an autoregulatory feedback loop governing pre-T cell migration and bone marrow/thymus homeostasis. These results also suggest that exogenous stress acts as a non-programmed regulator, modulating the naturally programmed cyclic patterns.

  10. Endogenous IL-33 is highly expressed in mouse epithelial barrier tissues, lymphoid organs, brain, embryos, and inflamed tissues: in situ analysis using a novel Il-33-LacZ gene trap reporter strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichery, Mélanie; Mirey, Emilie; Mercier, Pascale; Lefrancais, Emma; Dujardin, Arnaud; Ortega, Nathalie; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2012-04-01

    IL-33 (previously known as NF from high endothelial venules) is an IL-1 family cytokine that signals through the ST2 receptor and drives cytokine production in mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, invariant NKT and NK cells, Th2 lymphocytes, and type 2 innate immune cells (natural helper cells, nuocytes, and innate helper 2 cells). Little is known about endogenous IL-33; for instance, the cellular sources of IL-33 in mouse tissues have not yet been defined. In this study, we generated an Il-33-LacZ gene trap reporter strain (Il-33(Gt/Gt)) and used this novel tool to analyze expression of endogenous IL-33 in vivo. We found that the Il-33 promoter exhibits constitutive activity in mouse lymphoid organs, epithelial barrier tissues, brain, and embryos. Immunostaining with anti-IL-33 Abs, using Il-33(Gt/Gt) (Il-33-deficient) mice as control, revealed that endogenous IL-33 protein is highly expressed in mouse epithelial barrier tissues, including stratified squamous epithelia from vagina and skin, as well as cuboidal epithelium from lung, stomach, and salivary gland. Constitutive expression of IL-33 was not detected in blood vessels, revealing the existence of species-specific differences between humans and mice. Importantly, IL-33 protein was always localized in the nucleus of producing cells with no evidence for cytoplasmic localization. Finally, strong expression of the Il-33-LacZ reporter was also observed in inflamed tissues, in the liver during LPS-induced endotoxin shock, and in the lung alveoli during papain-induced allergic airway inflammation. Together, our findings support the possibility that IL-33 may function as a nuclear alarmin to alert the innate immune system after injury or infection in epithelial barrier tissues.

  11. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    North, P; Jablonka, P; Hill, V; Shetrone, M; Letarte, B; Lemasle, B; Venn, K A; Battaglia, G; Tolstoy, E; Irwin, M J; Primas, F; Francois, P

    2012-01-01

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other elements in these galaxies, including alpha and iron-peak ones, which allowed us to build [Mn/Fe] and [Mn/alpha] versus [Fe/H] diagrams. The Mn abundances imply sub-solar [Mn/Fe] ratios for the stars in all four galaxies examined. In Sculptor, [Mn/Fe] stays roughly constant between [Fe/H]\\sim -1.8 and -1.4 and decreases at higher iron abundance. In Fornax, [Mn/Fe] does not vary in any significant way with [Fe/H]. The relation between [Mn/alpha] and [Fe/H] for the dSph galaxies is clearly systematically offset from that for the Milky Way, which reflects the different star formation histories of the respective galaxies. The [Mn/alpha] behavior can be interpreted as a result of the metal-dependent Mn yields of type II and ...

  12. Maternal retinoids control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and set the offspring immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pavert, Serge A.; Ferreira, Manuela; Domingues, Rita G.; Ribeiro, Hélder; Molenaar, Rosalie; Moreira-Santos, Lara; Almeida, Francisca F.; Ibiza, Sales; Barbosa, Inês; Goverse, Gera; Labão-Almeida, Carlos; Godinho-Silva, Cristina; Konijn, Tanja; Schooneman, Dennis; O'Toole, Tom; Mizee, Mark R.; Habani, Yasmin; Haak, Esther; Santori, Fabio R.; Littman, Dan R.; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Dzierzak, Elaine; Simas, J. Pedro; Mebius, Reina E.; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2014-04-01

    The impact of nutritional status during fetal life on the overall health of adults has been recognized; however, dietary effects on the developing immune system are largely unknown. Development of secondary lymphoid organs occurs during embryogenesis and is considered to be developmentally programmed. Secondary lymphoid organ formation depends on a subset of type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) named lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. Here we show that mouse fetal ILC3s are controlled by cell-autonomous retinoic acid (RA) signalling in utero, which pre-sets the immune fitness in adulthood. We found that embryonic lymphoid organs contain ILC progenitors that differentiate locally into mature LTi cells. Local LTi cell differentiation was controlled by maternal retinoid intake and fetal RA signalling acting in a haematopoietic cell-autonomous manner. RA controlled LTi cell maturation upstream of the transcription factor RORγt. Accordingly, enforced expression of Rorgt restored maturation of LTi cells with impaired RA signalling, whereas RA receptors directly regulated the Rorgt locus. Finally, we established that maternal levels of dietary retinoids control the size of secondary lymphoid organs and the efficiency of immune responses in the adult offspring. Our results reveal a molecular link between maternal nutrients and the formation of immune structures required for resistance to infection in the offspring.

  13. [Lymphoid neogenesis and lymphangiogenesis: two newcomers in the pathophysiology of chronic rejection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attuil-Audenis, Valérie; Duthey, Aurélie; Patey, Natacha; Gautreau, Chantal; McGregor, Brigitte; Morelon, Emmanuel; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Nicoletti, Antonino; Thaunat, Olivier

    2009-04-01

    Chronic rejection is one of the main causes of late allograft failure and no therapy is currently available to prevent efficiently its development. Improving the comprehension of the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of chronic rejection is a mandatory step to propose innovative therapies that would prolong grafts' survival. Using the rat aortic interposition model of chronic vascular rejection, we have demonstrated that the intragraft inflammatory infiltrate progressively organized itself into a functional ectopic lymphoid tissue (tertiary lymphoid organ) supporting the local synthesis of alloantibody. Thus, during chronic rejection the graft is at the same time the target and the site of elaboration of the humoral allo-immune response. This hypothesis has been confirmed in the clinical setting by the analysis of human grafts (kidneys, hearts and lungs) removed for terminal failure due to chronic rejection. This lymphoid neogenesis process, previously identified in other chronic inflammatory diseases, occurs with a strikingly high frequency in chronically rejected grafts, suggesting that an additional mechanism synergizes to initiate the development of tertiary lymphoid organs during chronic rejection. We propose that the defective lymphatic drainage of chronically rejected organs triggers lymphoid neogenesis and we discuss the complex crosstalk between lymphoid neogenesis and lymphangiogenesis that takes place during chronic rejection.

  14. Cellular capsules as a tool for multicellular spheroid production and for investigating the mechanics of tumor progression in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandri, Kévin; Sarangi, Bibhu Ranjan; Gurchenkov, Vasily Valérïévitch; Sinha, Bidisha; Kießling, Tobias Reinhold; Fetler, Luc; Rico, Felix; Scheuring, Simon; Lamaze, Christophe; Simon, Anthony; Geraldo, Sara; Vignjević, Danijela; Doméjean, Hugo; Rolland, Leslie; Funfak, Anette; Bibette, Jérôme; Bremond, Nicolas; Nassoy, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering the multifactorial determinants of tumor progression requires standardized high-throughput preparation of 3D in vitro cellular assays. We present a simple microfluidic method based on the encapsulation and growth of cells inside permeable, elastic, hollow microspheres. We show that this approach enables mass production of size-controlled multicellular spheroids. Due to their geometry and elasticity, these microcapsules can uniquely serve as quantitative mechanical sensors to measure the pressure exerted by the expanding spheroid. By monitoring the growth of individual encapsulated spheroids after confluence, we dissect the dynamics of pressure buildup toward a steady-state value, consistent with the concept of homeostatic pressure. In turn, these confining conditions are observed to increase the cellular density and affect the cellular organization of the spheroid. Postconfluent spheroids exhibit a necrotic core cemented by a blend of extracellular material and surrounded by a rim of proliferating hypermotile cells. By performing invasion assays in a collagen matrix, we report that peripheral cells readily escape preconfined spheroids and cell–cell cohesivity is maintained for freely growing spheroids, suggesting that mechanical cues from the surrounding microenvironment may trigger cell invasion from a growing tumor. Overall, our technology offers a unique avenue to produce in vitro cell-based assays useful for developing new anticancer therapies and to investigate the interplay between mechanics and growth in tumor evolution. PMID:23980147

  15. A spheroid toxicity assay using magnetic 3D bioprinting and real-time mobile device-based imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A; Shen, Tsaiwei; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Shiao, Sue; Chen, Jianbo; Desai, Pujan K; Liao, Angela; Hebel, Chris; Raphael, Robert M; Becker, Jeanne L; Souza, Glauco R

    2015-09-14

    An ongoing challenge in biomedical research is the search for simple, yet robust assays using 3D cell cultures for toxicity screening. This study addresses that challenge with a novel spheroid assay, wherein spheroids, formed by magnetic 3D bioprinting, contract immediately as cells rearrange and compact the spheroid in relation to viability and cytoskeletal organization. Thus, spheroid size can be used as a simple metric for toxicity. The goal of this study was to validate spheroid contraction as a cytotoxic endpoint using 3T3 fibroblasts in response to 5 toxic compounds (all-trans retinoic acid, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, 5'-fluorouracil, forskolin), sodium dodecyl sulfate (+control), and penicillin-G (-control). Real-time imaging was performed with a mobile device to increase throughput and efficiency. All compounds but penicillin-G significantly slowed contraction in a dose-dependent manner (Z' = 0.88). Cells in 3D were more resistant to toxicity than cells in 2D, whose toxicity was measured by the MTT assay. Fluorescent staining and gene expression profiling of spheroids confirmed these findings. The results of this study validate spheroid contraction within this assay as an easy, biologically relevant endpoint for high-throughput compound screening in representative 3D environments.

  16. Lymphoid cells in chicken intestinal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, P

    1975-01-01

    The intraepithelial lymphoid cells of chicken small intestine were studied by light microscopy using 1 mu Epon sections, and by electron microscopy. Three cell types were found: small lymphocytes, large lymphoid cells, and granular cells. These cells correspond to the theliolymphocytes and globule...

  17. Lymphoid cells in chicken intestinal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, P

    1975-01-01

    The intraepithelial lymphoid cells of chicken small intestine were studied by light microscopy using 1 mu Epon sections, and by electron microscopy. Three cell types were found: small lymphocytes, large lymphoid cells, and granular cells. These cells correspond to the theliolymphocytes and globule...

  18. B cell repertoire expansion occurs in meningeal ectopic lymphoid tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Wang, Sheng-zhi; Sagan, Sharon A.; Zamvil, Scott S.; von Büdingen, H.-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic lymphoid tissues (ELT) can be found in multiple sclerosis (MS) and other organ-specific inflammatory conditions. Whether ELT in the meninges of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune disease exhibit local germinal center (GC) activity remains unknown. In an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of CNS autoimmunity, we found activation-induced cytidine deaminase, a GC-defining enzyme, in meningeal ELT (mELT) densely populated by B and T cells. To determine GC activity in mEL...

  19. A multicellular spheroid array to realize spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torisawa, Yu-suke; Takagi, Airi; Nashimoto, Yuji; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel multicellular spheroid culture system that facilitates the easy preparation and culture of a spheroid microarray for the long-term monitoring of cellular activity. A spheroid culture device with an array of pyramid-like microholes was constructed in a silicon chip that was equipped with elastomeric microchannels. A cell suspension was introduced via the microfluidic channel into the microstructure that comprised silicon microholes and elastomeric microwells. A single spheroid can be formed and localized precisely within each microstructure. Since the culture medium could be replaced via the microchannels, a long-term culture (of approximately 2 weeks) is available on the chip. Measurement of albumin production in the hepatoma cell line (HepG2) showed that the liver-specific functions were maintained for 2 weeks. Based on the cellular respiratory activity, the cellular viability of the spheroid array on the chip was evaluated using scanning electrochemical microscopy. Responses to four different chemical stimulations were simultaneously detected on the same chip, thus demonstrating that each channel could be evaluated independently under various stimulation conditions. Our spheroid culture system facilitated the understanding of spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a single chip, thus functioning as a useful drug-screening device for cancer and liver cells.

  20. Bars and spheroids in gravimetry problem

    CERN Document Server

    Sizikov, Valery

    2016-01-01

    The direct gravimetry problem is solved by dividing each deposit body into a set of vertical adjoining bars, whereas in the inverse problem, each deposit body is modelled by a homogeneous ellipsoid of revolution (spheroid). Well-known formulae for the z-component of gravitational intensity for a spheroid are transformed to a convenient form. Parameters of a spheroid are determined by minimizing the Tikhonov smoothing functional with constraints on the parameters, which makes the ill-posed inverse problem by unique and stable. The Bulakh algorithm for initial estimating the depth and mass of a deposit is modified. The proposed technique is illustrated by numerical model examples of deposits in the form of two and five bodies. The inverse gravimetry problem is interpreted as a gravitational tomography problem or, in other words, as "introscopy" of Earth's crust and mantle.

  1. Use of spheroidal models in gravitational tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Sizikov, Valery

    2015-01-01

    The direct gravimetry problem is solved using the subdivision of each body of a deposit into a set of vertical adjoining bars, and in the inverse problem each body of a deposit is modeled by a uniform ellipsoid of revolution (spheroid). Well-known formulas for z-component of gravitational intensity of a spheroid are transformed to a convenient form. Parameters of a spheroid are determined by minimizing the Tikhonov smoothing functional using constraints on the parameters. This makes the ill-posed inverse problem by unique and stable. The Bulakh algorithm for initial estimating the depth and mass of a deposit is modified. The technique is illustrated by numerical model examples of deposits in the form of two and five bodies. The inverse gravimetry problem is interpreted as a gravitational tomography problem or the intravision of the Earth's crust and mantle.

  2. Charged fluid distribution in higher dimensional spheroidal space-time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G P Singh; S Kotambkar

    2005-07-01

    A general solution of Einstein field equations corresponding to a charged fluid distribution on the background of higher dimensional spheroidal space-time is obtained. The solution generates several known solutions for superdense star having spheroidal space-time geometry.

  3. Sulphur isotope ratios in the Canyon Diablo metallic spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwing, C. E.; Rees, C. E.; Thode, H. G.

    1983-09-01

    Nininger (1956) has discovered metallic spheroids in the soil surrounding Meteor Crater in Arizona. Nininger suggested that the spheroids condensed from the center of a homogeneous explosion-produced metallic vapor cloud. The present investigation is concerned with measurements of sulfur contents and delta S-34 values of metallic spheroids from the vicinity of Meteor Crater. It is found that the small metallic spheroids have lower sulfur contents and higher delta S-34 values than do the large spheroids. It is concluded that the observed isotopic patterns are unlikely to have arisen during desulfurization of the metallic liquid from which the spheroids were formed or during high temperature oxidation or the spheroids. The most likely process for the production of the observed delta S-34 values and sulfur contents is low temperature oxidation reactions experienced by the spheroids during their surface exposure following formation.

  4. Morphological Features of Lymphoid Structures of Nasooropharynx in Children with Hyperplasia of Pharyngeal Lymphoid Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Ovcharenko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is the features of the immunomorphofunctional organization of the adenoids in children with pharyngeal lymphoid ring hyperplasia were defined. The study included 54 children (random sample from 3 to 7 years examined for the pharyngeal tonsil hypertrophy. Among the 54 selected children, there were 28 (52 % boys and 26 (48 % girls. The cause for surgical removal of the adenoids was the ineffectiveness of conservative therapy. The materials for morphological studies were adenoids of children obtained after adenoidectomy. When analyzing the anamnesis of 54 children with adenoid vegetations aged 3 to 7 years, it was found that among patients with this pathology, those aged 4–6 years predominated. The degree of hypertrophy of the pharyngeal tonsil was the highest among preschool children. Morphometric study of adenoids revealed a reciprocal relationship («scissors» between the relative areas of the follicular and diffuse lymphoid tissue, with a reduction in the length of the zone of lymphoepithelial symbiosis, and an increase in the length of the respiratory epithelium, with preserved local reactive sites.

  5. Optical signature of multicellular tumor spheroid using index-mismatch-induced spherical aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, G.; Weiss, P.; Ducommun, B.; Lorenzo, C.

    2014-02-01

    The development of new cancer treatments and the early prediction of their therapeutic potential are often made difficult by the lack of predictive pharmacological models. The 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model offers a level of complexity that recapitulates the three-dimensional organization of a tumor and appears to be fairly predictive of therapeutic efficiency. The use of spheroids in large-scale automated screening was recently reported to link the power of a high throughput analysis to the predictability of a 3D cell model. The spheroid has a radial symmetry; this simple geometry allows establishing a direct correlation between structure and function. The outmost layers of MCTS are composed of proliferating cells and form structurally uniform domain with an approximate thickness of 100 microns. The innermost layers are composed of quiescent cells. Finally, cells in the center of the spheroid can form a necrotic core. This latest region is structurally heterogeneous and is poorly characterized. These features make the spheroid a model of choice and a paradigm to study the optical properties of various epithelial tissues. In this study, we used an in-vitro optical technique for label-free characterization of multicellular systems based on the index- mismatch induced spherical aberrations. We achieve to monitor and characterize the optical properties of MCTS. This new and original approach might be of major interest for the development of innovative screening strategies dedicated to the identification of anticancer drugs.

  6. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies keystones of galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Gallagher, S; Wyse, F G

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  7. Stress Clamp Experiments on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Montel, Fabien; Elgeti, Jens; Malaquin, Laurent; Basan, Markus; Risler, Thomas; Cabane, Bernard; Vignjevic, Danijela; Prost, Jacques; Cappello, Giovanni; Joanny, Jean-François; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.188102

    2011-01-01

    The precise role of the microenvironment on tumor growth is poorly understood. Whereas the tumor is in constant competition with the surrounding tissue, little is known about the mechanics of this interaction. Using a novel experimental procedure, we study quantitatively the effect of an applied mechanical stress on the long-term growth of a spheroid cell aggregate. We observe that a stress of 10 kPa is sufficient to drastically reduce growth by inhibition of cell proliferation mainly in the core of the spheroid. We compare the results to a simple numerical model developed to describe the role of mechanics in cancer progression.

  8. Lymphoid tissue inducer cells: architects of CD4 immune responses in mice and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M-Y; Kim, K-S; McConnell, F; Lane, P

    2009-07-01

    In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the multiple functions of the mouse lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells in: (i) the development of organized lymphoid tissue, (ii) the generation and maintenance of CD4-dependent immunity in adult lymphoid tissues; and (iii) the regulation of central tolerance in thymus. By contrast with mouse LTi cells, which have been well described, the human equivalent is only just beginning to be characterized. Human LTi-like cells expressing interleukin (IL)-22 have been identified recently and found to differentiate into natural killer (NK) cells. The relationship of LTi cells to NK cells is discussed in the light of several studies reporting a close relationship in the mouse between LTi cells and transcription factor retinoid-related orphan receptor gammat-dependent IL-22 producing NK cells in the gut. We also outline our data suggesting that these cells are present in adult human lymphoid tissues.

  9. Context-Dependent Development of Lymphoid Stroma from Adult CD34+ Adventitial Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna M. Sitnik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the key role of primary and secondary lymphoid organ stroma in immunity, our understanding of the heterogeneity and ontogeny of these cells remains limited. Here, we identify a functionally distinct subset of BP3−PDPN+PDGFRβ+/α+CD34+ stromal adventitial cells in both lymph nodes (LNs and thymus that is located within the vascular niche surrounding PDPN−PDGFRβ+/α−Esam-1+ITGA7+ pericytes. CD34+ adventitial cells developed in late embryonic thymus and in postnatal LNs and in the thymus originated, along with pericytes, from a common anlage-seeding progenitor population. Using lymphoid organ re-aggregate grafts, we demonstrate that adult CD34+ adventitial cells are capable of differentiating into multiple lymphoid stroma-like subsets including pericyte-, FRC-, MRC-, and FDC-like cells, the development of which was lymphoid environment-dependent. These findings extend the current understanding of lymphoid mesenchymal cell heterogeneity and highlight a role of the CD34+ adventitia as a potential ubiquitous source of lymphoid stromal precursors in postnatal tissues.

  10. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  11. Fractal Model of the Spheroidal Graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.Y.HE; K.Z.HWANG

    1996-01-01

    In this paper,a fractal model about the microstructure of spheroidal-graphite is presented through the research on the surface form and the analysis to microregion.The fractal dimension is calculated and the forming mechanism is also discussed.

  12. Zero-point energy in spheroidal geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Kitson, A. R.; Signal, A. I.

    2005-01-01

    We study the zero-point energy of a massless scalar field subject to spheroidal boundary conditions. Using the zeta-function method, the zero-point energy is evaluated for small ellipticity. Axially symmetric vector fields are also considered. The results are interpreted within the context of QCD flux tubes and the MIT bag model.

  13. Blue straggler stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mapelli, M.; Ripamonti, E.; Tolstoy, E.; Sigurdsson, S.; Irwin, M. J.; Battaglia, G.

    2007-01-01

    Blue straggler star (BSS) candidates have been observed in all old dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), however whether or not they are authentic BSSs or young stars has been a point of debate. To both address this issue and obtain a better understanding of the formation of BSSs in different environme

  14. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  15. Innate lymphoid cells involve in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiqiang; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) promptly initiate cytokine responses to pathogen exposure in the mucosa and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues. ILCs were recently categorized as being of the lymphoid lineage and have been classified into three groups. ILCs play important roles in immunity against pathogens, and an anti-tumor immune-related function was recently demonstrated. In this review we discuss whether and how ILCs involve in the tumorigenesis, providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying the particular functions of ILCs as well as the potential targets for tumor intervention.

  16. Autophagy Protects from Trastuzumab-Induced Cytotoxicity in HER2 Overexpressing Breast Tumor Spheroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina E Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Multicellular tumor spheroids represent a 3D in vitro model that mimics solid tumor essential properties including assembly and development of extracellular matrix and nutrient, oxygen and proliferation gradients. In the present study, we analyze the impact of 3D spatial organization of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells on the response to Trastuzumab. We cultured human mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines as spheroids with the hanging drop method and we observed a gradient of proliferating, quiescent, hypoxic, apoptotic and autophagic cells towards the inner core. This 3D organization decreased Trastuzumab sensitivity of HER2 over-expressing cells compared to monolayer cell cultures. We did not observe apoptosis induced by Trastuzumab but found cell arrest in G0/G1 phase. Moreover, the treatment downregulated the basal apoptosis only found in tumor spheroids, by eliciting protective autophagy. We were able to increase sensitivity to Trastuzumab by autophagy inhibition, thus exposing the interaction between apoptosis and autophagy. We confirmed this result by developing a resistant cell line that was more sensitive to autophagy inhibition than the parental BT474 cells. In summary, the development of Trastuzumab resistance relies on the balance between death and survival mechanisms, characteristic of 3D cell organization. We propose the use of spheroids to further improve the understanding of Trastuzumab antitumor activity and overcome resistance.

  17. HCV Virus and Lymphoid Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Tsutsumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the viruses known to cause hepatic cancer. HCV is also believed to be involved in malignant lymphoma. In this paper, we investigated characteristics of malignant lymphoma cases that were anti-HCV antibody (HCV-Ab positive. We were able to perform pathological examinations on 13 out of 14 HCV-positive cases. Of these, lymphoid tissues of 10 stained positive for HCV-Ab. There was no significant correlation between the degree of HCV staining and the rate of recurrence or resistance to treatment. However, there did appear to be a consistent decrease in the amount of HCV-RNA between pre- and posttreatment among HCV-Ab-positive cases; that is, treatment-resistant cases that exhibited resistance from the first treatment and recurrent cases more frequently had a higher HCV level at treatment termination compared to the pretreatment level. This suggests that the HCV virus either accelerates oncogenesis by direct interaction with B cells or indirectly affects lymphoma prognosis.

  18. Total lymphoid irradiation and discordant cardiac xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, E.; Dresdale, A.R.; Diehl, J.T.; Katzen, N.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Konstam, M.A.; Payne, D.D.; Cleveland, R.J. (Tufts Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation can prolong concordant cardiac xenografts. The effects of total lymphoid irradiation in a discordant xenograft model (guinea pig to rat) were studied with and without adjuvant pharmacologic immunosuppression. Inbred Lewis rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups. Group 1 (n = 6) served as a control group and rats received no immunosuppression. Group 2 (n = 5) received triple-drug therapy that consisted of intraperitoneal azathioprine (2 mg/kg), cyclosporine (20 mg/kg), and methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg) for 1 week before transplantation. Group 3 animals (n = 5) received 15 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation in 12 divided doses over a 3-week period. Group 4 (n = 6) received both triple-drug therapy and total lymphoid irradiation as described for groups 2 and 3. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay was performed to determine if a correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and rejection-free interval existed. Rejection was defined as cessation of graft pulsation and was confirmed by histologic test results. Only groups 1 and 2 showed a difference in survival (group 1, 6.9 +/- 1.0 minutes; group 2, 14.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, p = 0.02). Although total lymphoid irradiation did decrease complement-dependent cytotoxicity, linear regression revealed no correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and graft survival (coefficient of correlation, 0.30). Unlike concordant cardiac xenografts, total lymphoid irradiation with or without triple-drug therapy does not prolong graft survival.

  19. Impaired telomerase activity hinders proliferation and in vitro transformation of Penaeus monodon lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayesh, P; Vrinda, S; Priyaja, P; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2016-08-01

    Retaining terminal transferase activity of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein enzyme which add telomeric repeats on chromosome end is thought to be required to prevent cellular ageing. Additionally, telomerase considered as a marker for cell proliferation and immortalization in eukaryotes. We examined telomerase activity in tissues and lymphoid cell culture of Penaeus monodon. Along with telomerase activity, telomere repeats and an attempt on identification of telomerase reverse transcriptase (PmTERT) were made. Telomeric repeat amplification protocol revealed that telomerase-dependent telomeric lengthening has been taking place in P. monodon and the adult tissues were retaining this capacity throughout their lifespan with the highest activity in ovary, testis and lymphoid organ. However, telomerase activity could not be detected in lymphoid cells in culture. The canonical telomeric repeats added by telomerase of lymphoid tissue extract were identified as TTAGG, but pentameric repeats GGTTA and AGGTT were also added by the telomerase. PmTERT protein sequence (partial) shared 100 % identity with the TERT sequence of Daphnia pulex, 27 % sequence identity with Purple sea urchin and 24-25 % with Zebra fish. Undetectable telomerase activity in lymphoid cell culture supports the hypothesis that the inadequate telomerase activity or gene expression may be a reason that prevents neoplastic transformation and spontaneous immortalization of the cells in vitro. Thus, it is envisaged that telomerase activation in lymphoid cells may surmount cellular ageing for in vitro transformation and cell line establishment.

  20. Pulsar searches in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Herrera, Eduardo; Maccarone, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    We have been undertaking a comprehensive survey for pulsars and fast radio transients in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way using the Green Bank Radio Telescope operating at a central frequency of 350 MHz. Our search pipeline allows the detection of periodical signals and single dispersed pulses and it is optimized to search for millisecond radio pulsars. Here we present preliminary results of the searches we have conducted in the Ursa Minoris, Draco and Leo I dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. Our searches have revealed no periodic signals but a few unconfirmed millisecond single pulses at various dispersion measures, possibly related to neutron stars. Detecting neutron stars in these systems can potentially help to test the existence of haloes of dark matter surrounding these systems as predicted by Dehnen & King (2006).

  1. Making electromagnetic wavelets: II. Spheroidal shell antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Gerald [Center for Signals and Waves, 3803 Tonkawa Trail 2, Austin, TX (United States)

    2005-01-14

    In the companion paper, a charge-current distribution was obtained for radiating electromagnetic wavelets. However, it cannot be realized because of two drawbacks: (a) it requires the existence of magnetic charges, and (b) the charge-current distribution, which is concentrated on a spheroidal surface S{sub {alpha}}, is too singular for practical implementation. Both of these difficulties are resolved here. The first is resolved by using Hertz vectors to generate a charge-current distribution on S{sub {alpha}} due solely to bound electric charges. The second is resolved by replacing S{sub {alpha}} with a spheroidal shell of finite thickness. This generalizes the usual boundary conditions on an interface between electromagnetic media by allowing the transition to be gradual.

  2. Interstellar Extinction by Spheroidal Dust Grains

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ranjan; Mukai, Tadashi; Vaidya, D. B.; Sen, Asoke K.; Okada, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Observations of interstellar extinction and polarization indicate that the interstellar medium consists of aligned non-spherical dust grains which show variation in the interstellar extinction curve for wavelengths ranging from NIR to UV. To model the extinction and polarization, one cannot use the Mie theory which assumes the grains as solid spheres. We have used a T-matrix based method for computing the extinction efficiencies of spheroidal silicate and graphite grains of different shapes (...

  3. New Classes of Charged Spheroidal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thirukkanesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New classes of exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell system is found in closed form by assuming that the hypersurface is spheroidal. This is achieved by choosing a particular form for the electric field intensity. A class of solution is found for all positive spheroidal parameter for a specific form of electric field intensity. In general, the condition of pressure isotropy reduces to a difference equation with variable, rational coefficients that can be solved. Consequently, an explicit solution in series form is found. By placing restrictions on the parameters, it is shown that the series terminates and there exist two classes of solutions in terms of elementary functions. These solutions contain the models found previously in the limit of vanishing charge. Solutions found are directly relating the spheroidal parameter and electric field intensity. Masses obtained are consistent with the previously reported experimental and theoretical studies describing strange stars. A physical analysis indicates that these models may be used to describe a charged sphere.

  4. Directly spheroidizing during hot deformation in GCr15 steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-hui ZHU; Gang ZHENG

    2008-01-01

    The spheroidizing heat treatment is normally required prior to the cold forming in GCr15 steel in order to improve its machinability. In the conventional spher-oidizing process, very long annealing time, generally more than 10 h, is needed to assure proper spheroidizing. It results in low productivity, high cost, and especially high energy consumption. Therefore, the possibility of directly spheroidizing during hot deformation in GCr15 steel is preliminarily explored. The effect of hot deformation parameters on the final microstructure and hardness is investigated systematically in order to develop a directly spheroidizing technology. Experimental results illustrate that low deformation temperature and slow cooling rate is the favorite in directly softening and/or spheroidizing dur-ing hot deformation, which allows the properties of as-rolled GCr15 to be applicable for post-machining without requirement of prior annealing.

  5. Orbits in Homogeneous Oblate Spheroidal Gravitational Space-Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifu E. N.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The generalized Lagrangian in general relativistic homogeneous oblate spheroidal gravitational fields is constructed and used to study orbits exterior to homogenous oblate spheroids. Expressions for the conservation of energy and angular momentum for this gravitational field are obtained. The planetary equation of motion and the equation of motion of a photon in the vicinity of an oblate spheroid are derived. These equations have additional terms not found in Schwarzschild's space time.

  6. Valence electron theory of graphite spheroidizing in primary crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志林; 孙振国; 李志林

    1995-01-01

    Bond-length-difference (BLD) analysis results show that austenrte and cementite containing Mg, Zr. S have very different valence electron structures from Fe -C austenite and cementite. We find that this difference is the tie of absorption hypothesis, surface tension hypothesis, undercooling hypothesis in graphite spheroidizing theory. By using "the model of valence electron theory of drag-like effect" in our previous paper in crystallization theory, the spheroidizing effect of Mg and Zr and the anti-spheroidizing effect of S can be explained with the valence electron structure data of phases. Therefore, electron theory of graphite spheroidizing can be advanced.

  7. The biology of innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artis, David; Spits, Hergen

    2015-01-15

    The innate immune system is composed of a diverse array of evolutionarily ancient haematopoietic cell types, including dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages and granulocytes. These cell populations collaborate with each other, with the adaptive immune system and with non-haematopoietic cells to promote immunity, inflammation and tissue repair. Innate lymphoid cells are the most recently identified constituents of the innate immune system and have been the focus of intense investigation over the past five years. We summarize the studies that formally identified innate lymphoid cells and highlight their emerging roles in controlling tissue homeostasis in the context of infection, chronic inflammation, metabolic disease and cancer.

  8. Differentiation and selection of hepatocyte precursors in suspension spheroid culture of transgenic murine embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Gabriel

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte precursor cells represent a promising model for clinical transplantations to diseased livers, as well as for establishment of in vitro systems for drug metabolism and toxicology investigations. This study aimed to establish an in vitro culture system for scalable generation of hepatic progenitor cells. We used stable transgenic clones of murine embryonic stem cells possessing a reporter/selection vector, in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein- and puromycin N-acetyltransferase-coding genes are driven by a common alpha-fetoprotein gene promoter. This allowed for "live" monitoring and puromycin selection of the desired differentiating cell type possessing the activated alpha-fetoprotein gene. A rotary culture system was established, sequentially yielding initially partially selected hepatocyte lineage-committed cells, and finally, a highly purified cell population maintained as a dynamic suspension spheroid culture, which progressively developed the hepatic gene expression phenotype. The latter was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis, which showed a progressive up-regulation of hepatic genes during spheroid culture, indicating development of a mixed hepatocyte precursor-/fetal hepatocyte-like cell population. Adherent spheroids gave rise to advanced differentiated hepatocyte-like cells expressing hepatic proteins such as albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, cytokeratin 18, E-cadherin, and liver-specific organic anion transporter 1, as demonstrated by fluorescent immunostaining. A fraction of adherent cells was capable of glycogen storage and of reversible up-take of indocyanine green, demonstrating their hepatocyte-like functionality. Moreover, after transplantation of spheroids into the mouse liver, the spheroid-derived cells integrated into recipient. These results demonstrate that large-scale hepatocyte precursor-/hepatocyte-like cultures can be established for use in clinical trials, as well as in

  9. Sedimentation of elongated non-motile prolate spheroids in homogenous isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ardekani, M Niazi; Brandt, L; Karp-Boss, L; Bearon, R N; Variano, E A

    2016-01-01

    Phytoplankton are the foundation of aquatic food webs. Through photosynthesis, phytoplankton draw down CO2 at magnitudes equivalent to forests and other terrestrial plants and convert it to organic material that is then consumed by other organisms of phytoplankton in higher trophic levels. Mechanisms that affect local concentrations and velocities are of primary significance to many encounter-based processes in the plankton including prey-predator interactions, fertilization and aggregate formation. We report results from simulations of sinking phytoplankton, considered as elongated spheroids, in homogenous isotropic turbulence to answer the question of whether trajectories and velocities of sinking phytoplankton are altered by turbulence. We show in particular that settling spheroids with physical characteristics similar to those of diatoms weakly cluster and preferentially sample regions of down-welling flow, corresponding to an increase of the mean settling speed with respect to the mean settling speed in ...

  10. Human Lymphoid Tissues Harbor a Distinct CD69+CXCR6+ NK Cell Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugthart, Gertjan; Melsen, Janine E; Vervat, Carly; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Corver, Willem E; Roelen, Dave L; van Bergen, Jeroen; van Tol, Maarten J D; Lankester, Arjan C; Schilham, Marco W

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of human NK cells is based primarily on conventional CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from blood. However, most cellular immune interactions occur in lymphoid organs. Based on the coexpression of CD69 and CXCR6, we identified a third major NK cell subset in lymphoid tissues. This population represents 30-60% of NK cells in marrow, spleen, and lymph node but is absent from blood. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells have an intermediate expression of CD56 and high expression of NKp46 and ICAM-1. In contrast to circulating NK cells, they have a bimodal expression of the activating receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells do not express the early markers c-kit and IL-7Rα, nor killer cell Ig-like receptors or other late-differentiation markers. After cytokine stimulation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells produce IFN-γ at levels comparable to CD56(dim) NK cells. They constitutively express perforin but require preactivation to express granzyme B and exert cytotoxicity. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells do not exhibit the hyperexpansion observed for both conventional NK cell populations. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells constitute a separate NK cell population with a distinct phenotype and function. The identification of this NK cell population in lymphoid tissues provides tools to further evaluate the cellular interactions and role of NK cells in human immunity.

  11. The role of innate lymphoid cells in healthy and inflamed skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte M.; Geisler, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The skin constitutes the interface between the organism and the environment, and it protects the body from harmful substances in the environment via physical, chemical and immunological barriers. The immunological barrier of the skin comprises both cells from the innate and the adaptive immune...... system. During the last years, it has become clear that innate lymphoid cells play a role in homeostasis and inflammation of the skin in humans and mice. In this review, we will discuss the role of innate lymphoid cells in healthy and inflamed skin with special focus on their role in atopic dermatitis....

  12. Total lymphoid irradiation of intractable rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, M.; Fritz, H.; Sauer, R.

    1986-12-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation, (total dose 20 Gy). Lasting improvement in clinical symptoms was found in four patients during treatment and the remaining patients experienced similar benefit within 2 months of irradiation. There was marked reduction in exacerbations and number of joints involved. Morning stiffness, joint swelling and tenderness decreased. Complications included severe fatigue during treatment and acute bacterial arthritis in multiple joints in one patient. Four patients have since died, one of renal failure, another of cardiogenic shock following surgery 3 and 24 months after total lymphoid irradiation. Both had generalised amyloidosis. The third patient developed joint empyema and died of toxic cardiac failure. The fourth died 3 months after resection of a Kaposi's sarcoma complicated by wound infection which responded to treatment. Immunologically, total lymphoid irradiation resulted in suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and reduction in T-helper cells, the number of T-suppressor cells remaining unchanged. These data provide evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Total lymphoid irradiation can induce sustained improvement in clinical disease activity, but severe, possibly fatal, side-effects cannot be ignored.

  13. The new WHO nomenclature: lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Susan J; Rodak, Bernadette F

    2002-01-01

    The development of the WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms is a remarkable example of cooperation and communication between pathologists and oncologists from around the world. Joint classification committees of the major hematopathology societies will periodically review and update this classification, facilitating further progress in the understanding and treatment of hematologic malignancies.

  14. The evolution of innate lymphoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivier, Eric; van de Pavert, Serge A; Cooper, Max D; Belz, Gabrielle T

    2017-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are the most recently discovered group of immune cells. Understanding their biology poses many challenges. We discuss here the current knowledge on the appearance of ILC subsets during evolution and propose how the connection between ILCs and T cells contributes to the robustness of immunity and hence to the fitness of the hosts. PMID:27328009

  15. Conjunctival lymphoma arising from reactive lymphoid hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuhara Junichi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extra nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (EMZL of the conjunctiva typically arises in the marginal zone of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. The pathogenesis of conjunctival EMZL remains unknown. We describe an unusual case of EMZL arising from reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH of the conjunctiva. A 35-year-old woman had fleshy salmon-pink conjunctival tumors in both eyes, oculus uterque (OU. Specimens from conjunctival tumors in the right eye, oculus dexter (OD, revealed a collection of small lymphoid cells in the stroma. Immunohistochemically, immunoglobulin (Ig light chain restriction was not detected. In contrast, diffuse atypical lymphoid cell infiltration was noted in the left eye, oculus sinister (OS, and positive for CD20, a marker for B cells OS. The tumors were histologically diagnosed as RLH OD, and EMZL OS. PCR analysis detected IgH gene rearrangement in the joining region (JH region OU. After 11 months, a re-biopsy specimen demonstrated EMZL based on compatible pathological and genetic findings OD, arising from RLH. This case suggests that even if the diagnosis of the conjunctival lymphoproliferative lesions is histologically benign, confirmation of the B-cell clonality by checking IgH gene rearrangement should be useful to predict the incidence of malignancy.

  16. Attenuation of microwaves by poly-disperse small spheroid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peichang; Wang, Zhenhui

    1998-08-01

    Expressions for calculating the attenuation cross sections of poly-disperse, small spheroids, whose rotatory axes are in specific status, have been derived from a universal formula for calculating the attenuation cross section of a particle of arbitrary shape. Attenuation cross sections of liquid, ice, and spongy spheroidal droplets in different size and eccentricity at different wave lengths have been computed and analyzed.

  17. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis.

  18. Engineering analysis and development of the spheroid reservoir bioartificial liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Malcolm B; Corner, Stephen M; Amiot, Bruce P; Nyberg, Scott L

    2009-01-01

    A significant demand exists for a liver support device such as a Bioartifical Liver (BAL) to treat patients experiencing acute liver failure. This descriptive paper outlines the design and development of two of the key components of the Mayo Spheroid Reservoir Bioartificial Liver (SRBAL) system. One of the components is the multifunctional Spheroid Reservoir and the other is Multi-shelf Rocker. The Spheroid Reservoir provides an environment to support the viability and functionality of the hepatocyte spheroids at very high cell densities. The Spheroid Reservoir is the biologically active component of this extracorporeal liver support device. Since the Spheroid Reservoir is designed to support 200-400 grams of hepatocyte spheroids, a method to quickly produce large quantities of spheroids is required. The Multi-Shelf Rocker fulfills the production requirement by allowing the culturing of up to six liters of hepatocyte suspension in a conventional laboratory incubator. The SRBAL is designed to provide life sustaining liver-like function to patients in acute liver failure.

  19. Global gene expression analysis of early response to chemotherapy treatment in ovarian cancer spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetu Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy (CT resistance in ovarian cancer (OC is broad and encompasses diverse unrelated drugs, suggesting more than one mechanism of resistance. To better understand the molecular mechanisms controlling the immediate response of OC cells to CT exposure, we have performed gene expression profiling in spheroid cultures derived from six OC cell lines (OVCAR3, SKOV3, TOV-112, TOV-21, OV-90 and TOV-155, following treatment with 10,0 μM cisplatin, 2,5 μM paclitaxel or 5,0 μM topotecan for 72 hours. Results Exposure of OC spheroids to these CT drugs resulted in differential expression of genes associated with cell growth and proliferation, cellular assembly and organization, cell death, cell cycle control and cell signaling. Genes, functionally involved in DNA repair, DNA replication and cell cycle arrest were mostly overexpressed, while genes implicated in metabolism (especially lipid metabolism, signal transduction, immune and inflammatory response, transport, transcription regulation and protein biosynthesis, were commonly suppressed following all treatments. Cisplatin and topotecan treatments triggered similar alterations in gene and pathway expression patterns, while paclitaxel action was mainly associated with induction of genes and pathways linked to cellular assembly and organization (including numerous tubulin genes, cell death and protein synthesis. The microarray data were further confirmed by pathway and network analyses. Conclusion Most alterations in gene expression were directly related to mechanisms of the cytotoxics actions in OC spheroids. However, the induction of genes linked to mechanisms of DNA replication and repair in cisplatin- and topotecan-treated OC spheroids could be associated with immediate adaptive response to treatment. Similarly, overexpression of different tubulin genes upon exposure to paclitaxel could represent an early compensatory effect to this drug action. Finally, multicellular

  20. Context-Dependent Development of Lymphoid Stroma from Adult CD34+ Adventitial Progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Wendland, Kerstin; Weishaupt, Holger;

    2016-01-01

    ) and thymus that is located within the vascular niche surrounding PDPN-PDGFRβ+/α-Esam-1+ITGA7+ pericytes. CD34+ adventitial cells developed in late embryonic thymus and in postnatal LNs and in the thymus originated, along with pericytes, from a common anlage-seeding progenitor population. Using lymphoid organ...

  1. Leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary leukodystrophy (POLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider, C; Van Gerpen, J A.; DeArmond, S; Shuster, E A.; Dickson, D W.; Wszolek, Z K.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and familial pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) present as adult-onset dementia with motor impairment and epilepsy. They are regarded as distinct diseases. We review data from the literature that support their being a single entity. Apart from a slightly older age at onset, a more rapid course, and more prominent pyramidal tract involvement, familial POLD is clinically similar to HDLS. Moreover, the pathologic hallmarks of the two diseases, axonal spheroids in HDLS and pigmented macrophages in POLD, can be identified in both conditions. This supports HDLS and POLD being referred collectively as adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP). GLOSSARY ALSP = adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia; HDLS = hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids; OLD = orthochromatic leukodystrophy; POLD = pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy. PMID:19487654

  2. Design of a Uranium Dioxide Spheroidization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Daniel P.; Mireles, Omar R.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2013-01-01

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) fuel cermets. The PSS process improves particle spherocity and surface morphology for coating by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Angular fully dense particles melt in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet at between 32-36 kW, and become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Particles range in size from 100 - 50 microns in diameter. Student s t-test and hypothesis testing of two proportions statistical methods were applied to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders show great than 800% increase in the number of spherical particles over the stock powder with the mean spherocity only mildly improved. It is recommended that powders be processed two-three times in order to reach the desired spherocity, and that process parameters be optimized for a more narrow particles size range. Keywords: spherocity, spheroidization, plasma, uranium-dioxide, cermet, nuclear, propulsion

  3. Mucosal vaccination by the intranasal route. Nose-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT)-Structure, function and species differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Reinhard

    2015-08-26

    The advantage of mucosal vaccination in viral and bacterial infections in different age groups is of enormous clinical relevance. The advantages and potential hazards of intranasal vaccination have always to be considered. The intranasal route for vaccination is very successful for some antigens. Specific adjuvants are necessary. In the nose of rodents there is a structured lymphoid tissue (nose-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT)). This abbreviation should not be used for nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue, as this includes parts of the tonsils. In children lymphoid tissue is more dispersed in the nose and not concentrated at the bottom of the dorsal nose ducts as in rodents. There are no data on organized lymphoid tissue in the nose of adults. In NALT of rodents there is a unique structure of adhesion molecule expression; the postnatal development and the different composition of T and B lymphocytes in comparison with Peyer's patches document the uniqueness of this lymphoid organ. There is also a mucosa in the nose with antigen-presenting dendritic cells. Thus, it is often unclear whether intranasal vaccination is initiated via NALT or the diffuse nasal mucosa. There are still many open questions e. g., which adjuvant is necessary for a specific virus, bacterium or other allergen, how many doses are critical for an effective nasal vaccination. Species differences are of major importance when extrapolating results from rodents to humans.

  4. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL FUNDAMENTAL SOLUTION TO STOKES FLOW IN THE OBLATE SPHEROIDAL COORDINATES WITH APPLICATIONS TO MULTIPLES SPHEROID PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄宏; 严宗毅; 吴望一

    2002-01-01

    A new three-dimensional fundamental solution to the Stokes flow was proposedby transforming the solid harmonic functions in Lamb' s solution into expressions in terms ofthe oblate spheroidal coordinates. These fundamental solutions are advantageous in treatingflows past an arbitrary number of arbitrarily positioned and oriented oblate spheroids. Theleast squares technique was adopted herein so that the convergence difficulties oftenencountered in solving three-dimensional problems were completely avoided. The examplesdemonstrate that present approach is highly accurate, consistently stable andcomputationally efficient.The oblate spheroid may be used to model a variety of particle shapes between acircular disk and a sphere. For the first time, the effect of various geometric factors on theforces and torques exerted on two oblate spheroids were systematically studied by using theproposed fundamental solutions. The generality of this approach was illustrated by twoproblems of three spheroids.

  5. Clinical analysis of 670 cases in two trials of the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Lymphoma Cooperative Group subtyped according to the Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms: a comparison with the Working Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaluga, S; Bijnens, L; Teodorovic, I; Hagenbeek, A; Meerwaldt, J H; Somers, R; Thomas, J; Noordijk, E M; De Wolf-Peeters, C

    1996-05-15

    In the Working Formulation (WF), non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are grouped according to their clinical behavior. These disorders are listed as entities defined by morphology, phenotype, and cytogenetics in the proposed Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms (REAL), the clinical relevance of which is still debated. We analyzed 670 NHL cases included in two randomized clinical trials (EORTC 20855 WF-intermediate/high-grade and 20856 WF-low-grade malignancy) with histologic material available for review. Based on hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections, 77% of cases could be subtyped. Immunophenotyping was considered to be mandatory only in diagnosing T-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Of 522 cases subtyped, 11% were mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 5% were marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (MZBCL), 46% were follicle center lymphoma, and 32% were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Statistical analysis and comparisons between classifications were made only within each trial and treatment group. MCL and MZBCL were characterized by a shorter median survival (3.4 and 4.1 years, respectively) in comparison with low- and intermediate-grade WF groups (> 9.3 and 5.8 years, respectively). In terms of progression-free survival, MCL showed a behavior similar to the low-grade group, with frequent relapses. Follicle center cell lymphomas behaved as low-grade lymphomas as defined by the WF and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas as the WF-intermediate grade group. Because several NHL entities have a clinical behavior of their own, their recognition by the REAL classification offers clinicians additional information that is not obtained when the WF is used.

  6. Differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids under microgravity conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerwinka Wolfgang H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To develop and characterize a novel cell culture method for the generation of undifferentiated and differentiated human mesenchymal stem cell 3D structures, we utilized the RWV system with a gelatin-based scaffold. 3 × 106 cells generated homogeneous spheroids and maximum spheroid loading was accomplished after 3 days of culture. Spheroids cultured in undifferentiated spheroids of 3 and 10 days retained expression of CD44, without expression of differentiation markers. Spheroids cultured in adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation media exhibited oil red O staining and von Kossa staining, respectively. Further characterization of osteogenic lineage, showed that 10 day spheroids exhibited stronger calcification than any other experimental group corresponding with significant expression of vitamin D receptor, alkaline phosphatase, and ERp60 . In conclusion this study describes a novel RWV culture method that allowed efficacious engineering of undifferentiated human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids and rapid osteogenic differentiation. The use of gelatin scaffolds holds promise to design implantable stem cell tissue of various sizes and shapes for future regenerative treatment.

  7. Low CXCL13 expression, splenic lymphoid tissue atrophy and germinal center disruption in severe canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselli S Silva

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis is associated with atrophy and histological disorganization of splenic compartments. In this paper, we compared organized and disorganized splenic lymphoid tissue from dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum assessing the size of the white pulp compartments, the distribution of T, B and S100+ dendritic cells, using immunohistochemistry and morphometry and the expression of CCR7 and the cytokines, CXCL13, lymphotoxin (LT-α, LT-β, CCL19, CCL21, TNF-α, IL-10, IFN-γ and TGF-β, using by real time RT-PCR. The lymphoid follicles and marginal zones were smaller (3.2 and 1.9 times, respectively; Mann-Whitney, P<0.02 in animals with disorganized splenic tissue in comparison to those with organized splenic lymphoid tissue. In spleens with disorganized lymphoid tissue, the numbers of T cells and S100+ dendritic cells were decreased in the follicles, and the numbers of B cells were reduced in both the follicles and marginal zones. CXCL13 mRNA expression was lower in animals with disorganized lymphoid tissue (0.5±0.4 compared to those with organized lymphoid tissue (2.7±2.9, both relative to 18S expression, P = 0.01. These changes in the spleen were associated with higher frequency of severe disease (7/12 in the animals with disorganized than in animals with organized (2/13, Chi-square, P = 0.01 splenic lymphoid tissue. The data presented herein suggest that natural infection with Leishmania infantum is associated with the impairment of follicular dendritic cells, CXCL13 expression, B cell migration and germinal center formation and associates these changes with severe clinical forms of visceral leishmaniasis. Furthermore the fact that this work uses dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum emphasizes the relevance of the data presented herein for the knowledge on the canine and human visceral leishmaniasis.

  8. STUDIES ON TRANSMISSIBLE LYMPHOID LEUCEMIA OF MICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, J; Strumia, M

    1931-04-30

    Lymphoid leucemia of the mouse is readily transmitted by intravenous inoculations. The majority of the mice inoculated successfully develop leucemic, a smaller number of them, aleucemic lymphadenosis. The data presented favor the view that leucemic and aleucemic lymphadenosis are essentially the same condition. Leucemia produced by transmission is preceded by an aleucemic stage, in which the lymph nodes and the spleen are uniformly enlarged, and the white blood count and the percentage of lymphocytes are within the normal range but immature lymphocytes are numerous in the circulating blood. Young as well as old mice may develop leucemia if leucotic material enters their circulation. Studies of transmissible leucemia favor the view that leucemia of mammals is a neoplastic disease. The basic problem of leucemia would seem to be determination of the factors that bring about a malignant transformation of lymphoid cells.

  9. Innate lymphoid cells in inflammation and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Andrew N J; Spits, Hergen; Eberl, Gerard

    2014-09-18

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) were first described as playing important roles in the development of lymphoid tissues and more recently in the initiation of inflammation at barrier surfaces in response to infection or tissue damage. It has now become apparent that ILCs play more complex roles throughout the duration of immune responses, participating in the transition from innate to adaptive immunity and contributing to chronic inflammation. The proximity of ILCs to epithelial surfaces and their constitutive strategic positioning in other tissues throughout the body ensures that, in spite of their rarity, ILCs are able to regulate immune homeostasis effectively. Dysregulation of ILC function might result in chronic pathologies such as allergies, autoimmunity, and inflammation. A new role for ILCs in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis has started to emerge, underlining their importance in fundamental physiological processes beyond infection and immunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dermatan Sulfate-Free Mice Display Embryological Defects and Are Neonatal Lethal Despite Normal Lymphoid and Non-Lymphoid Organogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanthi N Stachtea

    Full Text Available The epimerization of glucuronic acid into iduronic acid adds structural variability to chondroitin/dermatan sulfate polysaccharides. Iduronic acid-containing domains play essential roles in processes such as coagulation, chemokine and morphogen modulation, collagen maturation, and neurite sprouting. Therefore, we generated and characterized, for the first time, mice deficient in dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 and 2, two enzymes uniquely involved in dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. The resulting mice, termed DKO mice, were completely devoid of iduronic acid, and the resulting chondroitin sulfate chains were structurally different from the wild type chains, from which a different protein binding specificity can be expected. As a consequence, a vast majority of the DKO mice died perinatally, with greatly variable phenotypes at birth or late embryological stages such as umbilical hernia, exencephaly and a kinked tail. However, a minority of embryos were histologically unaffected, with apparently normal lung and bone/cartilage features. Interestingly, the binding of the chemokine CXCL13, an important modulator of lymphoid organogenesis, to mouse DKO embryonic fibroblasts was impaired. Nevertheless, the development of the secondary lymphoid organs, including the lymph nodes and spleen, was normal. Altogether, our results indicate an important role of dermatan sulfate in embryological development and perinatal survival.

  11. Are z>2 Herschel galaxies proto-spheroids?

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzi, F; Gruppioni, C; Granato, G L; Cresci, G; Silva, L; Pozzetti, L; Matteucci, F; Zamorani, G

    2015-01-01

    We present a backward approach for the interpretation of the evolution of the near-infrared and the far-infrared luminosity functions across the redshift range 02 can be explained as progenitors of local spheroids caught during their formation. We also test the effects of mass downsizing by dividing the spheroids into three populations of different present-day stellar masses. The results obtained in this case confirm the validity of our approach, i.e. that the bulk of proto-spheroids can be modelled by means of a single model which describes the evolution of galaxies at the break of the present-day early type K-band LF.

  12. Modeling a spheroidal microswimmer and cooperative swimming in thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Theers, Mario; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G

    2016-01-01

    We propose a hydrodynamic model for a spheroidal microswimmer with two tangential surface velocity modes. This model is analytically solvable and reduces to Lighthill's and Blake's spherical squirmer model in the limit of equal major and minor semi-axes. Furthermore, we present an implementation of such a spheroidal squirmer by means of multiparticle collision dynamics simulations. We investigate its properties as well as the scattering of two spheroidal squirmers in a slit geometry. Thereby we find a stable fixed point, where two pullers swim cooperatively forming a wedge-like conformation with a small constant angle.

  13. Characteristic of innate lymphoid cells (ILC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Adamiak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILC is a newly described family of immune cells that are part of the natural immunity which is important not only during infections caused by microorganisms, but also in the formation of lymphoid tissue, tissue remodeling after damage due to injury and homeostasis tissue stromal cells. Family ILC cells form NK cells (natural killer and lymphoid tissue inducer T cells (LTi, which, although they have different functions, are evolutionarily related. NK cells are producing mainly IFN-γ, whereas LTi cells as NKR+LTi like, IL-17 and/or IL-22, which suggests that the last two cells, can also represent the innate versions of helper T cell - TH17 and TH22. Third population of ILC is formed by cells with characteristics such as NK cells and LTi (ILC22 - which are named NK22 cells, natural cytotoxicity receptor 22 (NCR22 cells or NK receptor-positive (LTi NKR+ LTi cells. Fourth population of ILC cells are ILC17 - producing IL-17, while the fifth is formed by natural helper type 2 T cells (nTH2, nuocyte, innate type 2 helper cells (IH2 and multi-potent progenitor type 2 cells (MPPtype2. Cells of the last population synthesize IL-5 and IL-13. It is assumed that an extraordinary functional diversity of ILC family, resembles T cells, probably because they are under the control of the corresponding transcription factors - as direct regulation factors, such as the family of lymphocytes T.

  14. Ectopic Tertiary Lymphoid Tissue in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Protective or Provocateur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eoin Neil McNamee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Organized lymphoid tissues like the thymus first appeared in jawed vertebrates around 500 million years ago and have evolved to equip the host with a network of specialized sites, strategically located to orchestrate strict immune-surveillance and efficient immune responses autonomously. The gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT maintain a mostly tolerant environment to dampen our responses to daily dietary and microbial products in the intestine. However, when this homeostasis is perturbed by chronic inflammation, the intestine is able to develop florid organized tertiary lymphoid tissues (TLT, which heralds the onset of regional immune dysregulation. While TLT are a pathologic hallmark of Crohn’s disease (CD, their role in the overall process remains largely enigmatic. A critical question remains; are intestinal TLT generated by the immune infiltrated intestine to modulate immune responses and rebuild tolerance to the microbiota or are they playing a more sinister role by generating dysregulated responses that perpetuate disease? Herein we discuss the main theories of intestinal tertiary lymphoid tissue neogenesis and focus on the most recent findings that open new perspectives to their role in inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. Delivery of Human Adipose Stem Cells Spheroids into Lockyballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Frederico D. A. S.; Gruber, Peter; Stuart, Mellannie P.; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Brakke, Ken; Kasyanov, Vladimir; da Silva, Jorge V. L.; Granjeiro, José M.; Mironov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) spheroids show enhanced regenerative effects compared to single cells. Also, spheroids have been recently introduced as building blocks in directed self-assembly strategy. Recent efforts aim to improve long-term cell retention and integration by the use of microencapsulation delivery systems that can rapidly integrate in the implantation site. Interlockable solid synthetic microscaffolds, so called lockyballs, were recently designed with hooks and loops to enhance cell retention and integration at the implantation site as well as to support spheroids aggregation after transplantation. Here we present an efficient methodology for human ASCs spheroids biofabrication and lockyballs cellularization using micro-molded non-adhesive agarose hydrogel. Lockyballs were produced using two-photon polymerization with an estimated mechanical strength. The Young’s modulus was calculated at level 0.1362 +/-0.009 MPa. Interlocking in vitro test demonstrates high level of loading induced interlockability of fabricated lockyballs. Diameter measurements and elongation coefficient calculation revealed that human ASCs spheroids biofabricated in resections of micro-molded non-adhesive hydrogel had a more regular size distribution and shape than spheroids biofabricated in hanging drops. Cellularization of lockyballs using human ASCs spheroids did not alter the level of cells viability (p › 0,999) and gene fold expression for SOX-9 and RUNX2 (p › 0,195). The biofabrication of ASCs spheroids into lockyballs represents an innovative strategy in regenerative medicine, which combines solid scaffold-based and directed self-assembly approaches, fostering opportunities for rapid in situ biofabrication of 3D building-blocks. PMID:27829016

  16. Diversity of cell-mediated adhesions in breast cancer spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivascu, Andrea; Kubbies, Manfred

    2007-12-01

    Due to their three dimensional (3D) architecture, multicellular tumor spheroids mimic avascular tumor areas comprising the establishment of diffusion gradients, reduced proliferation rates and increased drug resistance. We have shown recently that the spontaneous formation of spheroids is restricted to a limited number of cell lines whereas the majority grow only as aggregates of cells with loose cell-cell contacts when cultured in 3D. However, by the addition of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM, Matrigel), aggregates can be transformed into spheroids with diffusion barriers and development of quiescent therapy-resistant cells. In this report, we investigated adhesion molecules responsible for rBM-driven versus spontaneous spheroid formation in a diverse population of eight breast tumor cell lines relevant for in vitro and in vivo antitumor drug testing. Inhibition of spheroid formation was monitored in the presence of adhesion molecule functional blocking antibodies and after siRNA-mediated down-regulation of E- and N-cadherin and integrin beta1 adhesion receptors. We identified that E-cadherin mediates the spontaneous formation of spheroids in MCF7, BT-474, T-47D and MDA-MB-361 cells, whereas N-cadherin is responsible for tight packing of MDA-MB-435S cells. In contrast, the matrix protein-induced transformation of 3D aggregates into spheroids in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells is mediated primarily by the collagen I/integrin beta1 interaction with no cadherin involvement. A combination of both, homophilic E-cadherin and integrin beta1/collagen I interaction establishes spheroids in MDA-MB-468 cells. These findings indicate that an evolutionary diverse and complex pattern of interacting cell surface proteins exists in breast cancer cells that determines the 3D growth characteristic in vitro, thereby influencing small molecule or antibody permeation in preclinical in vitro and in vivo tumor models.

  17. New static spheroidal solution in Jordan-Brands-Dicke theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyrev, S M

    2010-01-01

    The static spheroidal solutions of Jordan-Brands-Dicke theory (JBD) are studied. We consider the effect of the anisotropic stresses of scalar field on the shape of JBD self-graviting objects. It is shown that scalar fields can have significant effect on the structure and properties of self-graviting objects. In contrast with general relativity in JBD theory there are nonflat static spheroidal solutions.

  18. Therapy of gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea Morgner; Renate Schmelz; Christian Thiede; Manfred Stolte; Stephan Miehlke

    2007-01-01

    Gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT)lymphoma has recently been incorporated into the World Health Organization (WHO) lymphoma classification,termed as extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of MALT-type. In about 90% of cases this lymphoma is associated with H pylori infection which has been clearly shown to play a causative role in lymphomagenesis.Although much knowledge has been gained in defining the clinical features, natural history, pathology, and molecular genetics of the disease in the last decade, the optimal treatment approach for gastric MALT lymphomas,especially locally advanced cases, is still evolving. In this review we focus on data for the therapeutic, stage dependent management of gastric MALT lymphoma.Hence, the role of eradication therapy, surgery,chemotherapy and radiotherapy is critically analyzed.Based on these data, we suggest a therapeutic algorithm that might help to better stratify patients for optimal treatment success.

  19. Wave Dark Matter and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Alan R.

    We explore a model of dark matter called wave dark matter (also known as scalar field dark matter and boson stars) which has recently been motivated by a new geometric perspective by Bray. Wave dark matter describes dark matter as a scalar field which satisfies the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. These equations rely on a fundamental constant Upsilon (also known as the "mass term'' of the Klein-Gordon equation). Specifically, in this dissertation, we study spherically symmetric wave dark matter and compare these results with observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a first attempt to compare the implications of the theory of wave dark matter with actual observations of dark matter. This includes finding a first estimate of the fundamental constant Upsilon. In the introductory Chapter 1, we present some preliminary background material to define and motivate the study of wave dark matter and describe some of the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In Chapter 2, we present several different ways of describing a spherically symmetric spacetime and the resulting metrics. We then focus our discussion on an especially useful form of the metric of a spherically symmetric spacetime in polar-areal coordinates and its properties. In particular, we show how the metric component functions chosen are extremely compatible with notions in Newtonian mechanics. We also show the monotonicity of the Hawking mass in these coordinates. Finally, we discuss how these coordinates and the metric can be used to solve the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. In Chapter 3, we explore spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, the defining equations of wave dark matter, where the scalar field is of the form f(t, r) = eiotF(r) for some constant o ∈ R and complex-valued function F(r). We show that the corresponding metric is static if and only if F( r) = h(r)eia for some constant alpha ∈ R and real-valued function h(r). We describe the

  20. [Immunological profile of lymphoid cells in patients with chronic lymphoid leukemia and immunological complications during the treatment with prednisolone and chlorambucil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohins'kyĭ, V O; Karol', Iu S; Tsiapka, O M; Vyhovs'ka, Ia I

    2009-01-01

    Comparative study of immunological phenotype of lymphoid cells of peripheral blood of patients with chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) and immune cytopenia at the treatment with prednisolone and chlorambucil has been carried out. It was shown, that inclusion in the treatment of chlorambucil (chlorambucil + prednisolone) enabled the achievement of remission of immune process at the majority of patients though average duration of remission essentially did not differ. The best clinical result was accompanied by more essential variations of leukemic B-cellular population than during the treatment with prednisolone alone. The reduction of absolute number of lymphocytes in patients with CLL under the treatment with chlorambucil and prednisolone was accompanied by reduction of expression of separate B-cellular antigens of mature cells with minimal signs of their activation. The expediency of a combination of prednisolone with chlorambucil in cases of high leukocytosis and expressed hyperplasia of organs of the limphoid systems.

  1. Becoming angular momentum density flow through nonlinear mass transfer into a gravitating spheroidal body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    superposition forms an antidiffusion flow of an angular momentum density into a gravitating spheroidal body. References: [1] Krot, A.M. The statistical model of gravitational interaction of particles. Achievement in Modern Radioelectronics (spec.issue"Cosmic Radiophysics", Moscow), 1996, no.8, pp. 66-81 (in Russian). [2] Krot, A.M. Statistical description of gravitational field: a new approach. Proc. SPIE's 14th Annual Intern.Symp. "AeroSense", Orlando, Florida, USA, 2000, vol.4038, pp.1318-1329. [3] Krot, A.M. The statistical model of rotating and gravitating spheroidal body with the point of view of general relativity. Proc.35th COSPAR Scientific Assembly, Paris, France, 2004, Abstract A-00162. [4] Krot, A. The statistical approach to exploring formation of Solar system. Proc.EGU General Assembly, Vienna, Austria, 2006, Geophys.Res.Abstracts, vol.8, A-00216; SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/. [5] Krot, A.M. A statistical approach to investigate the formation of the solar system. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals, 2008, doi:10.1016/j.chaos.2008.06.014. [6] Glansdorff, P. and Prigogine, I. Thermodynamic Theory of Structure, Stability and Fluctuations. London, 1971. [7] Nicolis, G. and Prigogine, I. Self-organization in Nonequilibrium Systems:From Dissipative Structures to Order through Fluctuation. John Willey and Sons, New York etc., 1977.

  2. Tertiary lymphoid neogenesis is a component of pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia in patients with common variable immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J.; Ko, Huaibin M.; Beasley, Mary B.; Strauchen, James A.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite reducing pneumonia and other infections, antibody replacement does not appear to treat pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia (PLH) in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). The pathogenesis and optimal treatments remain to be clarified. Objective We aimed to better understand the pathology of CVID-associated lung disease. Tertiary lymphoneogenesis, although a component of interstitial lung disease associated with autoimmune diseases, has not previously been explored in patients with CVID. Methods We examined the clinical characteristics and pathologic findings of 6 patients with CVID with nodular/infiltrative lung disease who had biopsy specimens demonstrating PLH. Results In these subjects regions of PLH contained distinct Band T-cell zones, with B-cell predominance in 1 patient and T-cell predominance in the others. Colocalization of Ki67, Bcl6, and CD23 within this ectopic lymphoid architecture demonstrated tertiary lymphoneogenesis with active centers of cellular proliferation. One patient received rituximab with improved pulmonary radiologic findings. Conclusion Ectopic lymphoid tissue forming germinal centers suggest tertiary lymphoneogenesis in CVID-associated lung disease. B cell–targeted therapy might disrupt CVID-associated lymphoid hyperplasia. PMID:24131823

  3. Tertiary lymphoid neogenesis is a component of pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia in patients with common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Ko, Huaibin M; Beasley, Mary B; Strauchen, James A; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2014-02-01

    Despite reducing pneumonia and other infections, antibody replacement does not appear to treat pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia (PLH) in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). The pathogenesis and optimal treatments remain to be clarified. We aimed to better understand the pathology of CVID-associated lung disease. Tertiary lymphoneogenesis, although a component of interstitial lung disease associated with autoimmune diseases, has not previously been explored in patients with CVID. We examined the clinical characteristics and pathologic findings of 6 patients with CVID with nodular/infiltrative lung disease who had biopsy specimens demonstrating PLH. In these subjects regions of PLH contained distinct B- and T-cell zones, with B-cell predominance in 1 patient and T-cell predominance in the others. Colocalization of Ki67, Bcl6, and CD23 within this ectopic lymphoid architecture demonstrated tertiary lymphoneogenesis with active centers of cellular proliferation. One patient received rituximab with improved pulmonary radiologic findings. Ectopic lymphoid tissue forming germinal centers suggest tertiary lymphoneogenesis in CVID-associated lung disease. B cell-targeted therapy might disrupt CVID-associated lymphoid hyperplasia. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetically levitated mesenchymal stem cell spheroids cultured with a collagen gel maintain phenotype and quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha S Lewis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multicellular spheroids are an established system for three-dimensional cell culture. Spheroids are typically generated using hanging drop or non-adherent culture; however, an emerging technique is to use magnetic levitation. Herein, mesenchymal stem cell spheroids were generated using magnetic nanoparticles and subsequently cultured within a type I collagen gel, with a view towards developing a bone marrow niche environment. Cells were loaded with magnetic nanoparticles, and suspended beneath an external magnet, inducing self-assembly of multicellular spheroids. Cells in spheroids were viable and compared to corresponding monolayer controls, maintained stem cell phenotype and were quiescent. Interestingly, core spheroid necrosis was not observed, even with increasing spheroid size, in contrast to other commonly used spheroid systems. This mesenchymal stem cell spheroid culture presents a potential platform for modelling in vitro bone marrow stem cell niches, elucidating interactions between cells, as well as a useful model for drug delivery studies.

  5. Spheroidal galactic halos and mirror dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2004-01-01

    Mirror matter has been proposed as a dark matter candidate. It has several very attractive features, including automatic stability and darkness, the ability to mimic the broad features of cold dark matter while in the linear density perturbation regime, and consistency with all direct dark matter search experiments, both negative (e.g. CDMS II) and positive (DAMA). In this paper we consider an important unsolved problem: Are there plausible reasons to explain why most of the mirror matter in spiral galaxies exists in the form of gaseous {\\it spheroidal} galactic halos around ordinary matter {\\it disks}? We compute an order-of-magnitude estimate that the mirror photon luminosity of a typical spiral galaxy today is around $10^{44}$ erg/s. Interestingly, this rate of energy loss is similar to the power supplied by ordinary supernova explosions. We discuss circumstances under which supernova power can be used to heat the gaseous part of the mirror matter halo and hence prevent its collapse to a disk. The {\\it mac...

  6. Life and times of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Salvadori, S; Schneider, R

    2008-01-01

    We propose a cosmological scenario for the formation and evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), satellites of the Milky Way (MW). An improved version of the semi-analytical code GAMETE (GAlaxy Merger Tree & Evolution) is used to follow the dSphs evolution simultaneously with the MW formation, matching the observed properties of both. In this scenario dSph galaxies represent fossil objects virializing at z = 7.2 +/- 0.7 (i.e. in the pre-reionization era z > z_rei = 6) in the MW environment, which at that epoch has already been pre-enriched up to [Fe/H] ~ -3; their dynamical masses are in the narrow range M = (1.6 +/- 0.7) x 10^8 M_sun, although a larger spread might be introduced by a more refined treatment of reionization. Mechanical feedback effects are dramatic in such low-mass objects, causing the complete blow-away of the gas ~100 Myr after the formation epoch: 99% of the present-day stellar mass, M_* = (3 +/- 0.7) x 10^6 M_sun, forms during this evolutionary phase, i.e. their age is >13 Gyr....

  7. Testing modified gravity with dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Haghi, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    The observed velocity dispersion of the classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) requires the Newtonian stellar mass-to-light ($M_*/L$) ratios in the range of about 10 to more than 100 solar units that are well outside the acceptable limit predicted by stellar population synthesis models. Using Jeans analysis, we calculate the line-of-sight velocity dispersion ($\\sigma_{\\emph{los}}$) of stars in eight MW dSphs in the context of the modified gravity (MOG) theory of Moffat, assuming a constant $M_*/L$ ratio without invoking the exotic cold dark matter. First, we use the weak field approximation of MOG and assume the two parameters $ \\alpha $ and $ \\mu $ of the theory to be constant as has already been inferred from fitting to the observed rotational data of The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey catalogue of galaxies. We find that the derived $M_*/L$ ratios for almost all dSphs are too large to be explained by the stellar population values. In order to fit the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of ...

  8. Testing modified gravity with dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghi, Hosein; Amiri, Vahid

    2016-12-01

    The observed velocity dispersion of the classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) requires the Newtonian stellar mass-to-light (M*/L) ratios in the range of about 10 to more than 100 solar units that are well outside the acceptable limit predicted by stellar population synthesis models. Using Jeans analysis, we calculate the line-of-sight velocity dispersion (σlos) of stars in eight MW dSphs in the context of the modified gravity (MOG) theory of Moffat, assuming a constant M*/L ratio without invoking the exotic cold dark matter. First, we use the weak field approximation of MOG and assume the two parameters α and μ of the theory to be constant as has already been inferred from fitting to the observed rotational data of The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey catalogue of galaxies. We find that the derived M*/L ratios for almost all dSphs are too large to be explained by the stellar population values. In order to fit the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of the dSph with reasonable M*/L values, we must vary α and μ on a case by case basis. A common pair of values cannot be found for all dSphs. Comparing with the values found from rotation curve fitting, it appears that μ correlates strongly with galaxy luminosity, shedding doubt on it as a universal constant.

  9. Effect of seasonal variation on lymphoid tissues of the lizards, Mabuya quinquetaeniata Licht. and Uromastyx aegyptia Forsk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, M F; Badir, N; el-Ridi, R; Akef, M

    1978-07-01

    The thymus in the lizards Mabuya quinquetaeniata and Uromastyx aegyptia is highly involuted in winter but exhibits in the other seasons a rich lymphoepithelial organization. The splenic white pulp is severely depleted in winter but is extensively developed in spring, summer and autumn. In these seasons, the splenic lymphoid tissue of Mabuya occurs in a continuous phase throughout the organ obscuring the red pulp, whereas in Uromastyx the white pulp remains localized as periarteriolar aggregates and the red pulp is always clearly delineated. In both lizard species, gut-associated lymphoid tissue is well represented, especially in the large intestines and in Mabuya it is almost similar in different seasons. In Uromastyx, in winter, lymphoid nodules are only found in the caecum and the colon, but during warm seasons, inumerable nodules are distributed throughout the gut. The findings are important for a clearer understanding of immunologic competence in reptiles.

  10. Human Cardiac Progenitor Spheroids Exhibit Enhanced Engraftment Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Oltolina

    Full Text Available A major obstacle to an effective myocardium stem cell therapy has always been the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the heart. Better engraftment can be achieved if cells are administered as cell aggregates, which maintain their extra-cellular matrix (ECM. We have generated spheroid aggregates in less than 24 h by seeding human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs onto methylcellulose hydrogel-coated microwells. Cells within spheroids maintained the expression of stemness/mesenchymal and ECM markers, growth factors and their cognate receptors, cardiac commitment factors, and metalloproteases, as detected by immunofluorescence, q-RT-PCR and immunoarray, and expressed a higher, but regulated, telomerase activity. Compared to cells in monolayers, 3D spheroids secreted also bFGF and showed MMP2 activity. When spheroids were seeded on culture plates, the cells quickly migrated, displaying an increased wound healing ability with or without pharmacological modulation, and reached confluence at a higher rate than cells from conventional monolayers. When spheroids were injected in the heart wall of healthy mice, some cells migrated from the spheroids, engrafted, and remained detectable for at least 1 week after transplantation, while, when the same amount of cells was injected as suspension, no cells were detectable three days after injection. Cells from spheroids displayed the same engraftment capability when they were injected in cardiotoxin-injured myocardium. Our study shows that spherical in vivo ready-to-implant scaffold-less aggregates of hCPCs able to engraft also in the hostile environment of an injured myocardium can be produced with an economic, easy and fast protocol.

  11. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. Isolated lymphoid follicles in colon: Switch points between inflammation and colorectal cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferenc Sipos; Gy(o)rgyi Müzes

    2011-01-01

    Gut-associated lymphoid tissue is supposed to play a central role in both the organization of colonic repair mechanisms and colorectal carcinogenesis. In inflammatory conditions, the number, diameter and density of isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs) increases. They are not only involved in immune surveillance, but their presence is also indispensable in normal mucosal regeneration of the colon. In carcinogenesis, ILFs may play a dual role.On the one hand they may support tumor growth and the metastatic process by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling and producing a specific cytokine and cellular milieu, but on the other hand their presence is sometimes associated with a better prognosis.The relation of ILFs to bone marrow derived stem cells, follicular dendritic cells, subepithelial myofibroblasts or crypt formation, which are all involved in mucosal repair and carcinogenesis, has not been directly studied. Data about the putative organizer role of ILFs is scattered in scientific literature.

  20. Isolated lymphoid follicles in colon: switch points between inflammation and colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Ferenc; Muzes, Györgyi

    2011-04-07

    Gut-associated lymphoid tissue is supposed to play a central role in both the organization of colonic repair mechanisms and colorectal carcinogenesis. In inflammatory conditions, the number, diameter and density of isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs) increases. They are not only involved in immune surveillance, but their presence is also indispensable in normal mucosal regeneration of the colon. In carcinogenesis, ILFs may play a dual role. On the one hand they may support tumor growth and the metastatic process by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling and producing a specific cytokine and cellular milieu, but on the other hand their presence is sometimes associated with a better prognosis. The relation of ILFs to bone marrow derived stem cells, follicular dendritic cells, subepithelial myofibroblasts or crypt formation, which are all involved in mucosal repair and carcinogenesis, has not been directly studied. Data about the putative organizer role of ILFs is scattered in scientific literature.

  1. Tumor xenotransplantation in Wistar rats after treatment with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation. [X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenhout, J. (St. Radbond Academic Hospital, Nijmegen, Netherlands); Kazem, I.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Bakkeren, J.A.J.; de Jong, J.; Kal, H.B.; van Munster, P.J.J.

    1982-10-01

    Three-month-old male Wistar rats were treated with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation, and C22LR mouse osteosarcoma was transplanted into the rats. The effects of immunosuppression were monitored by lymphocyte counts, serum IgG determinations, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) responses, measurement of the proportion of B cells, and histopathological studies of the lymphoid organs. At eight days after treatment, the lymphocyte counts, IgG levels, and PHA and Con A values were decreased. Mitotic activity started in the depleted B and T cell areas of the peripheral lymphatic organs two weeks after treatment. There was a 94% graft take of the osteosarcoma. It was determined that the optimum time for tumor xenograft transplantation is 4 days after treatment. The duration of growth was 11 days, and this was followed by regression up to day 21.

  2. Tumor xenotransplantation in Wistar rats after treatment with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenhout, J.; Kazem, I.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Bakkeren, J.A.; de Jong, J.; Kal, H.B.; van Munster, P.J.

    1982-10-01

    Three-month-old male Wistar rats were treated with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation, and C22LR mouse osteosarcoma was transplanted into the rats. The effects of immunosuppression were monitored by lymphocyte counts, serum IgG determinations, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) responses, measurement of the proportion of B cells, and histopathological studies of the lymphoid organs. At eight days after treatment, the lymphocyte counts, IgG levels, and PHA and Con A values were decreased. Mitotic activity started in the depleted B and T cell areas of the peripheral lymphatic organs two weeks after treatment. There was a 94% graft take of the osteosarcoma. It was determined that the optimum time for tumor xenograft transplantation is 4 days after treatment. The duration of growth was 11 days, and this was followed by regression up to day 21.

  3. Suitability of stratagene reference RNA for analysis of lymphoid tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybkaer, Karen; Zhou, Guimei; Iqbal, Javeed

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a lymphoid RNA standard prepared in our laboratory for spotted microarrays against the Universal Human Reference standard from Stratagene. Our goal was to determine if the Stratagene standard, which contains only two lymphoid cell lines out of a pool of 10 human cancer cell lines, had...

  4. Suitability of stratagene reference RNA for analysis of lymphoid tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybkaer, Karen; Zhou, Guimei; Iqbal, Javeed;

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a lymphoid RNA standard prepared in our laboratory for spotted microarrays against the Universal Human Reference standard from Stratagene. Our goal was to determine if the Stratagene standard, which contains only two lymphoid cell lines out of a pool of 10 human cancer cell lines, ha...

  5. Practical Rhumb Line Calculations on the Spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G. G.

    About ten years ago this author wrote the software for a suite of navigation programmes which was resident in a small hand-held computer. In the course of this work it became apparent that the standard text books of navigation were perpetuating a flawed method of calculating rhumb lines on the Earth considered as an oblate spheroid. On further investigation it became apparent that these incorrect methods were being used in programming a number of calculator/computers and satellite navigation receivers. Although the discrepancies were not large, it was disquieting to compare the results of the same rhumb line calculations from a number of such devices and find variations of some miles when the output was given, and therefore purported to be accurate, to a tenth of a mile in distance and/or a tenth of a minute of arc in position. The problem has been highlighted in the past and the references at the end of this show that a number of methods have been proposed for the amelioration of this problem. This paper summarizes formulae that the author recommends should be used for accurate solutions. Most of these may be found in standard geodetic text books, such as, but also provided are new formulae and schemes of solution which are suitable for use with computers or tables. The latter also take into account situations when a near-indeterminate solution may arise. Some examples are provided in an appendix which demonstrate the methods. The data for these problems do not refer to actual terrestrial situations but have been selected for illustrative purposes only. Practising ships' navigators will find the methods described in detail in this paper to be directly applicable to their work and also they should find ready acceptance because they are similar to current practice. In none of the references cited at the end of this paper has the practical task of calculating, using either a computer or tabular techniques, been addressed.

  6. Photoluminescent carbon nanotubes interrogate the permeability of multicellular tumor spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Janki; Roxbury, Daniel; Paknejad, Navid; Heller, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have been extensively investigated for cancer drug delivery and imaging applications. Nanoparticles that show promise in two-dimensional cell culture systems often fail in more complex environments, possibly due to the lack of penetration in dense, three-dimensional structures. Multicellular tumor spheroids are an emerging model system to investigate interactions of nanoparticles with 3D in vitro cell culture environments. Using the intrinsic near-infrared emission of semiconducting carbon nanotubes to optically reconstruct their localization within a three-dimensional volume, we resolved the relative permeability of two different multicellular tumor spheroids. Nanotube photoluminescence revealed that nanotubes rapidly internalized into MCF-7 breast cancer cell-derived spheroids, whereas they exhibited little penetration into spheroids derived from SK-136, a cell line that we developed from murine liver cancer. Characterization of the spheroids by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry revealed large differences in the extracellular matrix and interstitial spacing, which correlated directly with nanotube penetration. This platform portends a new approach to characterize the permeability of living multicellular environments. PMID:26456974

  7. A Reproducible Method for Isolation and In Vitro Culture of Functional Human Lymphoid Stromal Cells from Tonsils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Ephraim, Yotam E.; Konijn, Tanja; Gönültas, Mehmet; Mebius, Reina E.

    2016-01-01

    The stromal compartment of secondary lymphoid organs is classicaly known for providing a mechanical scaffold for the complex interactions between hematopoietic cells during immune activation as well as for providing a niche which is favorable for survival of lymphocytes. In recent years, it became increasingly clear that these cells also play an active role during such a response. Currently, knowledge of the interactions between human lymphoid stroma and hematopoietic cells is still lacking and most insight is based on murine systems. Although methods to isolate stromal cells from tonsils have been reported, data on stability in culture, characterization, and functional properties are lacking. Here, we describe a reproducible and easy method for isolation and in vitro culture of functional human lymphoid stromal cells from palatine tonsils. The cells isolated express markers and characteristics of T cell zone fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and react to inflammatory stimuli by upregulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines as well as adhesion molecules, as previously described for mouse lymphoid stroma. Also, cultured tonsil stromal cells support survival of human innate lymphoid cells, showing that these stromal cells can function as bone fide FRCs, providing a favorable microenvironment for hematopoietic cells. PMID:27907202

  8. Stokesian swimming of a prolate spheroid at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2016-01-01

    The swimming of a spheroid immersed in a viscous fluid and performing surface deformations periodically in time is studied on the basis of Stokes equations of low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. The average over a period of time of the swimming velocity and the rate of dissipation are given by integral expressions of second order in the amplitude of surface deformations. The first order flow velocity and pressure, as functions of spheroidal coordinates, are expressed as sums of basic solutions of Stokes equations. Sets of superposition coefficients of these solutions which optimize the mean swimming speed for given power are derived from an eigenvalue problem. The maximum eigenvalue is a measure of the efficiency of the optimal stroke within the chosen class of motions. The maximum eigenvalue for sets of low order is found to be a strongly increasing function of the aspect ratio of the spheroid.

  9. The effect of gravitational tides on dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nichols, Matthew; Jablonka, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the local environment on the evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies is poorly understood. We have undertaken a suite of simulations to investigate the tidal impact of the Milky Way on the chemodynamical evolution of dwarf spheroidals that resemble present day classical dwarfs using the SPH code GEAR. After simulating the models through a large parameter space of potential orbits the resulting properties are compared with observations from both a dynamical point of view, but also from the, often neglected, chemical point of view. In general, we find that tidal effects quench the star formation even inside gas-endowed dwarfs. Such quenching, may produce the radial distribution of dwarf spheroidals from the orbits seen within large cosmological simulations. We also find that the metallicity gradient within a dwarf is gradually erased through tidal interactions as stellar orbits move to higher radii. The model dwarfs also shift to higher $\\langle$[Fe/H]$\\rangle$/L ratios, but only when losing $>$$20...

  10. Induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten and molybdenum powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The melting, evaporation and oxidation behaviors as well as the solidification phenomena of tungsten and molybdenum in induction plasma were studied. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology and the cross section of plasma-processed powders. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the oxides formed on the particle surface of these two metals. The influence of spray chamber pressure on the spheroidization and oxidation phenomena was discussed. The results show that fewer Mo particles than W particles are spheroidized at the same powder feed rate under the same plasma spray condition although molybdenum has a lower melting point. A small fraction of tungsten is evaporized and condensed either on the surface of tungsten particles nearby or on the wall of spray chamber. Tungsten oxides were found in tungsten powder processed under soft vacuum condition. Extremely large grains form inside some spheroidized particles of tungsten powder.

  11. Numerical Study of the Sedimentation of Spheroidal Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ardekani, Mehdi Niazi; Breugem, Wim-Paul; Brandt, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The gravity-driven motion of rigid particles in a viscous fluid is relevant in many natural and industrial processes, yet this has mainly been investigated for spherical particles. We therefore consider the sedimentation of non-spherical (spheroidal) isolated and particle pairs in a viscous fluid via numerical simulations using the Immersed Boundary Method. The simulations performed here show that the critical Galileo number for the onset of secondary motions decreases as the spheroid aspect ratio departs from 1. Above this critical threshold, oblate particles perform a zigzagging motion whereas prolate particles rotate around the vertical axis while having their broad side facing the falling direction. Instabilities of the vortices in the wake follow when farther increasing the Galileo number. We also study the drafting-kissing-tumbling associated with the settling of particle pairs. We find that the interaction time increases significantly for non-spherical particles and, more interestingly, spheroidal part...

  12. Centrifugal force induced by relativistically rotating spheroids and cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Joseph; Bicak, Jiri; 10.1088/0264-9381/28/6/065004

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the gravitational potential of a Newtonian spheroidal shell we discuss electrically charged rotating prolate spheroidal shells in the Maxwell theory. In particular we consider two confocal charged shells which rotate oppositely in such a way that there is no magnetic field outside the outer shell. In the Einstein theory we solve the Ernst equations in the region where the long prolate spheroids are almost cylindrical; in equatorial regions the exact Lewis "rotating cylindrical" solution is so derived by a limiting procedure from a spatially bound system. In the second part we analyze two cylindrical shells rotating in opposite directions in such a way that the static Levi-Civita metric is produced outside and no angular momentum flux escapes to infinity. The rotation of the local inertial frames in flat space inside the inner cylinder is thus exhibited without any approximation or interpretational difficulties within this model. A test particle within the inner cylinder kept at rest with respect...

  13. Monoenergetic electron parameters in a spheroid bubble model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Sattarian; Sh.Rahmatallahpur; T.Tohidi

    2013-01-01

    A reliable analytical expression for the potential of plasma waves with phase velocities near the speed of light is derived.The presented spheroid cavity model is more consistent than the previous spherical and ellipsoidal models and it explains the mono-energetic electron trajectory more accurately,especially at the relativistic region.The maximum energy of electrons is calculated and it is shown that the maximum energy of the spheroid model is less than that of the spherical model.The electron energy spectrum is also calculated and it is found that the energy distribution ratio of electrons △E/E for the spheroid model under the conditions reported here is half that of the spherical model and it is in good agreement with the experimental value in the same conditions.As a result,the quasi-mono-energetic electron output beam interacting with the laser plasma can be more appropriately described with this model.

  14. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  15. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Basheer, Haneen A.; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D.; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC–19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC–19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  16. Fusion of uniluminal vascular spheroids: a model for assembly of blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul A; Argraves, W Scott; Gentile, Carmine; Neagu, Adrian; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J

    2010-02-01

    We evaluated the self-assembly properties of uniluminal vascular spheroids having outer layers of vascular smooth muscle cells and a contiguous inner layer of endothelial cells lining a central lumen. We showed that while pairs of uniluminal vascular spheroids suspended in culture medium fused to form a larger diameter spheroidal structure, spheroids in collagen hydrogels formed elongated structures. These findings highlight the potential use of uniluminal vascular spheroids as modules to engineer blood vessels. We also demonstrate that uniluminal vascular spheroid fusion conforms to models describing the coalescence of liquid drops. Furthermore, the fusion of uniluminal vascular spheroids in vitro closely resembled the in vivo process by which the descending aorta forms from the fusion of the paired dorsal aortae during embryonic development. Together, the findings indicate that tissue liquidity underlies uniluminal vascular spheroid fusion and that in vivo anastomosis of blood vessels may involve a similar mechanism.

  17. [Reaction of circadian rhythms of the lymphoid system to deep screening from geomagnetic fields of the earth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Iu I; Letiagin, A Y

    1990-02-01

    C57B1/6 inbred mice were placed in hypomagnetic condition during 14 days constantly. Degree of relaxation of geomagnetic field was 10(4). The increase of the number of eosinophil granulocytes was discovered in peripheral blood of mice. Measures of circadian rhythms of blood's absolute lymphocytosis, absolute number of cells in bone marrow, thymus, spleen and inguinal lymph nodes were safe. Adaptation of lymphoid system to hypomagnetic condition was manifested by desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity on the basis of different sensitivity of lymphoid organs, that realized in strengthening of ultradian rhythms with periods of 15 hours. There are indirect data, that show the increase of speed and/or volume of recirculation of lymphoid cells.

  18. Deciphering the Innate Lymphoid Cell Transcriptional Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Seillet

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are enriched at mucosal surfaces, where they provide immune surveillance. All ILC subsets develop from a common progenitor that gives rise to pre-committed progenitors for each of the ILC lineages. Currently, the temporal control of gene expression that guides the emergence of these progenitors is poorly understood. We used global transcriptional mapping to analyze gene expression in different ILC progenitors. We identified PD-1 to be specifically expressed in PLZF+ ILCp and revealed that the timing and order of expression of the transcription factors NFIL3, ID2, and TCF-1 was critical. Importantly, induction of ILC lineage commitment required only transient expression of NFIL3 prior to ID2 and TCF-1 expression. These findings highlight the importance of the temporal program that permits commitment of progenitors to the ILC lineage, and they expand our understanding of the core transcriptional program by identifying potential regulators of ILC development.

  19. Innate lymphoid cells and the MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinette, M L; Colonna, M

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a new class of immune cells that include natural killer (NK) cells and appear to be the innate counterparts to CD4(+) helper T cells and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells based on developmental and functional similarities. Like T cells, both NK cells and other ILCs also show connections to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In human and mouse, NK cells recognize and respond to classical and nonclassical MHC I molecules as well as structural homologues, whereas mouse ILCs have recently been shown to express MHC II. We describe the history of MHC I recognition by NK cells and discuss emerging roles for MHC II expression by ILC subsets, making comparisons between both mouse and human when possible.

  20. Gene Rearrangement Analysis of Orbital Lymphoid Infiltrating Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Yan; Zhongyao Wu; Shuqi Huang; Yongping Li

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the use of polymerase chain reaction for B-cell gene rearrangement in patients with orbital lymphoid infiltrate disorders could be useful in the diagnosis of lymphoma, especially, in differentiating benign lesion from malignant one. Methods: In addition to clinical, pathological, and immunohistochemical evaluations,48 cases of orbital lymphoid infiltrate disorders were examined for immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) gene rearrangement by means of PCR to amplify the FR3 region with formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues. Results: Gene rearrangement in the third frame-work of the IgH region was detected in specimens obtained from 15 cases of malignant lymphoma, 4 of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and 3 of orbital pseudotumor. All of these patients showed a discrete band (100bp) which reflected monoclonal proliferation of B lymphocytes. 5 cases of malignant lymphoma, 6 of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and 15 of orbital pseudotumor did not show a discrete band on PCR. Conclusions: The FR3 region gene rearrangement of Ig heavy in patients with orbital lymphoid infiltrate disorders may be an additional diagnostic tool in differentiating benign from malignant lymphoid diseases and in offering a useful adjunct for diagnosis in difficult or unclear cases. It is a reliable and practical method of gene diagnosis in orbital lymphoid infiltrate disorders and helps to identify the molecular mechanism of malignant lymphoma. Eye Science 2000; 16:15 ~ 21.

  1. Gene Rearrangement Analysis of Orbital Lymphoid Infilktrating Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianghuaYan; ZhongyaoWu; 等

    2002-01-01

    Purpose:To determine whether the use of polymerae chain reaction for B-cell gene rearrangement in patients with orbital lymphoid infiltrate disorders could be useful in the diagnosis of lymphoma,especially,in differentiating benign lesion from malignant one.Methoids:In addition to clinical,pathological,and immunohistochemical evaluatons,48 cases of orbital lymphoid infiltrate disorders were examined for immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) gene rearrangement by means of PCR to amplify the FR3 region with formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues.Results:Gene rearrangement in the third frame-work of the IgH region was detected in specimens obtained from 15 cases of malignant lymphoma,4 of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and 3 of orbital pseudotumor.All of these patients showed a discrete band (100bp) which reflected monoclonal proliferation of B lymphocytes.5 cases of malignant lymphoma,6 of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and 15 of orbital pseudotumor did not show a discrete band on PCR.Conclusions:The FR3 region gene rearrangement of Ig heavy in patients with orbital lymphoid infilktrate disorders may be an additional diagnostic tool in differentiating benign from malignant lymphoid diseases and in offering a useful adjunct for diagnosis in difficult or unclear case.It is a reliable and practical method of gene diagnosis in orbital lymphoid infiltrate disorders and helps to identife the molecular mechanism of malignant lymphoma.Eye Science 2000;16:15-21.

  2. Ectopic Tertiary Lymphoid Tissue in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Protective or Provocateur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Eóin N.; Rivera-Nieves, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Organized lymphoid tissues like the thymus first appeared in jawed vertebrates around 500 million years ago and have evolved to equip the host with a network of specialized sites, strategically located to orchestrate strict immune-surveillance and efficient immune responses autonomously. The gut-associated lymphoid tissues maintain a mostly tolerant environment to dampen our responses to daily dietary and microbial products in the intestine. However, when this homeostasis is perturbed by chronic inflammation, the intestine is able to develop florid organized tertiary lymphoid tissues (TLT), which heralds the onset of regional immune dysregulation. While TLT are a pathologic hallmark of Crohn’s disease (CD), their role in the overall process remains largely enigmatic. A critical question remains; are intestinal TLT generated by the immune infiltrated intestine to modulate immune responses and rebuild tolerance to the microbiota or are they playing a more sinister role by generating dysregulated responses that perpetuate disease? Herein, we discuss the main theories of intestinal TLT neogenesis and focus on the most recent findings that open new perspectives to their role in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27579025

  3. Developmental changes of lymphoid tissue in Harderian gland of the laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Bejdić

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Harderian gland of 110 laying hens was histologically investigated from the time of hatching to the period of 10 months of age. Tissue sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-schiff (PAS and methyl green-pyronin technique. The research shows that lymphoid tissue is colonised by three types of cells: heterophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells. The number of these cells is directly dependent on bird’s age. During the lifetime of the hens there gradually comes a shift in dominance of these three cell types. Lymphoid nodules are detected only in 40-day-old chickens, while later in adult birds Harderian gland is the organ which contain the largest number of mature plasma cells. Some plasma cells contain the Russell bodies with different size and shape.

  4. Back to the drawing board: Understanding the complexity of hepatic innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotel, Marie; Hasan, Uzma; Viel, Sébastien; Marçais, Antoine; Walzer, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of immune populations in nonlymphoid organs have highlighted the great diversity of the innate lymphoid system. It has also become apparent that mouse and human innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have distinct phenotypes and properties. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Harmon et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 2111-2120] characterized human hepatic NK-cell subsets. The authors report that hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells resemble mouse liver ILC1s in that they express CXCR6 and have an immature phenotype. However, unlike mouse ILC1s, they express high levels of Eomes and low levels of T-bet, and upon stimulation with tumor cells, secrete low amounts of cytokines. These unexpected findings further support the differences between human and mouse immune populations and prompt the study of the role of hepatic ILC subsets in immune responses.

  5. Myeloid and lymphoid contribution to non-haematopoietic lineages through irradiation-induced heterotypic cell fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygren, J.M.; Liuba, K.; Breitbach, M.;

    2008-01-01

    and Purkinje neurons. However, through lineage fate-mapping we demonstrate that such in vivo fusion of lymphoid and myeloid blood cells does not occur to an appreciable extent in steady-state adult tissues or during normal development. Rather, fusion of blood cells with different non-haematopoietic cell types...... is induced by organ-specific injuries or whole-body irradiation, which has been used in previous studies to condition recipients of bone marrow transplants. Our findings demonstrate that blood cells of the lymphoid and myeloid lineages contribute to various non-haematopoietic tissues by forming rare fusion......Recent studies have suggested that regeneration of non-haematopoietic cell lineages can occur through heterotypic cell fusion with haematopoietic cells of the myeloid lineage. Here we show that lymphocytes also form heterotypic-fusion hybrids with cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, hepatocytes...

  6. Vitamin A Controls the Presence of RORγ+ Innate Lymphoid Cells and Lymphoid Tissue in the Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverse, Gera; Labao-Almeida, Carlos; Ferreira, Manuela; Molenaar, Rosalie; Wahlen, Sigrid; Konijn, Tanja; Koning, Jasper; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Mebius, Reina E

    2016-06-15

    Changes in diet and microbiota have determining effects on the function of the mucosal immune system. For example, the active metabolite of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA), has been described to maintain homeostasis in the intestine by its influence on both lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Additionally, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), important producers of cytokines necessary for intestinal homeostasis, are also influenced by vitamin A in the small intestines. In this study, we show a reduction of both NCR(-) and NCR(+) ILC3 subsets in the small intestine of mice raised on a vitamin A-deficient diet. Additionally, the percentages of IL-22-producing ILCs were reduced in the absence of dietary vitamin A. Conversely, mice receiving additional RA had a specific increase in the NCR(-) ILC3 subset, which contains the lymphoid tissue inducer cells. The dependence of lymphoid tissue inducer cells on vitamin A was furthermore illustrated by impaired development of enteric lymphoid tissues in vitamin A-deficient mice. These effects were a direct consequence of ILC-intrinsic RA signaling, because retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt-Cre × RARα-DN mice had reduced numbers of NCR(-) and NCR(+) ILC3 subsets within the small intestine. However, lymphoid tissue inducer cells were not affected in these mice nor was the formation of enteric lymphoid tissue, demonstrating that the onset of RA signaling might take place before retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt is expressed on lymphoid tissue inducer cells. Taken together, our data show an important role for vitamin A in controlling innate lymphoid cells and, consequently, postnatal formed lymphoid tissues within the small intestines.

  7. The Birth of Open Separation on a Prolate Spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Vollmers (1983), and Costis, Polen , Hoang and Telionis (1988), will agree in detail with the solu- tions of the model problem but the latter allows the...7, pp. 435-454. Costis, C.E., Polen , D.M. Hoang, N.T. and Telionis, D.P. 1988 Laminar Separating Flow Over a Prolate Spheroid. To be published in J

  8. Sulphur, zinc and carbon in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skúladóttir, Ása

    2016-01-01

    The Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is a Milky Way satellite with predominantly old stellar population, and therefore the ideal target to study early chemical evolution. The chemical abundances of photospheres of stars reveal the composition of their birth environment; studying stars of different a

  9. Building blocks of the Milky Way's accreted spheroid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oirschot, Pim; Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Nelemans, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    In the $\\Lambda$CDM model of structure formation, a stellar spheroid grows by the assembly of smaller galaxies, the so-called building blocks. Combining the Munich-Groningen semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with the high resolution Aquarius simulations of dark matter haloes, we study the

  10. Axisymmetric acoustic scattering from submerged prolate spheroidal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Jeffrey E.; Hayek, Sabih I.

    2005-09-01

    The equations of motion for nonaxisymmetric vibration of prolate spheroidal shells of constant thickness were derived using Hamilton's principle [S. I. Hayek and J. E. Boisvert, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2799-2811 (2003)]. The shell theory used in this derivation includes shear deformations and rotatory inertias. The shell displacements and rotations were expanded in infinite series of comparison functions. These include associated Legendre functions in terms of the prolate spheroidal angular coordinate and circular functions in the azimuthal angle coordinate. The shell is insonified by a plane wave incident along the major axis. The external (heavy) fluid loading impedance was computed using an eigenfunction expansion of prolate spheroidal wavefunctions. Far-field scattered acoustic pressure spectra are presented for several shell thickness-to-half-length ratios ranging from 0.005 to 0.1, and for various shape parameters, a, ranging from an elongated spheroidal shell (a=1.01) to a spherical shell (a~100). The far-field directivity of acoustic scattering is presented at selected frequencies. [Work supported by the ONR/ASEE Summer Faculty Research Program.

  11. Analytical Equation for Estimating Terminal Velocities of Spheroidal Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2007-06-01

    An analytical method for estimating the terminal velocities of spheroidal particles in a fluid medium has been derived form a graphical approach proposed by Haider and Levenspiel. Using an analytical equation enables the researcher to calculate the terminal velocities without resorting to graphical interpolations, thereby reducing errors and enabling terminal velocities to be estimated in automated calculations.

  12. The mass content of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, G.; Helmi, A.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M.; Andersen, J; BlandHawthorn, J; Nordstrom, B

    2009-01-01

    We present a new determination of the mass content of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, based on a novel approach which takes into account the two distinct stellar populations present in this galaxy. This method helps to partially break the well-known mass-anisotropy degeneracy present in the mo

  13. Building blocks of the Milky Way's accreted spheroid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oirschot, Pim; Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Nelemans, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    In the $\\Lambda$CDM model of structure formation, a stellar spheroid grows by the assembly of smaller galaxies, the so-called building blocks. Combining the Munich-Groningen semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with the high resolution Aquarius simulations of dark matter haloes, we study the as

  14. Estimation of scattering from a moist rough surface with spheroidal dust particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2009-08-01

    The scattering from moisture rough surface with spheroidal dust particles having surface with spheroidal dust particles has recently received much attention. In part due to the recent prediction and observation of the spheroidal dust particles in rough surfaces under elastic wave by the Kirchhoff scattering model and scalar approximation with slope. Our analysis shows that the scattering depends on the moisture (2–4.5%) with spheroidal dust particles. At slightly moisture rough surface the dielectric properties increase with change in field amplitude in a rough surface with spheroidal dust particles.

  15. Structural Features of the Lymphoid Tissue of Newborns’ Gastric Mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Kliuchko, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    72 Wistar rats’ stomachs were examined in order to study the features of the dynamics of the lymphoid cells content and distribution in the newborns rats’ gastric mucosa in normal. Morphometric, histological and statistical methods were used. The most significant changes in the composition of different populations of immune cells of the gastric mucosa lymphoid tissue was found to occur within the first three weeks after birth, when antigen load on the stomach increases in the form of new food...

  16. Reproducibility of Uniform Spheroid Formation in 384-Well Plates: The Effect of Medium Evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Viswanath; Fürst, Tomáš; Gurská, Soňa; Džubák, Petr; Hajdúch, Marián

    2016-10-01

    Spheroid cultures of cancer cells reproduce the spatial dimension-induced in vivo tumor traits more effectively than the conventional two-dimensional cell cultures. With growing interest in spheroids for high-throughput screening (HTS) assays, there is an increasing demand for cost-effective miniaturization of reproducible spheroids in microtiter plates (MPs). However, well-to-well variability in spheroid size, shape, and growth is a frequently encountered problem with almost every culture method that has prevented the transfer of spheroids to the HTS platform. This variability partly arises due to increased susceptibility of MPs to edge effects and evaporation-induced changes in the growth of spheroids. In this study, we examined the effect of evaporation on the reproducibility of spheroids of tumor and nontumor cell lines in 384-well plates, and show that culture conditions that prevent evaporation-induced medium loss result in the formation of uniform spheroids across the plate. Additionally, we also present a few technical improvements to increase the scalability of the liquid-overlay spheroid culturing technique in MPs, together with a simple software routine for the quantification of spheroid size. We believe that these cost-effective improvements will aid in further improvement of spheroid cultures for HTS drug discovery.

  17. Cellular and molecular markers in monitoring the fate of lymphoid cell culture from Penaeus monodon Fabricius (1798).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthumana, Jayesh; Jose, Seena; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2015-12-01

    Lymphoid cell culture from penaeid shrimps has gained much acceptance as an in vitro platform to facilitate research on the development of prophylaxis, and therapeutic strategies against viruses and for cell line development. However, lymphoid cells can be used as platform for in vitro research, only if they are in metabolically and mitotically active state in vitro with unaltered cell surface receptors. Through this study, we addressed the response of lymphoid cells to a new microenvironment at cellular and molecular levels; including the study of mitotic events, DNA synthesis, expression profile of cell cycle genes, cytoskeleton organization, metabolic activity and viral susceptibility. The S-phase entry and synthesis of new DNA was recorded by immunoflourescent technique. Cdc2, CycA, CycB, EF-1α and BUB3 genes involved in cell cycle were studied in both the cells and tissue, of which EF-1α showed an elevated expression in cells in vitro (∼ 19.7%). Cytoskeleton network of the cell was examined by studying the organization of actin filaments. As the markers for metabolic status, mitochondrial dehydrogenase, protein synthesis and glucose assimilation by the cells were also assessed. Viral susceptibility of the cell was determined using WSSV to confirm the preservation of cellular receptors. This study envisages to strengthen the shrimp cell line research and to bring forth lymphoid cell culture system as a 'model' in vitro system for shrimp and crustaceans altogether.

  18. Superficially located enlarged lymphoid follicles characterise nodular gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Takuma; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Hoshino, Hitomi; Iwaya, Yugo; Tanaka, Eiji; Kobayashi, Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    Nodular gastritis is a form of chronic Helicobacter pylori gastritis affecting the gastric antrum and characterised endoscopically by the presence of small nodular lesions resembling gooseflesh. It is generally accepted that hyperplasia of lymphoid follicles histologically characterises nodular gastritis; however, quantitative analysis in support of this hypothesis has not been reported. Our goal was to determine whether nodular gastritis is characterised by lymphoid follicle hyperplasia.The number, size, and location of lymphoid follicles in nodular gastritis were determined and those properties compared to samples of atrophic gastritis. The percentages of high endothelial venule (HEV)-like vessels were also evaluated.The number of lymphoid follicles was comparable between nodular and atrophic gastritis; however, follicle size in nodular gastritis was significantly greater than that seen in atrophic gastritis. Moreover, lymphoid follicles in nodular gastritis were positioned more superficially than were those in atrophic gastritis. The percentage of MECA-79 HEV-like vessels was greater in areas with gooseflesh-like lesions in nodular versus atrophic gastritis.Superficially located hyperplastic lymphoid follicles characterise nodular gastritis, and these follicles correspond to gooseflesh-like nodular lesions observed endoscopically. These observations suggest that MECA-79 HEV-like vessels could play at least a partial role in the pathogenesis of nodular gastritis.

  19. Clinical drawbacks of total lymphoid irradiation: the cons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, L.W.; Ellison, G.W.; Fahey, J.L.; Tesler, A.; Gottlieb, M.S.

    1988-07-01

    Success has been reported with use of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) in organ transplant recipients and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. In a well-conducted randomized double blind clinical trial, Cook et al have found that TLI was superior to sham irradiation of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, it is clear from looking at this data that not all patients responded to TLI and that with time disease activity returned. Our own experience with TLI in two MS patients was very disappointing. Despite its apparent benefit in some conditions, considerable drawbacks are associated with TLI. These include high financial cost, unpleasant treatment-related side effects, and the possibility that more serious morbidity as well as mortality may be treatment-related. Furthermore, the optimum therapeutic regimen for TLI has not yet been established. Issues related to cumulative dose, dose per fraction, frequency of fractions, field of irradiation, and interaction with other therapies still need clarification. For these reasons we do not recommend TLI as a treatment for MS.

  20. Generation of multipotent early lymphoid progenitors from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi, Aniya; Mitjavila-Garcia, Maria Teresa; Flamant, Stéphane; Valogne, Yannick; Clay, Denis; Usunier, Benoît; l'Homme, Bruno; Féraud, Olivier; Casal, Ibrahim; Gobbo, Emilie; Divers, Dominique; Chapel, Alain; Turhan, Ali G; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Haddad, Rima

    2014-12-15

    During human embryonic stem cell (ESC) hematopoietic differentiation, the description of the initial steps of lymphopoiesis remains elusive. Using a two-step culture procedure, we identified two original populations of ESC-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) with CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(-) and CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(+) phenotypes. Bulk cultures and limiting dilution assays, culture with MS5 cells in the presence of Notch ligand Delta-like-1 (DL-1), and ex vivo colonization tests using fetal thymic organ cultures showed that although CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(-) HPCs could generate cells of the three lymphoid lineages, their potential was skewed toward the B cell lineages. In contrast, CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(+) HPCs predominantly exhibited a T/natural killer (NK) cell differentiation potential. Furthermore these cells could differentiate equivalently into cells of the granulo-macrophagic lineage and dendritic cells and lacked erythroid potential. Expression profiling of 18 markers by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(-) and CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(+) HPCs express genes of the lymphoid specification and that CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(-) cells express B-cell-associated genes, while CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(+) HPCs display a T-cell molecular profile. Altogether, these findings indicate that CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(-) and CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(+) HPCs correspond to candidate multipotent early lymphoid progenitors polarized toward either the B or T/NK lineage, respectively. This work should improve our understanding of the early steps of lymphopoiesis from pluripotent stem cells and pave the way for the production of lymphocytes for cell-based immunotherapy and lymphoid development studies.

  1. Binding and interstitial penetration of liposomes within avascular tumor spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostarelos, Kostas; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Papakostas, Alexandros; Yang, Wei-Hong; Ballangrud, Ase; Sgouros, George

    2004-11-20

    The liposomal delivery of cancer therapeutics, including gene therapy vectors, is an area of intense study. Poor penetration of liposomes into interstitial tumor spaces remains a problem, however. In this work, the penetration of different liposomal formulations into prostate carcinoma spheroids was examined. Spheroid penetration was assessed by confocal microscopy of fluorescently labeled liposomes. The impact of liposomal surface charge, mean diameter, lipid bilayer fluidity and fusogenicity on spheroid penetration was examined. A variety of different liposome systems relevant to clinical or preclinical protocols have been studied, including classical zwitterionic (DMPC:chol) and sterically stabilized liposomes (DMPC:chol:DOPE-PEG2000), both used clinically, and cationic liposomes (DMPC:DOPE:DC-chol and DOTAP), forming the basis of the vast majority of nonviral gene transfer vectors tested in various cancer trials. Surface interactions between strongly cationic vesicles and the tumor cells led to an electrostatically derived binding-site barrier effect, inhibiting further association of the delivery systems with the tumor spheroids (DMPC:DC-chol). However, inclusion of the fusogenic lipid DOPE and use of a cationic lipid of lower surface charge density (DOTAP instead of DC-chol) led to improvements in the observed intratumoral distribution characteristics. Sterically stabilized liposomes did not interact with the tumor spheroids, whereas small unilamellar classical liposomes exhibit extensive distribution deeper into the tumor volume. Engineering liposomal delivery systems with a relatively low charge molar ratio and enhanced fusogenicity, or electrostatically neutral liposomes with fluid bilayers, offered enhanced intratumoral penetration. This study shows that a delicate balance exists between the strong affinity of delivery systems for the tumor cells and the efficient penetration and distribution within the tumor mass, similar to previous work studying

  2. Total lymphoid irradiation for multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devereux, C.K.; Vidaver, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Troiano, R.; Dowling, P.C.; Cook, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Although chemical immunosuppression has been shown to benefit patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), it appears that chemotherapy has an appreciable oncogenic potential in patients with multiple sclerosis. Accordingly, we developed a modified total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) regimen designed to reduce toxicity and applied it to a randomized double blind trial of TLI or sham irradiation in MS. Standard TLI regimens were modified to reduce dose to 1,980 rad, lowering the superior mantle margin to midway between the thyroid cartilage and angle of the mandible (to avert xerostomia) and the lower margin of the mantle field to the inferior margin of L1 (to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity by dividing abdominal radiation between mantle and inverted Y), limiting spinal cord dose to 1,000 rad by custom-made spine blocks in the mantle and upper 2 cm of inverted Y fields, and also protecting the left kidney even if part of the spleen were shielded. Clinical efficacy was documented by the less frequent functional scale deterioration of 20 TLI treated patients with chronic progressive MS compared to to 20 sham-irradiated progressive MS patients after 12 months (16% versus 55%, p less than 0.03), 18 months (28% versus 63%, p less than 0.03), and 24 months (44% versus 74%, N.S.). Therapeutic benefit during 3 years follow-up was related to the reduction in lymphocyte count 3 months post-irradiation (p less than 0.02). Toxicity was generally mild and transient, with no instance of xerostomia, pericarditis, herpes zoster, or need to terminate treatment in TLI patients. However, menopause was induced in 2 patients and staphylococcal pneumonia in one.

  3. Close Encounters of Lymphoid Cells and Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Veiga, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    During infections, the first reaction of the host against microbial pathogens is carried out by innate immune cells, which recognize conserved structures on pathogens, called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Afterward, some of these innate cells can phagocytose and destroy the pathogens, secreting cytokines that would modulate the immune response to the challenge. This rapid response is normally followed by the adaptive immunity, more specific and essential for a complete pathogen clearance in many cases. Some innate immune cells, usually named antigen-presenting cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, are able to process internalized invaders and present their antigens to lymphocytes, triggering the adaptive immune response. Nevertheless, the traditional boundary of separated roles between innate and adaptive immunity has been blurred by several studies, showing that very specialized populations of lymphocytes (cells of the adaptive immunity) behave similarly to cells of the innate immunity. These “innate-like” lymphocytes include γδ T cells, invariant NKT cells, B-1 cells, mucosal-associated invariant T cells, marginal zone B cells, and innate response activator cells, and together with the newly described innate lymphoid cells are able to rapidly respond to bacterial infections. Strikingly, our recent data suggest that conventional CD4+ T cells, the paradigm of cells of the adaptive immunity, also present innate-like behavior, capturing bacteria in a process called transinfection. Transinfected CD4+ T cells digest internalized bacteria like professional phagocytes and secrete large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, protecting for further bacterial challenges. In the present review, we will focus on the data showing such innate-like behavior of lymphocytes following bacteria encounter.

  4. Tethered spheroids as an in vitro hepatocyte model for drug safety screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lei; Sakban, Rashidah Binte; Qu, Yinghua; Hong, Xin; Zhang, Wenxia; Nugraha, Bramasta; Tong, Wen Hao; Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Zheng, Baixue; Chau, Ian Yin-Yan; Jia, Ruirui; McMillian, Michael; Silva, Jose; Dallas, Shannon; Yu, Hanry

    2012-03-01

    Hepatocyte spheroids mimic many in vivo liver-tissue phenotypes but increase in size during extended culture which limits their application in drug testing applications. We have developed an improved hepatocyte 3D spheroid model, namely tethered spheroids, on RGD and galactose-conjugated membranes using an optimized hybrid ratio of the two bioactive ligands. Cells in the spheroid configuration maintained 3D morphology and uncompromised differentiated hepatocyte functions (urea and albumin production), while the spheroid bottom was firmly tethered to the substratum maintaining the spheroid size in multi-well plates. The oblate shape of the tethered spheroids, with an average height of 32 μm, ensured efficient nutrient, oxygen and drug access to all the cells within the spheroid structure. Cytochrome P450 induction by prototypical inducers was demonstrated in the tethered spheroids and was comparable or better than that observed with hepatocyte sandwich cultures. These data suggested that tethered 3D hepatocyte spheroids may be an excellent alternative to 2D hepatocyte culture models for drug safety applications.

  5. Mass transfer inside oblate spheroidal solids: modelling and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. F. Carmo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical solution of the unsteady diffusion equation describing mass transfer inside oblate spheroids, considering a constant diffusion coefficient and the convective boundary condition, is presented. The diffusion equation written in the oblate spheroidal coordinate system was used for a two-dimensional case. The finite-volume method was employed to discretize the basic equation. The linear equation set was solved iteratively using the Gauss-Seidel method. As applications, the effects of the Fourier number, the Biot number and the aspect ratio of the body on the drying rate and moisture content during the process are presented. To validate the methodology, results obtained in this work are compared with analytical results of the moisture content encountered in the literature and good agreement was obtained. The results show that the model is consistent and it may be used to solve cases such as those that include disks and spheres and/or those with variable properties with small modifications.

  6. A method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics using spheroidal kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulbright, Michael S.; Benz, Willy; Davies, Melvyn B.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) designed to model systems dominated by deformation along a preferential axis. These systems cause severe problems for SPH codes using spherical kernels, which are best suited for modeling systems which retain rough spherical symmetry. Our method allows the smoothing length in the direction of the deformation to evolve independently of the smoothing length in the perpendicular plane, resulting in a kernel with a spheroidal shape. As a result the spatial resolution in the direction of deformation is significantly improved. As a test case we present the one-dimensional homologous collapse of a zero-temperature, uniform-density cloud, which serves to demonstrate the advantages of spheroidal kernels. We also present new results on the problem of the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

  7. Plasma spheroidization of nickel powders in a plasma reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Shanmugavelayutham; V Selvarajan

    2004-10-01

    Thermal spray coatings of surfaces with metal, alloy and ceramic materials for protection against corrosion, erosion and wear is an intense field of research. The technique involves injection of the powder into a plasma flame, melting, acceleration of the powder particles, impact and bonding with the substrate. Feedstock powders of metals, alloys and ceramics for thermal spray applications have to meet several requirements. Particle shape, size and its distribution, powder flow characteristics and density are the important factors to be considered in order to ensure high spray efficiency and better coating properties. For smooth and uniform feeding of powders into plasma jet, the powder particles have to be spherical in shape. High temperatures and steep temperatures present in thermal plasma is exploited to spheroidize particles in the present investigation. Nickel powder particles in the size range from 40–100 m were spheroidized using plasma processing. SEM and optical micrographs showed spherical shape of processed particles.

  8. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We constrain the parameters of a self-interacting massive dark matter scalar particle in a condensate using the kinematics of the eight brightest dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way. For the case of an attractive self-interaction the condensate develops a mass density profile with a characteristic scale radius that is closely related to the fundamental parameters of the theory. We find that the velocity dispersion of dwarf spheroidal galaxies suggests a scale radius of the order of 1 kpc, in tension with previous results found using the rotational curve of low-surface-brightness and dwarf galaxies. We discuss the implications of our findings for the particle dark matter model and argue that a single classical coherent state cannot play, in general, a relevant role for the description of dark matter in galaxies.

  9. A VIRIAL CORE IN THE SCULPTOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnello, A.; Evans, N. W., E-mail: aagnello@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: nwe@ast.cam.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    The projected virial theorem is applied to the case of multiple stellar populations in the nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies. As each population must reside in the same gravitational potential, this provides strong constraints on the nature of the dark matter halo. We derive necessary conditions for two populations with Plummer or exponential surface brightnesses to reside in a cusped Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo. We apply our methods to the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal, and show that there is no NFW halo compatible with the energetics of the two populations. The dark halo must possess a core radius of {approx}120 pc for the virial solutions for the two populations to be consistent. This conclusion remains true, even if the effects of flattening or self-gravity of the stellar populations are included.

  10. Transcriptional profiling of peripheral lymphoid tissue reveals genes and networks linked to SSBP/1 scrapie pathology in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossner, Anton; Roupaka, Sofia; Foster, Jim; Hunter, Nora; Hopkins, John

    2011-12-15

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are slow and progressive neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals. The major target organ for all TSEs is the brain but some TSE agents are associated with prior accumulation within the peripheral lymphoid system. Many studies have examined the effects of scrapie infection on the expression of central nervous system (CNS) genes, but this study examines the progression of scrapie pathology in the peripheral lymphoid system and how scrapie infection affects the transcriptome of the lymph nodes and spleen. Infection of sheep with SSBP/1 scrapie resulted in PrP(Sc) deposition in the draining prescapular lymph node (PSLN) by 25 days post infection (dpi) in VRQ/VRQ genotype sheep and 75 dpi in tonsils and spleen. Progression of PrP(Sc) deposition in VRQ/ARR animals was 25 dpi later in the PSLN and 250 dpi later in spleen. Microarray analysis of 75 dpi tissues from VRQ/VRQ sheep identified 52 genes in PSLN and 37 genes in spleen cells that showed significant difference (P ≤ 0.05) between scrapie-infected and mock-infected animals. Transcriptional pathway analysis highlighted immunological disease, cell death and neurological disease as the biological pathways associated with scrapie pathogenesis in the peripheral lymphoid system. PrP(Sc) accumulation of lymphoid tissue resulted in the repression of genes linked to inflammation and oxidative stress, and the up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis.

  11. Long-term immunologically competent human peripheral lymphoid tissue cultures in a 3D bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, Igor; Sun, Hongliang; Moshkani, Safiekhatoon; Feng, Changyong; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Wu, JH David; Bottaro, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral lymphoid organs (PLOs), the primary sites of development of adaptive immune responses, display a complex structural organization reflecting separation of cellular subsets (e.g. T and B lymphocytes) and functional compartments which is critical for immune function. The generation of in vitro culture systems capable of recapitulating salient features of PLOs for experimental, biotechnological and clinical applications would be highly desirable, but has been hampered so far by the complexity of these systems. We have previously developed a three-dimensional bioreactor system for long-term, functional culture of human bone marrow cells on macroporous microspheres in a packed-bed bioreactor with frequent medium change. Here we adapt the same system for culture of human primary cells from PLOs (tonsil) in the absence of specific exogenous growth factors or activators. Cells in this system displayed higher viability over several weeks, and maintain population diversity and cell surface markers largely comparable to primary cells. Light microscopy showed cells organizing in large diverse clusters within the scaffold pores and presence of B cell-enriched areas. Strikingly, these cultures generated a significant number of antibody-producing B cells when challenged with a panel of diverse antigens, as expected from a lymphoid tissue. Thus the three-dimensional tonsil bioreactor culture system may serve as a useful model of PLOs by recapitulating their structural organization and function ex vivo. PMID:21309085

  12. Alloantigens of human lymphoid cell lines; `human Ia-like antigens'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K.; Nakamuro, K.; Tanigaki, N.; Pressman, D.

    1977-01-01

    Membrane glycoproteins that appear to belong to a new alloantigen system were partially purified by gel filtration and lentil-lectin affinity chromatography from a non-ionic detergent (Renex 30) solubilized membrane fraction of each of two Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, B46M and Daudi. The preparations were radioiodinated and further purified by gel filtration, lentil—lectin affinity chromatography and anti-HLA antibody affinity chromatography. The labelled preparations thus obtained did not have binding activity with any of rabbit anti-HLA, rabbit anti-human β2-microglobulin and rabbit anti-human IgG-Fab antisera, but did have a high level of binding activity with rabbit anti-B-cell membrane antiserum. Moreover, the labelled preparations showed relatively high binding activity with some conventional HLA typing sera. Out of sixty-eight human tissue typing alloantisera tested, three (Berlin 373, Betz and TO-29-01) gave especially high binding with both of the labeled preparations. The antigens involved in reaction with these alloantisera and also with the rabbit anti-B-cell membrane antiserum contained two components, one 31,000 ∼ 32,000 daltons and another 24,000 ∼ 25,000 daltons, bound non-covalently. The alloantigens were specific to B cell type cell lines (B-lymphoid cell lines and Burkitt-lymphoma cell lines) in cultured cell lines and also to B lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In organs and tissues, however, they were found to be present widely distributed in lymphoid organs (thymus as well as spleen and lymph node) and in non-lymphoid organs (including liver, kidney, testis and heart). PMID:24587

  13. VERITAS Deep Observations of the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Segue 1

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Decerprit, G; Dickherber, R; Dumm, J; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Ferrer, F; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lee, K; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G D; Skole, C; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2012-01-01

    The VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes has carried out a deep observational program on the nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1. We report on the results of nearly 48 hours of good quality selected data, taken between January 2010 and May 2011. No significant $\\gamma$-ray emission is detected at the nominal position of Segue 1, and upper limits on the integrated flux are derived. According to recent studies, Segue 1 is the most dark matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal galaxy currently known. We derive stringent bounds on various annihilating and decaying dark matter particle models. The upper limits on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section are $\\mathrm{^{95% CL} \\lesssim 10^{-23} cm^{3} s^{-1}}$, improving our limits from previous observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies by at least a factor of two for dark matter particle masses $\\mathrm{m_{\\chi}\\gtrsim 300 GeV}$. The lower limits on the decay lifetime are at the level of $\\mathrm{\\tau^{95% CL} \\gtrsim 10^{24} s}$. Finally, we address the inte...

  14. Reparative Spheroids in HPV-Associated Chronic Cervicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy T. Sukhikh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spheroid cell structures (SCS described in cell culture are used to study cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the role of the SCS in the repair process in vivo remains unexplored. The aim of the study was to examine the cellular composition of the spherical structures and their functional significance in the repair of the squamous epithelium in human papilloma virus-associated chronic cervicitis (HPV-CC. Methods and Results: The cytology and biopsy materials from 223 patients with HPV-CC were subjected to molecular testing for HPV DNA by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (Real-Time PCR with genotyping and chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, as well as immunocytological and immunohistochemical analyses of p16INK4A, Ki67, SMA, Vimentin, CD34, E-cadherin, Oct4, CD44, CKW markers. In the stem cell niche zone, these spheroid structures were discovered having proliferative activity and showing signs of producing stem cells involved in the repair of the cervical mucosa in HPV-CC. Conclusion: The persistence of the HPV in the stem cell niche zone cells in the cervix determines the chronization of inflammation in this area, with the ability to perform pathological repair. The immunophenotype of the spheroid cell structures in the HPV-CC includes cells with signs of stem cells (‘stemness’ and the mesenchymal-epithelial transition.

  15. Silicon spheroidization treatment of thixoformed Al-Si-Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogris, E.; Uggowitzer, P.J. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Metallurgy; Luechinger, H. [SAG-Aluminium Lend GmbH und Co KG and THIXALLOY trademark Components GmbH und Co KG, Lend (Austria)

    2002-07-01

    Al-Si-Mg alloys are commonly used in the automobile industry because of their outstanding mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. The need of lighter and safer cars is the driving force behind research in the area of high strength light metal safety part applications. The strength level can be tuned by varying the amount of alloyed magnesium. Usually if strength is increased, ductility will decrease. Following the demands of the automotive industry, safety parts should have a minimum fracture elongation of 15% and a minimum yield strength of 150 MPa. The huge hurdle is the 15% fracture elongation which can not be reached by sand or die casting, but some relatively new alternative casting technologies, like Thioxocasting or New Rheocasting, yield encouraging ductility values. Recent research activity has focused on increasing strength and ductility, but so far the results have not yet been satisfying. This paper presents investigations on the spheroidization process of eutectic silicon and its positive effect on mechanical properties. It is shown that the spheroidization process is already finished after minutes of exposure to heat treatment. Metallographical and quantitative microstructural analysis is used to describe the growth and spheroidization process of the silicon crystals. Specimens of THIXALLOY trademark 630 (A356) thixocast components were heat treated for varied periods of time, aged and tested. Results show amazing improvements of ductility and strength in comparison to the as cast state. Maximum values of 18% fracture elongation and 230 MPa yield strength are reached. (orig.)

  16. Vibration of fluid-loaded hemi-prolate spheroidal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Jeffrey E.; Hayek, Sabih I.

    2003-04-01

    The equations of motion for nonaxisymmetric vibration of hemi-prolate spheroidal shells of constant thickness were derived using Hamilton's principle. The shell is clamped at the equator and is excited by mechanical surface force fields. The shell theory used in this derivation includes shear deformations and rotatory inertias. The displacements and rotations were expanded in an infinite series of comparison functions. The shell is fluid-filled and is submerged in an infinite fluid medium. The external and internal fluid loading impedances were computed using expansions of prolate spheroidal wavefunctions in each domain. The dynamic response of the fluid-loaded shell was determined using an axisymmetric normal surface force as the excitation input. Numerical results were obtained for the driving and transfer mobilities for several shell thickness-to-length ratios ranging from 0.005 to 0.1, and for various shape parameters, ``a,'' ranging from an elongated hemi-spheroidal shell (a=1.01) to a hemispherical shell (a=100). Results are presented for various combinations of external and internal fluid loading, and comparisons are made to the in-vacuo shell vibration. [Work supported by ONR and the Navy/ASEE Summer Faculty Program.

  17. Inhibition of autophagy overcomes glucocorticoid resistance in lymphoid malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Xu, Lingzhi; Xie, Jiajun; Li, Sisi; Guan, Yanchun; Zhang, Yan; Hou, Zhijie; Guo, Tao; Shu, Xin; Wang, Chang; Fan, Wenjun; Si, Yang; Yang, Ya; Kang, Zhijie; Fang, Meiyun; Liu, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) resistance remains a major obstacle to successful treatment of lymphoid malignancies. Till now, the precise mechanism of GC resistance remains unclear. In the present study, dexamethasone (Dex) inhibited cell proliferation, arrested cell cycle in G0/G1-phase, and induced apoptosis in Dex-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. However, Dex failed to cause cell death in Dex-resistant lymphoid malignant cells. Intriguingly, we found that autophagy was induced by Dex in resistant cells, as indicated by autophagosomes formation, LC3-I to LC3-II conversion, p62 degradation, and formation of acidic autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, the results showed that Dex reduced the activity of mTOR pathway, as determined by decreased phosphorylation levels of mTOR, Akt, P70S6K and 4E-BP1 in resistant cells. Inhibition of autophagy by either chloroquine (CQ) or 3-methyladenine (3-MA) overcame Dex-resistance in lymphoid malignant cells by increasing apoptotic cell death in vitro. Consistently, inhibition of autophagy by stably knockdown of Beclin1 sensitized Dex-resistant lymphoid malignant cells to induction of apoptosis in vivo. Thus, inhibition of autophagy has the potential to improve lymphoid malignancy treatment by overcoming GC resistance.

  18. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  19. Fluid absorption related to ion transport in human airway epithelial spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P S; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Larsen, P L

    1999-01-01

    , and amiloride inhibited both values. Fluid transport rates were calculated from repeated measurements of spheroid diameters. The results showed that 1) non-CF and CF spheroids absorbed fluid at identical rates (4.4 microl x cm(-2) x h(-1)), 2) amiloride inhibited fluid absorption to a lower residual level......) osmotic water permeabilities were equal in non-CF and CF spheroids ( approximately 27 x 10(-7) cm x s(-1) x atm(-1))....

  20. Multiparametric Analysis of Oncology Drug Screening with Aqueous Two-Phase Tumor Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi Thakuri, Pradip; Ham, Stephanie L; Luker, Gary D; Tavana, Hossein

    2016-11-07

    Spheroids present a biologically relevant three-dimensional model of avascular tumors and a unique tool for discovery of anticancer drugs. Despite being used in research laboratories for several decades, spheroids are not routinely used in the mainstream drug discovery pipeline primarily due to the difficulty of mass-producing uniformly sized spheroids and intense labor involved in handling, drug treatment, and analyzing spheroids. We overcome this barrier using a polymeric aqueous two-phase microtechnology to robotically microprint spheroids of well-defined size in standard 384-microwell plates. We use different cancer cells and show that resulting spheroids grow over time and display characteristic features of solid tumors. We demonstrate the feasibility of robotic, high-throughput screening of 25 standard chemotherapeutics and molecular inhibitors against tumor spheroids of three different cancer cell lines. This screening uses over 7000 spheroids to elicit high quality dose-dependent drug responses from spheroids. To quantitatively compare performance of different drugs, we employ a multiparametric scoring system using half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50), maximum inhibition (Emax), and area under the dose-response curve (AUC) to take into account both potency and efficacy parameters. This approach allows us to identify several compounds that effectively inhibit growth of spheroids and compromise cellular viability, and distinguish them from moderately effective and ineffective drugs. Using protein expression analysis, we demonstrate that spheroids generated with the aqueous two-phase microtechnology reliably resolve molecular targets of drug compounds. Incorporating this low-cost and convenient-to-use tumor spheroid technology in preclinical drug discovery will make compound screening with realistic tumor models a routine laboratory technique prior to expensive and tedious animal tests to dramatically improve testing throughput and efficiency and

  1. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): the stellar mass budget of galaxy spheroids and discs

    OpenAIRE

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Lange, Rebecca; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, Aaron S G; Kelvin, Lee S; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Andrews, Stephen K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E.; Colless, Matthew; Davies, Luke J. M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kafle, Prajwal R.

    2016-01-01

    We build on a recent photometric decomposition analysis of 7506 Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey galaxies to derive stellar mass function fits to individual spheroid and disc component populations down to a lower mass limit of log(M*/M⊙) = 8. We find that the spheroid/disc mass distributions for individual galaxy morphological types are well described by single Schechter function forms. We derive estimates of the total stellar mass densities in spheroidsspheroid = 1.24 ± 0.49 × 108 M...

  2. Increased Survival and Function of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids Entrapped in Instructive Alginate Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Steve S.; Murphy, Kaitlin C.; Binder, Bernard Y.K.; Vissers, Caroline B.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies are under broad investigation for applications in tissue repair but suffer from poor cell persistence and engraftment upon transplantation. MSC spheroids exhibit improved survival, anti-inflammatory, and angiogenic potential in vitro, while also promoting vascularization when implanted in vivo. However, these benefits are lost once cells engage the tissue extracellular matrix and migrate from the aggregate. The efficacy of cell therapy is consistently improved when using engineered materials, motivating the need to investigate the role of biomaterials to instruct spheroid function. In order to assess the contribution of adhesivity on spheroid activity in engineered materials and promote the bone-forming potential of MSCs, we compared the function of MSC spheroids when entrapped in Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified alginate hydrogels to nonfouling unmodified alginate. Regardless of material, MSC spheroids exhibited reduced caspase activity and greater vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion compared with equal numbers of dissociated cells. MSC spheroids in RGD-modified hydrogels demonstrated significantly greater cell survival than spheroids in unmodified alginate. After 5 days in culture, spheroids in RGD-modified gels had similar levels of apoptosis, but more than a twofold increase in VEGF secretion compared with spheroids in unmodified gels. All gels contained mineralized tissue 8 weeks after subcutaneous implantation, and cells entrapped in RGD-modified alginate exhibited greater mineralization versus cells in unmodified gels. Immunohistochemistry confirmed more diffuse osteocalcin staining in gels containing spheroids compared with dissociated controls. This study demonstrates the promise of cell-instructive biomaterials to direct survival and function of MSC spheroids for bone tissue engineering applications. Significance Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) spheroids exhibit improved therapeutic potential in vitro

  3. Methods: Using Three-Dimensional Culture (Spheroids) as an In Vitro Model of Tumour Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leek, Russell; Grimes, David Robert; Harris, Adrian L; McIntyre, Alan

    Regions of hypoxia in tumours can be modelled in vitro in 2D cell cultures with a hypoxic chamber or incubator in which oxygen levels can be regulated. Although this system is useful in many respects, it disregards the additional physiological gradients of the hypoxic microenvironment, which result in reduced nutrients and more acidic pH. Another approach to hypoxia modelling is to use three-dimensional spheroid cultures. In spheroids, the physiological gradients of the hypoxic tumour microenvironment can be inexpensively modelled and explored. In addition, spheroids offer the advantage of more representative modelling of tumour therapy responses compared with 2D culture. Here, we review the use of spheroids in hypoxia tumour biology research and highlight the different methodologies for spheroid formation and how to obtain uniformity. We explore the challenge of spheroid analyses and how to determine the effect on the hypoxic versus normoxic components of spheroids. We discuss the use of high-throughput analyses in hypoxia screening of spheroids. Furthermore, we examine the use of mathematical modelling of spheroids to understand more fully the hypoxic tumour microenvironment.

  4. [Clonality lymphoid study through rearrangement analysis of antigen receptor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar-Rivera, Nicolás; Olaya, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    As a rule, malignant lymphoid proliferations are clonal. While most of the time the biological potential can be established through routine pathologic examination and auxiliary techniques, some cases are difficult to classify. Moreover, there are situations in which there are dominant clones whose analysis are important, such as occur in autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiency. This paper presents in an understandable way the main techniques for the study of clonality in lymphoid lesions, i.e. the analysis of rearrangements of antigen receptor genes by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based tests.

  5. Single-cell analysis defines the divergence between the innate lymphoid cell lineage and lymphoid tissue-inducer cell lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Chea, Sylvestre; Gudjonson, Herman; Constantinides, Michael G; Dinner, Aaron R; Bendelac, Albert; Golub, Rachel

    2016-03-01

    The precise lineage relationship between innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells is poorly understood. Using single-cell multiplex transcriptional analysis of 100 lymphoid genes and single-cell cultures of fetal liver precursor cells, we identified the common proximal precursor to these lineages and found that its bifurcation was marked by differential induction of the transcription factors PLZF and TCF1. Acquisition of individual effector programs specific to the ILC subsets ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 was initiated later, at the common ILC precursor stage, by transient expression of mixed ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 transcriptional patterns, whereas, in contrast, the development of LTi cells did not go through multilineage priming. Our findings provide insight into the divergent mechanisms of the differentiation of the ILC lineage and LTi cell lineage and establish a high-resolution 'blueprint' of their development.

  6. The development of innate lymphoid cells requires TOX-dependent generation of a common innate lymphoid cell progenitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehus, Corey R; Aliahmad, Parinaz; de la Torre, Brian; Iliev, Iliyan D; Spurka, Lindsay; Funari, Vincent A; Kaye, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Diverse innate lymphoid cell (ILC) subtypes have been defined on the basis of effector function and transcription factor expression. ILCs derive from common lymphoid progenitors, although the transcriptional pathways that lead to ILC-lineage specification remain poorly characterized. Here we found that the transcriptional regulator TOX was required for the in vivo differentiation of common lymphoid progenitors into ILC lineage-restricted cells. In vitro modeling demonstrated that TOX deficiency resulted in early defects in the survival or proliferation of progenitor cells, as well as ILC differentiation at a later stage. In addition, comparative transcriptome analysis of bone marrow progenitors revealed that TOX-deficient cells failed to upregulate many genes of the ILC program, including genes that are targets of Notch, which indicated that TOX is a key determinant of early specification to the ILC lineage.

  7. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hindlimb ischemia mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Su; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2014-02-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive cell source for tissue engineering. However, one obstacle to this approach is that the transplanted ASC population can decline rapidly in the recipient tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) spheroid in a hindlimb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hindlimbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) of spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The spheroid + LLLT group enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with other groups. The spheroid contributed tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs was increased by the decreased apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hindlimb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs group and spheroid group. These data suggest that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhances the survival of ASCs and stimulates the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hindlimb.

  8. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells mm9 All antigens Blood Lymphoid cells SRX658419,SRX...658405,SRX658389,SRX658437,SRX971601,SRX971603,SRX021894,SRX971602 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoid_cells.bed ...

  16. Functional differences between human NKp44- and NKp44+ RORC+ innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Hoorweg (Kerim); C.P. Peters (Charlotte); F.H.J. Cornelissen (Ferry); P. Aparicio-Domingo (Patricia); N. Papazian (Natalie); G. Kazemier (Geert); J.M. Mjösberg (Jenny); H. Spits (Hergen); T. Cupedo (Tom)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHuman RORC+ lymphoid tissue inducer cells are part of a rapidly expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILC) that participate in innate and adaptive immune responses as well as in lymphoid tissue (re) modeling. The assessment of a potential role for innate lymphocyte-derived cytokines

  17. Functional differences between human NKp44- and NKp44+ RORC+ innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Hoorweg (Kerim); C.P. Peters (Charlotte); F.H.J. Cornelissen (Ferry); P. Aparicio-Domingo (Patricia); N. Papazian (Natalie); G. Kazemier (Geert); J.M. Mjösberg (Jenny); H. Spits (Hergen); T. Cupedo (Tom)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHuman RORC+ lymphoid tissue inducer cells are part of a rapidly expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILC) that participate in innate and adaptive immune responses as well as in lymphoid tissue (re) modeling. The assessment of a potential role for innate lymphocyte-derived cytokines

  18. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: NoD.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: NoD.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: NoD.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: NoD.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Intraluminal Injection of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Spheroids Attenuates Experimental Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molendijk, Ilse; Barnhoorn, Marieke C; de Jonge-Muller, Eveline S M; Mieremet-Ooms, Marij A C; van der Reijden, Johan J; van der Helm, Danny; Hommes, Daniel W; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Verspaget, Hein W

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, mesenchymal stromal cells [MSCs] emerged as a promising therapeutic option for various diseases, due to their immunomodulatory properties. We previously observed that intraperitoneally injected MSCs in experimental colitis form spherical shaped aggregates. Therefore, we aggregated MSCs in vitro into spheroids and injected them intraluminally in mice with established colitis, to investigate whether these MSC spheroids could alleviate the colitis. We injected 0.5 x 10(6) MSCs in spheroids, 2.0 x 10(6) MSCs in spheroids, or phosphate-buffered saline [PBS] as a treatment control, via an enema in mice with established dextran sulphate sodium [DSS]-induced colitis. Body weight was measured daily and disease activity score was determined at sacrifice. Endoscopy was performed to evaluate mucosal healing. After sacrifice, both systemic and local inflammatory responses were evaluated. Intraluminally injected MSC spheroids alleviated DSS-induced colitis, resulting in significantly less body weight loss and lower disease activity score at sacrifice when a high dose of MSC spheroids was administered. However, the percentage of mucosal lesions in the distal colon and endoscopy scores were not significantly lower after treatment with 2.0 x 10(6) MSCs in spheroids compared with PBS-treated mice. Systemic inflammation marker serum amyloid A [SAA] was significantly reduced after treatment with 2.0 x 10(6) MSCs in spheroids. In addition, local cytokine levels of IFN-ɣ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17a, as well as numbers of macrophages and neutrophils, showed a clear decrease-though not always significant-after intraluminal injection of the MSC spheroids. Intraluminally injected MSC spheroids at least partially attenuate experimental colitis, with fewer phagocytes and proinflammmatory cytokines, when a high dose of MSCs in spheroids was administered. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  15. SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND THEIR HOST SPHEROIDS. I. DISASSEMBLING GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savorgnan, G. A. D.; Graham, A. W., E-mail: gsavorgn@astro.swin.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Several recent studies have performed galaxy decompositions to investigate correlations between the black hole mass and various properties of the host spheroid, but they have not converged on the same conclusions. This is because their models for the same galaxy were often significantly different and not consistent with each other in terms of fitted components. Using 3.6 μm Spitzer imagery, which is a superb tracer of the stellar mass (superior to the K band), we have performed state-of-the-art multicomponent decompositions for 66 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. Our sample is the largest to date and, unlike previous studies, contains a large number (17) of spiral galaxies with low black hole masses. We paid careful attention to the image mosaicking, sky subtraction, and masking of contaminating sources. After a scrupulous inspection of the galaxy photometry (through isophotal analysis and unsharp masking) and—for the first time—2D kinematics, we were able to account for spheroids; large-scale, intermediate-scale, and nuclear disks; bars; rings; spiral arms; halos; extended or unresolved nuclear sources; and partially depleted cores. For each individual galaxy, we compared our best-fit model with previous studies, explained the discrepancies, and identified the optimal decomposition. Moreover, we have independently performed one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) decompositions and concluded that, at least when modeling large, nearby galaxies, 1D techniques have more advantages than 2D techniques. Finally, we developed a prescription to estimate the uncertainties on the 1D best-fit parameters for the 66 spheroids that takes into account systematic errors, unlike popular 2D codes that only consider statistical errors.

  16. OVCAR-3 spheroid-derived cells display distinct metabolic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Vermeersch

    Full Text Available Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells.To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines.These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines.Overall, we demonstrate for the first time that metabolism

  17. Conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue in avian mucosal immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van F.W.; Gulley, S.L.; Lammers, A.; Hoerr, F.J.; Gurjar, R.; Toro, H.

    2012-01-01

    Conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue’s (CALT) role in generating avian mucosal adaptive immunity was measured by analyzing cellular composition, expression of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), and production of cytokines and antibodies in chickens ocular exposed to a replication-defici

  18. Occurrence of lymphoid cells in the intestine of the Goldfish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinberg, Steven

    1975-01-01

    The Goldfish intestine normally contains a large number of lymphocytes, many of them being present in the epithelial layer. After stimulation with antigen, the number of lymphoid cells does not increase, but the proportion of large pyroninophilic cells and plasma cells does. It seems therefore that

  19. Quantitative image analysis of HIV-1 infection in lymphoid tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A.T.; Zupancic, M.; Cavert, W. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-08

    Tracking human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection at the cellular level in tissue reservoirs provides opportunities to better understand the pathogenesis of infection and to rationally design and monitor therapy. A quantitative technique was developed to determine viral burden in two important cellular compartments in lymphoid developed to determine viral burden in two important cellular compartments in lymphoid tissues. Image analysis and in situ hybridization were combined to show that in the presymptomatic stages of infection there is a large, relatively stable pool of virions on the surfaces of follicular dendritic cells and a smaller pool of productivity infected cells. Despite evidence of constraints on HIV-1 replication in the infected cell population in lymphoid tissues, estimates of the numbers of these cells and the virus they could produce are consistent with the quantities of virus that have been detected in the bloodstream. The cellular sources of virus production and storage in lymphoid tissues can now be studied with this approach over the course of infection and treatment. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Synchronous high-risk melanoma and lymphoid neoplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, R A

    2012-02-03

    Large population-based studies have shown a significant association between melanoma and lymphoid neoplasia, particularly non-Hodgkin\\'s lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), that is independent of any treatment received for the initial tumour. This study examines the presentation, diagnosis, treatment and progress of three patients who developed advanced melanoma concurrently with a lymphoid neoplasm (one NHL, two CLLs), in order to illustrate their association, discuss common aetiological factors and examine possible therapeutic options. As it is the melanoma rather than the lymphoid neoplasm that represents the bigger threat to overall survival, initial treatment should be targeted towards this cancer. However, because of the interplay between the diseases and the possible side-effects of the various treatments, the choice of adjuvant therapy requires careful consideration. Immunosuppression associated with chemotherapy may permit a more aggressive course for the melanoma, while locoregional radiotherapy is contraindicated following lymph node dissections. As immunotherapy is of benefit in the treatment of melanoma and has also been recently shown to be effective in the management of lymphoid neoplasia, we instituted interferon-alpha as adjuvant therapy for these patients, thereby utilizing a single agent to treat the dual pathologies. The three patients have now been followed-up for 6 months without evidence of disease recurrence or progression.

  1. 9 CFR 113.31 - Detection of avian lymphoid leukosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., shall be done in chick embryo cell cultures. (1) Each vaccine virus, cytopathic to chick embryo... lymphoid leukosis virus can be propagated on cell culture during the 21-day growth period. If a vaccine... preparation of such questionable vaccine. (2) When cell cultures are tested, 5 ml of the final cell suspension...

  2. Note: 3D printed spheroid for uniform magnetic field generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Y.; Aktaş, B.

    2016-10-01

    This article is focused on a novel and practical production method for a uniform magnetic field generator. The method involves building of a surface coil template using a desktop 3D printer and winding of a conducting wire onto the structure using surface grooves as a guide. Groove pattern was based on the parametric spheroidal helical coil formula. The coil was driven by a current source and the magnetic field inside was measured using a Hall probe placed into the holes on the printed structure. The measurements are found to be in good agreement with our finite element analysis results and indicate a fairly uniform field inside.

  3. Chemical Evolution of Mn in Three Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Men-Quan Liu; Jie Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Based on an improved model, more reasonable nucleosyn-thesis and explosion rate of SNeIa and CCSNe, we studied Mn evolution for three local dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), considering the detailed SNe yield and explosion rates for different types of progenitors. The results can explain the main observation ofMn abundance for tens stars in those dSphs, and give some constraints to the nucleosynthesis and explosion ratio of different types of supernovae and Star Formation Rates (SFR) in those dSphs.

  4. Characterisation of austempered spheroidal graphite aluminium cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutorabi, S.M.A. [Iran Univ. of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials

    1997-06-01

    The micro constituents of austempered spheroidal graphite aluminium cast iron were investigated. The heat tinting, special etching and microhardness measurement techniques were used. The results showed that the colour of each micro constituents and the hardness values in austempered ductile iron depend on the carbon content of each phase. The above techniques were supported by using an special etching which showed similar differences in each phase. It was shown that the heat tinting and special etching are reliable tools to characterise the complex matrix of ADI. The microhardness data supported interestingly the colour changes in above technique. (orig.)

  5. Short-term effects of radiation in glioblastoma spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg Petterson, Stine; Pind Jakobsen, Ida; Jensen, Stine Skov;

    2016-01-01

    and five days. We found a small reduction in primary spheroid size after radiation and an associated small increase in uptake of the cell death marker propidium iodide. Using immunohistochemistry, P53 expression was found to be significantly increased, whereas the Ki-67 proliferation index...... capacity. Gene expression analysis of nine stem cell- and two hypoxia-related genes did not reveal any upregulation after radiation. In conclusion, this study suggests that a major short-term effect of radiation is pronounced reduction of tumor cell proliferation. We found no upregulation of stem cell...

  6. VARIATIONS IN A UNIVERSAL DARK MATTER PROFILE FOR DWARF SPHEROIDALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardel, John R.; Gebhardt, Karl, E-mail: jardel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    Using a newly developed modeling technique, we present orbit-based dynamical models of the Carina, Draco, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. These models calculate the dark matter profiles non-parametrically without requiring any assumptions to be made about their profile shapes. By lifting this restriction, we discover a host of dark matter profiles in the dSphs that are different from the typical profiles suggested by both theorists and observers. However, when we scale these profiles appropriately and plot them on a common axis, they appear to follow an approximate r {sup –1} power law with considerable scatter.

  7. Trigonometric potentials arising from the spheroidal equation: Supersymmetric partners and integral formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel

    2016-06-01

    We construct supersymmetric partners of a quantum system featuring a class of trigonometric potentials that emerge from the spheroidal equation. Examples of both standard and confluent supersymmetric transformations are presented. Furthermore, we use integral formulas arising from the confluent supersymmetric formalism to derive new representations for single and multiple integrals of spheroidal functions.

  8. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the Stellar Mass Budget of Galaxy Spheroids and Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Moffett, Amanda J; Driver, Simon P; Robotham, Aaron S G; Kelvin, Lee S; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Andrews, Stephen K; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E; Colless, Matthew; Davies, Luke J M; Holwerda, Benne W; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kafle, Prajwal R; Liske, Jochen; Meyer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We build on a recent photometric decomposition analysis of 7506 Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey galaxies to derive stellar mass function fits to individual spheroid and disk component populations down to a lower mass limit of log(M_*/M_sun)= 8. We find that the spheroid/disk mass distributions for individual galaxy morphological types are well described by single Schechter function forms. We derive estimates of the total stellar mass densities in spheroids (rho_spheroid = 1.24+/-0.49 * 10^8 M_sun Mpc^-3 h_0.7) and disks (rho_disk = 1.20+/-0.45 * 10^8 M_sun Mpc^-3 h_0.7), which translates to approximately 50% of the local stellar mass density in spheroids and 48% in disks. The remaining stellar mass is found in the dwarf "little blue spheroid" class, which is not obviously similar in structure to either classical spheroid or disk populations. We also examine the variation of component mass ratios across galaxy mass and group halo mass regimes, finding the transition from spheroid to disk mass dominance ...

  9. Surface electric current distributions on spheres and spheroids as sources of pure quadrupole magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    L. Medina; E. Ley-Koo

    2011-01-01

    Neutral atom magnetic traps and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging require internal regions with constant gradient magnetic induction fields, which are identified as pure quadrupole fields. This contribution starts from such fields in the interior of spheres and spheroids in cartesian coordinates, identifying immediately their respective scalar magnetic potentials. Next, the corresponding potentials inside and outside are constructed using spherical and spheroidal harmonic functions, respecti...

  10. Rapid generation of single-tumor spheroids for high-throughput cell function and toxicity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivascu, Andrea; Kubbies, Manfred

    2006-12-01

    Spheroids are widely used in biology because they provide an in vitro 3-dimensional (3D) model to study proliferation, cell death, differentiation, and metabolism of cells in tumors and the response of tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The methods of generating spheroids are limited by size heterogeneity, long cultivation time, or mechanical accessibility for higher throughput fashion. The authors present a rapid method to generate single spheroids in suspension culture in individual wells. A defined number of cells ranging from 1000 to 20,000 were seeded into wells of poly-HEMA-coated, 96-well, round-or conical-bottom plates in standard medium and centrifuged for 10 min at 1000 g. This procedure generates single spheroids in each well within a 24-h culture time with homogeneous sizes, morphologies, and stratification of proliferating cells in the rim and dying cells in the core region. Because a large number of tumor cell lines form only loose aggregates when cultured in 3D, the authors also performed a screen for medium additives to achieve a switch from aggregate to spheroid morphology. Small quantities of the basement membrane extract Matrigel, added to the culture medium prior to centrifugation, most effectively induced compact spheroid formation. The compact spheroid morphology is evident as early as 24 h after centrifugation in a true suspension culture. Twenty tumor cell lines of different lineages have been used to successfully generate compact, single spheroids with homogenous size in 96-well plates and are easily accessible for subsequent functional analysis.

  11. Abnormal hepatic copper accumulation of spheroid composed of liver cells from LEC rats in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, K; Yoshizawa, M; Satoh, T; Yoneda, S; Ohmichi, M; Yamazaki, M; Mori, Y; Suzuki, K T

    1995-11-01

    The LEC rat is a mutant strain displaying hereditary hepatitis, and shows abnormal accumulation of copper (Cu) similar to that occurring in Wilson's disease. We prepared a multicellular spheroid composed of LEC rat liver cells to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu. These multicellular spheroids were prepared by detaching the monolayer on the collagen-conjugated thermo-responsive polymer coated culture dish at a temperature below the critical solution temperature and culturing on the non-adhesive substratum. Long-term cultured spheroids of LEC rat liver cells as well as SD rat liver cells were attempted. Non-parenchymal cells obtained by collagenase perfusion from the LEC liver were fewer than those from the SD liver. Cells from the LEC rat, over 11 weeks of age, did not form a cell sheet; however, a mixture of parenchymal cells from LEC rats over aged 11 weeks and non-parenchymal cells from SD rats of any age yielded intact spheroids. We examined the toxicity, the accumulation and distribution of Cu in spheroids. The accumulation of Cu in LEC spheroids was higher than that in SD spheroids. Results suggest that spheroids consisting of LEC liver cells are useful as an alternative model to in vivo tests to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu in liver.

  12. Issues in diagnosis of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms involving the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Report on the Bone Marrow Workshop of the XVIIth meeting of the European Association for Haematopathology and the Society for Hematopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porwit, Anna; Fend, Falko; Kremer, Marcus; Orazi, Attilio; Safali, Mükerrem; van der Walt, Jon

    2016-09-01

    Small B cell lymphoid neoplasms are the most common lymphoproliferative disorders involving peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM). The Bone Marrow Workshop (BMW) organized by the European Bone Marrow Working Group (EBMWG) of the European Association for Haematopathology (EAHP) during the XVIIth EAHP Meeting in Istanbul, October 2014, was dedicated to discussion of cases illustrating how the recent advances in immunophenotyping, molecular techniques and cytogenetics provide better understanding and classification of these entities. Submitted cases were grouped into following categories: (i) cases illustrating diagnostic difficulties in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL); (ii) cases of BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms other than CLL; (iii) transformation of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms in the BM; and (iv) multiclonality and composite lymphomas in the BM. This report summarizes presented cases and conclusions of the BMW and provides practical recommendations for classification of the BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms based on the current state of knowledge.

  13. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells utilize the IRF4-IL-9 module to coordinate epithelial cell maintenance of lung homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, A; Van Dyken, S J; Schneider, C; Nussbaum, J C; Liang, H-E; Locksley, R M

    2016-01-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) have an important role in acute allergic lung inflammation. Given their distribution and function, lung ILC2s are hypothesized to coordinate epithelial responses to the external environment; however, how barrier surveillance is linked to ILC2 activation remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that alveolar type II cells are the main source of interleukin (IL)-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) generated in response to chitin or migratory helminths. IL-33 and TSLP synergistically induce an interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4)-IL-9 program in ILC2s, and autocrine IL-9 promotes rapid IL-5 and IL-13 production required for optimal epithelial responses in the conducting airways. Thus, ILC2s link alveolar function to regulation of airway flow, revealing a key interaction between resident lymphoid and structural cells that might underlie similar organizational hierarchies in other organs.

  14. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Parker, Terry L; Walker, David A; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B; Gellert, Paul R; Garnett, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  15. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyan P Ivanov

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  16. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie, E-mail: leejay1986@163.com; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-07

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time. - Highlights: • Fully algebraic solutions for the spheroidal droplet evaporation rate is obtained. • We examine the effect of aspect ratio on the droplet evaporation. • We propose a calculation method of Nusselt number for spheroidal droplet.

  17. The low-frequency dielectric response of charged oblate spheroidal particles immersed in an electrolyte

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Chang-Yu; Sen, Pabitra N

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-frequency polarization response of a surface-charged oblate spheroidal particle immersed in an electrolyte solution. Because the charged spheroid attracts counter-ions which form the electric double layer around the particle, using usual boundary conditions at the interface between the particle and electrolyte can be quite complicated and challenging. Hence, we generalize Fixman's boundary conditions, originally derived for spherical particles, to the case of the charged oblate spheroid. Given two different counter-ion distributions in the thin electric double layer limit, we obtain analytic expressions for the polarization coefficients to the first non-trivial order in frequency. We find that the polarization response normal to the symmetry axis depends on the total amount of charge carried by the oblate spheroid while that parallel to the symmetry axis is suppressed when there is less charge on the edge of the spheroid. We further study the overall dielectric response for a dilute suspensio...

  18. High-Throughput Spheroid Screens Using Volume, Resazurin Reduction, and Acid Phosphatase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Grabowska, Anna M; Garnett, Martin C

    2017-01-01

    Mainstream adoption of physiologically relevant three-dimensional models has been slow in the last 50 years due to long, manual protocols with poor reproducibility, high price, and closed commercial platforms. This chapter describes high-throughput, low-cost, open methods for spheroid viability assessment which use readily available reagents and open-source software to analyze spheroid volume, metabolism, and enzymatic activity. We provide two ImageJ macros for automated spheroid size determination-for both single images and images in stacks. We also share an Excel template spreadsheet allowing users to rapidly process spheroid size data, analyze plate uniformity (such as edge effects and systematic seeding errors), detect outliers, and calculate dose-response. The methods would be useful to researchers in preclinical and translational research planning to move away from simplistic monolayer studies and explore 3D spheroid screens for drug safety and efficacy without substantial investment in money or time.

  19. Building Blocks of the Milky Way's Accreted Spheroid

    CERN Document Server

    van Oirschot, Pim; Helmi, Amina; Nelemans, Gijs

    2016-01-01

    In the $\\Lambda$CDM model of structure formation, a stellar spheroid grows by the assembly of smaller galaxies, the so-called building blocks. Combining the Munich-Groningen semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with the high resolution Aquarius simulations of dark matter haloes, we study the assembly history of the stellar spheroids of six Milky Way-mass galaxies, focussing on building block properties such as mass, age and metallicity. These properties are compared to those of the surviving satellites in the same models. We find that the building blocks have higher star formation rates on average, and this is especially the case for the more massive objects. At high redshift these dominate in star formation over the satellites, whose star formation timescales are longer on average. These differences ought to result in a larger $\\alpha$-element enhancement from Type II supernovae in the building blocks (compared to the satellites) by the time Type Ia supernovae would start to enrich them in iron, explain...

  20. Mergers and the outside-in formation of dwarf spheroidals

    CERN Document Server

    Benítez-Llambay, Alejandro; Abadi, Mario G; Gottloeber, Stefan; Yepes, Gustavo; Hoffman, Yehuda; Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of the Local Group to explore the origin of age and metallicity gradients in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We find that a number of simulated dwarfs form "outside-in", with an old, metal-poor population that surrounds a younger, more concentrated metal-rich component, reminiscent of dwarf spheroidals like Sculptor or Sextans. We focus on a few examples where stars form in two populations distinct in age in order to elucidate the origin of these gradients. The spatial distributions of the two components reflect their diverse origin; the old stellar component is assembled through mergers, but the young population forms largely in situ. The older component results from a first episode of star formation that begins early but is quickly shut off by the combined effects of stellar feedback and reionization. The younger component forms when a late accretion event adds gas and reignites star formation. The effect of mergers is to disperse the old stellar population, incr...

  1. Structural analysis of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present wide-field g- and i-band stellar photometry of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its surrounding area out to four times its half-light radius (rh = 695 pc), based on images obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO. We find clear evidence of stellar substructure associated with the galaxy, extending to a distance of 82 arcmin (2 kpc) from its centre. We perform a statistical analysis of the overdensities and find three distinct features, as well as an extended halo-like structure, to be significant at the 99.7 per cent confidence level or higher. Unlike the extremely elongated and extended substructures surrounding the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the overdensities seen around Sextans are distributed evenly about its centre, and do not appear to form noticeable tidal tails. Fitting a King model to the radial distribution of Sextans stars yields a tidal radius rt = 83.2 arcmin ± 7.1 arcmin (2.08 ± 0.18 kpc), which implies the majority of detected substructure is gravitationally bound to the galaxy. This finding suggests that Sextans is not undergoing significant tidal disruption from the Milky Way, supporting the scenario in which the orbit of Sextans has a low eccentricity.

  2. Dynamics of prolate spheroidal mass distributions with varying eccentricity

    CERN Document Server

    Rathulnath, R

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the potential for a prolate spheroidal distribution as in a dark matter halo with a radially varying eccentricity. This is obtained by summing up the shell-by-shell contributions of isodensity surfaces, which are taken to be concentric and with a common polar axis and with an axis ratio that varies with radius. Interestingly, the constancy of potential inside a shell is shown to be a good approximation even when the isodensity contours are dissimilar spheroids, as long as the radial variation in eccentricity is small as seen in realistic systems. We consider three cases where the isodensity contours are more prolate at large radii, or are less prolate, or have a constant eccentricity. Other relevant physical quantities like the rotation velocity, the net orbital and vertical frequency due to the halo and an exponential disc of finite thickness embedded in it are obtained. We apply this to the kinematical origin of Galactic warp, and show that a prolate shaped halo is not conducive t...

  3. Discriminating Between the Physical Processes that Drive Spheroid Size Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Hernquist, Lars; Wuyts, Stijn; Cox, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    Massive galaxies at high-z have smaller effective radii than those today, but similar central densities. Their size growth therefore relates primarily to the evolving abundance of low-density material. Various models have been proposed to explain this evolution, which have different implications for galaxy, star, and BH formation. We compile observations of spheroid properties as a function of redshift and use them to test proposed models. Evolution in progenitor gas-richness with redshift gives rise to initial formation of smaller spheroids at high-z. These systems can then evolve in apparent or physical size via several channels: (1) equal-density 'dry' mergers, (2) later major or minor 'dry' mergers with less-dense galaxies, (3) adiabatic expansion, (4) evolution in stellar populations & mass-to-light-ratio gradients, (5) age-dependent bias in stellar mass estimators, (6) observational fitting/selection effects. If any one of these is tuned to explain observed size evolution, they make distinct predict...

  4. Study on the effects of nylon-chitosan-blended membranes on the spheroid-forming activity of human melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Hsiao, Wen-Chu; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Yu, Hsin-Su; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Lai, Juin-Yih; Young, Tai-Horng

    2006-10-01

    Though reported limitedly in tissue engineering, modification of cellular functions can be achieved by culturing them into multicellular spheroids. We have shown melanocytes form spheroids on chitosan surface. However, how biomaterials promote spheroid formation has never been systemically investigated. In this work, nylon, which inhibits melanocyte spheroid formation, and chitosan, which promotes melanocyte spheroid formation, are used to prepare nylon/chitosan-blended membranes. Membranes composed of pure nylon, pure chitosan and various ratios of nylon and chitosan are employed to examine their effects on spheroid formation. Melanocytes show better adhesion to nylon membranes than that to chitosan membranes. In blended membranes, as more nylon is incorporated, cell adhesion increases and the trend for spheroid formation decreases. Melanocytes can only form spheroids on membranes with poorer cell adhesion. Examining the surface of the blended membranes shows phase separation of nylon and chitosan. As nylon content increases, the nylon phase on the membrane surface increases and thereby enhances cell adhesion. The opposite trend for cell adhesion and spheroid formation substantiates our hypothesis of spheroid formation on biomaterials: a balance between cell-substrate interaction and cell-cell interaction. The decrease in cell-substrate interaction tilts the balance to a state more favorable for spheroid formation. Our work can serve as a model to investigate the relative strengths of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and also pave way to design blended membranes with desired physical properties while preserving the spheroid-forming activity.

  5. Generation of co-culture spheroids as vascularisation units for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Walser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell spheroids represent attractive building units for bone tissue engineering, because they provide a three-dimensional environment with intensive direct cell-cell contacts. Moreover, they allow for co-culture of both osteoblasts and vessel-forming cells, which may markedly increase their survival and vascularisation after transplantation. To test this hypothesis, we generated co-culture spheroids by aggregating different combinations of primary human osteoblasts (HOB, human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC and normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF using the liquid overlay technique. Mono-culture spheroids consisting either of HOB or HDMEC served as controls. After in vitro characterisation, the different spheroids were transplanted into dorsal skinfold chambers of CD1 nu/nu mice to study in vivo their viability and vascularisation over a 2-week observation period by means of repetitive intravital fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. In vitro, co-culture spheroids containing HDMEC rapidly formed dense tubular vessel-like networks within 72 h and exhibited a significantly decreased rate of apoptotic cell death when compared to mono-culture HDMEC spheroids. After transplantation, these networks interconnected to the host microvasculature by external inosculation. Of interest, this process was most pronounced in HOB-HDMEC spheroids and could not further be improved by the addition of NHDF. Accordingly, HOB-HDMEC spheroids were larger when compared to the other spheroid types. These findings indicate that HOB-HDMEC spheroids exhibit excellent properties to preserve viability and to promote proliferation and vascularisation. Therefore, they may be used as functional vascularisation units in bone tissue engineering for the seeding of scaffolds or for the vitalisation of non-healing large bone defects.

  6. Lymphoid Aggregates Remodel Lymphatic Collecting Vessels that Serve Mesenteric Lymph Nodes in Crohn Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Bala, Shashi; Rahier, Jean-François; Johnson, Michael W; Wang, Peter L; Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Chau, Amélie; Pariente, Benjamin; Kartheuser, Alex; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    2016-12-01

    Early pathological descriptions of Crohn disease (CD) argued for a potential defect in lymph transport; however, this concept has not been thoroughly investigated. In mice, poor healing in response to infection-induced tissue damage can cause hyperpermeable lymphatic collecting vessels in mesenteric adipose tissue that impair antigen and immune cell access to mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs), which normally sustain appropriate immunity. To investigate whether analogous changes might occur in human intestinal disease, we established a three-dimensional imaging approach to characterize the lymphatic vasculature in mesenteric tissue from controls or patients with CD. In CD specimens, B-cell-rich aggregates resembling tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) impinged on lymphatic collecting vessels that enter and exit LNs. In areas of creeping fat, which characterizes inflammation-affected areas of the bowel in CD, we observed B cells and apparent innate lymphoid cells that had invaded the lymphatic vessel wall, suggesting these cells may be mediators of lymphatic remodeling. Although TLOs have been described in many chronic inflammatory states, their anatomical relationship to preestablished LNs has never been revealed. Our data indicate that, at least in the CD-affected mesentery, TLOs are positioned along collecting lymphatic vessels in a manner expected to affect delivery of lymph to LNs. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Establishment of an in vitro system representing the chicken gut-associated lymphoid tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorjahan Banu Alitheen

    Full Text Available The bursa of Fabricius is critical for B cell development and differentiation in chick embryos. This study describes the production in vitro, from dissociated cell suspensions, of cellular agglomerates with functional similarities to the chicken bursa. Co-cultivation of epithelial and lymphoid cells obtained from embryos at the appropriate developmental stage regularly led to agglomerate formation within 48 hours. These agglomerates resembled bursal tissue in having lymphoid clusters overlaid by well organized epithelium. Whereas lymphocytes within agglomerates were predominantly Bu-1a(+, a majority of those emigrating onto the supporting membrane were Bu-1a(- and IgM(+. Both agglomerates and emigrant cells expressed activation-induced deaminase with levels increasing after 24 hours. Emigrating cells were actively proliferating at a rate in excess of both the starting cell population and the population of cells remaining in agglomerates. The potential usefulness of this system for investigating the response of bursal tissue to avian Newcastle disease virus (strain AF2240 was examined.

  8. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells promote HIV-1-induced group 3 innate lymphoid cell depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Cheng, Liang; Zhao, Juanjuan; Li, Guangming; Zhang, Liguo; Chen, Weiwei; Nie, Weiming; Reszka-Blanco, Natalia J; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Su, Lishan

    2015-09-01

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) have demonstrated roles in promoting antibacterial immunity, maintaining epithelial barrier function, and supporting tissue repair. ILC3 alterations are associated with chronic inflammation and inflammatory disease; however, the characteristics and relevant regulatory mechanisms of this cell population in HIV-1 infection are poorly understood due in part to a lack of a robust model. Here, we determined that functional human ILC3s develop in lymphoid organs of humanized mice and that persistent HIV-1 infection in this model depletes ILC3s, as observed in chronic HIV-1-infected patients. In HIV-1-infected mice, effective antiretroviral therapy reversed the loss of ILC3s. HIV-1-dependent reduction of ILC3s required plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), IFN-I, and the CD95/FasL pathway, as targeted depletion or blockade of these prevented HIV-1-induced ILC3 depletion in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Finally, we determined that HIV-1 infection induces CD95 expression on ILC3s via a pDC- and IFN-I-dependent mechanism that sensitizes ILC3s to undergo CD95/FasL-mediated apoptosis. We conclude that chronic HIV-1 infection depletes ILC3s through pDC activation, induction of IFN-I, and CD95-mediated apoptosis.

  9. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B activation reduces Coxsackievirus B3 replication in lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Katharina; Wilsky, Steffi; Althof, Nadine; Wiesener, Nadine; Wutzler, Peter; Henke, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Interactions between viral replication machineries and host cell metabolism display interesting information how certain viruses capitalize cellular pathways to support progeny production. Among those pathogens, Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) has been identified to manipulate intracellular signaling very comprehensively. Next to others, this human pathogenic virus causes acute and chronic forms of myocarditis, pancreatitis, and meningitis. Here, activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling appears to be involved in successful infection. Viral replication is not restricted to solid organs but involves susceptible immune cells as well. In the present study, p65 phosphorylation as one aspect of NFκB activation and inhibition via BAY 11-7085 administration was analyzed in the context of CVB3 replication in lymphoid cells. During CVB3 infection, an up-regulation of p65 translation is detectable, which is accompanied by noticeable phosphorylation. Inhibition of NFκB signaling reduces viral replication in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that during CVB3 replication in human and murine lymphoid cells, NFκB signaling is activated and facilitates viral replication. Therefore, antiviral strategies to target such central cellular signaling pathways may represent potential possibilities for the development of new virostatica. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lymphoid neogenesis in skin of human hand, nonhuman primate, and rat vascularized composite allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautz, Theresa; Zelger, Bettina G; Nasr, Isam W; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Barth, Rolf N; Rodriguez, Eduardo D; Brandacher, Gerald; Weissenbacher, Annemarie; Zelger, Bernhard; Cavadas, Pedro; Margreiter, Raimund; Lee, W P Andrew; Pratschke, Johann; Lakkis, Fadi G; Schneeberger, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms of skin rejection in vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) remain incompletely understood. The formation of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO) in hand transplantation has been recently described. We assess this phenomenon in experimental and clinical VCA rejection. Skin biopsies of human (n = 187), nonhuman primate (n = 11), and rat (n = 15) VCAs were analyzed for presence of TLO. A comprehensive immunohistochemical assessment (characterization of the cell infiltrate, expression of adhesion molecules) including staining for peripheral node addressin (PNAd) was performed and correlated with rejection and time post-transplantation. TLO were identified in human, nonhuman primate, and rat skin samples. Expression of PNAd was increased in the endothelium of vessels upon rejection in human skin (P = 0.003) and correlated with B- and T-lymphocyte numbers and LFA-1 expression. PNAd expression was observed at all time-points after transplantation and increased significantly after year 5. In nonhuman primate skin, PNAd expression was found during inflammatory conditions early and late after transplantation. In rat skin, PNAd expression was strongly associated with acute rejection and time post-transplantation. Lymphoid neogenesis and TLO formation can be uniformly found in experimental and human VCA. PNAd expression in vascular endothelium correlates with skin rejection and T- and B-cell infiltration.

  11. Multifactorial Experimental Design to Optimize the Anti-Inflammatory and Proangiogenic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kaitlin C; Whitehead, Jacklyn; Falahee, Patrick C; Zhou, Dejie; Simon, Scott I; Leach, J Kent

    2017-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell therapies promote wound healing by manipulating the local environment to enhance the function of host cells. Aggregation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into three-dimensional spheroids increases cell survival and augments their anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic potential, yet there is no consensus on the preferred conditions for maximizing spheroid function in this application. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for forming MSC spheroids that simultaneously enhance their anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic nature. We applied a design of experiments (DOE) approach to determine the interaction between three input variables (number of cells per spheroid, oxygen tension, and inflammatory stimulus) on MSC spheroids by quantifying secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), two potent molecules in the MSC secretome. DOE results revealed that MSC spheroids formed with 40,000 cells per spheroid in 1% oxygen with an inflammatory stimulus (Spheroid 1) would exhibit enhanced PGE2 and VEGF production versus those formed with 10,000 cells per spheroid in 21% oxygen with no inflammatory stimulus (Spheroid 2). Compared to Spheroid 2, Spheroid 1 produced fivefold more PGE2 and fourfold more VEGF, providing the opportunity to simultaneously upregulate the secretion of these factors from the same spheroid. The spheroids induced macrophage polarization, sprout formation with endothelial cells, and keratinocyte migration in a human skin equivalent model-demonstrating efficacy on three key cell types that are dysfunctional in chronic non-healing wounds. We conclude that DOE-based analysis effectively identifies optimal culture conditions to enhance the anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic potential of MSC spheroids. Stem Cells 2017;35:1493-1504. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  12. Hepatic nodular lymphoid lesion with increased IgG4-positive plasma cells associated with primary biliary cirrhosis: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jessica; Carbonell, Nicolas; Scatton, Olivier; Marzac, Christophe; Ganne-Carrie, Nathalie; Wendum, Dominique

    2015-11-01

    The nodular lymphoid lesion of the liver known as reactive lymphoid hyperplasia or pseudolymphoma is rare and its pathogenesis is unknown. We report two cases of nodular lymphoid lesions of the liver with numerous IgG4-positive plasma cells in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Histologically, in both cases, the lesion showed a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with lymphoid follicles and granulomas. Fibrous tissue was scarce and without a storiform pattern. Obliterative phlebitis was not identified. The IgG4+ plasma cell counts were 82 and 76 per high power field, with an IgG4/IgG ratio of 75 and 64 %, respectively, which qualifies the lesions according to the diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease as « probable histological feature of IgG4-related disease ». There were no rearrangements of immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes and plasma cells had a polytypic pattern of kappa and lambda light-chain expression. The non-tumor liver showed primary biliary cirrhosis with destructive cholangitis without IgG4 plasma cells. In both cases, IgG4-related disease was not found in other organs neither at the time of diagnosis nor 3 years later. Serum IgG4 levels normalized after local ablation of the lesions. It seems unlikely that these lesions are a manifestation of IgG4-related disease. However, because the pathogenesis of both nodular lymphoid lesions and IgG4-related disease remains unclear, further studies are needed to elucidate a potential link between nodular lymphoid lesions of the liver and an increased number of IgG4 plasma cells. More definite conclusions will be possible when the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease has been clarified.

  13. Regulation of intestinal health and disease by innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2014-09-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently appreciated immune cell population that is constitutively found in the healthy mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract and associated lymphoid tissues. Translational studies have revealed that alterations in ILC populations are associated with GI disease in patients, such as inflammatory bowel disease, HIV infection and colon cancer, suggesting a potential role for ILCs in either maintaining intestinal health or promoting intestinal disease. Mouse models identified that ILCs have context-dependent protective and pathologic functions either during the steady state, or following infection, inflammation or tissue damage. This review will discuss the associations of altered intestinal ILCs with human GI diseases, and the functional consequences of targeting ILCs in mouse models. Collectively, our current understanding of ILCs suggests that the development of novel therapeutic strategies to modulate ILC responses will be of significant clinical value to prevent or treat human GI diseases.

  14. [TINU syndrome and lymphoid interstitial alveolitis: a new observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khammassi, Naziha; Mohsen, Dorsaf; Ounissi, Mondher; Tougourti, Mohamed Nejib; Hamza, Mohsen

    2011-02-01

    TINU syndrome is a rare entity known Dobrin disease, combining uveitis mostly bilateral and recurrent with acute tubulo interstitial nephritis (AIN) occurring in young adults. The etiology and pathogenesis of this syndrome remain unknown. To report a new case of TINU syndrome and to discuss its etiopathogenesis. This 33 year old women is hospitalized for exploration of acute renal failure, in a context of deterioration of general condition, associated with a unilateral anterior uveitis. The bronchoalveolar lavage showed lymphoid interstitial alveolitis with CD4 and the renal biopsy found lesions characteristic of AIN. Evolution under corticoïd treatment was favorable. Lymphoid interstitial alveolitis associated with TINU syndrome has been reported only twice before. The discovery of a TINU syndrome must practice bronchoalveolar lavage in search of sub clinical pulmonary involvement.

  15. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with lymphoid irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strober, S.; Kotzin, B.L.; Hoppe, R.T.; Slavin, S.; Gottlieb, M.; Calin, A.; Fuks, Z.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    Subdiaphragmatic lymphoid radiation was used as an alternative to cytotoxic drug therapy to treat six patients with progressive erosive rheumatoid arthritis. All were previously unresponsive to conventional therapy. Radiation (4,000 rad) was given to subdiaphragmatic lymphoid tissues in fractionated doses of 150 to 250 rad each. Three of the six patients demonstrated long-lasting clinical improvement with a decrease in synovitis and morning stiffness and an increase in joint function. All six patients showed a profound depression in the peripheral blood lymphocyte count which persisted for at least six months. The irradiation was well tolerated; there have been no serious complications due to radiotherapy with follow-up ranging from 13 to 36 months. The substantial efficacy in some patients and the lack of severe toxicity in all suggests that radiotherapy deserves further study as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Total lymphoid irradiation in refractory systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Gross, D.J.; Braverman, A.; Weshler, Z.; Fuks, Z.; Slavin, S.; Eliakim, M.

    1986-07-01

    In two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, conventional therapy was considered to have failed because of persistent disease activity and unacceptable side effects. Both were treated with total lymphoid irradiation without clinical benefit, despite adequate immunosuppression as documented by markedly reduced numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte-dependent proliferative responses in vitro. The first patient developed herpes zoster, gram-negative septicemia, neurologic symptoms, and deterioration of lupus nephritis. The second patient developed massive bronchopneumonia, necrotic cutaneous lesions, and progressive nephritis and died 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. These observations, although limited to two patients, indicate that total lymphoid irradiation in patients with severe systemic lupus erythematosus should be regarded as strictly experimental.

  17. Optimization of Albumin Secretion and Metabolic Activity of Cytochrome P450 1A1 of Human Hepatoblastoma HepG2 Cells in Multicellular Spheroids by Controlling Spheroid Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tomoko; Tanaka, Yutaro; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ogino, Yuka; Kusamori, Kosuke; Mizuno, Narumi; Mizukami, Yuya; Shimizu, Kazunori; Konishi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are useful as three-dimensional cell culture systems and for cell-based therapies. Their successful application requires an understanding of the consequences of spheroid size for cellular functions. In the present study, we prepared multicellular spheroids of different sizes using the human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells, as hepatocytes are frequently used for in vitro drug screening and cell-based therapy. Precise polydimethylsiloxane-based microwells with widths of 360, 450, 560, and 770 µm were fabricated using a micromolding technique. Incubation of HepG2 cells in cell culture plates containing the microwells resulted in the formation of HepG2 spheroids with average diameters of 195, 320, 493, and 548 µm. The cell number per spheroid positively correlated with its diameter, and the viability of HepG2 cells was 94% or above for all samples. The smallest HepG2 spheroids showed the highest albumin secretion. On the other hand, the metabolic activity of 7-ethoxyresorufin, a fluorometric substrate for CYP1A1, increased with increasing spheroid size. These results indicate that controlling spheroid size is important when preparing HepG2 spheroids and that the size of HepG2 spheroids greatly influences the cellular function of HepG2 cells in the spheroids.

  18. UVES Abundances of Stars in Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Venn, Kim; Shetrone, Matt; Primas, Francesca; Hill, Vanessa; Kaufer, Andreas; Szeifert, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a galaxy in possession of a good quantity of gas must want to form stars. It is the details of how and why that baffle us all. The simplest theories either would have this process a carefully self-regulated affair, or one that goes completely out of control and is capable of wrecking the galaxy which hosts it. Of course the majority of galaxies seem to amble along somewhere between these two extremes, and the mean properties tend to favour a quiescent self-regulated evolutionary scenario. But there area variety of observations which require us to invoke transitory ‘bursts’ of star-formation at one time or another in most galaxy types. Several nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies have clearly determined star-formation histories with apparent periods of zero star formation followed by periods of fairly active star formation. If we are able to understand what separated these bursts we would understand several important phenomena in galaxy evolution. Were these galaxies able to clear out their gas reservoir in a burst of star formation? How did this gas return? or did it? Have these galaxies receieved gas from the IGM instead? Could stars from these types of galaxy contribute significantly to the halo population in our Galaxy? To answer these questions we need to combine accurate stellar photometry and Colour-Magnitude Diagram interpretation with detailed metal abundances to combine a star-formation rate versus time with a range of element abundances with time. Different elements trace different evolutionary process (e.g., relative contributions of type I and II supernovae). We often aren't even sure of the abundance spread in these galaxies. We have collected detailed high resolution UVES spectra of four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I & Carina) to begin to answer these questions. This is a precursor study to a more complete study with FLAMES. We presented at this meeting the initial results for

  19. Fully Automated One-Step Production of Functional 3D Tumor Spheroids for High-Content Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjaret, François; Fernandes, Mathieu; Duchemin-Pelletier, Eve; Argento, Amelie; Degot, Sébastien; Young, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of spheroids within high-content screening (HCS) has lagged behind high-throughput screening (HTS) due to issues with running complex assays on large three-dimensional (3D) structures.To enable multiplexed imaging and analysis of spheroids, different cancer cell lines were grown in 3D on micropatterned 96-well plates with automated production of nine uniform spheroids per well. Spheroids achieve diameters of up to 600 µm, and reproducibility was experimentally validated (interwell and interplate CV(diameter) integration of micropatterned spheroid models within fundamental research and drug discovery applications.

  20. Lymphoid proliferations in the orbit: malignant or benign?

    OpenAIRE

    van der Gaag, R.; Koornneef, L.; Heerde, P. van; Vroom, T M; Pegels, J H; Feltkamp, C.A.; Peeters, H J; Gillissen, J P; Bleeker, G M; Feltkamp, T E

    1984-01-01

    Clinical, pathological, and immunological analysis of 20 patients with ocular adnexal lymphoid disease has demonstrated several parameters which are useful for distinguishing malignant from benign lesions. Patients in the fourth or fifth decade of life presenting with an acute history of pain, oedema, epiphora, double vision, and ptosis, with a mass localised in the lacrimal gland area, are more likely to have a pseudolymphoma or a chronic inflammatory lesion than a true non-Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  1. Genomic Modifiers of Natural Killer Cells, Immune Responsiveness and Lymphoid Tissue Remodeling Together Increase Host Resistance to Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Alyssa Lundgren; Teoh, Jeffrey; Lee, Heather; Prince, Jessica; Stadnisky, Michael D; Anderson, Monique; Nash, William; Rival, Claudia; Wei, Hairong; Gamache, Awndre; Farber, Charles R; Tung, Kenneth; Brown, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The MHC class I D(k) molecule supplies vital host resistance during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells expressing the Ly49G2 inhibitory receptor, which specifically binds D(k), are required to control viral spread. The extent of D(k)-dependent host resistance, however, differs significantly amongst related strains of mice, C57L and MA/My. As a result, we predicted that relatively small-effect modifier genetic loci might together shape immune cell features, NK cell reactivity, and the host immune response to MCMV. A robust D(k)-dependent genetic effect, however, has so far hindered attempts to identify additional host resistance factors. Thus, we applied genomic mapping strategies and multicolor flow cytometric analysis of immune cells in naive and virus-infected hosts to identify genetic modifiers of the host immune response to MCMV. We discovered and validated many quantitative trait loci (QTL); these were mapped to at least 19 positions on 16 chromosomes. Intriguingly, one newly discovered non-MHC locus (Cmv5) controlled splenic NK cell accrual, secondary lymphoid organ structure, and lymphoid follicle development during MCMV infection. We infer that Cmv5 aids host resistance to MCMV infection by expanding NK cells needed to preserve and protect essential tissue structural elements, to enhance lymphoid remodeling and to increase viral clearance in spleen.

  2. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Aharon G; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34(+)CD45RA(+) hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of intractable lupus nephritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strober, S.; Field, E.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kotzin, B.L.; Shemesh, O.; Engleman, E.; Ross, J.C.; Myers, B.D.

    1985-04-01

    Ten patients with lupus nephritis and marked proteinuria (3.9 g or more/d) that did not respond adequately to treatment with prednisone alone or prednisone in combination with azathioprine were treated with total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled feasibility study. Within 6 weeks after the start of total lymphoid irradiation, the serum albumin level rose in all patients in association with a reduction in the serum level of anti-DNA antibodies, an increase in the serum complement level, or both. Improvement in these variables persisted in eight patients followed for more than 1 year, with the stabilization or reduction of the serum creatinine level. Urinary leakage of albumin was substantially reduced in all patients. Side effects associated with radiotherapy included transient constitutional complaints in ten patients, transient blood element depressions in three, localized viral and bacterial infections in four, and ovarian failure in one. The results suggest that total lymphoid irradiation may provide an alternative to cytotoxic drugs in the treatment of lupus nephritis.

  4. Approach to cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates: When to consider lymphoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Vincent Charli-Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates (CLIs are common in routine dermatopathology. However, differentiating a reactive CLI from a malignant lymphocytic infiltrate is often a significant challenge since many inflammatory dermatoses can clinically and/or histopathologically mimic cutaneous lymphomas, coined pseudolymphomas. We conducted a literature review from 1966 to July 1, 2015, at PubMed.gov using the search terms: Cutaneous lymphoma, cutaneous pseudolymphoma, cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, simulants/mimics/imitators of cutaneous lymphomas, and cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates. The diagnostic approach to CLIs and the most common differential imitators of lymphoma is discussed herein based on six predominant morphologic and immunophenotypic, histopathologic patterns: (1 Superficial dermal T-cell infiltrates (2 superficial and deep dermal perivascular and/or nodular natural killer/T-cell infiltrates (3 pan-dermal diffuse T-cell infiltrates (4 panniculitic T-cell infiltrates (5 small cell predominant B-cell infiltrates, and (6 large-cell predominant B-cell infiltrates. Since no single histopathological feature is sufficient to discern between a benign and a malignant CLI, the overall balance of clinical, histopathological, immunophenotypic, and molecular features should be considered carefully to establish a diagnosis. Despite advances in ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry and molecular clonality, these studies often display specificity and sensitivity limitations. Therefore, proper clinicopathological correlation still remains the gold standard for the precise diagnosis of CLIs.

  5. Approach to Cutaneous Lymphoid Infiltrates: When to Consider Lymphoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charli-Joseph, Yann Vincent; Gatica-Torres, Michelle; Pincus, Laura Beth

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates (CLIs) are common in routine dermatopathology. However, differentiating a reactive CLI from a malignant lymphocytic infiltrate is often a significant challenge since many inflammatory dermatoses can clinically and/or histopathologically mimic cutaneous lymphomas, coined pseudolymphomas. We conducted a literature review from 1966 to July 1, 2015, at PubMed.gov using the search terms: Cutaneous lymphoma, cutaneous pseudolymphoma, cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, simulants/mimics/imitators of cutaneous lymphomas, and cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates. The diagnostic approach to CLIs and the most common differential imitators of lymphoma is discussed herein based on six predominant morphologic and immunophenotypic, histopathologic patterns: (1) Superficial dermal T-cell infiltrates (2) superficial and deep dermal perivascular and/or nodular natural killer/T-cell infiltrates (3) pan-dermal diffuse T-cell infiltrates (4) panniculitic T-cell infiltrates (5) small cell predominant B-cell infiltrates, and (6) large-cell predominant B-cell infiltrates. Since no single histopathological feature is sufficient to discern between a benign and a malignant CLI, the overall balance of clinical, histopathological, immunophenotypic, and molecular features should be considered carefully to establish a diagnosis. Despite advances in ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry and molecular clonality, these studies often display specificity and sensitivity limitations. Therefore, proper clinicopathological correlation still remains the gold standard for the precise diagnosis of CLIs.

  6. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Aharon G.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34+CD45RA+ hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field. PMID:24661538

  7. Total lymphoid irradiation in the Wistar rat: technique and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenhout, J.; Kazem, I.; de Jong, J.

    1983-01-01

    The technical and dosimetric aspects of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) in the Wistar rat were evaluated as part of a set-up to develop a new model for tumor xenotransplantation. Information obtained from anatomical dissections, radionuclide imaging of the spleen, lymphography and chromolymphography was used to standardize the localization portals cut out in a lead plate. The two portals encompassed the lymphoid tissue above and below the diaphragm. A specially designed masonite phantom was used to measure the dose distribution in the simulated target volumes. Ionization chamber dosimetery, thermoluminescence dosimetry and film densitometry were used for measuring exposure and absorbed dose. Irradiation was performed with 250 kV X rays (HVL 3.1 mm Cu). The dose rate was regulated by adjusting the treatment distance. The dose inhomogeneity measured in the target volumes varied between 80-100%. The side scatter dose to non target tissues under the shielded area between the two portals ranged between 20-30%. The technique and dosimetry of total lymphoid irradiation in Wistar rats are now standardized and validated and pave the way for tumor xenotransplantation experiments.

  8. Identification of Lgr5-Independent Spheroid-Generating Progenitors of the Mouse Fetal Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana C. Mustata

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Immortal spheroids were generated from fetal mouse intestine using the culture system initially developed to culture organoids from adult intestinal epithelium. Spheroid proportion progressively decreases from fetal to postnatal period, with a corresponding increase in production of organoids. Like organoids, spheroids show Wnt-dependent indefinite self-renewing properties but display a poorly differentiated phenotype reminiscent of incompletely caudalized progenitors. The spheroid transcriptome is strikingly different from that of adult intestinal stem cells, with minimal overlap of Wnt target gene expression. The receptor LGR4, but not LGR5, is essential for their growth. Trop2/Tacstd2 and Cnx43/Gja1, two markers highly enriched in spheroids, are expressed throughout the embryonic-day-14 intestinal epithelium. Comparison of in utero and neonatal lineage tracing using Cnx43-CreER and Lgr5-CreERT2 mice identified spheroid-generating cells as developmental progenitors involved in generation of the prenatal intestinal epithelium. Ex vivo, spheroid cells have the potential to differentiate into organoids, qualifying as a fetal type of intestinal stem cell.

  9. A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Shahzadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs are formed on the wetting layer (WL. However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere. In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

  10. Early formation of massive, compact, spheroidal galaxies with classical profiles by violent disc instability or mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Ceverino, Daniel; Tweed, Dylan; Primack, Joel

    2014-01-01

    We address the formation of massive stellar spheroids between redshifts $z=4$ and 1 using a suite of AMR hydro-cosmological simulations. The spheroids form as bulges, and the spheroid mass growth is partly driven by violent disc instability (VDI) and partly by mergers. A kinematic decomposition to disc and spheroid yields that the mass fraction in the spheroid is between 50% and 90% and is roughly constant in time, consistent with a cosmological steady state of VDI discs that are continuously fed from the cosmic web. The density profile of the spheroid is typically classical, with a Sersic index $n = 4.5\\pm 1$, independent of whether it grew by mergers or VDI. The disc is characterized by $n=1.5\\pm 0.5$, and the whole galaxy by $n=3\\pm 1$. The high-redshift spheroids are compact due to the dissipative inflow of gas and the high universal density. The stellar surface density within the effective radius of each galaxy as it evolves remains roughly constant in time after its first growth. For galaxies of a fixed...

  11. Evaluation of bioactivity of octacalcium phosphate using osteoblastic cell aggregates on a spheroid culture device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahisa Anada

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Much attention has been paid to three-dimensional cell culture systems in the field of regenerative medicine, since three-dimensional cellular aggregates, or spheroids, are thought to better mimic the in vivo microenvironments compared to conventional monolayer cultured cells. Synthetic calcium phosphate (CaP materials are widely used as bone substitute materials in orthopedic and dental surgeries. Here we have developed a technique for constructing a hybrid spheroid consisting of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and synthetic CaP materials using a spheroid culture device. We found that the device is able to generate uniform-sized CaP/cell hybrid spheroids rapidly and easily. The results showed that the extent of osteoblastic differentiation from MSCs was different when cells were grown on octacalcium phosphate (OCP, hydroxyapatite (HA, or β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP. OCP showed the greatest ability to increase the alkaline phosphatase activity of the spheroid cells. The results suggest that the spheroids with incorporated OCP may be an effective implantable hybrid consisting of scaffold material and cells for bone regeneration. It is also possible that this CaP–cell spheroid system may be used as an in vitro method for assessing the osteogenic induction ability of CaP materials.

  12. Isolation, identification, and spheroids formation of breast cancer stem cells, therapeutics implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maytham Abbas Abboodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are population of cells present in tumors, which can undergo self-renewal and differentiation. Three-dimensional (3D in vitro models mimic features of the in vivo environment and provide unique perspectives on the behavior of stem cells. Materials and Methods: In this study, MDA-MB 231 cells were grown in two-dimensional (2D monolayers and 3D spheroid formats and CSCs were isolated and grown as spheroids. The isolated CSCs were subjected to molecular studies for detection of CD44, CD24, MMP1, ABCG2, ALDH1, and GAPDH markers. Results: The monolayer of CSCs grown as spheroids showed better growth rate than the MDA-MB 231 cells, which shows the efficacy of 3D spheroid format of growing CSCs. CD44 show increased expression in spheroids compared to 2D culture of MDA-MB 231. ALDH1 a key marker of breast stem cells was highly expressed in BCSCs and MDA-MB 231 grown in 3D, while being absent in CSCs and MDA-MB 231 cells grown in 2D. Conclusions: The CSCs grown as spheroids showed better growth rate, which showed the efficacy of 3D spheroid format for CSCs culture. Since the association between BCSCs prevalence and clinical outcome and the evidence presented in this study support key roles of CSCs in breast cancer metastasis and drug resistance, it has been proposed that new therapies must target these cells.

  13. Electromagnetic scattering by spheroidal volumes of discrete random medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.

    2017-10-01

    We use the superposition T-matrix method to compare the far-field scattering matrices generated by spheroidal and spherical volumes of discrete random medium having the same volume and populated by identical spherical particles. Our results fully confirm the robustness of the previously identified coherent and diffuse scattering regimes and associated optical phenomena exhibited by spherical particulate volumes and support their explanation in terms of the interference phenomenon coupled with the order-of-scattering expansion of the far-field Foldy equations. We also show that increasing nonsphericity of particulate volumes causes discernible (albeit less pronounced) optical effects in forward and backscattering directions and explain them in terms of the same interference/multiple-scattering phenomenon.

  14. Spheroid degeneration of conjunctiva and cornea. Two years' follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, M

    1980-10-01

    Twenty-six subjects with spheroid degeneration were followed up after two years. The number of colourless conjunctival droplets was seen to have increased by on an average 46% (2 alpha = 0.05) and that of autofluorescent conjunctival droplets by 223% (2 alpha less than 0.01). Counting within the individual sites sites disclosed that some droplets will disappear (not less than 30 and 21% respectivelY), while recently formed will constitute at least 76 and 243%. The number of areas with band-shaped keratopathy was found to rise from 3 to 26 (P less than 0.001) out of 104 possibilities, (nasally and temporally of right and left eye). Vital staining (fluorescein, rose bengal, tetrazolium, alcian blue) showed the epithelium above the droplets to be intact, and the droplet-containing eyes were found not to be abnormally dry (break up time, tear production).

  15. The influence of binary stars on dwarf spheroidal galaxy kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, J C; Annan, J D

    1995-01-01

    We have completed a Monte-Carlo simulation to estimate the effect of binary star orbits on the measured velocity dispersion in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. This paper analyses previous attempts at this calculation, and explains the simulations which were performed with mass, period and ellipticity distributions similar to that measured for the solar neighbourhood. The conclusion is that with functions such as these, the contribution of binary stars to the velocity dispersion is small. The distributions are consistent with the percentage of binaries detected by observations, although this is quite dependent on the measuring errors and on the number of years over which measurements have been taken. For binaries to be making a significant contribution to the dispersion measured in dSph galaxies, the distributions of the orbital parameters would need to be very different from those of stars in the solar neighbourhood. In particular more smaller period orbits with higher mass secondaries would be required. The shape...

  16. Eigenvalue spectrum of the spheroidal harmonics: A uniform asymptotic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2015-06-01

    The spheroidal harmonics Slm (θ ; c) have attracted the attention of both physicists and mathematicians over the years. These special functions play a central role in the mathematical description of diverse physical phenomena, including black-hole perturbation theory and wave scattering by nonspherical objects. The asymptotic eigenvalues {Alm (c) } of these functions have been determined by many authors. However, it should be emphasized that all the previous asymptotic analyzes were restricted either to the regime m → ∞ with a fixed value of c, or to the complementary regime | c | → ∞ with a fixed value of m. A fuller understanding of the asymptotic behavior of the eigenvalue spectrum requires an analysis which is asymptotically uniform in both m and c. In this paper we analyze the asymptotic eigenvalue spectrum of these important functions in the double limit m → ∞ and | c | → ∞ with a fixed m / c ratio.

  17. Formation of microstructures in the spheroidal graphite cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Daloz, D.; Bruneseaux, F.; Lesoult, G.

    2012-01-01

    Pipeline systems for hydraulic networks are obtained via centrifugal casting of spheroidal graphite cast iron. The very high cooling rate that is achieved in the skin of the product can sometimes lead to carbide instead of graphite in cast iron. An experimental device has been built in the laboratory that allows reproducing the extreme thermal conditions encountered during formation of skin of centrifugally cast pipes. Liquid metal droplets fall on a cold substrate. Rapid directional solidification occurs. The temperature evolution of the lower surface of the droplet is recorded during the very first moment of the solidification (t cast state and the heat-treated state. They are compared to the centrifugally cast ones. A model of directional solidification of cast iron under a very large temperature gradient has been built. It allows explaining the transition from stable to metastable micro structure that was observed in the products and reproduced in the laboratory samples.

  18. Eigenvalue spectrum of the spheroidal harmonics: A uniform asymptotic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, Shahar

    2015-01-01

    The spheroidal harmonics $S_{lm}(\\theta;c)$ have attracted the attention of both physicists and mathematicians over the years. These special functions play a central role in the mathematical description of diverse physical phenomena, including black-hole perturbation theory and wave scattering by nonspherical objects. The asymptotic eigenvalues $\\{A_{lm}(c)\\}$ of these functions have been determined by many authors. However, it should be emphasized that all previous asymptotic analyzes were restricted either to the regime $m\\to\\infty$ with a fixed value of $c$, or to the complementary regime $|c|\\to\\infty$ with a fixed value of $m$. A fuller understanding of the asymptotic behavior of the eigenvalue spectrum requires an analysis which is asymptotically uniform in both $m$ and $c$. In this paper we analyze the asymptotic eigenvalue spectrum of these important functions in the double limit $m\\to\\infty$ and $|c|\\to\\infty$ with a fixed $m/c$ ratio.

  19. Landslides and Mass Shedding on Spinning Spheroidal Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Scheeres, D J

    2014-01-01

    Conditions for regolith landslides to occur on spinning, gravitating spheroidal asteroids and their aftermath are studied. These conditions are developed by application of classical granular mechanics stability analysis to the asteroid environment. As part of our study we determine how slopes evolve across the surface of these bodies as a function of spin rate, the dynamical fate of material that exceeds the angle of repose, and an analysis of how the shape of the body may be modified based on these results. We find specific characteristics for body surfaces and shapes when spun near the surface disruption limit and develop what their observable implications are. The small, oblate and rapidly spinning asteroids such as 1999 KW4 Alpha and 2008 EV5 exhibit some of these observable traits. The detailed mechanisms outlined here can also provide insight and constraints on the recently observed active asteroids such as P/2013 P5, and the creation of asteroidal meteor streams.

  20. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time.

  1. Motion of a rigid prolate spheroid in a sound wave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongkun; Hong, Lianjin

    2014-08-01

    The motions of a rigid and unconstrained prolate spheroid subjected to plane sound waves are computed using preliminary analytic derivation and numerical approach. The acoustically induced motions are found comprising torsional motion as well as translational motion in the case of acoustic oblique incidence and present great relevance to the sound wavelength, body geometry, and density. The relationship between the motions and acoustic particle velocity is obtained through finite element simulation in terms of sound wavelengths much longer than the overall size of the prolate spheroid. The results are relevant to the design of inertial acoustic particle velocity sensors based on prolate spheroids.

  2. Shape effects on dynamics of inertia-free spheroids in wall turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challabotla, Niranjan Reddy; Zhao, Lihao; Andersson, Helge I. [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-06-15

    The rotational motion of inertia-free spheroids has been studied in a numerically simulated turbulent channel flow. Although inertia-free spheroids were translated as tracers with the flow, neither the disk-like nor the rod-like particles adapted to the fluid rotation. The flattest disks preferentially aligned their symmetry axes normal to the wall, whereas the longest rods were parallel with the wall. The shape-dependence of the particle orientations carried over to the particle rotation such that the mean spin was reduced with increasing departure from sphericity. The streamwise spin fluctuations were enhanced due to asphericity, but substantially more for prolate than for oblate spheroids.

  3. Solution of Axisymmetric Potential Problem in Oblate Spheroid Using the Exodus Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Momoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of Exodus method for computing potential distribution within a conducting oblate spheroidal system. An explicit finite difference method for solving Laplace’s equation in oblate spheroidal coordinate systems for an axially symmetric geometry was developed. This was used to determine the transition probabilities for the Exodus method. A strategy was developed to overcome the singularity problems encountered in the oblate spheroid pole regions. The potential computation results obtained correlate with those obtained by exact solution and explicit finite difference methods.

  4. Leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary leukodystrophy (POLD): a single entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider, C; Van Gerpen, J A; DeArmond, S; Shuster, E A; Dickson, D W; Wszolek, Z K

    2009-06-02

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and familial pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) present as adult-onset dementia with motor impairment and epilepsy. They are regarded as distinct diseases. We review data from the literature that support their being a single entity. Apart from a slightly older age at onset, a more rapid course, and more prominent pyramidal tract involvement, familial POLD is clinically similar to HDLS. Moreover, the pathologic hallmarks of the two diseases, axonal spheroids in HDLS and pigmented macrophages in POLD, can be identified in both conditions. This supports HDLS and POLD being referred collectively as adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP).

  5. Classificação da Organização Mundial da Saúde para os tumores dos tecidos hematopoético e linfoide, 4ª edição, 2008: principais modificações introduzidas em relação à 3ª edição, 2001 World Health Organization classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues, 4th edition, 2008: major changes from the 3rd edition, 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Claudia Nogueira Zerbini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A Classificação da Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS para os tumores do tecido hematopoético e linfoide (4ª edição, 2008¹ representa uma atualização da 3ª edição, 2001². Apresentamos a seguir um resumo dessas alterações nos grupos das doenças mieloproliferativas, mileodisplásicas, leucemias mieloides agudas, neoplasias de células precursoras B e T, e neoplasias de células B, T e NK maduras. O entendimento das alterações genético-moleculares e os resultados alcançados com propostas terapêuticas inovadoras nesses grupos de doenças demandam constante reavaliação de sua classificação, justificando as alterações importantes aqui discutidas1,3-5.The World Health Organization (WHO Classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues (4th edition, 2008¹ presents an updated version of the 3rd edition published in 2001². A summary of these changes relates to the groups of chronic myeloproliferative disorders, myelodisplasia, acute myeloid leukemias, neoplasms of precursor B and T cells and neoplasms derived of mature B, T and NK cells. A better understanding of molecular genetic changes and results achieved with innovative therapeutic approaches in these groups of diseases requires constant reassessment of the classifications, supporting the major changes discussed here, including interesting comments from literature1, 3-5.

  6. Advanced chronic lymphoid leukemia with severe bronchopneumonia: an Autopsy Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Felipe Gomes Campos; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano; Hatanaka, Veruska Menegatti Anastacio; Siqueira, Sheila Aparecida Coelho

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a lymphoid neoplasia with the B immunophenotype, which corresponds to the leukemic form of lymphocytic lymphoma. This entity is characterized, in most cases, by immunosuppression due to impaired function of immune cells, hypogammaglobulinemia, bone marrow infiltration, and immune dysfunction due to the neoplasia and the chemotherapy, when prescribed. We describe the case of a 63-year-old woman with a previous diagnosis of advanced CLL, refractory to treatment, who presented respiratory failure at the emergency department and died soon after hospital admission. The autopsy examination showed a large retroperitoneal mass compressing large vessels and abdominal and pelvic organs; generalized lymphadenopathy; and liver, spleen, bone marrow, heart and kidney infiltration. A Gram-negative bacilli bronchopneumonia with diffuse alveolar damage was detected, which was likely to be the immediate cause of death. PMID:27284536

  7. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baek NH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available NamHuk Baek,1,* Ok Won Seo,1,* Jaehwa Lee,1 John Hulme,2 Seong Soo A An2 1Department of Research and Development, NanoEntek Inc., Seoul, 2Department of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell–cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145, testis (F9, embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3, muscle (C2C12, embryonic kidney (293T, neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549, cervical cancer (HeLa, HeLa contaminant (HEp2, pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3, embryonic cell (PA317, and osteosarcoma (U-2OS cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 µM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be

  8. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    CERN Document Server

    Mitri, F G

    2015-01-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (\\theta = \\pi) in the near-field and the backscattering form function in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam \\beta, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) due to the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigati...

  9. Green's function and image system for the Laplace operator in the prolate spheroidal geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Changfeng; Deng, Shaozhong

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper, electrostatic image theory is studied for Green's function for the Laplace operator in the case where the fundamental domain is either the exterior or the interior of a prolate spheroid. In either case, an image system is developed to consist of a point image inside the complement of the fundamental domain and an additional symmetric continuous surface image over a confocal prolate spheroid outside the fundamental domain, although the process of calculating such an image system is easier for the exterior than for the interior Green's function. The total charge of the surface image is zero and its centroid is at the origin of the prolate spheroid. In addition, if the source is on the focal axis outside the prolate spheroid, then the image system of the exterior Green's function consists of a point image on the focal axis and a line image on the line segment between the two focal points.

  10. Study of human prostate spheroids treated with zinc using X-ray microfluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Pereira, Gabriela R., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: gpereira@metalmat.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Carlos A.N., E-mail: cansantos.bio@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (DIPRO/INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Nasciutti, Luiz E., E-mail: nasciutt@ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (ICB/CCS/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Interacoes Celulares; Souza, Pedro A.V.R., E-mail: pedroaugustoreis@uol.com.br [Hospital Federal do Andarai (HFA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Urologia; Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Estatual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2013-07-01

    Spheroids cell culture is a useful technique for tissue engineering or regenerative medicine re-search, pharmacological and toxicological studies, and fundamental studies in cell biology. In this study, we investigated Zn distribution in cell spheroids in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (DU145) and analyzed the differences in the response to Zinc (0-150 μM) treatment. The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed non-uniform distribution of Zn in all the spheroids analyzed. The differential response to zinc of DU145 and BPH cell spheroids suggests that zinc may have an important role in prostate cancer and BPH diagnosis. (author)

  11. Patient-specific three-dimensional explant spheroids derived from human nasal airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, June Kehlet; Stevens, Elizabeth Munkebjerg; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional explant spheroid formation is an ex vivo technique previously used in studies of airway epithelial ion and water transport. Explanted cells and sheets of nasal epithelium form fully differentiated spheroids enclosing a partly fluid-filled lumen with the ciliated apical....... Nasal ciliary cells and sheets were removed on day 1 by nasal brush biopsy and analyzed with regard to ciliary beat pattern-and frequency using high-speed video imaging for standard reference values. Three-dimensional explant spheroid formation was initiated in the same individual on the same day...... was successful in 15 out of 18 (82%) sampled individuals. Thus, formation was successful in seven healthy controls and eight PCD patients, while unsuccessful in 3 with PCD due to infection. Median (range) number of days in culture before harvesting of spheroids was 4 (1-5) in healthy versus 2 (1-5) in PCD...

  12. Surface chemistry-mediated penetration and gold nanorod thermotherapy in multicellular tumor spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shubin; Ma, Xiaowei; Ma, Huili; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liu, Juan; Hou, Shuai; Meng, Jie; Wang, Paul C.; Wu, Xiaochun; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the penetration and thermotherapy efficiency of different surface coated gold nanorods (Au NRs) in multicellular tumor spheroids. The current data show that negatively charged Au NRs, other than positively charged Au NRs, can penetrate deep into the tumor spheroids and achieve a significant thermal therapeutic benefit.We investigated the penetration and thermotherapy efficiency of different surface coated gold nanorods (Au NRs) in multicellular tumor spheroids. The current data show that negatively charged Au NRs, other than positively charged Au NRs, can penetrate deep into the tumor spheroids and achieve a significant thermal therapeutic benefit. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods section. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31877f

  13. Inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in wider size range and aspect ratio range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Hong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-spherical particle sizing is very important in the aerosol science, and it can be determined by the light extinction measurement. This paper studies the effect of relationship of the size range and aspect ratio range on the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution by the dependent mode algorithm. The T matrix method and the geometric optics approximation method are used to calculate the extinction efficiency of the spheroids with different size range and aspect ratio range, and the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in these different ranges is conducted. Numerical simulation indicates that a fairly reasonable representation of the spheroid particle size distribution can be obtained when the size range and aspect ratio range are suitably chosen.

  14. Spheroids at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary are altered impact droplets of basaltic composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, A.; Hay, R.L.; Alvarez, W.; Asaro, F.; Michel, H.V.; Alvarez, L.W.; Smit, J.

    1983-11-01

    Sand-size spheroids of K-feldspar in the Cretaceous-Tertiary (C-T) boundary clay at Caravaca, southern Spain, were interpreted by Smit and Klaver as having solidified from a melt resulting from the impact of a large extraterrestrial body. Sand-size spheroids of K-feldspar, glauconite, and magnetite-quartz have been found in the C-T boundary clay in northern Italy, and spheroids of K-feldspar and pyrite were found in the boundary clay at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 465A, in the central Pacific. These spheroids have textures similar to those of rapidly crystallized feldspar and mafic silicates. They are interpreted as diagenetically altered microcrystalline spherules of basaltic composition produced by the impact of a large asteroid in an ocean basin at the end of the Cretaceous. They are analogous to the glassy microtektites produced by impacts on more siliceous target rocks. 21 references, 4 figures.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with spheroids (HDLS) and familial pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD), both of which cause very similar white matter damage and cognitive and movement problems. POLD was thought to be distinguished by the presence ...

  16. Spheroid culture as a tool for creating 3D complex tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennema, Eelco; Rivron, Nicolas; Rouwkema, Jeroen; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2013-02-01

    3D cell culture methods confer a high degree of clinical and biological relevance to in vitro models. This is specifically the case with the spheroid culture, where a small aggregate of cells grows free of foreign materials. In spheroid cultures, cells secrete the extracellular matrix (ECM) in which they reside, and they can interact with cells from their original microenvironment. The value of spheroid cultures is increasing quickly due to novel microfabricated platforms amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS) and advances in cell culture. Here, we review new possibilities that combine the strengths of spheroid culture with new microenvironment fabrication methods that allow for the creation of large numbers of highly reproducible, complex tissues.

  17. Photoinduced synthesis of single-digit micrometer-size spheroidal calcite composites in the presence of partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Takashi; Naka, Kensuke

    2015-06-01

    Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), which was based on the photodecarboxylation of ketoprofen (KP, 2-(3-benzoylphyenyl)propionic acid) under alkaline conditions of pH 8.4 and 10 was studied for preparation of CaCO3 composite particles in single-digit micrometer-sizes. In this method, a homogeneous solution comprising KP, calcium chloride, ammonia, and partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAPS, degree of saponification: 86.5-89.0 mol%) was used as a precursor solution and was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation for different time periods. After the UV irradiation for 50 min, calcite spheroids in single-digit micrometer-sizes were obtained as major products at pH 8.4. The obtained calcite spheroids contained organic components of about 10 wt%. The comparison of the characteristics of the CaCO3 obtained at pH 8.4 and 10 suggests that the nucleation and crystallization of both vaterite and calcite continuously took place in a moderated supersaturation owing to the CO2 hydration equilibrium as long as the photodecarboxylation of KP continued. Consequently, the aggregation-based crystal growth in the presence of PVAPS seemed to enable the formation of the spheroidal composites of calcite in single-digit micrometer-sizes.

  18. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Langan

    Full Text Available Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid and absolute size (118±32 μm allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid cultures in biomedical and

  19. Diffuse Nodular Lymphoid Hyperplasia of the Intestine Caused by Common Variable Immunodeficiency and Refractory Giardiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Hye; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Jieun; Yi, Kijong; Oh, Young-Ha; Kim, Yongsoo

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract is a rare disease characterized by numerous small polypoid nodules in the small intestine, large intestine, or both. It is associated with immunodeficiency and infection, such as Giardia lamblia and Helicobacter pylori. Although diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia associated with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and giardiasis is already known, a few studies have reported a regression of the lymphoid nodules after the eradication of infection. We herein describe a case of diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the intestine associated with CVID and refractory giardiasis that markedly improved after successfully treating giardiasis.

  20. Intracerebral expression of CXCL13 and BAFF is accompanied by formation of lymphoid follicle-like structures in the meninges of mice with relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliozzi, Roberta; Columba-Cabezas, Sandra; Serafini, Barbara; Aloisi, Francesca

    2004-03-01

    Given the abnormalities in B-cell activity occurring in the central nervous system (CNS) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), we have explored the possibility that CNS inflammation induced in mouse models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) triggers expression of molecules that control the development and functional organization of lymphoid follicles, the sites where B-cell responses are initiated. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we find that gene expression of CXCL13, a chemokine involved in B-cell recruitment into lymphoid follicles, and BAFF, a key regulator of B-cell survival, is markedly and persistently upregulated in the CNS of mice with relapsing-remitting and chronic-relapsing EAE. Using immunohistochemical techniques, we also show the presence of lymphoid follicle-like structures containing B cells and a reticulum of CXCL13+ and FDC-M1+ follicular dendritic cells within the meninges of several mice undergoing progressive relapsing EAE. These observations indicate that, under chronic inflammatory conditions, the less immunoprivileged meningeal compartment is the site where ectopic lymphoid follicles preferentially develop and where pathogenic B-cell responses could be sustained in autoimmune disorders of the CNS.

  1. The fusion of tissue spheroids attached to pre-stretched electrospun polyurethane scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vince Beachley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Effective cell invasion into thick electrospun biomimetic scaffolds is an unsolved problem. One possible strategy to biofabricate tissue constructs of desirable thickness and material properties without the need for cell invasion is to use thin (<2 µm porous electrospun meshes and self-assembling (capable of tissue fusion tissue spheroids as building blocks. Pre-stretched electrospun meshes remained taut in cell culture and were able to support tissue spheroids with minimal deformation. We hypothesize that elastic electrospun scaffolds could be used as temporal support templates for rapid self-assembly of cell spheroids into higher order tissue structures, such as engineered vascular tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate how the attachment of tissue spheroids to pre-stretched polyurethane scaffolds may interfere with the tissue fusion process. Tissue spheroids attached, spread, and fused after being placed on pre-stretched polyurethane electrospun matrices and formed tissue constructs. Efforts to eliminate hole defects with fibrogenic tissue growth factor-β resulted in the increased synthesis of collagen and periostin and a dramatic reduction in hole size and number. In control experiments, tissue spheroids fuse on a non-adhesive hydrogel and form continuous tissue constructs without holes. Our data demonstrate that tissue spheroids attached to thin stretched elastic electrospun scaffolds have an interrupted tissue fusion process. The resulting tissue-engineered construct phenotype is a direct outcome of the delicate balance of the competing physical forces operating during the tissue fusion process at the interface of the pre-stretched elastic scaffold and the attached tissue spheroids. We have shown that with appropriate treatments, this process can be modulated, and thus, a thin pre-stretched elastic polyurethane electrospun scaffold could serve as a supporting template for rapid biofabrication of thick tissue

  2. β-Catenin-regulated ALDH1A1 is a target in ovarian cancer spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condello, S; Morgan, C A; Nagdas, S; Cao, L; Turek, J; Hurley, T D; Matei, D

    2015-04-30

    Cancer cells form three-dimensional (3D) multicellular aggregates (or spheroids) under non-adherent culture conditions. In ovarian cancer (OC), spheroids serve as a vehicle for cancer cell dissemination in the peritoneal cavity, protecting cells from environmental stress-induced anoikis. To identify new targetable molecules in OC spheroids, we investigated gene expression profiles and networks upregulated in 3D vs traditional monolayer culture conditions. We identified ALDH1A1, a cancer stem cell marker as being overexpressed in OC spheroids and directly connected to key elements of the β-catenin pathway. β-Catenin function and ALDH1A1 expression were increased in OC spheroids vs monolayers and in successive spheroid generations, suggesting that 3D aggregates are enriched in cells with stem cell characteristics. β-Catenin knockdown decreased ALDH1A1 expression levels and β-catenin co-immunoprecipitated with the ALDH1A1 promoter, suggesting that ALDH1A1 is a direct β-catenin target. Both short interfering RNA-mediated β-catenin knockdown and A37 ((ethyl-2-((4-oxo-3-(3-(pryrrolidin-1-yl)propyl)-3,4-dihydrobenzo [4,5]thioeno [3,2-d]pyrimidin-2-yl)thio)acetate)), a novel ALDH1A1 small-molecule enzymatic inhibitor described here for the first time, disrupted OC spheroid formation and cell viability (Pmodel. These data strongly support the role of β-catenin-regulated ALDH1A1 in the maintenance of OC spheroids and propose new ALDH1A1 inhibitors targeting this cell population.

  3. Tumor-derived spheroids: Relevance to cancer stem cells and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sato, Ai; Yamawaki, Kaoru; Enomoto, Takayuki; Okamoto, Koji

    2017-03-01

    Recently, many types of in vitro 3-D culture systems have been developed to recapitulate the in vivo growth conditions of cancer. The cancer 3-D culture methods aim to preserve the biological characteristics of original tumors better than conventional 2-D monolayer cultures, and include tumor-derived organoids, tumor-derived spheroids, organotypic multicellular spheroids, and multicellular tumor spheroids. The 3-D culture methods differ in terms of cancer cell sources, protocols for cell handling, and the required time intervals. Tumor-derived spheroids are unique because they are purposed for the enrichment of cancer stem cells (CSCs) or cells with stem cell-related characteristics. These spheroids are grown as floating spheres and have been used as surrogate systems to evaluate the CSC-related characteristics of solid tumors in vitro. Because eradication of CSCs is likely to be of clinical importance due to their association with the malignant nature of cancer cells, such as tumorigenicity or chemoresistance, the investigation of tumor-derived spheroids may provide invaluable clues to fight against cancer. Spheroid cultures have been established from cancers including glioma, breast, colon, ovary, and prostate cancers, and their biological and biochemical characteristics have been investigated by many research groups. In addition to the investigation of CSCs, tumor-derived spheroids may prove to be instrumental for a high-throughput screening platform or for the cultivation of CSC-related tumor cells found in the circulation or body fluids. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. Radioresistance of human glioma spheroids and expression of HSP70, p53 and EGFr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedrigo Carlos A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation therapy is routinely prescribed for high-grade malignant gliomas. However, the efficacy of this therapeutic modality is often limited by the occurrence of radioresistance, reflected as a diminished susceptibility of the irradiated cells to undergo cell death. Thus, cells have evolved an elegant system in response to ionizing radiation induced DNA damage, where p53, Hsp70 and/or EGFr may play an important role in the process. In the present study, we investigated whether the content of p53, Hsp70 and EGFr are associated to glioblastoma (GBM cell radioresistance. Methods Spheroids from U-87MG and MO59J cell lines as well as spheroids derived from primary culture of tumor tissue of one GBM patient (UGBM1 were irradiated (5, 10 and 20 Gy, their relative radioresistance were established and the p53, Hsp70 and EGFr contents were immunohistochemically determined. Moreover, we investigated whether EGFr-phospho-Akt and EGFr-MEK-ERK pathways can induce GBM radioresistance using inhibitors of activation of ERK (PD098059 and Akt (wortmannin. Results At 5 Gy irradiation UGBM1 and U-87MG spheroids showed growth inhibition whereas the MO59J spheroid was relatively radioresistant. Overall, no significant changes in p53 and Hsp70 expression were found following 5 Gy irradiation treatment in all spheroids studied. The only difference observed in Hsp70 content was the periphery distribution in MO59J spheroids. However, 5 Gy treatment induced a significant increase on the EGFr levels in MO59J spheroids. Furthermore, treatment with inhibitors of activation of ERK (PD098059 and Akt (wortmannin leads to radiosensitization of MO59J spheroids. Conclusions These results indicate that the PI3K-Akt and MEK-ERK pathways triggered by EGFr confer GBM radioresistance.

  5. MicroRNA-125b expands hematopoietic stem cells and enriches for the lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, A G Lisa; Sahoo, Debashis; Adorno, Maddalena; Wang, Yulei; Weissman, Irving L; Park, Christopher Y

    2010-12-14

    MicroRNAs profoundly impact hematopoietic cells by regulating progenitor cell-fate decisions, as well as mature immune effector function. However to date, microRNAs that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function have been less well characterized. Here we show that microRNA-125b (miR-125b) is highly expressed in HSCs and its expression decreases in committed progenitors. Overexpression of miR-125b in mouse HSC enhances their function, demonstrated through serial transplantation of highly purified HSC, and enriches for the previously described Slamf1(lo)CD34(-) lymphoid-balanced and the Slamf1(neg)CD34(-) lymphoid-biased cell subsets within the multipotent HSC (CD34-KLS) fraction. Mature peripheral blood cells derived from the miR-125b-overexpressing HSC are skewed toward the lymphoid lineage. Consistent with this observation, miR-125b overexpression significantly increases the number of early B-progenitor cells within the spleen and induces the expansion and enrichment of the lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased HSC subset via an antiapoptotic mechanism, reducing the mRNA expression levels of two proapoptotic targets, Bmf and KLF13. The antiapoptotic effect of miR-125b is more pronounced in the lymphoid-biased HSC subset because of their intrinsic higher baseline levels of apoptosis. These effects of miR-125b are associated with the development of lymphoproliferative disease, marked by expansion of CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Taken together, these data reveal that miR-125b regulates HSC survival and can promote lymphoid-fate decisions at the level of the HSC by preferentially expanding lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased HSC.

  6. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Patients and methods Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. Results A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, pgastritis and lymphoid follicles were associated most commonly with H. pylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status. PMID:28860835

  7. Scalable spheroid model of human hepatocytes for hepatitis C infection and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Nugraha, Bramasta; Triyatni, Miriam; Hart, Stefan; Sankuratri, Suryanarayana; Yu, Hanry

    2014-07-07

    Developing effective new drugs against hepatitis C (HCV) virus has been challenging due to the lack of appropriate small animal and in vitro models recapitulating the entire life cycle of the virus. Current in vitro models fail to recapitulate the complexity of human liver physiology. Here we present a method to study HCV infection and replication on spheroid cultures of Huh 7.5 cells and primary human hepatocytes. Spheroid cultures are constructed using a galactosylated cellulosic sponge with homogeneous macroporosity, enabling the formation and maintenance of uniformly sized spheroids. This facilitates easy handling of the tissue-engineered constructs and overcomes limitations inherent of traditional spheroid cultures. Spheroids formed in the galactosylated cellulosic sponge show enhanced hepatic functions in Huh 7.5 cells and maintain liver-specific functions of primary human hepatocytes for 2 weeks in culture. Establishment of apical and basolateral polarity along with the expression and localization of all HCV specific entry proteins allow for a 9-fold increase in viral entry in spheroid cultures over conventional monolayer cultures. Huh 7.5 cells cultured in the galactosylated cellulosic sponge also support replication of the HCV clone, JFH (Japanese fulminant hepatitis)-1 at higher levels than in monolayer cultures. The advantages of our system in maintaining liver-specific functions and allowing HCV infection together with its ease of handling make it suitable for the study of HCV biology in basic research and pharmaceutical R&D.

  8. A microfluidic platform for chemoresistive testing of multicellular pleural cancer spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppen, Janine; Cortes-Dericks, Lourdes; Marconi, Emanuele; Karoubi, Golnaz; Schmid, Ralph A; Peng, Renwang; Marti, Thomas M; Guenat, Olivier T

    2014-03-21

    This study reports on a microfluidic platform on which single multicellular spheroids from malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), an aggressive tumor with poor prognosis, can be loaded, trapped and tested for chemotherapeutic drug response. A new method to detect the spheroid viability cultured on the microfluidic chip as a function of the drug concentration is presented. This approach is based on the evaluation of the caspase activity in the supernatant sampled from the chip and tested using a microplate reader. This simple and time-saving method does only require a minimum amount of manipulations and was established for very low numbers of cells. This feature is particularly important in view of personalised medicine applications for which the number of cells obtained from the patients is low. MPM spheroids were continuously perfused for 48 hours with cisplatin, one of the standard chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat MPM. The 50% growth inhibitory concentration of cisplatin in perfused MPM spheroids was found to be twice as high as in spheroids cultured under static conditions. This chemoresistance increase might be due to the continuous support of nutrients and oxygen to the perfused spheroids.

  9. Immunomodulation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Diomira; D'Arienzo, Rossana; Bergamo, Paolo; Maurano, Francesco; Rossi, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue is deputed both to protect from infectious diseases and to evoke immune tolerance. Efficient responses need mucosal adjuvants: starting from cholera toxin, new variants of cholera toxin were developed depleted of toxicity. In addition, lipid colloidal particles, bacterial DNA, and probiotics have been experimented. Tolerance is currently induced by means of the B subunit of cholera toxin, whereas new strategies encompass the use of probiotics, expansion of regulatory T cells and blocking of paracellular entry of antigens. Finally, we report different approaches developed for celiac disease, an immune-mediated disease whose triggering antigen is known.

  10. Possible relationship between mercury retention and resistance to lymphoid leukosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, V.L.; Bearse, G.E.; McClary, C.F.; Csonka, E.

    1969-01-01

    An attempt is made to investigate the retention of mercury by resistant and susceptible chicks from four separate selective breeding programs. Four to eight week old chicks, weighing approximately 300-700 g., were injected intramuscularly with 3.0 mg. mercury per kg body weight as mercuric chloride or as pheynlmercuric acetate. After 96 hours the chicks were killed and the livers and kidneys excised and analyzed for mercury. Results revealed that chicks resistant to lymphoid leukosis retained larger amounts of mercury from mercuric chloride or phenylmercuric acetate injections than susceptible chicks.

  11. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, S.D.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Hernandez, E.; Lavenhar, M.; Vidaver, R.; Dowling, P.C.

    1986-06-21

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI; 1980 cGy) or sham irradiation was given to 40 patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) in a prospective, randomised, double-blind study. During mean follow-up of 21 months, MS patients treated with TLI has less functional decline than sham-irradiated MS patients (p<0.01). A significant relation was noted between absolute blood lymphocyte counts in the first year after TLI and subsequent course, patients with higher lymphocyte counts generally having a worse prognosis (p<0.01). TLI was well tolerated and associated with only mild short-term, and to date, long-term side-effects.

  12. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States) Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States) PRESTO, JRDC, Institute of Phical and Chemical Research, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Miyai, K. (Univ. of California, San Diego, LA Jolla, CA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4[sup +] T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8[sup +] T cells did not. CD4[sup +] T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4[sup +] T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Supermassive black holes and their host spheroids I. Galaxy vivisection

    CERN Document Server

    Savorgnan, Giulia A D

    2015-01-01

    Several recent studies have performed galaxy decompositions to investigate correlations between the black hole mass and various properties of the host spheroid, but they have not converged on the same conclusions. This is because their models for the same galaxy were often significantly different and not consistent with each other in terms of fitted components. Using $3.6 \\rm ~\\mu m$ $Spitzer$ imagery, which is a superb tracer of the stellar mass (superior to the $K$-band), we have performed state-of-the-art multicomponent decompositions for 66 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. Our sample is the largest to date and, unlike previous studies, contains a large number (17) of spiral galaxies with low black hole masses. We paid careful attention to the image mosaicking, sky subtraction and masking of contaminating sources. After a scrupulous inspection of the galaxy photometry (through isophotal analysis and unsharp masking) and - for the first time - 2D kinematics, we were able to account for sph...

  14. Comptonization of cosmic microwave background photons in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Evans, N. Wyn; Colafrancesco, S.

    2006-05-01

    We present theoretical modelling of the electron distribution produced by annihilating neutralino dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). In particular, we follow up the idea of Colafrancesco and find that such electrons distort the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For an assumed neutralino mass of 10 GeV and beam size of 1 arcsec, the SZ temperature decrement is of the order of nano-Kelvin for dSph models with a soft core. By contrast, it is of the order of micro-Kelvin for the strongly cusped dSph models favoured by some cosmological simulations. Although this is out of reach of current instruments, it may well be detectable by future mm telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimetre Array. We also show that the upscattered CMB photons have energies within reach of upcoming X-ray observatories, but that the flux of such photons is too small to be detectable now. None the less, we conclude that searching for the dark matter induced SZ effect is a promising way of constraining the dark distribution in dSphs, especially if the particles are light.

  15. Comptonisation of Cosmic Microwave Background Photons in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Culverhouse, T L; Colafrancesco, S; Culverhouse, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    We present theoretical modelling of the electron distribution produced by annihilating neutralino dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). In particular, we follow up the idea of Colafrancesco (2004) and find that such electrons distort the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. For an assumed neutralino mass of 10 GeV and beam size of 1'', the SZ temperature decrement is of the order of nano-Kelvin for dSph models with a soft core. By contrast, it is of the order of micro-Kelvin for the strongly cusped dSph models favoured by some cosmological simulations. Although this is out of reach of current instruments, it may well be detectable by future mm telescopes, such as ALMA. We also show that the upscattered CMB photons have energies within reach of upcoming X-ray observatories, but that the flux of such photons is too small to be detectable soon. Nonetheless, we conclude that searching for the dark matter induced Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect is a promising way of constraining ...

  16. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Domcke, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass $m_f$. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable to form a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting configuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to $m_f$. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the dispersion velocity of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit of the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that $m_f \\simeq 200$ eV. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance...

  17. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domcke, Valerie; Urbano, Alfredo, E-mail: valerie.domcke@sissa.it, E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it [SISSA - International School for Advanced Studies, via Bonomea 256, Trieste, 34136 Italy (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass m{sub f}. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable of forming a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting con figuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to m{sub f}. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the velocity dispersion of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit to the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that m{sub f}≅ 200 eV. Furthermore, we show that in this setup larger galaxies correspond to the non-degenerate limit of the gas. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance and the bound on the free-streaming length constrains the inflation model in terms of inflaton mass, its branching ratio into DM and the reheating temperature.

  18. The effect of tides on the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Giuseppina; Nipoti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of the mass distribution and dark-matter (DM) content of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are usually derived under the assumption that the effect of the tidal field of the host galaxy is negligible over the radial extent probed by kinematic data-sets. We assess the implications of this assumption in the specific case of the Fornax dSph by means of N-body simulations of a satellite orbiting around the Milky Way. We consider observationally-motivated orbits and we tailor the initial distributions of the satellite's stars and DM to match, at the end of the simulations, the observed structure and kinematics of Fornax. In all our simulations the present-day observable properties of Fornax are not significantly influenced by tidal effects. The DM component is altered by the interaction with the Galactic field (up to 20% of the DM mass within 1.6 kpc is lost), but the structure and kinematics of the stellar component are only mildly affected even in the more eccentric orbit (more than 99% of the stellar ...

  19. The structure of Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    del Pino, Andrés; Hidalgo, Sebastian L; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We analyze in detail the spatial distribution and kinematic properties of two different stellar populations in Andromeda II (And II) dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We obtained their detailed surface density maps, together with their radial density profiles. The two populations differ not only in age and metallicity, but also in their spatial distribution and kinematics. Old stars ($\\gtrsim 11$ Gyr) follow a round distribution well fitted by truncated density profiles. These stars rotate around the projected optical major axis of the galaxy with line-of-sight velocities $v_{los}(r_h) = 16 \\pm 3$ km s$^{-1}$ and a velocity gradient of $2.06 \\pm 0.21$ km s$^{-1}$ arcmin$^{-1}$. Intermediate-age stars ($\\lesssim 9$ Gyr) concentrate in the centre of the galaxy and form an elongated structure extending along the projected optical major axis. This structure appears to rotate with a steeper velocity gradient, $2.24 \\pm 0.22$ km s$^{-1}$ arcmin$^{-1}$, and around the optical minor axis. The centres of rotation and kinetic p...

  20. The Evolution of Spheroidal Galaxies in Different Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Fritz, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the kinematic and chemical evolution of 203 distant spheroidal (elliptical and S0) galaxies at 0.2

  1. Unbiased constraints on ultralight axion mass from dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzáles-Morales, Alma X; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Ureña-López, Luis

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that the internal dynamics of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can be used to test whether or not ultralight axions with $m_a\\sim 10^{-22}\\text{eV}$ are a preferred dark matter candidate. However, comparisons to theoretical predictions tend to be inconclusive for the simple reason that while most cosmological models consider only dark matter, one observes only baryons. Here we use realistic kinematic mock data catalogs of Milky Way dSph's to show that the "mass-anisotropy degeneracy" in the Jeans equations leads to biased bounds on the axion mass in galaxies with unknown dark matter halo profiles. In galaxies with multiple chemodynamical components this bias can be partly removed by modelling the mass enclosed within each subpopulation. However, analysis of the mock data reveals that the least-biased constraints on the axion mass result from fitting the luminosity-averaged velocity dispersion of the individual chemodynamical components directly. Applying our analysis to two dSph's with ...

  2. Kinematic sub-populations in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ural, Ugur; Koch, Andreas; Gilmore, Gerard; Beers, Timothy C; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N Wyn; Grebel, Eva K; Vidrih, Simon; Zucker, Daniel B

    2008-01-01

    We present new spectroscopic data for twenty six stars in the recently-discovered Canes Venatici I (CVnI) dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We use these data to investigate the recent claim of the presence of two dynamically inconsistent stellar populations in this system (Ibata et al., 2006). We do not find evidence for kinematically distinct populations in our sample and we are able to obtain a mass estimate for CVnI that is consistent with all available data, including previously published data. We discuss possible differences between our sample and the earlier data set and study the general detectability of sub-populations in small kinematic samples. We conclude that in the absence of supporting observational evidence (for example, metallicity gradients), sub-populations in small kinematic samples (typically fewer than 100 stars) should be treated with extreme caution, as their detection depends on multiple parameters and rarely produces a signal at the 3sigma confidence level. It is therefore essential to determi...

  3. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Zhen; Jing, Y P

    2015-01-01

    Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW) dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH) has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH using a simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe) as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass M_x of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of M_x depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = t_sat . Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > t_sat , part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  4. The Dynamical and Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Revaz, Y; Sawala, T; Hill, V; Letarte, B; Irwin, M; Battaglia, G; Helmi, A; Shetrone, M D; Tolstoy, E; Venn, K A

    2009-01-01

    We present a large sample of fully self-consistent hydrodynamical Nbody/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. The initial total mass (gas + dark matter) of these galaxies is the main driver of their evolution. Star formation (SF) occurs in series of short bursts. In massive systems, the very short intervals between the SF peaks mimic a continuous star formation rate, while less massive systems exhibit well separated SF bursts, as identified observationally. The delay between the SF events is controlled by the gas cooling time dependence on galaxy mass. The observed global scaling relations, luminosity-mass and luminosity-metallicity, are reproduced with low scatter. We take advantage of the unprecedentedly large sample size and data homogeneity of the ESO Large Programme DART, and add to it a few independent studies, to constrain the s...

  5. Conventional flow curves of liquid cast iron put on spheroidization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Borowiecki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the investigation was to confirm the hypothesis that the conventional flow curves of liquid cast iron put on sferoidization determined from the rod fluidity test are comparable to flow curves of liquids in environmental temperature. Moreover has been identified, that conventional flow curves for this liquid cast iron are similar to generalized non- Newtonian liquids curves.For rods with the diameters 3-8 mm there are three various curves:1 – the flow curve of liquid cast iron put on spheroidization overheated about 80 K resemble a shape adequately to a curve of densified liquid with shearing. This phenomenon can be caused by high overcooled and creation of crystallization nuclei;2 – metal alloys overheated about 180 K resemble a shape adequately to Newtonian liquid;3 – metal alloys overheated about 210 K resemble a shape of curve adequately to dispersed liquid with shearing. This phenomenon probably depends on influence of gas which creates on boundary of metal-sand mould.

  6. Metals Removed by Outflows from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, Evan N; Finlator, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    The stars in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are significantly more metal-poor than would be expected from a closed box model of chemical evolution. Gas outflows likely carried away most of the metals produced by the dSphs. Based on previous Keck/DEIMOS observations and models, we calculate the mass in Mg, Si, Ca, and Fe expelled from each of eight dSphs. Essentially, these masses are the differences between the observed amount of metals present in the dSphs' stars today and the inferred amount of metals produced by supernovae. We conclude that the dSphs lost 96% to >99% of the metals their stars manufactured. We apply the observed mass function of Milky Way dSphs to the ejected mass function to determine that a single large dSph, like Fornax, lost more metals over 10 Gyr than all smaller dSphs combined. Therefore, small galaxies like dSphs are not significant contributors to the metal content of the intergalactic medium. Finally, we compare our ejected mass function to previo...

  7. The Dearth of Neutral Hydrogen in Galactic Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Spekkens, K; Mason, B S; Willman, B; Aguirre, J E

    2014-01-01

    We present new upper limits on the neutral hydrogen (HI) content within the stellar half-light ellipses of 15 Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), derived from pointed observations with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as Arecibo L-band Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey and Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) data. All of the limits Mlim are more stringent than previously reported values, and those from the GBT improve upon contraints in the literature by a median factor of 23. Normalizing by V-band luminosity Lv and dynamical mass Mdyn, we find Mlim/Lv ~ 10^{-3} Mo/Lo and Mlim/Mdyn ~ 5 x 10^{-5}, irrespective of location in the Galactic halo. Comparing these relative HI contents to those of the Local Group and nearby neighbor dwarfs compiled by McConnachie, we find that the Galactic dSphs are extremely gas-poor. Our HI upper limits therefore provide the clearest picture yet of the environmental dependence of the HI content in Local Volume dwarfs. If ram pressure stripping explains the dearth of HI in these ...

  8. On the R-Process Enrichment of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bramante, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations of Reticulum II have uncovered an overabundance of r-process elements, compared to similar ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UFDs). Because the metallicity and star formation history of Reticulum II appear consistent with all known UFDs, the high r-process abundance of Reticulum II suggests enrichment through a single, rare event, such as a double neutron star (NS) merger. However, we note that this scenario is extremely unlikely, as binary stellar evolution models require significant supernova natal kicks to produce NS-NS or NS-black hole mergers, and these kicks would efficiently remove compact binary systems from the weak gravitational potentials of UFDs. We examine alternative mechanisms for the production of r-process elements in UFDs, including a novel mechanism wherein NSs in regions of high dark matter density implode after accumulating a black-hole-forming mass of dark matter. We find that r-process proto-material ejection by tidal forces, when a single neutron star implodes ...

  9. X-RAY SOURCES IN THE DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY DRACO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonbas, E. [University of Adiyaman, Department of Physics, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I., E-mail: edasonbas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with L{sub X} > 3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup −1} in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  10. Pseudoislet of hybrid cellular spheroids from commercial cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Y H; Nam, B M; Kim, B Y; Nemeno, J G; Lee, S; Yeo, J E; Yang, W; Park, S H; Kim, Y S; Lee, J I

    2013-10-01

    Investigators conducting diabetes-related research have focused on islet transplantation as a radical therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Pancreatic islet isolation, an essential process, is a very demanding work because of the proteolytic enzymes, species, treatment time, and individual difference. Replacement of primary isolated pancreatic islets must be carried out continuously for various in vitro tests, making primary isolated islets a useful tool for cell transplantation research. Hence, we sought to develop pseudoislets from commercial pancreas-derived cell lines. In this study, we used RIN-5F and RIN-m cells, which secrete insulin, somatostatin, or glucagon. To manufacture hybrid cellular spheroids, the cells were cultured under hanging drop plate and nonadhesive plate methods. We observed that hybrid cellular pseudoislets exhibited an oval shape, with sizes ranging from 590 to 1200 μm. Their morphology was similar to naïve islets. Cell line pseudoislets secreted and expressed insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemistry analyses. Thus, the current artificially manufactured biomimetic pseudoislets resembled pancreatic islets of the endocrine system, appearing as cellular aggregates that secreted insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin. Enhanced immunoisolation techniques may lead to the development of new islet sources for pancreatic transplantation through this pseudoislet strategy.

  11. The early days of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Jablonka, P; Mashonkina, L; Hill, V; Revaz, Y; Shetrone, M; Starkenburg, E; Irwin, M; Tolstoy, E; Battaglia, G; Venn, K; Helmi, A; Primas, F; Francois, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the high resolution spectroscopic study of five -3.9<=[Fe/H]<=-2.5 stars in the Local Group dwarf spheroidal, Sculptor, thereby doubling the number of stars with comparable observations in this metallicity range. We carry out a detailed analysis of the chemical abundances of alpha, iron peak, light and heavy elements, and draw comparisons with the Milky Way halo and the ultra faint dwarf stellar populations. We show that the bulk of the Sculptor metal-poor stars follows the same trends in abundance ratios versus metallicity as the Milky Way stars. This suggests similar early conditions of star formation and a high degree of homogeneity of the interstellar medium. We find an outlier to this main regime, which seems to miss the products of the most massive of the TypeII supernovae. In addition to its value to help refining galaxy formation models, this star provides clues to the production of cobalt and zinc. Two of our sample stars have low odd-to-even barium isotope abundance ratios, suggesti...

  12. Jeans Analysis for Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies in Wave Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shu-Rong; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2016-01-01

    Observations suggest that dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies exhibit large constant-density cores in the centers, which can hardly be explained by dissipationless cold dark matter simulations. Wave dark matter (${\\psi {\\rm DM}}$), characterized by a single parameter, the dark matter particle mass $m_{\\psi}$, predicts a central soliton core in every galaxy arising from quantum pressure against gravity. Here we apply Jeans analysis to the kinematic data of eight classical dSphs so as to constrain $m_{\\psi}$, and obtain $m_{\\psi}=1.18_{-0.24}^{+0.28}\\times10^{-22}{\\,\\rm eV}$ and $m_{\\psi}=1.79_{-0.33}^{+0.35}\\times10^{-22}{\\,\\rm eV}~(2\\sigma)$ using the observational data sets of Walker et al. (2007) and Walker et al. (2009b), respectively. We show that the estimate of $m_{\\psi}$ is sensitive to the dSphs kinematic data sets and is robust to various models of stellar density profile. We also consider multiple stellar subpopulations in dSphs and find consistent results. This mass range of $m_{\\psi}$ is in good agre...

  13. Multiple stellar population in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy?

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, M; Pancino, E

    2001-01-01

    We present wide field (33 X 34 arcmin^2) multiband (BVI) CCD photometry (down to I <= 20.5) of the very low surface brightness dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Sextans. In the derived Color Magnitude Diagrams we have found evidences suggesting the presence of multiple stellar populations in this dSph. In particular we discovered: {\\it (i)} a Blue Horizontal Branch (HB) tail that appears to lie on a brighter sequence with respect to the prominent Red HB and the RR Lyrae stars, very similar to what found by Majewski et al. (1999) for the Sculptor dSph; {\\it (ii)} hints of a bimodal distribution in color of the RGB stars; {\\it (iii)} a double RGB-bump. All these features suggest that (at least) two components are present in the old stellar population of this galaxy: a main one with [Fe/H]~ -1.8 and a minor component around [Fe/H]<~ -2.3. The similarity with the Sculptor case may indicate that multiple star formation episodes are common also in the most nearby dSphs that ceased their star formation activity a...

  14. Spheroid model study comparing the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérard, Matthieu; Le Clerc, Justine; Watrin, Tanguy; Meary, Fleur; Pérez, Fabienne; Tricot-Doleux, Sylvie; Pellen-Mussi, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the biological effects of a new dentine substitute based on Ca₃SiO₅ (Biodentine™) for use in pulp-capping treatment, on pseudo-odontoblastic (MDPC-23) and pulp (Od-21) cells. The secondary objective was to evaluate the effects of Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on gene expression in cultured spheroids. We used the acid phosphatase assay to compare the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA. Cell differentiation was investigated by RT-qPCR. We investigated the expression of genes involved in odontogenic differentiation (Runx2), matrix secretion (Col1a1, Spp1) and mineralisation (Alp). ANOVA and PLSD tests were used for data analysis. MDPC-23 cells cultured in the presence of MTA had higher levels of viability than those cultured in the presence of Biodentine and control cells on day 7 (P = 0.0065 and P = 0.0126, respectively). For Od-21 cells, proliferation rates on day 7 were significantly lower in the presence of Biodentine or MTA than for control (P MTA than in those cultured in the presence of Biodentine and in control cells. Biodentine and MTA may modify the proliferation of pulp cell lines. Their effects may fluctuate over time, depending on the cell line considered. The observed similarity between Biodentine and MTA validates the indication for direct pulp-capping claimed by the manufacturers.

  15. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH usinga simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass Mx of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of Mx depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = tsat. Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > tsat, part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  16. Expression of HOX C homeobox genes in lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, H J; Stage, K M; Mathews, C H; Detmer, K; Scibienski, R; MacKenzie, M; Migliaccio, E; Boncinelli, E; Largman, C

    1993-08-01

    The class I homeobox genes located in four clusters in mammalian genomes (HOX A, HOX B, HOX C, and HOX D) appear to play a major role in fetal development. Previous surveys of homeobox gene expression in human leukemic cell lines have shown that certain HOX A genes are expressed only in myeloid cell lines, whereas HOX B gene expression is largely restricted to cells with erythroid potential. We now report a survey of the expression patterns of 9 homeobox genes from the HOX C locus in a panel of 24 human and 7 murine leukemic cell lines. The most striking observation is the lymphoid-specific pattern of expression of HOX C4, located at the 3' end of the locus. A major transcript of 1.9 kilobases is observed in both T-cell and B-cell lines. HOX C4 expression is also detected in normal human marrow and peripheral blood lymphocytes, but not in mature granulocytes or monocytes. HOX C8 is also expressed in human lymphoid cells but is expressed in other blood cell types as well. However, the HOX C8 transcript pattern is lineage specific. These data, in conjunction with earlier findings, suggest that homeobox gene expression influences lineage determination during hematopoiesis.

  17. Increased lymphoid tissue apoptosis in baboons with bacteremic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Philip A; Tinsley, Kevin; Minnich, Douglas J; Monterroso, Victor; Wagner, J; Lainée, Pierre; Lorré, Katrien; Swanson, Paul E; Hotchkiss, Richard; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2004-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms of immune cell apoptosis during sepsis remain unclear. Two young adult baboons (Papio sp.) received a lethal dose of live Escherichia coli and were sacrificed at either 16 (for animal welfare concerns) or 24 h post-septic shock. An additional baboon, which received no bacteria, served as a control. Necropsy was performed immediately with subsequent immunohistochemical staining of lymphoid tissue. Immunohistologic analysis of tissues from the septic baboons revealed marked systemic lymphocyte apoptosis occurring in all lymphoid tissues examined. Focally, pyknotic and karyorrhectic lymphocytes demonstrated activation of a mitochondrial-dependent cell death pathway (active caspase 9 and apoptosis-inducing factor). Other regions demonstrated apoptotic lymphocytes with activation of a death receptor-dependent cell pathway (Fas ligand). Thus, we have demonstrated for the first time in primates that overwhelming gram-negative bacteremia produces an early and profound lymphocyte death that occurs through multiple cell death pathways. Bacteremic shock in the baboon may be an appropriate model for studying experimental therapies aimed at blocking lymphocyte apoptosis because their response appears comparable to humans dying from sepsis.

  18. TH2, allergy and group 2 innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Limón, Paula; Kim, Lark Kyun; Palm, Noah W; Flavell, Richard A

    2013-06-01

    The initiation of type 2 immune responses by the epithelial cell-derived cytokines IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP has been an area of extensive research in the past decade. Such studies have led to the identification of a new innate lymphoid subset that produces the canonical type 2 cytokines IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13 in response to IL-25 and IL-33. These group 2 or type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2 cells) represent a critical source of type 2 cytokines in vivo and serve an important role in orchestrating the type 2 response to helminths and allergens. Further characterization of ILC2 cell biology will enhance the understanding of type 2 responses and may identify new treatments for asthma, allergies and parasitic infections. Interactions between ILC2 cells and the adaptive immune system, as well as examination of potential roles for ILC2 cells in the maintenance of homeostasis, promise to be particularly fruitful areas of future research.

  19. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, ppylori-positive group (ppylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status.

  20. [Immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells and regulation of their transcription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenko, A G; Urakov, D N; Luchina, N N; Deev, S M; Polianovskiĭ, O L

    1990-01-01

    The hybridoma genomes contain polyploid sets of immunoglobulin genes. We have shown, that the hybridoma PTF-02 genome contains three genes of heavy chains and two genes of light chains. The genes responsible for antibody synthesis were cloned and their structure were determined. Investigation of the kappa gene transcription and its fragments which contain regulatory sequences revealed a nuclear factor. The latter interacts with the octanucleotide localized at the promoter region of the kappa gene. The purified factor activates the transcription of the kappa gene in a heterologous cell-free system. Together with the tissue-specific factor there is also an universal factor interacting with the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interact with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interacting with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. As a result, there is a family of factors which interact with ATTTGCAT sequence. One major factor (m.w. 60 +/- 2 kDa) is an obligatory component for the initiation of immunoglobulin genes transcription.

  1. Sustained improvement of intractable rheumatoid arthritis after total lymphoid irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, E.H.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.L.; Tanay, A.S.; Calin, H.J.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was administered to 11 patients who had intractable rheumatoid arthritis that was unresponsive to conventional medical therapy, including aspirin, multiple nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, gold salts, and D-penicillamine. Total lymphoid irradiation was given as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs such as azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. After radiotherapy, 9 of the 11 patients showed a marked improvement in clinical disease activity as measured by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, joint swelling, and overall functional abilities. The mean improvement of disease activity in all patients ranged from 40-70 percent and has persisted throughout a 13-28 month followup period. This improvement permitted the mean daily steroid dose to be reduced by 54%. Complications included severe fatigue and other constitutional symptoms during radiotherapy, development of Felty's syndrome in 1 patient, and an exacerbation of rheumatoid lung disease in another. After therapy, all patients exhibited a profound T lymphocytopenia, and a reversal in their T suppressor/cytotoxic cell to helper cell ratio. The proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and allogeneic leukocytes (mixed leukocyte reaction) were markedly reduced, as was in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. Alterations in T cell numbers and function persisted during the entire followup period, except that the mixed leukocyte reaction showed a tendency to return to normal values.

  2. MicroRNAs in mouse models of lymphoid malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola A. O. Zanesi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs has revealed a new layer of gene expression regulation that affects many normal and pathologic biological systems. Among the malignancies affected by the dysregulation of miRNAs there are cancers of lymphoid origin, in which miRNAs are thought to have tumor suppressive or tumor promoting activities, depending on the nature of their specific targets. In the last 4-5 years, the experimental field that provided the deepest insights into the in vivo biology of miRNAs is that of mouse modeling in which transgenic and knockout animals mimic, respectively, over-expression or down-regulation of specific miRNAs involved in human leukemia/lymphoma. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of lymphoid malignancies based on the natural and engineered mouse models of three different miRNAs, miR-15a/16-1 cluster, miR-155, and miR-17-92 cluster.

  3. Occult pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma presenting as catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regunath, Hariharan; Shortridge, James; Raza, Shahzad; Nistala, Puja; Huffman, Brandon M; Wang, Michael X; Xiang, Dong

    2013-11-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (CAPS) is characterized by fulminant thrombosis of the arterial and venous beds of multiple organ systems over a relatively short period of time and with a high mortality rate. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma of the lung has never been reported as a causative or precipitating factor for CAPS in the CAPS registry database. The present study describes a rare case of pulmonary MALT lymphoma of the lung that presented as CAPS. A 19-year-old Hispanic female presented with shortness of breath and abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest and abdomen revealed multiple portal vein thromboses and bilateral pulmonary nodules. Within one week of presentation, the patient developed a straight sinus thrombosis and upper extremity deep vein thrombosis, which led to shortness of breath. A biopsy of the lung nodule revealed MALT lymphoma. The present case illustrates a rarely reported pulmonary MALT lymphoma presenting as CAPS in a young female. The patient was successfully treated with 90 mg/m(2) bendamustine on days one and two and rituximab 375 mg/m(2) on day one of each 28-day cycle. Complete remission of the lung nodules was observed following three cycles of treatment, as visualized by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. Fondaparinux was identified as a feasible anticoagulation drug of choice for this case. At seven months post-treatment, the patient continues to be stable with no further evidence of thrombosis and is currently undergoing rituximab maintenance therapy every six months for two years. A repeat lupus anticoagulant antibody assay turned and remained negative during the clinical follow-up period. A prompt diagnosis and early aggressive treatment is potentially curative and may dramatically decrease the mortality risk. Future studies should explore the role of rituximab in the management of CAPS-associated B-cell lymphoid malignancies.

  4. Experimental evaluation of the drag torque, drag force and Magnus force acting on a rotating prolate spheroid

    OpenAIRE

    Lukerchenko, N. (Nikolay); Keita, I. (Ibrahima); Kvurt, Y.; Miles, J.

    2010-01-01

    The drag torque, drag force and Magnus force acting on a spheroid rotating around its axis of symmetry and moving perpendicularly to this axis in initially quiescent water were studied using experimental data and numerical simulation. The prolate spheroid with ratio of the axes 4/3 was speeded up in special device, which ensured the required rotational and translational velocity in the given plane. A video system was used to record the spheroid motion in water. Using the video records the sph...

  5. Characterization of liver-specific structure and function during hepatocyte spheroid self-assembly: Implications for a bioartificial liver device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Julie Renee

    A hollow fiber bioreactor containing collagen-entrapped hepatocytes has been developed as a bioartificial liver device. For clinical application, further scale-up of the device is desirable. This may be achieved through the use of hepatocyte spheroids, which are compacted aggregates that exhibit prolonged viability, higher liver-specific function and a more tissue-like ultrastructure compared to hepatocytes cultured as monolayers. In order to gain a better understanding of structural changes in spheroids over the course of their self-assembly, confocal microscopy was used to optically section spheroids and monitor changes in situ. Channels within spheroids hypothesized to be bile canaliculi were first evaluated by monitoring the diffusion of a fluorescent tracer, FITC-dextran, into spheroids. Three-dimensional reconstruction of spheroids showed that a continuous network of channels was forming within spheroids. Functionality of these channels as bile canaliculi was demonstrated by monitoring secretion of a fluorescently tagged bile acid, FITC-glycocholate, by hepatocytes in spheroids. Secretion of FITC-glycocholate could be seen in both rat and porcine hepatocyte spheroids. To elucidate changes in metabolism occurring during spheroid self-assembly, metabolic flux analysis was applied to hepatocyte spinner cultures. Glucose, lactate, amino acid, albumin and urea concentration in culture medium were measured and used to estimate intracellular fluxes within hepatocytes. Metabolism before and after spheroid formation was compared. Overall, little difference was seen in metabolism before and after spheroid self-assembly. As the BAL approaches clinical trials, methods of bioreactor storage for shipping and inventory purposed need to be developed. Storage conditions were tested in various hepatocyte culture systems. A protocol for storing reactors for 24 hours without significant loss in function was developed. Further optimization will be necessary for storage for longer

  6. EMT/MET at the Crossroad of Stemness, Regeneration and Oncogenesis: The Ying-Yang Equilibrium Recapitulated in Cell Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Forte

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT is an essential trans-differentiation process, which plays a critical role in embryonic development, wound healing, tissue regeneration, organ fibrosis, and cancer progression. It is the fundamental mechanism by which epithelial cells lose many of their characteristics while acquiring features typical of mesenchymal cells, such as migratory capacity and invasiveness. Depending on the contest, EMT is complemented and balanced by the reverse process, the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET. In the saving economy of the living organisms, the same (Ying-Yang tool is integrated as a physiological strategy in embryonic development, as well as in the course of reparative or disease processes, prominently fibrosis, tumor invasion and metastasis. These mechanisms and their related signaling (e.g., TGF-β and BMPs have been effectively studied in vitro by tissue-derived cell spheroids models. These three-dimensional (3D cell culture systems, whose phenotype has been shown to be strongly dependent on TGF-β-regulated EMT/MET processes, present the advantage of recapitulating in vitro the hypoxic in vivo micro-environment of tissue stem cell niches and their formation. These spheroids, therefore, nicely reproduce the finely regulated Ying-Yang equilibrium, which, together with other mechanisms, can be determinant in cell fate decisions in many pathophysiological scenarios, such as differentiation, fibrosis, regeneration, and oncogenesis. In this review, current progress in the knowledge of signaling pathways affecting EMT/MET and stemness regulation will be outlined by comparing data obtained from cellular spheroids systems, as ex vivo niches of stem cells derived from normal and tumoral tissues. The mechanistic correspondence in vivo and the possible pharmacological perspective will be also explored, focusing especially on the TGF-β-related networks, as well as others, such as SNAI1, PTEN, and EGR1. This

  7. EMT/MET at the Crossroad of Stemness, Regeneration and Oncogenesis: The Ying-Yang Equilibrium Recapitulated in Cell Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Elvira; Chimenti, Isotta; Rosa, Paolo; Angelini, Francesco; Pagano, Francesca; Calogero, Antonella; Giacomello, Alessandro; Messina, Elisa

    2017-07-29

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential trans-differentiation process, which plays a critical role in embryonic development, wound healing, tissue regeneration, organ fibrosis, and cancer progression. It is the fundamental mechanism by which epithelial cells lose many of their characteristics while acquiring features typical of mesenchymal cells, such as migratory capacity and invasiveness. Depending on the contest, EMT is complemented and balanced by the reverse process, the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). In the saving economy of the living organisms, the same (Ying-Yang) tool is integrated as a physiological strategy in embryonic development, as well as in the course of reparative or disease processes, prominently fibrosis, tumor invasion and metastasis. These mechanisms and their related signaling (e.g., TGF-β and BMPs) have been effectively studied in vitro by tissue-derived cell spheroids models. These three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems, whose phenotype has been shown to be strongly dependent on TGF-β-regulated EMT/MET processes, present the advantage of recapitulating in vitro the hypoxic in vivo micro-environment of tissue stem cell niches and their formation. These spheroids, therefore, nicely reproduce the finely regulated Ying-Yang equilibrium, which, together with other mechanisms, can be determinant in cell fate decisions in many pathophysiological scenarios, such as differentiation, fibrosis, regeneration, and oncogenesis. In this review, current progress in the knowledge of signaling pathways affecting EMT/MET and stemness regulation will be outlined by comparing data obtained from cellular spheroids systems, as ex vivo niches of stem cells derived from normal and tumoral tissues. The mechanistic correspondence in vivo and the possible pharmacological perspective will be also explored, focusing especially on the TGF-β-related networks, as well as others, such as SNAI1, PTEN, and EGR1. This latter, in

  8. Immunohistochemical detection of prion protein in lymphoid tissues of sheep with natural scrapie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Schreuder, B.E.C.; Meloen, R.H.; Mooij-Harkes, G.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The scrapie-associated form of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) accumulates in the brain and lymphoid tissues of sheep with scrapie. In order to assess whether detecting PrP(Sc) in lymphoid tissue could he used as a diagnostic test for scrapie, we studied the localization and distribution of PrP(Sc) in v

  9. [Histopathological Study of the Relationship between Lymphoid Follicles and Different Endoscopic Types of Nodular Gastritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Takuo; Ishitake, Hisahito; Shimamoto, Fumio; Tamura, Tadamasa; Matsumura, Kazunori; Sumii, Masaharu; Nakai, Shirou

    2014-11-01

    Nodular gastritis is characterized histologically by hyperplasia and enlargement of lymphoid follicles in the lamina propria. With the objective of elucidating the relationship between different endoscopic types of nodular gastritis and lymphoid follicles, distributions of lymphoid follicles in the lamina propria were investigated in young gastric cancer patients with nodular gastritis. For the study, whole-mucosal step sectioning of each resected stomach was performed, the densities of lymphoid follicles of all specimens were measured microscopically, and the horizontal and depth distributions were calculated. For assessment in the horizontal direction, density distribution diagrams of lymphoid follicles were created. For assessment in the depth direction, the different endoscopic types of nodular gastritis were compared in the five different analysis sites. In the assessment of the horizontal distribution, no characteristic distribution tendencies were observed in either the granular type group or the scattered type group; however, it was found that areas with relatively high densities of lymphoid follicles generally coincided with the areas where nodular gastritis was observed endoscopically. These results suggested that hyperplasia and aggregation of lymphoid follicles in the lamina propria are involved at the sites where nodular gastritis is observed endoscopically. In the assessment of the depth distribution, lymphoid follicles tended to be more unevenly distributed in the upper lamina propria in the granular type group than in the scattered type at the three different analysis sites where nodular gastritis was observed endoscopically. These results suggested the possibility of a granular type characteristic.

  10. Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mature lymphoid malignancies after reduced-intensity conditioning regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Celso Arrais; Rocha, Vanderson; Dreger, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    We have reported encouraging results of unrelated cord blood transplantation for patients with lymphoid malignancies. Whether those outcomes are comparable to matched unrelated donor transplants remains to be defined. We studied 645 adult patients with mature lymphoid malignancies who received an...

  11. Chronic inflammatory disease, lymphoid tissue neogenesis and extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Bende; F. van Maldegem; C.J.M. van Noesel

    2009-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune or pathogen-induced immune reactions resulting in lymphoid neogenesis are associated with development of malignant lymphomas, mostly extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphomas (MZBCLs). In this review we address (i) chemokines and adhesion molecules involved in lymphoid neogenesis;

  12. Gata3 drives development of RORγt+ group 3 innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Serafini (Nicolas); R.G.J. Klein Wolterink (Roel); N. Satoh-Takayama (Naoko); W. Xu (Weiwei); C.A. Vosshenrich (Christian); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); J.P. di Santo (James)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractGroup 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) include IL-22-producing NKp46+ cells and IL-17A/IL-22-producing CD4+ lymphoid tissue inducerlike cells that express RORγt and are implicated in protective immunity at mucosal surfaces. Whereas the transcription factor Gata3 is essential for T cell and

  13. Cells involved in the immune response. XXIX Establishment of optimal conditions for the primary and secondary immune responses by rabbit lymphoid cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Behelak, Y

    1975-01-01

    Attempts were made to initiate the primary and secondary humoral immune responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in vitro as determined by the hemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) response, with cell suspensions prepared from a variety of lymphoid organs of the rabbit- thymus, bone marrow, spleen, appendix, sacculus rotundus, Peyer's patches, popliteal lymph node and circulating leukocytes. A number of different media and gaseous phases were utilized in order to establish the optimal conditions for the immune response in vitro. The induction of a secondary PFC response was consistently obtained with 'memory' spleen cells obtained from rabbits 3-6 months following intravenous immunization with SRBC but not with cells of any of the other lymphoid organs, and this response probably represents the activity of memory cells which reside in the rabbit spleen. A primary response was observed only with 'normal' spleen cells, and the medium which faciliated the response was different from that which facilitated the induction of the secondary response in vitro. It was also observed, using a medium in which normal spleen cells were incapable of generating PFC', that mixed cultures of normal spleen and normal appendix or bone marrow cells could give a marked PFC reponse in vitro. Whether the PFC response to SRBCs obtained with the lymphoid cells of normal, unimmunized rabbits represent a true primary response, a secondary response, or a response of a different nature as a consequence of continuous subthreshold immunization of the rabbit with enteric microorganisms which cross-react with the antigen, remains to be determined. However, out initial successes with cultures consisting of cells of at least two distinct lymphoid organs in cases where the cells of any one of these organs could not respond, suggest that interaction of at least two functionally distinct cells is required and that the repsonse observed in vitro is probably a primary immune response.

  14. Primary exploration of conditions for hypothermic preservation of rat hepatocyte spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-ling LIU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To optimize conditions for hypothermic preservation of rat hepatocyte spheroids without freezing in order to facilitate the application of biological artificial liver. Methods Rat hepatic cells were isolated by a two-step perfusion method, and hepatocyte spheroids formed after 48 hours of rocking culture in serum free medium (SFM. Spheroids were then maintained in rocking culture at 37℃ (control condition, or cold stored at 4℃ for 24 or 48 hours in four different cold storage solutions: SFM alone; SFM+1mmol/L deferoxamine (Def ; SFM+1μmol/L cyclosporin A (CsA; and SFM+1mmol/L Def+1μmol/L CsA. After culturing for another 4 or 5 days, survival rate, changes in ultrastructure, and the production of albumin and urea were observed. Results Cold-induced injury could be reduced significantly by the addition of the iron chelators Def and CsA. The function and structure of hepatocyte spheroids stored in SFM+Def+CsA or SFM+Def for 24 hours were similar to those in control conditions. But the function was significantly reduced after hypothermic preservation in SFM alone. After cold storage for 48 hours, the ultrastructure of hepatocyte spheroids obviously changed and the number of dead cells increased. The survival rate of hepatocyte spheroids stored in SFM+Def+CsA or SFM+Def was significantly higher than that stored in SFM or SFM+CsA(P0.05. Conclusions Hepatocyte spheroids tolerate 24 hours of cold storage with stable viability and function. Hypothermic preservation increases the availability of cell-based therapy for liver diseases. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.12.02

  15. Assembly of Hepatocyte Spheroids Using Magnetic 3D Cell Culture for CYP450 Inhibition/Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujan K. Desai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant need for in vitro methods to study drug-induced liver injury that are rapid, reproducible, and scalable for existing high-throughput systems. However, traditional monolayer and suspension cultures of hepatocytes are difficult to handle and risk the loss of phenotype. Generally, three-dimensional (3D cell culture platforms help recapitulate native liver tissue phenotype, but suffer from technical limitations for high-throughput screening, including scalability, speed, and handling. Here, we developed a novel assay for cytochrome P450 (CYP450 induction/inhibition using magnetic 3D cell culture that overcomes the limitations of other platforms by aggregating magnetized cells with magnetic forces. With this platform, spheroids can be rapidly assembled and easily handled, while replicating native liver function. We assembled spheroids of primary human hepatocytes in a 384-well format and maintained this culture over five days, including a 72 h induction period with known CYP450 inducers/inhibitors. CYP450 activity and viability in the spheroids were assessed and compared in parallel with monolayers. CYP450 activity was induced/inhibited in spheroids as expected, separate from any toxic response. Spheroids showed a significantly higher baseline level of CYP450 activity and induction over monolayers. Positive staining in spheroids for albumin and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2 indicates the preservation of hepatocyte function within spheroids. The study presents a proof-of-concept for the use of magnetic 3D cell culture for the assembly and handling of novel hepatic tissue models.

  16. Acoustic scattering of a Bessel vortex beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Partial-wave series representation of the acoustic scattering field of high-order Bessel vortex beams by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids using the modal matching method is developed. The method, which is applicable to slightly elongated objects at low-to-moderate frequencies, requires solving a system of linear equations which depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs), and satisfying the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface in the least-squares sense. This original semi-analytical approach developed for Bessel vortex beams is demonstrated for finite oblate and prolate spheroids, where the mathematical functions describing the spheroidal geometry are written in a form involving single angular (polar) integrals that are numerically computed. The transverse (θ = π / 2) and 3D scattering directivity patterns are evaluated in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid) not exceeding 3:1, the half-cone angle β and order m of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kr0. Periodic oscillations in the magnitude plots of the far-field scattering form function are observed, which result from the interference of the reflected waves with the circumferential (Franz') waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3D directivity patterns illustrate the far-field scattering from the spheroid, that vanishes in the forward (θ = 0) and backward (θ = π) directions. Particular applications in underwater acoustics and scattering, acoustic levitation and the detection of submerged elongated objects using Bessel vortex waves to name a few, would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  17. Orthogonality of Harmonic Potentials and Fields in Spheroidal Coordinates (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, F. J.

    2012-04-01

    Spherical harmonic scalar potentials are the independent solutions of the Laplace equation relevant in a spherical geometry; they are used widely in global geomagnetism and geodesy to represent the situation in the source-free region outside the Earth. It is well known that these harmonics are orthogonal over the sphere, as are the vector fields that are the gradients of the harmonics. If we have data (potential or field) over the sphere, this orthogonality enables us to use spherical harmonic analysis to determine separately the numerical coefficient relevant for each harmonic potential. But the Earth is better approximated by an oblate spheroid; and for sources near the surface it is more relevant to use a spheroidal coordinate system; in this case the appropriate solutions of the Laplace equation are now spheroidal harmonics. However these SPHEROIDAL harmonics are NOT orthogonal over the SPHEROID, and neither are the corresponding vector potential gradients. I show how this problem can be overcome by using an appropriate weighting factor that depends only on colatitude; the factor is different for potential and for field. By using the appropriate weighting factor it is then possible to do the spheroidal equivalent of spherical harmonic analysis, either for the scalar potential or the corresponding vector field. In the spherical case, because of the orthogonality it is possible to separate the total mean-square potential over the sphere into parts contributed by harmonics of different degrees, e.g. the 'degree variance' in geodesy. Similarly, in geomagnetism we have the 'power spectrum' that separates the total mean-square vector field into contributions from different degrees. But in the spheroidal case such a separation (of potential or field) is possible only if we use a WEIGHTED mean-square.

  18. Cytogenetic Damages from Iododeoxyuridine -induced Radiosensitivity with and without Methoxyamine in Human Glioblastoma Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Neshasteh-Riz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Iododeoxyuridine-induced Radiosensitivityi (IUdR is ahalogenated thymidine analogue recognized to be effective in vitro andin vivo radiosensitizer in human cancers. It is reported that Methoxyamine (MXpotentiates DNA damages in cancer cells with blocking the repair pathway ofIUdR damages. But studies, entirely, are restricted on monolayer culture cellsfrom human colon cancer cells. Spheroids are 3D form of cells that aggregateand grow together which resemble in vivo tumor models in several aspects andthe the results of such studies can be extended to tumor in vivo. The aim of thecurrent study was to evaluate DNA damages from IUdR and gamma rays withand without Methoxyamine in human Glioblastoma spheroids.Materials and Methods: The DNA induced damages in U87MG cell line werecompared using alkaline comet assay method. Experiments were performedwith two different sizes of spheroids (100μm and 300μm.Results: Evaluation of the effects of IUdR with and without MX pretreatmenton spheroids following ionizing radiation showed that MX increased the celldamages of IUdR with and without irradiation in both diameters spheroids. Thedamages were further increased in 100μm compared with 300μm diameter.Conclusion: Comparisons of tail moments in spheroids with 100 and 300μmdiameter showed that cell damages in larger spheroids, 300μm, are lesserthan smaller one, 100μm. This could be due to existence of G0 cells and cellswith longer cycle which IUdR was less incorporated into them. Thus, decreasein IUdR radiosensitization and base wxcision repair (BER, results in reductionof MX activities. Using agents for Inhibiting the activities of proteins whichare responsible for carrying the cells to G0 may be beneficial in solving suchproblems.

  19. Generation of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids with Microwell-Based Agarose Scaffolds for Drug Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gong

    Full Text Available Three dimensional multicellular aggregate, also referred to as cell spheroid or microtissue, is an indispensable tool for in vitro evaluating antitumor activity and drug efficacy. Compared with classical cellular monolayer, multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS offers a more rational platform to predict in vivo drug efficacy and toxicity. Nevertheless, traditional processing methods such as plastic dish culture with nonadhesive surfaces are regularly time-consuming, laborious and difficult to provide uniform-sized spheroids, thus causing poor reproducibility of experimental data and impeding high-throughput drug screening. In order to provide a robust and effective platform for in vitro drug evaluation, we present an agarose scaffold prepared with the template containing uniform-sized micro-wells in commercially available cell culture plates. The agarose scaffold allows for good adjustment of MCTS size and large-scale production of MCTS. Transparent agarose scaffold also allows for monitoring of spheroid formation under an optical microscopy. The formation of MCTS from MCF-7 cells was prepared using different-size-well templates and systematically investigated in terms of spheroid growth curve, circularity, and cell viability. The doxorubicin cytotoxicity against MCF-7 spheroid and MCF-7 monolayer cells was compared. The drug penetration behavior, cell cycle distribution, cell apoptosis, and gene expression were also evaluated in MCF-7 spheroid. The findings of this study indicate that, compared with cellular monolayer, MCTS provides a valuable platform for the assessment of therapeutic candidates in an in vivo-mimic microenvironment, and thus has great potential for use in drug discovery and tumor biology research.

  20. Dynamic Change of Polarity in Primary Cultured Spheroids of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma and Its Role in Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Hiroaki; Kondo, Jumpei; Sato, Yumi; Endo, Hiroko; Nakajima, Aya; Piulats, Jose M; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Itoh, Yu; Mizoguchi, Akira; Ohue, Masayuki; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells possess apical-basal polarity, which governs the exchange of nutrients and waste. Perturbation of cell polarity appears to be a general feature of cancers, although most colorectal cancers are differentiated adenocarcinomas, in which polarity is maintained to some extent. Little is known about the role of dysregulated polarity in cancer. The cancer tissue-originated spheroid method was applied to the preparation and culture of spheroids. Spheroids were cultured in suspension or in type I collagen gel. Polarity was assessed by IHC of apical markers and electron microscopy. Two types of polarity status in spheroids were observed: apical-in, with apical membrane located at cavities inside the spheroids in type I collagen gel; and apical-out, with apical membrane located at the outermost layer of spheroids in suspension. These polarities were highly interchangeable. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin attenuated the polarity switch. In patients, clusters of cancer cells that invaded vessels had both apical-in and apical-out morphologic features, whereas primary and metastatic tumors had apical-in features. In a mouse liver metastasis model, apical-out spheroids injected into the portal vein became apical-in spheroids in the liver within a few days. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin significantly decreased liver metastasis. Polarity switching was observed in spheroids and human cancer. The polarity switch was critical in an experimental liver metastasis model.

  1. Improvement of the Mechanical Properties of 1022 Carbon Steel Coil by Using the Taguchi Method to Optimize Spheroidized Annealing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cold forging is often applied in the fastener industry. Wires in coil form are used as semi-finished products for the production of billets. This process usually requires preliminarily drawing wire coil in order to reduce the diameter of products. The wire usually has to be annealed to improve its cold formability. The quality of spheroidizing annealed wire affects the forming quality of screws. In the fastener industry, most companies use a subcritical process for spheroidized annealing. Various parameters affect the spheroidized annealing quality of steel wire, such as the spheroidized annealing temperature, prolonged heating time, furnace cooling time and flow rate of nitrogen (protective atmosphere. The effects of the spheroidized annealing parameters affect the quality characteristics of steel wire, such as the tensile strength and hardness. A series of experimental tests on AISI 1022 low carbon steel wire are carried out and the Taguchi method is used to obtain optimum spheroidized annealing conditions to improve the mechanical properties of steel wires for cold forming. The results show that the spheroidized annealing temperature and prolonged heating time have the greatest effect on the mechanical properties of steel wires. A comparison between the results obtained using the optimum spheroidizing conditions and the measures using the original settings shows the new spheroidizing parameter settings effectively improve the performance measures over their value at the original settings. The results presented in this paper could be used as a reference for wire manufacturers.

  2. Improvement of the Mechanical Properties of 1022 Carbon Steel Coil by Using the Taguchi Method to Optimize Spheroidized Annealing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Cheng; Liu, Chang-Lun

    2016-08-12

    Cold forging is often applied in the fastener industry. Wires in coil form are used as semi-finished products for the production of billets. This process usually requires preliminarily drawing wire coil in order to reduce the diameter of products. The wire usually has to be annealed to improve its cold formability. The quality of spheroidizing annealed wire affects the forming quality of screws. In the fastener industry, most companies use a subcritical process for spheroidized annealing. Various parameters affect the spheroidized annealing quality of steel wire, such as the spheroidized annealing temperature, prolonged heating time, furnace cooling time and flow rate of nitrogen (protective atmosphere). The effects of the spheroidized annealing parameters affect the quality characteristics of steel wire, such as the tensile strength and hardness. A series of experimental tests on AISI 1022 low carbon steel wire are carried out and the Taguchi method is used to obtain optimum spheroidized annealing conditions to improve the mechanical properties of steel wires for cold forming. The results show that the spheroidized annealing temperature and prolonged heating time have the greatest effect on the mechanical properties of steel wires. A comparison between the results obtained using the optimum spheroidizing conditions and the measures using the original settings shows the new spheroidizing parameter settings effectively improve the performance measures over their value at the original settings. The results presented in this paper could be used as a reference for wire manufacturers.

  3. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  4. Reactive lymphoid hyperplasia of the liver mimicking hepatocellular carcinoma: incidental finding of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ang; Liu, Wendy; Qian, Hong-Gang; Leng, Jia-Hua; Hao, Chun-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Reactive lymphoid hyperplasia is a rare disease that forms a mass-like lesion and is characterized by the proliferation of non-neoplastic, polyclonal lymphocytes forming follicles. We recently encountered 2 cases of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia of liver, both of which were asymptomatic and mimicked hepatocellular carcinoma by various imaging modalities. Based on the clinical impression of hepatocellular carcinoma, surgical resections were performed. Microscopic findings revealed that both lesions consisted of an aggregation of lymphocytes consisting of predominantly B-cells, with multiple lymphoid follicles positive for CD10 and negative for bcl-2, consistent with the diagnosis of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia. Polyclonality of both lesions was further confirmed by B cell receptor gene rearrangement study. The incidence of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia in the liver is exceedingly rare, and it is difficult to differentiate such lesions from hepatic malignancies based upon clinical grounds. The clinicopathological findings and literature review of this report may be helpful to improve the clinical decision-making.

  5. Lymphoid papillary hyperplasia of the palatine tonsil: a Chinese case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Yu, Jingjing; Li, Changshui

    2013-01-01

    Lymphoid papillary hyperplasia is a rare abnormality of the tonsils with a predilection for affecting young Asian girls. Herein, we report a 31-year-old Chinese woman presented as right lateral recurrent tonsillar hypertrophy with odynophagia and dysphagia over the past 5 years, worsening over a period of for half a year. Clinically, this lesion was similar to papillomatosis or lymphoid polyposis. However, histopathologic study showed a distinctive form of lymphoid hyperplasia with considerable distinct finger-like projections composed of many phyllodes which contained remarkable follicular lymphoid hyperplasia. This is the only Chinese case of lymphoid papillary hyperplasia of the palatine tonsils that has been reported in the most recent English literature so far. The importance of recognizing this disorder rests in the fact that in spite of the clinical features suggestive of both a benign and a malignant tumor, however, the process is a benign tumor-like proliferation, probably non-neoplastic, could easily be cured by tonsillectomy.

  6. Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particles (SCPs) as Chronological Markers in Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornalley, D.; Rose, N.; Oppo, D.

    2016-12-01

    Spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) are a component of fly-ash, the particulate by-product of industrial high-temperature combustion of coal and fuel-oil that is released to the atmosphere with flue-gases. They are morphologically distinct and have no natural sources making them unambiguous markers of contamination from these anthropogenic sources. In naturally accumulating archives, SCPs may be used as a chronological tool as they provide a faithful record of industrial emissions and deposition. While the timing of the first presence of SCP in the 19th century, and the observed sub-surface peak are dependent on factors such as sediment accumulation rates and local industrial history, a rapid increase in SCP inputs in the mid-20thcentury appears to be a global signal corresponding to an acceleration in global electricity demand following the Second World War and the use of fuel-oil in electricity production at an industrial scale for the first time. While this approach has been widely used in lake sediments, it has not been applied to marine sediments, although there is great potential. Improved dating of 19th-20th century marine sediments has particular relevance for developing reconstructions of recent multi-decadal climate and ocean variability, and for studies that aim to place 20thcentury climate change within the context of the last millennium. Here, we present data from three sediment cores from the continental slope south of Iceland to demonstrate the temporal and spatial replicability of the SCP record in the marine environment and compare these data with cores taken from more contaminated areas off the coast of the eastern United States. The improved age model constraints provided by the analysis of SCPs has enabled a more accurate assessment of the timing of recent abrupt climate events recorded in these archives and has thus improved our understanding of likely causal climate mechanisms.

  7. THE DEARTH OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN GALACTIC DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spekkens, Kristine; Urbancic, Natasha [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K 7B4 (Canada); Mason, Brian S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Willman, Beth [Haverford College, 370 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); Aguirre, James E., E-mail: kristine.spekkens@rmc.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We present new upper limits on the neutral hydrogen (H I) content within the stellar half-light ellipses of 15 Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), derived from pointed observations with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as Arecibo L-band Fast ALFA survey and Galactic All-Sky Survey data. All of the limits M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim} are more stringent than previously reported values, and those from the GBT improve upon constraints in the literature by a median factor of 23. Normalizing by V-band luminosity L{sub V} and dynamical mass M {sub dyn}, we find M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim}/L{sub V}∼10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙}/L{sub ⊙} and M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim}/M{sub dyn}∼5×10{sup −5}, irrespective of location in the Galactic halo. Comparing these relative H I contents to those of the Local Group and nearby neighbor dwarfs compiled by McConnachie, we find that the Galactic dSphs are extremely gas-poor. Our H I upper limits therefore provide the clearest picture yet of the environmental dependence of the H I content in Local Volume dwarfs. If ram pressure stripping explains the dearth of H I in these systems, then orbits in a relatively massive Milky Way are favored for the outer halo dSph Leo I, while Leo II and Canes Venatici I have had a pericentric passage in the past. For Draco and Ursa Minor, the interstellar medium mass that should accumulate through stellar mass loss in between pericentric passages exceeds M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim} by a factor of ∼30. In Ursa Minor, this implies that either this material is not in the atomic phase, or that another mechanism clears the recycled gas on shorter timescales.

  8. Dating recent lake sediments using spheroidal carbonaceous particle (SCP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yanhong; WANG Sumin; XIA Weilan; LIU Jian

    2005-01-01

    Dating lake sediment using sedimentary event is the supplement and calibration to traditional dating by radionuclide such as 210Pb and 137Cs. Based on the change of spheroidal carbonaceous particle (SCP) concentration, the age sequence of lake sediments can be deduced. It is one of the dating methods using sedimentary event. SCP is formed from combustion of fossil fuel at high temperature up to 1750℃ and at a rate of heating of approaching 104 ℃/s. It can be dispersed to several hundred kilometers away from its source and deposited with precipitation or dryly deposited, and kept in sediments. Compared with Cs or Pb, there is no evidence for SCP that it decays in lake sediments and is un-removable once stored except by physical disturbance because it is mainly composed of element carbon. Handy method to extract, identify and calculate has been developed. Although fossil fuel has been used early in China, combustion at high temperature started later since emergence of electricity generation. The productivity of SCP is positively related with the generated thermal power, which is reflected as the SCP concentration in lake sediments increases with the increase of generated thermal power. Therefore, reliable sediment markers from the start of the SCP record and the remarkable variation can be used for dating purpose. In China, electricity industry started from the 1950s, and rapid increase of generated power took place since 1978. Based on these time markers, SCP time sequences of lake sediment cores LH and LL-4 from Longgan Lake, the middle reach of the Yangtze River, have been established, which is comparable with the results from 137Cs and 210Pb, and has eliminated the errors of dating using 137Cs and 210Pb.

  9. Molecular pathogenesis and histologic and clinical features of extranodal marginal zone lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper-Hommel, M.J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type (EMZL) is considered an antigen driven lymphoid malignancy associated with protracted antigenic stimulation by microbial pathogens, auto-antigens or other unknown stimuli, which trigger a sustained lymphoid proliferat

  10. Predicting the growth of glioblastoma multiforme spheroids using a multiphase porous media model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascheroni, Pietro; Stigliano, Cinzia; Carfagna, Melania; Boso, Daniela P; Preziosi, Luigi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Schrefler, Bernhard A

    2016-10-01

    Tumor spheroids constitute an effective in vitro tool to investigate the avascular stage of tumor growth. These three-dimensional cell aggregates reproduce the nutrient and proliferation gradients found in the early stages of cancer and can be grown with a strict control of their environmental conditions. In the last years, new experimental techniques have been developed to determine the effect of mechanical stress on the growth of tumor spheroids. These studies report a reduction in cell proliferation as a function of increasingly applied stress on the surface of the spheroids. This work presents a specialization for tumor spheroid growth of a previous more general multiphase model. The equations of the model are derived in the framework of porous media theory, and constitutive relations for the mass transfer terms and the stress are formulated on the basis of experimental observations. A set of experiments is performed, investigating the growth of U-87MG spheroids both freely growing in the culture medium and subjected to an external mechanical pressure induced by a Dextran solution. The growth curves of the model are compared to the experimental data, with good agreement for both the experimental settings. A new mathematical law regulating the inhibitory effect of mechanical compression on cancer cell proliferation is presented at the end of the paper. This new law is validated against experimental data and provides better results compared to other expressions in the literature.

  11. A system for determining the pharmacology of indirect radiation sensitizer drugs on multicellular spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, N.; Bicher, H.I.; Hetzel, F.W.; Brown, M.

    1981-01-01

    We have characterized some of the physiology of multicellular spheroids of different sizes grown from Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells. Among the parameters studied were oxygen tension distributions within the spheroid. This was achieved using ultramicroelectrodes with tip diameters of 1-5 mu and a perfusion system whereby environmental conditions such as flow, temperature, and chemical makeup of the milieu could be measured and controlled. Plateau pO/sup 2/ values of less than 10 mm Hg were consistently obtained from spheroids under various conditions. We were able to modify these distributions by use of indirect radiation sensitizer drugs such as mechlorethamine HCl (mustargen) at nontoxic doses. We have also made determinations of the inhibitory capacities of several other drugs on the respiration rate of constituent cells of multicellular spheroids in single-cell suspensions. We have concluded that there are indeed hypoxic cells in spheroids whose radioresistance may be modified by essentially nontoxic levels of indirect radiosensitizer drugs and that the system described shows great promise for screening agents which may modify radiation response.

  12. Cell invasion in the spheroid sprouting assay: a spatial organisation analysis adaptable to cell behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blacher

    Full Text Available The endothelial cell spheroid assay provides a suitable in vitro model to study (lymph angiogenesis and test pro- and anti-(lymph angiogenic factors or drugs. Usually, the extent of cell invasion, observed through optical microscopy, is measured. The present study proposes the spatial distribution of migrated cells as a new descriptor of the (lymph angiogenic response. The utility of this novel method rests with its capacity to locally characterise spheroid structure, allowing not only the investigation of single and collective cell invasion but also the evolution of the spheroid core itself. Moreover, the proposed method can be applied to 2D-projected spheroid images obtained by optical microscopy, as well as to 3D images acquired by confocal microscopy. To validate the proposed methodology, endothelial cell invasion was evaluated under different experimental conditions. The results were compared with widely used global parameters. The comparison shows that our method prevents local spheroid modifications from being overlooked and leading to the possible misinterpretation of results.

  13. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Farid G

    2015-10-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (θ = π) in the near field and the backscattering form function in the far field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) because of the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3-D directivity patterns illustrate the near- and far-field axisymmetric scattering. Investigations in underwater acoustics, particle levitation, scattering, and the detection of submerged elongated objects and other related applications utilizing Bessel waves would benefit from the results of the present study.

  14. High-throughput generation of spheroids using magnetic nanoparticles for three-dimensional cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Choi, Jong-Ho; Kim, Minsoo; Rhee, Won Jong; Son, Boram; Jung, Hyun-Kyo; Park, Tai Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Various attempts have been made to develop three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture methods because 3-D cells mimic the structures and functional properties of real tissue compared with those of monolayer cultures. Here, we report on a highly simple and efficient 3-D spheroid generation method based on a magnetic pin-array system to concentrate magnetic nanoparticle-incorporated cells in a focal direction. This system was comprised only of external magnets and magnetically induced iron pins to generate a concentrated magnetic field for attracting cells in a focused direction. 3-D spheroid generation was achieved simply by adding magnetic nanoparticle-incorporated cells into a well and covering the plate with a magnetic lid. Cell clustering occurred rapidly within 5 min and created more compact cells with time through the focused magnetic force. This system ensured not only reproducible and size-controlled generation of spheroids but also versatile types of spheroids such as random mixed, core-shell, and fused spheroids, providing a very useful tool for various biological applications.

  15. Exploring Drug Dosing Regimens In Vitro Using Real-Time 3D Spheroid Tumor Growth Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Titus, Steven A; Brimacombe, Kyle; Michael, Sam; Sittampalam, Gurusingham; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer cell proliferation assays for cancer drug discovery have made the implementation of large-scale screens feasible but only seem to reflect a simplified view that oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes are the genetic drivers of cancer cell proliferation. However, there is now increased evidence that the cellular and physiological context in which these oncogenic events occur play a key role in how they drive tumor growth in vivo and, therefore, in how tumors respond to drug treatments. In vitro 3D spheroid tumor models are being developed to better mimic the physiology of tumors in vivo, in an attempt to improve the predictability and efficiency of drug discovery for the treatment of cancer. Here we describe the establishment of a real-time 3D spheroid growth, 384-well screening assay. The cells used in this study constitutively expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled the real-time monitoring of spheroid formation and the effect of chemotherapeutic agents on spheroid size at different time points of sphere growth and drug treatment. This real-time 3D spheroid assay platform represents a first step toward the replication in vitro of drug dosing regimens being investigated in vivo. We hope that further development of this assay platform will allow the investigation of drug dosing regimens, efficacy, and resistance before preclinical and clinical studies.

  16. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R.G.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Santos, C.A.N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, A.; Souza, P.A.V.R.; Nasciutti, L.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Pereira, G.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaios Nao Destrutivos, Corrosao e Soldagem

    2013-08-15

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  17. Insights into the dynamics of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerpen, J A.; Wider, C; Broderick, D F.; Dickson, D W.; Brown, L A.; Wszolek, Z K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To report a new American family with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), including serial, presymptomatic and symptomatic, cranial MRIs from the proband. Methods: We report clinical and genealogic investigations of an HDLS family, sequential brain MRIs of the proband, and autopsy slides of brain tissue from the proband’s father. Results: We identified seven affected family members (five deceased). The mean age at symptomatic disease onset was 35 years (range: 20–57), and the mean disease duration was 16 years (range: 3–46). Five affected individuals initially manifested memory disturbance and behavioral changes, whereas two experienced a mood disorder as their presenting symptom. Our proband’s father had been diagnosed clinically with vascular dementia, but his brain autopsy was consistent with HDLS. The proband had a cranial MRI prior to symptom onset, with two subsequent MRIs performed during follow-up. These serial images reveal a progressive, confluent, frontal-predominant leukoencephalopathy with symmetric cortical atrophy. Conclusions: The proband of our newly identified hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) kindred had subtle evidence of an incipient leukoencephalopathy on a presymptomatic cranial MRI. Conceivably, MRI may facilitate identifying affected presymptomatic individuals within known HDLS kindreds, increasing the likelihood of isolating the causative genes. GLOSSARY DLS = diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids; FLAIR = fluid-attenuated inversion recovery; HDLS = hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids; LENAS = leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids; LFB = Luxol fast blue; NAL = neuroaxonal leukodystrophy; POLD = pigmentary type of orthochromatic leukodystrophy. PMID:18794495

  18. KINETICS OF B-CELL SUBPOPULATIONS IN PERIPHERAL LYMPHOID-TISSUES - EVIDENCE FOR THE PRESENCE OF PHENOTYPICALLY DISTINCT SHORT-LIVED AND LONG-LIVED B-CELL SUBSETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEENEN, GJ; KROESE, FGM

    1993-01-01

    A small proportion of the sIg+ B lymphocytes in peripheral lymphoid organs [22% in spleen and 6% in lymph node (LN)] in rat carries the Thy-1 antigen. These Thy-1 + B cells represent newly formed bone marrow (BM) derived (or immature) B cells. In this study we investigated the kinetic behavior of Th

  19. Peyer's patch innate lymphoid cells regulate commensal bacteria expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Kojima, Hidefumi; Kobayashi, Ayano; Kanno, Yumiko; Kobata, Tetsuji

    2015-05-01

    Anatomical containment of commensal bacteria in the intestinal mucosa is promoted by innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). However, the mechanism by which ILCs regulate bacterial localization to specific regions remains unknown. Here we show that Peyer's patch (PP) ILCs robustly produce IL-22 and IFN-γ in the absence of exogenous stimuli. Antibiotic treatment of mice decreased both IL-22+ and IFN-γ+ cells in PPs. Blockade of both IL-2 and IL-23 signaling in vitro lowered IL-22 and IFN-γ production. PP ILCs induced mRNA expression of the antibacterial proteins RegIIIβ and RegIIIγ in intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, in vivo depletion of ILCs rather than T cells altered bacterial composition and allowed bacterial proliferation in PPs. Collectively, our results show that ILCs regulate the expansion of commensal bacteria in PPs.

  20. T-cell-predominant lymphoid hyperplasia in a tattoo*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Erica Sales; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Batista, Everton da Silva; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Ferreira; Farre, Lourdes; Bittencourt, Achilea Lisboa

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia (CLH) can be idiopathic or secondary to external stimuli, and is considered rare in tattoos. The infiltrate can be predominantly of B or T-cells, the latter being seldom reported in tattoos. We present a case of a predominantly T CLH, secondary to the black pigment of tattooing in a 35-year-old patient, with a dense infiltrate of small, medium and scarce large T-cells. Analysis of the rearrangement of T-cells receptor revealed a polyclonal proliferation. Since the infiltrate of CLH can simulate a T lymphoma, it is important to show that lesions from tattoos can have a predominance of T-cells. PMID:25387518

  1. Prevalence and aetiology of anaemia in lymphoid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, J; Singh, R K Bikramjit; Saxena, R; Gupta, R; Vivekanandan, S; Sreenivas, V; Raina, V; Sharma, A; Kumar, L

    2013-01-01

    We prospectively studied the prevalence, type and causes of anaemia in newly diagnosed patients with lymphoid malignancies. Between January 2007 and June 2008, a total of 316 newly diagnosed, consecutive patients (aged 15 years or above) of Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia with anaemia (haemoglobin anaemia. Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia were the diagnoses in 81 (25.8%), 203 (64.7%) and 30 (9.6%) patients, respectively. Anaemia was present in 134 patients (42.4%). Anaemia of chronic disease was present in 33/46 (71.7%) and iron deficiency in 18/46 (39.1%) patients. Vitamin B12 and/or folate deficiency was detected in 10/46 (21.7%) patients (B12 deficiency alone in 7, folate deficiency alone in 1 and combined B12 and folate deficiency in 2). Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia was detected in 5/46 (10.9%) although direct Coombs test was positive in 17/46 (37%) patients. Among patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, anaemia due to bone marrow involvement was present in 16/40 (40%). In most patients with bone marrow involvement, anaemia was due to other causes. In only 3 patients, anaemia was attributable to bone marrow involvement alone. Anaemia was multifactorial in 18/46 (39.1%) patients. Nutritional deficiency alone or in combination was present in 22/46 (47.8%) patients. Anaemia is common in lymphoid malignancies at initial presentation. Besides managing anaemia of chronic disease and bone marrow involvement, nutritional and autoimmune causes should be ruled out. Copyright 2013, NMJI.

  2. A Computational Method to Calculate the Exact Solution for Acoustic Scattering by Liquid Spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    González, Juan D; Blanc, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The problem of scattering of harmonic plane acoustic waves by liquid spheroids (prolate and oblate) is addressed from an analytical approach. Mathematically, it consists in solving the Helmholtz equation in an unbounded domain with Sommerfeld radiation condition at infinity. The domain where propagation takes place is characterised by density and sound speed values $\\rho_0$ and $c_0$, respectively, while $\\rho_1$ and $c_1$ are the corresponding density and sound speed values of an inmersed object that is responsible of the scattered field. Since Helmholtz equation is separable in prolate (oblate) spheroidal coordinates, its exact solution for the scattered field can be expressed as an expansion on prolate (oblate) spheroidal functions multiplied by coefficients whose values depend upon the boundary conditions verified at the medium-inmersed fluid obstacle interface. The general case ($c_0 \

  3. Polarimetric scattering and transmitting of the Stokes vector from a layer of chiral small spheroids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常梅; 金亚秋

    2002-01-01

    To measure fully polarimetric scattering from random chiral small spheroids,the 2 × 2 dimensional (2 × 2-D) complex scattering amplitude matrix of randomly oriented,chiral small spheroid is derived.Polarimetric scattering from a bounded layer of non-uniformly oriented,chirally-active small spheroids in the Mueller matrix solution is obtained.Co-polarized and cross-polarized backscattering and polarization degree for any polarized incidence (X,ψ) are numerically calculated.Transmitting of coherent Stokes parameters through the layer are also discussed.Either non-uniform orientation or chirality can yield non-diagonal extinction matrix κe and full eigenmatrix E due to the fact of forward depolarized-scattering functions , ≠ 0.Comparisons of fully polarimetric scattering from the chiral and achiral particulate media demonstrate the chirality effect on wave scattering and transmitting.``

  4. Monitoring the Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway in a 3D Spheroid Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondesert, Odile; Frongia, Céline; Clayton, Olivia; Boizeau, Marie-Laure; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the DNA-Damage Response (DDR) activated pathway in multicellular tumor spheroid models is an important challenge as these 3D models have demonstrated their major relevance in pharmacological evaluation. Herein we present DDR-Act-FP, a fluorescent biosensor that allows detection of DDR activation through monitoring of the p21 promoter p53-dependent activation. We show that cells expressing the DDR-Act-FP biosensor efficiently report activation of the DDR pathway after DNA damage and its pharmacological manipulation using ATM kinase inhibitors. We also report the successful use of this assay to screen a small compound library in order to identify activators of the DDR response. Finally, using multicellular spheroids expressing the DDR-Act-FP we demonstrate that DDR activation and its pharmacological manipulation with inhibitory and activatory compounds can be efficiently monitored in live 3D spheroid model. This study paves the way for the development of innovative screening and preclinical evaluation assays.

  5. Stable Ni isotopes and Be-10 and Al-26 in metallic spheroids from Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, S.; Herzog, G. F.; Hall, G. S.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Juenemann, D.

    1993-01-01

    The Canyon Diablo spheroids, which are found around Meteor Crater, Arizona, are nickel-enriched objects with diameters from less than 0.1 to several mm. Previous studies have suggested that the enrichment of nickel resulted either from shock-melting of S-rich areas followed by solidification of the liquids under strongly non-equilibrium conditions at rapid cooling rates during flight outward from the crater or from the selective oxidation of iron. Isotopic studies are an effective tool for constraining the degree of open-system evaporation experienced by a system. The purpose of this study was to see whether Ni isotopes had been fractionated by volatilization during spheroid formation. In addition, the cosmogenic nuclides Be-10 and Al-26 were measured to try to estimate the depths in the parent meteorite from which the spheroids came.

  6. Extended stellar substructure surrounding the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, T. A.; Mackey, A. D.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present deep stellar photometry of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g- and i-band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct overdensity encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Boötes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Boötes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  7. Extended stellar substructure surrounding the Bo\\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Roderick, T A; Jerjen, H; Da Costa, G S

    2016-01-01

    We present deep stellar photometry of the Bo\\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g and i band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct over-density encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Bo\\"otes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Bo\\"otes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Bo\\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  8. Prolonged heart xenograft survival using combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Saad, T.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1986-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine have profound immunosuppressive properties and permit successful heart allotransplantation. Cyclosporine used alone has not permitted consistently successful transplantation between species in all cases. Total lymphoid irradiation has not been applied to xenotransplantation. The efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation alone and in combination with cyclosporine was examined using an animal model of heart xenotransplantation. Heterotopic heart transplants were performed using inbred Syrian hamsters as donors and Lewis rats as recipients. Total lymphoid irradiation was administered preoperatively over 3 weeks for a total dose of 15 gray. Cyclosporine was started on the day of surgery and was given as a daily intramuscular injection of 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day until rejection was complete. Neither total lymphoid irradiation nor cyclosporine alone markedly prolonged graft survival. However, combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day, dramatically prolonged graft survival to greater than 100 days in most recipients. There were no treatment-related deaths. In conclusion, combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine permit successful long-term survival of heart xenotransplants in this hamster-to-rat model.

  9. Supermassive Black Holes and their Host Spheroids III. The Mbh-nsph Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savorgnan, Giulia A. D.

    2016-04-01

    The Sérsic {R}1/n model is the best approximation known to date for describing the light distribution of stellar spheroidal and disk components, with the Sérsic index n providing a direct measure of the central radial concentration of stars. The Sérsic index of a galaxy’s spheroidal component, nsph, has been shown to tightly correlate with the mass of the central supermassive black hole, MBH. The {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} correlation is also expected from other two well known scaling relations involving the spheroid luminosity, Lsph: the {L}{sph}{--}{n}{sph} and the {M}{BH}{--}{L}{sph}. Obtaining an accurate estimate of the spheroid Sérsic index requires a careful modeling of a galaxy’s light distribution and some studies have failed to recover a statistically significant {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} correlation. With the aim of re-investigating the {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} and other black hole mass scaling relations, we performed a detailed (i.e., bulge, disks, bars, spiral arms, rings, halo, nucleus, etc.) decomposition of 66 galaxies, with directly measured black hole masses, that had been imaged at 3.6 μm with Spitzer. In this paper, the third of this series, we present an analysis of the {L}{sph}{--}{n}{sph} and {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} diagrams. While early-type (elliptical+lenticular) and late-type (spiral) galaxies split into two separate relations in the {L}{sph}{--}{n}{sph} and {M}{BH}{--}{L}{sph} diagrams, they reunite into a single {M}{BH}\\propto {n}{sph}3.39+/- 0.15 sequence with relatively small intrinsic scatter (ε ≃ 0.25 {dex}). The black hole mass appears to be closely related to the spheroid central concentration of stars, which mirrors the inner gradient of the spheroid gravitational potential.

  10. Scaffold-Free Coculture Spheroids of Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma Cells and Normal Colonic Fibroblasts Promote Tumorigenicity in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-il Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to form a scaffold-free coculture spheroid model of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CACs and normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs and to use the spheroids to investigate the role of NCFs in the tumorigenicity of CACs in nude mice. We analysed three-dimensional (3D scaffold-free coculture spheroids of CACs and NCFs. CAC Matrigel invasion assays and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice were performed to examine the effect of NCFs on CAC invasive behaviour and tumorigenicity in 3D spheroids. We investigated the expression pattern of fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α by immunohistochemical staining. CAC monocultures did not form densely-packed 3D spheroids, whereas cocultured CACs and NCFs formed 3D spheroids. The 3D coculture spheroids seeded on a Matrigel extracellular matrix showed higher CAC invasiveness compared to CACs alone or CACs and NCFs in suspension. 3D spheroids injected into nude mice generated more and faster-growing tumors compared to CACs alone or mixed suspensions consisting of CACs and NCFs. FAP-α was expressed in NCFs-CACs cocultures and xenograft tumors, whereas monocultures of NCFs or CACs were negative for FAP-α expression. Our findings provide evidence that the interaction between CACs and NCFs is essential for the tumorigenicity of cancer cells as well as for tumor propagation.

  11. Navier-Stokes computations of separated vortical flows past prolate spheroid at incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tin-Chee; Kandil, Osama A.; Liu, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of steady incompressible viscous flow past prolate spheroids at incidence is formulated using the unsteady incompressible and compressible thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. The two sets of Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a pseudotime stepping of the implicit flux-difference splitting scheme on a curvilinear grid, which is generated by a transfinite grid generator. The Baldwin and Lomax (1978) algebraic eddy-viscosity model is used to model the turbulent flow. The computational applications cover a 6:1 prolate spheroid at different angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. The results are compared with experimental data.

  12. The kinetics of inactivation of spheroidal microbial cells by pulsed electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lebovka, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    The nature of non-exponential kinetics in microbial cells inactivation by pulsed electric fields (PEF) is discussed. It was demonstrated that possible mechanism of non-exponential kinetics can be related to orientational disorder in suspension of microbial cells of anisotropic form. A numerical studies of spheroidal cell suspensions was carried out. The most pronounced deviations from the exponential kinetics were observed for disordered suspensions of prolate spheroids at small electric field strength $E$ or at large aspect ratio $a$. For partially oriented suspensions, efficiency of inactivation enhances with increasing of order parameter and field strength. A possibility of the PEF-induced orientational ordering in microbial suspensions is discussed.

  13. Wave Polarization Scattering and Transmission Property in Randomly Distributed Chiral Spheroids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the scattering amplitude functions of a spatially-oriented chiral spheroid are derived. Po larization scattering from a layer of randomly distributed chiral spheroids in the Mueller matrix solution is obtained. Co-polarized and de-polarized backscattering and polarization degree for any polarized incidence are numerically calcu lated. Transmissions of coherent waves with four Stokes parameters through the layer are also discussed. Comparisons of polarization scattering from the chiral and achiral particulate media demonstrate the chirality effect on wave scattering and transmission.

  14. Dielectric Behavior of Oblate Spheroidal Particles:Application to Erythrocytes Suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ji-Ping; YU Kin-Wah

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the pressure effect on the eletrorotation (ER) spectrum of living cell suspensions byconsidering the particle shape effect. In particular, we consider coated oblate spheroidal particles and present a theoreticalstudy of ER based on the spectral representation theory. Analytic expressions for the characteristic frequency as wellas the dispersion strength can be obtained, thus simplifying the fitting of experimental data on oblate spheroidal cellsthat abound in the literature. From the theoretical analysis, we find that the cellshape, coating as well as materialparameters can change the ER spectrum. We demonstrate a good agreement between our theoretical predictions andexperimental data on human erthrocytes suspensions.

  15. New Spheroidizing Technique of Ultra-High Carbon Steel With Aluminum Addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-juan; WANG Bao-qi; SONG Xiao-yan; GUO Su-zhen; GU Nan-ju

    2006-01-01

    A new spheroidizing process of ultra-high carbon steel (UHCS) containing C 1.55%, Cr 1.45%, and Al 1.5% in mass percent has been proposed. The effect of processing parameters on the microstructure was analyzed. The UHCS produced by this new process has a microstructure with recrystallized ferrite matrix and fine and uniform carbide particles. After this spheroidizing, the UHCS exhibits good mechanical properties at ambient temperature, for example σb=1 100 MPa, σs=915 MPa, δ=8% and high ratio of σs/σb.

  16. A New Integral Equation for the Spheroidal equations in case of m equal 1

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Guihua

    2012-01-01

    The spheroidal wave functions are investigated in the case m=1. The integral equation is obtained for them. For the two kinds of eigenvalues in the differential and corresponding integral equations, the relation between them are given explicitly. Though there are already some integral equations for the spheroidal equations, the relation between their two kinds of eigenvalues is not known till now. This is the great advantage of our integral equation, which will provide useful information through the study of the integral equation. Also an example is given for the special case, which shows another way to study the eigenvalue problem.

  17. Microwave-assisted synthesis of spheroidal vaterite CaCO 3 in ethylene glycol-water mixed solvents without surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinxia; Ji, Xianbing; Wang, Xiaobo

    2010-10-01

    Spheroidal vaterite CaCO 3 composed of irregular nanoparticals have been synthesized by a fast microwave-assisted method. The structures are fabricated by the reaction of Ca(CH 3COO) 2 with (NH 4) 2CO 3 at 90 °C in ethylene glycol-water mixed solvents without any surfactants. The diameters of the spheroidal vaterite CaCO 3 range from 1 to 2 μm, and the average size of the nanoparticals is about 70 nm. Bundle-shaped aragonite and rhombohedral calcite are also obtained by adjusting the experimental parameters. Our experiments show that the ratio of ethylene glycol to water, microwave power, reaction time, and two sources of ammonium ions and acetate anions are key parameters for the fabrication of spheroidal vaterite CaCO 3. A possible growth mechanism for the spheroidal structures has been proposed, which suggests that the spheroidal vaterite CaCO 3 is formed by an aggregation mechanism.

  18. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antônio N.; Junior, Antônio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-05-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45° incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.

  19. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Energia Nuclear; Santos, Carlos Antonio N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia - Bioengenharia; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Souza, Pedro A.V.R.; Nasciutti, Luiz E., E-mail: nasciutt@ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Interacoes Celulares

    2011-07-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed. (author)

  20. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antonio N.; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia - Bioengenharia - DIPRO, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial, Xerem. 25250-020, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Interacoes Celulares, ICB-CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941- 590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Interacoes Celulares, ICB-CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941- 590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-05-17

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg. incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.