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Sample records for lymphoblastoid cells tk6

  1. Investigation of the apoptotic way induced by digallic acid in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells

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    Bhouri Wissem

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The digallic acid (DGA purified from Pistacia lentiscus. L fruits was investigated for its antiproliferative and apoptotic activities on human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Methods We attempt to characterize the apoptotic pathway activated by DGA. Apoptosis was detected by DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage and by evaluating caspase activities. Results The inhibition of lymphoblastoid cell proliferation was noted from 8.5 μg/ml of DGA. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by DNA fragmentation and PARP cleavage. We have demonstrated that DGA induces apoptosis by activating the caspase-8 extrinsic pathway. Caspase-3 was also activated in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion In summary, DGA exhibited an apoptosis inductor effect in TK6 cells revealing thus its potential as a cancer-preventive agent.

  2. A combination of in vitro comet assay and micronucleus test using human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells.

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    Kimura, Aoi; Miyata, Atsuro; Honma, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    The comet assay has been widely used as a genotoxicity test for detecting primary DNA damage in individual cells. The micronucleus (MN) test is also a well-established assay for detecting clastogenicity and aneugenicity. A combination of the comet assay (COM) and MN test is capable of detecting a variety of genotoxic potentials as an in vitro screening system. Although the in vitro MN test has a robust protocol and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline, the in vitro COM does not. To establish a robust protocol for the COM and to compare its sensitivity with that of the MN, we conducted COM and MN concurrently for five genotoxic agents (ethyl methanesulfonate, methyl methanesulfonate, hydrogen peroxide, gamma-rays and mitomycin C) and one non-genotoxic agent (triton X-100), using human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Relative cell count (RCC), relative population doubling (RPD), relative increase in cell count (RICC) and relative cell viability determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay (TBDE) were employed as cytotoxic measurements. However, the relative cell viability determined by TBDE just after the treatment was not an appropriate parameter of cytotoxicity for the genotoxic agents because it remained constant even at the highest doses, which showed severe cytotoxicity by RCC, RPD and RICC. The results of the COM showed qualitative agreement (positive or negative) with those of the MN except for mitomycin C, which is an interstrand cross-linker. The COM always required higher doses than the MN to detect the genotoxic potential of the genotoxic agents under the test conditions applied here. The doses that induced a comet tail always yielded test guideline for MN because of their high cytotoxicity. These results are helpful for interpreting the results of the COM and MN in in vitro genotoxic hazard assessments. Further investigation is required to standardise the COM.

  3. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation enhances H-RAS protein stability and causes abnormal cell cycle progression in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells treated with hydroquinone.

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    Liu, Linhua; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Tang, Huanwen; Chen, Jialong; Wen, Qiaosheng; Zou, Fei

    2015-08-05

    Hydroquinone (HQ), one of the most important benzene-derived metabolites, can induce aberrant cell cycle progression; however, the mechanism of this induction remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), which is catalysed primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), participates in various biological processes, including cell cycle control. The results of the present study show an accumulation in G1 phase versus S phase of TK6 human lymphoblast cells treated with HQ for 48h compared with PBS-treated cells; after 72h of HQ treatment, the cells transitioned from G1 arrest to S phase arrest. We examined the expression of six genes related to the cell cycle or leukaemia to further explore the reason for this phenomenon. Among these genes, H-RAS was found to be associated with this phenomenon because its mRNA and protein expression decreased at 48h and increased at 72h. Experiments for PARP activity induction and inhibition revealed that the observed PARylation was positively associated with H-RAS expression. Moreover, in cells treated with HQ in conjunction with PARP-1 knockdown, expression of the H-RAS protein decreased and the number of cells in G1 phase increased. The degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl) modification of the H-RAS protein increased in cells treated with HQ for 72h, further supporting that changes in PARylation contributed to the rapid alteration of H-RAS protein expression, followed by abnormal progression of the cell cycle. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether protein complexes were formed by PARP-1 and H-RAS proteins, and the direct interaction between these proteins indicated that PARylation regulated H-RAS expression. As detected by confocal microscopy, the H-RAS protein was found in the nucleus and cytoplasm. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal that H-RAS protein can be modified by PARylation.

  4. 低剂量氢醒对TK6淋巴母细胞生物学性状及miR-221表达影响%Influences of biological characteristics and the expression of milt-221 induce by low-level hydroquinone exposure in TK6 lymphoblastoid cells

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    刘林华; 梁小虎; 凌晓璇; 唐焕文

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨低剂童氮醌(HQ)对TK6淋巴母细胞的生物学性状及小分子非编码RNA(microRNA)-221(miR-221)表达的影响.方法 磷酸盐缓冲液(PBS)溶解HQ,以PBS处理组为对照组,分别以2.5、5.0和10.0 μmol/L HQ染毒TK6细胞为处理组.应用CCK-8试剂盒检测细胞活力和细胞增殖,通过磷脂结合蛋白(Annexin V)/碘化丙啶(PI)标记的流式细胞技术检测细胞调亡,用实时荧光定童-聚合酶链反应(qRT-PCR)检测milR-221的表达改变.结果 细胞增殖以48 h最为明显,2.5、5.0和10.0 μmol/L组细胞增殖指数分别为1.33(P<0.05)、1.14(P<0.05)和1.12(P<0.05);milR-221表达改变以72h最为明显,2.5、5.0、10.0 p.μmol/L HQ组细胞milR-221表达量分别抑制了0.31倍(P<0.05)、0.39倍(P<0.05)和0.33倍(P<0.05).结论 低剂量HQ能抑制TK6细胞调亡和milR-221的表达,促进细胞增殖.%Objective To explore the influences of biological characteristics and the expression of small non-coding RNA (miR-221) induced by low-level hydroquinone (HQ) exposure in TK6 lymphoblastoid cells. Methods HQ dissolved in PBS buffer at the concentrations of 2. 5,5.0 and 10. 0μmol/L were respectively given to TK6 cells,and cells treated with PBS only were as the control. Cell viability and proliferation were detected with CCK-8 assay kit, the cell apoptosis assay was attained by Annexin V/PI apoptosis assay kit, while miR-221 expression was defined by reverse transcription real-time RT-PCR assay.Results Obvious alternation of cell growth occurred at 48 hours post HQ treatment, the proliferation indexes for 2. 5,5.0 and 10.0 μmol/L HQ were 1.33 (P<0.05),1. 14 (P<0.05) and 1.12 (P <0.05) ,respectively. The expression of miR-221 were inhibited by 0.31-(P<0.05) ,0. 39-(P<0.05) and 0. 33-fold (P<0. 05) in the groups of 2.5,5.0 and 10.0 μmol/L HQ,respectively at 72 hours post treatment. Conclusion Low-level HQ could inhibit TK6cell apoptosis and miR-221 expression,while promote cell growth.

  5. Cadmium chloride, benzo[a]pyrene and cyclophosphamide tested in the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test (MNvit) in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 at Covance laboratories, Harrogate UK in support of OECD draft Test Guideline 487.

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    Fowler, Paul; Whitwell, James; Jeffrey, Laura; Young, Jamie; Smith, Katie; Kirkland, David

    2010-10-29

    The following genotoxic chemicals were tested in the in vitro micronucleus assay, at Covance Laboratories, Harrogate, UK in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Cadmium chloride (an inorganic carcinogen), benzo[a]pyrene (a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon requiring metabolic activation) and cyclophosphamide (an alkylating agent requiring metabolic activation) were treated with and without cytokinesis block (by addition of cytochalasin B). This work formed part of a collaborative evaluation of the toxicity measures recommended in the draft OECD Test Guideline 487 for the in vitro micronucleus test. The toxicity measures used, capable of detecting both cytostasis and cell death, were relative population doubling, relative increase in cell counts and relative cell counts for treatments in the absence of cytokinesis block, and replication index or cytokinesis blocked proliferation index in the presence of cytokinesis block. All of the chemicals tested gave significant increases in the percentage of micronucleated cells with and without cytokinesis block at concentrations giving approximately 60% toxicity (cytostasis and cell death) or less by all of the toxicity measures used. The outcomes from this series of tests support the use of relative increase in cell counts and relative population doubling, as well as relative cell counts, as appropriate measures of cytotoxicity for the non-cytokinesis blocked in the in vitro micronucleus assay.

  6. Mitomycin C, 5-fluoruracil, colchicine and etoposide tested in the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test (MNvit) in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 at Novartis in support of OECD draft Test Guideline 487.

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    Elhajouji, Azeddine

    2010-10-29

    The following reference genotoxic agents were tested in the in vitro micronucleus test, at Novartis, Basel, Switzerland. Mitomycin C, 5-fluoruracil, colchicine and etoposide were tested in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6, with and without cytokinesis block (in the presence of cytochalasin B). This was done in support of the toxicity measures recommended in the draft OECD Test Guideline on In Vitro Mammalian Cell Micronucleus Test (MNvit) and was part of an international collaborative work. As toxicity measures, detecting cytostasis and cell death, relative cell counts (RCC), relative increase in cell counts (RICC), and relative population doubling (RPD) were used for treatments in the absence of cytokinesis block, and replication index (RI) or cytokinesis-blocked proliferation in the presence of cytokinesis block. All four reference agents were positive in the assay with and without cytokinesis block at concentrations giving approximately 50% toxicity or less as assessed by all of the toxicity measures used. Accordingly, the results of this work support the use of relative population doubling and relative increase in cell counts, as well as relative cell counts, as appropriate measures of toxicity for the non-cytokinesis-blocked in vitro micronucleus assay.

  7. Reduction of 8-oxodGTP in the nucleotide pool by hMTH1 leads to reduction in mutations in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 exposed to UVA

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    Fotouhi, Asal; Skioeld, Sara; Shakeri-Manesh, Sara; Osterman-Golkar, Siv; Wojcik, Andrzej; Jenssen, Dag; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: siamak.haghdoost@gmt.su.se [Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-10-01

    UVA has been suggested to play an important role in UV-induced mutagenesis. The mechanisms by which UVA induces mutations are still a matter of debate. Our aim was to investigate the protective capacity of hMTH1, a nucleotide pool sanitization enzyme with 8-oxodGTPase activity. Human B lymphoblastoid cells were stably transfected with shRNA directed against hMTH1. Clonogenic survival, mutations, intracellular and extracellular levels of 8-oxodG (8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and dG in the nucleotide pool of UVA-irradiated transfected and non-transfected cells were investigated. Mutations were determined in the thymidine kinase locus. Intracellular 8-oxodG and dG were measured using a modified ELISA and HPLC, respectively, after extraction of the nucleotide pool and conversion of nucleotides to their corresponding nucleosides. 8-oxodG in the medium was measured using ELISA. UVA-induced mutations were significantly higher while the survival was slightly lower in transfected compared to non-transfected cells. The increased mutation rate in transfected cells at increased exposure correlated with enhanced levels of 8-oxodG in the nucleotide pool, and a somewhat reduced level of 8-oxodG in the medium. The results indicate that the nucleotide pool is a significant target for UVA-induced mutations and implicates that hMTH1 plays an important role in protecting cells from UVA-induced oxidative stress.

  8. Epigenetic factors in cancer risk: effect of chemical carcinogens on global DNA methylation pattern in human TK6 cells.

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    Ali M Tabish

    Full Text Available In the current study, we assessed the global DNA methylation changes in human lymphoblastoid (TK6 cells in vitro in response to 5 direct and 10 indirect-acting genotoxic agents. TK6 cells were exposed to the selected agents for 24 h in the presence and/or absence of S9 metabolic mix. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for quantitative profiling of 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine. The effect of exposure on 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine between control and exposed cultures was assessed by applying the marginal model with correlated residuals on % global DNA methylation data. We reported the induction of global DNA hypomethylation in TK6 cells in response to S9 metabolic mix, under the current experimental settings. Benzene, hydroquinone, styrene, carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene induced global DNA hypomethylation in TK6 cells. Furthermore, we showed that dose did not have an effect on global DNA methylation in TK6 cells. In conclusion we report changes in global DNA methylation as an early event in response to agents traditionally considered as genotoxic.

  9. A predictive toxicogenomics signature to classify genotoxic versus non-genotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells

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    Andrew Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity testing is a critical component of chemical assessment. The use of integrated approaches in genetic toxicology, including the incorporation of gene expression data to determine the DNA damage response pathways involved in response, is becoming more common. In companion papers previously published in Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, Li et al. (2015 [6] developed a dose optimization protocol that was based on evaluating expression changes in several well-characterized stress-response genes using quantitative real-time PCR in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells in culture. This optimization approach was applied to the analysis of TK6 cells exposed to one of 14 genotoxic or 14 non-genotoxic agents, with sampling 4 h post-exposure. Microarray-based transcriptomic analyses were then used to develop a classifier for genotoxicity using the nearest shrunken centroids method. A panel of 65 genes was identified that could accurately classify toxicants as genotoxic or non-genotoxic. In Buick et al. (2015 [1], the utility of the biomarker for chemicals that require metabolic activation was evaluated. In this study, TK6 cells were exposed to increasing doses of four chemicals (two genotoxic that require metabolic activation and two non-genotoxic chemicals in the presence of rat liver S9 to demonstrate that S9 does not impair the ability to classify genotoxicity using this genomic biomarker in TK6cells.

  10. Telomere loss, not average telomere length, confers radiosensitivity to TK6-irradiated cells

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    Berardinelli, F.; Nieri, D.; Sgura, A.; Tanzarella, C. [Dip. Di Biologia, Università “Roma Tre”, Rome (Italy); INFN – “Roma Tre”, Rome (Italy); Antoccia, A., E-mail: antoccia@uniroma3.it [Dip. Di Biologia, Università “Roma Tre”, Rome (Italy); INFN – “Roma Tre”, Rome (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: ► Ionizing radiation induced telomere lengthening in TK6 clones from a single cell. ► Telomerase is not involved in the telomere lengthening observed. ► TK6 cells display very heterogeneous values in telomere length and telomere loss. ► A selective process account for telomere lengthening in irradiated cells. ► Telomere loss, not mean telomere length, is predictive of radiosensitivity. - Abstract: Many and varied are the proposed mechanisms that lead to resistance to ionizing radiation treatment. Among them, an inverse relationship between telomere length and radioresistance has been recently advanced. Investigating such a relationship in TK6 lymphoblasts, we found that clones originating from cells survived to 4 Gy of X-rays showed a significantly higher telomere length when compared with clones grown from untreated cells. The lengthening observed was not attributable to a radiation-induced increase in telomerase activity, as demonstrated by TRAP assay performed in the dose range of 1–10 Gy. Given the evidence that TK6 whole population was characterized by heterogeneity in cellular mean telomere length and telomere loss, we tested the hypothesis that a process of selection may favour cells with longer telomeres (more radioresistant cells) following exposure to irradiation. In order to do this 15 independent TK6 clones were selected and characterized for telomere length and loss on the basis of q-FISH and flow-FISH analysis. Among the screened clones four characterized by long telomeres and four characterized by short telomeres were tested for their radiosensitivity by means of clonogenic assay. The results obtained showed that, in our experimental conditions (cellular model, radiation doses) no significant correlation was observed between radiosensitivity and mean telomere lengths, whereas a positive correlation was observed with respect to telomere loss. Overall, these results indicate that telomere loss and not mean telomere length plays

  11. Impact of cell cycle delay on micronucleus frequency in TK6 cells.

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    Sobol, Zhanna; Spellman, Richard A; Thiffeault, Catherine; Dobo, Krista L; Schuler, Maik

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies with TK6 cells have shown that extending the recovery period after pulse treatment allows for greater micronucleus expression for some compounds. This study explores the role of cell cycle delay in micronucleus expression after pulse treatment with three model genotoxins [mitomycin C, etoposide (ETOP), vinblastine]. Cells were treated for 4 hr and allowed to recover for 36 hr with samples removed at various time points during the recovery period and analyzed for cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and micronucleus frequency. Our results show that mitomycin C causes cell cycle delay for 20 hr after pulse treatment and cell cycle perturbation is no longer evident after 36 hr of recovery. The micronucleus frequency of cells sampled at 36 hr is doubled when compared with cells sampled at 20 hr after mitomycin C removal. When cells were treated with indirect acting genotoxins (ETOP, vinblastine), cell cycle perturbation was not observed at the 20 hr time point. Micronucleus frequency after treatment with either ETOP or vinblastine did not differ between the 20 hr and the 36 hr time point. All three compounds induced similar levels of apoptosis ranging from 4.5 to 5.6% with maximum induction occurring at the 36-hr time point. We conclude that TK6 cells exhibit extended cell cycle arrest after exposure to MMC and can go on to express micronuclei, after overcoming cell cycle arrest.

  12. Effect of chemical mutagens and carcinogens on gene expression profiles in human TK6 cells.

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    Lode Godderis

    Full Text Available Characterization of toxicogenomic signatures of carcinogen exposure holds significant promise for mechanistic and predictive toxicology. In vitro transcriptomic studies allow the comparison of the response to chemicals with diverse mode of actions under controlled experimental conditions. We conducted an in vitro study in TK6 cells to characterize gene expression signatures of exposure to 15 genotoxic carcinogens frequently used in European industries. We also examined the dose-responsive changes in gene expression, and perturbation of biochemical pathways in response to these carcinogens. TK6 cells were exposed at 3 dose levels for 24 h with and without S9 human metabolic mix. Since S9 had an impact on gene expression (885 genes, we analyzed the gene expression data from cells cultures incubated with S9 and without S9 independently. The ribosome pathway was affected by all chemical-dose combinations. However in general, no similar gene expression was observed among carcinogens. Further, pathways, i.e. cell cycle, DNA repair mechanisms, RNA degradation, that were common within sets of chemical-dose combination were suggested by clustergram. Linear trends in dose-response of gene expression were observed for Trichloroethylene, Benz[a]anthracene, Epichlorohydrin, Benzene, and Hydroquinone. The significantly altered genes were involved in the regulation of (anti- apoptosis, maintenance of cell survival, tumor necrosis factor-related pathways and immune response, in agreement with several other studies. Similarly in S9+ cultures, Benz[a]pyrene, Styrene and Trichloroethylene each modified over 1000 genes at high concentrations. Our findings expand our understanding of the transcriptomic response to genotoxic carcinogens, revealing the alteration of diverse sets of genes and pathways involved in cellular homeostasis and cell cycle control.

  13. Antimutagenicity and antioxidative DNA damage properties of oligomeric proanthocyanidins from Thai grape seeds in TK6 cells.

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    Praphasawat, Ratsada; Klungsupya, Prapaipat; Muangman, Thunchanok; Laovitthayanggoon, Sarunya; Arunpairojana, Vullapa; Himakoun, Lakana

    2011-01-01

    Oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs) are found mostly in red grape seeds. Many publications have reported that OPCs possess an excellent anti-oxidant effects. Since it could against cellular damage from reactive oxygen species (ROS) led to reduce the risk of chronic disease and cancers. We carried out this study on the Thai OPCs to evaluate the mutagenicity/ anti-mutagenicity and anti-oxidative DNA damage effects in TK6 cells by micronucleus (MN) and comet assays. In the MN assay, OPCs-treatment of TK6 cells at concentrations ranging from 10-200 ?g/ml (4 and 24 h) did not cause micronucleus induction over the negative control group but revealed a significant reduction the micronucleus frequencies against the known mutagen (mitomycin C). In the comet assay, OPCs-treated TK6 cells at concentrations of 100, 250, 500, and 1,000 ?g/ml could inhibit DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) as indicated by 18.7, 36.4, 30.6, and 60.1%, respectively. Our results suggest that OPCs possess the anti-mutagenic and anti-oxidative DNA damage effects in TK6 cells under the conditions of this assay.

  14. The TP53 dependence of radiation-induced chromosome instability in human lymphoblastoid cells

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    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Jordan, Robert; Evans, Helen H.; Lenarczyk, Marek; Liber, Howard

    2003-01-01

    The dose and TP53 dependence for the induction of chromosome instability were examined in cells of three human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WIL2 cells: TK6, a TP53-normal cell line, NH32, a TP53-knockout created from TK6, and WTK1, a WIL2-derived cell line that spontaneously developed a TP53 mutation. Cells of each cell line were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, and then surviving clones were isolated and expanded in culture for approximately 35 generations before the frequency and characteristics of the instability were analyzed. The presence of dicentric chromosomes, formed by end-to-end fusions, served as a marker of chromosomal instability. Unexposed TK6 cells had low levels of chromosomal instability (0.002 +/- 0.001 dicentrics/cell). Exposure of TK6 cells to doses as low as 5 cGy gamma rays increased chromosome instability levels nearly 10-fold to 0.019 +/- 0.008 dicentrics/cell. There was no further increase in instability levels beyond 5 cGy. In contrast to TK6 cells, unexposed cultures of WTK1 and NH32 cells had much higher levels of chromosome instability of 0.034 +/- 0.007 and 0.041 +/- 0.009, respectively, but showed little if any effect of radiation on levels of chromosome instability. The results suggest that radiation exposure alters the normal TP53-dependent cell cycle checkpoint controls that recognize alterations in telomere structure and activate apoptosis.

  15. Cytosine arabinoside, vinblastine, diethylstilboestrol and 2-aminoanthracene tested in the in vitro human TK6 cell line micronucleus test (MNvit) at Institut Pasteur de Lille in support of OECD draft test guideline 487.

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    Nesslany, Fabrice; Marzin, Daniel

    2010-10-29

    The reference genotoxic agents Cytosine arabinoside, Vinblastine, Diethylstilboestrol and 2-Aminoanthracene were tested in the in vitro micronucleus assay, in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells, without cytokinesis block, at the laboratories of Institut Pasteur de Lille, France. This was done in support of the toxicity measures recommended in the late 2007 version of the draft OECD Test Guideline 487 for the testing of chemicals. All four reference agents were positive in the assay at concentrations giving approximately 50% toxicity or less as assessed by draft Test Guideline 487 recommended measures, relative population doublings and relative increase in cell counts. Accordingly, this work supports the premise that relative population doublings and relative increase in cell counts are appropriate measures of toxicity for the non-cytokinesis blocked in vitro micronucleus assay.

  16. Analysis of mutant frequencies and mutation spectra in hMTH1 knockdown TK6 cells exposed to UV radiation.

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    Fotouhi, Asal; Hagos, Winta Woldai; Ilic, Marina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; de Gruijl, Frank; Mullenders, Leon; Jansen, Jacob G; Haghdoost, Siamak

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is a highly mutagenic agent that damages the DNA by the formation of mutagenic photoproducts at dipyrimidine sites and by oxidative DNA damages via reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can also give rise to mutations via oxidation of dNTPs in the nucleotide pool, e.g. 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP and subsequent incorporation during DNA replication. Here we show that expression of human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1) which sanitizes the nucleotide pool by dephosphorylating oxidized dNTPs, protects against mutagenesis induced by long wave UVA light and by UVB light but not by short wave UVC light. Mutational spectra analyses of UVA-induced mutations at the endogenous Thymidine kinase gene in human lymphoblastoid cells revealed that hMTH1 mainly protects cells from transitions at GC and AT base pairs.

  17. Analysis of mutant frequencies and mutation spectra in hMTH1 knockdown TK6 cells exposed to UV radiation

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    Fotouhi, Asal [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden); Hagos, Winta Woldai [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Ilic, Marina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden); Gruijl, Frank de [Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon; Jansen, Jacob G. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: Siamak.Haghdoost@su.se [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • hMTH1 protects cells from mutagenesis induced by UVA and UVB, but not UVC. • No protective role of hMTH1 in cell survival post UVB and UVC irradiation. • hMTH1 prevents induction of transition-type mutations at AT and GC post UVA irradiation. • 2-OH-dATP rather than 8-oxo-dGTP in the nucleotide pool likely contributes in UVA-induced mutations. - Abstract: Ultraviolet radiation is a highly mutagenic agent that damages the DNA by the formation of mutagenic photoproducts at dipyrimidine sites and by oxidative DNA damages via reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can also give rise to mutations via oxidation of dNTPs in the nucleotide pool, e.g. 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP and subsequent incorporation during DNA replication. Here we show that expression of human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1) which sanitizes the nucleotide pool by dephosphorylating oxidized dNTPs, protects against mutagenesis induced by long wave UVA light and by UVB light but not by short wave UVC light. Mutational spectra analyses of UVA-induced mutations at the endogenous Thymidine kinase gene in human lymphoblastoid cells revealed that hMTH1 mainly protects cells from transitions at GC and AT base pairs.

  18. The role of nucleophosmin/B23 in radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human lymphoblastoid cells of different p53 genotypes.

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    Chen, Honghong; Jia, Rongfei; Zhou, Meijun; Xu, Aihong; Hu, Yuxing; Cheng, Wenying; Shao, Chunlin

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the role of nucleophosmin (NPM/B23) in radiation-induced chromosomal instability and apoptosis in human lymphoblastoid cells with different protein 53 (p53) status. Wild type (wt) p53 TK6 and mutant type (mt) p53 WTK1 with or without short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated silencing of NPM, TK6 with or without short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of p53 (p53i and NEGi) were irradiated with 4 Gy gamma-rays. Six to 48 h after irradiation, the index of apoptosis, chromosome aberration, cell cycle distribution and the levels of total NPM and phosphorylated-threonine 199 (pThr¹⁹⁹) NPM proteins were measured. Cells in some dishes were treated with 10 μM Olomoucine (OLO) for 3 h before irradiation and remained in the medium after irradiation. The rates of radiation-induced apoptosis in TK6 and TK6/NEGi were about 2-fold of those in WTK1 and TK6/p53i, while the frequencies of polyploidy in TK6 and TK6/NEGi were obviously lower than those in WTK1 and TK6/p53i. Moreover, after irradiation, pThr¹⁹⁹ NPM levels increased significantly in WTK1 and TK6/p53i, and slightly increased in TK6 and TK6/NEGi, indicating that the increased level of pThr¹⁹⁹ NPM was related to p53 status. When Thr¹⁹⁹ hyperphosphorylation of NPM was inhibited by OLO or when NPM was knocked down, we found that radiation-induced apoptosis was more pronounced and polyploidy formation was reduced as compared with negative control while the magnitude of these changes in TK6 was obviously higher than that in WTK1, indicating that NPM has an antagonistic interaction with wt p53. NPM/B23 plays an important role in protecting cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and increasing polyploidy formation via either a p53 or non-p53 pathway.

  19. Hydroquinone-induced malignant transformation of TK6 cells by facilitating SIRT1-mediated p53 degradation and up-regulating KRAS.

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    Chen, Yuting; Chen, Jiajia; Yun, Lin; Xu, Longmei; Liu, Jiaxian; Xu, Yongchun; Yang, Hui; Liang, Hairong; Tang, Huanwen

    2016-09-30

    Hydroquinone (HQ), known as one of the metabolic products of benzene, causes a number of hematologic malignancies. The study evaluated the potential mechanism of Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in HQ-induced TK6 cell malignant transformation. The data of our study show that short term exposure of TK6 cells to HQ led to a decrease expression of SIRT1. Knockdown of SIRT1 sensitized to the HQ-induced apoptosis in vitro and increased the expression of p53, p21 and γ-H2AX. Furthermore, chronic HQ-treated (20μM once a week for 19 weeks) caused carcinogenic transformation and was confirmed by abnormal cell proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase 9(MMP9) and subcutaneous tumor formation in nude mice. SIRT1 increased KRAS expression, and decreased H3K9 and H3K18 acetylation, inhibited p53 signaling and the level of caspase-3 in HQ-induced transformation cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SIRT1 is involved in HQ-induced malignant transformation associated with suppressing p53 signaling and activation of KRAS.

  20. Genotoxicity testing of PLGA-PEO nanoparticles in TK6 cells by the comet assay and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimirova, Alena; Magdolenova, Zuzana; Barancokova, Magdalena; Staruchova, Marta; Volkovova, Katarina; Dusinska, Maria

    2012-10-09

    The in vitro genotoxicity of PLGA-PEO (poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid-polyethylene oxide copolymer) nanoparticles was assessed in TK6 cells using the comet assay as well as cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. The cells were exposed to 0.12-75μg/cm² of PLGA-PEO nanoparticles during 2 and 24h for analysis in the comet assay, and to 3-75μg/cm² of these nanoparticles during 4, 24, 48 and 72h, respectively, for analysis in the CBMN assay. Two different protocols for treatment with cytochalasin B were used. We found that PLGA-PEO was neither cytotoxic (measured by relative cell growth activity and cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI)), nor did it induce DNA strand-breaks (detected by the comet assay) or oxidative DNA lesions (measured by the comet assay modified with lesion-specific enzyme formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase). There were no statistically significant differences in the frequencies of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBNCs) between untreated and treated cells in either of the conditions used. This suggests that PLGA-PEO did not have potential genotoxicity. However, using two experimental protocols of the micronucleus assay, PLGA-PEO nanoparticles showed a weak but significant increase in the level of MN in mononucleated cells, in cells treated for 48h with PLGA-PEO nanoparticles when cytochalasin B was added for the last 24h (1st protocol), and in cells treated for 24h with PLGA-PEO nanoparticles followed by washing of NPs and addition of cytochalasin B for another 24h (2nd protocol). It remains unclear whether the increase of MNMNC after treatment with PLGA-PEO nanoparticles is the effect of a possible, weak aneugenic potential or early effect of these particles, or due to another reason. These results suggest that aneugenicity in addition to clastogenicity may be considered as an important biomarker when assessing the genotoxic potential of polymeric nanoparticles.

  1. Flow cytometric 96-well microplate-based in vitro micronucleus assay with human TK6 cells: protocol optimization and transferability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Steven M; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Tate, Matthew; Walmsley, Richard M; Saad, Frédéric; Van Dijck, Kris; De Boeck, Marlies; Van Goethem, Freddy; Lukamowicz-Rajska, Magdalena; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2013-04-01

    An automated approach for scoring in vitro micronuclei (MN) has been described in which flow cytometric analysis is combined with compound exposure, processing, and sampling in a single 96-well plate (Bryce SM et al. [2010]: Mutat Res 703:191-199). The current report describes protocol optimization and an interlaboratory assessment of the assay's transferability and reproducibility. In a training phase, the methodology was refined and collaborating laboratories were qualified by repeatedly testing three compounds. Second, a set of 32 chemicals comprised of reference genotoxicants and presumed non-genotoxicants was tested at each of four sites. TK6 cells were exposed to 10 closely spaced compound concentrations for 1.5- to 2-cell population doublings, and were then stained and lysed for flow cytometric analysis. MN frequencies were determined by evaluating ≥ 5,000 cells per replicate well, and several indices of cytotoxicity were acquired. The prevalence of positive results varied according to the MN-fold increase used to signify a genotoxic result, as well as the endpoint used to define a cytotoxicity limit. By varying these parameters, assay sensitivity and specificity values ranged from 82 to 98%, and 86 to 97%, respectively. In a third phase, one laboratory tested a further six genotoxicants and five non-genotoxic apoptosis inducers. In these experiments assay specificity was markedly improved when top concentration selection was based on two cytotoxicity endpoints-relative survival and quantification of ethidium monoazide-positive events. Collectively, the results indicate that the miniaturized assay is transferable across laboratories. The 96-well format consumes considerably less compound than conventional in vitro MN test methods, and the high information content provided by flow cytometry helps guard against irrelevant positive results arising from overt toxicity.

  2. Nonlinear responses for chromosome and gene level effects induced by vinyl acetate monomer and its metabolite, acetaldehyde in TK6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinsky, Robert; Gollapudi, Bhaskar; Albertini, Richard J; Valentine, Rudolph; Stavanja, Mari; Teeguarden, Justin; Fensterheim, Robert; Rick, David; Lardie, Thomas; McFadden, Lisa; Green, Amanda; Recio, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    Vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) produced rat nasal tumors at concentrations in the hundreds of parts per million. However, VAM is weakly genotoxic in vitro and shows no genotoxicity in vivo. A European Union Risk Assessment concluded that VAM's hydrolysis to acetaldehyde (AA), via carboxylesterase, is a critical key event in VAM's carcinogenic potential. In the following study, we observed increases in micronuclei (MN) and thymidine kinase (Tk) mutants that were dependent on the ability of TK6 cell culture conditions to rapidly hydrolyze VAM to AA. Heat-inactivated horse serum demonstrated a high capacity to hydrolyze VAM to AA; this activity was highly correlated with a concomitant increase in MN. In contrast, heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS) did not hydrolyze VAM and no increase in MN was observed. AA's ability to induce MN was not impacted by either serum since it directly forms Schiff bases with DNA and proteins. Increased mutant frequency at the Tk locus was similarly mitigated when AA formation was not sufficiently rapid, such as incubating VAM in the presence of FBS for 4 hr. Interestingly, neither VAM nor AA induced mutations at the HPRT locus. Finally, cytotoxicity paralleled genotoxicity demonstrating that a small degree of cytotoxicity occurred prior to increases in MN. These results established 0.25 mM as a consistent concentration where genotoxicity first occurred for both VAM and AA provided VAM is hydrolyzed to AA. This information further informs significant key events related to the mode of action of VAM-induced nasal mucosal tumors in rats.

  3. Chromosome loss caused by DNA fragmentation induced in main nuclei and micronuclei of human lymphoblastoid cells treated with colcemid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mika; Wakata, Akihiro; Aoki, Yoshinobu; Miyamae, Yoichi; Kodama, Seiji

    2014-04-01

    Aneuploidy, a change in the number of chromosomes, plays an essential role in tumorigenesis. Our previous study demonstrated that a loss of a whole chromosome is induced in human lymphocytes by colcemid, a well-known aneugen. Here, to clarify the mechanism for colcemid-induced chromosome loss, we investigated the relationship between chromosome loss and DNA fragmentation in human lymphoblastoid cells treated with colcemid (an aneugen) compared with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS; a clastogen). We analyzed the number of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) signals targeted for a whole chromosome 2 in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated TK6 cells and WTK-1 cells treated with colcemid and MMS, and concurrently detected DNA fragmentation by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results revealed that DNA fragmentation occurred in 60% of all binucleated TK6 cells harboring colcemid-induced chromosome loss (30% of micronuclei and 30% of main nuclei). DNA fragmentation was observed in colcemid-induced micronuclei containing a whole chromosome but not in MMS-induced micronuclei containing chromosome fragments. In contrast, colcemid-induced nondisjunction had no effect on induction of DNA fragmentation, suggesting that DNA fragmentation was triggered by micronuclei containing a whole chromosome but not by micronuclei containing chromosome fragments or nondisjunction. In addition, the frequency of binucleated cells harboring chromosome loss with DNA fragmentation in micronuclei or main nuclei was higher in wild-type p53 TK6 cells than in mutated-p53 WTK-1 cells treated with colcemid. Taken together, these present and previous results suggest that colcemid-induced chromosome loss is caused by DNA fragmentation, which is triggered by a micronucleus with a whole chromosome and controlled by the p53-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutagenic adaptive response to high-LET radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells exposed to X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vares, Guillaume, E-mail: vares@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Wang, Bing, E-mail: jp2813km@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tanaka, Kaoru; Kakimoto, Ayana; Eguchi-Kasai, Kyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-01-10

    The ability of cells to adapt low-dose or low-dose rate radiation is well known. High-LET radiation has unique characteristics, and the data concerning low doses effects and high-LET radiation remain fragmented. In this study, we assessed in vitro the ability of low doses of X-rays to induce an adaptive response (AR) to a subsequent challenging dose of heavy-ion radiation. Lymphoblastoid cells (TK6, AHH-1, NH32) were exposed to priming 0.02-0.1 Gy X-rays, followed 6 h later by challenging 1 Gy heavy-ion radiation (carbon-ion: 20 and 40 keV/{mu}m, neon-ion: 150 keV/{mu}m). Pre-exposure of p53-competent cells resulted in decreased mutation frequencies at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus and different H2AX phosphorylation kinetics, as compared to cells exposed to challenging radiation alone. This phenomenon did not seem to be linked with cell cycle effects or radiation-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggested the existence of an AR to mutagenic effects of heavy-ion radiation in lymphoblastoid cells and the involvement of double-strand break repair mechanisms.

  5. Mutagenic adaptive response to high-LET radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells exposed to X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varès, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Kakimoto, Ayana; Eguchi-Kasai, Kyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-10

    The ability of cells to adapt low-dose or low-dose rate radiation is well known. High-LET radiation has unique characteristics, and the data concerning low doses effects and high-LET radiation remain fragmented. In this study, we assessed in vitro the ability of low doses of X-rays to induce an adaptive response (AR) to a subsequent challenging dose of heavy-ion radiation. Lymphoblastoid cells (TK6, AHH-1, NH32) were exposed to priming 0.02-0.1Gy X-rays, followed 6h later by challenging 1Gy heavy-ion radiation (carbon-ion: 20 and 40keV/μm, neon-ion: 150keV/μm). Pre-exposure of p53-competent cells resulted in decreased mutation frequencies at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus and different H2AX phosphorylation kinetics, as compared to cells exposed to challenging radiation alone. This phenomenon did not seem to be linked with cell cycle effects or radiation-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggested the existence of an AR to mutagenic effects of heavy-ion radiation in lymphoblastoid cells and the involvement of double-strand break repair mechanisms.

  6. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on the Expression Profile of Microrna in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Story, Michael; Mangala, Lingegowda

    2012-07-01

    EFFECTS OF SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ON THE EXPRESSION PROFILE OF MICRORNA IN HUMAN LYMPHOBLASTOID CELLS Lingegowda S. Mangala1,2, Ye Zhang1,3, Zhenhua He2, Kamal Emami1, Govindarajan T. Ramesh4, Michael Story 5, Larry H. Rohde2, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA 2 University of Houston Clear Lake, Houston, Texas, USA 3 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, Texas, USA 4 Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA, USA 5 University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA This study explores the changes in expression of microRNA (miRNA) and related genes under simulated microgravity conditions. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or animals. miRNA has recently emerged as an important regulator of gene expression, possibly regulating as many as one-third of all human genes. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on miRNA expression. To test the hypothesis that the miRNA expression profile would be altered in zero gravity resulting in altered regulation of gene expression leading to metabolic or functional changes in cells, we cultured TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV; bioreactor) for 72 h either in the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as a control. Expression of several miRNA was changed significantly in the simulated microgravity condition including miR-150, miR-34a, miR-423-5p, miR-22 and miR-141, miR-618 and miR-222. To confirm whether this altered miRNA expression correlates with gene expression and functional changes of the cells, we performed DNA microarray and validated the related genes using q-RT PCR. Network and pathway analysis of gene and miRNA expression profiles indicates that the regulation of cell communication and catalytic activities, as well as pathways involved in immune response_IL-15

  11. Characterization of a TK6-Bcl-xL gly-159-ala Human Lymphoblast Clone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyall, L.: Gauny, S.; Kronenberg, A.

    2006-01-01

    TK6 cells are a well-characterized human B-lymphoblast cell line derived from WIL-2 cells. A derivative of the TK6 cell line that was stably transfected to express a mutated form of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL (TK6-Bcl-xL gly-159- ala clone #38) is compared with the parent cell line. Four parameters were evaluated for each cell line: growth under normal conditions, plating efficiency, and frequency of spontaneous mutation to 6‑thioguanine resistance (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase locus) or trifluorothymidine resistance (thymidine kinase locus). We conclude that the mutated Bcl-xL protein did not affect growth under normal conditions, plating efficiency or spontaneous mutation frequencies at the thymidine kinase (TK) locus. Results at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus were inconclusive. A mutant fraction for TK6‑Bcl-xL gly-159-ala clone #38 cells exposed to 150cGy of 160kVp x-rays was also calculated. Exposure to x-irradiation increased the mutant fraction of TK6‑Bcl-xL gly-159-ala clone #38 cells.

  12. Effects of Modeled Microgravity on Expression Profiles of Micro RNA in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Emami, Kamal; Story, Michael; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Among space radiation and other environmental factors, microgravity or an altered gravity is undoubtedly the most significant stress experienced by living organisms during flight. In comparison to the static 1g, microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or animals. Micro RNA (miRNA) has recently emerged as an important regulator of gene expression, possibly regulating as many as one-third of all human genes. miRNA represents a class of single-stranded noncoding regulatory RNA molecules ( 22 nt) that control gene expressions by inhibiting the translation of mRNA to proteins. However, very little is known on the effect of altered gravity on miRNA expression. We hypothesized that the miRNA expression profile will be altered in zero gravity resulting in regulation of the gene expression and functional changes of the cells. To test this hypothesis, we cultured TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in Synthecon s Rotary cell culture system (bioreactors) for 72 h either in the rotating (10 rpm) to model the microgravity in space or in the static condition. The cell viability was determined before and after culturing the cells in the bioreactor using both trypan blue and guava via count. Expressions of a panel of 352 human miRNA were analyzed using the miRNA PCRarray. Out of 352 miRNAs, expressions of 75 were significantly altered by a change of greater than 1.5 folds and seven miRNAs were altered by a fold change greater than 2 under the rotating culture condition. Among these seven, miR-545 and miR-517a were down regulated by 2 folds, whereas miR-150, miR-302a, miR-139-3p, miR-515-3p and miR-564 were up regulated by 2 to 8 folds. To confirm whether this altered miRNA expression correlates with gene expression and functional changes of the cells, we performed DNA Illumina Microarray Analysis and validated the related genes using q-RT PCR.

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  18. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 Input control Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...osciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 Input control Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...osciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  20. Molecular signatures in response to Isoliquiritigenin in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Eun; Hong, Eun-Jung; Nam, Hye-Young [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Meeyul [Research Center for Biomedical Resource of Oriental Medicine, Daegu Haany University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji-Hyun [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of); Han, Bok-Ghee, E-mail: bokghee@nih.go.kr [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jae-Pil, E-mail: jpjeon@cdc.go.kr [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified the inhibitory effect of ISL on cell proliferation of LCLs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ISL-induced genes and miRNAs through microarray approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs associated with ISL effect. -- Abstract: Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) has been known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of various cancer cells. However, genetic factors regulating ISL effects remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular signatures involved in ISL-induced cell death of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) using microarray analyses. For gene expression and microRNA (miRNA) microarray experiments, each of 12 LCL strains was independently treated with ISL or DMSO as a vehicle control for a day prior to total RNA extraction. ISL treatment inhibited cell proliferation of LCLs in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray analysis showed that ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway, having a potential as regulators in LCL survival and sensitivity to ISL-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, 36 miRNAs including five miRNAs with unknown functions were differentially expressed in ISL-treated LCLs. The integrative analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs. Among them, miR-1207-5p and miR-575 were negatively correlated with p53 pathway- and cell cycle-associated genes, respectively. In conclusion, our study suggests that miRNAs play an important role in ISL-induced cytotoxicity in LCLs by targeting signaling pathways including p53 pathway and cell cycle.

  1. Network signatures of cellular immortalization in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Sung-Mi; Jung, So-Young; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Mee-Hee; Kim, Jun-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Osong 363-951 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jae-Pil, E-mail: jaepiljeon@hanmail.net [Division of Brain Diseases, Center for Biomedical Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Osong 363-951 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We identified network signatures of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles. •More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCLs. •MicroRNA target genes in LCLs are involved in apoptosis and immune-related functions. •This approach is useful to find functional miRNA targets in specific cell conditions. -- Abstract: Human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) has been used as an in vitro cell model in genetic and pharmacogenomic studies, as well as a good model for studying gene expression regulatory machinery using integrated genomic analyses. In this study, we aimed to identify biological networks of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles of microRNAs and their target genes in LCLs. We first selected differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and microRNAs (DEmiRs) between early passage LCLs (eLCLs) and terminally differentiated late passage LCLs (tLCLs). The in silico and correlation analysis of these DEGs and DEmiRs revealed that 1098 DEG–DEmiR pairs were found to be positively (n = 591 pairs) or negatively (n = 507 pairs) correlated with each other. More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCL immortalizations. The target DEGs of DEmiRs were enriched for cellular functions associated with apoptosis, immune response, cell death, JAK–STAT cascade and lymphocyte activation while non-miRNA target DEGs were over-represented for basic cell metabolisms. The target DEGs correlated negatively with miR-548a-3p and miR-219-5p were significantly associated with protein kinase cascade, and the lymphocyte proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. In addition, the miR-106a and miR-424 clusters located in the X chromosome were enriched in DEmiR–mRNA pairs for LCL immortalization. In this study, the integrated transcriptomic analysis of LCLs could identify functional networks of biologically active microRNAs and their target genes involved in LCL immortalization.

  2. Utilization of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines as a System for the Molecular Modeling of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Colin A.; Liu, Stephenie Y.; Hicks, Chindo; Gregg, Jeffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide an alternative approach for understanding the biology and genetics of autism, we performed statistical analysis of gene expression profiles of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from children with autism and their families. The goal was to assess the feasibility of using this model in identifying autism-associated genes.…

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard L. Liber; Jeffrey L. Schwartz

    2005-10-31

    There are many different model systems that have been used to study chromosome instability. What is clear from all these studies is that conclusions concerning chromosome instability depend greatly on the model system and instability endpoint that is studied. The model system for our studies was the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. TK6 was isolated from a spontaneously immortalized lymphoblast culture. Thus there was no outside genetic manipulation used to immortalize them. TK6 is a relatively stable p53-normal immortal cell line (37). It shows low gene and chromosome mutation frequencies (19;28;31). Our general approach to studying instability in TK6 cells has been to isolate individual clones and analyze gene and chromosome mutation frequencies in each. This approach maximizes the possibility of detecting low frequency events that might be selected against in mass cultures.

  4. p53和γ-H2AX作为乙醛引起DNA损伤早期生物标记物的实验研究%Changes of p53 andγ-H2AXofTK6 cells causedby acetaldehyde

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周学贤; Penny Jones; Paul Carmichael; 郝卫东

    2014-01-01

    目的:评价乙醛染毒p53野生型人类淋巴母细胞(TK6)后,细胞中DNA损伤标记物p53、γ-H2AX的表达变化,并与彗星试验中的DNA链断裂指标进行敏感性比较,探讨p53和γ-H2AX作为乙醛引起DNA损伤的早期生物标记物的可能。方法:乙醛在0.5~20 mmol/L的浓度范围分别染毒TK6细胞20 min、2和12 h后,采用高通量的流式细胞术检测肿瘤抑制蛋白total-p53、磷酸化p53(p-p53)以及磷酸化组蛋白(γ-H2AX)的细胞表达率和表达强度(平均荧光强度);同时采用碱性彗星试验检测乙醛引起的DNA链断裂指标(细胞拖尾率、尾长、尾部DNA百分含量以及尾矩)的变化。结果:乙醛染毒TK6细胞12 h后,γ-H2AX的表达强度在15及20 mmol/L浓度下显著升高(P<0.05),p-p53的细胞表达率在0.5~7.5 mmol/L浓度范围内呈现剂量依赖的升高趋势,total-p53的细胞表达率趋势与p-p53相似,但与阴性对照组相比,差异无统计学意义。彗星试验中,细胞拖尾率、尾长、尾部DNA百分含量以及尾矩在5.0~12.5 mmol/L浓度范围内均增加,并呈现剂量依赖性。染毒2 h后,与阴性对照组相比,total-p53和p-p53的细胞表达率在15和20 mmol/L浓度下显著升高(P均<0.05),细胞拖尾率、尾部DNA百分含量以及尾矩在20 mmol/L浓度升高(P均<0.05)。染毒20 min后,3种生物标志物均未见清晰的变化趋势,4种DNA链断裂指标均未见显著变化(P均>0.05)。结论:乙醛染毒TK6细胞12 h可诱导p-p53细胞表达率升高、γ-H2AX细胞表达强度升高、total-p53细胞表达率轻微升高,以及细胞拖尾率、尾长、尾部DNA百分含量、尾矩的升高。p-p53比γ-H2AX和DNA链断裂指标在检测乙醛诱导的DNA损伤方面更加敏感。%OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of biomarkers of DNA damage,total p53,phospho-p53 (p-p53) and phospho-H2AX (p-H2AX orγ-H2AX) following exposure of TK6 cells to

  5. Control of cell respiration by nitric oxide in Ataxia Telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masci, Alessandra; Mastronicola, Daniela; Arese, Marzia; Piane, Maria; De Amicis, Andrea; Blanck, Thomas J J; Chessa, Luciana; Sarti, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients are particularly sensitive to oxidative-nitrosative stress. Nitric oxide (NO) controls mitochondrial respiration via the reversible inhibition of complex IV. The mitochondrial response to NO of AT lymphoblastoid cells was investigated. Cells isolated from three patients and three intrafamilial healthy controls were selected showing within each group a normal diploid karyotype and homogeneous telomere length. Different complex IV NO-inhibition patterns were induced by varying the electron flux through the respiratory chain, using exogenous cell membrane permeable electron donors. Under conditions of high electron flux the mitochondrial NO inhibition of respiration was greater in AT than in control cells (P< or =0.05). This property appears peculiar to AT, and correlates well to the higher concentration of cytochrome c detected in the AT cells. This finding is discussed on the basis of the proposed mechanism of reaction of NO with complex IV. It is suggested that the peculiar response of AT mitochondria to NO stress may be relevant to the mitochondrial metabolism of AT patients.

  6. Human iPSC-derived neurons and lymphoblastoid cells for personalized medicine research in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwitz, David

    2016-01-01

    The development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine crucially depends on the availability of high-quality human biosamples; animal models, although capable of modeling complex human diseases, cannot reflect the large variation in the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Although the biosamples available from public biobanks that store human tissues and cells may represent the large human diversity for most diseases, these samples are not always sufficient for developing biomarkers for patient-tailored therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders. Postmortem human tissues are available from many biobanks; nevertheless, collections of neuronal human cells from large patient cohorts representing the human diversity remain scarce. Two tools are gaining popularity for personalized medicine research on neuropsychiatric disorders: human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and human lymphoblastoid cell lines. This review examines and contrasts the advantages and limitations of each tool for personalized medicine research.

  7. Human lymphoblastoid B-cell lines reprogrammed to EBV-free induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Deepika; Dickerson, Sarah J; Yu, Junying; Brown, Matthew E; Thomson, James A; Seay, Nicholas J

    2011-08-18

    Generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent cells (iPSCs) holds great promise for regenerative medicine. Epstein-Barr virus immortalized lymphoblastoid B-cell lines (LCLs) can be generated from a minimal amount of blood and are banked worldwide as cellular reference material for immunologic or genetic analysis of pedigreed study populations. We report the generation of iPSCs from 2 LCLs (LCL-iPSCs) via a feeder-free episomal method using a cocktail of transcription factors and small molecules. LCL-derived iPSCs exhibited normal karyotype, expressed pluripotency markers, lost oriP/EBNA-1 episomal vectors, generated teratomas, retained donor identity, and differentiated in vitro into hematopoietic, cardiac, neural, and hepatocyte-like lineages. Significantly, although the parental LCLs express viral EBNA-1 and other Epstein-Barr virus latency-related elements for their survival, their presence was not detectable in LCL-iPSCs. Thus, reprogramming LCLs could offer an unlimited source for patient-specific iPSCs.

  8. Dose-dependent cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of antineoplastic alkylating agents on human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, B.J.S.; Johnson, K.J.; Henner, W.D. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The alkylating agents in clinical use as antineoplastics are strongly implicated as human carcinogens on the basis of animal studies and human epidemiologic studies. However, there is little quantitative information on the extent to which exposure to these drugs is mutagenic for normal (non-malignant) cells and the extent to which such mutagenicity correlates with cytotoxicity of these agents. Human lymphoblastoid cells (WIL2-NS) were exposed to graded doses of eight antineoplastic alkylating agents. Dose-dependent decreases in survival were used to calculate IC{sub 50}s for each of the drugs tested. The mutagenicity of these agents is correlated strongly with cytotoxicity. These results quantitate the dose-dependent cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of these bifunctional alkylating agents on human cells. All are cytotoxic and mutagenic, although their mutagenic efficiency varies.

  9. Human NK cells activated by EBV+ lymphoblastoid cells overcome anti-apoptotic mechanisms of drug resistance in haematological cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Azaceta, Gemma; Muntasell, Aura; Aguiló, Nacho; Núñez, David; Gálvez, Eva M; Naval, Javier; Anel, Alberto; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; Marzo, Isabel; Villalba, Martín; Pardo, Julián

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells recognize and eliminate transformed or infected cells that have downregulated MHC class-I and express specific activating ligands. Recent evidence indicates that allogeneic NK cells are useful to eliminate haematological cancer cells independently of MHC-I expression. However, it is unclear if transformed cells expressing mutations that confer anti-apoptotic properties and chemoresistance will be susceptible to NK cells. Allogeneic primary human NK cells were activated using different protocols and prospectively tested for their ability to eliminate diverse mutant haematological and apoptotic-resistant cancer cell lines as well as patient-derived B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with chemotherapy multiresistance. Here, we show that human NK cells from healthy donors activated in vitro with Epstein Barr virus positive (EBV+)-lymphoblastoid cells display an enhanced cytotoxic and proliferative potential in comparison to other protocols of activation such a K562 cells plus interleukin (IL)2. This enhancement enables them to kill more efficiently a variety of haematological cancer cell lines, including a panel of transfectants that mimic natural mutations leading to oncogenic transformation and chemoresistance (e.g., overexpression of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 or downregulation of p53, Bak/Bax or caspase activity). The effect was also observed against blasts from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients showing multi-resistance to chemotherapy. Our findings demonstrate that particular in vitro activated NK cells may overcome anti-apoptotic mechanisms and oncogenic alterations frequently occurring in transformed cells, pointing toward the use of EBV+-lymphoblastoid cells as a desirable strategy to activate NK cells in vitro for the purpose of treating haematological neoplasia with poor prognosis. PMID:25949911

  10. In vitro cytotoxicity against Marek's disease lymphoblastoid cell lines after enzymatic removal of Marek's disease tumor-associated surface antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Schat, K A; Murthy, K K

    1980-01-01

    Marek's disease tumor-associated surface antigen (MATSA) has been claimed to be the target of cytotoxic lymphocytes in in vitro tests for Marek's disease immunity. Treatment with papain, but not with trypsin or mixed glycosidases, removed MATSA from certain Marek's disease lymphoblastoid cell lines. Tumor cells with and without MATSA were used as target cells for in vitro studies on cell-mediated immune responses with sensitized spleen cells in a chromium release assay. The removal of MATSA d...

  11. The role of mitochondria in the radiation-induced bystander effect in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Sountharia; Harrison, Scott H; Thomas, Robert A; Tucker, James D

    2011-02-01

    Cells without intact mitochondrial DNA have been shown to lack the bystander effect, which is an energy-dependent process. We hypothesized that cells harboring mutations in mitochondrial genes responsible for ATP synthesis would show a decreased bystander effect compared to normal cells. Radiation-induced bystander effects were analyzed in two normal and four mitochondrial mutant human lymphoblastoid cells. Medium from previously irradiated cells (conditioned medium) was transferred to unirradiated cells from the respective cell lines and evaluated for the bystander effect using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Unlike normal cells that were used as a control, mitochondrial mutant cells neither generated nor responded to the bystander signals. The bystander effect was inhibited in normal cells by adding the mitochondrial inhibitors rotenone and oligomycin to the culture medium. Time-controlled blocking of the bystander effect by inhibitors was found to occur either for prolonged exposure to the inhibitor prior to irradiation with an immediate and subsequent removal of the inhibitors or immediate post-application of the inhibitor. Adding the inhibitors just prior to irradiation and removing them immediately after irradiation was uneventful. Fully functional mitochondrial metabolic capability may therefore be essential for the bystander effect.

  12. Involvement of recombination in x-ray mutagenesis of human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amundson, S.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Xia, F.; Liber, H.L. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WI-L2 differ greatly in their responses to X-irradiation. Compared with TK6 (ATCC CRL 8015), WI-L2-NS (ATCC CRL 8155) has an enhanced X-ray survival. The induction of mutation by X-rays is also markedly different. The hemizygous hprt locus is slightly more mutable in WI-L2-NS than in TK6, and the dose response fits best to a linear-quadratic curve rather than the linear fit of TK6X-ray induced mutation at the autosomal tk locus in heterozygotes derived from WI-L2-NS is 20-50 fold higher than in heterozygotes derived from TK6. A larger proportion of WI-L2-NS mutants had lost heterozygosity compared with mutants of TK6. , Fluorescence in situ hybridization indicated that loss of heterozygosity was due almost uniformly to deletion of an allele in mutants of TK6, and to recombination or gene conversion in mutants of WI-L2-NS. These results indicate that recombinational repair contributes to both cell survival and mutation following exposure to ionizing radiation.

  13. P53 alters the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity for oxidized graphene in human B-lymphoblastoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibone, Dayton Matthew

    Widespread use of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industry, medicine, and consumer products raises concern about potential adverse impacts on human health. The p53 tumor suppressor protein is crucial to maintaining cellular and genetic stability to prevent carcinogenesis. Here, we show that oxygen functionalized graphene (f-G) absorption and p53 functional status correlate with cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human B-lymphoblastoid cells. Trends in f-G absorption by were dose-dependent. Cells with functional p53 exposed to f-G arrested in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, suppressed f-G induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and had elevated apoptosis. While compared to p53 competent cells, the p53 deficient cells exposed to f-G accumulated in S-phase of the cell cycle, had elevated ROS levels, and evaded apoptosis. The f-G genotoxicity was evident as increased loss-of-heterozygosity mutants independent of p53 status, and structural chromosome damage in p53 deficient cells. These findings have broad implications for the safety and efficacy of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industrial, consumer products and biomedical applications.

  14. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Pathway Regulation in T-Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Turrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has shown its antitumor activity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. However, the mechanisms at the basis of CAP-cell interaction are not yet completely understood. The aim of this study is to investigate CAP proapoptotic effect and identify some of the molecular mechanisms triggered by CAP in human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells. CAP treatment was performed by means of a wand electrode DBD source driven by nanosecond high-voltage pulses under different operating conditions. The biological endpoints were assessed through flow cytometry and real-time PCR. CAP caused apoptosis in Jurkat cells mediated by p53 upregulation. To test the involvement of intrinsic and/or extrinsic pathway, the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-8 was analyzed. The activation of caspase-8 and the upregulation of Bax and Bcl-2 were observed. Moreover, CAP treatment increased ROS intracellular level. The situation reverts after a longer time of treatment. This is probably due to compensatory cellular mechanisms such as the posttranscriptional upregulation of SOD1, CAT, and GSR2. According to ROS increase, CAP induced a significant increase in DNA damage at all treatment conditions. In conclusion, our results provide a deeper understanding of CAP potential in the oncological field and pose the basis for the evaluation of its toxicological profile.

  15. Differences between the genomes of lymphoblastoid cell lines and blood-derived samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joesch-Cohen LM

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lena M Joesch-Cohen, Gustavo Glusman Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs represent a convenient research tool for expanding the amount of biologic material available from an individual. LCLs are commonly used as reference materials, most notably from the Genome in a Bottle Consortium. However, the question remains how faithfully LCL-derived genome assemblies represent the germline genome of the donor individual as compared to the genome assemblies derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We present an in-depth comparison of a large collection of LCL- and peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived genomes in terms of distributions of coverage and copy number alterations. We found significant differences in the depth of coverage and copy number calls, which may be driven by differential replication timing. Importantly, these copy number changes preferentially affect regions closer to genes and with higher GC content. This suggests that genomic studies based on LCLs may display locus-specific biases, and that conclusions based on analysis of depth of coverage and copy number variation may require further scrutiny. Keywords: genomics, whole-genome sequencing, viral transformation, copy number changes, bioinformatics

  16. Porcine circovirus type 2 morphogenesis in a clone derived from the l35 lymphoblastoid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cariño, C; Duffy, C; Sánchez-Chardi, A; McNeilly, F; Allan, G M; Segalés, J

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the essential infectious agent of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), one of the most important diseases of swine. Although several studies have described different biological properties of the virus, some aspects of its replication cycle, including ultrastructural alterations, remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe for the first time a complete morphogenesis study of PCV2 in a clone of the lymphoblastoid L35 cell line at the ultrastructural level using electron microscopy techniques. Cells were infected with PCV2 at a multiplicity of infection of 10 and examined at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, 60 and 72h post-infection. PCV2 was internalized by endocytosis, after which the virus aggregated in intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies (ICIs). Subsequently, PCV2 was closely associated with mitochondria, completing a first cytoplasmic phase. The virus entered the nucleus for replication and virus assembly and encapsidation occurred with the participation of the nuclear membrane. Immature virions left the nucleus and formed ICIs in a second cytoplasmic phase. The results suggest that at the end of the replication cycle (between 24 and 48h), PCV2 was released either by budding of mature virion clusters or by lysis of apoptotic or dead cells. In conclusion, the L35-derived clone represents a suitable in-vitro model for PCV2 morphogenesis studies and characterization of the PCV2 replication cycle.

  17. Genotype instability during long-term subculture of lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Hee; Kim, Young Jin; Moon, Sanghoon; Nam, Hye-Young; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Jong-Young; Cho, Yoon Shin

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) promise to address the challenge posed by the limited availability of primary cells needed as a source of genomic DNA for genetic studies. However, the genetic stability of LCLs following prolonged culture has never been rigorously investigated. To evaluate genotypic errors caused by EBV integration into human chromosomes, we isolated genomic DNA from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and LCLs collected from 20 individuals and genotyped the DNA samples using the Affymetrix 500K SNP array set. Genotype concordance measurements between two sources of DNA from the same individual indicated that genotypic discordance is negligible in early-passage LCLs (50 passages). Analysis of concordance on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis identified genomic regions with a high frequency of genotypic errors resulting from the loss of heterozygosity observed in late-passage LCLs. Our findings suggest that, although LCLs harvested during early stages of propagation are a reliable source of genomic DNA for genetic studies, investigations that involve genotyping of the entire genome should not use DNA from late-passage LCLs.

  18. Cellular models for mitochondrial DNA-based diseases: lymphoblastoid cell lines and transmitochondrial cybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, Sun; Xiaoxu, Zhao; Lihua, Qiao; Shuang, Mei; Zhipeng, Nie; Qinghai, Zhang; Yanchun, Ji; Pingping, Jiang; Min-Xin, Guan

    2016-07-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause a variety of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases which have been studied using Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and transmitochondrial cybrids. Individual genetic information is preserved permanently in LCLs while the development of transmitochondrial cybrids provide ex-vivo cellular platform to study molecular mechanism of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases. The cytoplasmic donor cells for previous transmitochondrial cybrids come from patient's tissue or platelet directly. Here, we depicted in details the principle, methods and techniques to establish LCLs from frozen peripheral bloods harboring mitochondrial 4401G > A mutation by infection of Epstein Barr virus, and then to generate cybrids using ρ(0) 206 and LCLs. The process of establishing these two cellular models was summarized into four steps as follows: (1) Generation of LCLs; (2) Transformation; (3) Selection; (4) Verification. To faithfully represent the function of mtDNA mutation, we analyzed and identified the sites of mtDNA mutations and copy numbers of each cellular models as well as the karyotype of transmitochondrial cybrids. Those clones with consistent parameters were selected for preservation and future analysis of the function of point mutations of mtDNA. Although these two cellular models play important roles in understanding molecular mechanism of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases on the cellular level, their limitations should be considered when elucidating the character of tissue specificity of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases.

  19. Integration sites of Epstein-Barr virus genome on chromosomes of human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuu, K.D.; Chen, Y.J.; Wang-Wuu, S. [Institute of Genetics, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the pathogen of infectious mononucleosis. The viral genome is present in more than 95% of the African cases of Burkitt lymphoma and it is usually maintained in episomal form in the tumor cells. Viral integration has been described only for Nanalwa which is a Burkitt lymphoma cell line lacking episomes. In order to examine the role of EBV in the immortalization of human Blymphocytes, we investigated whether the EBV integration into the human genome is essential. If the integration does occur, we would like to know whether the integration is randomly distributed or whether the viral DNA integrates preferentially at certain sites. Fourteen in vitro immortalized human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a biotinylated EBV BamHI w DNA fragment as probe. The episomal form of EBV DNA was found in all cells of these cell lines, while only about 65% of the cells have the integrated viral DNA. This might suggest that integration is not a pre-requisite for cell immortalization. Although all chromosomes, except Y, have been found with integrated viral genome, chromsomes 1 and 5 are the most frequent EBV DNA carrier (p<0.05). Nine chromosome bands, namely, 1p31, 1q31, 2q32, 3q13, 3q26, 5q14, 6q24, 7q31 and 12q21, are preferential targets for EBV integration (p<0.001). Eighty percent of the total 938 EBV hybridization signals were found to be at G-band-positive area. This suggests that the mechanism of EBV integration might be different from that of the retroviruses, which specifically integrate to G-band-negative areas. Thus, we conclude that the integration of EBV to host genome is non-random and it may have something to do with the structure of chromosome and DNA sequences.

  20. Cytotoxic drug sensitivity of Epstein-Barr virus transformed lymphoblastoid B-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olah Eva

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is the causative agent of immunosuppression associated lymphoproliferations such as post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD, AIDS related immunoblastic lymphomas (ARL and immunoblastic lymphomas in X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP. The reported overall mortality for PTLD often exceeds 50%. Reducing the immunosuppression in recipients of solid organ transplants (SOT or using highly active antiretroviral therapy in AIDS patients leads to complete remission in 23–50% of the PTLD/ARL cases but will not suffice for recipients of bone marrow grafts. An additional therapeutic alternative is the treatment with anti-CD20 antibodies (Rituximab or EBV-specific cytotoxic T-cells. Chemotherapy is used for the non-responding cases only as the second or third line of treatment. The most frequently used chemotherapy regimens originate from the non-Hodgkin lymphoma protocols and there are no cytotoxic drugs that have been specifically selected against EBV induced lymphoproliferative disorders. Methods As lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs are well established in vitro models for PTLD, we have assessed 17 LCLs for cytotoxic drug sensitivity. After three days of incubation, live and dead cells were differentially stained using fluorescent dyes. The precise numbers of live and dead cells were determined using a custom designed automated laser confocal fluorescent microscope. Results Independently of their origin, LCLs showed very similar drug sensitivity patterns against 29 frequently used cytostatic drugs. LCLs were highly sensitive for vincristine, methotrexate, epirubicin and paclitaxel. Conclusion Our data shows that the inclusion of epirubicin and paclitaxel into chemotherapy protocols against PTLD may be justified.

  1. Genetic analysis of human traits in vitro: drug response and gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Choy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, originally collected as renewable sources of DNA, are now being used as a model system to study genotype-phenotype relationships in human cells, including searches for QTLs influencing levels of individual mRNAs and responses to drugs and radiation. In the course of attempting to map genes for drug response using 269 LCLs from the International HapMap Project, we evaluated the extent to which biological noise and non-genetic confounders contribute to trait variability in LCLs. While drug responses could be technically well measured on a given day, we observed significant day-to-day variability and substantial correlation to non-genetic confounders, such as baseline growth rates and metabolic state in culture. After correcting for these confounders, we were unable to detect any QTLs with genome-wide significance for drug response. A much higher proportion of variance in mRNA levels may be attributed to non-genetic factors (intra-individual variance--i.e., biological noise, levels of the EBV virus used to transform the cells, ATP levels than to detectable eQTLs. Finally, in an attempt to improve power, we focused analysis on those genes that had both detectable eQTLs and correlation to drug response; we were unable to detect evidence that eQTL SNPs are convincingly associated with drug response in the model. While LCLs are a promising model for pharmacogenetic experiments, biological noise and in vitro artifacts may reduce power and have the potential to create spurious association due to confounding.

  2. Effects of inorganic and organic arsenic compounds on growth and apoptosis of human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikita, Eri; Arai, Mariko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Utsumi, Hiroya; Yuan, Bo; Toyoda, Hiroo; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the effects of inorganic and organic arsenic compounds on human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells. Cell proliferation was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5¬diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptotic cell morphology was examined by cell staining with Hoechst 33342. Cellular caspase-3/7 activities were measured after arsenic treatment. The inhibitory concentration by 50% (IC(50)) values of As(2)O(3) towards MOLT-4 and daunorubicin- resistant MOLT-4/DNR cell proliferation were 0.87 and 0.92 μM, while the values for arsenic acid were 69.1 and 116.6 μM, respectively. These arsenic compounds also inhibited mitogen-induced proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Six organic arsenic compounds did not inhibit leukemia cell proliferation. As(2)O(3) and arsenic acid induced apoptotic cell morphology and increased caspase-3/7 activity in the leukemia cells. Ascorbic acid and buthionine sulfoxide enhanced, while N-acetyl-L-cysteine abated, the suppressive effects of inorganic arsenic compounds on leukemia cell proliferation. As(2)O(3) and arsenic acid inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in MOLT-4 and daunorubicine-resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells via glutathione-depletion and subsequent caspase-3/7 activation. Organic arsenic compounds have no inhibitory activity on the leukemia cell proliferation. Inorganic arsenic compounds are suggested as useful agents for treatment of T-lymphoblastoid leukemia.

  3. Forward subtractive libraries containing genes transactivated by dexamethasone in ataxia-telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells.

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    Biagiotti, Sara; Menotta, Michele; Giacomini, Elisa; Radici, Lucia; Bianchi, Marzia; Bozzao, Cristina; Chessa, Luciana; Magnani, Mauro

    2014-07-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the Ataxia Telangiectasia-mutated gene. A-T shows a complex phenotype ranging from early-onset progressive neurodegeneration to immunodeficiencies, high incidence of infections, and tumors. Unfortunately, no therapy is up to now available for treating this condition. Recently, the short term treatment of ataxia-telangiectasia patients with glucocorticoids was shown to improve their neurological symptoms and possibly reverse cerebellar atrophy. Thus, corticosteroids represent an attractive approach for the treatment of this neurodegenerative disease. However, the molecular mechanism involved in glucocorticoid action in A-T is yet unknown. The aim of our work is to construct cDNA libraries containing those genes which are transactivated by the glucocorticoid analogue, dexamethasone, in A-T human cells. For this purpose, suppression subtractive hybridization has been performed on ATM-null lymphoblastoid cell transcriptome extracted following drug administration. Annotation of whole genes contained in the libraries has been obtained by coupling subtractive hybridization with microarray analysis. Positive transcripts have been validated by quantitative PCR. Through in silico analyses, identified genes have been classified on the basis of the pathway in which they are involved, being able to address signaling required for dexamethasone action. Most of the induced transcripts are involved in metabolic processes and regulation of cellular processes. Our results can help to unravel the mechanism of glucocorticoid action in the reversion of A-T phenotype. Moreover, the induction of a specific region of the ATM transcript has been identified as putative biomarker predictive of dexamethasone efficacy on ataxic patients.

  4. Distinct lithium-induced gene expression effects in lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with bipolar disorder.

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    Fries, Gabriel R; Colpo, Gabriela D; Monroy-Jaramillo, Nancy; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming; Arnold, Jodi G; Bowden, Charles L; Walss-Bass, Consuelo

    2017-09-19

    Lithium is the most commonly prescribed medication for the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD), yet the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are still unclear. We aimed to compare the effects of lithium treatment in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from BD patients and controls. LCLs were generated from sixty-two BD patients (based on DSM-IV) and seventeen healthy controls matched for age, sex, and ethnicity. Patients were recruited from outpatient clinics from February 2012 to October 2014. LCLs were treated with 1mM lithium for 7 days followed by microarray gene expression assay and validation by real-time quantitative PCR. Baseline differences between groups, as well as differences between vehicle- and lithium-treated cells within each group were analyzed. The biological significance of differentially expressed genes was examined by pathway enrichment analysis. No significant differences in baseline gene expression (adjusted p-value Lithium treatment of LCLs from controls did not lead to any significant differences. However, lithium altered the expression of 236 genes in LCLs from patients; those genes were enriched for signaling pathways related to apoptosis. Among those genes, the alterations in the expression of PIK3CG, SERP1 and UPP1 were validated by real-time PCR. A significant correlation was also found between circadian functioning and CEBPG and FGF2 expression levels. In summary, our results suggest that lithium treatment induces expression changes in genes associated with the apoptosis pathway in BD LCLs. The more pronounced effects of lithium in patients compared to controls suggest a disease-specific effect of this drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. Arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with proteotoxicity in human lymphoblastoid cells

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    Bolt, Alicia M.; Zhao, Fei; Pacheco, Samantha; Klimecki, Walter T., E-mail: klimecki@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2012-10-15

    Epidemiological studies of arsenic-exposed populations have provided evidence that arsenic exposure in humans is associated with immunosuppression. Previously, we have reported that arsenite-induced toxicity is associated with the induction of autophagy in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL). Autophagy is a cellular process that functions in the degradation of damaged cellular components, including protein aggregates formed by misfolded or damaged proteins. Accumulation of misfolded or damaged proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). In an effort to investigate the mechanism of autophagy induction by arsenite in the LCL model, we examined the potential contribution of ER stress and activation of the UPR. LCL exposed to sodium arsenite for 8-days induced expression of UPR-activated genes, including CHOP and GRP78, at the RNA and the protein level. Evidence for activation of the three arms of the UPR was observed. The arsenite-induced activation of the UPR was associated with an accumulation of protein aggregates containing p62 and LC3, proteins with established roles in the sequestration and autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. Taken together, these data provide evidence that arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with the generation of ER stress, activation of the UPR, and formation of protein aggregates that may be targeted to the lysosome for degradation. -- Highlights: ► Arsenite induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response. ► Arsenite induces the formation of protein aggregates that contain p62 and LC3-II. ► Time-course data suggests that arsenite-induced autophagy precedes ER stress.

  6. Linking short tandem repeat polymorphisms with cytosine modifications in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhou; Zheng, Yinan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Cong; Joyce, Brian Thomas; Kibbe, Warren A; Hou, Lifang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Inter-individual variation in cytosine modifications has been linked to complex traits in humans. Cytosine modification variation is partially controlled by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), known as modified cytosine quantitative trait loci (mQTL). However, little is known about the role of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs), a class of structural genetic variants, in regulating cytosine modifications. Utilizing the published data on the International HapMap Project lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), we assessed the relationships between 721 STRPs and the modification levels of 283,540 autosomal CpG sites. Our findings suggest that, in contrast to the predominant cis-acting mode for SNP-based mQTL, STRPs are associated with cytosine modification levels in both cis-acting (local) and trans-acting (distant) modes. In local scans within the ±1 Mb windows of target CpGs, 21, 9, and 21 cis-acting STRP-based mQTL were detected in CEU (Caucasian residents from Utah, USA), YRI (Yoruba people from Ibadan, Nigeria), and the combined samples, respectively. In contrast, 139,420, 76,817, and 121,866 trans-acting STRP-based mQTL were identified in CEU, YRI, and the combined samples, respectively. A substantial proportion of CpG sites detected with local STRP-based mQTL were not associated with SNP-based mQTL, suggesting that STRPs represent an independent class of mQTL. Functionally, genetic variants neighboring CpG-associated STRPs are enriched with genome-wide association study (GWAS) loci for a variety of complex traits and diseases, including cancers, based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) GWAS Catalog. Therefore, elucidating these STRP-based mQTL in addition to SNP-based mQTL can provide novel insights into the genetic architectures of complex traits.

  7. Protein degradation in a LAMP-2-deficient B-lymphoblastoid cell line from a patient with Danon disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lanzas, Raul; Alvarez-Castelao, Beatriz; Bermejo, Teresa; Ayuso, Teresa; Tuñón, Teresa; Castaño, José G

    2016-08-01

    Danon disease, a condition characterized by cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and intellectual disability, is caused by mutations in the LAMP-2 gene. Lamp-2A protein, generated by alternative splicing from the Lamp-2 pre-mRNA, is reported to be the lysosomal membrane receptor essential for the chaperone-mediated autophagic pathway (CMA) aimed to selective protein targeting and translocation into the lysosomal lumen for degradation. To study the relevance of Lamp-2 in protein degradation, a lymphoblastoid cell line was obtained by EBV transformation of B-cells from a Danon patient. The derived cell line showed no significant expression of Lamp-2 protein. The steady-state mRNA and protein levels of alpha-synuclein, IΚBα, Rcan1, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, four proteins reported to be selective substrates of the CMA pathway, were similar in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis showed that the half-life of alpha-synuclein, IΚBα, and Rcan1 was similar in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells, and its degradation prevented by proteasome inhibitors. Both in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells, induction of CMA and macroautophagy by serum and aminoacid starvation of cells for 8h produced a similar decrease in IΚBα and Rcan1 protein levels and was prevented by the addition of lysosome and autophagy inhibitors. In conclusion, the results presented here showed that Lamp-2 deficiency in human lymphoblastoid cells did not modify the steady-state levels or the degradation of several protein substrates reported as selective substrates of the CMA pathway.

  8. Targeting Epstein-Barr virus–transformed B lymphoblastoid cells using antibodies with T-cell receptor–like specificities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Junyun; Tan, Wei Jian; Too, Chien Tei; Choo, Joanna Ai Ling; Wong, Lan Hiong; Mustafa, Fatimah Bte; Srinivasan, Nalini; Lim, Angeline Pei Chiew; Zhong, Youjia; Gascoigne, Nicholas R. J.; Hanson, Brendon J.; Chan, Soh Ha; Chen, Jianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncovirus associated with several human malignancies including posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in immunosuppressed patients. We show here that anti-EBV T-cell receptor–like monoclonal antibodies (TCR-like mAbs) E1, L1, and L2 bound to their respective HLA-A*0201-restricted EBV peptides EBNA1562-570, LMP1125-133, and LMP2A426-434 with high affinities and specificities. These mAbs recognized endogenously presented targets on EBV B lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCLs), but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells, from which they were derived. Furthermore, these mAbs displayed similar binding activities on several BLCLs, despite inherent heterogeneity between different donor samples. A single weekly administration of the naked mAbs reduced splenomegaly, liver tumor spots, and tumor burden in BLCL-engrafted immunodeficient NOD-SCID/Il2rg−/− mice. In particular, mice that were treated with the E1 mAb displayed a delayed weight loss and significantly prolonged survival. In vitro, these TCR-like mAbs induced early apoptosis of BLCLs, thereby enhancing their Fc-dependent phagocytic uptake by macrophages. These data provide evidence for TCR-like mAbs as potential therapeutic modalities to target EBV-associated diseases. PMID:27338099

  9. Impact of 1.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) on DNA damage and repair induced by doxorubicin in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Yezhen, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Jiliang, He

    2010-01-01

    In the present in vitro study, a comet assay was used to determine whether 1.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR, SAR of 2W/kg) can influence DNA repair in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells exposed to doxorubicin (DOX) at the doses of 0microg/ml, 0.05microg/ml, 0.075microg/ml, 0.10microg/ml, 0.15microg/ml and 0.20microg/ml. The combinative exposures to RFR with DOX were divided into five categories. DNA damage was detected at 0h, 6h, 12h, 18h and 24h after exposure to DOX via the comet assay, and the percent of DNA in the tail (% tail DNA) served as the indicator of DNA damage. The results demonstrated that (1) RFR could not directly induce DNA damage of human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells; (2) DOX could significantly induce DNA damage of human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells with the dose-effect relationship, and there were special repair characteristics of DNA damage induced by DOX; (3) E-E-E type (exposure to RFR for 2h, then simultaneous exposure to RFR and DOX, and exposure to RFR for 6h, 12h, 18h and 24h after exposure to DOX) combinative exposure could obviously influence DNA repair at 6h and 12h after exposure to DOX for four DOX doses (0.075microg/ml, 0.10microg/ml, 0.15microg/ml and 0.20microg/ml) in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of GD3-CLIPR-59 association in lymphoblastoid T cell apoptosis triggered by CD95/Fas.

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    Maurizio Sorice

    Full Text Available We previously found that a directional movement of the raft component GD3 towards mitochondria, by its association with microtubules, was mandatory to late apoptogenic events triggered by CD95/Fas. Since CLIPR-59, CLIP-170-related protein, has recently been identified as a microtubule binding protein associated with lipid rafts, we analyzed the role of GD3-CLIPR-59 association in lymphoblastoid T cell apoptosis triggered by CD95/Fas. To test whether CLIPR-59 could play a role at the raft-microtubule junction, we performed a series of experiments by using immunoelectron microscopy, static or flow cytometry and biochemical analyses. We first assessed the presence of CLIPR-59 molecule in lymphoblastoid T cells (CEM. Then, we demonstrated that GD3-microtubule interaction occurs via CLIPR-59 and takes place at early time points after CD95/Fas ligation, preceding the association GD3-tubulin. GD3-CLIPR-59 association was demonstrated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET analysis. The key role of CLIPR-59 in this dynamic process was clarified by the observation that silencing CLIPR-59 by siRNA affected the kinetics of GD3-tubulin association, spreading of GD3 towards mitochondria and apoptosis execution. We find that CLIPR-59 may act as a typical chaperone, allowing a prompt interaction between tubulin and the raft component GD3 during cell apoptosis triggered by CD95/Fas. On the basis of the suggested role of lipid rafts in conveying pro-apoptotic signals these results disclose new perspectives in the understanding of the mechanisms by which raft-mediated pro-apoptotic signals can directionally reach their target, i.e. the mitochondria, and trigger apoptosis execution.

  11. Clonal analysis of a human lymphoblastoid cell line (B17) secreting antibody to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polke, C; Greger, B; Steinitz, M; Eichmann, K

    1982-10-01

    In this paper we analyse the clonal composition of a human lymphoblastoid B-cell line secreting IgM/k antibody to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, the immunodominant sugar of Group-A-streptococcal carbohydrate. Besides non-antibody secreting cells, the line consists of two clonotypes of antibody-secreting cells: B17 cells producing over 90% and F6 cells producing less than 10% of the antibody in the supernatant. The proportions of B17 and F6 cells in the cell line seem to be similar to the proportion of antibodies in the supernatant. F6 cells can be isolated by cloning and maintained as stable lines, whereas this is more difficult with B17 cells. The results suggest that upon establishment of the line, at least two N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific B cells were immortalized and coexist together as independent clonotypes. Although F6 cells seem to have a slight tissue culture advantage, they represent the minor clonotype in the B17 cell line.

  12. Genotoxicity of tamoxifen, tamoxifen epoxide and toremifene in human lymphoblastoid cells containing human cytochrome P450s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, J A; Davies, A; Lim, C K; De Matteis, F; Stanley, L A; White, I N; Yuan, Z X; Smith, L L

    1994-01-01

    The clastogenicity of tamoxifen and toremifene was tested in six human lymphoblastoid cell lines each expressing increased monooxygenase activity associated with a specific transfected human cytochrome P450 cDNA (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2D6, CYP2E1 or CYP3A4). The chemicals were also tested in a cell line (MCL-5) expressing elevated native CYP1A1 and containing transfected CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 and epoxide hydrolase, and in a cell line containing only the viral vector (Ho1). Dose-related increases in micronuclei were observed when cells expressing 2E1, 3A4, 2D6 or MCL-5 cells were exposed to tamoxifen. The positive responses in the cell lines were in the order MCL-5 > 2E1 > 3A4 > 2D6. Toremifene also gave positive results with 2E1, 3A4 and MCL-5 cells, although the responses were less marked and the positive effects required higher doses than with tamoxifen. A synthesized epoxide of tamoxifen was also tested in these cell lines and produced similar increases in the incidences of micronucleated cells. The increases in the responses observed with the epoxide were greater than with tamoxifen or toremifene. The P450 isoenzyme activities in these cells were in a range similar to those of human tumour-derived cell lines. Microsomes (1A1, 2A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2E1, 3A4 and 2D6) from these cells all metabolized tamoxifen. The major metabolite detected by HPLC was N-desmethyltamoxifen, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen was also detected in cells with cytochrome P450 2E1 and 2D6. These results are consistent with the following conclusions. (1) Tamoxifen requires metabolic activation to DNA-reactive species by specific CYP monooxygenases in order to exert its genotoxic effects. (2) The positive clastogenic effects elicited in lymphoblastoid cells by tamoxifen epoxide suggest that the genotoxic (and possibly the carcinogenic) effects of tamoxifen may be due to one or more epoxide metabolites that are generated intracellularly, probably in close proximity to the nucleus. (3) Tamoxifen is

  13. Ferredoxin-NADP reductase from the thermophilic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Miyuki; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2009-08-01

    The thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, assimilates carbon dioxide via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Small iron-sulfur proteins, ferredoxins, play a central role as low-potential electron donors for this cycle. The fpr gene of this bacterium, encoding a putative ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR, EC 1.18.1.2), was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity. Unexpectedly, the monomeric Fpr protein contained one molecule of FMN as a prosthetic group, although FNRs from other organisms are known to contain FAD. The FMN-containing Fpr was shown to be a bona fide FNR that catalyzes a reversible redox reaction between NADP(+)/NADPH and ferredoxins.

  14. In vitro study of AFB1 and AFM1 effects on human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, D; Russo, R; Balestrieri, A; Marzocco, S; Bergamo, P; Severino, L

    2014-10-01

    Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus spp. that can occur as a natural contaminant in foods and feeds of vegetable origin. Post-ingestion, AFB(1) can be metabolized in the liver of mammals into hydroxylated aflatoxin M(1) (AFM(1)) that is excreted with milk. Although several studies have been carried out to evaluate effects of AFB(1) on the immune system, studies regarding AFM(1) are moreover lacking. The aim of the current study was to investigate effects of AFB(1) and AFM(1) on immune function using a lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cell line as an experimental model. Both AFB(1) and AFM(1) produced significant decreases in Jurkat cell proliferation, whereas only minor effects were noted on interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ cytokines mRNA expression in stimulated cells that had been pre-incubated with AFB(1) and AFM(1). Particularly, AFB(1), but not AFM(1), at the highest concentration (50 µM) induced a marked increase in IL-8 mRNA expression. The results of the current study suggested the existence of a concentration threshold for AFB(1) and AFM(1) needed to exert biological activity on cell viability and innate immunity.

  15. Utility of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generation

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    Satish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of EBV immortalized LCLs have been generated and maintained in genetic/epidemiological studies as a perpetual source of DNA and as a surrogate in vitro cell model. Recent successes in reprograming LCLs into iPSCs have paved the way for generating more relevant in vitro disease models using this existing bioresource. However, the overall reprogramming efficiency and success rate remain poor and very little is known about the mechanistic changes that take place at the transcriptome and cellular functional level during LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming. Here, we report a new optimized LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming protocol using episomal plasmids encoding pluripotency transcription factors and mouse p53DD (p53 carboxy-terminal dominant-negative fragment and commercially available reprogramming media. We achieved a consistently high reprogramming efficiency and 100% success rate using this optimized protocol. Further, we investigated the transcriptional changes in mRNA and miRNA levels, using FC-abs ≥ 2.0 and FDR ≤ 0.05 cutoffs; 5,228 mRNAs and 77 miRNAs were differentially expressed during LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming. The functional enrichment analysis of the upregulated genes and activation of human pluripotency pathways in the reprogrammed iPSCs showed that the generated iPSCs possess transcriptional and functional profiles very similar to those of human ESCs.

  16. Genome-wide association study for biomarker identification of Rapamycin and Everolimus using a lymphoblastoid cell line system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eJiang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors, a set of promising potential anti-cancer agents, has shown response variability among individuals. This study aimed to identify novel biomarkers and mechanisms that might influence the response to Rapamycin and Everolimus. Genome-wide association (GWA analyses involving single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, mRNA and microRNAs microarray data were assessed for association with area under the cytotoxicity dose response curve (AUC of two mTOR inhibitors in 272 human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Integrated analysis among SNPs, expression data, microRNA data and AUC values were also performed to help select candidate genes for further functional characterization. Functional validation of candidate genes using siRNA screening in multiple cell lines followed by MTS assays for the two mTOR inhibitors were performed. We found that 16 expression probe sets (genes that overlapped between the two drugs were associated with AUC values of two mTOR inhibitors. 127 and 100 SNPs had P<10-4, while 8 and 10 SNPs had P<10-5 with Rapamycin and Everolimus AUC, respectively. Functional studies indicated that 13 genes significantly altered cell sensitivity to either one or both drugs in at least one cell line. Additionally, one microRNA, miR-10a, was significantly associated with AUC values for both drugs and was shown to repress expression of genes that were associated with AUC and desensitize cells to both drugs. In summary, this study identified genes and a microRNA that might contribute to response to mTOR inhibitors.

  17. Individual radiosensitivity does not correlate with radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell lines or CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes

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    Wistop, A.; Keller, U.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R.; Distel, L.V.R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Sprung, C.N. [Div. of Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2005-05-01

    Background and purpose: spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from healthy donors, cancer patients and donors with radiosensitivity syndromes as well as CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes from patients with {>=} grade 3 late toxicity were investigated as a possible marker for the detection of individual radiosensitivity. These investigations are based on the hypothesis that hypersensitive patients have reduced levels of apoptosis after in vitro irradiation as a result of a defect in the signaling pathway. Material and methods: Epstein-Barr virus-(EBV-)transformed LCLs derived from five healthy donors, seven patients with heterozygous or homozygous genotype for ataxia-telangiectasia or Nijmegen breakage syndrome and five patients with {>=} grade 3 late toxicity (RTOG) were investigated. In addition, CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes from 21 healthy individuals and 18 cancer patients including five patients with a proven cellular hypersensitivity to radiation were analyzed. Cells were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 2 and 5 Gy and were incubated for 48 h. Apoptotic rates were measured by the TUNEL assay followed by customized image analysis. Results: four out of seven radiosensitivity syndrome patients were identified to have an increased cellular radiosensitivity as determined by reduced apoptotic rates after irradiation of their respective LCLs. Comparatively, only two of the five hypersensitive cancer patients were clearly identified by reduced apoptotic rates. Spontaneous apoptotic rates were very homogeneous among all 39 samples from controls and patients, while lymphocytes of all cancer patients showed significantly lower radiation-induced rates. Conclusion: only a subgroup of hypersensitive patients may be identified by reduction of radiation-induced apoptotic rate. It is concluded that the hypothesis according to which hypersensitive cells have reduced levels of apoptosis is only conditionally true. The authors suggest that this

  18. The Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines of Recurrence Condyloma Acuminatum Patients Produce Lower Level of Tumor Necrosis Factor Stimulated with LPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冬先; 周礼义; 陈兴平

    2003-01-01

    To study the mechanism of Condyloma acuminatum (CA) recurrence, and the associa-tion of CA recurrence with the ability of the host derived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) stimulatedby LPS to produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF), EBV-transformedB LCL were used as TNF pro-ducing cells. The ability of LCL stimulated by LPS to produce TNF was measured by bioassay.The results showed that the LCL from CA patients (including recurrent and non-recurrent CA pa-tients) produced similar level of TNF stimulated by LPS to that of normal controls (29.54% ±11.28% vs 34. 31%±11.46%, P=0. 1498). The LCL of CA recurrent patients produced significantly lower amount of TNF than that of non-recurrent CA patients (23.72%±7.41% vs 37.33%± 11.10%, P=0. 0032). Compared with the normal controls, CA recurrent patients showed a de-creased ability to produce TNF (23.72% ± 7.41 vs 34.31% ± 11.46, P = 0. 0054 ), whereas CAnon recurrent patients had the similar ability to the controls (37.33%±11.10 vs 34.31%±11.46,P=0. 4914). It was concluded that the onset of CA was not relevant to the individual's ability toproduce TNF. But the recurrence of CA was associated with the ability to produce TNF. It was al-so indicated that the TNF involved cellular immunity might play an important role in the clearanceof the residual HPV by the host after treatment.

  19. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  20. Molecular characterization of neoplastic and normal "sister" lymphoblastoid B-cell lines from chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanemo Myhrinder, Anna; Hellqvist, Eva; Bergh, Ann-Charlotte;

    2013-01-01

    /short tandem repeat (STR) fingerprinting. Innate B-cell features, i.e. natural Ab production and CD5 receptors, were present in most CLL cell lines, but in none of the normal LCLs. This panel of immortalized CLL-derived cell lines is a valuable reference representing a renewable source of authentic Abs and DNA....

  1. Gene conversion is strongly induced in human cells by double-strand breaks and is modulated by the expression of BCL-XL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, Claudia; Pierce, Andrew J.; Gauny, Stacey S.; Jasin, Maria; Kronenberg, Amy

    2001-09-25

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a well-established mechanism that contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability in rodent cells, and it has been assumed that HDR is of similar importance in the repair of DSBs in human cells. However, in addition to promoting genomic stability, some outcomes of homologous recombination can be deleterious, suggesting that factors exist to regulate HDR. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of BCL-2 or BCL-xL enhanced the frequency of x-ray-induced mutations involving the TK1 locus, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events presumed to arise by mitotic recombination. The present study was designed to test whether HDR is a prominent DSB repair pathway in human cells, and to directly determine whether ectopic expression of BCL-xL affects HDR. We used the B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6, which expresses wild-type TP53 and resembles normal lymphocytes in undergoing apoptosis following! genotoxic stress. U sing isogenic derivatives of TK6 cells (TK6-neo, TK6-bcl-xL), we find that a DSB in an integrated HDR reporter stimulates gene conversion 40-50-fold in TK6-neo cells, demonstrating that a DSB can be efficiently repaired by gene conversion in human cells. Significantly, DSB-induced gene conversion events are 3- to 4-fold more frequent in BCL-xL overexpressing cells. The results demonstrate that HDR plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity in human cells and that ectopic expression of BCL-xL enhances HDR of DSBs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight a function for BCL-xL in modulating DSB repair in human cells.

  2. In vitro evaluation of human hybrid cell lines generated by fusion of B-lymphoblastoid cells and ex vivo tumour cells as candidate vaccines for haematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Dunnion, Debbie; Teobald, Iryna; Walewska, Renata; Browning, Michael J

    2012-10-12

    Fusions of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumour cells have been shown to induce protective immunity to tumour challenge in animal models, and to represent a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. The broader clinical application of this approach, however, is potentially constrained by the lack of replicative capacity and limited standardisation of fusion cell preparations. We show here that fusion of ex vivo tumour cells isolated from patients with a range of haematological malignancies with the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL), HMy2, followed by chemical selection of the hybridomas, generated stable, self-replicating human hybrid cell lines that grew continuously in tissue culture, and survived freeze/thawing cycles. The hybrid cell lines expressed HLA class I and class II molecules, and the major T-cell costimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD86. All but two of 14 hybrid cell lines generated expressed tumour-associated antigens that were not expressed by HMy2 cells, and were therefore derived from the parent tumour cells. The hybrid cell lines stimulated allogeneic T-cell proliferative responses and interferon-gamma release in vitro to a considerably greater degree than their respective parent tumour cells. The enhanced T-cell stimulation was inhibited by CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, and by blocking antibodies to MHC class I and class II molecules. Finally, all of five LCL/tumour hybrid cell lines tested induced tumour antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses in vitro in PBL from healthy, HLA-A2+ individuals, as detected by HLA-A2-peptide pentamer staining and cellular cytotoxicity. These data show that stable hybrid cell lines, with enhanced immunostimulatory properties and potential for therapeutic vaccination, can be generated by in vitro fusion and chemical selection of B-LCL and ex vivo haematological tumour cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Generation of human scFvs antibodies recognizing a prion protein epitope expressed on the surface of human lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imperiale Valentina

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A hallmark of prion disease is the transformation of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc into an infectious disease-associated isoform, (PrPsc. Anti-prion protein monoclonal antibodies are invaluable for structure-function studies of PrP molecules. Furthermore recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies can prevent the incorporation of PrPc into propagating prions. In the present article, we show two new human phage antibodies, isolated on recombinant hamster prion protein (rHaPrP. Results We adopted an antibody phage display strategy to isolate specific human antibodies directed towards rHaPrP which has been used as a bait for panning the synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library. Two phage antibodies clones named MA3.B4 and MA3.G3 were isolated and characterized under genetic biochemical and immunocytochemical aspects. The clones were found to recognize the prion protein in ELISA studies. In flow-cytometry studies, these human single chain Fragment variable (scFv phage-antibodies show a well defined pattern of reactivity on human lymphoblastoid and myeloid cells. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the gene encoding for the antibody fragments and antigen recognition patterns determined by flow-cytometry analysis indicate that the isolated scFvs recognize novel epitopes in the PrPc molecule. These new anti PrPc human antibodies are unique reagents for prion protein detection and may represent a biologic platform to develop new reagents to treat PrPsc associated disease.

  4. Molecular Signatures of Cardiac Defects in Down Syndrome Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines Suggest Altered Ciliome and Hedgehog Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Clémentine; Rivals, Isabelle; Ait Yahya-Graison, Emilie; Dauphinot, Luce; Paly, Evelyne; Mircher, Clothilde; Ravel, Aimé; Grattau, Yann; Bléhaut, Henri; Mégarbane, André; Dembour, Guy; de Fréminville, Bénédicte; Touraine, Renaud; Créau, Nicole; Potier, Marie Claude; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Forty percent of people with Down syndrome exhibit heart defects, most often an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and less frequently a ventricular septal defect (VSD) or atrial septal defect (ASD). Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were established from lymphocytes of individuals with trisomy 21, the chromosomal abnormality causing Down syndrome. Gene expression profiles generated from DNA microarrays of LCLs from individuals without heart defects (CHD−; n = 22) were compared with those of LCLs from patients with cardiac malformations (CHD+; n = 21). After quantile normalization, principal component analysis revealed that AVSD carriers could be distinguished from a combined group of ASD or VSD (ASD+VSD) carriers. From 9,758 expressed genes, we identified 889 and 1,016 genes differentially expressed between CHD− and AVSD and CHD− and ASD+VSD, respectively, with only 119 genes in common. A specific chromosomal enrichment was found in each group of affected genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 65% are expressed in human or mouse fetal heart tissues (GEO dataset). Additional LCLs from new groups of AVSD and ASD+VSD patients were analyzed by quantitative PCR; observed expression ratios were similar to microarray results. Analysis of GO categories revealed enrichment of genes from pathways regulating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in patients with AVSD and of genes involved in semaphorin-plexin-driven cardiogenesis and the formation of cytoplasmic microtubules in patients with ASD-VSD. A pathway-oriented search revealed enrichment in the ciliome for both groups and a specific enrichment in Hedgehog and Jak-stat pathways among ASD+VSD patients. These genes or related pathways are therefore potentially involved in normal cardiogenesis as well as in cardiac malformations observed in individuals with trisomy 21. PMID:22912673

  5. Molecular signatures of cardiac defects in Down syndrome lymphoblastoid cell lines suggest altered ciliome and Hedgehog pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Ripoll

    Full Text Available Forty percent of people with Down syndrome exhibit heart defects, most often an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD and less frequently a ventricular septal defect (VSD or atrial septal defect (ASD. Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs were established from lymphocytes of individuals with trisomy 21, the chromosomal abnormality causing Down syndrome. Gene expression profiles generated from DNA microarrays of LCLs from individuals without heart defects (CHD(-; n = 22 were compared with those of LCLs from patients with cardiac malformations (CHD(+; n = 21. After quantile normalization, principal component analysis revealed that AVSD carriers could be distinguished from a combined group of ASD or VSD (ASD+VSD carriers. From 9,758 expressed genes, we identified 889 and 1,016 genes differentially expressed between CHD(- and AVSD and CHD(- and ASD+VSD, respectively, with only 119 genes in common. A specific chromosomal enrichment was found in each group of affected genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 65% are expressed in human or mouse fetal heart tissues (GEO dataset. Additional LCLs from new groups of AVSD and ASD+VSD patients were analyzed by quantitative PCR; observed expression ratios were similar to microarray results. Analysis of GO categories revealed enrichment of genes from pathways regulating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in patients with AVSD and of genes involved in semaphorin-plexin-driven cardiogenesis and the formation of cytoplasmic microtubules in patients with ASD-VSD. A pathway-oriented search revealed enrichment in the ciliome for both groups and a specific enrichment in Hedgehog and Jak-stat pathways among ASD+VSD patients. These genes or related pathways are therefore potentially involved in normal cardiogenesis as well as in cardiac malformations observed in individuals with trisomy 21.

  6. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling reveals microRNA-correlated genes and biological processes in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expression level of many genes shows abundant natural variation in human populations. The variations in gene expression are believed to contribute to phenotypic differences. Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs are one of the key regulators of gene expression. However, past studies have focused on the miRNA target genes and used loss- or gain-of-function approach that may not reflect natural association between miRNA and mRNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine miRNA regulatory effect on global gene expression under endogenous condition, we performed pair-wise correlation coefficient analysis on expression levels of 366 miRNAs and 14,174 messenger RNAs (mRNAs in 90 immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines, and observed significant correlations between the two species of RNA transcripts. We identified a total of 7,207 significantly correlated miRNA-mRNA pairs (false discovery rate q<0.01. Of those, 4,085 pairs showed positive correlations while 3,122 pairs showed negative correlations. Gene ontology analyses on the miRNA-correlated genes revealed significant enrichments in several biological processes related to cell cycle, cell communication and signal transduction. Individually, each of three miRNAs (miR-331, -98 and -33b demonstrated significant correlation with the genes in cell cycle-related biological processes, which is consistent with important role of miRNAs in cell cycle regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates feasibility of using naturally expressed transcript profiles to identify endogenous correlation between miRNA and miRNA. By applying this genome-wide approach, we have identified thousands of miRNA-correlated genes and revealed potential role of miRNAs in several important cellular functions. The study results along with accompanying data sets will provide a wealth of high-throughput data to further evaluate the miRNA-regulated genes and eventually in phenotypic variations of

  7. In vitro adverse effects of iron ore dusts on human lymphoblastoid cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Wang, Jing J; Sanderson, Barbara J S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adverse effects produced by four types of iron (Fe) ore dust using cultured human cells. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by Fe ore dusts were determined by assays including cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN), population growth, and methyl tetrazolium (MTT). Four iron ore dusts were tested, namely, 1002 Limonite & Goethite (1002), HG2 hematite (HG2), HG1 Soutlem Pit (HG1), and HG4. WIL2 -NS cells were incubated for 10 h with extracts from a range of concentrations (0, 75, or 150 μg/ml) of Fe ore dust. Significant decreases in percent cell viability were seen at 150 μg/ml HG2 and 1002 as measured by MTT, with viability that decreased to 75 and 73%, respectively, compared to untreated controls. The cell population regrew to a different extent after Fe ore dust was removed, except for HG1, where population remained declined. An approximately twofold significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBNC) was seen with 1002, HG2, and HG1 at 150 μg/ml. A significant rise in apoptosis induction was observed at 150 μg/ml HG1. Data indicate that Fe ore dusts at 150 μg/ml produced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  8. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr virus DNA release from lymphoblastoid cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yih-Yih KOK; Pauline BALRAJ; Alan Soo-Beng KHOO; Wan-Loy CHU; Siew-Moi PHANG; Shar Mariam MOHAMED; Rakesh NAIDU; Pey-Jiun LAI; Shui-Nyuk LING; Joon-Wah MAK; Patricia Kim-Chooi LIM

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the inhibitory activities of methanol extracts from the microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus, and Spirulina platensis against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in three Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines, namely Akata, B95-8, and P3HR-1. The antiviral activity was assessed by quantifying the cell-free EBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The methanol extracts from Ankistrodesmus convolutus and Synechococcus elongatus displayed low cytotoxicity and potent effect in reducing cell-free EBV DNA (EC50<0.01 μg/ml) with a high therapeutic index (>28000). After fractionation by column chromatography, the fraction from Synechococcus elongatus (SEF1) reduced the cell-free EBV DNA most effectively (EC50=2.9 μg/ml, therapeutic index>69). Upon further fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the sub-fraction SEF1'a was most active in reducing the cell-free EBV DNA (EC50=1.38 μg/ml, therapeutic index>14.5). This study suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds that can be used against EBV.

  9. Mutagenic adaptive response to high-LET radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells exposed to low doses of heavy-ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vares, Guillaume, E-mail: vares@nirs.go.jp [Radiation Risk Reduction Research Program, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Wang, Bing, E-mail: jp2813km@nirs.go.jp [Radiation Risk Reduction Research Program, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tanaka, Kaoru; Kakimoto, Ayana; Eguchi-Kasai, Kyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru [Radiation Risk Reduction Research Program, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Adaptive response (AR) and bystander effect are two important phenomena involved in biological responses to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). Furthermore, there is a strong interest in better understanding the biological effects of high-LET radiation. We previously demonstrated the ability of low doses of X-rays to induce an AR to challenging heavy-ion radiation . In this study, we assessed in vitro the ability of priming low doses (0.01 Gy) of heavy-ion radiation to induce a similar AR to a subsequent challenging dose (1-4 Gy) of high-LET IR (carbon-ion: 20 and 40 keV/{mu}m, neon-ion: 150 keV/{mu}m) in TK6, AHH-1 and NH32 cells. Our results showed that low doses of high-LET radiation can induce an AR characterized by lower mutation frequencies at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus and faster DNA repair kinetics, in cells expressing p53.

  10. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV antigen expression in lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Yih Yih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against the expression of three EBV antigens, latent membrane protein (LMP1, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA1 and Z Epstein-Barr reactivation activator (ZEBRA were assessed by immunocytochemistry. The observation that the methanol extracts and their fractions from Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus and Spirulina platensis exhibited inhibitory activity against EBV proteins in three Burkitt’s lymphoma cell lines at concentrations as low as 20 μg/ml suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds against EBV.

  11. Cyto- and genotoxicity of ultrafine TiO2 particles in cultured human lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing J; Sanderson, Barbara J S; Wang, He

    2007-04-01

    Titanium dioxide is frequently used in the production of paints, paper, plastics, welding rod-coating material, and cosmetics, because of its low toxicity. However, recent studies have shown that nano-sized or ultrafine TiO(2) (UF-TiO(2)) (<100 nm in diameter) can generate pulmonary fibrosis and lung tumor in rats. Cytotoxicity induced by UF-TiO(2) in rat lung alveolar macrophages was also observed. This generates great concern about the possible adverse effects of UF-TiO(2) for humans. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of UF-TiO(2) were investigated using the methyl tetrazolium cytotoxicity (MTT) assay, the population growth assay, the apoptosis assay by flow cytometry, the cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay, the comet assay, and the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation assay. WIL2-NS cells were incubated for 6, 24 and 48 h with 0, 26, 65 and 130 microg/ml UF-TiO(2). Significant decreases in viability were seen in the MTT assay at higher doses; for example, 61, 7 and 2% relative viability at 130 microg/ml for 6, 24 and 48-h exposure (P<0.01). A dose-dependent relationship was observed, while a time-dependent relationship was seen only at the highest dose (130 microg/ml) after exposure for 24 and 48 h. Treatment with 130 microg/ml UF-TiO(2) induced approximately 2.5-fold increases in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells (P<0.01). In addition, a significant reduction in the cytokinesis block proliferation index was observed by the CBMN assay (P<0.05). In the comet assay, treatment with 65 microg/ml UF-TiO(2) induced approximately 5-fold increases in olive tail moment (P<0.05). In the HPRT mutation assay, treatment with 130 microg/ml UF-TiO(2) induced approximately 2.5-fold increases in the mutation frequency (P<0.05). The results of this study indicate that UF-TiO(2) can cause genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in cultured human cells.

  12. Exon expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from subjects with schizophrenia before and after glucose deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Maureen V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of glucose reduction stress on lymphoblastic cell line (LCL gene expression in subjects with schizophrenia compared to non-psychotic relatives. Methods LCLs were grown under two glucose conditions to measure the effects of glucose reduction stress on exon expression in subjects with schizophrenia compared to unaffected family member controls. A second aim of this project was to identify cis-regulated transcripts associated with diagnosis. Results There were a total of 122 transcripts with significant diagnosis by probeset interaction effects and 328 transcripts with glucose deprivation by probeset interaction probeset effects after corrections for multiple comparisons. There were 8 transcripts with expression significantly affected by the interaction between diagnosis and glucose deprivation and probeset after correction for multiple comparisons. The overall validation rate by qPCR of 13 diagnosis effect genes identified through microarray was 62%, and all genes tested by qPCR showed concordant up- or down-regulation by qPCR and microarray. We assessed brain gene expression of five genes found to be altered by diagnosis and glucose deprivation in LCLs and found a significant decrease in expression of one gene, glutaminase, in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. One SNP with previously identified regulation by a 3' UTR SNP was found to influence IRF5 expression in both brain and lymphocytes. The relationship between the 3' UTR rs10954213 genotype and IRF5 expression was significant in LCLs (p = 0.0001, DLPFC (p = 0.007, and anterior cingulate cortex (p = 0.002. Conclusion Experimental manipulation of cells lines from subjects with schizophrenia may be a useful approach to explore stress related gene expression alterations in schizophrenia and to identify SNP variants associated with gene expression.

  13. Studying the protein expression in human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) with protein microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Wei, Zheng; Yezhen, Lu; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jiliang, He

    2013-03-29

    In the present study, the protein microarray was used to investigate the protein expression in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells intermittently exposed to 1.8-GHz GSM radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.0 W/kg for 24 h. The differential expression of 27 proteins was found, which were related to DNA damage repair, apoptosis, oncogenesis, cell cycle and proliferation (ratio >1.5-fold, P<0.05). The results validated with Western blot assay indicated that the expression of RPA32 was significantly down-regulated (P<0.05) while the expression of p73 was significantly up-regulated in RFR exposure group (P<0.05). Because of the crucial roles of those proteins in DNA repair and cell apoptosis, the results of present investigation may explain the biological effects of RFR on DNA damage/repair and cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Repair of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet irradiation and aromatic amines in normal and repair-deficient human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevnsner, Tinna; Frandsen, Henrik; Autrup, Herman

    1995-01-01

    A host cell reactivation (HCR) assay was employed to study the capacity of a normal and three repair-deficient human lymphoblastoid cell lines to repair DNA damage induced by UV irradiation and the aromatic amines 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene....... In the XP-D cell line, which had practically no DNA repair capacity, AAF adducts had a more potent inhibitory effect on gene expression than UV and PhIP adducts. When corrected for this inhibitory effect, the wild-type, XP-C and CS-B cell lines repaired low levels of AAF and UV adducts with similar...

  15. Host cell reactivation of uv- and X-ray-damaged herpes simplex virus by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, E.E. (Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA); Long, W.K.

    1981-12-01

    The efficacy of using an infected centers assay, employing herpes simplex virus-infected, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as components, to study host cell reactivation has been explored. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was shown through the infected centers assay to have detectable but varying ability to lytically infect LCLs established from chromosomal breakage syndromes or closely related genetic disorders. The rate of HSV inactivation by ultraviolet (uv) irradiation was faster in LCLs established from Cockaynes's syndrome than in normal LCLs, and faster still in LCLs established from xeroderma pigmentosum. These results indicate that Cockayne's syndrome, while having what appears to be quantitatively normal levels of uv-induced DNA repair replication, shows decreased ability to host cell reactivated uv-damaged HSV. In direct contrast, X-irradiated HSV showed identical survival when assayed on normal LCLs or LCLs established from ataxia telangiectasia showing increased sensitivity to X irradiation as measured by colony formation. Through the infected centers assay, it has also been possible to demonstrate low levels of multiplicity reactivation of mutagen-damaged HSV in permanently proliferating LCLs.

  16. The EBNA3 family of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear proteins associates with the USP46/USP12 deubiquitination complexes to regulate lymphoblastoid cell line growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Makoto; Holthaus, Amy M; Calderwood, Michael A; Lai, Chiou-Yan; Krastins, Bryan; Sarracino, David; Johannsen, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear proteins EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C interact with the cell DNA binding protein RBPJ and regulate cell and viral genes. Repression of the CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene products p16(INK4A) and p14(ARF) by EBNA3A and EBNA3C is critical for EBV mediated transformation of resting B lymphocytes into immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). To define the composition of endogenous EBNA3 protein complexes, we generated lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) expressing flag-HA tagged EBNA3A, EBNA3B, or EBNA3C and used tandem affinity purification to isolate each EBNA3 complex. Our results demonstrated that each EBNA3 protein forms a distinct complex with RBPJ. Mass-spectrometry revealed that the EBNA3A and EBNA3B complexes also contained the deubquitylation complex consisting of WDR48, WDR20, and USP46 (or its paralog USP12) and that EBNA3C complexes contained WDR48. Immunoprecipitation confirmed that EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C association with the USP46 complex. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that WDR48 and USP46 are recruited to the p14(ARF) promoter in an EBNA3C dependent manner. Mapping studies were consistent with WDR48 being the primary mediator of EBNA3 association with the DUB complex. By ChIP assay, WDR48 was recruited to the p14(ARF) promoter in an EBNA3C dependent manner. Importantly, WDR48 associated with EBNA3A and EBNA3C domains that are critical for LCL growth, suggesting a role for USP46/USP12 in EBV induced growth transformation.

  17. Induction of p16(INK4a) is the major barrier to proliferation when Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transforms primary B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalska, Lenka; White, Robert E; Parker, Gillian A; Turro, Ernest; Sinclair, Alison J; Paschos, Kostas; Allday, Martin J

    2013-02-01

    To explore the role of p16(INK4a) as an intrinsic barrier to B cell transformation by EBV, we transformed primary B cells from an individual homozygous for a deletion in the CDKN2A locus encoding p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Using recombinant EBV-BAC viruses expressing conditional EBNA3C (3CHT), we developed a system that allows inactivation of EBNA3C in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) lacking active p16(INK4a) protein but expressing a functional 14(ARF)-fusion protein (p14/p16). The INK4a locus is epigenetically repressed by EBNA3C--in cooperation with EBNA3A--despite the absence of functional p16(INK4a). Although inactivation of EBNA3C in LCLs from normal B cells leads to an increase in p16(INK4a) and growth arrest, EBNA3C inactivation in the p16(INK4a)-null LCLs has no impact on the rate of proliferation, establishing that the repression of INK4a is a major function of EBNA3C in EBV-driven LCL proliferation. This conditional LCL system allowed us to use microarray analysis to identify and confirm genes regulated specifically by EBNA3C, independently of proliferation changes modulated by the p16(INK4a)-Rb-E2F axis. Infections of normal primary B cells with recombinant EBV-BAC virus from which EBNA3C is deleted or with 3CHT EBV in the absence of activating ligand 4-hydroxytamoxifen, revealed that EBNA3C is necessary to overcome an EBV-driven increase in p16(INK4a) expression and concomitant block to proliferation 2-4 weeks post-infection. If cells are p16(INK4a)-null, functional EBNA3C is dispensable for the outgrowth of LCLs.

  18. Induction of p16(INK4a is the major barrier to proliferation when Epstein-Barr virus (EBV transforms primary B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Skalska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To explore the role of p16(INK4a as an intrinsic barrier to B cell transformation by EBV, we transformed primary B cells from an individual homozygous for a deletion in the CDKN2A locus encoding p16(INK4a and p14(ARF. Using recombinant EBV-BAC viruses expressing conditional EBNA3C (3CHT, we developed a system that allows inactivation of EBNA3C in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs lacking active p16(INK4a protein but expressing a functional 14(ARF-fusion protein (p14/p16. The INK4a locus is epigenetically repressed by EBNA3C--in cooperation with EBNA3A--despite the absence of functional p16(INK4a. Although inactivation of EBNA3C in LCLs from normal B cells leads to an increase in p16(INK4a and growth arrest, EBNA3C inactivation in the p16(INK4a-null LCLs has no impact on the rate of proliferation, establishing that the repression of INK4a is a major function of EBNA3C in EBV-driven LCL proliferation. This conditional LCL system allowed us to use microarray analysis to identify and confirm genes regulated specifically by EBNA3C, independently of proliferation changes modulated by the p16(INK4a-Rb-E2F axis. Infections of normal primary B cells with recombinant EBV-BAC virus from which EBNA3C is deleted or with 3CHT EBV in the absence of activating ligand 4-hydroxytamoxifen, revealed that EBNA3C is necessary to overcome an EBV-driven increase in p16(INK4a expression and concomitant block to proliferation 2-4 weeks post-infection. If cells are p16(INK4a-null, functional EBNA3C is dispensable for the outgrowth of LCLs.

  19. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  20. Studying the protein expression in human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) with protein microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhijian, Chen [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Xiaoxue, Li [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Wei, Zheng [Zhejiang International Travel Healthcare Center, 230 Zhonghezhong Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Yezhen, Lu; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Jiliang, He, E-mail: he_jiliang@hotmail.com [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Protein microarray shows the differential expression of 27 proteins induced by RFR. ► RPA32 related to DNA repair is down-regulated in Western blot. ► p73 related to cell genome stability and apoptosis is up-regulated in Western blot. -- Abstract: In the present study, the protein microarray was used to investigate the protein expression in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells intermittently exposed to 1.8-GHz GSM radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.0 W/kg for 24 h. The differential expression of 27 proteins was found, which were related to DNA damage repair, apoptosis, oncogenesis, cell cycle and proliferation (ratio >1.5-fold, P < 0.05). The results validated with Western blot assay indicated that the expression of RPA32 was significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05) while the expression of p73 was significantly up-regulated in RFR exposure group (P < 0.05). Because of the crucial roles of those proteins in DNA repair and cell apoptosis, the results of present investigation may explain the biological effects of RFR on DNA damage/repair and cell apoptosis.

  1. Gene expression profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines from monozygotic twins discordant in severity of autism reveals differential regulation of neurologically relevant genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Norman H

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autism spectrum encompasses a set of complex multigenic developmental disorders that severely impact the development of language, non-verbal communication, and social skills, and are associated with odd, stereotyped, repetitive behavior and restricted interests. To date, diagnosis of these neurologically based disorders relies predominantly upon behavioral observations often prompted by delayed speech or aberrant behavior, and there are no known genes that can serve as definitive biomarkers for the disorders. Results Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that lymphoblastoid cell lines from monozygotic twins discordant with respect to severity of autism and/or language impairment exhibit differential gene expression patterns on DNA microarrays. Furthermore, we show that genes important to the development, structure, and/or function of the nervous system are among the most differentially expressed genes, and that many of these genes map closely in silico to chromosomal regions containing previously reported autism candidate genes or quantitative trait loci. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that novel candidate genes for autism may be differentially expressed in lymphoid cell lines from individuals with autism spectrum disorders. This finding further suggests the possibility of developing a molecular screen for autism based on expressed biomarkers in peripheral blood lymphocytes, an easily accessible tissue. In addition, gene networks are identified that may play a role in the pathophysiology of autism.

  2. Global methylation profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines reveals epigenetic contributions to autism spectrum disorders and a novel autism candidate gene, RORA, whose protein product is reduced in autistic brain

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Anhthu; Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P.; Hu, Valerie W.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is currently considered a multigene disorder with epigenetic influences. To investigate the contribution of DNA methylation to autism spectrum disorders, we have recently completed large-scale methylation profiling by CpG island microarray analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from monozygotic twins discordant for diagnosis of autism and their nonautistic siblings. Methylation profiling revealed many candidate genes differentially methylated between discordant MZ twins as well ...

  3. Instability of the expanded (CTG){sub n} repeats in the myotonin protein kinase gene in cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Patel, B.J.; Monckton, D.G. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and other

    1996-08-15

    The mutation associated with myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the expansion of an unstable trinucleotide repeat, (CTG){sub n}, in the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the myotonin protein kinase gene. Although expanded repeats show both germline and somatic instability, the mechanisms of the instability are poorly understood. To establish a model system in which somatic instability of the DM repeat could be studied in more detail, we established lymphoblastoid cell lines (LBCL) from DM patients. Analysis of the DNA from DM LBCL using Southern blotting showed that the (CTG). repeats were apparently stable up to 29 passages in culture. To study infrequent repeat size mutations that are undetectable due to the size heterogeneity, we established LBCL of single-cell origins by cloning using multiple steps of limiting dilution. After expansion to approximately 10{sup 6} cells (equivalent to approximately 20 cell cycles), the DNAs of these cell lines were analyzed by the small pool PCR technique using primers flanking the (CTG), repeat region. Two types of mutations of the expanded (CTG){sub n} repeat alleles were detected: (1) frequent mutations that show small changes of the (CTG){sub n} repeat size, resulting in alleles in a normal distribution around the progenitor allele, and (2) relatively rare mutations with large changes of the (CTG){sub n} repeat size, with a bias toward contraction. The former may represent the mechanism responsible for the so matic heterogeneity of the (CTG), repeat size observe in blood cells of DM patients. This in vitro experimental system will be useful for further studies on mechanisms involved in the regulation of the somatic stability of the (CTG). repeats in DM. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Induction of epstein-barr virus (EBV lytic cycle in vitro causes lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage in lymphoblastoid B cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    benmansour Riadh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the oxidative modifications of lipids, proteins and DNA, potential molecular targets of oxidative stress, in two lymphoblastoid cell lines: B95-8 and Raji, after EBV lytic cycle induction. Conjugated dienes level was measured as biomarker of lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde adduct and protein carbonyl levels, as well as protein thiol levels were measured as biomarkers of protein oxidation. DNA fragmentation was evaluated as biomarker of DNA oxidation. Results After 48 h (peak of lytic cycle, a significant increase in conjugated dienes level was observed in B95-8 and Raji cell lines (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.019 respectively. Malondialdehyde adduct, protein carbonyl levels were increased in B95-8 and Raji cell lines after EBV lytic cycle induction as compared to controls (MDA-adduct: p = 0.008 and p = 0.006 respectively; Carbonyl: p = 0.003 and p = 0.0039 respectively. Proteins thiol levels were decreased by induction in B95-8 and Raji cell lines (p = 0.046; p = 0.002 respectively. DNA fragmentation was also detected in B95-8 and Raji cell lines after EBV lytic cycle induction as compared to controls. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate the presence of increased combined oxidative modifications in lipids, proteins in B95-8 and Raji cells lines after EBV lytic cycle induction. These results suggest that lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA fragmentation are generally induced during EBV lytic cycle induction and probably contribute to the cytopathic effect of EBV.

  5. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Differentially Affects Lithium Sensitivity of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines from Lithium Responder and Non-responder Bipolar Disorder Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Elena; Hadar, Adva; Maffioletti, Elisabetta; Werner, Haim; Shomron, Noam; Gennarelli, Massimo; Schulze, Thomas G; Costa, Marta; Del Zompo, Maria; Squassina, Alessio; Gurwitz, David

    2015-07-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric illness with an unknown etiology. Lithium is considered the cornerstone in the management of BD, though about 50-60 % of patients do not respond sufficiently to chronic treatment. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has been identified as a candidate gene for BD susceptibility, and its low expression has been suggested as a putative biomarker for lithium unresponsiveness. In this study, we examined the in vitro effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on lithium sensitivity in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from lithium responder (R) and non-responder (NR) bipolar patients. Moreover, we evaluated levels of microRNA let-7c, a small RNA predicted to target IGF1. We found that exogenous IGF-1 added to serum-free media increased lithium sensitivity selectively in LCLs from NR BD patients. However, no significant differences were observed when comparing let-7c expression in LCLs from R vs. NR BD patients. Our data support a key role for IGF-1 in lithium resistance/response in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

  6. Mutagenicity and clastogenicity of extracts of Helicobacter pylori detected by the Ames test and in the micronucleus test using human lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Ohta, Kaori; Yuhara, Yuta; Ayabe, Yuka; Negishi, Tomoe; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Oguma, Keiji; Otsuka, Takanao

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a close association between infection with Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) and the development of gastric carcinoma. Chronic H.pylori infection increases the frequency of mutation in gastric epithelial cells. However, the mechanism by which infection of H.pylori leads to mutation in gastric epithelial cells is unclear. We suspected that components in H.pylori may be related to the mutagenic response associated with DNA alkylation, and could be detected with the Ames test using a more sensitive strain for alkylating agents. Our investigation revealed that an extract of H.pylori was mutagenic in the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium YG7108, which is deficient in the DNA repair of O(6)-methylguanine. The extract of H.pylori may contain methylating or alkylating agents, which might induce O (6)-alkylguanine in DNA. Mutagenicity of the alkylating agents N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in the Ames test with S.typhimurium TA1535 was enhanced significantly in the presence of the extract of H.pylori. The tested extracts of H.pylori resulted in a significant induction of micronuclei in human-derived lymphoblastoid cells. Heat instability and dialysis resistance of the extracts of H.pylori suggest that the mutagenic component in the extracts of H.pylori is a heat-unstable large molecule or a heat-labile small molecule strongly attached or adsorbed to a large molecule. Proteins in the extracts of H.pylori were subsequently fractionated using ammonium sulphate precipitation. However, all fractions expressed enhancing effects toward MNU mutagenicity. These results suggest the mutagenic component is a small molecule that is absorbed into proteins in the extract of H.pylori, which resist dialysis. Continuous and chronic exposure of gastric epithelial cells to the alkylative mutagenic component from H.pylori chronically infected in the stomach might be a causal factor in the gastric carcinogenesis

  7. Proliferation rates and gene expression profiles in human lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with depression characterized in response to antidepressant drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitfeld, J; Scholl, C; Steffens, M; Brandenburg, K; Probst-Schendzielorz, K; Efimkina, O; Gurwitz, D; Ising, M; Holsboer, F; Lucae, S; Stingl, J C

    2016-11-15

    The current therapy success of depressive disorders remains in need of improvement due to low response rates and a delay in symptomatic improvement. Reliable functional biomarkers would be necessary to predict the individual treatment outcome. On the basis of the neurotrophic hypothesis of antidepressant's action, effects of antidepressant drugs on proliferation may serve as tentative individual markers for treatment efficacy. We studied individual differences in antidepressant drug effects on cell proliferation and gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from patients treated for depression with documented clinical treatment outcome. Cell proliferation was characterized by EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) incorporation assays following a 3-week incubation with therapeutic concentrations of fluoxetine. Genome-wide expression profiling was conducted by microarrays, and candidate genes such as betacellulin-a gene involved in neuronal stem cell regeneration-were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Ex vivo assessment of proliferation revealed large differences in fluoxetine-induced proliferation inhibition between donor LCLs, but no association with clinical response was observed. Genome-wide expression analyses followed by pathway and gene ontology analyses identified genes with different expression before vs after 21-day incubation with fluoxetine. Significant correlations between proliferation and gene expression of WNT2B, FZD7, TCF7L2, SULT4A1 and ABCB1 (all involved in neurogenesis or brain protection) were also found. Basal gene expression of SULT4A1 (P=0.029), and gene expression fold changes of WNT2B by ex vivo fluoxetine (P=0.025) correlated with clinical response and clinical remission, respectively. Thus, we identified potential gene expression biomarkers eventually being useful as baseline predictors or as longitudinal targets in antidepressant therapy.

  8. Proliferation rates and gene expression profiles in human lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with depression characterized in response to antidepressant drug therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitfeld, J; Scholl, C; Steffens, M; Brandenburg, K; Probst-Schendzielorz, K; Efimkina, O; Gurwitz, D; Ising, M; Holsboer, F; Lucae, S; Stingl, J C

    2016-01-01

    The current therapy success of depressive disorders remains in need of improvement due to low response rates and a delay in symptomatic improvement. Reliable functional biomarkers would be necessary to predict the individual treatment outcome. On the basis of the neurotrophic hypothesis of antidepressant's action, effects of antidepressant drugs on proliferation may serve as tentative individual markers for treatment efficacy. We studied individual differences in antidepressant drug effects on cell proliferation and gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from patients treated for depression with documented clinical treatment outcome. Cell proliferation was characterized by EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) incorporation assays following a 3-week incubation with therapeutic concentrations of fluoxetine. Genome-wide expression profiling was conducted by microarrays, and candidate genes such as betacellulin—a gene involved in neuronal stem cell regeneration—were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Ex vivo assessment of proliferation revealed large differences in fluoxetine-induced proliferation inhibition between donor LCLs, but no association with clinical response was observed. Genome-wide expression analyses followed by pathway and gene ontology analyses identified genes with different expression before vs after 21-day incubation with fluoxetine. Significant correlations between proliferation and gene expression of WNT2B, FZD7, TCF7L2, SULT4A1 and ABCB1 (all involved in neurogenesis or brain protection) were also found. Basal gene expression of SULT4A1 (P=0.029), and gene expression fold changes of WNT2B by ex vivo fluoxetine (P=0.025) correlated with clinical response and clinical remission, respectively. Thus, we identified potential gene expression biomarkers eventually being useful as baseline predictors or as longitudinal targets in antidepressant therapy. PMID:27845776

  9. Necrosis is increased in lymphoblastoid cell lines from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenech, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterised by impairments in reciprocal social interaction, communication and stereotyped behaviours. As increased DNA damage events have been observed in a range of other neurological disorders, it was hypothesised that they would be elevated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) obtained from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings. Six case–sibling pairs of LCLs from children with autistic disorder and their non-autistic siblings were obtained from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) and cultured in standard RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium. Cells were exposed to medium containing either 0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM hydrogen peroxide (an oxidative stressor) or 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 µM s-nitroprusside (a nitric oxide producer) for 1h. Following exposure, the cells were microscopically scored for DNA damage, cytostasis and cytotoxicity biomarkers as measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. Necrosis was significantly increased in cases relative to controls when exposed to oxidative and nitrosative stress (P = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Nuclear division index was significantly lower in LCLs from children with autistic disorder than their non-autistic siblings when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (P = 0.016), but there was no difference in apoptosis, micronucleus frequency, nucleoplasmic bridges or nuclear buds. Exposure to s-nitroprusside significantly increased the number of micronuclei in non-autistic siblings compared with cases (P = 0.003); however, other DNA damage biomarkers, apoptosis and nuclear division did not differ significantly between groups. The findings of this study show (i) that LCLs from children with autism are more sensitive to necrosis under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress than their non-autistic siblings and (ii) refutes the hypothesis that children with autistic disorder are abnormally

  10. Unsuitability of lymphoblastoid cell lines as surrogate of cryopreserved isolated lymphocytes for the analysis of DNA double-strand break repair activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zijno, Andrea [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Porcedda, Paola [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Saini, Francesca [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Allione, Alessandra [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Garofalo, Bruno; Marcon, Francesca [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Guarrera, Simonetta [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Turinetto, Valentina; Minieri, Valentina [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Funaro, Ada [Department of Genetics, Biology and Biochemistry, University of Turin (Italy); Crebelli, Riccardo [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Giachino, Claudia [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Matullo, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.matullo@unito.it [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Department of Genetics, Biology and Biochemistry, University of Turin (Italy)

    2010-02-03

    As first task of a comprehensive investigation on DNA repair genotype-phenotype correlations, the suitability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as surrogate of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in DNA repair phenotypic assays was evaluated. To this aim the amount of DNA damage induced by {gamma}-rays and DNA repair capacity were evaluated in unstimulated (G{sub 0}) and mitogen-simulated (G{sub 2}) PBMC from 20 healthy subjects and in EBV-transformed LCL obtained from the same individuals. Phosphorylation of histone H2AX, micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations were the end-points investigated. The results obtained show higher basal frequencies of binucleated cells bearing micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) in LCL with respect to PBMC, suggesting that EBV transformation may be associated with chromosomal instability. After irradiation, higher levels of micronuclei were induced in G{sub 0}-treated PBMC compared to cycling LCL; conversely, NPB were more frequent in LCL than in PBMC. Moreover, higher levels of chromosomal aberrations were observed in G{sub 2}-treated PBMC compared to LCL. Concerning {gamma}-H2AX measurements, phosphorylation levels 1 h after treatment and dephosphorylation kinetics were basically similar in LCL and in PBMC. However, while Spearman's test showed a strong correlation between the results obtained in replicated experiments with PBMC, high inter-experimental variability and poor reproducibility was observed in the experiments performed with LCL, possibly due to the intrinsic instability of LCL. In summary, both the analysis of {gamma}-H2AX and the evaluation of chromosome damage highlighted a larger inter-experimental variability in the results obtained with LCL compared to PBMC. Noteworthy, the two set of results proved to lack any significant correlation at the individual level. These results indicate that LCL may be unsuitable for investigating genotype

  11. Necrosis is increased in lymphoblastoid cell lines from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Penelope A E; Thomas, Philip; Esterman, Adrian; Fenech, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterised by impairments in reciprocal social interaction, communication and stereotyped behaviours. As increased DNA damage events have been observed in a range of other neurological disorders, it was hypothesised that they would be elevated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) obtained from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings. Six case-sibling pairs of LCLs from children with autistic disorder and their non-autistic siblings were obtained from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) and cultured in standard RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium. Cells were exposed to medium containing either 0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM hydrogen peroxide (an oxidative stressor) or 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 µM s-nitroprusside (a nitric oxide producer) for 1h. Following exposure, the cells were microscopically scored for DNA damage, cytostasis and cytotoxicity biomarkers as measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. Necrosis was significantly increased in cases relative to controls when exposed to oxidative and nitrosative stress (P = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Nuclear division index was significantly lower in LCLs from children with autistic disorder than their non-autistic siblings when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (P = 0.016), but there was no difference in apoptosis, micronucleus frequency, nucleoplasmic bridges or nuclear buds. Exposure to s-nitroprusside significantly increased the number of micronuclei in non-autistic siblings compared with cases (P = 0.003); however, other DNA damage biomarkers, apoptosis and nuclear division did not differ significantly between groups. The findings of this study show (i) that LCLs from children with autism are more sensitive to necrosis under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress than their non-autistic siblings and (ii) refutes the hypothesis that children with autistic disorder are abnormally

  12. Comparative study of the metabolism of drug substrates by human cytochrome P450 3A4 expressed in bacterial, yeast and human lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J; Abd-Ellah, M F; Randolph, N L; Kenworthy, K E; Carlile, D J; Friedberg, T; Houston, J B

    2002-11-01

    1. The aim was to compare the metabolic activity of human CYP3A4 expressed in bacteria (E. coli), yeast (S. cerevisiae) and human lymphoblastoid cells (hBl), with the native CYP3A4 activity observed in a panel of human livers. 2. Three CYP3A4 substrates were selected for study: dextromethorphan (DEM), midazolam (MDZ) and diazepam (DZ). The substrate metabolism in each of the four systems was characterized by deriving the kinetic parameters K(m) or S(50), V(max) and intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) or maximum clearance (CL(max)) from the kinetic profiles; the latter differing by 100-fold across the three substrates. 3. The K(m) or S(50) for the formation of metabolites 3-methoxymorphinan (MEM), 1'-hydroxymidazolam (1'-OH MDZ) and 3-hydroxydiazepam (3HDZ) compared well in all systems. For CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of DEM, MDZ and DZ, the V(max) for hBl microsomes were generally 2-9-fold higher than the respective yeast and human liver microsomes and E. coli membrane preparations, resulting in greater CL(int) or CL(max). In the case of 3HDZ formation, non-linear kinetics were observed for E. coli, hBl microsomes and human liver microsomes, whereas the kinetics observed for S. cerevisiae were linear. 4. The use of native human liver microsomes for drug metabolic studies will always be preferable. However, owing to the limited availability of human tissues, we find it is reasonable to use any of the recombinant systems described herein, since all three recombinant systems gave good predictions of the native human liver enzyme activities.

  13. Effects of maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposure on CEM T-lymphoblastoid human cell growth and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, K.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to magnetic fields similar to those produced by maglev vehicles (combined ac and dc components) was studied for the ability to alter cell growth and chemically induced cellular differentiation processes in cultured human CEM Tlymphoblastoid leukemia cells. A series of continuous and intermittent magnetic field (MF) exposures for varying lengths of time were tested at intensities up to 7-fold greater than that produced by the German TR07 maglev vehicle. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or mycophenolic acid were used to induce cell differentiation. Changes in cell number, morphology, and fluorescence expression of antigenic markers of differentiation were monitored. The results indicated that maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposures up to 2 gauss had little effect on culture growth or chemically induced cellular differentiation when exposed to maglev-spectrum magnetic fields compared to chemically treated but MF-unexposed controls.

  14. Induction of anti-EBNA-1 protein by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment of human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Longthung; Tanaka, Akiko; Nonoyama, Meihan (Showa Univ. Research Institute for Biomedicine in Florida, St. Petersburg (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Binding of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA-1) to BamHI-C DNA was studied by affinity column chromatography followed by immunoblotting with human serum specific for EBNA-1. Two species of EBNA-1 (68 and 70 kilodaltons) were identified in nuclear extracts of the EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Raji and not in nuclear extracts of the EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma cell line BJAB. Both EBNA-1s bound specifically to the region required for EBV plasmid DNA maintenance (oriP) located in the BamHI-C fragment. Upon treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, which activates latent EBV genome in Raji cells, the 68-kilodalton EBNA-1 was uncoupled from binding to EBV oriP. Nuclear extracts from 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-treated BJAB cells also uncoupled the binding of both EBNA-1s to oriP. DNA-cellulose column chromatography identified two protein species which competed for and uncoupled the binding of EBNA-1 to oriP. The two cellular competitors the authors called anti-EBNA-1 proteins had molecular masses of 60 and 40 kilodaltons, respectively. They were not found in nuclear extracts of BJAB cells not activated by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.

  15. Epstein-Barr Viruses (EBVs) Deficient in EBV-Encoded RNAs Have Higher Levels of Latent Membrane Protein 2 RNA Expression in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines and Efficiently Establish Persistent Infections in Humanized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorovic, Goran; Boulden, Elizabeth A; Bosshard, Rachel; Elgueta Karstegl, Claudio; Skalsky, Rebecca; Cullen, Bryan R; Gujer, Cornelia; Rämer, Patrick; Münz, Christian; Farrell, Paul J

    2015-11-01

    Functions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNAs (EBERs) were tested in lymphoblastoid cell lines containing EBER mutants of EBV. Binding of EBER1 to ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22) was confirmed. Deletion of EBER1 or EBER2 correlated with increased levels of cytoplasmic EBV LMP2 RNA and with small effects on specific cellular microRNA (miRNA) levels, but protein levels of LMP1 and LMP2A were not affected. Wild-type EBV and EBER deletion EBV had approximately equal abilities to infect immunodeficient mice reconstituted with a human hematopoietic system.

  16. The NRF2-KEAP1 pathway is an early responsive gene network in arsenic exposed lymphoblastoid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio J Córdova

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic (iAs, a major environmental contaminant, has risen as an important health problem worldwide. More detailed identification of the molecular mechanisms associated with iAs exposure would help to establish better strategies for prevention and treatment. Although chronic iAs exposures have been previously studied there is little to no information regarding the early events of exposure to iAs. To better characterize the early mechanisms of iAs exposure we conducted gene expression studies using sublethal doses of iAs at two different time-points. The major transcripts differentially regulated at 2 hrs of iAs exposure included antioxidants, detoxificants and chaperones. Moreover, after 12 hrs of exposure many of the down-regulated genes were associated with DNA replication and S phase cell cycle progression. Interestingly, the most affected biological pathway by both 2 or 12 hrs of iAs exposure were the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway, represented by the highly up-regulated HMOX1 transcript, which is transcriptionally regulated by the transcription factor Nrf2. Additional Nrf2 targets included SQSTM1 and ABCB6, which were not previously associated with acute iAs exposure. Signalling pathways such as interferon, B cell receptor and AhR route were also responsive to acute iAs exposure. Since HMOX1 expression increased early (20 min and was responsive to low iAs concentrations (0.1 µM, this gene could be a suitable early biomarker for iAs exposure. In addition, the novel Nrf2 targets SQSTM1 and ABCB6 could play an important and previously unrecognized role in cellular protection against iAs.

  17. The NRF2-KEAP1 pathway is an early responsive gene network in arsenic exposed lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova, Emilio J; Martínez-Hernández, Angélica; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Centeno, Federico; Morales-Marín, Mirna; Koneru, Harsha; Coleman, Matthew A; Orozco, Lorena

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs), a major environmental contaminant, has risen as an important health problem worldwide. More detailed identification of the molecular mechanisms associated with iAs exposure would help to establish better strategies for prevention and treatment. Although chronic iAs exposures have been previously studied there is little to no information regarding the early events of exposure to iAs. To better characterize the early mechanisms of iAs exposure we conducted gene expression studies using sublethal doses of iAs at two different time-points. The major transcripts differentially regulated at 2 hrs of iAs exposure included antioxidants, detoxificants and chaperones. Moreover, after 12 hrs of exposure many of the down-regulated genes were associated with DNA replication and S phase cell cycle progression. Interestingly, the most affected biological pathway by both 2 or 12 hrs of iAs exposure were the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway, represented by the highly up-regulated HMOX1 transcript, which is transcriptionally regulated by the transcription factor Nrf2. Additional Nrf2 targets included SQSTM1 and ABCB6, which were not previously associated with acute iAs exposure. Signalling pathways such as interferon, B cell receptor and AhR route were also responsive to acute iAs exposure. Since HMOX1 expression increased early (20 min) and was responsive to low iAs concentrations (0.1 µM), this gene could be a suitable early biomarker for iAs exposure. In addition, the novel Nrf2 targets SQSTM1 and ABCB6 could play an important and previously unrecognized role in cellular protection against iAs.

  18. Repair of I-SceI induced DSB at a specific site of chromosome in human cells: influence of low-dose, low-dose-rate gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatagai, Fumio; Suzuki, Masao; Ishioka, Noriaki; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Honma, Masamitsu

    2008-11-01

    We investigated the influence of low-dose, low-dose-rate gamma-ray irradiation on DNA double strand break (DSB) repair in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. A single DSB was introduced at intron 4 of the TK+ allele (chromosome 17) by transfection with the I-SceI expression vector pCBASce. We assessed for DSB repair due to non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) by determining the generation of TK-deficient mutants in the TK6 derivative TSCE5 (TK +/-) carrying an I-SceI recognition site. We similarly estimated DSB repair via homologous recombination (HR) at the same site in the derived compound heterozygote (TK-/-) cell line TSCER2 that carries an additional point mutation in exon 5. The NHEJ repair of DSB was barely influenced by pre-irradiation of the cells with 30 mGy gamma-rays at 1.2 mGy h(-1). DSB repair by HR, in contrast, was enhanced by approximately 50% after pre-irradiation of the cells under these conditions. Furthermore, when I-SceI digestion was followed by irradiation at a dose of 8.5 mGy, delivered at a dose rate of only 0.125 mGy h(-1), HR repair efficiency was enhanced by approximately 80%. This experimental approach can be applied to characterize DSB repair in the low-dose region of ionizing radiation.

  19. Comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses measuring methods of point mutations; high density cell cultures for low dose studies; measurement and sequence determination of mutations in DNA; the mutational spectra of styrene oxide and ethlyene oxide in TK-6 cells; mutational spectrum of Cr in human lymphoblast cells; mutational spectra of radon in TK-6 cells; and the mutational spectra of smokeless tobacco. (CBS)

  20. Comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses measuring methods of point mutations; high density cell cultures for low dose studies; measurement and sequence determination of mutations in DNA; the mutational spectra of styrene oxide and ethlyene oxide in TK-6 cells; mutational spectrum of Cr in human lymphoblast cells; mutational spectra of radon in TK-6 cells; and the mutational spectra of smokeless tobacco. (CBS)

  1. Defective IL-4/Stat6 Signaling Correlates with Increased Apoptosis of Human EBV-lymphoblastoid B Cells and Mouse Spleen Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1Introduction IL-4-induced Stat6 (Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6) pathway is active in many cell types including cancer cells and immune cells which plays an important role in cell differenciation/growth and resistance to apoptosis~([1]). IL-4/Stat6 signaling up-regulates cell surface moleculi suchas CD23, MHC class II and IL-4Rα, and down-regulates proinflammatory cytokines,i.e, IL-12 and TNFα.Stat6 can be spontaneously activated in Hodgkin's lymphoma and other tumors, suggesting its...

  2. Global methylation profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines reveals epigenetic contributions to autism spectrum disorders and a novel autism candidate gene, RORA, whose protein product is reduced in autistic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, AnhThu; Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Hu, Valerie W

    2010-08-01

    Autism is currently considered a multigene disorder with epigenetic influences. To investigate the contribution of DNA methylation to autism spectrum disorders, we have recently completed large-scale methylation profiling by CpG island microarray analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from monozygotic twins discordant for diagnosis of autism and their nonautistic siblings. Methylation profiling revealed many candidate genes differentially methylated between discordant MZ twins as well as between both twins and nonautistic siblings. Bioinformatics analysis of the differentially methylated genes demonstrated enrichment for high-level functions including gene transcription, nervous system development, cell death/survival, and other biological processes implicated in autism. The methylation status of 2 of these candidate genes, BCL-2 and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA), was further confirmed by bisulfite sequencing and methylation-specific PCR, respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses of tissue arrays containing slices of the cerebellum and frontal cortex of autistic and age- and sex-matched control subjects revealed decreased expression of RORA and BCL-2 proteins in the autistic brain. Our data thus confirm the role of epigenetic regulation of gene expression via differential DNA methylation in idiopathic autism, and furthermore link molecular changes in a peripheral cell model with brain pathobiology in autism.

  3. Induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs gamma radiation: comparison to the induction by exposure to accelerated 56Fe particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts by exposure to (137)Cs gamma radiation was investigated by measuring the frequency and characteristics of unstable clones isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure. Clones surviving irradiation and control clones were analyzed for 17 characteristics including chromosomal aberrations, growth defects, alterations in response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the thymidine kinase and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase loci. Putative unstable clones were defined as those that exhibited a significant alteration in one or more characteristics compared to the controls. The frequency and characteristics of the unstable clones were compared in clones exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays or (56)Fe particles. The majority of the unstable clones isolated after exposure to either gamma rays or (56)Fe particles exhibited chromosomal instability. Alterations in growth characteristics, radiation response and mutant frequencies occurred much less often than cytogenetic alterations in these unstable clones. The frequency and complexity of the unstable clones were greater after exposure to (56)Fe particles than to gamma rays. Unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to gamma rays exhibited increases in the incidence of dicentric chromosomes but not of chromatid breaks, whereas unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited increases in both chromatid and chromosome aberrations.

  4. Mutation induction in human lymphoid cells by energetic heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-10-01

    One of the concerns for extended space flight outside the magnetosphere is exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. In the series of studies presented herein, the mutagenic effectiveness of high energy heavy ions is examined using human B-lymphoblastoid cells across an LET range from 32keV/μm to 190 keV/μm. Mutations were scored for an autosomal locus, thymidine kinase (tk), and for an X-linked locus, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt). For each of the radiations studied, the autosomal locus is more sensitive to mutation induction than is the X-linked locus. When mutational yields are expressed in terms of particle fluence, the two loci respond quite differently across the range of LET. The action cross section for mutation induction peaks at 61 keV/μm for the tk locus and then declines for particles of higher LET, including Fe ions. For the hprt locus, the action cross section for mutation is maximal at 95 keV/μm but is relatively constant across the range from 61 keV/μm to 190 keV/gmm. The yields of hprt-deficient mutants obtained after HZE exposure to TK6 lymphoblasts may be compared directly with published data on the induction of hprt-deficient mutants in human neonatal fibroblasts exposed to similar ions. The action cross section for induction of hprt-deficient mutants by energetic Fe ions is more than 10-fold lower for lymphoblastoid cells than for fibroblasts.

  5. Correlation between Nucleophosmin Expression and Chromosome Instability in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells%NPM基因在人淋巴母细胞中的差异表达与染色体不稳定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾荣飞; 陈红红; 邹美君; 徐爱红; 程文英

    2009-01-01

    目的:研究NPM基因与染色体不稳定性(CIN)、细胞增殖及p53的关系,为阐明恶性血液病发生的分子机制提供参考.方法:采用软琼脂克隆形成法、常规染色体分析和G显带法检测人淋巴母细胞TK6(wt p53)、WTK1(mt p53)和正常人淋巴细胞永生化细胞(HNILL)的细胞增殖、染色体数量变化和5号染色体质量排.并观察Olomoucine对其的影响;用Sanger测序法和Western Blot方法分别测定NPM第12外显子的DNA序列、NPM蛋白和磷酸化蛋白的表达.结果:WTK1细胞的克隆形成能力和多倍体率均显著高于TK6细胞.同时WTK1细胞的NPM蛋白和磷酸化蛋白表达亦明显高于TK6细胞.且它们均又显著高于HNILL细胞;3株细胞均未发现5号染色体的重排和NPM第12外显子编码区的突变.用Olomoucine抑制NPM蛋白磷酸化后WTK1细胞的多倍体率明显降低.结论:WTK1、TK6和HNILL细胞的增殖能力、CIN与NPM蛋白和磷酸化蛋白表达呈正相关,而且与p53状态密切相关.

  6. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A. [Queen`s Univ., Ontario (Canada)

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  7. DNA damage signaling, impairment of cell cycle progression, and apoptosis triggered by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine incorporated into DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Halicka, H Dorota; Li, Jiangwei; Biela, Ewa; Berniak, Krzysztof; Dobrucki, Jurek; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-11-01

    The "click chemistry" approach utilizing 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) as a DNA precursor was recently introduced to assess DNA replication and adapted to flow- and imaging-cytometry. In the present study, we observed that EdU, once incorporated into DNA, induces DNA damage signaling (DDS) such as phosphorylation of ATM on Ser1981, of histone H2AX on Ser139, of p53 on Ser15, and of Chk2 on Thr68. It also perturbs progression of cells through the cell cycle and subsequently induces apoptosis. These effects were observed in non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma A549 as well as in B-cell human lymphoblastoid TK6 and WTK1 cells, differing in the status of p53 (wt versus mutated). After 1 h EdU pulse-labeling, the most affected was cells progression through the S phase subsequent to that at which they had incorporated EdU. This indicates that DNA replication using the template containing incorporated EdU is protracted and triggers DDS. Furthermore, progression of cells having DNA pulse-labeled with EdU led to accumulation of cells in G2 , likely by activating G2 checkpoint. Consistent with the latter was activation of p53 and Chk2. Although a correlation was observed in A549 cells between the degree of EdU incorporation and the extent of γH2AX induction, such correlation was weak in TK6 and WTK1 cells. The degree of perturbation of the cell cycle kinetics by the incorporated EdU was different in the wt p53 TK6 cells as compared to their sister WTK1 cell line having mutated p53. The data are thus consistent with the role of p53 in modulating activation of cell cycle checkpoints in response to impaired DNA replication. The confocal microscopy analysis of the 3D images of cells exposed to EdU for 1 h pulse and then grown for 24 or 48 h revealed an increased number of colocalized γH2AX and p53BP1 foci considered to be markers of DNA double-strand breaks and enlarged nuclei.

  8. Dose-Dependent Pattern of Inducible mRNA Expression of PIG3 Gene in Normal Human Lymphoblastoid Cells by Thermal Neutron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Nan-ru; SUI; Li; WANG; Xiao; KONG; Fu-quan; LIU; Xiao-dan; ZHOU; Ping-kun

    2012-01-01

    <正>Using the thermal neutron produced by the hospital neutron irradiator, AHH-1 cell was irradiated at the various dose, 0, 0.5, 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy, respectively. After irradiation, cells were collected at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h post-irradiation, and then cell cycle distribution was tested using flow cytometry, as well as PIG3 mRNA expression level was detected using real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR detection.

  9. Potassium bromate treatment predominantly causes large deletions, but not GC > TA transversion in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Yang [Div. of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)]|[Div. of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)]|[Center for Drug Safety Evaluation, Shanghai Inst. of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 294 Tai-Yuan Road, Shanghai 200031 (China); Suzuki, Takayoshi [Div. of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Palanisamy, Rajaguru [Div. of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)]|[Department of Biotechnology, School of Engineering and Technology, Bharathidasan Univ., Palkalaiperur, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Takashima, Yoshio; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Sakuraba, Mayumi; Koizumi, Tomoko; Hayashi, Makoto [Div. of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Saito, Mika [Div. of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)]|[Dept. of Food Science and Technology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon Univ., 1866 Kameino, Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa 252-8510 (Japan); Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Yamagata, Kazuo [Dept. of Food Science and Technology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon Univ., 1866 Kameino, Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa 252-8510 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Teruhide [Div. of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Honma, Masamitsu [Div. of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: honma@nihs.go.jp

    2007-06-01

    Potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}) is strongly carcinogenic in rodents and mutagenic in bacteria and mammalian cells in vitro. The proposed genotoxic mechanism for KBrO{sub 3} is oxidative DNA damage. KBrO{sub 3} can generate high yields of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG) DNA adducts, which cause GC > TA transversions in cell-free systems. In this study, we investigated the in vitro genotoxicity of KBrO{sub 3} in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells using the comet (COM) assay, the micronucleus (MN) test, and the thymidine kinase (TK) gene mutation assay. After a 4 h treatment, the alkaline and neutral COM assay demonstrated that KBrO{sub 3} directly yielded DNA damages including DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). KBrO{sub 3} also induced MN and TK mutations concentration-dependently. At the highest concentration (5 mM), KBrO{sub 3} induced MN and TK mutation frequencies that were over 30 times the background level. Molecular analysis revealed that 90% of the induced mutations were large deletions that involved loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TK locus. Ionizing-irradiation exhibited similar mutational spectrum in our system. These results indicate that the major genotoxicity of KBrO{sub 3} may be due to DSBs that lead to large deletions rather than to 8OHdG adducts that lead to GC > TA transversions, as is commonly believed. To better understand the genotoxic mechanism of KBrO{sub 3}, we analyzed gene expression profiles of TK6 cells using Affymetrix Genechip. Some genes involved in stress, apoptosis, and DNA repair were up-regulated by the treatment of KBrO{sub 3}. However, we could not observe the similarity of gene expression profile in the treatment of KBrO{sub 3} to ionizing-irradiation as well as oxidative damage inducers.

  10. BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants of high and low clinical significance influence lymphoblastoid cell line post-irradiation gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nic Waddell

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The functional consequences of missense variants in disease genes are difficult to predict. We assessed if gene expression profiles could distinguish between BRCA1 or BRCA2 pathogenic truncating and missense mutation carriers and familial breast cancer cases whose disease was not attributable to BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (BRCAX cases. 72 cell lines from affected women in high-risk breast ovarian families were assayed after exposure to ionising irradiation, including 23 BRCA1 carriers, 22 BRCA2 carriers, and 27 BRCAX individuals. A subset of 10 BRCAX individuals carried rare BRCA1/2 sequence variants considered to be of low clinical significance (LCS. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had similar expression profiles, with some subclustering of missense mutation carriers. The majority of BRCAX individuals formed a distinct cluster, but BRCAX individuals with LCS variants had expression profiles similar to BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Gaussian Process Classifier predicted BRCA1, BRCA2 and BRCAX status, with a maximum of 62% accuracy, and prediction accuracy decreased with inclusion of BRCAX samples carrying an LCS variant, and inclusion of pathogenic missense carriers. Similarly, prediction of mutation status with gene lists derived using Support Vector Machines was good for BRCAX samples without an LCS variant (82-94%, poor for BRCAX with an LCS (40-50%, and improved for pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutation carriers when the gene list used for prediction was appropriate to mutation effect being tested (71-100%. This study indicates that mutation effect, and presence of rare variants possibly associated with a low risk of cancer, must be considered in the development of array-based assays of variant pathogenicity.

  11. Polyphenolic Profile and Targeted Bioactivity of Methanolic Extracts from Mediterranean Ethnomedicinal Plants on Human Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Pollio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The methanol extracts of the aerial part of four ethnomedicinal plants of Mediterranean region, two non-seed vascular plants, Equisetum hyemale L. and Phyllitis scolopendrium (L. Newman, and two Spermatophyta, Juniperus communis L. (J. communis and Cotinus coggygria Scop. (C. coggygria, were screened against four human cells lines (A549, MCF7, TK6 and U937. Only the extracts of J. communis and C. coggygria showed marked cytotoxic effects, affecting both cell morphology and growth. A dose-dependent effect of these two extracts was also observed on the cell cycle distribution. Incubation of all the cell lines in a medium containing J. communis extract determined a remarkable accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase, whereas the C. coggygria extract induced a significant increase in the percentage of G1 cells. The novelty of our findings stands on the observation that the two extracts, consistently, elicited coherent effects on the cell cycle in four cell lines, independently from their phenotype, as two of them have epithelial origin and grow adherent and two are lymphoblastoid and grow in suspension. Even the expression profiles of several proteins regulating cell cycle progression and cell death were affected by both extracts. LC-MS investigation of methanol extract of C. coggygria led to the identification of twelve flavonoids (compounds 1–11, 19 and eight polyphenols derivatives (12–18, 20, while in J. communis extract, eight flavonoids (21–28, a α-ionone glycoside (29 and a lignin (30 were found. Although many of these compounds have interesting individual biological activities, their natural blends seem to exert specific effects on the proliferation of cell lines either growing adherent or in suspension, suggesting potential use in fighting cancer.

  12. Polyphenolic Profile and Targeted Bioactivity of Methanolic Extracts from Mediterranean Ethnomedicinal Plants on Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollio, Antonino; Zarrelli, Armando; Romanucci, Valeria; Di Mauro, Alfredo; Barra, Federica; Pinto, Gabriele; Crescenzi, Elvira; Roscetto, Emanuela; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2016-03-23

    The methanol extracts of the aerial part of four ethnomedicinal plants of Mediterranean region, two non-seed vascular plants, Equisetum hyemale L. and Phyllitis scolopendrium (L.) Newman, and two Spermatophyta, Juniperus communis L. (J. communis) and Cotinus coggygria Scop. (C. coggygria), were screened against four human cells lines (A549, MCF7, TK6 and U937). Only the extracts of J. communis and C. coggygria showed marked cytotoxic effects, affecting both cell morphology and growth. A dose-dependent effect of these two extracts was also observed on the cell cycle distribution. Incubation of all the cell lines in a medium containing J. communis extract determined a remarkable accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase, whereas the C. coggygria extract induced a significant increase in the percentage of G1 cells. The novelty of our findings stands on the observation that the two extracts, consistently, elicited coherent effects on the cell cycle in four cell lines, independently from their phenotype, as two of them have epithelial origin and grow adherent and two are lymphoblastoid and grow in suspension. Even the expression profiles of several proteins regulating cell cycle progression and cell death were affected by both extracts. LC-MS investigation of methanol extract of C. coggygria led to the identification of twelve flavonoids (compounds 1-11, 19) and eight polyphenols derivatives (12-18, 20), while in J. communis extract, eight flavonoids (21-28), a α-ionone glycoside (29) and a lignin (30) were found. Although many of these compounds have interesting individual biological activities, their natural blends seem to exert specific effects on the proliferation of cell lines either growing adherent or in suspension, suggesting potential use in fighting cancer.

  13. Correlation of In  Vivo Versus In Vitro Benchmark Doses (BMDs) Derived From Micronucleus Test Data: A Proof of Concept Study

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explored the applicability of using in vitro micronucleus (MN) data from human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells to derive in vivo genotoxicity potency information. Nineteen chemicals covering a broad spectrum of genotoxic modes of action were tested in an in vitro MN test using TK6 cells using the same study protocol. Several of these chemicals were considered to need metabolic activation, and these were administered in the presence of S9. The Benchmark dose (BMD) approach was appli...

  14. MiRNA Profiles in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines of Finnish Prostate Cancer Families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fischer

    Full Text Available Heritable factors are evidently involved in prostate cancer (PrCa carcinogenesis, but currently, genetic markers are not routinely used in screening or diagnostics of the disease. More precise information is needed for making treatment decisions to distinguish aggressive cases from indolent disease, for which heritable factors could be a useful tool. The genetic makeup of PrCa has only recently begun to be unravelled through large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The thus far identified Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs explain, however, only a fraction of familial clustering. Moreover, the known risk SNPs are not associated with the clinical outcome of the disease, such as aggressive or metastasised disease, and therefore cannot be used to predict the prognosis. Annotating the SNPs with deep clinical data together with miRNA expression profiles can improve the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of different phenotypes of prostate cancer.In this study microRNA (miRNA profiles were studied as potential biomarkers to predict the disease outcome. The study subjects were from Finnish high risk prostate cancer families. To identify potential biomarkers we combined a novel non-parametrical test with an importance measure provided from a Random Forest classifier. This combination delivered a set of nine miRNAs that was able to separate cases from controls. The detected miRNA expression profiles could predict the development of the disease years before the actual PrCa diagnosis or detect the existence of other cancers in the studied individuals. Furthermore, using an expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL analysis, regulatory SNPs for miRNA miR-483-3p that were also directly associated with PrCa were found.Based on our findings, we suggest that blood-based miRNA expression profiling can be used in the diagnosis and maybe even prognosis of the disease. In the future, miRNA profiling could possibly be used in targeted screening, together with Prostate Specific Antigene (PSA testing, to identify men with an elevated PrCa risk.

  15. Morphologic, immunologic, enzymehistochemical and chromosomal analysis of a cell line derived from Hodgkin's disease : Evidence for a B-cell origin of Sternberg-Reed cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppema, Sibrand; de Jong, Bauke; Atmosoerodjo, Jane; Idenburg, Vera; Visser, Lydia; de Ley, Lou

    1985-01-01

    Cell lines derived from Hodgkin's disease may provide a clue to the nature of Sternberg-Reed cells. In the current study, the establishment of an Epstein-Barr-virus-negative lymphoblastoid cell line, derived from the pleural fluid of a patient with the nodular sclerosis type of Hodgkin's disease, is

  16. 3. Chromosomal instability in B-lymphoblasotoid cell lines from Werner's and Bloom's syndrome patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Werner's syndrome (WS) and Bloom's syndrome (BS) are rare autosomal recessive diseases in which the feature of premature aging and the elevated risk of neoplasia may be associated with genomic instability. To cha-racterize the genomic instability of WS and BS, B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from WS and BS patients were cytogenetically analyzed, comparing to those from healthy donors. Although all

  17. Induction of apoptosis by high linear energy transfer radiation: role of p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, D.; Fischer, B.; Holl, V.; Dufour, P. [Lab. de Cancerologie Experimentale et de Radiobiologie, LCER, Inst. de Recherche contre les Cancers de l' Appareil Digestif, IRCAD, Hopital Civil, Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Denis, J.M.; Gueulette, J. [Lab. de Radiobiologie et de Radioprotection, Faculte de Medecine, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles (Belgium); Bergerat, J.P.; Bischoff, P. [Lab. de Cancerologie Experimentale et de Radiobiologie, LCER, Inst. de Recherche contre les Cancers de l' Appareil Digestif, IRCAD, Hopital Civil, Strasbourg CEDEX (France)

    2002-07-01

    The involvement of the tumor suppressor p53 gene in the sensitivity of many cell types towards low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is now well established. However, little information is available on the relationship between p53 status of tumor cells and their ability to undergo apoptosis following exposure to high-LET radiation. Here we present the results of experiments carried out with the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 and its p53 knock-out counterpart NH32. Cells were irradiated at doses ranging from 0.25 to 8 Gy with fast neutrons (65 MeV), carbon ions (95 MeV/nucleon), and X rays (15 MV). For both cell lines, the occurrence of apoptosis, determined by the quantification of hypodiploid particles as well as the activation of several caspases, was compared with their sensitivity towards high-LET radiation. Results indicate that p53 is involved in the response of TK6 cells to fast neutrons and carbon ions, as measured by cell proliferation and occurrence of apoptosis. However, p53-deficient cells are still able to undergo apoptosis following irradiation. This suggests that heavy ions and fast neutrons induce cellular damage that is not under the control of p53. The involvement of executioner caspases in high-LET radiation induced apoptosis was also evaluated by use of specific inhibitors. (author)

  18. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (killing of CD4 cells.

  19. Correlation of In Vivo Versus In Vitro Benchmark Doses (BMDs) Derived From Micronucleus Test Data: A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; Fellows, Mick D; Johnson, George E; Slob, Wout

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we explored the applicability of using in vitro micronucleus (MN) data from human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells to derive in vivo genotoxicity potency information. Nineteen chemicals covering a broad spectrum of genotoxic modes of action were tested in an in vitro MN test using TK6 cells using the same study protocol. Several of these chemicals were considered to need metabolic activation, and these were administered in the presence of S9. The Benchmark dose (BMD) approach was applied using the dose-response modeling program PROAST to estimate the genotoxic potency from the in vitro data. The resulting in vitro BMDs were compared with previously derived BMDs from in vivo MN and carcinogenicity studies. A proportional correlation was observed between the BMDs from the in vitro MN and the BMDs from the in vivo MN assays. Further, a clear correlation was found between the BMDs from in vitro MN and the associated BMDs for malignant tumors. Although these results are based on only 19 compounds, they show that genotoxicity potencies estimated from in vitro tests may result in useful information regarding in vivo genotoxic potency, as well as expected cancer potency. Extension of the number of compounds and further investigation of metabolic activation (S9) and of other toxicokinetic factors would be needed to validate our initial conclusions. However, this initial work suggests that this approach could be used for in vitro to in vivo extrapolations which would support the reduction of animals used in research (3Rs: replacement, reduction, and refinement).

  20. Drug-induced death of leukaemic cells after G2/M arrest: higher order DNA fragmentation as an indicator of mechanism.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Many reports have documented apoptotic death in different cell types within hours of exposure to cytotoxic drugs; lower drug concentrations may cause cell cycle arrest at G2/M and subsequent death, which has been distinguished from 'classic' apoptosis. We have analysed etoposide-induced cell death in two lymphoblastoid T-cell lines, CCRF-CEM and MOLT-4, specifically in relation to DNA cleavage as indicated by pulse-field gel and conventional electrophoresis. High (5 microM) concentration etop...

  1. Gender differences in the metabolism of 1,3-butadiene to butadiene diepoxide in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Dahl, A.R.; Bechtold, W.E. [and others

    1995-12-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a gaseous compound used in the production of rubber, is a potent carcinogen in mice and a weak carcinogen in rats. The mechanism of BD-induced carcinogenicity is thought to involve genotoxic effects of its reactive epoxide metabolites butadiene monoepoxide (BDO) and butadiene diepoxide (BDO{sub 2}). Studies in our laboratory have shown that levels of the epoxides, particularly BDO{sub 2}, are greater in mice-the more sensitive species-than rats. While both epoxides are genotoxic in a number of assays, BDO{sub 2} is mutagenic in TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells at concentrations approximately 100-fold lower than BDO. Species differences in carcinogenicity of BD have posed a dilemma to investigators deciding which animal model is most appropriate for BD risk assessment.

  2. B-lymphoblastoid cell lines from multiple sclerosis patients and a healthy control producing a putative new human retrovirus and Epstein-Barr virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, M; Møller-Larsen, A; Christensen, T;

    1995-01-01

    with MS who had a reactivated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Both LCLs were found by EM to produce RVLP and EBV particles. Reverse transcriptase (RT) assays were positive in purified viral material from both LCLs. To substantiate these findings we initiated an intensified culturing procedure and were...

  3. Comparative genomic analyses identify common molecular pathways modulated upon exposure to low doses of arsenic and cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fry Rebecca C

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to the toxic metals arsenic and cadmium is associated with detrimental health effects including cancers of various organs. While arsenic and cadmium are well known to cause adverse health effects at high doses, the molecular impact resulting from exposure to environmentally relevant doses of these metals remains largely unexplored. Results In this study, we examined the effects of in vitro exposure to either arsenic or cadmium in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells using genomics and systems level pathway mapping approaches. A total of 167 genes with differential expression were identified following exposure to either metal with surprisingly no overlap between the two. Real-time PCR was used to confirm target gene expression changes. The gene sets were overlaid onto protein-protein interaction maps to identify metal-induced transcriptional networks. Interestingly, both metal-induced networks were significantly enriched for proteins involved in common biological processes such as tumorigenesis, inflammation, and cell signaling. These findings were further supported by gene set enrichment analysis. Conclusions This study is the first to compare the transcriptional responses induced by low dose exposure to cadmium and arsenic in human lymphoblastoid cells. These results highlight that even at low levels of exposure both metals can dramatically influence the expression of important cellular pathways.

  4. TP53-dependent chromosome instability is associated with transient reductions in telomere length in immortal telomerase-positive cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, J. L.; Jordan, R.; Liber, H.; Murnane, J. P.; Evans, H. H.

    2001-01-01

    Telomere shortening in telomerase-negative somatic cells leads to the activation of the TP53 protein and the elimination of potentially unstable cells. We examined the effect of TP53 gene expression on both telomere metabolism and chromosome stability in immortal, telomerase-positive cell lines. Telomere length, telomerase activity, and chromosome instability were measured in multiple clones isolated from three related human B-lymphoblast cell lines that vary in TP53 expression; TK6 cells express wild-type TP53, WTK1 cells overexpress a mutant form of TP53, and NH32 cells express no TP53 protein. Clonal variations in both telomere length and chromosome stability were observed, and shorter telomeres were associated with higher levels of chromosome instability. The shortest telomeres were found in WTK1- and NH32-derived cells, and these cells had 5- to 10-fold higher levels of chromosome instability. The primary marker of instability was the presence of dicentric chromosomes. Aneuploidy and other stable chromosome alterations were also found in clones showing high levels of dicentrics. Polyploidy was found only in WTK1-derived cells. Both telomere length and chromosome instability fluctuated in the different cell populations with time in culture, presumably as unstable cells and cells with short telomeres were eliminated from the growing population. Our results suggest that transient reductions in telomere lengths may be common in immortal cell lines and that these alterations in telomere metabolism can have a profound effect on chromosome stability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. TRAIL causes deletions at the HPRT and TK1 loci of clonogenically competent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Mark A.; Shekhar, Tanmay M. [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Hall, Nathan E. [La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Life Sciences Computation Centre, Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Hawkins, Christine J., E-mail: c.hawkins@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Treatment with TRAIL or EMS provokes mutations in clonogenically viable TK6 cells. • TRAIL is 2–5-fold less mutagenic than an equivalently lethal concentration of EMS. • EMS mainly causes transition mutations at the HPRT and TK1 loci of TK6 cells. • Most loss-of-function HPRT or TK1 mutations caused by TRAIL treatment are deletions. - Abstract: When chemotherapy and radiotherapy are effective, they function by inducing DNA damage in cancerous cells, which respond by undergoing apoptosis. Some adverse effects can result from collateral destruction of non-cancerous cells, via the same mechanism. Therapy-related cancers, a particularly serious adverse effect of anti-cancer treatments, develop due to oncogenic mutations created in non-cancerous cells by the DNA damaging therapies used to eliminate the original cancer. Physiologically achievable concentrations of direct apoptosis inducing anti-cancer drugs that target Bcl-2 and IAP proteins possess negligible mutagenic activity, however death receptor agonists like TRAIL/Apo2L can provoke mutations in surviving cells, probably via caspase-mediated activation of the nuclease CAD. In this study we compared the types of mutations sustained in the HPRT and TK1 loci of clonogenically competent cells following treatment with TRAIL or the alkylating agent ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). As expected, the loss-of-function mutations in the HPRT or TK1 loci triggered by exposure to EMS were almost all transitions. In contrast, only a minority of the mutations identified in TRAIL-treated clones lacking HPRT or TK1 activity were substitutions. Almost three quarters of the TRAIL-induced mutations were partial or complete deletions of the HPRT or TK1 genes, consistent with sub-lethal TRAIL treatment provoking double strand breaks, which may be mis-repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Mis-repair of double-strand breaks following exposure to chemotherapy drugs has been implicated in the pathogenesis of

  6. Apoptosis-inducing potential of Myrothamnus flabellifolius, an edible medicinal plant, on human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dhillon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Conventional therapies for treating acute myeloid leukemia involve chemotherapy and radiation. This approach causes damage to both normal and cancerous cells resulting in several side effects. There is a dire need to discover novel drugs that selectively targets only the cancer cells with minimal effects on normal cells. Our research is an effort to identify a novel plant based drug which is edible and selectively targets only the leukemic cells with negligible effects on the normal cells. In this study, extracts from Myrothamnus flabellifolius, a South African resurrection plant was used against human leukemic cells (HL-60. M. flabellifolius is known for its anti-viral, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. Extracts from this plant also contain derivatives of galloyl and quinic acid. In literature, galloyl and quinic acid have been demonstrated to show anti-cancerous effects. Here, we investigated the anti-cancerous effects of the methanolic and petroleum ether extract of this plant on human leukemic cells (HL-60 compared to non-leukemic lymphocytes (TK6. The methanolic extract depicted reduced HL-60 cell viability while the petroleum ether extract did not. The loss in HL-60 viability in response to the methanolic extract was accompanied by the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis by way of caspase-7 and Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage. This study establishes an IC50 of 62.5 µg/ml of dry Myrothamnus extract on HL-60 leukemic cells.Industrial Relevance. The outcome of our study depicts the potential of M. flabellifolius as a cancer drug due to its selective biological activity against cancer cells. The anti-cancer effects of this plant extract did not manifest toxic side effects as it did not harm the normal lymphocytic cells. The edible nature of M. flabellifolius marks it as having a potential role in cancer treatment as a complementary medicine to the existing treatment options.Keywords. Myrothamnus

  7. Population differences in the rate of proliferation of international HapMap cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Amy L; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Tong; O'Donnell, Peter H; Beiswanger, Christine M; Huang, R Stephanie; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen

    2010-12-10

    The International HapMap Project is a resource for researchers containing genotype, sequencing, and expression information for EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from populations across the world. The expansion of the HapMap beyond the four initial populations of Phase 2, referred to as Phase 3, has increased the sample number and ethnic diversity available for investigation. However, differences in the rate of cellular proliferation between the populations can serve as confounders in phenotype-genotype studies using these cell lines. Within the Phase 2 populations, the JPT and CHB cell lines grow faster (p HapMap panels into discovery and replication sets must take this into consideration.

  8. Down-regulation of cell surface CXCR4 by HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vigh Sandor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4, a member of the G-protein-coupled chemokine receptor family, can serve as a co-receptor along with CD4 for entry into the cell of T-cell tropic X4 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains. Productive infection of T-lymphoblastoid cells by X4 HIV-1 markedly reduces cell-surface expression of CD4, but whether or not the co-receptor CXCR4 is down-regulated has not been conclusively determined. Results Infection of human T-lymphoblastoid cell line RH9 with HIV-1 resulted in down-regulation of cell surface CXCR4 expression. Down-regulation of surface CXCR4 correlated temporally with the increase in HIV-1 protein expression. CXCR4 was concentrated in intracellular compartments in H9 cells after HIV-1 infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies showed that CXCR4 and HIV-1 glycoproteins were co-localized in HIV infected cells. Inducible expression of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins also resulted in down-regulation of CXCR4 from the cell surface. Conclusion These results indicated that cell surface CXCR4 was reduced in HIV-1 infected cells, whereas expression of another membrane antigen, CD3, was unaffected. CXCR4 down-regulation may be due to intracellular sequestering of HIV glycoprotein/CXCR4 complexes.

  9. Accurate detection of carcinoma cells by use of a cell microarray chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Yamamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate detection and analysis of circulating tumor cells plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cancer treatment. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cell microarray chip was used to detect spiked carcinoma cells among leukocytes. The chip, with 20,944 microchambers (105 µm width and 50 µm depth, was made from polystyrene; and the formation of monolayers of leukocytes in the microchambers was observed. Cultured human T lymphoblastoid leukemia (CCRF-CEM cells were used to examine the potential of the cell microarray chip for the detection of spiked carcinoma cells. A T lymphoblastoid leukemia suspension was dispersed on the chip surface, followed by 15 min standing to allow the leukocytes to settle down into the microchambers. Approximately 29 leukocytes were found in each microchamber when about 600,000 leukocytes in total were dispersed onto a cell microarray chip. Similarly, when leukocytes isolated from human whole blood were used, approximately 89 leukocytes entered each microchamber when about 1,800,000 leukocytes in total were placed onto the cell microarray chip. After washing the chip surface, PE-labeled anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody and APC-labeled anti-CD326 (EpCAM monoclonal antibody solution were dispersed onto the chip surface and allowed to react for 15 min; and then a microarray scanner was employed to detect any fluorescence-positive cells within 20 min. In the experiments using spiked carcinoma cells (NCI-H1650, 0.01 to 0.0001%, accurate detection of carcinoma cells was achieved with PE-labeled anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, verification of carcinoma cells in the microchambers was performed by double staining with the above monoclonal antibodies. CONCLUSION: The potential application of the cell microarray chip for the detection of CTCs was shown, thus demonstrating accurate detection by double staining for cytokeratin and EpCAM at the single carcinoma cell level.

  10. Construction of heteroduplex DNA and in vitro model for functional analysis of mismatch repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi; Clark Alan; WANG Jiaxun; SUN Menghong; SHI Daren

    2004-01-01

    Functional deficiency of mismatch repair (MMR) system is one of the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. With the development of the investigation and the requirement from the clinical diagnosis and treatment it is necessary to build up a method to evaluate the functional status of the whole MMR system in the concerned tumors. The original ssDNA and dsDNA from wild type (wt) bacteriophage M13mp2 and its three derivates with mutation points in the lacZα Gene have been used to construct two kinds of heteroduplex DNA molecules. One named del(2) has two bases deleted in the negative strand, the other has a G·G mismatch base pair in the negative strand too. Introducing this heteroduplex DNA into E. Coli NR9162 (mutS-) without the MMR ability on the indicator plate with x-gal and IPTG, there are three kinds of plaques, mixture plaque as the characteristic phenotype of heteroduplex DNA, blue and clear plaques. If the cell extract is mismatch repair competent the percentage of the mixture plaque will decrease after incubation with these heteroduplex DNA, the repair efficiency is expressed in percentage as 100× (1 minus the ratio of percentages of mixture plaque obtained from the extract-treated sample and untreated samples), which can imply the functional status of MMR system of certain samples. After large T-antigen-dependent SV-40 DNA replication assay cell extract from TK6, a human lymphoblastoid B-cell lymphoma cell line with MMR ability, and Lovo, a human colonic carcinoma cell line with MMR deficiency have incubated with these heteroduplex DNA. The repair efficiency of TK6 to del(2) is more than 60%, to G·G is more than 50%. The Lovo efficiency to del(2) is less than 10%, to G·G is less than 20%. Therefore, in this in vitro model used for functional analysis of mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA as the repair target, TK6 can serve as the control for MMR proficiency and Lovo as the control for MMR deficiency. Using this model the tumor tissue from a case of hereditary

  11. Genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles evaluated using the Ames test and in vitro micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, David H; Yan, Jian; Chen, Ying; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Zhang, Yongbin; Biris, Alexandru S; Heflich, Robert H; Chen, Tao

    2012-06-14

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have antimicrobial properties, which have contributed to their widespread use in consumer products. A current issue regarding nanomaterials is the extent to which existing genotoxicity assays are useful for evaluating the risks associated with their use. In this study, the genotoxicity of 5 nm AgNPs was assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and the in vitro micronucleus assay. Using the preincubation version of the Ames assay, Salmonella strains TA102, TA100, TA1537, TA98, and TA1535 were treated with 0.15-76.8 μg/plate of the AgNPs. Toxicity limited the doses that could be assayed to 2.4-38.4 μg/plate; no increases in mutant frequency over the vehicle control were found for the concentrations that could be assayed. Human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were treated with 10-30 μg/ml AgNPs, and additional cells were treated with water and 0.73 gy X-rays as vehicle and positive controls. Micronucleus frequency was increased by the AgNP treatment in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 30 μg/ml (with 45.4% relative population doubling), AgNPs induced a significant, 3.17-fold increase with a net increase of 1.60% in micronucleus frequency over the vehicle control, a weak positive response by our criteria. These results demonstrate that the 5 nm AgNP are genotoxic in TK6 cells. Also, the data suggest that the in vitro micronucleus assay may be more appropriate than the Ames test for evaluating the genotoxicity of the AgNPs.

  12. Cloning and identification of measles virus receptor gene from marmoset cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) strains with mutated hemagglutinin gene (ha) lost the capacity to infect its sensitive host cells (Vero cells), but it may infect the marmoset B-lymphoblastoid cell line B95a. From above, we can presume that there is a novel cellular receptor for those measles virus strains on B95a cell s. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we screened and cloned a novel gene--bip (B-lympho- blastoid interaction protein of marmoset) from B95a cell cDNA library, which encoded a protein interacting with measles virus hemagglutinin protein (Ha). The bip cDNA was 1540 base pairs in length and contained a unique open rea ding frame (ORF) of 1011 base pairs encoding a transmembrane protein of 337 amino acid residues. The primary structure of amino acids residue is predicted that the Bip comprised a hydrophobic transmembrane domain and a hydrophobic leader region. The researches about the deletion mutants showed that the deletion of tran smembrane domain in Bip did not affect the interaction between Bip and Ha protei ns. Expression of bip in measles virus non-permissive cell line--CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells was performed to prove that CHO/Bip can be infected by meas les virus and then turned to the MV permissive cells. We concluded that the bip gene is a novel measles virus receptor gene in marmoset B-lymphoblastoid cells.

  13. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  14. Expression of a Buckwheat Trypsin Inhibitor Gene in Escherichia coli and its Effect on Multiple Myeloma IM-9 Cell Proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The gene of buckwheat trypsin inhibitor (BTI) has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The yield of this recombinant inhibitor was over 12 mg/L by using one-step purification on a Ni2+-NTA Sepharose column. Its molecular weight was 9322.1 Da, determined by mass spectrum analysis. The MTT and cytometry analyses showed that recombinant BTI could specifically inhibit the proliferation of IM-9 human B lymphoblastoid cells (from patient with multiple myeloma) in a dose-dependent manner. The test of recombinant BTI-induced apoptosis in IM-9 cells implied that the inhibitor might have potential application in the treatment of cancer.

  15. Experiment list: SRX189419 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically normal; 4 paternal cousins have Cornelia de Lange syndrome; 46,...te=1,2 || cell=GM10248 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically norma

  16. Experiment list: SRX189421 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid cell line, clinically normal; monozygotic twin sister with Cornelia De Lange syndrome...cell=GM13976 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, clinically normal; monozyg

  17. Decreased mitochondrial DNA content in association with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in house dust during wintertime: from a population enquiry to cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicky Pieters

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are widespread environmental pollutants that are formed in combustion processes. At the cellular level, exposure to PAHs causes oxidative stress and/or some of it congeners bind to DNA, which may interact with mitochondrial function. However, the influence of these pollutants on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content remains largely unknown. We determined whether indoor exposure to PAHs is associated with mitochondrial damage as represented by blood mtDNA content. Blood mtDNA content (ratio mitochondrial/nuclear DNA copy number was determined by real-time qPCR in 46 persons, both in winter and summer. Indoor PAH exposure was estimated by measuring PAHs in sedimented house dust, including 6 volatile PAHs and 8 non-volatile PAHs. Biomarkers of oxidative stress at the level of DNA and lipid peroxidation were measured. In addition to the epidemiologic enquiry, we exposed human TK6 cells during 24 h at various concentrations (range: 0 to 500 µM of benzo(apyrene and determined mtDNA content. Mean blood mtDNA content averaged (± SD 0.95 ± 0.185. The median PAH content amounted 554.1 ng/g dust (25(th-75(th percentile: 390.7-767.3 and 1385 ng/g dust (25(th-75(th percentile: 1000-1980 in winter for volatile and non-volatile PAHs respectively. Independent for gender, age, BMI and the consumption of grilled meat or fish, blood mtDNA content decreased by 9.85% (95% CI: -15.16 to -4.2; p = 0.002 for each doubling of non-volatile PAH content in the house dust in winter. The corresponding estimate for volatile PAHs was -7.3% (95% CI: -13.71 to -0.42; p = 0.04. Measurements of oxidative stress were not correlated with PAH exposure. During summer months no association was found between mtDNA content and PAH concentration. The ability of benzo(apyrene (range 0 µM to 500 µM to lower mtDNA content was confirmed in vitro in human TK6 cells. Based on these findings, mtDNA content can be a target of PAH toxicity in humans.

  18. Decreased mitochondrial DNA content in association with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in house dust during wintertime: from a population enquiry to cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Nicky; Koppen, Gudrun; Smeets, Karen; Napierska, Dorota; Plusquin, Michelle; De Prins, Sofie; Van De Weghe, Hendrik; Nelen, Vera; Cox, Bianca; Cuypers, Ann; Hoet, Peter; Schoeters, Greet; Nawrot, Tim S

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental pollutants that are formed in combustion processes. At the cellular level, exposure to PAHs causes oxidative stress and/or some of it congeners bind to DNA, which may interact with mitochondrial function. However, the influence of these pollutants on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content remains largely unknown. We determined whether indoor exposure to PAHs is associated with mitochondrial damage as represented by blood mtDNA content. Blood mtDNA content (ratio mitochondrial/nuclear DNA copy number) was determined by real-time qPCR in 46 persons, both in winter and summer. Indoor PAH exposure was estimated by measuring PAHs in sedimented house dust, including 6 volatile PAHs and 8 non-volatile PAHs. Biomarkers of oxidative stress at the level of DNA and lipid peroxidation were measured. In addition to the epidemiologic enquiry, we exposed human TK6 cells during 24 h at various concentrations (range: 0 to 500 µM) of benzo(a)pyrene and determined mtDNA content. Mean blood mtDNA content averaged (± SD) 0.95 ± 0.185. The median PAH content amounted 554.1 ng/g dust (25(th)-75(th) percentile: 390.7-767.3) and 1385 ng/g dust (25(th)-75(th) percentile: 1000-1980) in winter for volatile and non-volatile PAHs respectively. Independent for gender, age, BMI and the consumption of grilled meat or fish, blood mtDNA content decreased by 9.85% (95% CI: -15.16 to -4.2; p = 0.002) for each doubling of non-volatile PAH content in the house dust in winter. The corresponding estimate for volatile PAHs was -7.3% (95% CI: -13.71 to -0.42; p = 0.04). Measurements of oxidative stress were not correlated with PAH exposure. During summer months no association was found between mtDNA content and PAH concentration. The ability of benzo(a)pyrene (range 0 µM to 500 µM) to lower mtDNA content was confirmed in vitro in human TK6 cells. Based on these findings, mtDNA content can be a target of PAH toxicity in humans.

  19. F-box protein FBXL2 targets cyclin D2 for ubiquitination and degradation to inhibit leukemic cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bill B.; Glasser, Jennifer R.; Coon, Tiffany A.; Zou, Chunbin; Miller, Hannah L.; Fenton, Moon; McDyer, John F.; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hematologic maligancies exhibit a growth advantage by up-regulation of components within the molecular apparatus involved in cell-cycle progression. The SCF (Skip-Cullin1-F-box protein) E3 ligase family provides homeostatic feedback control of cell division by mediating ubiquitination and degradation of cell-cycle proteins. By screening several previously undescribed E3 ligase components, we describe the behavior of a relatively new SCF subunit, termed FBXL2, that ubiquitinates and destabilizes cyclin D2 protein leading to G0 phase arrest and apoptosis in leukemic and B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. FBXL2 expression was strongly suppressed, and yet cyclin D2 protein levels were robustly expressed in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patient samples. Depletion of endogenous FBXL2 stabilized cyclin D2 levels, whereas ectopically expressed FBXL2 decreased cyclin D2 lifespan. FBXL2 did not bind a phosphodegron within its substrate, which is typical of other F-box proteins, but uniquely targeted a calmodulin-binding signature within cyclin D2 to facilitate its polyubiquitination. Calmodulin competes with the F-box protein for access to this motif where it bound and protected cyclin D2 from FBXL2. Calmodulin reversed FBXL2-induced G0 phase arrest and attenuated FBXL2-induced apoptosis of lymphoblastoid cells. These results suggest an antiproliferative effect of SCFFBXL2 in lymphoproliferative malignancies. PMID:22323446

  20. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states.

  1. Comparison of DNA fragmentation and color thresholding for objective quantitation of apoptotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plymale, D. R.; Ng Tang, D. S.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Martin, D. S.; Garry, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis is a process of cell death characterized by distinctive morphological changes and fragmentation of cellular DNA. Using video imaging and color thresholding techniques, we objectively quantitated the number of cultured CD4+ T-lymphoblastoid cells (HUT78 cells, RH9 subclone) displaying morphological signs of apoptosis before and after exposure to gamma-irradiation. The numbers of apoptotic cells measured by objective video imaging techniques were compared to numbers of apoptotic cells measured in the same samples by sensitive apoptotic assays that quantitate DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation assays gave consistently higher values compared with the video imaging assays that measured morphological changes associated with apoptosis. These results suggest that substantial DNA fragmentation can precede or occur in the absence of the morphological changes which are associated with apoptosis in gamma-irradiated RH9 cells.

  2. Activated allogeneic NK cells preferentially kill poor prognosis B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Sanchez-Martinez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild type (wt IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA mismatched Natural Killer (NK cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments.□

  3. Experiment list: SRX188972 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically normal; 4 paternal cousins have Cornelia de Lange syndr...sm=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically normal; 4 paternal cousins have Cornelia d

  4. Experiment list: SRX306567 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rce_name=lymphoblastoid cell line || biomaterial_provider=Coriell; http://ccr.coriell.org/Sections/Search.../Search.aspx?PgId=165&q=GM18522 || cell line=GM18522 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cel

  5. Experiment list: SRX080333 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst....aspx?Ref=GM12875 || cell=GM12875 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  6. Experiment list: SRX150531 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...| cell=GM12892 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap

  7. Experiment list: SRX069154 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...&q=GM12865 || cell=GM12865 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  8. Experiment list: SRX080339 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...aspx?Ref=GM12864 || cell=GM12864 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  9. Experiment list: SRX080332 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...f=GM12878 || cell=GM12878 || cell organism=Human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Pr

  10. Experiment list: SRX080355 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst....aspx?Ref=GM12872 || cell=GM12872 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  11. Experiment list: SRX080368 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus...90 || cell=GM06990 || cell organism=Human || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project,

  12. Experiment list: SRX069228 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus... cell=GM06990 || cell organism=Human || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/

  13. Experiment list: SRX080388 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...aspx?Ref=GM12865 || cell=GM12865 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  14. Experiment list: SRX150489 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-...n=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell=GM12878 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  15. Experiment list: SRX069118 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...&q=GM12864 || cell=GM12864 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  16. Experiment list: SRX150719 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, tr... || cell=GM12892 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapM

  17. Experiment list: SRX080371 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus...90 || cell=GM06990 || cell organism=Human || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project,

  18. Experiment list: SRX080364 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Ba...f=GM12801 || cell=GM12801 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  19. Experiment list: SRX080393 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...aspx?Ref=GM12873 || cell=GM12873 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  20. Experiment list: SRX069151 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus... cell=GM06990 || cell organism=Human || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/

  1. Experiment list: SRX069105 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...&q=GM12865 || cell=GM12865 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  2. Experiment list: SRX080425 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst....aspx?Ref=GM12864 || cell=GM12864 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  3. Experiment list: SRX188971 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid cell line, clinically normal; monozygotic twin sister with Cornelia De Lange ... cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, clinically normal; monozygotic twin sister with Cornelia De Lang

  4. Nonylphenol decreases viability and arrests cell cycle via reactive oxygen species in Raji cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei; Liu, Yingxia; Zhang, Wenya

    2013-01-01

    4-Nonylphenol (NP), an environmental contaminant commonly found in water systems, has been documented to have adverse effects on human health. In the current study, the effects of NP on the survival, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell cycle distribution of human Raji cells, a human lymphoblastoid cell line with B cell characteristics, were investigated. Furthermore, N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) was used to explore the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that NP dramatically reduced cell viability along with the induction of ROS in a dose dependent manner, and cell survival was recovered by NAC pretreatment. Most strikingly, NP exposure altered the cell cycle profile, mainly leading to the accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. Pretreatment of Raji cells with NAC attenuated the NP-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. Taken together, the results suggest NP exhibits cytotoxic effects on Raji cells by decreasing cell viability and inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, in a ROS dependent manner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. CTSH regulates β-cell function and disease progression in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløyel, Tina; Brorsson, Caroline; Nielsen, Lotte B;

    2014-01-01

    (CTSH) affects disease mechanisms and progression in T1D. The T allele of rs3825932 was associated with lower CTSH expression in human lymphoblastoid cell lines and pancreatic tissue. Proinflammatory cytokines decreased the expression of CTSH in human islets and primary rat β-cells, and overexpression...... of CTSH protected insulin-secreting cells against cytokine-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies indicated that CTSH exerts its antiapoptotic effects through decreased JNK and p38 signaling and reduced expression of the proapoptotic factors Bim, DP5, and c-Myc. CTSH overexpression also up-regulated Ins2...... the experimental and clinical data. In line with these observations, healthy human subjects carrying the T allele have lower β-cell function, which was evaluated by glucose tolerance testing. The data provide strong evidence that CTSH is an important regulator of β-cell function during progression of T1D...

  6. Different sensitivities of cultured mammalian cells towards aphidicolin-enhanced DNA effects in the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Schütz, Petra; Bausinger, Julia

    2016-06-01

    The comet assay in combination with the polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin (APC) has been used to measure DNA excision repair activity, DNA repair kinetics and individual DNA repair capacity. Since APC can enhance genotoxic effects of mutagens measured by the comet assay, this approach has been proposed for increasing the sensitivity of the comet assay in human biomonitoring. The APC-modified comet assay has mainly been performed with human blood and it was shown that it not only enhances the detection of DNA damage repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER) but also damage typically repaired by base excision repair (BER). Recently, we reported that in contrast to blood leukocytes, A549 cells (a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line) seem to be insensitive towards the repair-inhibiting action of APC. To further elucidate the general usefulness of the APC-modified comet assay for studying repair in cultured mammalian cells, we comparatively investigated further cell lines (HeLa, TK6, V79). DNA damage was induced by BPDE (benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide) and MMS (methyl methanesulfonate) in the absence and presence of APC (3 or 15μM). APC was either added for 2h together with the mutagen or cells were pre-incubated for 30min with APC before the mutagen was added. The results indicate that the cell lines tested differ fundamentally with regard to their sensitivity and specificity towards the repair-inhibiting effect of APC. The actual cause for these differences is still unclear but potential molecular explanations are discussed. Irrespective of the underlying mechanism(s), our study revealed practical limitations of the use of the APC-modified comet assay.

  7. Experiment list: SRX150602 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment: Epst...5 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan,

  8. Experiment list: SRX150607 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tokyo, Japan, treatment: Epstein-B...cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tokyo, Jap

  9. Experiment list: SRX150609 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tokyo, Japan, treatment: Epst...951 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tok

  10. Experiment list: SRX150362 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment: Epstein-Barr...|| cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, N

  11. Experiment list: SRX150601 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment:...=GM18505 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in

  12. Experiment list: SRX150604 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment: Epst...26 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China,

  13. Experiment list: SRX150361 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment: Epstein-Barr...| cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China,

  14. Experiment list: SRX150528 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment: Epst...18526 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China,

  15. Experiment list: SRX150603 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment:...GM18526 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China,

  16. Experiment list: SRX150402 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-B...cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nige

  17. Experiment list: SRX150404 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-B...cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nige

  18. Experiment list: SRX067520 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Bar...hromatin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  19. Experiment list: SRX150527 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tokyo, Japan, treatment: Epstein-B...1 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tokyo

  20. Experiment list: SRX067503 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein...=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  1. Experiment list: SRX150405 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epst...193 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibada

  2. Experiment list: SRX150366 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...l=GM12892 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Proj

  3. Experiment list: SRX067518 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Barr ...atin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International Ha

  4. Experiment list: SRX199857 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...M12873 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project

  5. Experiment list: SRX150403 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epst...099 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibada

  6. Experiment list: SRX199864 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...12865 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project,

  7. Experiment list: SRX150605 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epst...GM12891 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Projec

  8. Experiment list: SRX067459 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Bar...=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  9. Experiment list: SRX150534 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-B...9 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan,

  10. Experiment list: SRX150643 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...|| cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH

  11. Experiment list: SRX150533 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-B...3 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan,

  12. Experiment list: SRX193598 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...2865 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project,

  13. The flavoring agent dihydrocoumarin reverses epigenetic silencing and inhibits sirtuin deacetylases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Olaharski

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuins are a family of phylogenetically conserved nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylases that have a firmly established role in aging. Using a simple Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast heterochromatic derepression assay, we tested a number of environmental chemicals to address the possibility that humans are exposed to sirtuin inhibitors. Here we show that dihydrocoumarin (DHC, a compound found in Melilotus officinalis (sweet clover that is commonly added to food and cosmetics, disrupted heterochromatic silencing and inhibited yeast Sir2p as well as human SIRT1 deacetylase activity. DHC exposure in the human TK6 lymphoblastoid cell line also caused concentration-dependent increases in p53 acetylation and cytotoxicity. Flow cytometric analysis to detect annexin V binding to phosphatidylserine demonstrated that DHC increased apoptosis more than 3-fold over controls. Thus, DHC inhibits both yeast Sir2p and human SIRT1 deacetylases and increases p53 acetylation and apoptosis, a phenotype associated with senescence and aging. These findings demonstrate that humans are potentially exposed to epigenetic toxicants that inhibit sirtuin deacetylases.

  14. Analysis of 75 marketed pharmaceuticals using the GADD45a-GFP 'GreenScreen HC' genotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastwell, Paul W; Webster, Thomas W; Tate, Matthew; Billinton, Nicholas; Lynch, Anthony M; Harvey, James S; Rees, Robert W; Walmsley, Richard M

    2009-09-01

    The GADD45a-GFP (GreenScreen HC) reporter assay detects genotoxic damage in the human lymphoblastoid TK6 cell line and gives positive results for all classes of genotoxin, including mutagens, aneugens and clastogens. In this study, a collection of 75 marketed pharmaceuticals were tested in the assay. Compounds in the collection represent a broad range of chemical structures, pharmacologies and therapeutic indications, including neoplasia and viral infection where positive genotoxicity results are often associated with the pharmacological activity. Based on the results of this study, two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the GreenScreen HC is more predictive of in vivo genotoxicity (88%) and genotoxic carcinogenicity (93%) data than the any of the other regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assay and (ii) no compounds were uniquely positive in the GADD45a-GFP assay. This analysis therefore provides additional evidence to support the use of the GADD45a-GFP assay as an effective tool either in early genotoxic liability identification or non-clinical safety assessment of candidate pharmaceuticals during development.

  15. An approach to estimate radioadaptation from DSB repair efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatagai, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Enomoto, Shuichi; Honma, Masamitsu

    2009-09-01

    In this review, we would like to introduce a unique approach for the estimation of radioadaptation. Recently, we proposed a new methodology for evaluating the repair efficiency of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) using a model system. The model system can trace the fate of a single DSB, which is introduced within intron 4 of the TK gene on chromosome 17 in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells by the expression of restriction enzyme I-SceI. This methodology was first applied to examine whether repair of the DSB (at the I-SceI site) can be influenced by low-dose, low-dose rate gamma-ray irradiation. We found that such low-dose IR exposure could enhance the activity of DSB repair through homologous recombination (HR). HR activity was also enhanced due to the pre-IR irradiation under the established conditions for radioadaptation (50 mGy X-ray-6 h-I-SceI treatment). Therefore, radioadaptation might account for the reduced frequency of homozygous loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events observed in our previous experiment (50 mGy X-ray-6 h-2 Gy X-ray). We suggest that the present evaluation of DSB repair using this I-SceI system, may contribute to our overall understanding of radioadaptation.

  16. Replication of the resident Marek's Disease virus genome in synchronized nonproducer MKT-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, R Y; Nonoyama, M

    1980-02-01

    MKT-1, a virus nonproducer lymphoblastoid cell line established from a Marek's disease tumor, was synchronized by double thymidine block to determine the sequence of events in the synthesis of cellular and latent marek's disease virus DNA. Cellular DNA synthesis was measured by incorporation of [3H]thymidine, whereas viral DNA synthesis was determined by DNA-DNA reassociation kinetics. The results of these studies indicate that the resident Marek's disease viral DNA in MKT-1 cells replicates during the early S phase of the cell cycle, before the onset of active cellular DNA synthesis. This observation is similar to that seen in the replication of resident Epstein-Barr virus DNA in synchronized Raji cells.

  17. Production of good manufacturing practice-grade cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and adenovirus to prevent or treat viral infections post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sili, Uluhan; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F; Gee, Adrian P; Huls, Helen; Heslop, Helen E; Bollard, Catherine M; Rooney, Cliona M

    2012-01-01

    Infections with a range of common community viruses remain a major cause of mortality and morbidity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. T cells specific for cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and adenoviruses can safely prevent and infections with these three most common culprits, but the manufacture of individual T cell lines for each virus would be prohibitive in terms of time and cost. We have demonstrated that T cells specific for all three viruses can be manufactured in a single culture using monocytes and EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), both transduced with an adenovirus vector expressing pp65 of CMV, as antigen-presenting cells. Trivirus-specific T cell lines produced from healthy stem cell donors could prevent and treat infections with all three viruses, not only in the designated recipient, but in unrelated, partially-HLA-matched third party recipients. We now provide the details and logistics of T cell manufacture.

  18. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. II. A hybridoma secreting antibody against an antigen expressed by human B and null lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Brooks, D A; Kupa, A; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-06-01

    A hybridoma (FMC4) has been derived which secretes antibody showing selective reaction with human B lymphocytes, monocytes and some null lymphocytes. Few, if any, T lymphocytes in normal blood are stained, although stimulation of lymphocytes with PHA leads to an increase in the proportion of cells reacting with the hybridoma antibody. The antibody reacts with B and null lymphoblastoid cell lines but not with T cell lines. B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells but not T-CLLs are stained and null-type acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells but not T-type ALL also react. Normal blood myeloid cells do not react with FMC4 supernatant whilst some myeloid leukaemias do. The expression of the antigen reacting with FMC4 supernatant suggests that FMC4 may secrete an antibody against the human equivalent of the Ia antigen.

  19. G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest and release in ataxia telangiectasia and normal cells after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, J.H.; Gatti, R.A.; Huo, Y.K.; Chiang, C.S.; McBride, W.H. [Univ. of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) are abnormal in their response to irradiation as judged by clonogenic survival and accumulation in G{sub 2} phase. The relationship of the results of these two assays, however, is still a matter of controversy. Flow cytometry was used to measure the distribution of cells in the phases of the cell cycle after 2 Gy irradiation in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and SV40-transformed fibroblasts. AT cells showed increased and prolonged accumulation in G{sub 2}/M phase regardless of the cell type (lymphoblastoid or fibroblast) or complementation group (A, C or D). To test the hypothesis that prolonged accumulation of AT cells in G{sub 2} phase after irradiation was not simply a reflection of their radiosensitivity, we gave iso-survival radiation doses to SV40-transformed fibroblasts of two AT and one control cell lines. The two AT cell lines exited from the G{sub 2}/M-phase block more slowly than control cells after each dose tested. This implies that prolonged accumulation in G{sub 2}/M phase in AT cells is not directly related to radiosensitivity as measured by clonogenic survival, but that factors involved in the exit from G{sub 2} phase after irradiation may be abnormally regulated. We found that G{sub 2}-phase arrest of AT cells did not necessarily result in a fatal consequence in the first cell cycle after irradiation. Furthermore, G{sub 2}-phase arrest did not lead to detectable DNA fragmentation characteristic of apoptosis as judged by gel electrophoresis. 37 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Experiment list: SRX150469 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus ...nism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-B

  1. Experiment list: SRX111773 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...nism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  2. Experiment list: SRX150359 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Barr Viru...ll organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera

  3. Experiment list: SRX150353 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Barr Viru...ll organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera

  4. Experiment list: SRX150718 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus trans...uman || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Vi

  5. Experiment list: SRX102991 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - Euro

  6. Experiment list: SRX150530 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus trans...ism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Ba

  7. Experiment list: SRX100530 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Cauca... cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasio

  8. Experiment list: SRX111774 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...nism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigre

  9. Experiment list: SRX100444 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, tr...datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  10. Experiment list: SRX150557 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein... organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah -

  11. Experiment list: SRX100561 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epste...escription=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Pr

  12. Experiment list: SRX100396 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...pe description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMa

  13. Experiment list: SRX111778 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...nism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigre

  14. Experiment list: SRX111776 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...nism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  15. Experiment list: SRX100534 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epst...description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigre

  16. Experiment list: SRX111777 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...nism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  17. Experiment list: SRX111775 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...ism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  18. Experiment list: SRX100458 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...ype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapM...ll organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Projec

  19. Experiment list: SRX100910 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Eps...Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan,...cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, Treat

  20. Experiment list: SRX100481 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...type description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International Hap...ell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Proje

  1. Experiment list: SRX100914 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein... || datatype=DnaseSeq || datatype description=DNaseI HS Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International...-value cutoff: 0.05,1% ENCODE array platform validation tests || replicate=1,3,2 || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International

  2. Experiment list: SRX100903 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Eps... HS Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Iba... || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, T

  3. The B cell transcription program mediates hypomethylation and overexpression of key genes in Epstein-Barr virus-associated proliferative conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Henar; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Islam, Abul B; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Rodríguez-Cortez, Virginia C; Javierre, Biola M; Mangas, Cristina; Fernández, Agustín F; Parra, Maribel; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Esteller, Manel; López-Granados, Eduardo; Fraga, Mario F; López-Bigas, Nuria; Ballestar, Esteban

    2013-01-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is a well characterized etiopathogenic factor for a variety of immune-related conditions, including lymphomas, lymphoproliferative disorders and autoimmune diseases. EBV-mediated transformation of resting B cells to proliferating lymphoblastoid cells occurs in early stages of infection and is an excellent model for investigating the mechanisms associated with acquisition of unlimited growth. We investigated the effects of experimental EBV infection of B cells on DNA methylation profiles by using high-throughput analysis. Remarkably, we observed hypomethylation of around 250 genes, but no hypermethylation. Hypomethylation did not occur at repetitive sequences, consistent with the absence of genomic instability in lymphoproliferative cells. Changes in methylation only occurred after cell divisions started, without the participation of the active demethylation machinery, and were concomitant with acquisition by B cells of the ability to proliferate. Gene Ontology analysis, expression profiling, and high-throughput analysis of the presence of transcription factor binding motifs and occupancy revealed that most genes undergoing hypomethylation are active and display the presence of NF-κB p65 and other B cell-specific transcription factors. Promoter hypomethylation was associated with upregulation of genes relevant for the phenotype of proliferating lymphoblasts. Interestingly, pharmacologically induced demethylation increased the efficiency of transformation of resting B cells to lymphoblastoid cells, consistent with productive cooperation between hypomethylation and lymphocyte proliferation. Our data provide novel clues on the role of the B cell transcription program leading to DNA methylation changes, which we find to be key to the EBV-associated conversion of resting B cells to proliferating lymphoblasts.

  4. Reprogramming human B cells into induced pluripotent stem cells and its enhancement by C/EBPα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, C; Sardina, J L; Di Stefano, B; Romero-Moya, D; Muñoz-López, A; Ariza, L; Chillón, M C; Balanzategui, A; Castaño, J; Herreros, A; Fraga, M F; Fernández, A; Granada, I; Quintana-Bustamante, O; Segovia, J C; Nishimura, K; Ohtaka, M; Nakanishi, M; Graf, T; Menendez, P

    2016-03-01

    B cells have been shown to be refractory to reprogramming and B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have only been generated from murine B cells engineered to carry doxycycline-inducible Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc (OSKM) cassette in every tissue and from EBV/SV40LT-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines. Here, we show for the first time that freshly isolated non-cultured human cord blood (CB)- and peripheral blood (PB)-derived CD19+CD20+ B cells can be reprogrammed to iPSCs carrying complete VDJH immunoglobulin (Ig) gene monoclonal rearrangements using non-integrative tetracistronic, but not monocistronic, OSKM-expressing Sendai Virus. Co-expression of C/EBPα with OSKM facilitates iPSC generation from both CB- and PB-derived B cells. We also demonstrate that myeloid cells are much easier to reprogram than B and T lymphocytes. Differentiation potential back into the cell type of their origin of B-cell-, T-cell-, myeloid- and fibroblast-iPSCs is not skewed, suggesting that their differentiation does not seem influenced by 'epigenetic memory'. Our data reflect the actual cell-autonomous reprogramming capacity of human primary B cells because biased reprogramming was avoided by using freshly isolated primary cells, not exposed to cytokine cocktails favoring proliferation, differentiation or survival. The ability to reprogram CB/PB-derived primary human B cells offers an unprecedented opportunity for studying developmental B lymphopoiesis and modeling B-cell malignancies.

  5. Ascorbic acid kills Epstein-Barr virus positive Burkitt lymphoma cells and Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-cells in vitro, but not in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatzer, Amber N; Espey, Michael Graham; Chavez, Mayra; Tu, Hongbin; Levine, Mark; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2013-05-01

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to kill various cancer cell lines at pharmacologic concentrations. We found that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells were more susceptible to ascorbic acid-induced cell killing than EBV-negative BL cells or EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). Ascorbic acid did not induce apoptosis in any of the tested cells but did induce the production of reactive oxygen species and cell death. Previously, we showed that bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, induces cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. We found that ascorbic acid is strongly antagonistic for bortezomib-induced cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. Finally, ascorbic acid did not prolong survival of severe combined immunodefiency mice inoculated with LCLs either intraperitoneally or subcutaneously. Thus, while ascorbic acid was highly effective at killing EBV-positive BL cells and LCLs in vitro, it antagonized cell killing by bortezomib and was ineffective in an animal model.

  6. Innate immune control of EBV-infected B cells by invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Brian K; Tsai, Kevin; Allan, Lenka L; Zheng, Dong Jun; Nie, Johnny C; Biggs, Catherine M; Hasan, Mohammad R; Kozak, Frederick K; van den Elzen, Peter; Priatel, John J; Tan, Rusung

    2013-10-10

    Individuals with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease lack invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and are exquisitely susceptible to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. To determine whether iNKT cells recognize or regulate EBV, resting B cells were infected with EBV in the presence or absence of iNKT cells. The depletion of iNKT cells increased both viral titers and the frequency of EBV-infected B cells. However, EBV-infected B cells rapidly lost expression of the iNKT cell receptor ligand CD1d, abrogating iNKT cell recognition. To determine whether induced CD1d expression could restore iNKT recognition in EBV-infected cells, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) were treated with AM580, a synthetic retinoic acid receptor-α agonist that upregulates CD1d expression via the nuclear protein, lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1). AM580 significantly reduced LEF-1 association at the CD1d promoter region, induced CD1d expression on LCL, and restored iNKT recognition of LCL. CD1d-expressing LCL elicited interferon γ secretion and cytotoxicity by iNKT cells even in the absence of exogenous antigen, suggesting an endogenous iNKT antigen is expressed during EBV infection. These data indicate that iNKT cells may be important for early, innate control of B cell infection by EBV and that downregulation of CD1d may allow EBV to circumvent iNKT cell-mediated immune recognition.

  7. Characterization of epstein-barr virus-infected mantle cell lymphoma lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Z

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV resides in resting B cells in vivo. However, an ideal in vitro system for studying EBV latent infection in vivo has not yet been established. In this study, a mantle cell lymphoma line, SP53, was successfully infected with a recombinant EBV containing a neomycin-resistant gene. The EBV-carrying SP53 cells were obtained by selection using G418. They expressed EBER-1, EBNAs, and LMP1; this expression pattern of the EBV genes was similar to that in a lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL. However, proliferation assay showed that the EBV-carrying SP53 cells have a doubling time of 73 h, compared with 57 h of SP53 cells. Transplantation of 10(8 SP53 cells to nude mice formed tumors in 4 of 10 mice inoculated, but the EBV-carrying SP53 cells did not. Unexpectedly, EBV infection reduced the proliferation and tumorigenicity of SP53 cells. However, the EBV-carrying SP53 cells showed higher resistance to apoptosis induced by serum starvation than did the SP53 cells. The inhibition of proliferation and the resistance to apoptosis induced in SP53 cells by EBV infection indicate that this cell line might to some extent provide a model of in vivo EBV reservoir cells.

  8. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Niluka M; Current, Kelley M; Obare, Sherine O

    2015-09-30

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism's ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the OPEN ACCESS Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16 23483 transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells.

  9. Experiment list: SRX100911 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Eps...Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan,... description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, Treatment

  10. Experiment list: SRX100908 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epst...equencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree...escription=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, Treatment: E

  11. Experiment list: SRX100909 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epst...equencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree...ll description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, Treatmen

  12. A hexane fraction of American ginseng suppresses mouse colitis and associated colon cancer: anti-inflammatory and proapoptotic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Deepak; Le, Phuong Mai; Davis, Tia; Hofseth, Anne B; Chumanevich, Alena; Chumanevich, Alexander A; Wargovich, Michael J; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Windust, Anthony; Hofseth, Lorne J

    2012-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with a high colon cancer risk. We have previously reported that American ginseng extract significantly reduced the inflammatory parameters of chemically induced colitis. The aim of this study was to further delineate the components of American ginseng that suppress colitis and prevent colon cancer. Among five different fractions of American ginseng (butanol, hexane, ethylacetate, dichloromethane, and water), a hexane fraction has particularly potent antioxidant and proapoptotic properties. The effects of this fraction were shown in a mouse macrophage cell line (ANA-1 cells), in a human lymphoblastoid cell line (TK6), and in an ex vivo model (CD4(+)/CD25(-) primary effector T cells). A key in vivo finding was that compared with the whole American ginseng extract, the hexane fraction of American ginseng was more potent in treating colitis in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) mouse model, as well as suppressing azoxymethane/DSS-induced colon cancer. Furthermore, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) labeling of inflammatory cells within the colonic mesenteric lymph nodes was elevated in mice consuming DSS + the hexane fraction of American ginseng. Results are consistent with our in vitro data and with the hypothesis that the hexane fraction of American ginseng has anti-inflammatory properties and drives inflammatory cell apoptosis in vivo, providing a mechanism by which this fraction protects from colitis in this DSS mouse model. This study moves us closer to understanding the molecular components of American ginseng that suppress colitis and prevent colon cancer associated with colitis.

  13. Phenotype-associated lectin-binding profiles of normal and transformed blood cells: a comparative analysis of mannose- and galactose-binding lectins from plants and human serum/placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, K K; André, S; Gabius, H J; Sharp, J G

    1994-10-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of normal and transformed blood cells are commonly characterized by plant lectins. To infer physiological significance of protein-carbohydrate interactions, mammalian lectins are obviously preferable as research tools. So far, human serum lectins have not been used to assess their binding to immunophenotyped human normal or transformed blood cells. Thus, our study combines two groups of lectins with different specificity from plant and human sources. Besides concanavalin A (ConA) we have isolated the mannose-binding protein and serum amyloid P component from human serum. Especially the mannose-binding protein is believed to play a role in host defence against bacteria and yeast cells with unknown impact on normal and tumor cells. These three lectins establish the first group. In addition to the immunomodulatory mistletoe lectin, whose binding can elicit enhanced cytokine secretion from mononuclear blood cells, we included the beta-galactoside-binding lectin (14 kDa) from human placenta in the second group. The initial series of measurements was undertaken using two-color flow cytometry to determine the phenotype-associated binding (based on cluster designation; CD) of the lectins to blood and bone marrow cells from normal donors and the cell line CEM (T-lymphoblastoid), KG1-A (primitive myeloid leukemia) and Croco II (B-lymphoblastoid). Heterogeneity was apparent for each lectin in the CD-defined cell populations. Significant differences in binding were noted between Viscum album agglutinin (VAA) and other lectins for CD4+ cells from blood and between mannose-binding protein (MBP) and VAA versus 14 kDa, ConA and serum amyloid P component (SAP) for CD19+ cells from bone marrow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Transplantability of human lymphoid cell line, lymphoma, and leukemia in splenectomized and/or irradiated nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, S.; Shimosato, Y.; Kuroki, M.; Sato, Y.; Nakajima, T.

    1980-07-01

    The effects of splenectomy and/or whole-body irradiation of nude mice before xenotransplantation of lymphoid cell lines, lymphoma, and leukemia were studied. Transplantation after whole-body irradiation resulted in the increased ''take'' rate of three cultured cell lines (two of T-cell-derived acute lymphocytic leukemia and one of B-cell derived acute lymphocytic leukemia) and in the tumorous growth of Burkitt-derived Raji and spontaneously transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. With splenectomy plus irradiation as a pretreatment, tumorous growth occurred in four other cell lines which were not transplantable after irradiation only (two cell lines of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cord blood cells and one each of null acute lymphocytic leukemia and nodular lymphoma-derived cell lines). Direct transplantation of leukemia and lymphoma cells into the pretreated mice was successful in 7 of 24 cases (29%). B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid lymphoma was transplantable in three of seven cases (43%). However, lymphoma and leukemia of peripheral T-cell origin was difficult to transplant even with pretreatment, and only one pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma grew to a significant size (2 cm). One tumor each of B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid and T-cell diffuse lymphoblastic lymphoma became transplantable.

  15. Exosomes released in vitro from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Andrea; Venturi, Giulietta; Borghi, Martina; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Fais, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with a number of malignancies. Both lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), and EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells have been demonstrated to release exosomes containing the EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), and mature micro-RNAs (EBV-miRNAs). Here we analyze the EBV protein and nucleic acid content of exosomes from different EBV-infected cells (LCL, 721 and Daudi) and we show for the first time that exosomes released from LCLs and 721 also contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs. This confirms and strengthens exosomes pathogenetic potential, and might provide insights for development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  16. Large-scale population study of human cell lines indicates that dosage compensation is virtually complete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette M Johnston

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation in female mammals results in dosage compensation of X-linked gene products between the sexes. In humans there is evidence that a substantial proportion of genes escape from silencing. We have carried out a large-scale analysis of gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from four human populations to determine the extent to which escape from X chromosome inactivation disrupts dosage compensation. We conclude that dosage compensation is virtually complete. Overall expression from the X chromosome is only slightly higher in females and can largely be accounted for by elevated female expression of approximately 5% of X-linked genes. We suggest that the potential contribution of escape from X chromosome inactivation to phenotypic differences between the sexes is more limited than previously believed.

  17. A Metabolic Biofuel Cell: Conversion of Human Leukocyte Metabolic Activity to Electrical Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X Tracy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC for biofuel cell (BFC applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient, a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL, and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents.

  18. Radiation sensitivity of Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, J.H.; Ramsay, J.R.; Birrell, G.W. [Queensland Institute of Medical Research (Australia)] [and others

    1995-07-30

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), being a small cell carcinoma, would be expected to be sensitive to radiation. Clinical analysis of patients at our center, especially those with macroscopic disease, would suggest the response is quite variable. We have recently established a number of MCC cell lines from patients prior to radiotherapy, and for the first time are in a position to determine their sensitivity under controlled conditions. Some of the MCC lines grew as suspension cultures and could not be single cell cloned; therefore, it was not possible to use clonogenic survival for all cell lines. A tetrazolium based (MTT) assay was used for these lines, to estimate cell growth after {gamma} irradiation. Control experiments were conducted on lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and the adherent MCC line, MCC13, to demonstrate that the two assays were comparable under the conditions used. We have examined cell lines from MCC, small cell lung cancer (SCLC), malignant melanomas, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) transformed lymphocytes (LCL), and skin fibroblasts for their sensitivity to {gamma} irradiation using both clonogenic cell survival and MTT assays. The results show that the tumor cell lines have a range of sensitivities, with melanoma being more resistant (surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) 0.57 and 0.56) than the small cell carcinoma lines, MCC (SF2 range 0.21-0.45, mean SF2 0.30, n = 8) and SCLC (SF2 0.31). Fibroblasts were the most sensitive (SF2 0.13-0.20, mean 0.16, n = 5). The MTT assay, when compared to clonogenic assay for the MCC13 adherent line and the LCL, gave comparable results under the conditions used. Both assays gave a range of SF2 values for the MCC cell lines, suggesting that these cancers would give a heterogeneous response in vivo. The results with the two derivative clones of MCC14 (SF2 for MCC14/1 0.38, MCC14/2 0.45) would further suggest that some of them may develop resistance during clonogenic evolution. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Hui Jin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As cancer stem cells (CSCs are postulated to play critical roles in cancer development, including metastasis and recurrence, CSC imaging would provide valuable information for cancer treatment and lead to CSC-targeted therapy. To assess the possibility of in vivo CSC targeting, we conducted basic studies on radioimmunotargeting of cancer cells positive for CD133, a CSC marker recognized in various cancers. Antibodies against CD133 were labeled with 125I, and their in vitro cell binding properties were tested. Using the same isotype IgG as a control, in vivo biodistribution of the labeled antibody retaining immunoreactivity was examined in mice bearing an HCT116 xenograft in which a population of the cancer cells expressed CD133. Intratumoral distribution of the labeled antibody was examined and compared to the CD133 expression pattern. The 125I-labeled anti-CD133 antibody showed a modest but significantly higher accumulation in the HCT116 xenograft compared to the control IgG. The intratumoral distribution of the labeled antibody mostly overlapped with the CD133 expression, whereas the control IgG was found in the area close to the necrotic tumor center. Our results indicate that noninvasive in vivo targeting of CSCs could be possible with radiolabeled antibodies against cell membrane markers.

  20. The role of urinary pH in o-phenylphenol-induced cytotoxicity and chromosomal damage in the bladders of F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, S; Hasegawa, L; Eastmond, D A

    2016-04-01

    o-Phenylphenol (OPP) is a widely used fungicide and antibacterial agent that at high doses has been shown to cause bladder cancer in male F344 rats. The mechanisms underlying OPP-induced bladder carcinogenicity remain unclear but it has been proposed that a non-enzymatic pH-dependent autoxidation of phenylhydroquinone (PHQ), a primary metabolite of OPP, may be a key step in OPP-induced rat bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this mechanism and to provide insights into the potential human health relevance of OPP-induced cancer, a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted. In human lymphoblastoid TK-6 cells and rat bladder epithelial NBT-II cells, strong increases in cytotoxicity were seen at a constant concentration of PHQ by increasing the buffer pH as well as by increasing concentrations of PHQ at a constant pH. In in vivo studies, male rats were administered OPP (4,000 and 8,000 ppm) in a diet supplemented with either 1% ammonium chloride or 3% sodium bicarbonate to produce acidic and alkaline urinary pH, respectively. Significant increases in cell proliferation as detected by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation and micronucleus formation were seen in the bladder cells of OPP-treated rats with neutral or alkaline urinary pH but not in animals with the acidified urine. The results from these in vitro and in vivo studies provide support for the autoxidation hypothesis of bioactivation, and provide additional evidence that urinary pH can significantly influence the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of this important agent.

  1. Differential effects of p53 on bystander phenotypes induced by gamma ray and high LET heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Konishi, Teruaki; Tu, Wenzhi; Liu, Weili; Shiomi, Naoko; Kobayashi, Alisa; Uchihori, Yukio; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Hei, Tom K.; Dang, Bingrong; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-04-01

    High LET particle irradiation has several potential advantages over γ-rays such as p53-independent response. The purpose of this work is to disclose the effect of p53 on the bystander effect induced by different LET irradiations and underlying mechanism. Lymphocyte cells of TK6 (wild type p53) and HMy2.CIR (mutated p53) were exposed to either low or high LET irradiation, then their mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS generation were detected. The micronuclei (MN) induction in HL-7702 hepatocytes co-cultured with irradiated lymphocytes was also measured. It was found that the mitochondrial dysfunction, p66Shc activation, and intracellular ROS were enhanced in TK6 but not in HMy2.CIR cells after γ-ray irradiation, but all of them were increased in both cell lines after carbon and iron irradiation. Consistently, the bystander effect of MN formation in HL-7702 cells was only triggered by γ-irradiated TK6 cells but not by γ-irradiated HMy2.CIR cells. But this bystander effect was induced by both lymphocyte cell lines after heavy ion irradiation. PFT-μ, an inhibitor of p53, only partly inhibited ROS generation and bystander effect induced by 30 keV/μm carbon-irradiated TK6 cells but failed to suppress the bystander effect induced by the TK6 cells irradiated with either 70 keV/μm carbon or 180 keV/μm iron. The mitochondrial inhibitors of rotenone and oligomycin eliminated heavy ion induced ROS generation in TK6 and HMy2.CIR cells and hence diminished the bystander effect on HL-7702 cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the bystander effect is p53-dependent for low LET irradiation, but it is p53-independent for high LET irradiation which may be because of p53-independent ROS generation due to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  2. Gene Transfer from Targeted Liposomes to Specific Lymphoid Cells by Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machy, Patrick; Lewis, Florence; McMillan, Lynette; Jonak, Zdenka L.

    1988-11-01

    Large unilamellar liposomes, coated with protein A and encapsulating the gene that confers resistance to mycophenolic acid, were used as a model system to demonstrate gene transfer into specific lymphoid cells. Protein A, which selectively recognizes mouse IgG2a antibodies, was coupled to liposomes to target them specifically to defined cell types coated with IgG2a antibody. Protein A-coated liposomes bound human B lymphoblastoid cells preincubated with a mouse IgG2a anti-HLA monoclonal antibody but failed to adhere to cells challenged with an irrelevant (anti-H-2) antibody of the same isotype or to cells incubated in the absence of antibody. Transfection of target cells bound to protein A-coated liposomes was achieved by electroporation. This step was essential since only electroporated cells survived in a selective medium containing mycophenolic acid. Transfection efficiency with electroporation and targeted liposomes was as efficient as conventional procedures that used unencapsulated plasmids free in solution but, in the latter case, cell selectivity is not possible. This technique provides a methodology for introducing defined biological macromolecules into specific cell types.

  3. Heparanase regulates secretion, composition, and function of tumor cell-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Camilla A; Purushothaman, Anurag; Ramani, Vishnu C; Vlodavsky, Israel; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2013-04-05

    Emerging evidence indicates that exosomes play a key role in tumor-host cross-talk and that exosome secretion, composition, and functional capacity are altered as tumors progress to an aggressive phenotype. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate these changes. Heparanase is an enzyme whose expression is up-regulated as tumors become more aggressive and is associated with enhanced tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We have discovered that in human cancer cells (myeloma, lymphoblastoid, and breast cancer), when expression of heparanase is enhanced or when tumor cells are exposed to exogenous heparanase, exosome secretion is dramatically increased. Heparanase enzyme activity is required for robust enhancement of exosome secretion because enzymatically inactive forms of heparanase, even when present in high amounts, do not dramatically increase exosome secretion. Heparanase also impacts exosome protein cargo as reflected by higher levels of syndecan-1, VEGF, and hepatocyte growth factor in exosomes secreted by heparanase-high expressing cells as compared with heparanase-low expressing cells. In functional assays, exosomes from heparanase-high cells stimulated spreading of tumor cells on fibronectin and invasion of endothelial cells through extracellular matrix better than did exosomes secreted by heparanase-low cells. These studies reveal that heparanase helps drive exosome secretion, alters exosome composition, and facilitates production of exosomes that impact both tumor and host cell behavior, thereby promoting tumor progression.

  4. Comparison of toxicogenomics and traditional approaches to inform mode of action and points of departure in human health risk assessment of benzo[a]pyrene in drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Sarah; Bourdon-Lacombe, Julie; Kuo, Byron; Buick, Julie K.; Lemieux, France; Williams, Andrew; Halappanavar, Sabina; Malik, Amal; Luijten, Mirjam; Aubrecht, Jiri; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Fornace, Albert J.; Swartz, Carol D.; Recio, Leslie; Yauk, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Toxicogenomics is proposed to be a useful tool in human health risk assessment. However, a systematic comparison of traditional risk assessment approaches with those applying toxicogenomics has never been done. We conducted a case study to evaluate the utility of toxicogenomics in the risk assessment of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a well-studied carcinogen, for drinking water exposures. Our study was intended to compare methodologies, not to evaluate drinking water safety. We compared traditional (RA1), genomics-informed (RA2) and genomics-only (RA3) approaches. RA2 and RA3 applied toxicogenomics data from human cell cultures and mice exposed to BaP to determine if these data could provide insight into BaP's mode of action (MOA) and derive tissue-specific points of departure (POD). Our global gene expression analysis supported that BaP is genotoxic in mice and allowed the development of a detailed MOA. Toxicogenomics analysis in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells demonstrated a high degree of consistency in perturbed pathways with animal tissues. Quantitatively, the PODs for traditional and transcriptional approaches were similar (liver 1.2 vs. 1.0 mg/kg-bw/day; lung 0.8 vs. 3.7 mg/kg-bw/day; forestomach 0.5 vs. 7.4 mg/kg-bw/day). RA3, which applied toxicogenomics in the absence of apical toxicology data, demonstrates that this approach provides useful information in data-poor situations. Overall, our study supports the use of toxicogenomics as a relatively fast and cost-effective tool for hazard identification, preliminary evaluation of potential carcinogens, and carcinogenic potency, in addition to identifying current limitations and practical questions for future work. PMID:25605026

  5. Identification of 4 ataxia telangiectasia cell lines hypersensitive to. gamma. -irradiation but not to hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantoni, O.; Sestili, P.; Santoro, M.P.; Tannoia, M.C.; Cattabeni, F. (Universita degli Studi di Urbino (Italy). Istituto di Farmacologia e Farmacognosia and Centro di Farmacologia Oncologia Sperimentale); Novelli, G.; Dallapiccola, B. (Universit degli Studi di Urbino (Italy). Cattedra di Genetica); Fiorilli, M. (Universita di Roma ' La Sapienze' (Italy). Cattedra di Allergologia e Immunologia Clinica)

    1989-09-01

    The effct of hydrogen peroxide on the rate of semi-conservative DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and normal human lymphoblastoid cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in AT cells was not depressed to a lesser extent than in normal cells, as might have been expected since H{sub 2O2} is a radiomimetic agent. On the contrary, 4 AT cell lines displayed a higher sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of H{sub 2O2} on DNA synthesis than 2 normal cell lines. Comparable levels of cytotoxicity were detected in cell vaibility studies. Furthermore, neither the level of DNA breakage produced by H{sub 2O2}, nor the rate of repair of these lesions was signigicantly different in normal and AT cells. Together, these results indicate that the AT cell lines utilized in this study are not hypersensitive to the oxidant. It is suggested that H-2-O-2 may not induce lethality via the direct ation of the hydroxyl radical (OH). (Author). 20 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab.

  6. [Flow cytometric analysis of ICRF-193 influence on cell passage through mitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatrova, A N; Aksenov, N D; Zenin, V V

    2002-01-01

    Studying the effect of topoisomerase II (topo II) inhibitors on cell passage through mitosis seems to be important for understanding the role of this enzyme during chromosome condensation and segregation. A flow cytometric assay (Zenin et al., 2001) allowed to determine the mitotic index, and to discriminate between not only cells in G2 and M phases (including metaphase and anaphase cells), but also cells in pseudo-G1 with 4c DNA content. It is shown that topo II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-193 blocks G2-M transition in a lymphoblastoid cell line GM-130. Addition of caffeine to cells abrogated a block of their entering mitosis but not the inhibitor action. Cells entered mitosis, which was proven by the presence of chromosomes in the examined specimen, and, bypassing anaphase, appeared in pseudo-G1 with 4c DNA content. We have found that in the presence of ICRF-193 cells, GM-130 and Hep-2 lines, previously blocked by nocodazole when in mitosis and then washed, pass through metaphase, enter anaphase and leave it to pass to pseudo-G1 with the 4c DNA content. Thus, by inhibiting topo II activity ICRF-193 causes abnormal mitotic transition.

  7. Stimulation by means of dendritic cells followed by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells as antigen-presenting cells is more efficient than dendritic cells alone in inducing Aspergillus f16-specific cytotoxic T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, F; Ramadan, G; Davies, B; Margolis, D A; Keever-Taylor, C A

    2008-02-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with in vitro expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) may be an effective approach to prevent, or even treat, Aspergillus (Asp) infections. Such lines can be generated using monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) as antigen-presenting cells (APC) but requires a relatively high volume of starting blood. Here we describe a method that generates Asp-specific CTL responses more efficiently using a protocol of antigen presented on DC followed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCL) as APC. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated weekly (2-5x) with a complete pool of pentadecapeptides (PPC) spanning the coding region of Asp f16 pulsed onto autologous mature DC. Cultures were split and stimulated subsequently with either PPC-DC or autologous PPC-pulsed BLCL (PPC-BLCL). Lines from the DC/BLCL arm demonstrated Asp f16-specific cytotoxicity earlier and to a higher degree than lines generated with PPC-DC alone. The DC/BLCL-primed lines showed a higher frequency of Asp f16-specific interferon (IFN)-gamma producing cells but an identical effector cell phenotype and peptide specificity compared to PPC-DC-only-primed lines. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, but not IL-10, appeared to play a role in the effectiveness of BLCL as APC. These results demonstrate that BLCL serve as highly effective APC for the stimulation of Asp f16-specific T cell responses and that a culture approach using initial priming with PPC-DC followed by PPC-BLCL may be a more effective method to generate Asp f16-specific T cell lines and requires less starting blood than priming with PPC-DC alone.

  8. Experiment list: SRX150526 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid NIGMS Human Genetic Cell Repository, DNA Polymorphism Discovery Resource Coll...Cell Repository, DNA Polymorphism Discovery Resource Collection, treatment: Epste

  9. Detection of EBV, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, HTLV-I and -II, and SMRV in human and other primate cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphoff, Cord C; Denkmann, Sabine A; Steube, Klaus G; Drexler, Hans G

    2010-01-01

    The high prevalence of contaminated cell cultures suggests that viral contaminations might be distributed among cultures. We investigated more than 460 primate cell lines for Epstein-Barr (EBV), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus I and II (HTLV-I/-II), and squirrel monkey retrovirus (SMRV) infections for risk assessment. None of the cell lines were infected with HCV, HIV-1, or HTLV-I/-II. However, one cell line displayed reverse transcriptase activity. Thirty-nine cell lines harbored EBV DNA sequences. Studies on the lytic phase of EBV revealed that five cell lines produce EBV particles and six further cell lines produced EBV upon stimulation. One cell line contained an integrated HBV genome fragment but showed no virus production. Six cell lines were SMRV-infected. Newly established cell lines should be tested for EBV infections to detect B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL). B-LCLs established with EBV from cell line B95-8 should be tested for SMRV infections.

  10. The feline lymphoid cell line MBM and its use for feline immunodeficiency virus isolation and quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, D; Mazzetti, P; Baldinotti, F; Zaccaro, L; Bendinelli, M

    1995-05-01

    We report on the development of a feline T lymphoblastoid cell line obtained from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of a specific pathogen free cat and designated MBM. The cells are pan-T+, CD4- and CD8- and remained interleukin-2-dependent and concanavalin A-dependent throughout the period of observation. MBM cells have proved at least as sensitive as fresh blasts to infection with cell-free stocks of three feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) isolates. Upon infection, they exhibit a lytic cytopathic effect. Repeated attempts to establish a chronic infection have failed. Using a limiting cell dilution method, it has been shown that MBM cells may be more sensitive than fresh blasts as substrate for isolating FIV from the PBMC of infected cats. These studies have also shown that considerable individual variations exist in the virus loads present in the PBMC of naturally infected cats, and that load size does not appear to correlate with cat age, clinical status, CD4/CD8 ratio and titer of serum neutralizing antibody.

  11. Detection and quantification of 4-ABP adducts in DNA from bladder cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Beatriz; Stillwell, Sara W; Wishnok, John S; Trudel, Laura J; Skipper, Paul; Yu, Mimi C; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Wogan, Gerald N

    2007-02-01

    We analyzed bladder DNA from 27 cancer patients for dG-C8-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP) adducts using the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method with a 700 attomol (1 adduct in 10(9) bases) detection limit. Hemoglobin (Hb) 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) adduct levels were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After isolation of dG-C8-ABP by immunoaffinity chromatography and further purification, deuterated (d9) dG-C8-ABP (MW=443 Da) was added to each sample. Structural evidence and adduct quantification were determined by selected reaction monitoring, based on the expected adduct ion [M+H+]+1, at m/z 435 with fragmentation to the product ion at m/z 319, and monitoring of the transition for the internal standard, m/z 444-->328. The method was validated by analysis of DNA (100 microg each) from calf thymus; livers from ABP-treated and untreated rats; human placentas; and TK6 lymphoblastoid cells. Adduct was detected at femtomol levels in DNA from livers of ABP-treated rats and calf thymus, but not in other controls. The method was applied to 41 DNA samples (200 microg each) from 27 human bladders; 28 from tumor and 14 from surrounding non-tumor tissue. Of 27 tissues analyzed, 44% (12) contained 5-80 dG-C8-ABP adducts per 10(9) bases; only 1 out of 27 (4%) contained adduct in both tumor and surrounding tissues. The Hb adduct was detected in samples from all patients, at levels of 12-1960 pg per gram Hb. There was no correlation between levels of DNA and Hb adducts. The presence of DNA adducts in 44% of the subjects and high levels of Hb adducts in these non-smokers indicate environmental sources of exposure to 4-ABP.

  12. Integrative "omic" analysis for tamoxifen sensitivity through cell based models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Weng

    Full Text Available It has long been observed that tamoxifen sensitivity varies among breast cancer patients. Further, ethnic differences of tamoxifen therapy between Caucasian and African American have also been reported. Since most studies have been focused on Caucasian people, we sought to comprehensively evaluate genetic variants related to tamoxifen therapy in African-derived samples. An integrative "omic" approach developed by our group was used to investigate relationships among endoxifen (an active metabolite of tamoxifen sensitivity, SNP genotype, mRNA and microRNA expressions in 58 HapMap YRI lymphoblastoid cell lines. We identified 50 SNPs that associate with cellular sensitivity to endoxifen through their effects on 34 genes and 30 microRNA expression. Some of these findings are shared in both Caucasian and African samples, while others are unique in the African samples. Among gene/microRNA that were identified in both ethnic groups, the expression of TRAF1 is also correlated with tamoxifen sensitivity in a collection of 44 breast cancer cell lines. Further, knock-down TRAF1 and over-expression of hsa-let-7i confirmed the roles of hsa-let-7i and TRAF1 in increasing tamoxifen sensitivity in the ZR-75-1 breast cancer cell line. Our integrative omic analysis facilitated the discovery of pharmacogenomic biomarkers that potentially affect tamoxifen sensitivity.

  13. Experiment list: SRX188966 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically affected; microcephaly; low frontal hairline; synophris...ozygotic twin sister is GM13976 || cell karyotype=affected || cell lineage=mesode...1.84 || cell=GM13977 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically affec...ted; microcephaly; low frontal hairline; synophris; penciled arched eyebrows; short

  14. Cytokines and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) genes expression in blood chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells and their immortalised CLL cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Chen, Fu; Castro, Juan; Avila-Carino, Javier; Lewin, Freddi

    2003-01-01

    We have encountered two unique chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) patients, PG and NN. Some blood CLL cells of these patients have been infected and carry Epstein Barr virus (EBV) in vivo. In spite of their early-activated G0/G1 stage of post germinal center (GC) memory cells, ex vivo EBV-carrying blood CLL cells of PG clone expressed LMPs and used specific QUK splice for their EBNA1 expression, similar to the EBV-carrying cells of non-B origin. Interestingly, EBV-carrying CLL cells of NN clone expressed LMP2a and used UK-splice for their EBNA1 expression, similar to the in vivo EBV-carrying high density normal B cells in the blood of healthy individuals. The CLL-derived lines but not normal lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) used QUK- and YUK-splice for their EBNA1 expression. As expected, LCL and their permanent CLL-derived lines used Cp promoter and up-regulated their EBNA2 expression. Blood CLL cells and the CLL-derived cell lines of these patients spontaneously produced cytokines as shown by microarray assay. The types and quantities of cytokines might relate to their CLL origin and viral strain in the given CLL cells. Neither blood CLL nor their CLL-derived cell lines express any detectable apoptosis-inducer ligands, CD95L or Apo 3L. As a consequence of cell cycle progression, CLL-derived cell lines up-regulated their co-stimulator molecules CD80 and apoptosis-related receptor CD95. Since only the rare EBV-carrying CLL cells grew in vitro, the combination of viral genome and cytokines seems to be critical for the outgrowth of EBV-carrying CLL cells over their EBV-negative counterpart in vitro but not in vivo.

  15. Isolation of a T-cell clone showing HLA-DRB1*0405-restricted cytotoxicity for hematopoietic cells in a patient with aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, S; Takami, A; Takamatsu, H; Zeng, W; Sugimori, N; Yamazaki, H; Miura, Y; Ueda, M; Shiobara, S; Yoshioka, T; Kaneshige, T; Yasukawa, M; Matsuda, T

    1997-05-15

    The existence of T cells capable of inhibiting in vitro hematopoiesis has been shown in aplastic anemia (AA), although whether such inhibition is mediated by a specific immune reaction involving an HLA allele remained unknown. We isolated a CD4+ Vbeta21+ T-cell clone that was most dominant among Vbeta21+ T cells in the bone marrow (BM) of an AA patient whose HLA-DRB1 alleles included 1501 and 0405. The T-cell clone named NT4.2 lysed an autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes (PHA-blasts) as well as allogeneic LCLs sharing HLA-DRB1*0405. Cytotoxicity against LCL cells and PHA-blasts by NT4.2 was blocked by anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) or anti-CD3 MoAb. NT4.2 also lysed autologous BM mononuclear cells enriched with CD34+ cells that had been cultured for one week in the presence of colony-stimulating factors as well as allogeneic CD34+ cells of a normal individual carrying HLA-DRB1*0405, cultured in the same way. Moreover, NT4.2 strongly inhibited colony formation by hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from cultured CD34+ cells sharing HLA-DRB1*0405. These results indicate that the AA patient has T cells capable of killing hematopoietic cells in an HLA-DRB1*0405-restricted manner and that such cytotoxic T cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of AA.

  16. Impaired Epstein-Barr virus-specific CD8+ T-cell function in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is restricted to SLAM family-positive B-cell targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hislop, Andrew D; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Leese, Alison M; Arkwright, Peter D; Rohrlich, Pierre S; Tangye, Stuart G; Gaspar, H Bobby; Lankester, Arjan C; Moretta, Alessandro; Rickinson, Alan B

    2010-10-28

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a condition associated with mutations in the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP; SH2D1A). SAP functions as an adaptor, binding to and recruiting signaling molecules to SLAM family receptors expressed on T and natural killer cells. XLP is associated with extreme sensitivity to primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, often leading to a lethal infectious mononucleosis. To investigate EBV-specific immunity in XLP patients, we studied 5 individuals who had survived EBV infection and found CD8(+) T-cell responses numerically comparable with healthy donors. However, further investigation of in vitro-derived CD8(+) T-cell clones established from 2 of these donors showed they efficiently recognized SLAM ligand-negative target cells expressing EBV antigens, but showed impaired recognition of EBV-transformed, SLAM ligand-positive, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Importantly, LCL recognition was restored when interactions between the SLAM receptors CD244 and natural killer-, T-, and B-cell antigen (NTBA) and their ligands on LCLs were blocked. We propose that XLP patients' particular sensitivity to EBV, and not to other viruses, reflects at least in part EBV's strict tropism for B lymphocytes and the often inability of the CD8(+) T-cell response to contain the primary infection of SLAM ligand-expressing target cells.

  17. Experiment list: SRX069089 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein...cell=GM12878 || cell organism=Human || cell description=lymphoblastoid || cell karyotype=relatively normal || cell lineage=Internatio...nal HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion; Epstein-Barr Virus || cell sex

  18. Experiment list: SRX069213 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein... cell=GM12878 || cell organism=Human || cell description=lymphoblastoid || cell karyotype=relatively normal || cell lineage=Internati...onal HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion; Epstein-Barr Virus || cell se

  19. Treatment with a BH3 mimetic overcomes the resistance of latency III EBV (+) cells to p53-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujals, A; Renouf, B; Robert, A; Chelouah, S; Hollville, E; Wiels, J

    2011-07-28

    P53 inactivation is often observed in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells due to mutations in the p53 gene or overexpression of its negative regulator, murine double minute-2 (MDM2). This event is now considered an essential part of the oncogenic process. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is strongly associated with BL and is a cofactor in its development. We previously showed that nutlin-3, an antagonist of MDM2, activates the p53 pathway in BL cell lines harboring wild-type p53. However, nutlin-3 strongly induced apoptosis in EBV (-) or latency I EBV (+) cells, whereas latency III EBV (+) cells were much more resistant. We show here that this resistance to apoptosis is also observed in latency III EBV (+) lymphoblastoid cell lines. We also show that, in latency III EBV (+) cells, B-cell lymphona 2 (Bcl-2) is selectively overproduced and interacts with Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), preventing its activation. The treatment of these cells with the Bcl-2-homology domain 3 mimetic ABT-737 disrupts Bax/Bcl-2 interaction and allows Bax activation by nutlin-3. Furthermore, treatment with these two compounds strongly induces apoptosis. Thus, a combination of Mdm2 and Bcl-2 inhibitors might be a useful anti-cancer strategy for diseases linked to EBV infection.

  20. Experiment list: SRX100533 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...hipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International...L818 || labexpid=SL818 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, Internatio...nal HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, Treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transfor

  1. Experiment list: SRX100527 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...ChipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International...SL1783 || labexpid=SL1783 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, Interna...tional HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, Treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus trans

  2. Experiment list: SRX100512 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...hipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International...L1782 || labexpid=SL1782 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, Internat...ional HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, Treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transf

  3. Neutron Exposures in Human Cells: Bystander Effect and Relative Biological Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Stewart, Robert D.; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0±0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8±2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety. PMID:24896095

  4. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Stewart, Robert D; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  5. Quantitative proteomic analysis of HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells reveals an early host response in important biological pathways: Protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navare, Arti T.; Sova, Pavel; Purdy, David E.; Weiss, Jeffrey M. [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro [Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Korth, Marcus J.; Chang, Stewart T.; Proll, Sean C. [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Jahan, Tahmina A. [Proteomics Resource, UW Medicine at South Lake Union, Seattle, WA (United States); Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Palermo, Robert E. [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Katze, Michael G., E-mail: honey@uw.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Washington National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-07-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) depends upon host-encoded proteins to facilitate its replication while at the same time inhibiting critical components of innate and/or intrinsic immune response pathways. To characterize the host cell response on protein levels in CD4+ lymphoblastoid SUP-T1 cells after infection with HIV-1 strain LAI, we used mass spectrometry (MS)-based global quantitation with iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification). We found 266, 60 and 22 proteins differentially expressed (DE) (P-value{<=}0.05) at 4, 8, and 20 hours post-infection (hpi), respectively, compared to time-matched mock-infected samples. The majority of changes in protein abundance occurred at an early stage of infection well before the de novo production of viral proteins. Functional analyses of these DE proteins showed enrichment in several biological pathways including protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation. Importantly, these early changes before the time of robust viral production have not been described before.

  6. An Efficient Method for Electroporation of Small Interfering RNAs into ENCODE Project Tier 1 GM12878 and K562 Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Ryan Y; Hammond, Ming C; Rio, Donald C; Lee, Yeon J

    2015-12-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional sequence elements in the human genome sequence by use of high-throughput DNA/cDNA sequencing approaches. To aid the standardization, comparison, and integration of data sets produced from different technologies and platforms, the ENCODE Consortium selected several standard human cell lines to be used by the ENCODE Projects. The Tier 1 ENCODE cell lines include GM12878, K562, and H1 human embryonic stem cell lines. GM12878 is a lymphoblastoid cell line, transformed with the Epstein-Barr virus, that was selected by the International HapMap Project for whole genome and transcriptome sequencing by use of the Illumina platform. K562 is an immortalized myelogenous leukemia cell line. The GM12878 cell line is attractive for the ENCODE Projects, as it offers potential synergy with the International HapMap Project. Despite the vast amount of sequencing data available on the GM12878 cell line through the ENCODE Project, including transcriptome, chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing for histone marks, and transcription factors, no small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown studies have been performed in the GM12878 cell line, as cationic lipid-mediated transfection methods are inefficient for lymphoid cell lines. Here, we present an efficient and reproducible method for transfection of a variety of siRNAs into the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, which subsequently results in targeted protein depletion.

  7. Class I major histocompatibility proteins as cell surface receptors for simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, W J; Norkin, L C

    1989-01-01

    Class I major histocompatibility complex proteins appear to be the major cell surface receptors for simian virus 40 (SV40), as implied by the following observations. Adsorption of SV40 to LLC-MK2 rhesus monkey kidney cells specifically inhibited binding of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against class I human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. Conversely, pretreatment of LLC-MK2 cells with anti-HLA MAbs inhibited infection by SV40. The ability of anti-HLA to inhibit infection was greatly reduced when the order of addition of the anti-HLA and the virus was reversed. Infection was also inhibited by preincubating SV40 with purified soluble class I protein. Finally, human lymphoblastoid cells of the Daudi line, which do not express class I major histocompatibility complex proteins, were infected at relatively low levels with SV40 virions. In a control experiment, we found that pretreatment of cells with a MAb specific for the leukocytic-function-associated antigen LFA-3 actually enhanced infection. This finding may also support the premise that class I major histocompatibility complex proteins are receptors for SV40. PMID:2476575

  8. Constituents of French Marigold (Tagetes patula L. Flowers Protect Jurkat T-Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irakli Chkhikvishvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flowers of French marigold (Tagetes patula L. are widely used in folk medicine, in particular for treating inflammation-related disorders. However, cellular mechanisms of this activity demand further investigation. In the present work, we studied the potential of T. patula compounds to alleviate the oxidative stress in hydrogen peroxide-challenged human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cells. Crude extracts of marigold flowers and purified fractions containing flavonoids patuletin, quercetagetin, and quercetin and their derivatives, as well as the carotenoid lutein, were brought in contact with Jurkat cells challenged with 25 or 50 μM H2O2. Hydrogen peroxide caused oxidative stress in the cells, manifested as generation of superoxide and peroxyl radicals, reduced viability, arrested cell cycle, and enhanced apoptosis. The stress was alleviated by marigold ingredients that demonstrated high radical-scavenging capacity and enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes involved in neutralization of reactive oxygen species. Flavonoid fraction rich in quercetin and quercetagetin showed the highest cytoprotective activity, while patuletin in high dose exerted a cytotoxic effect associated with its anticancer potential. T. patula compounds enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant interleukin-10 (IL-10 in Jurkat cells. Both direct radical-scavenging capacity and stimulation of protective cellular mechanisms can underlay the anti-inflammatory properties of marigold flowers.

  9. Complex forms of mitochondrial DNA in human B cells transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Christiansen, C; Zeuthen, J

    1983-01-01

    Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed lymphoblast......Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed...... lymphoblastoid cell lines. These complex forms of mtDNA were present in much lower frequencies in lymphocytes isolated from donor blood (1.3%-4.6%). Similar low frequencies were found with primary fibroblasts (1.1%) or freshly isolated monkey liver cells (2.1%). Samples from cultures of Burkitt lymphoma (BL......) cell lines of EBV-positive or -negative origin contained intermediate (5%-7%) frequencies of complex forms of mtDNA....

  10. Class I major histocompatibility proteins as cell surface receptors for simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, W J; Norkin, L C

    1989-10-01

    Class I major histocompatibility complex proteins appear to be the major cell surface receptors for simian virus 40 (SV40), as implied by the following observations. Adsorption of SV40 to LLC-MK2 rhesus monkey kidney cells specifically inhibited binding of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against class I human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. Conversely, pretreatment of LLC-MK2 cells with anti-HLA MAbs inhibited infection by SV40. The ability of anti-HLA to inhibit infection was greatly reduced when the order of addition of the anti-HLA and the virus was reversed. Infection was also inhibited by preincubating SV40 with purified soluble class I protein. Finally, human lymphoblastoid cells of the Daudi line, which do not express class I major histocompatibility complex proteins, were infected at relatively low levels with SV40 virions. In a control experiment, we found that pretreatment of cells with a MAb specific for the leukocytic-function-associated antigen LFA-3 actually enhanced infection. This finding may also support the premise that class I major histocompatibility complex proteins are receptors for SV40.

  11. Increased T-cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus with high viral load in patients with Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Satoko; Nakamura, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Miyauchi, Hidemasa; Kagami, Yoshitoyo; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Onoda, Hiroshi; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ito, Masafumi; Miyamura, Kouichi; Nagai, Hirokazu; Moritani, Suzuko; Sugiura, Isamu; Tsushita, Keitaro; Mihara, Hidetsugu; Ohbayashi, Kaneyuki; Iba, Sachiko; Emi, Nobuhiko; Okamoto, Masataka; Iwata, Seiko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Morishima, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    The immunological status of patients with Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV+ DLBCL) without obvious immunodeficiency has not been elucidated. A multicenter prospective study was conducted to assess pretreatment T-cell responses to EBV, EBV-DNA load and anti-EBV antibody in these patients. The proliferative and interferon (IFN)-γ-producing capacity of T-cells in response to autologous B-lymphoblastoid cell lines was determined using carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-based assay. Frequencies of EBV-specific CD4+ T-cells in patients with EBV+ DLBCL (n = 13) were significantly higher than in healthy controls (HCs) (n = 16) after both ex vivo and in vitro stimulation. Frequencies of EBV-specific CD8+ T-cells in patients with EBV+ DLBCL tended to be higher than in HCs after in vitro stimulation. Patients with EBV+ DLBCL also showed increased immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to lytic EBV-encoded antigens. Pretreatment plasma EBV-DNA level was significantly higher in patients with EBV+ DLBCL than in patients with EBV- DLBCL or HCs. In conclusion, EBV-specific T-cells showed increased reactivity, accompanied by higher levels of plasma virus DNA in patients with EBV+ DLBCL.

  12. Mitochondrial mutant cells are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation, phleomycin and mitomycin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Rohan; Reither, Adrian; Thomas, Robert A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5047 Gullen Mall, Suite 1370, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5047 Gullen Mall, Suite 1370, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2009-04-26

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an important contributor to the ATP-generating oxidative phosphorylation complex. Single nucleotide mutations in mitochondrial genes involved in ATP synthesis result in a broad range of diseases. Leber optic atrophy and Leigh's syndrome are two such diseases arising from point mutations in the mitochondrial genome. Here, ionizing radiation, phleomycin and mitomycin C (MMC) were used to induce structural chromosomal aberrations in Leber's and Leigh's cells to investigate how these mitochondrial mutations affect the cell's DNA repair processes. Because of the energy deprivation that results from mitochondrial mutations, we hypothesized that these mutant cells would demonstrate hypersensitivity when exposed to oxidative and genotoxic stress and we also expected that these cells would not be able to repair nuclear DNA damage as efficiently as normal cells. As a consequence, these mutant cells are expected to show increased levels of DNA damage, longer cell cycle delays and increased levels of cell death. Following acute radiation exposure these mutant cells showed an increase in the number of chromosomal aberrations and decreased mitotic indices when compared with normal human lymphoblastoid cells with wild-type mtDNA. When exposed to phleomycin or MMC, the mitochondrial mutant cells again showed hypersensitivity and decreased mitotic indices compared to normal cells. These results suggest that Leber's and Leigh's cells have an impaired ability to cope with oxidative and genotoxic stress. These observations may help explain the role of ATP generation in understanding the enhanced sensitivity of mitochondrial mutant cells to cancer therapeutic agents and to adverse environmental exposure, suggesting that individuals with mtDNA mutations may be at a greater risk for cancer and other diseases that result from an accumulation of nuclear DNA damage.

  13. Reovirus type 3 synthesizes proteins in interferon-treated HeLa cells without reversing the antiviral state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Esteban, M; Carrasco, L

    1988-06-01

    Treatment of HeLa cells with human lymphoblastoid interferon (IFN-alpha) does not inhibit reovirus type 3 protein synthesis during virus infection. In contrast, reovirus translation is blocked by treatment of L cells with mouse IFN-alpha. The (2'-5')A synthetase activity is induced in HeLa cells by IFN-alpha treatment and is activated after reovirus infection, since cell lysates from these cells synthesize in vitro (2'-5')A oligonucleotides. The IFN-induced protein kinase activity is also triggered in those lysates upon dsRNA addition. Thus, contrary to DNA-containing viruses, such as vaccinia virus or adenovirus, reovirus infection does not destroy or reverse the IFN-induced antiviral state. In support of this conclusion, superinfection with poliovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus of reovirus-infected HeLa cells treated with IFN leads only to a blockade of translation of the former viruses. These results provide a remarkable example where in the same cells doubly infected with two different viruses, the antiviral state induced by IFN-alpha is manifested by selectively inhibiting translation of one kind of virus (poliovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus) without affecting the translation of reovirus type 3. In addition, these results indicate that the resistance of reovirus translation to inhibition by IFN is different from the mechanism of resistance induced by DNA-containing viruses.

  14. A robust approach to identifying tissue-specific gene expression regulatory variants using personalized human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Hyuk Lee

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal variation in gene expression due to regulatory polymorphisms is often masked by biological and experimental noise. In addition, some regulatory polymorphisms may become apparent only in specific tissues. We derived human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells from adult skin primary fibroblasts and attempted to detect tissue-specific cis-regulatory variants using in vitro cell differentiation. We used padlock probes and high-throughput sequencing for digital RNA allelotyping and measured allele-specific gene expression in primary fibroblasts, lymphoblastoid cells, iPS cells, and their differentiated derivatives. We show that allele-specific expression is both cell type and genotype-dependent, but the majority of detectable allele-specific expression loci remains consistent despite large changes in the cell type or the experimental condition following iPS reprogramming, except on the X-chromosome. We show that our approach to mapping cis-regulatory variants reduces in vitro experimental noise and reveals additional tissue-specific variants using skin-derived human iPS cells.

  15. Experiment list: SRX150608 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid NIGMS Human Genetic Cell Repository, DNA Polymorphism Discovery Resource Collection, ...pository, DNA Polymorphism Discovery Resource Collection, treatment: Epstein-Barr

  16. Experiment list: SRX150364 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid NIGMS Human Genetic Cell Repository, DNA Polymorphism Discovery Resource Coll...Repository, DNA Polymorphism Discovery Resource Collection, treatment: Epstein-Ba

  17. Analysis of the cross-talk of Epstein–Barr virus-infected B cells with T cells in the marmoset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Jordon; van Driel, Nikki; Eggen, Bart JL; Paul, Chaitali; ‘t Hart, Bert A; Laman, Jon D; Kap, Yolanda S

    2017-01-01

    Despite the well-known association of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a lymphocryptovirus (LCV), with multiple sclerosis, a clear pathogenic role for disease progression has not been established. The translationally relevant experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in marmoset monkeys revealed that LCV-infected B cells have a central pathogenic role in the activation of T cells that drive EAE progression. We hypothesized that LCV-infected B cells induce T-cell functions relevant for EAE progression. In the current study, we examined the ex vivo cross-talk between lymph node mononuclear cells (MNCs) from EAE marmosets and (semi-) autologous EBV-infected B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs). Results presented here demonstrate that infection with EBV B95-8 has a strong impact on gene expression profile of marmoset B cells, particularly those involved with antigen processing and presentation or co-stimulation to T cells. At the cellular level, we observed that MNC co-culture with B-LCLs induced decrease of CCR7 expression on T cells from EAE responder marmosets, but not in EAE monkeys without clinically evident disease. B-LCL interaction with T cells also resulted in significant loss of CD27 expression and reduced expression of IL-23R and CCR6, which coincided with enhanced IL-17A production. These results highlight the profound impact that EBV-infected B-LCL cells can have on second and third co-stimulatory signals involved in (autoreactive) T-cell activation. PMID:28243437

  18. Long Noncoding RNA Expression Profiling in Normal B-Cell Subsets and Hodgkin Lymphoma Reveals Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg Cell-Specific Long Noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayari, Mina Masoumeh; Winkle, Melanie; Kortman, Gertrud; Sietzema, Jantine; de Jong, Debora; Terpstra, Martijn; Mestdagh, Pieter; Kroese, Frans G M; Visser, Lydia; Diepstra, Arjan; Kok, Klaas; van den Berg, Anke; Kluiver, Joost

    2016-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignancy of germinal center (GC) B-cell origin. To explore the role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in HL, we studied lncRNA expression patterns in normal B-cell subsets, HL cell lines, and tissues. Naive and memory B cells showed a highly similar lncRNA expression pattern, distinct from GC-B cells. Significant differential expression between HL and normal GC-B cells was observed for 475 lncRNA loci. For two validated lncRNAs, an enhanced expression was observed in HL, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. For a third lncRNA, increased expression levels were observed in HL and part of Burkitt lymphoma cell lines. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization on primary HL tissues revealed a tumor cell-specific expression pattern for all three lncRNAs. A potential cis-regulatory role was observed for 107 differentially expressed lncRNA-mRNA pairs localizing within a 60-kb region. Consistent with a cis-acting role, we showed a preferential nuclear localization for two selected candidates. Thus, we showed dynamic lncRNA expression changes during the transit of normal B cells through the GC reaction and widely deregulated lncRNA expression patterns in HL. Three lncRNAs showed a tumor cell-specific expression pattern in HL tissues and might therefore be of value as a biomarker. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Experiment list: SRX100905 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epst...licate=1,3,2 || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, Tre...ription=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Barr Viru...SRX100905 hg19 DNase-seq DNase-Seq Blood GM18507 Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Desc

  20. Mixed effects modeling of proliferation rates in cell-based models: consequence for pharmacogenomics and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Kyung Im

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The International HapMap project has made publicly available extensive genotypic data on a number of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Building on this resource, many research groups have generated a large amount of phenotypic data on these cell lines to facilitate genetic studies of disease risk or drug response. However, one problem that may reduce the usefulness of these resources is the biological noise inherent to cellular phenotypes. We developed a novel method, termed Mixed Effects Model Averaging (MEM, which pools data from multiple sources and generates an intrinsic cellular growth rate phenotype. This intrinsic growth rate was estimated for each of over 500 HapMap cell lines. We then examined the association of this intrinsic growth rate with gene expression levels and found that almost 30% (2,967 out of 10,748 of the genes tested were significant with FDR less than 10%. We probed further to demonstrate evidence of a genetic effect on intrinsic growth rate by determining a significant enrichment in growth-associated genes among genes targeted by top growth-associated SNPs (as eQTLs. The estimated intrinsic growth rate as well as the strength of the association with genetic variants and gene expression traits are made publicly available through a cell-based pharmacogenomics database, PACdb. This resource should enable researchers to explore the mediating effects of proliferation rate on other phenotypes.

  1. Experiment list: SRX189386 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically affected; microcephaly; low frontal hairline; synophris; pencil...|| cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically affected; microcephaly; low frontal hairline; synop...al retardation; clinically normal monozygotic twin sister is GM13976 || cell karyotype=affected

  2. Prediction of PAH mutagenicity in human cells by QSAR classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, E; Pilutti, P; Gramatica, P

    2008-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants of high environmental concern. The experimental data of a mutagenicity test on human B-lymphoblastoid cells (alternative to the Ames bacterial test) for a set of 70 oxo-, nitro- and unsubstituted PAHs, detected in particulate matter (PM), were modelled by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) classification methods (k-NN, k-Nearest Neighbour, and CART, Classification and Regression Tree) based on different theoretical molecular descriptors selected by Genetic Algorithms. The best models were validated for predictivity both externally and internally. For external validation, Self Organizing Maps (SOM) were applied to split the original data set. The best models, developed on the training set alone, show good predictive performance also on the prediction set chemicals (sensitivity 69.2-87.1%, specificity 62.5-87.5%). The classification of PAHs according to their mutagenicity, based only on a few theoretical molecular descriptors, allows a preliminary assessment of the human health risk, and the prioritisation of these compounds.

  3. The IL-15R alpha chain signals through association with Syk in human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, E; Budagian, V; Pohl, T; Krause, H; Dürkop, H; Paus, R; Bulfone-Paus, S

    2001-12-01

    The alpha-chain of the IL-15R (IL-15Ralpha) serves as the specific, high-affinity receptor for IL-15. It is expressed by lymphoid and nonlymphoid cells, including B cell lymphoma lines. In this study, we have further explored IL-15Ralpha-mediated signaling in activated primary B cells and in Raji cells, a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line which expresses the IL-15Ralpha and IL-2Rgamma chains, but lacks the IL-2Rbeta chain. Stimulation of Raji cells with IL-15 induces their proliferation and rescues them from C2-ceramide-induced apoptosis. By immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, we show that treatment of Raji cells and activated primary B cells with IL-15 induces coprecipitation of Syk kinase with the IL-15Ralpha chain. Upon association, the activated Syk kinase phosphorylates the IL-15Ralpha chain as well as phospholipase Cgamma, which coprecipitates with Syk. Furthermore, transfection of Raji cells with stem-loop Syk antisense oligonucleotides prevents IL-15Ralpha and phospholipase Cgamma phosphorylation as well as the inhibition of apoptosis by IL-15. Mutation of a defined region of the intracellular signaling portion of IL-15Ralpha (Tyr227) abrogates both the IL-15Ralpha/Syk association and IL-15Ralpha phosphorylation. Taken together, this suggests that Syk kinase physically and functionally associates with the IL-15Ralpha chain in B cells and that Syk plays a key role in mediating IL-15-induced signal transduction, thus accounting for the distinct functional consequences of IL-15 vs IL-2 binding to B cells.

  4. Fatal cases of Theileria annulata infection in calves in Portugal associated with neoplastic-like lymphoid cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvalho, João; Leitão, Alexandre; Pereira, Isadora; Malta, Manuel; Mariano, Isabel; Carvalho, Tânia; Baptista, Rui; Shiels, Brian R.; Peleteiro, Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate fifteen cases of acute lethal infection of calves (≤ 4 months of age) by the protozoan parasite Theileria (T.) annulata in the south of Portugal. Calves developed multifocal to coalescent nodular skin lesions, similar to multicentric malignant lymphoma. Infestation with ticks (genus Hyalomma) was intense. Theileria was seen in blood and lymph node smears, and T. annulata infection was confirmed by isolation of schizont-transformed cells and sequencing of hypervariable region 4 of the 18S rRNA gene. At necropsy, hemorrhagic nodules or nodules with a hemorrhagic halo were seen, particularly in the skin, subcutaneous tissue, skeletal and cardiac muscles, pharynx, trachea and intestinal serosa. Histologically, nodules were formed by large, round, lymphoblastoid neoplastic-like cells. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) identified these cells as mostly CD3 positive T lymphocytes and MAC387 positive macrophages. A marker for B lymphocytes (CD79αcy) labeled very few cells. T. annulata infected cells in these nodules were also identified by IHC through the use of two monoclonal antibodies (1C7 and 1C12) which are diagnostic for the parasite. It was concluded that the pathological changes observed in the different organs and tissues were caused by proliferation of schizont-infected macrophages, which subsequently stimulate a severe uncontrolled proliferation of uninfected T lymphocytes. PMID:20195062

  5. Protective activity of C-geranylflavonoid analogs from Paulownia tomentosa against DNA damage in 137Cs irradiated AHH-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyung-In; Jeong, Min Ho; Jo, Wol Soon

    2014-09-01

    Radiotherapy is an important form of treatment for a wide range of cancers, but it can damage DNA and cause adverse effects. We investigated if the diplacone analogs of P. tomentosa were radio-protective in a human lymphoblastoid cell line (AHH-1). Four geranylated flavonoids, diplacone, 3'-O-methyl-5'-hydroxydiplacone, 3'-O-methyl-5'-O-methyldiplacone and 3'-O-methyldiplacol, were tested for their antioxidant and radio-protective effects. Diplacone analogs effectively scavenged free radicals and inhibited radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in vitro. They significantly decreased levels of reactive oxygen species and cellular DNA damage in 2 Gy-irradiated AHH-1 cells. Glutathione levels and superoxide dismutase activity in irradiated AHH-1 cells increased significantly after treatment with these analogs. The enhanced biological anti-oxidant activity and radioprotective activity of diplacone analogs maintained the survival of irradiated AHH-1 cells in a clonogenic assay. These data suggest that diplacone analogs may protect healthy tissue surrounding tumor cells during radiotherapy to ensure better control of radiotherapy and allow higher doses of radiotherapy to be employed.

  6. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced tumor suppressor microRNA MiR-34a is growth promoting in EBV-infected B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Eleonora; Salinas, Raul E; Chang, Christina; Zhou, Ting; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Gottwein, Eva; Jacobs, Cassandra; Jima, Dereje; Li, Qi-Jing; Dave, Sandeep S; Luftig, Micah A

    2012-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of primary human B cells drives their indefinite proliferation into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). B cell immortalization depends on expression of viral latency genes, as well as the regulation of host genes. Given the important role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating fundamental cellular processes, in this study, we assayed changes in host miRNA expression during primary B cell infection by EBV. We observed and validated dynamic changes in several miRNAs from early proliferation through immortalization; oncogenic miRNAs were induced, and tumor suppressor miRNAs were largely repressed. However, one miRNA described as a p53-targeted tumor suppressor, miR-34a, was strongly induced by EBV infection and expressed in many EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-infected lymphoma cell lines. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) was sufficient to induce miR-34a requiring downstream NF-κB activation but independent of functional p53. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-34a was not toxic in several B lymphoma cell lines, and inhibition of miR-34a impaired the growth of EBV-transformed cells. This study identifies a progrowth role for a tumor-suppressive miRNA in oncogenic-virus-mediated transformation, highlighting the importance of studying miRNA function in different cellular contexts.

  7. Alteration in cell cycle-related proteins in lymphoblasts from carriers of the c.709-1G>A PGRN mutation associated with FTLD-TDP dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquezar, Carolina; Esteras, Noemí; Bartolomé, Fernando; Merino, José J; Alzualde, Ainhoa; López de Munain, Adolfo; Martín-Requero, Ángeles

    2012-02-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with neuronal inclusions containing TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is associated in most cases with null-mutations in the progranulin gene (PGRN). While the mechanisms by which PGRN haploinsufficiency leads to neurodegeneration remained speculative, increasing evidence support the hypothesis that cell cycle reentry of postmitotic neurons precedes many instances of neuronal death. Based in the mitogenic and neurotrophic activities of PGRN, we hypothesized that PGRN deficit may induce cell cycle disturbances and alterations in neuronal vulnerability. Because cell cycle dysfunction is not restricted to neurons, we studied the influence of PGRN haploinsufficiency, on cell cycle control in peripheral cells from patients suffering from frontotemporal dementia, bearing the PGRN mutation c.709-1G>A. Here we show that progranulin deficit increased cell cycle activity in immortalized lymphocytes. This effect was associated with increased levels of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRb), resulting in a G(1)/S regulatory failure. A loss of function of TDP-43 repressing CDK6 expression may result from altered subcellular TDP-43 distribution. The distinct functional features of lymphoblastoid cells from c.709-1 G>A carriers offer an invaluable, noninvasive tool to investigate the etiopathogenesis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

  8. Withania somnifera Induces Cytotoxic and Cytostatic Effects on Human T Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, Eleonora; Calcabrini, Cinzia; Sestili, Piero; Catanzaro, Elena; de Gianni, Elena; Diaz, Anna Rita; Hrelia, Patrizia; Tacchini, Massimo; Guerrini, Alessandra; Canonico, Barbara; Papa, Stefano; Valdrè, Giovanni; Fimognari, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy is characterized by an elevated intrinsic toxicity and the development of drug resistance. Thus, there is a compelling need for new intervention strategies with an improved therapeutic profile. Immunogenic cell death (ICD) represents an innovative anticancer strategy where dying cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns promoting tumor-specific immune responses. The roots of Withania somnifera (W. somnifera) are used in the Indian traditional medicine for their anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating, neuroprotective, and anticancer activities. The present study is designed to explore the antileukemic activity of the dimethyl sulfoxide extract obtained from the roots of W. somnifera (WE). We studied its cytostatic and cytotoxic activity, its ability to induce ICD, and its genotoxic potential on a human T-lymphoblastoid cell line by using different flow cytometric assays. Our results show that WE has a significant cytotoxic and cytostatic potential, and induces ICD. Its proapoptotic mechanism involves intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In our experimental conditions, the extract possesses a genotoxic potential. Since the use of Withania is suggested in different contexts including anti-infertility and osteoarthritis care, its genotoxicity should be carefully considered for an accurate assessment of its risk-benefit profile.

  9. Recovery of Epstein--Barr virus from nonproducer neonatal human lymphoid cell transformants. [X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G.; Miller, G.

    1979-06-01

    Lymphoid cell lines (LCL) were established by infection of two batches of human umbilical cord lymphocytes with low multiplicities of the B95-8 strain of Epstein--Barr virus. Three of the 17 lines released minute mounts of transforming virus. The rest did not, nor did they make capsid antigen. However virus could be regularly recovered by lethal x-irradiation of transformed cells followed by cocultivation with primary human umbilical cord leukocytes. By this technique transforming activity could be identified in 15 of the 17 lines. These data indicate that these nonproducer human neonatal cell transformants established by EBV infection in vitro possess sufficient genetic information to code for production of biologically active mature virions. X rays alone failed to cause a detectable increase in the number of cells with capsid antigen or to enhance extracellular virus production. EBV-positive human serum blocked rescue if it was added during the first 2 to 4 hr after cocultivation, but not thereafter. Transforming virus could be recovered from x-rayed cells which were immediately thereafter lysed by freezing and thawing. These results suggest that recovery of virus following x-ray and cocultivation is not due to activation of the intracellular virus genome. Rather, it is likely that the method detects small numbers of virions which are cell associated. While transforming virus could regularly be rescued from lymphoblastoid cell lines resulting from in vitro transformation, attempts to rescue virus from Raji or EBV-converted BJAB cells were unsuccessful. This discrepancy suggests differences in genome complexity or in genome-cell interactions in different types of EBV-transformed cells.

  10. Experiment list: SRX764613 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. Experiment list: SRX764697 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. Experiment list: SRX764561 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. Experiment list: SRX356715 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Experiment list: SRX764567 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. Experiment list: SRX764615 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Experiment list: SRX651494 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. Experiment list: SRX764565 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Experiment list: SRX764657 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. Experiment list: SRX764529 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. Experiment list: SRX764695 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. Experiment list: SRX356490 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. Experiment list: SRX764642 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Experiment list: SRX764648 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. Experiment list: SRX764532 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. Experiment list: SRX1027609 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. Experiment list: SRX764668 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. Experiment list: SRX764521 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. Experiment list: SRX080405 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. Experiment list: SRX080417 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. Experiment list: SRX189971 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. Experiment list: SRX080394 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. Experiment list: SRX080387 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. Experiment list: SRX080440 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Experiment list: SRX080348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. Experiment list: SRX189962 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Experiment list: SRX080428 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. Experiment list: SRX764512 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Experiment list: SRX356772 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. Experiment list: SRX764583 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. Experiment list: SRX764540 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. Experiment list: SRX764699 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. Experiment list: SRX764504 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Experiment list: SRX356486 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. Experiment list: SRX764542 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. Experiment list: SRX356557 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. Experiment list: SRX356755 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. Experiment list: SRX764485 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. Experiment list: SRX356769 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. Experiment list: SRX764619 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. Experiment list: SRX356775 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. Experiment list: SRX356753 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. Experiment list: SRX764611 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. Experiment list: SRX764563 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Experiment list: SRX764635 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. Experiment list: SRX764676 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Experiment list: SRX764693 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. Experiment list: SRX651498 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Experiment list: SRX651492 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. Experiment list: SRX764638 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. Experiment list: SRX764653 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. Experiment list: SRX356742 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356742 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31877095,98.0,3.2,31878 GSM1234174: GM2

  2. Experiment list: SRX764632 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Experiment list: SRX764518 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. Experiment list: SRX356549 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. Experiment list: SRX356737 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. Experiment list: SRX356488 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. Experiment list: SRX764662 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. Experiment list: SRX764471 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. Experiment list: SRX764679 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. Experiment list: SRX764523 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. Experiment list: SRX1027616 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. Experiment list: SRX764617 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. Experiment list: SRX764589 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Experiment list: SRX764624 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764624 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 34752736,99.2,5.7,51920 GSM1550945: GM1

  15. Experiment list: SRX764477 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764477 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 26516656,98.8,6.4,26419 GSM1550798: GM1

  16. Experiment list: SRX764651 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764651 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27861386,99.2,6.8,26675 GSM1550972: GM1

  17. Experiment list: SRX764673 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764673 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 25299365,99.0,11.0,44302 GSM1550994: GM

  18. Experiment list: SRX764569 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764569 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27800929,99.1,9.0,39495 GSM1550890: GM1

  19. Experiment list: SRX1027610 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ge=mesoderm|Description=parental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 161929200,96.0,21.9,74903 ChIP-seq o...SRX1027610 hg19 No description NA Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Linea

  20. Experiment list: SRX764546 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764546 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31595303,99.2,5.6,29486 GSM1550867: GM1

  1. Experiment list: SRX356717 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 55802975,98.8,9.5,1715 GSM1234149: GM2...SRX356717 hg19 Histone H3K27me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=par

  2. Experiment list: SRX356778 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356778 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 34796608,99.0,4.6,32160 GSM1234210: GM2

  3. Experiment list: SRX764543 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764543 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29992146,99.0,2.1,48060 GSM1550864: GM1

  4. Experiment list: SRX764580 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764580 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27889940,99.1,21.3,49801 GSM1550901: GM

  5. Experiment list: SRX764587 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764587 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30146016,99.3,12.9,43929 GSM1550908: GM

  6. Experiment list: SRX764659 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764659 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29181210,99.2,3.5,29600 GSM1550980: GM1

  7. Experiment list: SRX764525 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764525 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28325010,98.7,3.3,27508 GSM1550846: GM1

  8. Experiment list: SRX764678 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764678 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30462849,99.3,5.5,47716 GSM1550999: GM1

  9. Experiment list: SRX356551 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 81313998,99.0,8.1,3491 GSM1233983: GM1...SRX356551 hg19 Histone H3K27me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=par

  10. Experiment list: SRX764634 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764634 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28672579,98.9,8.9,23145 GSM1550955: GM1

  11. Experiment list: SRX764556 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764556 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29798067,99.2,3.6,29094 GSM1550877: GM1

  12. Experiment list: SRX764502 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764502 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27978333,99.1,5.7,43053 GSM1550823: GM1

  13. Experiment list: SRX764548 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764548 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31872768,97.1,7.1,29493 GSM1550869: GM1

  14. Experiment list: SRX764655 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764655 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 24870777,99.0,6.1,40941 GSM1550976: GM1

  15. Experiment list: SRX764670 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764670 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28767994,99.1,5.5,45452 GSM1550991: GM1

  16. Experiment list: SRX764545 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764545 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27692939,99.0,14.8,50546 GSM1550866: GM

  17. Experiment list: SRX651502 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX651502 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 73046209,95.2,2.2,56890 GSM1435527: LCL

  18. Experiment list: SRX356734 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356734 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30687263,98.3,5.1,53754 GSM1234166: GM2

  19. Experiment list: SRX764594 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764594 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29692967,99.3,6.2,28088 GSM1550915: GM1

  20. Experiment list: SRX764675 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764675 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28392223,99.2,4.4,26423 GSM1550996: GM1

  1. Experiment list: SRX1027613 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ge=mesoderm|Description=parental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 136038910,94.9,33.6,8080 ChIP-seq of...SRX1027613 hg19 No description NA Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Linea

  2. Experiment list: SRX764637 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764637 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28300702,99.2,8.7,43740 GSM1550958: GM1

  3. Experiment list: SRX764584 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764584 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 36650587,99.2,8.0,50234 GSM1550905: GM1

  4. Experiment list: SRX764491 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764491 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30547551,99.1,10.2,45256 GSM1550812: GM

  5. Experiment list: SRX764482 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764482 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28761359,99.0,1.6,45644 GSM1550803: GM1

  6. Experiment list: SRX356489 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 20851662,98.3,17.3,940 GSM1233921: GM1...SRX356489 hg19 Histone H3K36me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=par

  7. Experiment list: SRX764488 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764488 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 33247617,99.3,4.9,50992 GSM1550809: GM1

  8. Experiment list: SRX764631 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764631 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27574632,99.0,18.4,25892 GSM1550952: GM

  9. Experiment list: SRX764586 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764586 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31613285,99.0,10.9,45046 GSM1550907: GM

  10. Experiment list: SRX764581 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764581 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 32866490,99.1,17.3,27402 GSM1550902: GM

  11. Experiment list: SRX764507 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764507 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 17571288,49.0,0.0,0 GSM1550828: GM19203

  12. Experiment list: SRX764494 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764494 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31906028,99.0,10.5,26144 GSM1550815: GM

  13. Experiment list: SRX764501 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764501 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 34268427,99.0,1.7,42941 GSM1550822: GM1

  14. Experiment list: SRX150532 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...igree 1463, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transformed ||... || cell=GM12891 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah ped

  15. Experiment list: SRX150367 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, tr...igree 1463, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transformed ||... || cell=GM12891 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah ped

  16. Virus and autoantigen-specific CD4+ T cells are key effectors in a SCID mouse model of EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W; Mautner, Josef

    2014-05-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies.

  17. Analysis of baseline and cisplatin-inducible gene expression in Fanconi anemia cells using oligonucleotide-based microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Johnson M

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Fanconi anemia (FA suffer from multiple defects, most notably of the hematological compartment (bone marrow failure, and susceptibility to cancer. Cells from FA patients show increased spontaneous chromosomal damage, which is aggravated by exposure to low concentrations of DNA cross-linking agents such as mitomycin C or cisplatin. Five of the identified FA proteins form a nuclear core complex. However, the molecular function of these proteins remains obscure. Methods Oligonucleotide microarrays were used to compare the expression of approximately 12,000 genes from FA cells with matched controls. Expression profiles were studied in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from three different FA patients, one from the FA-A and two from the FA-C complementation groups. The isogenic control cell lines were obtained by either transfecting the cells with vectors expressing the complementing cDNAs or by using a spontaneous revertant cell line derived from the same patient. In addition, we analyzed expression profiles from two cell line couples at several time points after a 1-hour pulse treatment with a discriminating dose of cisplatin. Results Analysis of the expression profiles showed differences in expression of a number of genes, many of which have unknown function or are difficult to relate to the FA defect. However, from a selected number of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and chromatin structure, Western blot analysis showed that p21waf1/Cip1 was significantly upregulated after low dose cisplatin treatment in FA cells specifically (as well as being expressed at elevated levels in untreated FA cells. Conclusions The observed increase in expression of p21waf1/Cip1 after treatment of FA cells with crosslinkers suggests that the sustained elevated levels of p21waf1/Cip1 in untreated FA cells detected by Western blot analysis likely reflect increased spontaneous damage in these cells.

  18. Gene expression patterns vary in clonal cell cultures from Rett syndrome females with eight different MECP2 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzeroni Laura

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Females with the neurological disorder Rett syndrome are heterozygous for mutations in X-linked MECP2 that encodes methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 thought to act as a transcriptional repressor. To identify target genes for MeCP2 modulation, we studied global gene expression in single cell-derived wild-type and mutant MECP2 expressing fibroblast clones with four common mutations (R106W, R306C, 705delG, 1155del32 and in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs that included four mutant MeCP2 (T158M, 803delG, R168X and 1159del28 expressing, and five (1159del28, R106W, R255X, 803delG, 803delG wild-type MeCP2 expressing lines. Methods Clonality and mutation status were verified by androgen receptor methylation assays for X-inactivation and by sequencing MECP2 transcripts. Expression studies were done with oligonucleotide microarrays (Affymetrix U95 and verified with real-time quantitative RT-PCR using Sybr Green. Results Expression of 49 transcripts was increased, and expression of 21 transcripts was decreased, in at least 3 of 4 mutant/wild-type fibroblast comparisons. Transcript levels of 11 genes, determined by quantitative RT-PCR, were highly correlated with the microarray data. Therefore, multiple additional clones from two Rett individuals were tested by RT-PCR only. Striking expression differences were found in both mutant and wildtype MeCP2 expressing clones. Comparing expression profiles of lymphoblastoid cell lines yielded 16 differentially expressed genes. Conclusions MeCP2 deficiency does not lead to global deregulation of gene expression. Either MeCP2's in vivo function does not involve widespread transcriptional repression, or its function is redundant in cell types that also express other methyl-CpG binding proteins. Our data suggest that clonal fibroblast strains may show substantial inter-strain variation, making them a difficult and unstable resource for genome-wide expression profiling studies.

  19. Deciphering the plasma membrane hallmarks of apoptotic cells: Phosphatidylserine transverse redistribution and calcium entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez M Carmen

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During apoptosis, Ca2+-dependent events participate in the regulation of intracellular and morphological changes including phosphatidylserine exposure in the exoplasmic leaflet of the cell plasma membrane. The occurrence of phosphatidylserine at the surface of specialized cells, such as platelets, is also essential for the assembly of the enzyme complexes of the blood coagulation cascade, as demonstrated by hemorrhages in Scott syndrome, an extremely rare genetic deficiency of phosphatidylserine externalization, without other apparent pathophysiologic consequences. We have recently reported a reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry in Scott cells which may be part of the Scott phenotype. Results Taking advantage of these mutant lymphoblastoid B cells, we have studied the relationship between this mode of Ca2+ entry and phosphatidylserine redistribution during apoptosis. Ca2+ ionophore induced apoptosis in Scott but not in control cells. However, inhibition of store-operated Ca2+ channels led to caspase-independent DNA fragmentation and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential in both control and Scott cells. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 also reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry and induced apoptosis at comparable extents in control and Scott cells. During the apoptotic process, both control and more markedly Scott cells externalized phosphatidylserine, but in the latter, this membrane feature was however dissociated from several other intracellular changes. Conclusions The present results suggest that different mechanisms account for phosphatidylserine transmembrane migration in cells undergoing stimulation and programmed death. These observations testify to the plasticity of the plasma membrane remodeling process, allowing normal apoptosis even when less fundamental functions are defective.

  20. Dynamic Epstein-Barr virus gene expression on the path to B-cell transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alexander M; Luftig, Micah A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic human herpesvirus in the γ-herpesvirinae subfamily that contains a 170-180kb double-stranded DNA genome. In vivo, EBV commonly infects B and epithelial cells and persists for the life of the host in a latent state in the memory B-cell compartment of the peripheral blood. EBV can be reactivated from its latent state, leading to increased expression of lytic genes that primarily encode for enzymes necessary to replicate the viral genome and structural components of the virion. Lytic cycle proteins also aid in immune evasion, inhibition of apoptosis, and the modulation of other host responses to infection. In vitro, EBV has the potential to infect primary human B cells and induce cellular proliferation to yield effectively immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines, or LCLs. EBV immortalization of B cells in vitro serves as a model system for studying EBV-mediated lymphomagenesis. While much is known about the steady-state viral gene expression within EBV-immortalized LCLs and other EBV-positive cell lines, relatively little is known about the early events after primary B-cell infection. It was previously thought that upon latent infection, EBV only expressed the well-characterized latency-associated transcripts found in LCLs. However, recent work has characterized the early, but transient, expression of lytic genes necessary for efficient transformation and delayed responses in the known latency genes. This chapter summarizes these recent findings that show how dynamic and controlled expression of multiple EBV genes can control the activation of B cells, entry into the cell cycle, the inhibition of apoptosis, and innate and adaptive immune responses.

  1. Effects of Citrus aurantifolia concentrated extract on the spontaneous proliferation of MDA-MB-453 and RPMI-8866 tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, M; Doroudchi, M; Ghaderi, A

    2002-07-01

    The in vitro effects of concentrated lime juice (CLJ) extract on the spontaneous proliferation of a human breast carcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-453) and a human lymphoblastoid B cell line (RPMI-8866) were investigated. CLJ extract was prepared by freeze-drying fresh fruit juice and dialyzing the concentrated extract against phosphate buffered saline in order to deplete low molecular weight micronutrients such as flavonoids as well as adjusting the pH of the extract to the physiological range. The effects of different concentrations of the CLJ extract on the spontaneous proliferative responses of the cell lines were determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation after 24 hrs of incubation. CLJ extract had no significant effect on MDA-MB-453 cell line, however, using the concentrations of 125, 250, and 500 microg/ml of CLJ extract a significant inhibition of the spontaneous proliferation of RPMI-8866 cell line was detected (P < 0.05). Due to the protein nature of the biologically active macromolecules of the CLJ extract (Gharagozloo and Ghaderi, 2001), it is reasonable to assume that the protein components of the CLJ extract may have anti-proliferative effects on tumor cell lines.

  2. Characterization of an adenosine deaminase-deficient human histiocytic lymphoma cell line (DHL-9) and selection of mutants deficient in adenosir kinase and deoxycytidine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, M; Kamatani, N; Daddona, P E; Carson, D A

    1983-06-01

    The association of adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency with immunodeficiency disease has emphasized the importance of this purine metabolic enzyme for human lymphocyte growth and function. This report describes the natural occurrence of ADA deficiency in a human histiocytic lymphoma cell line, DHL-9. The minimal ADA activity in DHL-9 extracts, 0.028 nmol/min/mg protein, was less than 50% of the activity in two B-lymphoblastoid cell lines from ADA-deficient patients and was resistant to the potent ADA inhibitor deoxycoformycin. A sensitive radioimmunoassay failed to detect immunoreactive ADA in DHL-9 cells. Moreover, in DHL-9 cells, deoxycoformycin did not augment either the growth-inhibitory effects of adenosine and deoxyadenosine or the accumulation of deoxyadenosine triphosphate from deoxyadenosine. When compared to six other human hematopoietic cell lines, DHL-9 had 5.6-fold-higher levels of adenosylhomocysteinase. Chromosome 20, which bears the structural gene for ADA and adenosylhomocysteinase, was diploid and had a normal Giemsa banding pattern. The parental DHL-9 cell line was used for the selection and cloning of secondary mutants deficient in deoxycytidine kinase and adenosine kinase.

  3. DNA electrophoretic migration patterns change after exposure of Jurkat cells to a single intense nanosecond electric pulse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Romeo

    Full Text Available Intense nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs interact with cellular membranes and intracellular structures. Investigating how cells respond to nanosecond pulses is essential for a development of biomedical applications of nsPEFs, including cancer therapy, and b better understanding of the mechanisms underlying such bioelectrical effects. In this work, we explored relatively mild exposure conditions to provide insight into weak, reversible effects, laying a foundation for a better understanding of the interaction mechanisms and kinetics underlying nsPEF bio-effects. In particular, we report changes in the nucleus of Jurkat cells (human lymphoblastoid T cells exposed to single pulses of 60 ns duration and 1.0, 1.5 and 2.5 MV/m amplitudes, which do not affect cell growth and viability. A dose-dependent reduction in alkaline comet-assayed DNA migration is observed immediately after nsPEF exposure, accompanied by permeabilization of the plasma membrane (YO-PRO-1 uptake. Comet assay profiles return to normal within 60 minutes after pulse delivery at the highest pulse amplitude tested, indicating that our exposure protocol affects the nucleus, modifying DNA electrophoretic migration patterns.

  4. A cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication is involved in signal transduction in antigen-specific T cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, R L; Clark, R B; Gutowski, J K; Katz, M E; Fresa, K L; Cohen, S

    1990-05-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from T cell lines undergoing antigen-specific, interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent proliferation were tested for their ability to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. A tetanus toxoid (TET)-specific T cell line, established from peripheral blood of a normal human volunteer, was stimulated in the presence of relevant antigen and 1 unit/ml IL-2. Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells were capable of inducing DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei correlated positively with the degree of proliferation induced in these cells. In contrast, incubation of this T cell line in the absence of antigen failed to induce proliferation and cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells induced little to no DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The factor present in the cytoplasm of T cells stimulated with relevant antigen in the presence of IL-2 is similar, if not identical, to a factor which we have previously demonstrated in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and from mitogenically stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This factor, which we have called activator of DNA replication (ADR) is a heat-labile protein, and is inactivated by treatment with protease inhibitors, including aprotinin. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts from T cells undergoing antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent proliferation to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei was markedly inhibited in the presence of aprotinin, providing strong evidence that a cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication, ADR, is involved in the signal transduction process for antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent T cell proliferation. ADR may represent a common intracellular mediator of DNA synthesis in activated and transformed lymphocytes.

  5. Experiment list: SRX031181 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatmen...arch.aspx?PgId=165&q=NA19239 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YR

  6. Experiment list: SRX031185 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatmen...arch.aspx?PgId=165&q=NA19239 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YR

  7. Experiment list: SRX031172 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Bar...65&q=NA18507 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI) http://dbarch

  8. Experiment list: SRX031174 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Bar...165&q=NA18507 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI) http://dbarc

  9. Experiment list: SRX031171 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Bar...165&q=NA18507 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI) http://dbarc

  10. Experiment list: SRX031178 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Bar...=165&q=NA18507 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI) http://dbar

  11. Experiment list: SRX031176 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Bar...=165&q=NA18507 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI) http://dbar

  12. Experiment list: SRX031180 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatmen...rch.aspx?PgId=165&q=NA19239 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI

  13. Experiment list: SRX031183 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatmen...arch.aspx?PgId=165&q=NA19239 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YR

  14. Experiment list: SRX031175 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Bar...=165&q=NA18507 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI) http://dbar

  15. Experiment list: SRX031173 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Bar...65&q=NA18507 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI) http://dbarch

  16. Experiment list: SRX031179 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatmen...rch.aspx?PgId=165&q=NA19239 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI

  17. Experiment list: SRX031184 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatmen...arch.aspx?PgId=165&q=NA19239 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YR

  18. Experiment list: SRX031177 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Bar...=165&q=NA18507 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI) http://dbar

  19. Experiment list: SRX031182 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatmen...arch.aspx?PgId=165&q=NA19239 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YR

  20. Experiment list: SRX031186 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available m|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatmen...arch.aspx?PgId=165&q=NA19239 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || origin=Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (YR

  1. Experiment list: SRX019963 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transformed...h.aspx?PgId=165&q=GM06990 || cell line=GM06990 || cell type=Epstein-Barr Virus transformed lymphoblastoid ||

  2. Experiment list: SRX199892 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...M12864 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  3. Experiment list: SRX150365 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epst...GM12892 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  4. Experiment list: SRX199861 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...M12872 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  5. Experiment list: SRX150467 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...l=GM12891 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  6. Experiment list: SRX189417 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, De Lange phenotype; developmental delay; profound retardation || cell karyoty...pe=affected || cell lineage=mesoderm || cell sex=M || la

  7. Experiment list: SRX017951 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available blastoid Cells || biomaterial_provider=Coriell Cell Repositories http://ccr.coriell.org/Sections/Search.../Search.aspx?PgId=165&q=GM19099 || cell line=GM19099 || cell type=Lymphoblastoid cell

  8. Experiment list: SRX017913 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oblastoid Cells || biomaterial_provider=Coriell Cell Repositories http://ccr.coriell.org/Sections/Search.../Search.aspx?PgId=165&q=GM12891 || cell line=GM12891 || cell type=Lymphoblastoid cell

  9. Rare Circulating Cells in Familial Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Displaying the MYD88 L265P Mutation Are Enriched by Epstein-Barr Virus Immortalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroulio Pertesi

    Full Text Available The MYD88 L265P is a recurrent somatic mutation in neoplastic cells from patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia (WM. We identified the MYD88 L265P mutation in three individuals from unrelated families, but its presence did not explain the disease segregation within these WM pedigrees. We observed the mutation in these three individuals at high allele fractions in DNA extracted from EBV-immortalized Lymphoblastoid cell lines established from peripheral blood (LCL, but at much lower allele fractions in DNA extracted directly from peripheral blood, suggesting that this mutation is present in a clonal cell subpopulation rather than of germ-line origin. Furthermore, we observed that the MYD88 L265P mutation is enriched in WM families, detected in 40.5% of patients with familial WM or MGUS (10/22 WM, 5/15 MGUS, compared to 3.5% of patients with familial MM or MGUS (0/72 MM, 4/41 MGUS (p = 10-7. The mutant allele frequency increased with passages in vitro after immortalization with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV consistent with the MYD88 L265P described gain-of-function proposed for this mutation. The MYD88 L265P mutation appears to be frequently present in circulating cells in patients with WM, and MGUS, and these cells are amenable to immortalization by EBV.

  10. Rare Circulating Cells in Familial Waldenström Macroglobulinemia Displaying the MYD88 L265P Mutation Are Enriched by Epstein-Barr Virus Immortalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertesi, Maroulio; Galia, Perrine; Nazaret, Nicolas; Vallée, Maxime; Garderet, Laurent; Leleu, Xavier; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Foll, Matthieu; Byrnes, Graham; Lachuer, Joel; McKay, James D; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The MYD88 L265P is a recurrent somatic mutation in neoplastic cells from patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia (WM). We identified the MYD88 L265P mutation in three individuals from unrelated families, but its presence did not explain the disease segregation within these WM pedigrees. We observed the mutation in these three individuals at high allele fractions in DNA extracted from EBV-immortalized Lymphoblastoid cell lines established from peripheral blood (LCL), but at much lower allele fractions in DNA extracted directly from peripheral blood, suggesting that this mutation is present in a clonal cell subpopulation rather than of germ-line origin. Furthermore, we observed that the MYD88 L265P mutation is enriched in WM families, detected in 40.5% of patients with familial WM or MGUS (10/22 WM, 5/15 MGUS), compared to 3.5% of patients with familial MM or MGUS (0/72 MM, 4/41 MGUS) (p = 10-7). The mutant allele frequency increased with passages in vitro after immortalization with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) consistent with the MYD88 L265P described gain-of-function proposed for this mutation. The MYD88 L265P mutation appears to be frequently present in circulating cells in patients with WM, and MGUS, and these cells are amenable to immortalization by EBV.

  11. Bioenergetic and antiapoptotic properties of mitochondria from cultured human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, Alexander; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ). Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA) the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca²⁺ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP) when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca²⁺-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca²⁺. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia.

  12. Measurement of CD8+ and CD4+ T Cell Frequencies Specific for EBV LMP1 and LMP2a Using mRNA-Transfected DCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hee Sohn

    Full Text Available An EBV-specific cellular immune response is associated with the control of EBV-associated malignancies and lymphoproliferative diseases, some of which have been successfully treated by adoptive T cell therapy. Therefore, many methods have been used to measure EBV-specific cellular immune responses. Previous studies have mainly used autologous EBV-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs, recombinant viral vectors transfected or peptide pulsed dendritic cells (DCs as stimulators of CD8(+ and CD4(+ T lymphocytes. In the present study, we used an interferon-γ (IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT assay by using isolated CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells stimulated with mRNA-transfected DCs. The frequency of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1-specific IFN-γ producing CD4(+ T cells was significantly higher than that of LMP2a. The frequency of IFN-γ producing CD4(+ T cells was significantly correlated with that of CD8(+ T cells in LMP1-specific immune responses (r = 0.7187, Pc < 0.0001. To determine whether there were changes in LMP1- or LMP2a-specific immune responses, subsequent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs samples were analyzed. Significant changes were observed in 5 of the 10 donors examined, and CD4(+ T cell responses showed more significant changes than CD8(+ T cell responses. CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells from EBV-seropositive donors secreted only the Th1 cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, while Th2 (IL-4 and Th17 (IL-17a cytokines were not detected. CD4(+ T cells secreted significantly higher cytokine levels than did CD8(+ T cells. Analysis of EBV-specific T cell responses using autologous DCs transfected with mRNA might provide a comprehensive tool for monitoring EBV infection and new insights into the pathogenesis of EBV-associated diseases.

  13. Bioenergetic and antiapoptotic properties of mitochondria from cultured human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Panov

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC, metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ. Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca²⁺ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca²⁺-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca²⁺. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia.

  14. Bioenergetic and Antiapoptotic Properties of Mitochondria from Cultured Human Prostate Cancer Cell Lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, Alexander; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ). Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA) the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca2+ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP) when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca2+-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca2+. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia. PMID:23951286

  15. EPS8 inhibition increases cisplatin sensitivity in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija K Gorsic

    Full Text Available Cisplatin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic, is associated with ototoxicity, renal toxicity and neurotoxicity, thus identifying means to increase the therapeutic index of cisplatin may allow for improved outcomes. A SNP (rs4343077 within EPS8, discovered through a genome wide association study of cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, provided impetus to further study this gene. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the role of EPS8 in cellular susceptibility to cisplatin in cancerous and non-cancerous cells. We used EPS8 RNA interference to determine the effect of decreased EPS8 expression on LCL and A549 lung cancer cell sensitivity to cisplatin. EPS8 knockdown in LCLs resulted in a 7.9% increase in cisplatin-induced survival (P = 1.98 × 10(-7 and an 8.7% decrease in apoptosis (P = 0.004 compared to control. In contrast, reduced EPS8 expression in lung cancer cells resulted in a 20.6% decrease in cisplatin-induced survival (P = 5.08 × 10(-5. We then investigated an EPS8 inhibitor, mithramycin A, as a potential agent to increase the therapeutic index of cisplatin. Mithramycin A decreased EPS8 expression in LCLs resulting in decreased cellular sensitivity to cisplatin as evidenced by lower caspase 3/7 activation following cisplatin treatment (42.7% ± 6.8% relative to control P = 0.0002. In 5 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC cell lines, mithramycin A also resulted in decreased EPS8 expression. Adding mithramycin to 4 NSCLC cell lines and a bladder cancer cell line, resulted in increased sensitivity to cisplatin that was significantly more pronounced in tumor cell lines than in LCL lines (p<0.0001. An EGFR mutant NSCLC cell line (H1975 showed no significant change in sensitivity to cisplatin with the addition of mithramycin treatment. Therefore, an inhibitor of EPS8, such as mithramycin A, could improve cisplatin treatment by increasing sensitivity of tumor relative to normal cells.

  16. Assessment of targeted and non-targeted responses in cells deficient in ATM function following exposure to low and high dose X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuru, Anne; Kämäräinen, Meerit; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Pylkäs, Katri; Chapman, Kim; Koivistoinen, Armi; Parviainen, Teuvo; Winqvist, Robert; Kadhim, Munira; Launonen, Virpi; Lindholm, Carita

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity at low and high dose exposure to X-rays was investigated by means of chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis in heterozygous ATM mutation carrier and A-T patient (biallelic ATM mutation) lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Targeted and non-targeted responses to acutely delivered irradiation were examined by applying a co-culture system that enables study of both directly irradiated cells and medium-mediated bystander effects in the same experimental setting. No indication of radiation hypersensitivity was observed at doses of 0.01 Gy or 0.1 Gy for the ATM mutation carrier LCL. The A-T patient cells also did not show low-dose response. There was significant increase in unstable CA yields for both ATM mutation carrier and A-T LCLs at 1 and 2 Gy, the A-T cells displaying more distinct dose dependency. Both chromosome and chromatid type aberrations were induced at an increased rate in the irradiated A-T cells, whereas for ATM carrier cells, only unstable chromosomal aberrations were increased above the level observed in the wild type cell line. No bystander effect could be demonstrated in any of the cell lines or doses applied. Characteristics typical for the A-T cell line were detected, i.e., high baseline frequency of CA that increased with dose. In addition, dose-dependent loss of cell viability was observed. In conclusion, CA analysis did not demonstrate low-dose (≤100 mGy) radiosensitivity in ATM mutation carrier cells or A-T patient cells. However, both cell lines showed increased radiosensitivity at high dose exposure.

  17. Assessment of targeted and non-targeted responses in cells deficient in ATM function following exposure to low and high dose X-rays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kiuru

    Full Text Available Radiation sensitivity at low and high dose exposure to X-rays was investigated by means of chromosomal aberration (CA analysis in heterozygous ATM mutation carrier and A-T patient (biallelic ATM mutation lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Targeted and non-targeted responses to acutely delivered irradiation were examined by applying a co-culture system that enables study of both directly irradiated cells and medium-mediated bystander effects in the same experimental setting. No indication of radiation hypersensitivity was observed at doses of 0.01 Gy or 0.1 Gy for the ATM mutation carrier LCL. The A-T patient cells also did not show low-dose response. There was significant increase in unstable CA yields for both ATM mutation carrier and A-T LCLs at 1 and 2 Gy, the A-T cells displaying more distinct dose dependency. Both chromosome and chromatid type aberrations were induced at an increased rate in the irradiated A-T cells, whereas for ATM carrier cells, only unstable chromosomal aberrations were increased above the level observed in the wild type cell line. No bystander effect could be demonstrated in any of the cell lines or doses applied. Characteristics typical for the A-T cell line were detected, i.e., high baseline frequency of CA that increased with dose. In addition, dose-dependent loss of cell viability was observed. In conclusion, CA analysis did not demonstrate low-dose (≤100 mGy radiosensitivity in ATM mutation carrier cells or A-T patient cells. However, both cell lines showed increased radiosensitivity at high dose exposure.

  18. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cells as efficient antigen presenting cells to propagate Aspergillus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Gamal

    2008-01-01

    To overcome the cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) expansion limitations imposed by the lack of sufficient dendritic cells (DC) alternative sources of autologous antigen presenting cells (APC) such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCL), which are easy to establish in vitro, have been considered and studied in the present work. Non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells of three healthy donors were repeatedly primed with autologous Aspergillus fumigatus commercial culture-filtrate antigen-pulsed fast monocyte-derived DC (Aspf-CFA-DC) alone, Aspf-CFA-pulsed BLCL (Aspf-CFA-BLCL) alone or Aspf-CFA-BLCL after one, two, or three primings with Aspf-CFA-DC (1DC/BLCL, 2DC/BLCL or 3DCIBLCL; respectively). After 5th priming, lines generated by Aspf-CFA-BLCL only showed strong/weak lytic activity for EBV/Aspf; respectively. Aspf-specific lytic activity in all donors was increased by increasing the number of primings with Aspf-CFA-DC before switching to Aspf-CFA-BLCL (18.20 +/- 1.65% versus 35.67 +/- 1.02% and 40.03 +/- 1.41% in bulk cultures generated by 1DC/BLCL versus 2DC/BLCL and 3DC/BLCL, respectively). Bulk cultures generated by Aspf-CFA-BLCL after at least two primings with Aspf-CFA-DC showed approximately the same Aspf-specific lytic activity, effector cell phenotype, expansion level and percentage expression of IFN-gamma, CD69 and CD107a without any significant differences (p > 0.05) as standard bulk cultures generated by only Aspf-CFA-DC. Thus, this study explored the use of a combined DC/BLCL protocol to establish/propagate Aspf-specific CTL for adoptive immunotherapy to prevent or treat invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

  19. The oncogene DEK promotes leukemic cell survival and is downregulated by both Nutlin-3 and chlorambucil in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchiero, Paola; Voltan, Rebecca; di Iasio, Maria Grazia; Melloni, Elisabetta; Tiribelli, Mario; Zauli, Giorgio

    2010-03-15

    To characterize the role of the oncogene DEK in modulating the response to either Nutlin-3, a small-molecule inhibitor of the MDM2/p53 interaction, or chlorambucil in primary B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells. DEK mRNA and protein levels were evaluated in primary B-CLL samples (n = 21), p53(wild-type) SKW6.4, p53(mutated) BJAB lymphoblastoid cell lines, and normal CD19(+) B lymphocytes-treated Nutlin-3 or chlorambucil (10 micromol/L, each). Knocking down experiments with either p53 or DEK small interfering RNA (siRNA) were done to investigate the potential role of p53 in controlling the expression of DEK and the role of DEK in leukemic cell survival/apoptosis. Both Nutlin-3 and chlorambucil downregulated DEK in primary B-CLL samples (n = 21) and SKW6.4 but not in BJAB cells. Knocking down p53 attenuated the effect of Nutlin-3 on DEK expression, whereas knocking down DEK significantly increased both spontaneous and Nutlin-3-induced apoptosis. Conversely, counteracting DEK downmodulation by using p53 small interfering RNA reduced Nutlin-3-mediated apoptosis. On the other hand, Nutlin-3 potently induced p53 accumulation, but it did not affect DEK levels in normal CD19(+) B lymphocytes. These data show that the downregulation of DEK in response to either Nutlin-3 or chlorambucil represents an important molecular determinant in the cytotoxic response of leukemic cells, and suggest that strategies aimed to downregulate DEK might improve the therapeutic potential of these drugs.

  20. Endogenous DNA Damage and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, M B; Sigurdson, A J; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Graubard, B I; Korde, L; Greene, M H; McGlynn, K A

    2008-01-18

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are comprised of two histologic groups, seminomas and nonseminomas. We postulated that the possible divergent pathogeneses of these histologies may be partially explained by variable endogenous DNA damage. To assess our hypothesis, we conducted a case-case analysis of seminomas and nonseminomas using the alkaline comet assay to quantify single-strand DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites. The Familial Testicular Cancer study and the U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort provided 112 TGCT cases (51 seminomas & 61 nonseminomas). A lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured for each patient and the alkaline comet assay was used to determine four parameters: tail DNA, tail length, comet distributed moment (CDM) and Olive tail moment (OTM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Values for tail length, tail DNA, CDM and OTM were modeled as categorical variables using the 50th and 75th percentiles of the seminoma group. Tail DNA was significantly associated with nonseminoma compared to seminoma (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 3.31, 95%CI: 1.00, 10.98; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 3.71, 95%CI: 1.04, 13.20; p for trend=0.039). OTM exhibited similar, albeit statistically non-significant, risk estimates (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 2.27, 95%CI: 0.75, 6.87; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 2.40, 95%CI: 0.75, 7.71; p for trend=0.12) whereas tail length and CDM showed no association. In conclusion, the results for tail DNA and OTM indicate that endogenous DNA damage levels are higher in patients who develop nonseminoma compared with seminoma. This may partly explain the more aggressive biology and younger age-of-onset of this histologic subgroup compared with the relatively less aggressive, later-onset seminoma.

  1. Experiment list: SRX017992 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e_name=Lymphoblastoid Cells || biomaterial_provider=Coriell Cell Repositories http://ccr.coriell.org/Secti...ons/Search/Search.aspx?PgId=165&q=GM12891 || cell line=GM12891 || cell type=Lymphob

  2. Experiment list: SRX017878 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rce_name=Lymphoblastoid Cells || biomaterial_provider=Coriell Cell Repositories http://ccr.coriell.org/Sec...tions/Search/Search.aspx?PgId=165&q=GM15510 || cell line=GM15510 || cell type=Lymph

  3. Experiment list: SRX017868 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hoblastoid Cells || biomaterial_provider=Coriell Cell Repositories http://ccr.coriell.org/Sections/Search.../Search.aspx?PgId=165&q=GM18505 || cell line=GM18505 || cell type=Lymphoblastoid cel

  4. Dexamethasone improves redox state in ataxia telangiectasia cells by promoting an NRF2-mediated antioxidant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagiotti, Sara; Menotta, Michele; Orazi, Sara; Spapperi, Chiara; Brundu, Serena; Fraternale, Alessandra; Bianchi, Marzia; Rossi, Luigia; Chessa, Luciana; Magnani, Mauro

    2016-11-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare incurable neurodegenerative disease caused by biallelic mutations in the gene for ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). The lack of a functional ATM kinase leads to a pleiotropic phenotype, and oxidative stress is considered to have a crucial role in the complex physiopathology. Recently, steroids have been shown to reduce the neurological symptoms of the disease, although the molecular mechanism of this effect is largely unknown. In the present study, we have demonstrated that dexamethasone treatment of A-T lymphoblastoid cells increases the content of two of the most abundant antioxidants [glutathione (GSH) and NADPH] by up to 30%. Dexamethasone promoted the nuclear accumulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 to drive expression of antioxidant pathways involved in GSH synthesis and NADPH production. The latter effect was via glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activation, as confirmed by increased enzyme activity and enhancement of the pentose phosphate pathway rate. This evidence indicates that glucocorticoids are able to potentiate antioxidant defenses to counteract oxidative stress in ataxia telangiectasia, and also reveals an unexpected role for dexamethasone in redox homeostasis and cellular antioxidant activity. © 2016 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Fibroblast and lymphoblast gene expression profiles in schizophrenia: are non-neural cells informative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Matigian

    Full Text Available Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs and fibroblasts provide conveniently derived non-neuronal samples in which to investigate the aetiology of schizophrenia (SZ using gene expression profiling. This assumes that heritable mechanisms associated with risk of SZ have systemic effects and result in changes to gene expression in all tissues. The broad aim of this and other similar studies is that comparison of the transcriptomes of non-neuronal tissues from SZ patients and healthy controls may identify gene/pathway dysregulation underpinning the neurobiological defects associated with SZ. Using microarrays consisting of 18,664 probes we compared gene expression profiles of LCLs from SZ cases and healthy controls. To identify robust associations with SZ that were not patient or tissue specific, we also examined fibroblasts from an independent series of SZ cases and controls using the same microarrays. In both tissue types ANOVA analysis returned approximately the number of differentially expressed genes expected by chance. No genes were significantly differentially expressed in either tissue when corrected for multiple testing. Even using relaxed parameters (p or = 2-fold change between the groups of SZ cases and controls common to both LCLs and fibroblasts. We conclude that despite encouraging data from previous microarray studies assessing non-neural tissues, the lack of a convergent set of differentially expressed genes associated with SZ using fibroblasts and LCLs indicates the utility of non-neuronal tissues for detection of gene expression differences and/or pathways associated with SZ remains to be demonstrated.

  6. Endocytosis of receptor-bound insulin-like growth factor II is enhanced by mannose-6-phosphate in IM9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R

    1988-12-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and glycoproteins containing mannose 6-phosphate (M6P), bind to two different sites of the same receptor molecule (Morgan et al, Nature 329:301, 1987). To study the interactions between the two ligands on their common receptor in intact cells, we examined the effect of free M6P on IGF-II binding and endocytosis in the IM9 human lymphoblastoid cell line. M6P, up to a 3 mM concentration, had no effect on the binding of IGF-II to the cell surface receptor of intact IM9 cells at 4 degrees C. By contrast, when IM9 cells were incubated with 125I-IGF-II at 37 degrees C, 1 mM M6P increased cell-associated radioactivity by twofold. The increase was resistant to acid wash at 4 degrees C, and therefore assumed to represent endocytosed IGF-II. Acid-washable radioactivity was no different, confirming that, in intact cells, M6P does not affect IGF-II surface binding. In addition, preincubation of cells with M6P at 37 degrees C for up to 3 hours did not change the abundance of receptor on the cell surface, as measured by a subsequent 4 degrees C binding assay. We conclude that M6P causes a shift of IGF-II-occupied receptors form the cell surface to intracellular locations without affecting surface binding of this ligand in IM9 cells. The effect could be produced by the binding of M6P itself, or by the displacement of endogenous phosphomannosylated ligands.

  7. [{sup 131}I]FIAU labeling of genetically transduced, tumor-reactive lymphocytes: cell-level dosimetry and dose-dependent toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Koehne, Guenther; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; O' Reilly, Richard J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Allogeneic Transplantation Service, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Immunology Program, New York, NY (United States); Gallardo, Humilidad F. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, New York, NY (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York, NY (United States); Finn, Ronald [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiochemistry and Cyclotron Core Facility, New York, NY (United States); Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Immunology Program, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, New York, NY (United States); Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Donor T cells have been shown to be reactive against and effective in adoptive immunotherapy of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lymphomas which develop in some leukemia patients post marrow transplantation. These T cells may be genetically modified by incorporation of a replication-incompetent viral vector (NIT) encoding both an inactive mutant nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR), as an immunoselectable surface marker, and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK), rendering the cells sensitive to ganciclovir. The current studies are based on the selective HSV-TK-catalyzed trapping (phosphorylation) of the thymidine analog [{sup 131}I]-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuransyl-5-iodo-uracil (FIAU) as a means of stably labeling such T cells for in vivo trafficking (including tumor targeting) studies. Because of the radiosensitivity of lymphocytes and the potentially high absorbed dose to the nucleus from intracellular {sup 131}I (even at tracer levels), the nucleus absorbed dose (D{sub n}) and dose-dependent immune functionality were evaluated for NIT {sup +} T cells labeled ex vivo in [{sup 131}I ]FIAU-containing medium. Based on in vitro kinetic studies of [{sup 131}I ]FIAU uptake by NIT {sup +} T cells, D{sub n} was calculated using an adaptation of the MIRD formalism and the recently published MIRD cellular S factors. Immune cytotoxicity of [{sup 131}I ]FIAU-labeled cells was assayed against {sup 51}Cr-labeled target cells [B-lymphoblastoid cells (BLCLs) ] in a standard 4-h release assay. At median nuclear absorbed doses up to 830 cGy, a {sup 51}Cr-release assay against BLCLs showed no loss of immune cytotoxicity, thus demonstrating the functional integrity of genetically transduced, tumor-reactive T cells labeled at this dose level for in vivo cell trafficking and tumor targeting studies. (orig.)

  8. Tetravalent anti-CD20/CD3 bispecific antibody for the treatment of B cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Gregory J.; Tai, Pei-Han; Yang, Yu-Chen [Institute of Biologics, Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yu-Shen, E-mail: yshsu@advagene.com.tw [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, Advagene Biopharma, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Mingi, E-mail: mingi.chang@advagene.com.tw [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, Advagene Biopharma, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chuan-Lung, E-mail: fabio@dcb.org.tw [Institute of Biologics, Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-05-13

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are second generation antibodies for therapeutic application in immunotherapy. One of the major strategies of the bsAb platform is the recruitment of immune effector T cells by incorporating an anti-CD3 domain. A bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE), with one end having an affinity for CD3 and the other end with affinity for CD19, has been approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, due to their small size and lack of Fc region, these single-chain variable fragment (scFv) bsAbs have short half-lives in vivo. Additionally, poor solubility, structural instability, and low production yields have also become major challenges in the bulk production process. To overcome these challenges, we have engineered a tetravalent bsAb with bivalent binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigen in an immunoglobulin G (IgG) format. The fusion of the anti-CD3 scFvs to the CD20 antibody via a linker-hinge domain (LHD) results in improved antibody stabilization and properties. Here we demonstrate this antibody's highly efficient cancer cell elimination in a dose-dependent manner in a CD20-expressing B lymphoblastoid cell line in vitro. Our data suggest the potential clinical application of this bsAb for the treatment of CD20-expressing B cell malignancies. - Highlights: • A bispecific antibody (bsAb) can increase immunotherapeutic efficacy. • A tetravalent bsAb with binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigens is proposed. • A linker-hinge domain (LHD) within the bsAb results in improved antibody properties.

  9. Platelet-Activating Factor Antagonists Decrease Follicular Dendritic-Cell Stimulation of Human B Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halickman Isaac

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both B-lymphoblastoid cell lines and tonsillar B lymphocytes express receptors for platelet-activating factor (PAF. In lymph node germinal centres, B lymphocytes interact with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs, which present antigen-containing immune complexes to B lymphocytes. FDCs have phenotypic features that are similar to those of stromal cells and monocytes and may therefore be a source of lipid mediators. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the PAF antagonist WEB 2170 on the activation of tonsillar B lymphocytes by FDCs. FDCs were isolated from tonsils by Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA gradient centrifugation. After being cultured for 6 to 10 days, they were incubated with freshly isolated B cells in the presence or absence of the specific PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. B-lymphocyte proliferation was assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, and immunoglobulin (Ig G and IgM secretion was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. WEB 2170 (10-6 to 10-8 M inhibited [3H]-thymidine incorporation by up to 35% ± 3%. Moreover, the secretion of IgG and IgM was inhibited by up to 50% by WEB 2170 concentrations ranging from 10-6 to 10-8 M. There was no evidence of toxicity by trypan blue staining, and the addition of WEB 2170 to B cells in the absence of FDCs did not inhibit the spontaneous production of IgG or IgM. The effect of the PAF antagonist is primarily on B lymphocytes, as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detected little PAF receptor messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA from FDCs. These data suggest that endogenous production of PAF may be important in the interaction of B lymphocytes with FDCs.

  10. Inferring a role for methylation of intergenic DNA in the regulation of genes aberrantly expressed in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almamun, Md; Kholod, Olha; Stuckel, Alexei J; Levinson, Benjamin T; Johnson, Nathan T; Arthur, Gerald L; Davis, J Wade; Taylor, Kristen H

    2017-01-17

    A complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of pre-B ALL is lacking. In this study, we integrated DNA methylation data and gene expression data to elucidate the impact of aberrant intergenic DNA methylation on gene expression in pre-B ALL. We found a subset of differentially methylated intergenic loci that were associated with altered gene expression in pre-B ALL patients. Notably, 84% of these regions were also bound by transcription factors (TF) known to play roles in differentiation and B-cell development in a lymphoblastoid cell line. Further, an overall downregulation of eRNA transcripts was observed in pre-B ALL patients and these transcripts were associated with the downregulation of putative target genes involved in B-cell migration, proliferation, and apoptosis. The identification of novel putative regulatory regions highlights the significance of intergenic DNA sequences and may contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of pre-B ALL.

  11. Study of the Cytotoxic Effects of the New Synthetic Isothiocyanate CM9 and Its Fullerene Derivative on Human T-Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena De Gianni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One important strategy to develop effective anticancer agents is based on natural products. Many active phytochemicals are in human clinical trials and have been used for a long time, alone and in association with conventional anticancer drugs, for the treatment of various types of cancers. A great number of in vitro, in vivo and clinical reports document the multi-target anticancer activities of isothiocyanates and of compounds characterized by a naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide scaffold. In order to search for new anticancer agents with a better pharmaco-toxicological profile, we investigated hybrid compounds obtained by inserting isothiocyanate group(s on a naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide scaffold. Moreover, since water-soluble fullerene derivatives can cross cell membranes thus favoring the delivery of anticancer therapeutics, we explored the cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of hybrid compounds conjugated with fullerene. We studied their cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on a human T-lymphoblastoid cell line by using different flow cytometric assays. In order to better understand their pharmaco-toxicological potential, we also analyzed their genotoxicity. Our global results show that the synthesized compounds reduced significantly the viability of leukemia cells. However, the conjugation with a non-toxic vector did not increase their anticancer potential. This opens an interesting research pattern for certain fullerene properties.

  12. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  13. Short-term inhibition of TERT induces telomere length-independent cell cycle arrest and apoptotic response in EBV-immortalized and transformed B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeghin, Andrea; Giunco, Silvia; Freguja, Riccardo; Zangrossi, Manuela; Nalio, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; De Rossi, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Besides its canonical role in stabilizing telomeres, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) may promote tumorigenesis through extra-telomeric functions. The possible therapeutic effects of BIBR1532 (BIBR), a powerful TERT inhibitor, have been evaluated in different cellular backgrounds, but no data are currently available regarding Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-driven B-cell malignancies. Our aim was to characterize the biological effects of TERT inhibition by BIBR on EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and fully transformed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines. We found that BIBR selectively inhibits telomerase activity in TERT-positive 4134/Late and 4134/TERT+ LCLs and EBV-negative BL41 and EBV-positive BL41/B95.8 BL cell lines. TERT inhibition led to decreased cell proliferation, accumulation of cells in the S-phase and ultimately to increased apoptosis, compared with mock-treated control cells. All these effects occurred within 72 h and were not observed in BIBR-treated TERT-negative 4134/TERT- and U2OS cells. The cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, consequent upon short-term TERT inhibition, were associated with and likely dependent on the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR), highlighted by the increased levels of γH2AX and activation of ATM and ATR pathways. Analyses of the mean and range of telomere lengths and telomere dysfunction-induced foci indicated that DDR after short-term TERT inhibition was not related to telomere dysfunction, thus suggesting that TERT, besides stabilizing telomere, may protect DNA via telomere-independent mechanisms. Notably, TERT-positive LCLs treated with BIBR in combination with fludarabine or cyclophosphamide showed a significant increase in the number of apoptotic cells with respect to those treated with chemotherapeutic agents alone. In conclusion, TERT inhibition impairs cell cycle progression and enhances the pro-apoptotic effects of chemotherapeutic agents in TERT-positive cells. These results support new

  14. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isheeta Seth

    Full Text Available Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy, and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (p<0.0001. These data indicate that neutrons do not induce a bystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  15. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  16. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells display anti-cancer activity in SCID mice bearing disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Secchiero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although multimodality treatment can induce high rate of remission in many subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, significant proportions of patients relapse with incurable disease. The effect of human bone marrow (BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on tumor cell growth is controversial, and no specific information is available on the effect of BM-MSC on NHL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effect of BM-MSC was analyzed in two in vivo models of disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with an indolent (EBV(- Burkitt-type BJAB, median survival = 46 days and an aggressive (EBV(+ B lymphoblastoid SKW6.4, median survival = 27 days behavior in nude-SCID mice. Intra-peritoneal (i.p. injection of MSC (4 days after i.p. injection of lymphoma cells significantly increased the overall survival at an optimal MSC:lymphoma ratio of 1:10 in both xenograft models (BJAB+MSC, median survival = 58.5 days; SKW6.4+MSC, median survival = 40 days. Upon MSC injection, i.p. tumor masses developed more slowly and, at the histopathological observation, exhibited a massive stromal infiltration coupled to extensive intra-tumor necrosis. In in vitro experiments, we found that: i MSC/lymphoma co-cultures modestly affected lymphoma cell survival and were characterized by increased release of pro-angiogenic cytokines with respect to the MSC, or lymphoma, cultures; ii MSC induce the migration of endothelial cells in transwell assays, but promoted endothelial cell apoptosis in direct MSC/endothelial cell co-cultures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate that BM-MSC exhibit anti-lymphoma activity in two distinct xenograft SCID mouse models of disseminated NHL.

  17. Experiment list: SRX1091816 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ntibody=First, IP with custom mouse monoclonal BORIS Ab, next IP with custom mous...; ChIP-Seq source_name=Human chronic myelogenous leukemia; lymphoblastoid cells. || cell line=K562 || chip a

  18. Experiment list: SRX091627 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tions/Search/Sample_Detail.aspx?Ref=GM19171 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || population=YRI || eth...nicity=YORUBA || country of origin=NIGERIA http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu

  19. Experiment list: SRX091601 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tions/Search/Sample_Detail.aspx?Ref=GM18909 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || population=YRI || eth...nicity=YORUBA || country of origin=NIGERIA http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu

  20. Experiment list: SRX091641 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tions/Search/Sample_Detail.aspx?Ref=GM19225 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell line || population=YRI || eth...nicity=YORUBA || country of origin=NIGERIA http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu