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Sample records for lymantria dispar larval

  1. Transcriptome of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis

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    Transcriptomic profiles of the lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by the biopesticide Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of 49,613 assembled transcript sequences, of which...

  2. Transcriptome of the Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis.

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    Michael E Sparks

    Full Text Available Transcriptomic profiles of the serious lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, a biopesticide commonly used for its control. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of 49,613 assembled transcript sequences, of which 838, 1,248 and 3,305 were respectively partitioned into high-, mid- and low-quality tiers on the basis of homology information. Digital gene expression profiles suggested genes differentially expressed at 24 hours post infection, and qRT-PCR analyses were performed for verification. The differentially expressed genes primarily associated with digestive function, including α-amylase, lipase and carboxypeptidase; immune response, including C-type lectin 4; developmental genes such as arylphorin; as well as a variety of binding proteins: cellular retinoic acid binding protein (lipid-binding, insulin-related peptide binding protein (protein-binding and ovary C/EBPg transcription factor (nucleic acid-binding. This is the first study conducted to specifically investigate gypsy moth response to a bacterial infection challenge using large-scale sequencing technologies, and the results highlight important genes that could be involved in biopesticide resistance development or could serve as targets for biologically-based control mechanisms of this insect pest.

  3. Foliage maturity of Quercus ilex affects the larval development of a Croatian coastal population of Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Erebidae

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    Lukić Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar is one of the most important forest pests in the world. Numerous previous studies focused only on different host tree species, but small number of them on foliage age. Since recent genetic analyses showed that there are significant differences between Croatian continental and coastal population we investigated coastal population since there was no previous research. For this research juvenile and mature foliage of Holm oak (Quercus ilex was used. Larval development was investigated in two laboratory experiments. One experiment involved rearing trials consisting of 50 individual larvae per treatment while a parallel experiment investigated gregarious feeding conditions using 120 larvae in a rearing treatment. Larval mortality was lower and development time shorter for individuals reared on juvenile foliage. High pupation success in both the individual and group rearing experiment for larvae reared on juvenile foliage was also observed. To conclude, our results showed high mortality, poor larval development and low pupation success in larvae reared on mature foliage. This research is significant because in the aspect of ongoing climate changes there is a possibility that gypsy moth will move to the north and shift its distribution by expanding into new climatic area.

  4. Pyrrolidonyl and pyridyl alkaloids in Lymantria dispar.

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    Deml, Reinhold

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence and metabolism of nicotine and related N-containing compounds in body fluids of the gipsy moth were addressed. Thin layer chromatographic studies clearly showed the simultaneous presence of GABA and 2-pyrrolidone but not of GABamide in the larval haemolymph and osmeterial secretion of Lymantria dispar as well as in the corresponding body fluids of the saturniids, Saturnia pavonia and Attacus atlas. Furthermore, feeding and injection experiments using alkylated precursors and combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence of the transformation of 2-pyrrolidone to nicotine and of nicotinic acid to nicotinamide in caterpillars of L. dispar. Based on these results, on the earlier described variation of the secondary-compound patterns of L. dispar during its development, and on literature data, metabolic pathways for the hitherto detected pyridyl and pyrrolidonyl alkaloids in Lymantriidae (and possibly Saturniidae) are proposed.

  5. Potential improvement of Lymantria dispar L. management by quercetin

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    Perić-Mataruga Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymantria dispar, a polyphagous insect pest, copes with a wide variety of host-specific allelochemicals. Glutathione S-transferases (GST are important for catalyzing detoxification in L. dispar. Larval mortality, GST activity in midgut tissue and mass of L. dispar with different trophic adaptations (originating from two forests with a suitable host, Quercus robur, and an unsuitable host, Robinia pseudoacacia, differed after feeding on quercetin supplemented diets (2% or 5% w/w. Quercetin inhibited GST most potently in oak forest larvae that were less adapted to flavonoids in their diet. The larvicidal effect of quercetin on L. dispar larvae depended on the host-use history. We believe this is important in strategies for sustainable control of insect pests. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173027

  6. Control of Lymantria dispar L. by biological agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGGuo-cai; WANGYue-jie; YANGXiao-guang

    2005-01-01

    The experiment on control of Lymantria dispar L by using different kinds of biological measures, including nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) of Lymantria dispar L., BtMP-342, sex-attractant as well as botanical insecticide, was carried out in the forest regions of Inner Mongolia in 2003. Two concentrations (2.632×106 PIB·ml-1 and 2.632×107 PIB·ml-1) of Lymantria dispar L. NPV were sprayed on the 2rd-instar-larvae of L. dispar and 70% and 77.8% control effect were obtained respectively. BtMP0-342 was applied to the 3rd- and 4th-instar larvae and the control effect was around 80%. The sex-attractant provided by Canada Pacific Forestry Research Center also showed a good result in trapping L. dispar adults. The self-produced botanical insecticide, which was extracted from a kind of poisonous plant distributed in Daxing'an Mountains, China, exhibited a good control result in controlling the larvae of L. dispar, and 82% mortality was observed when spraying primary liquid of the botanical insecticide on the 3rd-5th-instar-larvae in lab.

  7. Juvenile hormone biosynthesis and secretion by the female Corpora allata of the larval gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L. ) utilizing in vitro organ culture

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    Jones, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    Junvenile hormone synthesis and secretion in the female larval gypsy moth was investigated. In vitro culturing methods were developed including: incubating 2 pair of CC-CA gland complexes in 50 ul of osmotically balanced Grace's insect medium containing 1 uCi /sup 3/H-methyl-methionine for 6 hr. JH homologues were identified and quantified using TLC and HPLC. In vitro methods were employed to investigate trends of JH secretion in 4th and ultimate female larval instar CA. Fourth instar CA produced JH peaks of 0.15 pmole/pr/hr between days 2 and 3, but the rate declined to half by day 4. Ultimate instar larvae began secreting 0.48 pmole/pr/hr, but by day 10, had decreased JH output to negligible levels which continued until pupation. Effects upon in vitro JH secretion produced by precocene II and caffeine were examined. Feulgen staining techniques revealed an equal number of cells (30) in 4th and last instar CA. Last instar Ca were 3 times larger than 4th in volume but their actual in vitro JH secretion at peak levels was only 20% greater. In vitro methods demonstrated that JH secretory trends differ in younger versus mature larval instars. Glandular volume increased in last instars but JH secretion was only 20% greater than in 4th's when compared on the basis of volume. Precocene II elicited a negative response on in vivo JH secretion at levels 10 times less than caffeine. Caffeine was judged not to significantly alter JH secretion.

  8. Classification, genetic variation and pathogenicity of Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus isolates from Asia, Europe, and North America

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    Robert L. Harrison; Melody A. Keena; Daniel L. Rowley

    2014-01-01

    Lymantria dispar multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) has been formulated and applied to control outbreaks of the gypsy moth, L. dispar. To classify and determine the degree of genetic variation among isolates of L. dispar NPVs from different parts of the range of the gypsy moth, partial sequences of the

  9. Larval instar impact on host selection suitability of asian gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar asiatica, AGM).%亚洲型舞毒蛾幼虫寄主选择与龄期关系初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏靖; 骆有庆; 石娟; 王德鹏; 沈绍伟

    2012-01-01

    The Asian gypsy moth ( Lymantria dispar asiatica, AGM) is one of three gypsy found in Asia. European gypsy moth was introduced to USA which caused a great damage moth subspecies that is . Former study showed Asia gypsy moth could harm more kinds of trees than European gypsy moth. In this experiment, we choose 16 kinds of tree species to test host selection suitability which are common in USA or China. Statistics mortality rate, developmental duration and pupae weight to analyze the host impact on Asia gypsy moth. The result showed the larve of AGM feed on Acer saccharum, Betula platyphylla, Populus canadensi could complete life cycle. Larvae feed on Juniperus rigida, Ligustrum lucidum, Buxus megistophylla, Picea koraiensis, Albizia julibrissin, Lirioden- dron chinense × tulipifera, Pinus bungeana, Pinus massoniana and Pinus thunbergii all died before 2nd instar. Larvae feed on P. tabulaeformis, P. strobus and Diospyros kaki after 4th instar, mortality is lower than 2nd instar. Once the larve develop after 4th instar, host range is wider than 1 st and 2nd instar.%舞毒蛾是一种世界性的害虫,常被分为欧洲型和亚洲型2种类型,欧洲型舞毒蛾在传入美国之后造成了巨大危害。之前报道指出亚洲型舞毒蛾的寄主范围比欧洲型舞毒蛾的广,故造成的危害和损失更大,北美植物保护组织据此对中国的高风险港口实施了船舶特别检疫措施,对我国的进出口贸易产生了巨大影响。鉴于此,本实验以16种北美和中国常见的行道树种和绿化树种作为供试树种,分析了不同寄主植物对亚洲型舞毒蛾生长发育指标的影响规律。结果表明:饲喂白桦、加杨和糖槭的幼虫可以完成生活周期。饲喂杜松、女贞、大叶黄杨、红皮云杉、合欢、杂交鹅掌楸、马尾松、黑松和白皮松的幼虫在2龄以前全部死亡。虽然2龄以前幼虫饲喂北美乔松、油松和柿树后死亡率较高,但

  10. Geographic isolates of Lymantria dispar multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus: Genome sequence analysis and pathogenicity against European and Asian gypsy moth strains

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    Harrison Robert L.; Daniel L. Rowley; Melody A. Keena

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of the baculovirus species Lymantria dispar multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus have been formulated and applied to suppress outbreaks of the gypsy moth, L. dispar. To evaluate the genetic diversity in this species at the genomic level, the genomes of three isolates from Massachusetts, USA (LdMNPV-Aba624), Spain (LdMNPV-3054...

  11. N-glycan structures of human transferrin produced by Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth)cells using the LdMNPV expression system

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    One Choi; Noboru Tomiya; Jung H. Kim; James M. Slavicek; Michael J. Betenbaugh; Yuan C. Lee

    2003-01-01

    N-glycan structures of recombinant human serum transferrin (hTf) expressed by Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) 652Y cells were determined. The gene encoding hTf was incorporated into a Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. This virus was then...

  12. The pheromonal gland of Lymantria dispar: morphology and evidence for its innervation.

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    Boi, Marianna; Quartu, Marina; Serra, Maria Pina; Solari, Paolo; Melis, Tiziana; Del Fiacco, Marina

    2009-04-01

    The morphological features of the glandular epithelium that secretes pheromone in the polyphagous pest gypsy moth Lymantria dispar are described by light and electron microscopy. The monolayered gland cells are covered by the folded cuticle of the intersegmental membrane between the 8th and 9th abdominal segments showing neither sites of discontinuity nor distinct openings on its external surface. The cells bear a large, often irregularly shaped nucleus, and contain granules of variable amount and electron-density. These granules are mostly located in the basal compartment of the cytoplasm, in a labyrinthine zone laying on a basement membrane. The apical membrane of the gland cells bear microvilli and cell-cell contact is established by different junctional structures. Nerve fibers enwrapped in glia are found beneath the basement membrane, in close contact with the secretory cells. This latter finding represents the first evidence of the innervation of the pheromonal gland in L. dispar.

  13. Temporal analysis and spatial mapping of Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus transcripts and in-vitro translation products

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    James M. Slavicek; Nancy Hayes-Plazolles

    1991-01-01

    The Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus LdNPV) is being used as a biopesticide against the gypsy moth. We are attempting to enhance the potency of the LdNPV through recombinant DNA technology. As a prerequisite to genetic manipulation, we have characterized LdNPV gene expression in cell culture through the generation of transcription and...

  14. A field release of genetically engineered gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus (LdNPV)

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    Vincent D' Amico; Joseph S. Elkinton; John D. Podgwaite; James M. Slavicek; Michael L. McManus; John P. Burand

    1999-01-01

    The gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) nuclear polyhedrosis virus was genetically engineered for nonpersistence by removal of the gene coding for polyhedrin production and stabilized using a coocclusion process. A β-galactosidase marker gene was inserted into the genetically engineered virus (LdGEV) so that infected larvae could be tested for...

  15. Survival of Bacillus thuringiensis strains in gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larvae is correlated with production of urease

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    Phyllis A.W. Martin; Robert R. Jr. Farrar; Michael B. Blackburn

    2011-01-01

    We tested 50 lepidopteran-toxic Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) strains with diverse phenotypes for the ability to survive repeated passages through larvae of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), without intervening growth on artificial media. These experiments have revealed a remarkable correlation...

  16. Interaction between a Nosema sp. (Microspora: Nosematidae) and Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus Infecting the Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae)1

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    Leah S. Bauer; Deborah L. Miller; Joseph V. Maddox; Michael L. McManus

    1998-01-01

    Simultaneous and sequential per os inoculations of gypsy moth larvae with the Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdNPV) and a Nosema sp. from Portugal demonstrated that the interaction of two pathogens during coinfection was variable, ranging from synergistic to antagonistic. Susceptibility of gypsy...

  17. Analysis of correlation structure in Lymantria dispar L. larvae from locally adapted populations

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    Mrdaković Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of allelochemical stress and population origin on the patterns of phenotypic and genetic correlations among life history traits and digestive enzyme activities were investigated in larvae of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.; Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae. Thirty-two full-sib families from oak (suitable host plant, Quercus population, and twenty-six full-sib families from locust-tree (unsuitable host plant, Robinia population forests were reared on an artificial diet, with or without a 5% tannic acid supplement. Comparison of correlation matrices revealed significant similarity between the two populations in the structure of phenotypic and genetic correlations of life history traits and of digestive enzyme activities. The patterns of correlations of the examined traits, within each of the two locally adapted populations and in the presence of allelochemical stress, remained stabile despite the different selection pressures that mold these traits. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173027

  18. The influence of increased rearing density on medial protocerebral neurosecretory neurons of Lymantria dispar L. caterpillars

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    Ilijin Larisa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphometric changes of A1, A1' and A2 protocerebral dorsomedial neurosecretory neurons, total brain protein content and brain protein profiles were analyzed in 4th instar Lymantria dispar larvae under elevated rearing density, i.e. under intense stress when 5 larvae were kept in a petri dish (V = 80 ml, less intense stress when 5 larvae were kept in a plastic cup (V = 300 ml. In the control samples the larvae were reared in isolated conditions. Protein pattern changes in the brain were observed. Proteins with the following molecular masses: 30, 14, 10 and 3.4-2.5 kD were detected in the experimental groups. The size and cytological characteristics of protocerebral dorsomedial neurosecretory neurons were changed under elevated rearing density.

  19. Specificity of Developmental Resistance in Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar) to two DNA-Insect Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kelli Hoover; Michael J. Grove

    2009-01-01

    Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larvae displayed marked developmental resistance within an instar to L. dispar M nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) regardless of the route of infection (oral or intrahemocoelic) in a previous study, indicating that in gypsy moth, this resistance has a systemic component. In this study, gypsy moth larvae challenged with the Amsacta moorei entomopoxvirus (AMEV) showed developmental resistance within the fourth instar to oral, but not intrahemocoelic, inoculation. In general, gypsy moth is considered refractory to oral challenge with AMEV, but in this study, 43% mortality occurred in newly molted fourth instars fed a dose of 5×106 large spheroids of AMEV; large spheroids were found to be more infectious than small spheroids when separated by a sucrose gradient. Developmental resistance within the fourth instar was reflected by a 2-fold reduction in mortality (18%-21%) with 5×106 large spheroids in larvae orally challenged at 24, 48 or 72 h post-molt. Fourth instars were highly sensitive to intrahemocoelic challenge with AMEV; 1PFU produced approximately 80% mortality regardless of age within the instar. These results indicate that in gypsy moth, systemic developmental resistance may be specific to LdMNPV, reflecting a co-evolutionary relationship between the baculovirus and its host.

  20. Characterization of the transcriptome of the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar identifies numerous transcripts associated with insecticide resistance.

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    Cao, ChuanWang; Sun, LiLi; Wen, RongRong; Shang, QingLi; Ma, Ling; Wang, ZhiYing

    2015-03-01

    Although the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar causes extensive forest damage worldwide, little is known regarding the genes involved in its development or response to insecticides. Accordingly, characterization of the transcriptome of L. dispar larvae would promote the development of toxicological methods for its control. RNA-seq analysis of L. dispar larvae messenger RNA (mRNA) generated 62,063 unigenes with N50 of 993 bp, from which 23,975 unique sequences (E-value insecticide targets, or proteins involved in the metabolism of insecticides. Reads per kilobase of unigene length per million mapped reads (RPKM) analysis identified 39 high abundance transcripts, of which 27 exhibited significantly altered expression patterns across the egg, larvae, pupae, male and female adult stages. Our study provides the most comprehensive transcriptomic sequence resource for L. dispar, which will form the basis for future identification of candidate insecticide resistance genes in L. dispar.

  1. Host Specificity of Microsporidia (Protista: Microspora) from European Populations of Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) to Indigenous North American Lepidoptera

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    Solter; Maddox; McManus

    1997-03-01

    Results of traditional laboratory bioassays may not accurately represent ecological (field) host specificity of entomopathogens but, if carefully interpreted, may be used to predict the ecological host specificity of pathogens being considered for release as classical biological control agents. We conducted laboratory studies designed to evaluate the physiological host specificity of microsporidia, which are common protozoan pathogens of insects. In these studies, 49 nontarget lepidopteran species indigenous to North America were fed five biotypes of microsporidia that occur in European populations of Lymantria dispar but are not found in North American populations of L. dispar. These microsporidia, Microsporidium sp. from Portugal, Microsporidium sp. from Romania, Microsporidium sp. from Slovakia, Nosema lymantriae, and Endoreticulatus sp. from Portugal, are candidates for release as classical biological control agents into L. dispar populations in the United States. The microsporidia produced a variety of responses in the nontarget hosts and, based on these responses, the nontarget hosts were placed in the following categories: (1) no infection (refractory), (2) atypical infections, and (3) heavy infections. Endoreticulatus sp. produced patent, host-like infections in nearly two-thirds of the nontarget hosts to which it was fed. Such generalist species should not be recommended for release. Infections comparable to those produced in L. dispar were produced in 2% of the nontarget hosts fed Microsporidium sp. from Portugal, 19% of nontarget hosts fed Microsporidium sp. from Romania, 13% fed spores of Microsporidium sp. from Slovakia, and 11% of nontarget species fed N. lymantriae. The remaining nontarget species developed infections that, despite production of mature spores, were not typical of infection in L. dispar. We believe it is very unlikely that these atypical infections would be horizontally transmitted within nontarget insect populations in the United

  2. Ecologically acceptable usage of derivatives of essential oil of sweet basil, Ocimum basilicum, as antifeedants against larvae of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar.

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    Popović, Zorica; Kostić, Miroslav; Stanković, Sladjan; Milanović, Slobodan; Sivčev, Ivan; Kostić, Igor; Kljajić, Petar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ethanol solutions of five fractions obtained from essential oil of sweet basil Ocimum basilicum L. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) (F1-F5) were tested for their antifeedant properties against 2(nd) instar gypsy moth larvae, Lymantria dispar L. (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), in laboratory non-choice and feeding-choice experiments. Prior to bioassays, the chemical composition of each fraction was determined by gas chromatography analyses. Significant larval deterrence from feeding was achieved by application of tested solutions to fresh leaves of the host plant. The most effective were were F1 (0.5%), F4 (0.05, 0.1, and 0.5%), and F5 (0.1 and 0.5%), which provided an antifeedant index > 80% after five days. A low rate of larval mortality was observed in no-choice bioassay. In situ screening of chlorophyll fluorescence as an indicator of plant stress level (assessed by the induced fluorometry) confirmed that the tested compounds did not cause alternations in the photosynthetic efficiency of treated leaves.

  3. Effects of pathogen exposure on life history variation in the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar)

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    Páez, David J.; Fleming-Davies, Arietta E.; Dwyer, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Investment in host defenses against pathogens may lead to tradeoffs with host fecundity. When such tradeoffs arise from genetic correlations, rates of phenotypic change by natural selection may be affected. However, genetic correlations between host survival and fecundity are rarely quantified. To understand tradeoffs between immune responses to baculovirus exposure and fecundity in the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar), we estimated genetic correlations between survival probability and traits related to fecundity, such as pupal weight. In addition, we tested whether different virus isolates have different effects on male and female pupal weight. To estimate genetic correlations, we exposed individuals of known relatedness to a single baculovirus isolate. To then evaluate the effect of virus isolate on pupal weight, we exposed a single gypsy moth strain to 16 baculovirus isolates. We found a negative genetic correlation between survival and pupal weight. In addition, virus exposure caused late-pupating females to be identical in weight to males, whereas unexposed females were 2–3 times as large as unexposed males. Finally, we found that female pupal weight is a quadratic function of host mortality across virus isolates, which is likely due to tradeoffs and compensatory growth processes acting at high and low mortality levels, respectively. Overall, our results suggest that fecundity costs may strongly affect the response to selection for disease resistance. In nature, baculoviruses contribute to the regulation of gypsy moth outbreaks, as pathogens often do in forest-defoliating insects. We therefore argue that tradeoffs between host life-history traits may help explain outbreak dynamics. PMID:26201381

  4. Phenology of Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), male flight and the effect of moth dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes

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    Régnière, J.; Sharov, Alexei

    A model of Lymantria dispar development was assembled from the published literature and used to predict the period of male moth flight in the United States. Model predictions were compared with observations made with pheromone traps in several locations throughout the United States but especially in Virginia, West Virginia and North Carolina between 1995 and 1996. The model was found to provide accurate and unbiased forecasts of the dates of 5%, 50% and 95% cumulative trap catch, particularly at lower elevations. In areas of high topographic diversity (such as West Virginia), deviations between model output and observations were minimized by basing predictions of 5% and 50% cumulative catch on minimum elevation within neighborhoods of 25-81 km2. This model of L. dispar male flight phenology can be used to time the deployment and retrieval of pheromone traps in intensive or extensive monitoring programs. However, a better understanding of moth movement is needed to fully explain the patterns of local trap catch.

  5. Transcription profiling of 12 asian gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) cytochrome P450 genes in response to insecticides.

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    Sun, Lili; Wang, Zhiying; Zou, Chuanshan; Cao, Chuanwang

    2014-04-01

    As the main group of detoxification enzymes, cytochrome P450 monoxygenases (P450s) catalyse an extremely diverse range of reactions that play an important role in the detoxification of foreign compounds. Transcription profiling of 12 Lymantria dispar P450 genes from the CYP6 subfamily believed to be involved in insecticide metabolism was performed in this study. Life-stage transcription profiling of CYP6 genes revealed significant variations between eggs, larvae, pupae, and adult males and females. Exposure of larvae to sublethal doses of deltamethrin, omethoate, and carbaryl enhanced the transcription of most of the CYP6 P450 genes, with induction peaking between 24 and 72 h after exposure. Transcription profiles were dependent on the levels of insecticide exposure and the various developmental stages.

  6. The Lymantria dispar IPLB-Ld652Y Cell Line Transcriptome Comprises Diverse Virus-Associated Transcripts

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    Michael E. Sparks

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The enhanced viral susceptibility of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar-derived IPLB-Ld652Y cell line has made it a popular in vitro system for studying virus-related phenomena in the Lepidoptera. Using both single-pass EST sequencing and 454-based pyrosequencing, a transcriptomic library of 14,368 putatively unique transcripts (PUTs was produced comprising 8,476,050 high-quality, informative bases. The gene content of the IPLB-Ld652Y transcriptome was broadly assessed via comparison with the NCBI non‑redundant protein database, and more detailed functional annotation was inferred by comparison to the Swiss-Prot subset of UniProtKB. In addition to L. dispar cellular transcripts, a diverse array of both RNA and DNA virus-associated transcripts was identified within the dataset, suggestive of a high level of viral expression and activity in IPLB-Ld652Y cells. These sequence resources will provide a sound basis for developing testable experimental hypotheses by insect virologists, and suggest a number of avenues for potential research.

  7. Response of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar to transgenic poplar, Populus simonii x P. nigra, expressing fusion protein gene of the spider insecticidal peptide and Bt-toxin C-peptide.

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    Cao, Chuan-Wang; Liu, Gui-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ying; Yan, Shan-Chun; Ma, Ling; Yang, Chuan-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The response of the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) to a fusion gene consisting of the spider, Atrax robustus Simon (Araneae: Hexanthelidae) ω-ACTX-Ar1 sequence coding for an ω-atracotoxin and a sequence coding for the Bt-toxin C-peptide, expressed in transgenic poplar Populus simonii x P. nigra L. (Malphigiales: Salicaceae) was investigated. Individual performance, feeding selection, midgut proteinase activity and nutrition utilization were monitored. The growth and development of L. dispar were significantly affected by continually feeding on the transgenic poplar, with the larval instars displaying significantly shorter developmental times than those fed on nontransgenic poplar, but pupation was delayed. Mortality was higher in populations fed transgenic poplar leaves, than for larvae fed nontransgenic poplar leaves. The cumulative mortality during all stages of larvae fed transgenic leaves was 92% compared to 16.7% of larvae on nontransgenic leaves. The highest mortality observed was 71.7% in the last larval instar stage. A two-choice test showed that fifth-instar larvae preferred to feed on nontransgenic leaves at a ratio of 1:1.4. Feeding on transgenic leaves had highly significant negative effects on relative growth of larvae, and the efficiency of conversion of ingested and digested food. Activity of major midgut proteinases was measured using substrates TAME and BTEE showed significant increases in tryptase and chymotrypsinlike activity (9.2- and 9.0-fold, respectively) in fifth-instar larvae fed on transgenic leaves over control. These results suggest transgenic poplar is resistant to L. dispar, and the mature L. dispar may be weakened by the transgenic plants due to Bt protoxins activated by elevated major midgut proteinase activity. The new transgenic poplar expressing fusion protein genes of Bt and a new spider insecticidal peptide are good candidates for managing gypsy moth.

  8. ETUDE DU DEVELOPPEMENT DE Lymantria dispar L. (Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae SUR QUELQUES ESPECES VEGETALES ASSOCIEES AU CHENE-LIEGE

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    M L OUAKID

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Lymantria dispar L. (Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae est un important ravageur du chêne-liège dans la région d’El Tarf (Algérie. Son cycle de développement a déjà été précisé. Lors du retard de débourrement des chênes, espèces végétales préférentielles du ravageur, les chenilles envahissent et consomment d’autres plantes du sous-bois. Différentes espèces végétales ont été testées comme substrat alimentaire des chenilles: le chêne-liège (Quercus suber, le chêne-zeen (Q. faginea, l’aubépine (Crataegus oxyacanta et le garou (Daphne gnidium. Nos résultats montrent que les chenilles ne consomment pas le garou et que les larves des premiers stades (L1, L2 manifestent une préférence alimentaire pour l’aubépine. Les larves des stades avances (L3 à L5 se développent relativement mieux sur le chêne. Toutefois, le chêne-liège demeure l’aliment le plus consommé. Il assure au ravageur les meilleures performances biologiques.

  9. Cadmium and high temperature effects on brain and behaviour of Lymantria dispar L. caterpillars originating from polluted and less-polluted forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perić-Mataruga, Vesna; Petković, Branka; Ilijin, Larisa; Mrdaković, Marija; Dronjak Čučaković, Slađana; Todorović, Dajana; Vlahović, Milena

    2017-10-01

    Insects brain as a part of nervous system is the first-line of fast stress response that integrate stress signals to regulate all aspects of insect physiology and behaviour. The cadmium (Cd) bioaccumulation factor (BF), activity of the neurotoxicity biomarker acetylcholinesterase (AChE), dopamine content, expression and amount of Hsp70 in the brain and locomotor activity were evaluated in the 4th instar of Lymantria dispar L. caterpillars fed a Cd supplemented diet and reared in an optimal temperature regime (23 °C) and/or exposed to high temperature (28 °C). The insects originated from two forests, one close to "Nikola Tesla" thermoelectric power plant, Obrenovac (polluted population), and the other Kosmaj mountain (less-polluted population, far from any industrial region). The Cd BF was higher in the less-polluted than in the polluted population especially at the high ambient temperature. AChE activity and dopamine content were changed in the brains of L. dispar from both populations in the same manner. Hsp70 concentration in caterpillar brains showed opposite trends, a decrease in the less-polluted and an increase in the polluted population. Locomotor activity was modified in both Lymantria dispar populations, but the pattern of changes depended on the stressors and their combined effect. ACh activity and dopamine content are sensitive parameters to Cd exposure, regardless of pollutant experience, and might be promising biomarkers in monitoring forest ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of benzo[a]pyrene dietary intake to antioxidative enzymes of Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) larvae from unpolluted and polluted forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilović, Anja; Ilijin, Larisa; Mrdaković, Marija; Vlahović, Milena; Mrkonja, Aleksandra; Matić, Dragana; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic activity in industrial development has imposed great threats to the environment and wildlife in the form of persistent organic pollutants. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) tend to accumulate in vegetation foliage which is the main food source of polyphagous insect species Lymantria dispar L. Origin and multigenerational adaptation of L. dispar population to environmental challenges strongly condition the enzymes' sensitivity to pollutants. In this study, our aim was to investigate response of the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) to the chronic dietary exposure of benzo[a]pyrene in the midgut tissues and hemolymph of two L. dispar populations originating from unpolluted and polluted forest habitat. Midgut tissue of the larvae from the polluted forest showed significant increase in SOD, CAT and GST activity, while in unpolluted forest's larvae SOD and CAT showed elevated activities in hemolymph. L. dispar populations adapted to different level of pollution in their environment and expressed distinct tissue-dependent antioxidative enzyme sensitivity to benzo[a]pyrene diet, implying high potential for further elucidation of these enzymes as molecular biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural and Functional Difference of Pheromone Binding Proteins in Discriminating Chemicals in the Gypsy Moth, Lymantria Dispar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxue Yu, Fei Ma, Yixia Cao, Junhua Zhang, Yongan Zhang, Shengnan Duan, Yadong Wei, Shuifang Zhu, Naizhong Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L., play an important role in olfaction. Here structures of PBPs were first built by Homology Modeling, and each model of PBPs had seven α-helices and a large hydrophobic cavity including 25 residues for PBP1 and 30 residues for PBP2. Three potential semiochemicals were first screened by CDOCKER program based on the PBP models and chemical database. These chemicals were Palmitic acid n-butyl ester (Pal, Bis(3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl adipate (Bis, L-trans-epoxysuccinyl-isoleucyl-proline methyl ester propylamide (CA-074. The analysis of chemicals docking the proteins showed one hydrogen bond was established between the residues Lys94 and (+-Disparlure ((+-D, and л-л interactions were present between Phe36 of PBP1 and (+-D. The Lys94 of PBP1 formed two and three hydrogen bonds with Bis and CA-074, respectively. There was no residue of PBP2 interacting with these four chemicals except Bis forming one hydrogen bond with Lys121. After simulating the conformational changes of LdisPBPs at pH7.3 and 5.5 by constant pH molecular dynamics simulation in implicit solvent, the N-terminal sequences of PBPs was unfolded, only having five α-helices, and PBP2 had larger binding pocket at 7.3 than PBP1. To investigate the changes of α-helices at different pH, far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism showed PBPs consist of α-helices, and the tertiary structures of PBP1 and PBP2 were influenced at pH7.3 and 5.5. The fluorescence binding assay indicated that PBP1 and PBP2 have similarly binding affinity to (+-D at pH 5.5 and 7.3, respectively. At pH 5.5, the dissociation constant of the complex between PBP1 and 2-decyl-1-oxaspiro [2.2] pentane (OXP1 was 0.68±0.01μM, for (+-D was 5.32±0.11μM, while PBP2 with OXP1 and (+-D were 1.88±0.02μM and 5.54±0.04μM, respectively. Three chemicals screened had higher affinity to PBP1 than (+-D except Pal at pH5.5, and had lower affinity than (+-D at p

  12. A Multi-Species TaqMan PCR Assay for the Identification of Asian Gypsy Moths (Lymantria spp.) and Other Invasive Lymantriines of Biosecurity Concern to North America

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stewart, Donald; Zahiri, Reza; Djoumad, Abdelmadjid; Freschi, Luca; Lamarche, Josyanne; Holden, Dave; Cervantes, Sandra; Ojeda, Dario I; Potvin, Amélie; Nisole, Audrey; Béliveau, Catherine; Capron, Arnaud; Kimoto, Troy; Day, Brittany; Yueh, Hesther; Duff, Cameron; Levesque, Roger C; Hamelin, Richard C; Cusson, Michel

    2016-01-01

    .... The name AGM designates a group of closely related Lymantria species (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Lymantriinae) comprising two L. dispar subspecies (L. dispar asiatica, L. dispar japonica) and three closely related Lymantria species...

  13. Response of the Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar to Transgenic Poplar, Populus simonii x P. nigra, Expressing Fusion Protein Gene of the Spider Insecticidal Peptide and Bt-toxin C-peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Chuan-Wang; Liu, Gui-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ying; Yan, Shan-Chun; Ma, Ling; Yang, Chuan-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The response of the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) to a fusion gene consisting of the spider, Atrax robustus Simon (Araneae: Hexanthelidae) ω?-ACTX-Ar1 sequence coding for an ω?-atracotoxin and a sequence coding for the Bt-toxin C-peptide, expressed in transgenic poplar Populus simonii x P. nigra L. (Malphigiales: Salicaceae) was investigated. Individual performance, feeding selection, midgut proteinase activity and nutrition utilization were monitored. The...

  14. Effect of Methoxyfenozide on the Activities of Protective Enzymes in Larvaes of Lymantria dispar%甲氧虫酰肼对舞毒蛾幼虫保护酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖月枝; 严善春; 李小平; 曹传旺

    2011-01-01

    测定甲氧虫酰肼(RH-2485)对舞毒蛾幼虫保护酶活性的影响.结果表明:舞毒蛾2龄、4龄、6龄幼虫经甲氧虫酰肼处理后,其体内的酚氧化酶(PO)、超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)的活性均先被诱导后被抑制.甲氧虫酰肼对舞毒蛾4龄、6龄幼虫体内过氧化物酶(POD)也表现为先诱导后抑制的作用,其中在处理24h时,对该酶的诱导作用最强,分别为同期对照的1.603,1.805倍;处理48h后,对该酶的抑制作用最强,分别为同期对照的0.858,0.608倍,差异均极显著(P<0.01);但对2龄幼虫休内该酶具有明显的抑制作用,其中在处理24h后,对该酶的抑制作用最强,为同期对照的0.541倍,差异极显著(P<0.01).甲氧虫酰肼对舞毒蛾幼虫体内几丁质酶也存在影响,其中对2龄幼虫体内该酶具有先诱导后抑制作用,对4龄、6龄幼虫体内该酶具有明显抑制作用.因此,甲氧虫酰肼能有效干扰舞毒蛾幼虫正常的生理代谢,从而起到毒杀作用.%In order to study the insecticidal activity and mechanism of methoxyfenozide ( RH-2485 ) , this paper measured effects of the chemical on the activities of protective enzymes in the larvals of Lymantria dispar. The results showed that the activities of phenoloxidase (PO) and superoxide dismutase( SOD) in the larvae treated with methoxyfenozide were first induced, and then inhibited. The activities of peroxidase ( POD) was different at different instar of larvals in response to treatment of methoxyfenozide. The activities of POD in the 4th and 6th instar larvals were first induced, and then inhibited too. The highest activities of POD in the 4th and 6th instar larvals occurred in 24 h,and were 1. 603 and 1. 805 times of CK in the same instar. The lowest activities of POD in the 4 th and 6th instar larvals occurred in 48 h after being treated with methoxyfenozide, and they were 0. 858 and 0. 608 times of CK in the same instar, these differences were significant (P <0. 01) . POD

  15. Development of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L on the foliage of Quercus cerris L., Q. Petraea (matt Liebl. and Q. Robur L. in the controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović Slobodan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L was monitored in laboratory conditions, on the foliage of the species Quercus cerris L. Quercus petraea (Matt Liebl. and Quercus robur L. The experiment was established in the controlled environmental conditions, at the temperature of 25°C, photoperiod 14:10 (day: night and relative humidity 70%. The objective of the research was to determine the suitability of the study host plant species for gypsy moth development. The study results show that Gypsy moth caterpillars cultivated on Q. petraea foliage had a lower survival, higher number of moultings, longer preadult development and lower fecundity, which makes this species less suitable compared to the other two. Gypsy moth caterpillars cultivated on Q. cerris foliage had the highest survival degree the lowest number of moultings, the shortest preadult development and the highest fecundity, which makes this species the most favourable for gypsy moth development. Q. robur was between the former two species in this respect.

  16. Temporal analysis and spatial mapping of Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus transcripts and in vitro translation polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Slavicek

    1991-01-01

    Genomic expression of the Lymantriu dispar multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) was studied. Viral specific transcripts expressed in cell culture at various times from 2 through 72 h postinfection were identified and their genomic origins mapped through Northern analysis. Sixty-five distinct transcripts were identified in this...

  17. Influences of the Populus deltoids seedlings treated with exogenous methyl jasmonate on the growth and development of Lymantria dispar larvae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zeng-hui; ZHAO Ling; YANG Di; SHEN Ying-bai; SHEN Fan-yi

    2006-01-01

    Lyantria dispar larvae were fed with the leaves of Populus deltoids seedlings exposed to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) for 24 h. The growth and development of the larvae were investigated, and phenolics contents in treated leaves including pyrocatechol, caffeic acid, coumarin, ferulic acid and benzoic acid were also surveyed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results indicated that approximate digestibility, efficiency of conversion of ingested food, efficiency of conversion of digested food, and weight of the larvae were inhibited obviously, especially from the sixth day, which may result from the increase of total phenolics contents in treated leaves. This result provides strong supports for MeJA acting as the airborne signal molecule between woody plants.

  18. Purification of Vip3Aa from Bacillus thuringiensis HD-1 and its contribution to toxicity of HD-1 to spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) and gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) (Lepidoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Ross; Liu, Yuehong; Gauthier, Debbie; van Frankenhuyzen, Kees

    2008-10-01

    We developed a protocol for obtaining high yields (10-15 mg per 1100 ml of culture supernatant) of highly purified (up to 95%) Vip3Aa protein from HD-1 cultures. The protocol is based on acetone precipitation of supernatant protein, followed by HPLC fractionation (DEAE-5PW column) and several concentration steps. Our protocol resulted in higher yields and purity of Vip3Aa than a previously published method [Estruch, J.J., Warren, G.W., Mullins, M.A., Nye, G.J., Craig, J.A., Koziel, M.G., 1996. Vip3A, a 353 novel Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein with a wide spectrum of 354 activities against lepidopteran insects. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 5389-5394.]. This was achieved by using acetone rather than ammonium sulfate for precipitation of proteins from culture supernatants, and a shallow rather than a steep NaCl gradient for elution of the toxin, and by conducting all the purification steps at low temperature to prevent toxin degradation. In bioassays of the purified protein, Choristoneura fumiferana and Lymantria dispar larvae were less susceptible than Spodopteraexigua (10- and approximately 100-fold, respectively). A B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki strain HD-1 from which the vip3Aa gene had been deleted (EG12414) showed reduced toxicity to S. exigua relative to the unmodified parental strain (EG2001), but not to L. dispar or C. fumiferana. We interpret these results as indicating that the Vip3Aa toxin does not contribute measurably to pathogenicity of HD-1 in these species.

  19. Effects of Chlorpyrifos on Food Utilization and Detoxifying Enzymes and Acetylcholinesterase of Lymantria dispar%毒死蜱对舞毒蛾食物利用和解毒酶及AChE活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧; 严善春; 王志英; 葛士林; 曹传旺

    2011-01-01

    采用质量法和酶活性测定法研究了毒死蜱对舞毒蛾(Lymantria dispar)3龄幼虫食物利用的影响,并测定了其毒力及解毒酶、乙酰胆碱酯酶(AChE)的活性.用亚致死浓度(1.5 mg·L-1)毒死蜱处理小黑杨叶片,饲喂舞毒蛾3龄幼虫,其幼虫生长率(RGR)、食物利用率(ECI)和食物转化率(ECD)均显著低于对照,而近似消化率(AD)显著高于对照,相对取食量(RCR)处理和对照间差异不显著.毒死蜱对舞毒蛾幼虫24 h致死中浓度(LC50)为5.86 mg·L-1,其毒力低于三氟氯氰菊酯而高于氧化乐果.毒死蜱对舞毒蛾3龄幼虫体内羧酸酯酶(CarE)、谷胱甘肽S-转移酶(GSTs)和AChE均有抑制作用,抑制程度为CarE>AChE>GSTs.毒死蜱通过影响舞毒蛾食物利用和抑制酶活性而表现出杀虫活性,为一种有效防治舞毒蛾的有机磷杀虫剂.%The effects of sublethal dose of chlorpyrifos (CPF) on food utilization of gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar,as well as CPF toxicity and enzyme activities of carboxylesterase ( CarE ), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were evaluated in the 3rd-instar gypsy moth larvae using gravimetric method and measuring enzyme activities. Relative growth rate (RGR), efficiency of the conversion of ingested food (ECI) and efficiency of the conversion of digested food (ECD) of 3rd-instar larvae fed on poplar leaves treated by sublethal concentration of CPF were significantly lower than thosc fed on normal polar leaves. However, approximate digestibility (AD) of the treatment was significantly higher than that of control. The relative consumption rate (RCR) of the treatment and control groups were not significantly different. The 24 h LC50 of CPF to the gypsy moth 3rd-instar larvae was 5.86 mg · L-1, which was higher than that of omethoate but lower than that of cyhalothrin. In vitro inhibition assay indicated that the activities of AChE, CarE and GSTs were inhibited by CPF depended on concentrations

  20. Establishment of Optimum Reaction System of Carboxylesterase from Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar)%舞毒蛾羧酸酯酶最佳反应体系的确立1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付莉; 胡春祥

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the optimum reaction system of carboxylesterase (CarE) from the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar), we used orthogonal experiment to measure the effects of the concentrations of carboxylesterase and substrate , pH, reaction temperature and reaction time to the activity of CarE .Through analyzing the data from orthogonal experiment with range analy-sis and analysis of variance , the optimum reaction system of carboxylesterase was ultimately determined as 0.2 beetle· mL-1 of carboxylesterase concentration , 0.2 mmol· L-1 of substrate concentration , 7.5 of pH, 45℃of reaction temperature , and 10 min of reaction time .%为了确定舞毒蛾(Lymantrai dispar)羧酸酯酶(CarE)活性的最佳反应体系,运用正交试验测定了反应体系中酶浓度、底物浓度、pH值、反应温度和反应时间5个因素对CarE活性的影响。极差分析和方差分析显示,舞毒蛾CarE的最优反应体系为酶浓度0.2头· mL-1,底物浓度0.2 mmol· L-1,pH=7.5,反应温度45℃,反应时间10 min。

  1. 舞毒蛾不同地理种群基于AFLP分子标记的遗传分析%AFLP Analysis of Different Geographic Populations of the Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar ( Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱路; 安榆林; 徐梅; 杨晓军; 朱宏斌

    2011-01-01

    舞毒蛾是一种食性很广、危害很大的世界性林木害虫,根据其地理分布和生活特性,现在被分为亚洲型和欧洲型2种.对来自俄罗斯远东地区、蒙古、日本、美国和中国5个地理种群,共26份舞毒蛾样品进行AFLP分子标记研究.成功建立并优化舞毒蛾AFLP分析体系,从16对引物组合中筛选出3对扩增条带多、多态检出率高的荧光标记引物组合,利用CEQ - 8000遗传分析仪进行毛细管电泳及数据分析,共检测到507个多态性位点.通过PAUP软件对AFLP数据进行UPGM和NJ树的聚类分析以及遗传距离分析,结果表明:5个地理种群舞毒蛾明显分成欧洲型(美国种群)和亚洲型,其中亚洲型又可分成俄罗斯、日本、中国及蒙古3个类群.美国种群间遗传变异比其他种群较大,中国种群与美国种群遗传距离最大,而与蒙古种群遗传分化最小.从分子水平上研究舞毒蛾不同种群的遗传分类情况,揭示利用AFLP分子标记技术可以区分舞毒蛾不同地理种群的基因型,为研究舞毒蛾的起源、入侵与扩散、遗传与变异以及检疫措施的制定等方面提供科学依据.%The gypsy moth,Lymantria dispar Linnaeus, is one of the most serious insect pests of palaearctic and nearctic forests. According to their geographical distribution and biology characteristics, they were divided into the Asian and European types of populations. We used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to detect genetic diversities within and among the gypsy moth populations. Three fluorescent-labeled AFLP primer combinations were used on 26 L. Dispar samples collected from different locations of Russia, Mongolia, Japan, United States of America and China, detecting a total of 507 polymorphic fragments. Genetic similarities based on these data were calculated and cluster analysis was performed to graphically display groupings between populations. L. Dispar samples from these areas were grouped

  2. Effects of spinosad on the activity of protective enzymes and chitinase in Lymantria dispar%多杀菌素对舞毒蛾保护酶及几丁质酶的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢杰明; 严善春; 曹传旺

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the insecticidal activity and mode of action of spinosad,its effect on the activity of protective enzymes and chitinase of 3rd and 5th instar larvae of Lymantria dispar was assayed in this study.The results showed that spinosad had no effect on catalase(CAT) activity,but significantly changed phenoloxidase(PO) activity in an activation-inhibition fashion for both 3rd and 5th instar larvae.The same significant "activation-inhibition" effect was also found on the activity of superoxide dismutase(SOD) and peroxidase(POD) in the 3rd instar larvae(P0.01),with the maximum enzyme activations occurred 3-6 hours after spinosad treatment.Whereas the POD and SOD activity in the 5th instar larvae was significantly increased within 3 hours after the treatment(P0.01;with treatment/CK ratios being 1.543 and 1.716,respectively),and no significant treatment effects were detected after 3-6 hours.The chitinase activity in the 3rd instar larvae was significantly activated 3-12 hours after spinosad treatment,while it was strongly inhibited in the 5th instar larvae 12-24 hours after the treatment.In conclusion,spinosad shows a significant effect on the activity of most protective enzymes and chitinase,and can interrupt normal metabolism of L.dispar larvae,therefore,has a potential to be an effective pesticide against this serious defoliator pest.%为进一步揭示多杀菌素的杀虫活性及作用机理,采用生化方法测定了多杀菌素对舞毒蛾3龄和5龄幼虫体内几种保护酶活性的影响。结果表明:多杀菌素处理舞毒蛾3龄和5龄幼虫后,其体内的过氧化氢酶(CAT)活性无明显变化,而酚氧化酶(PO)的活性表现为先激活后抑制作用。多杀菌素对舞毒蛾3龄幼虫体内超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、过氧化物酶(POD)同样表现为先激活后抑制作用,其中在处理3~6h时,对酶的激活作用达到最高(P〈0.01);但对5龄幼虫体内这

  3. Effects of locally inducing Larix olgensis using exogenous methyl jasmonate on the growth and development of Lymantria dispar%茉莉酸甲酯局部诱导长白落叶松对舞毒蛾生长发育的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜礅; 王杰; 姜虹; 张文一; 孟昭军; 严善春

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand how local spraying of exogenous methyl jasmonate would affect the induced resistance level of trees to insects, we sprayed identical amounts of 0. 01, 0. 10 and 1. 00 mmol/L methyl jasmonate, respectively, on whole Larix olgensis seedlings or on specific parts of the seedlings. We analyzed the effects of the methyl jasmonate treatments on the growth and reproduction of the gypsy moth ( Lymantria dispar) . The results showed that feeding gypsy moth larvae on plant sprayed either partially or entirely with these three concentrations of methyl jasmonate could decrease significantly the average larval weight of 3rd to 6th instars, the survival rate of the larvae, pupal weight, pupal and adult eclosion rates and the fecundity of adult females, compared to the control group ( P 0. 05 ) . The 0. 10 mmol/L concentration of methyl jasmonate sprayed on parts of plant had the best inductive effects. The above results illustrate that all three concentrations of methyl jasmonate applied either to parts or to entire seedlings can enhance the ability of larch to inhibit the growth and development of gypsy moth, and the partial spraying methyl jasmonate on larch seedlings can achieve the same inductive effects as spraying on the whole seedlings.%为了解茉莉酸甲酯局部处理对林木诱导抗虫性的影响,本研究以长白落叶松幼苗为试验材料,分别用浓度为0.01、0.10和1.00 mmoL/L的茉莉酸甲酯全株或局部喷施处理,分析不同处理苗木对舞毒蛾生长和繁殖的影响。结果表明,取食3个浓度茉莉酸甲酯局部或全株处理过的长白落叶松后,舞毒蛾的3~6龄幼虫平均质量、蛹质量以及成虫产卵量与对照组相比均显著下降(P0.05),其中0.10 mmoL/L茉莉酸甲酯局部处理诱导效果最好。本研究结果说明3个浓度茉莉酸甲酯局部和全株处理后均能不同程度诱导长白落叶松增强其对舞毒蛾生长发育的抑制能力,并且茉莉

  4. Toward a global barcode library for Lymantria (Lepidoptera: Lymantriinae) tussock moths of biosecurity concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detecting and controlling the movements of invasive species, such as insect pests, relies upon rapid and accurate species identification in order to initiate containment procedures by the appropriate authorities. Gypsy moth Lymantria dispar L., introduced from Europe in the 19th century, has become ...

  5. 不同光照强度对舞毒蛾生长发育及防御酶活性的影响1)%Effects of Different Light Intensities on the Development and Defensive Enzyme Activities of Lymantria dispar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      为探究光照与舞毒蛾生长发育和解毒代谢的关系,研究了不同光照强度条件下,舞毒蛾生长发育和防御酶的响应状况。结果表明:人工饲料喂养的舞毒蛾,在不同光照条件下,其生长发育以及保护酶的活性均无显著差异(p>0.05),但对解毒酶活性有显著影响(p<0.05),表明光照强度的改变,在一定程度上影响舞毒蛾解毒代谢。%We studied the responds of the development and defensive enzyme activities of Lymantria dispar to explore the effects of different lightintensities on the development and metabolizing enzyme activities of L.dispar.In different light intensities there are no significant effects on the development and protective enzyme activities (p>0.05).However, there are signifi-cant effects on detoxification enzymes of gypsy moth (p<0.05).Therefore, different light intensities have the effects on the detoxification metabolism of gypsy moth.

  6. Effects of temperature and dietary nitrogen on genetic variation and covariation in gypsy moth larval performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković-Tomanić Milena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the plastic and genetic components of variation in responses of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar 4th instar larvae to temperature and food quality, we applied a split-family four-environment experimental design where full-sibs were reared on two constant temperatures (23°C and 28°C and two concentrations of dietary nitrogen (1.5 and 3.7% dry weight. A temperature of 28°C and low dietary nitrogen decreased larval weight and prolonged larval developmental time, while viability was not affected. Only a marginally significant interaction between the two environmental factors was found for larval weight. The broad-sense heritability for larval developmental time did not change across environments, and across-environment genetic correlations were close to one. Heritability for larval weight depended on environmental and across-environmental genetic correlations that were not significant. There was no evidence of a trade-off between developmental time and larval weight. The implications of the obtained results for the evolution of phenotypic plasticity in complex environments are discussed. [Acknowledgments. This work was supported by Ministry of Education and Science of Serbia, grant No. 173027.

  7. A Multi-Species TaqMan PCR Assay for the Identification of Asian Gypsy Moths (Lymantria spp.) and Other Invasive Lymantriines of Biosecurity Concern to North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Donald; Zahiri, Reza; Djoumad, Abdelmadjid; Freschi, Luca; Lamarche, Josyanne; Holden, Dave; Cervantes, Sandra; Ojeda, Dario I.; Potvin, Amélie; Nisole, Audrey; Béliveau, Catherine; Capron, Arnaud; Kimoto, Troy; Day, Brittany; Yueh, Hesther; Duff, Cameron; Levesque, Roger C.; Hamelin, Richard C.; Cusson, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Preventing the introduction and establishment of forest invasive alien species (FIAS) such as the Asian gypsy moth (AGM) is a high-priority goal for countries with extensive forest resources such as Canada. The name AGM designates a group of closely related Lymantria species (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Lymantriinae) comprising two L. dispar subspecies (L. dispar asiatica, L. dispar japonica) and three closely related Lymantria species (L. umbrosa, L. albescens, L. postalba), all considered potential FIAS in North America. Ships entering Canadian ports are inspected for the presence of suspicious gypsy moth eggs, but those of AGM are impossible to distinguish from eggs of innocuous Lymantria species. To assist regulatory agencies in their identification of these insects, we designed a suite of TaqMan® assays that provide significant improvements over existing molecular assays targeting AGM. The assays presented here can identify all three L. dispar subspecies (including the European gypsy moth, L. dispar dispar), the three other Lymantria species comprising the AGM complex, plus five additional Lymantria species that pose a threat to forests in North America. The suite of assays is built as a “molecular key” (analogous to a taxonomic key) and involves several parallel singleplex and multiplex qPCR reactions. Each reaction uses a combination of primers and probes designed to separate taxa through discriminatory annealing. The success of these assays is based on the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 5’ region of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) or in its longer, 3’ region, as well as on the presence of an indel in the “FS1” nuclear marker, generating North American and Asian alleles, used here to assess Asian introgression into L. dispar dispar. These assays have the advantage of providing rapid and accurate identification of ten Lymantria species and subspecies considered potential FIAS. PMID:27513667

  8. A Multi-Species TaqMan PCR Assay for the Identification of Asian Gypsy Moths (Lymantria spp.) and Other Invasive Lymantriines of Biosecurity Concern to North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Donald; Zahiri, Reza; Djoumad, Abdelmadjid; Freschi, Luca; Lamarche, Josyanne; Holden, Dave; Cervantes, Sandra; Ojeda, Dario I; Potvin, Amélie; Nisole, Audrey; Béliveau, Catherine; Capron, Arnaud; Kimoto, Troy; Day, Brittany; Yueh, Hesther; Duff, Cameron; Levesque, Roger C; Hamelin, Richard C; Cusson, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Preventing the introduction and establishment of forest invasive alien species (FIAS) such as the Asian gypsy moth (AGM) is a high-priority goal for countries with extensive forest resources such as Canada. The name AGM designates a group of closely related Lymantria species (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Lymantriinae) comprising two L. dispar subspecies (L. dispar asiatica, L. dispar japonica) and three closely related Lymantria species (L. umbrosa, L. albescens, L. postalba), all considered potential FIAS in North America. Ships entering Canadian ports are inspected for the presence of suspicious gypsy moth eggs, but those of AGM are impossible to distinguish from eggs of innocuous Lymantria species. To assist regulatory agencies in their identification of these insects, we designed a suite of TaqMan® assays that provide significant improvements over existing molecular assays targeting AGM. The assays presented here can identify all three L. dispar subspecies (including the European gypsy moth, L. dispar dispar), the three other Lymantria species comprising the AGM complex, plus five additional Lymantria species that pose a threat to forests in North America. The suite of assays is built as a "molecular key" (analogous to a taxonomic key) and involves several parallel singleplex and multiplex qPCR reactions. Each reaction uses a combination of primers and probes designed to separate taxa through discriminatory annealing. The success of these assays is based on the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 5' region of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) or in its longer, 3' region, as well as on the presence of an indel in the "FS1" nuclear marker, generating North American and Asian alleles, used here to assess Asian introgression into L. dispar dispar. These assays have the advantage of providing rapid and accurate identification of ten Lymantria species and subspecies considered potential FIAS.

  9. Cloning and Analysis of LdOA1 in Lymantria dispar and Its Response to the Stress of Three Kinds of Insecticides%舞毒蛾LdOA1基因克隆分析及对3种杀虫剂胁迫的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹传旺; 孙丽丽; 问荣荣; 豆晓洁; 王志英

    2014-01-01

    The G protein coupled receptors ( GPCRs) ,known as transmembrane receptors,play an important role in drug research and development by activating G protein involved in inside signal transduction pathways. In present study, the full length cDNA of GPCR (namely LdOA1) was isolated from Lymantria dispar transcriptome. The open reading frame ( ORF) of LdOA1 was 453 bp encoding a protein of 150 amino acid residues with the molecular mass of 17. 54 kDa and theoretical pI of 9. 76. Phylogenetic analysis of GPCR proteins showed LdOA1 of L. dispar clustered into a group with Danaus plexippus. We further investigated the expression of LdOA1 in 3rd instar L. dispar larvae under deltamethrin, carbaryl and omethoate stresses using real-time PCR. The results showed that LdOA1 in L. dispar was obviously inhibited by deltamethrin,carbaryl and omethoate.%G蛋白偶联受体( GPCRs)是生物体内重要膜受体,通过激活三聚体 G 蛋白参与各种细胞内信号转导,在药物研发中具有重要的作用。从舞毒蛾无参照全转录本文库中鉴定获得 GPCR 家族中眼白化 I 型全长基因(命名为 LdOA1),该基因全长453 bp,编码150个氨基酸,分子质量为17.54 kDa,理论等电点(pI)为9.76。进化树分析表明 LdOA1蛋白与帝王蝶的亲缘关系较近。实时荧光定量 PCR 分析表明舞毒蛾3龄幼虫在溴氰菊酯、甲萘威和氧化乐果胁迫下 LdOA1的表达均表现为显著抑制。

  10. 甲氧虫酰肼对舞毒蛾幼虫解毒酶及其体内蛋白质表达的影响%Effect of Methoxyfenozide on Activities of Detoxifying Enzymes and Expression of Proteins in Lymantria dispar larvae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖月枝; 严善春; 曹传旺; 刘丹

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the insecticidal activity of methoxyfenozide ( RH-2485 ) against the larvae of Lymantria dispar ,the pesticide bioactivity of the chemical against the different instar larvae of L. dispar and its effect on the activities of detoxifying enzymes of the insect were assayed using leaf film method, and the expression of proteins in different tissues of the larvae were detected with SDS-PAGE. The results showed that methoxyfenozide had a high toxicity against the larvae,especially 2nd instar and 3rd instar, and the toxicity was obviously different with different larva instars. The activities of detoxifying enzymes, such as carboxylesterase ( CarE ) , MFO O-demethylase ( MFOD ) and glutathione S-transfer (GST) , in the 2nd , 4th , 6th instar larvae were significantly induced or inhibited by the methoxyfenozide treatment. The impact of methoxyfenozide on these enzymes was significantly different at different treatment time. After the 4th instar larvae were fed with methoxyfenozide, the protein expression pattern in the hemolymph ,midgut and epidermis was different from that in the control. The effect of methoxyfenozide on proteins in the hemolymph and midgut was obvious in 12 h and 24 h, whereas the effect on protein expression in epidermis tissue was more significant in 48 h. These results indicated that methoxyfenozide as a non-steroidal ecdysone had a higher biological activity against L. dispar, and the major detoxifying enzymes in the insect body were significantly interfered, showing that methoxyfenozide had a high toxic effect against L. dispar. The specific proteins were produced in the hemolymph , midgut and epidermal tissue, which might interfere with the normal physiological metabolism of insects and epidermal formation.%为研究甲氧虫酰肼(RH-2485)对舞毒蛾幼虫的杀虫活性,采用叶片药膜法测定该药剂对舞毒蛾不同龄期幼虫的生物活性及对其体内解毒酶活性的影响,并通过SDS-PAGE对舞毒

  11. Genomic sequencing and analyses of Lymantria xylina multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Chu-Fang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outbreaks of the casuarina moth, Lymantria xylina Swinehoe (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae, which is a very important forest pest in Taiwan, have occurred every five to 10 years. This moth has expanded its range of host plants to include more than 65 species of broadleaf trees. LyxyMNPV (L. xylina multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus is highly virulent to the casuarina moth and has been investigated as a possible biopesticide for controlling this moth. LdMNPV-like virus has also been isolated from Lymantria xylina larvae but LyxyMNPV was more virulent than LdMNPV-like virus both in NTU-LY and IPLB-LD-652Y cell lines. To better understand LyxyMNPV, the nucleotide sequence of the LyxyMNPV DNA genome was determined and analysed. Results The genome of LyxyMNPV consists of 156,344 bases, has a G+C content of 53.4% and contains 157 putative open reading frames (ORFs. The gene content and gene order of LyxyMNPV were similar to those of LdMNPV, with 151 ORFs identified as homologous to those reported in the LdMNPV genome. Two genes (Lyxy49 and Lyxy123 were homologous to other baculoviruses, and four unique LyxyMNPV ORFs (Lyxy11, Lyxy19, Lyxy130 and Lyxy131 were identified in the LyxyMNPV genome, including a gag-like gene that was not reported in baculoviruses. LdMNPV contains 23 ORFs that are absent in LyxyMNPV. Readily identifiable homologues of the gene host range factor-1 (hrf-1, which appears to be involved in the susceptibility of L. dispar to NPV infection, were not present in LyxyMNPV. Additionally, two putative odv-e27 homologues were identified in LyxyMNPV. The LyxyMNPV genome encoded 14 bro genes compared with 16 in LdMNPV, which occupied more than 8% of the LyxyMNPV genome. Thirteen homologous regions (hrs were identified containing 48 repeated sequences composed of 30-bp imperfect palindromes. However, they differed in the relative positions, number of repeats and orientation in the genome compared to LdMNPV. Conclusion The gene

  12. Comparison of the toxicities and antifeedant effects of four botanical insecticides against the larvae of Lymantria dispar asiatica Vnukovskij%4种植物源杀虫剂对亚洲型舞毒蛾幼虫的毒性与拒食作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁吉同; 唐桦; 阿地力·沙塔尔; 王玉珠

    2013-01-01

    In order to choose the best botanical insecticide for controlling Asian gypsy moth,Lymantria dispar asiatica,we compared toxicities and antifeedant effects of four botanical insecticides on the 3rd instar larvae,including 5% Rotenone,1% resmethrin-matrine,5% eucalyptole and 0.6% Oxymatrine-lactone.The results indicated that the four kinds of botanical insecticides all had the functions of stomach poison and contact toxicity,and the acute toxicity performance showed that the function of contact toxicity was more obvious than stomach poison.When botanical insecticides were diluted at the highest concentration,the stomach poison of 0.6 % Oxymatrine-lactone had the most mortality,followed by 5 % eucalyptole.Due to the LC50 of stomach poison groups were all less than that of contact toxicity groups,the stomach poison had a more toxic.Moreover,the toxicities of 0.6 % Oxymatrine-lactone and 5 % eucalyptole were much higher than the other two botanical insecticides,and the toxicities of 0.6 % Oxymatrine-lactone was the strongest.Comparing the weight of feedingstuff before and after feeding,we found that the antifeedant effects of Asian gypsy moth 3rd instar larvae performed well under the four kinds of botanical insecticides treatments,and the antifeedant rate under 5 % eucalyptole diluted 5 000 times reached to 99.31%.It was deduced that 5 % eucalyptole and 0.6 % Oxymatrine-lactone could be popularized and applied as botanical insecticides to control Asian gypsy moth.%为筛选出有效防治亚洲型舞毒蛾的最佳植物源杀虫剂,采用5%鱼藤酮、1%虫菊·苦参碱、5%桉油精、0.6%氧苦·内酯4种植物源杀虫剂,比较它们对舞毒蛾3龄幼虫胃毒和触杀处理后的毒性与拒食作用.结果表明:这4种植物源杀虫剂对舞毒蛾3龄幼虫均具有胃毒和触杀两种作用,其急性毒性总体表现为触杀处理大于胃毒处理,而在各自相对最高的浓度条件下,以0.6%氧苦·

  13. Screening of Effective Penetrant and Effect of the Compatibility of Medicines with Effective Penetrant and Me-thoxyfenozide to Lymantria dispar Eggs%高效渗透剂筛选及其与甲氧虫酰肼配伍毒杀舞毒蛾卵的效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李奇; 韦力; 孟昭军; 严善春; 宋大北; 曲凤静

    2013-01-01

    为提高杀虫剂对舞毒蛾( Lymantria dispar)卵的毒杀效果,比较了快速渗透剂T、氮酮、杰效利3种渗透剂的渗透性能,及其对杀虫剂甲氧虫酰肼的增效作用。3种渗透剂的渗透性由强到弱依次为:杰效利、渗透剂T、氮酮。以1%杰效利分别与6个质量浓度梯度的甲氧虫酰肼(2.4×10-1、2.4×10-2、2.4×10-3、2.4×10-4、2.4×10-5、2.4×10-6 mg· L-1)配伍成高渗药剂,对舞毒蛾卵进行毒杀试验。结果表明:用1%杰效利处理后,舞毒蛾卵的孵化率为40.14%;用甲氧虫酰肼+1%杰效利处理后,舞毒蛾卵的孵化率为19.95%~51.83%;它们均显著低于对照,但二者间差异不显著。由此可见,杀虫剂和渗透剂配伍的高渗药剂对舞毒蛾卵的孵化有明显的抑制作用。%The experiment was conducted to compare the infiltration capacity of penetrant T, azone, Jiexiaoli and their synergy to methoxyfenozide to improve the effect of pesticides to gypsy moth eggs.The order of their infiltration capacities are Jiexiaoli>penetrant T>azone.Then, the hypertonic agents composed of 1% of Jiexiaoli and six contents of methoxyfenozide (2.4× 10-1, 2.4×10-2, 2.4×10-3, 2.4×10-4, 2.4×10-5 and 2.4×10-6mg/L) were used for controlling gypsy moth eggs.The hatchability of gypsy moth eggs is 40.14%after the eggs are treated with 1%of Jiexiaoli, and the egg-hatchability is 19.95%-51.83%after the eggs are treated with the different concentration of hypertonic agents including methoxyfenozide .Their egg-hatchability with 1% of Jiexiaoli and hypertonic agent treatments is significantly lower than that of control, but the differences between 1%of Jiexiaoli and hypertonic agent treatments are not significant.Therefore, the hypertonic agents of the compatibility of medicines with pesticide and penetrant can obviously control the hatch ability of gypsy moth eggs.

  14. Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic information about cancer disparities in the U.S., factors that contribute to the disproportionate burden of cancer in some groups, and examples of disparities in incidence and mortality among certain populations.

  15. Survival and development of Lymantria monacha (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) on North American and introduced Eurasian tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keena, M A

    2003-02-01

    Lymantria monacha (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), the nun moth, is a Eurasian pest of conifers that has potential for accidental introduction into North America. To project the potential host range of this insect if introduced into North America, survival and development of L. monacha on 26 North American and eight introduced Eurasian tree species were examined. Seven conifer species (Abies concolor, Picea abies, P. glauca, P. pungens, Pinus sylvestris with male cones, P. menziesii variety glance, and Tsuga canadensis) and six broadleaf species (Betula populifolia, Malus x domestica, Prunus serotiaa, Quercus lobata, Q. rubra, and Q. velutina) were suitable for L. monacha survival and development. Eleven of the host species tested were rated as intermediate in suitability, four conifer species (Larix occidentalis, P. nigra, P. ponderosa, P. strobus, and Pseudotsuga menziesii variety menziesii) and six broadleaf species (Carpinus caroliniana, Carya ovata, Fagus grandifolia, Populus grandidentata, Q. alba, and Tilia cordata) and the remaining 10 species tested were rated as poor (Acer rubrum, A. platanoidies, A. saccharum, F. americana, Juniperus virginiana, Larix kaempferi, Liriodendron tulipfera, Morus alba, P. taeda, and P. deltoides). The phenological state of the trees had a major impact on establishment, survival, and development of L. monacha on many of the tree species tested. Several of the deciduous tree species that are suitable for L. monacha also are suitable for L. dispar (L.) and L. mathura Moore. Establishment of L. monacha in North America would be catastrophic because of the large number of economically important tree species on which it can survive and develop, and the ability of mated females to fly and colonize new areas.

  16. Response of birds to aerial application of nucleopolyhedrosis virus of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Lautenschlager; J.D. Podgwaite

    1979-01-01

    Resident populations of wild birds and caged quail, Colinus virginianus L., were evaluated to detect short-term effects from aerial applications of the nucleopolyhedrosis virus (NPV) of the gypsy moth. NPV in 2 formulations was sprayed on woodland plots in central Pennsylvania. Comparisons of prespray and postspray censuses of the common birds on the...

  17. Density-dependent resistance of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, to its nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    James R. Reilly; Ann E. Hajek

    2007-01-01

    The processes controlling disease resistance can strongly influence the population dynamics of insect outbreaks. Evidence that disease resistance is density-dependent is accumulating, but the exact form of this relationship is highly variable from species to species.

  18. 2-Methyl-(Z)-7-Octadecene - the sex pheromone of allopatric Lymantria serva and Lymantria lucescens: two potential invasive species in the Orient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul W. Schaefer; Gerhard Gries; Regine Gries; Yasutomo Higashiura; Yi-Bin Fan

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to identify the sex pheromones of two allopatric Lymantria species (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae): (1) L. serva (Fabricius) in Taiwan whose larvae attack and occasionally defoliate Ficus spp. and (2) L. lucescens (Fabricius) in Honshu, Japan, whose larvae feed on Quercus...

  19. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020: Oral Health Objectives Site Map Disparities in Oral Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Oral health ... to get and keep dental insurance. Disparities in Oral Health Some of the oral health disparities that exist ...

  20. Larval fish nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holt, J

    2011-01-01

    ... introduction to fish micronutrient history 4.2 Micronutrients in larval feeds 4.3 Requirements versus recommendations 4.4 Vitamins 4.5 Minerals 34.6 Future challenges Section 2: Nutritional Physi...

  1. Response of small mammals to aerial applications of the nucleopolyhedrosis virus of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Lautenschlager; H. Rothenbacher; J.D. Podgwaite

    1978-01-01

    Resident populations of white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus Rafinesque, red-backed voles, Clethrionomys gapperi Vigers, opossums, Didelphis marsupialis L., chipmunks, Tamias striatus L., and raccoons, Procyon lotor L., were evaluated to detect any short term effects from...

  2. Genetic variation and correlations of life-history traits in gypsy moths (Lymantria dispar L. from two populations in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Jelica

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodic fluctuations in density impose different selection pressures on populations of outbreaking Lepidoptera due to changes in their nutritional environment. The maternal effects hypothesis of insect outbreak predicts the transmission of this nutritional "information" to subsequent generations and alterations in offspring life-history traits. To test for these time-delayed effects of the parental generation, we compared life-history traits and their variation and covariation among laboratory-reared gypsy moths hatched from egg masses collected from low- and medium-density populations. Decreased individual performance was recorded in offspring from the medium-density population, indicating reduced egg provisioning under crowding conditions. Genetic variance and covariance were also shown to be sensitive to density of the parental generation. In gypsy moths from the medium-density population, quantitative genetic analysis revealed significantly higher broad-sense heritabilities for development duration traits and demonstrated a trade-off between development duration and body size.

  3. Biological control of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar): an RNAi-based approach and a case for DNA insecticides

    OpenAIRE

    Nyadar Palmahm; Zaitsev Aleksei S.; Tajudeen Adeyemi A.; Shumskykh Maksym N.; Oberemok Volodymyr V.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mechanism, widely known as RNAi (RNA interference),has contributed towards the elucidation of the cellular machinery involved in the response against viral infections based on gene silencing, and in developmental regulation of translational suppression. The application of RNAi in insect pest management (IPM),and gene functional analysis, has been of enormous importance. Unfortunately, as RNAi h...

  4. Are the phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein anti-herbivore defenses? A test using the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karowe, David Nathan; Radi, Joshua Karl

    2011-08-01

    Phytoestrogens are compounds that have moderate estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activity toward mammals. Although genistein and daidzein, the main phytoestrogens of soybean, have been the subject of thousands of studies that address their benefit to human health, relatively little is known about their benefits to plants that produce them. It has been suggested that genistein and daidzein protect plants against arthropod herbivores, but direct tests of this hypothesis are rare. In this study, we evaluated the effect of genistein and daidzein on the survivorship, growth, and fecundity of the gypsy moth, a generalist insect herbivore that does not encounter phytoestrogens in its normal diet. We compared survivorship, egg-to-pupa growth rate, and 4th instar performance of gypsy moth caterpillars on artificial diets containing no phytoestrogen, genistein, daidzein, or a combination of genistein and daidzein. Our results indicate that genistein and daidzein do not decrease survivorship, growth, or fecundity of this insect herbivore. Therefore, it seems unlikely that the primary function of these compounds in aboveground plant tissues is anti-herbivore defense.

  5. Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Minority Health has designed an interactive map, the Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool, to identify areas of disparities between subgroups of...

  6. Phenology of Lymantria monacha (Lepidoptera:Lymantriidae) laboratory reared on spruce foliage or a newly developed artificial diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melody A. Keena; Alice Vandel; Oldrich. Pultar

    2010-01-01

    Lymantria monacha (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) is a Eurasian pest of conifers that has potential for accidental introduction into North America. The phenology over the entire life cycle for L. monacha individuals from the Czech Republic was compared on Picea glauca (Moench) Voss (white spruce) and a newly...

  7. Larval nervous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The apical organ of ciliated larvae of cnidarians and bilaterians is a true larval organ that disappears before or at metamorphosis. It appears to be sensory, probably involved in metamorphosis, but knowledge is scant. The ciliated protostome larvae show ganglia/nerve cords that are retained as t...... common ancestor of the deuterostomes was very similar to the latest common pelago-benthic ancestor of the protostomes as described by the trochaea theory, and that the neural tube of the chordates is morphologically ventral....

  8. Disparity estimation and disparity-coherent watermarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh Faridul, Hasan; Doërr, Gwenaël.; Baudry, Séverine

    2015-03-01

    In the context of stereo video, disparity-coherent watermarking has been introduced to provide superior robustness against virtual view synthesis, as well as to improve perceived fidelity. Still, a number of practical considerations have been overlooked and in particular the role of the underlying depth estimation tool on performances. In this article, we explore the interplay between various stereo video processing primitives and highlight a few take away lessons that should be accounted for to improve performances of future disparity-coherent watermarking systems. In particular, we highlight how lost correspondences during the stereo warping process impact watermark detection, thereby calling for innovative designs.

  9. First feeding of larval herring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Munk, Peter; Støttrup, Josianne

    1985-01-01

    The transition period from endogenous to exogenous feeding by larval herring was investigated in the laboratory for four herring stocks in order to evaluate the chances of survival at the time of fiest feeding. Observations on larval activity, feeding and growth were related to amount of yolk, vi...

  10. Cancer Disparities - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blog posts on cancer health disparities research—including factors that influence disparities, disparities-related research efforts, and diversity in the cancer research workforce—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  11. Drosophila adult and larval pheromones modulate larval food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farine, Jean-Pierre; Cortot, Jérôme; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2014-06-07

    Insects use chemosensory cues to feed and mate. In Drosophila, the effect of pheromones has been extensively investigated in adults, but rarely in larvae. The colonization of natural food sources by Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila simulans species may depend on species-specific chemical cues left in the food by larvae and adults. We identified such chemicals in both species and measured their influence on larval food preference and puparation behaviour. We also tested compounds that varied between these species: (i) two larval volatile compounds: hydroxy-3-butanone-2 and phenol (predominant in D. simulans and D. buzzatii, respectively), and (ii) adult cuticular hydrocarbons (CHs). Drosophila buzzatii larvae were rapidly attracted to non-CH adult conspecific cues, whereas D. simulans larvae were strongly repulsed by CHs of the two species and also by phenol. Larval cues from both species generally reduced larval attraction and pupariation on food, which was generally--but not always--low, and rarely reflected larval response. As these larval and adult pheromones specifically influence larval food search and the choice of a pupariation site, they may greatly affect the dispersion and survival of Drosophila species in nature.

  12. Larval development of japanese "conchostracans"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jorgen; Fritsch, Martin; Grygier, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    For comparison with the remarkable larvae of the laevicaudatan (clam shrimp) Lynceus brachyurus, a basic description of the larval sequence of another laevicaudatan branchiopod, the Japanese Lynceus biformis, is provided. Four larval stages have been identified, ranging in size from 258 to 560 mu m...... to the endopod and a change in the form of the naupliar process, used for food manipulation, from a long, unbranched, pointed spine to a bifid structure. In addition, buds of trunk limbs (five pairs) first appear externally in stage 4 but can be recognized through the cuticle in the previous stage. The larval...

  13. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-06-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1).

  14. Kauri seeds and larval somersaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Steen Thorleif

    2012-01-01

    The trunk morphology of the larvae of the kauri pine (Agathis) seed infesting moth Agathiphaga is described using conventional, polarization, and scanning electron microscopy. The pine seed chamber formed by the larva is also described and commented on. The simple larval chaetotaxy includes more...... of the minute posture sensing setae, proprioceptors, than expected from the lepidopteran larval ground plan. The excess of proprioceptors is suggested to be necessary for sensory input concerning the larval posture within the seed chamber. The trunk musculature includes an autapomorphic radial ventral...... musculature made up of unique multisegmental muscles. The combined presence of additional proprioceptors and the unique ventral musculature is proposed to be related to the larval movement within the confined space of the seed chamber, especially to a proposed somersault movement that allows the larva...

  15. Disparities in Gynecological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshna eChatterjee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Health disparities and inequalities in access to care among different socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial groups have been well documented in the U.S. healthcare system. In this review, we aimed to provide an overview of barriers to care contributing to health disparities in gynecological oncology management and to describe site-specific disparities in gynecologic care for endometrial, ovarian, and cervical cancer. Methods: We performed a literature review of peer-reviewed academic and governmental publications focusing on disparities in gynecological care in the United States by searching PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases. Results: There are multiple important underlying issues that may contribute to the disparities in gynecological oncology management in the United States, namely geographic access and hospital based-discrepancies, research-based discrepancies, influence of socioeconomic and health insurance status, and finally the influence of race and biological factors. Despite the reduction in overall cancer-related deaths since the 1990s, the 5-year survival for Black women is significantly lower than for White women for each gynecologic cancer type and each stage of diagnosis. For ovarian and endometrial cancer, black patients are less likely to receive treatment consistent with evidence-based guidelines and have worse survival outcomes even after accounting for stage and comorbidities. For cervical and endometrial cancer, the mortality rate for black women remains twice that of White women. Conclusions: Health care disparities in the incidence and outcome of gynecologic cancers are complex and involve biologic factors as well as racial, socioeconomic and geographic barriers that influence treatment and survival. These barriers must be addressed to provide optimal care to women in the U.S. with gynecologic cancer.

  16. Modification of a pollen trap design to capture airborne conidia of Entomophaga maimaiga and detection of conidia by quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonya D. Bittner; Ann E. Hajek; Andrew M. Liebhold; Harold Thistle; Dan Cullen

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop effective and practical field sampling methods for quantification of aerial deposition of airborne conidia of Entomophaga maimaiga over space and time. This important fungal pathogen is a major cause of larval death in invasive gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) populations in the United States...

  17. Cancer Disparities: Unmet Challenges in the Elimination of Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sarah; Colditz, Graham A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The first 20 years of publication of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention occurred during a period of increased attention to health disparities and advances in knowledge about their determinants. Yet, despite clear documentation of disparities and advanced understanding of determinants, we have made little headway in reducing disparities at the population level. Multilevel models, such as one produced by the Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD), hold promise for understanding the complex determinants of cancer disparities and their interactions as well as translating scientific discoveries into solutions. The CPHHD model maps across a range of scientific disciplines, from the biological to the social, each with its own disciplinary language and methods. The ability to work effectively across disciplinary boundaries is essential to framing comprehensive solutions. Methods After briefly characterizing the current state of knowledge about health disparities, we outline three major challenges faced by disparities researchers and practitioners and offer suggestions for addressing these challenges. Results These challenges are how to consider race and ethnicity in disparities research, how best to translate discoveries into public health solutions to cancer disparities, and how to create a research environment that supports the successful execution of multilevel research. Conclusions Attention to all three of the challenges outlined above is urgently needed to advance our efforts to eliminate cancer disparities. Impact Addressing the challenges outlined above will help to eliminate disparities in the future. PMID:21784956

  18. Estimating of larval stadia of West Indian sweetpotato weevil Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire) developed in the artificial larval diet by measuring larval head widths.

    OpenAIRE

    下地, 幸夫; Shimoji, Yukio; 琉球産経株式会社

    2003-01-01

    The survey conducted by measuring larval head widths of West Indian sweetpotato weevil Euscepes postfasciatus developed in the artificial larval diet revealed that there were five larval stadia in the developmental period. The result of this experiment can be used to estimate the larval stadia approximately in the artificial larval diet.

  19. First feeding of larval herring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Munk, Peter; Støttrup, Josianne

    1985-01-01

    The transition period from endogenous to exogenous feeding by larval herring was investigated in the laboratory for four herring stocks in order to evaluate the chances of survival at the time of fiest feeding. Observations on larval activity, feeding and growth were related to amount of yolk......, visual experience with potential prey organisms prior to first feeding and prey density. Herring larvae did not initiate exogenous feeding until around the time of yolk resorption. The timing of first feeding was not influenced by prior exposure to potential prey organisms during the yolk sac stage....... In the light of these observations, the ecological significance of the yolk sac stage is discussed. Initiation of exogenous feeding was delayed by 1-4 days at a low (7.5 nauplii .cntdot. l-1) compared to a high (120 nauplii .cntdot. l-1) prey density, but even at prey densities corresponding to the lower end...

  20. 'Peer pressure' in larval Drosophila?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewalda, Thomas; Jeske, Ines; Michels, Birgit; Gerber, Bertram

    2014-06-06

    Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on 'peer pressure', that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i) by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii) by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii) by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv) by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila.

  1. Clinicohistological disparity in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majumdar S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A healthy elderly man presented with localized isolated erythematous tender, anesthetic, oval plaque with little scaling near the medial angle of right eye, of 3 years′ duration without any obvious nerve thickening, treated irregularly with WHO MDT for 3 months, clinically simulating BT leprosy with downgrading reversal reaction. Histology showed a BL granuloma with plenty of solid staining AFB within the foamy macrophages. Lepromin test was very weakly positive. The case is discussed in the light of clinicohistological disparity in leprosy cases with review of relevant literatures. A stress is laid on the importance of newer MDT in such cases to prevent drug-resistance, relapse and recurrence.

  2. The 5' non-translated region of Varroa destructor virus 1 (genus Iflavirus): structure prediction and IRES activity in Lymantria dispar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongus, J.R.; Roode, E.C.; Pleij, C.W.A.; Vlak, J.M.; Oers, van M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Structure prediction of the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of four iflavirus RNAs revealed two types of potential internal ribosome entry site (IRES), which are discriminated by size and level of complexity, in this group of viruses. In contrast to the intergenic IRES of dicistroviruses, the potenti

  3. Canopy recovery of pedunculate oak, Turkey oak and beech trees after severe defoliation by gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar: Case study from Western Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csóka György

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the canopy recovery of 3 tree species (pedunculate oak, Turkey oak, European beech at two locations in the Veszprém county (Western Hungary after severe defoliation by gypsy moth caterpillars in the spring of 2005. The Turkey oak has evidently the best recovery potential, and it almost completely replaced the lost foliage in 4 months. The pedunculate oak and beech needed 2 years to reach the same level of recovery. The pedunculate oak suffered from a heavy infection of Microsphaera alphitoides after defoliation and it probably slowed down its recovery. Neither the presence of Agrilus biguttatus in the oak plot nor the appearance of Agrilus viridis in the beech plot was observed during the study period. Population density of the buprestid Coraebus floerentinus showed a considerable increase in the oak plot, but remained under the damage level. Neither other harmful appearance of other pests nor significant tree mortality were observed within 4 years from the defoliation. These results provide information for the evaluation of longer term influences of the gypsy moth defoliation and may support the decisions concerning pest control.

  4. Efficacy of single and double applications of Foray 48B (bacillus thuringiensis) against the gypsy moth (lymantria dispar l. ) in Ontario. Information report No. O-X-423

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    In May 1991, an experimental aerial spraying program was conducted in Pembroke District to compare the efficacy of single and double applications of Foray 48B (Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner) (B.t.) against gypsy moths. Two blocks were treated with a double application of 30 BIU/2.4L/ha and six blocks (three early and three late) were treated with a single application of 50 BIU/4 L/ha. This report gives the results of the program.

  5. The 5' non-translated region of Varroa destructor virus 1 (genus Iflavirus): structure prediction and IRES activity in Lymantria dispar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongus, J.R.; Roode, E.C.; Pleij, C.W.A.; Vlak, J.M.; Oers, van M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Structure prediction of the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of four iflavirus RNAs revealed two types of potential internal ribosome entry site (IRES), which are discriminated by size and level of complexity, in this group of viruses. In contrast to the intergenic IRES of dicistroviruses, the potenti

  6. A multi-species TaqMan assay for the identification of Asian gypsy moths and other invasive lymantriines of biosecurity concern to North America

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stewart, D; Zahiri, R; Djoumad, A; Freschi, L; Lamarche, J; Holden, D; Cervantes, S; Ojeda, D.I; Potvin, A; Nisole, A; Béliveau, C; Capron, A; Kimoto, T; Day, B; Yueh, H; Duff, C; Lévesque, R.C; Hamelin, R.C; Cusson, M

    2016-01-01

    .... The name AGM designates a group of closely related Lymantria species (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Lymantriinae) comprising two L. dispar subspecies (L. dispar asiatica, L. dispar japonica) and three closely related Lymantria species...

  7. Evaluating neurophylogenetic patterns in the larval nervous systems of brachiopods and their evolutionary significance to other bilaterian phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagata, Scott

    2011-10-01

    Recent structural analyses of invertebrate nervous systems have supported hypotheses stating that specific developmental and cytological aspects of larval and adult brains are conserved among bilaterian animals. Opposing views argue that structural similarities in larval nervous systems may be the result of convergent evolution and that the developmental diversity of adult brains is more indicative of several independent origins. Here, I use various cytological probes, confocal microscopy, and reconstruction techniques to investigate the cellular diversity within the larval nervous systems of Glottidia pyramidata and Terebratalia transversa (Brachiopoda). Neuronal cell types are compared among the rhynchonelliform, linguliform, and craniiform brachiopods as well as the phoronids. Although the respective larval types of the previously mentioned systematic groups clearly diverge in the neuroarchitecture of their larval apical organs (and nervous systems in general), a ground plan is proposed based on shared, centrally-located, peptidergic neuronal cell types that can be compared with similar cell types in other lophotrochozoan phyla (bryozoans and spiralians). Assessing hierarchal levels of homology within and among the nervous systems of morphologically disparate phyla is challenging in that many phyla share early developmental signals that induce the specification of the neural ectoderm, clouding our ability to discern divergent larval and juvenile brain structure. Solving these problems will require a combined effort involving both traditional and more recent cytological techniques with a diversity of molecular probes that will better map the neuronal complexity of diverse invertebrate nervous systems. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. [Canine peritoneal larval cestodosis caused by Mesocestoides spp. larval stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häußler, T C; Peppler, C; Schmitz, S; Bauer, C; Hirzmann, J; Kramer, M

    2016-01-01

    In a female dog with unspecific clinical symptoms, sonography detected a hyperechoic mass in the middle abdomen and blood analysis a middle grade systemic inflammatory reaction. Laparotomy revealed a peritoneal larval cestodosis (PLC). The diagnosis of an infection with tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides spp. was confirmed by parasitological examination and molecularbiological analysis. Reduction of the intra-abdominal parasitic load as well as a high dose administration of fenbendazole over 3 months led to a successful treatment which could be documented sonographically and by decreased concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). Seven months after discontinuation of fenbendazole administration, PLC recurred, pre-empted by an elevation of serum CRP values. According to the literature a life-long fenbendazole treatment was initiated. In cases of unclear chronic granulomatous inflammations in the abdominal cavity in dogs, PLC should be considered. CRP concentration and sonographic examinations are suitable to control for treatment success and a possibly occurring relapse.

  9. Health Disparities in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbuckle, Lyndsey M; Amutah-Onukagha, Ndidiamaka; Bryan, Alicia; Skidmore Edwards, Elizabeth; Madzima, Takudzwa; Massey, Kelly; May, Linda; Robinson, Leah E

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND SCOPE Clinical Medicine Insights: Women’s Health is an international, open-access, peer-reviewed journal which considers manuscripts on all aspects of the diagnosis, management, and prevention of disorders specific to women, in addition to related genetic, pathophysiological, and epidemiological topics. Clinical Medicine Insights: Women’s Health aims to provide researchers working in this complex, quickly developing field with online, open access to highly relevant scholarly articles by leading international researchers. In a field where the literature is ever-expanding, researchers increasingly need access to up-to-date, high-quality scholarly articles on areas of specific contemporary interest. This supplement is on Health Disparities in Women. This supplement aims to address this by presenting high-quality articles that allow readers to distinguish the signal from the noise. The editor in chief hopes that through this effort, practitioners and researchers will be aided in finding answers to some of the most complex and pressing issues of our time. PMID:28579867

  10. Larval helminths in intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Poulin, R

    2005-01-01

    a reduction in size, caused by crowding, virtually nothing is known about longer-lasting effects after transmission to the definitive host. This study is the first to use in vitro cultivation with feeding of adult trematodes to investigate how numbers of parasites in the intermediate host affect the size......Density-dependent effects on parasite fitness have been documented from adult helminths in their definitive hosts. There have, however, been no studies on the cost of sharing an intermediate host with other parasites in terms of reduced adult parasite fecundity. Even if larval parasites suffer...... and fecundity of adult parasites. For this purpose, we examined two different infracommunities of parasites in crustacean hosts. Firstly, we used experimental infections of Maritrema novaezealandensis in the amphipod, Paracalliope novizealandiae, to investigate potential density-dependent effects in single...

  11. Disparities in women's cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Jean C; Pettey, Christina M; Souder, Elaine; Rhoads, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in women, and disparities affect the diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of CVD for women. Biology, genetics, and race contribute to these disparities. Obstetric-gynecologic health care providers routinely encounter women who are at risk for developing CVD and are uniquely positioned as a point of access to intervene to improve/prevent CVD by assessing for risks and discussing healthy lifestyle changes during routine visits.

  12. Studi Biologi Ulat Bulu Lymantria marginata Wlk. (Lepidoptera : Lymantridae Pada Tanaman Mangga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NI NENGAH DARMIATI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted at the Laboratory of Plant Pest and Disease Management, Departmentof Agroecotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Udayana. The purpose of this study was todetermine the life cycle of caterpillars L. marginata, praoviposisi period, oviposition, pascaoviposisi,male imago long life, female imago long life and fecundity of caterpillars L. marginata and sex ratio ofcaterpillars L. marginataThe results showed that the life cycle of L. marginata average of 52.00 ± 3.68 days with an eggstage was 8.20 ± 1.88 days, larval stage average 29.05 ± 1.76 days, and the pupal stage an average of12.60 ± 2.18 days (n = 20.The number of eggs laid by the female imago is 2872 grains with an average 143.60 ± 34.63 eggsper imago, with praoviposisi period was 2.15 ± 0.75 days, oviposition period of 1.80 ± 0.77 days, aperiod pascaoviposisi 2.05 ± 0.83 days. Females imago long live ranged from 5-7 days with an averageof 6 ± 0.85 days and males imago long life ranged from 2-7 days with an average of 4.5 ± 1.54 days(n = 20. Sex ratio of L. marginata approaching 1:1 (47% males and 53% females

  13. Behavioral ecology of larval dragonflies and damselflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D M

    1991-01-01

    During the past decade, larval dragonflies and damselflies (Insecta: Odonata) have been the subjects for very productive ecological research. Descriptive field work, enclosure experiments and laboratory behavior studies have identified fish predation, intraguild predation (especially mutual predation among odonates, including cannibalism) and interference competition as particularly strong interactions influencing larval odonate assemblages. Behavioral differences among species suggest evolutionary adaptations for coexistence with different predators, and for winning intraspecific aggressive encounters.

  14. Detecting larval export from marine reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, R A; Warner, R R; Gaines, S D; Paris, C B

    2010-10-26

    Marine reserve theory suggests that where large, productive populations are protected within no-take marine reserves, fished areas outside reserves will benefit through the spillover of larvae produced in the reserves. However, empirical evidence for larval export has been sparse. Here we use a simple idealized coastline model to estimate the expected magnitude and spatial scale of larval export from no-take marine reserves across a range of reserve sizes and larval dispersal scales. Results suggest that, given the magnitude of increased production typically found in marine reserves, benefits from larval export are nearly always large enough to offset increased mortality outside marine reserves due to displaced fishing effort. However, the proportional increase in recruitment at sites outside reserves is typically small, particularly for species with long-distance (on the order of hundreds of kilometers) larval dispersal distances, making it very difficult to detect in field studies. Enhanced recruitment due to export may be detected by sampling several sites at an appropriate range of distances from reserves or at sites downcurrent of reserves in systems with directional dispersal. A review of existing empirical evidence confirms the model's suggestion that detecting export may be difficult without an exceptionally large differential in production, short-distance larval dispersal relative to reserve size, directional dispersal, or a sampling scheme that encompasses a broad range of distances from the reserves.

  15. Metacommunity patterns in larval odonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Shannon J; Davis, Christopher J; Relyea, Rick A; Yurewicz, Kerry L; Skelly, David K; Werner, Earl E

    2008-11-01

    The growth of metacommunity ecology as a subdiscipline has increased interest in how processes at different spatial scales structure communities. However, there is still a significant knowledge gap with respect to relating the action of niche- and dispersal-assembly mechanisms to observed species distributions across gradients. Surveys of the larval dragonfly community (Odonata: Anisoptera) in 57 lakes and ponds in southeast Michigan were used to evaluate hypotheses about the processes regulating community structure in this system. We considered the roles of both niche- and dispersal-assembly processes in determining patterns of species richness and composition across a habitat gradient involving changes in the extent of habitat permanence, canopy cover, area, and top predator type. We compared observed richness patterns and species distributions in this system to patterns predicted by four general community models: species sorting related to adaptive trade-offs, a developmental constraints hypothesis, dispersal assembly, and a neutral community assemblage. Our results supported neither the developmental constraints nor the neutral-assemblage models. Observed patterns of richness and species distributions were consistent with patterns expected when adaptive tradeoffs and dispersal-assembly mechanisms affect community structure. Adaptive trade-offs appeared to be important in limiting the distributions of species which segregate across the habitat gradient. However, dispersal was important in shaping the distributions of species that utilize habitats with a broad range of hydroperiods and alternative top predator types. Our results also suggest that the relative importance of these mechanisms may change across this habitat gradient and that a metacommunity perspective which incorporates both niche- and dispersal-assembly processes is necessary to understand how communities are organized.

  16. Eliminating Disparities in School Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    Disparities in suspension rates for White, Black, Hispanic, and American Indian students are more often a result of inequitable disciplinary actions than differences in behavior. Exclusionary discipline undermines students' academic achievement by weakening their connection with school and removing them from the classroom. Students who experience…

  17. 29 CFR 1607.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disparate treatment. 1607.11 Section 1607.11 Labor... EMPLOYEE SELECTION PROCEDURES (1978) General Principles § 1607.11 Disparate treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of validation. A selection...

  18. Anopheline larval habitats seasonality and species distribution: a prerequisite for effective targeted larval habitats control programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliningaya J Kweka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Larval control is of paramount importance in the reduction of malaria vector abundance and subsequent disease transmission reduction. Understanding larval habitat succession and its ecology in different land use managements and cropping systems can give an insight for effective larval source management practices. This study investigated larval habitat succession and ecological parameters which influence larval abundance in malaria epidemic prone areas of western Kenya. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 51 aquatic habitats positive for anopheline larvae were surveyed and visited once a week for a period of 85 weeks in succession. Habitats were selected and identified. Mosquito larval species, physico-chemical parameters, habitat size, grass cover, crop cycle and distance to nearest house were recorded. Polymerase chain reaction revealed that An. gambiae s.l was the most dominant vector species comprised of An.gambiae s.s (77.60% and An.arabiensis (18.34%, the remaining 4.06% had no amplification by polymerase chain reaction. Physico-chemical parameters and habitat size significantly influenced abundance of An. gambiae s.s (P = 0.024 and An. arabiensis (P = 0.002 larvae. Further, larval species abundance was influenced by crop cycle (P≤0.001, grass cover (P≤0.001, while distance to nearest houses significantly influenced the abundance of mosquito species larvae (r = 0.920;P≤0.001. The number of predator species influenced mosquito larval abundance in different habitat types. Crop weeding significantly influenced with the abundance of An.gambiae s.l (P≤0.001 when preceded with fertilizer application. Significantly higher anopheline larval abundance was recorded in habitats in pasture compared to farmland (P = 0.002. When habitat stability and habitat types were considered, hoof print were the most productive followed by disused goldmines. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that implementation of effective larval

  19. Health Disparity and Cancer Health Disparity in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Jiao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    China is one of the largest and most populated countries in the world. It has undergone rapid economic growth in recent years. However, the development is not equitable, and the distribution of wealth significantly varies among the regions in China. Geographical and socioeconomic inequalities, together with the lack of an equitable national social support system, cause the high variance of health outcomes among the regions. Furthermore, the fast growth of the economy has evoked many environmental challenges and puts much pressure on the population. The severe environmental deterioration, especially of the atmosphere and water bodies, has affected the health of the people living in China. As a result, cancer has become a major public health issue, and an alarming increase in incidence and mortality has been reported. However, cancer incidence and mortality vary in different areas in China. Cancer and cancer treatment disparities have existed for years. This article will discuss the existing health and cancer disparities associated with the risk factors and how these disparities are managed in China. PMID:28083550

  20. Health disparity and cancer health disparity in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available China is one of the largest and most populated countries in the world. It has undergone rapid economic growth in recent years. However, the development is not equitable, and the distribution of wealth significantly varies among the regions in China. Geographical and socioeconomic inequalities, together with the lack of an equitable national social support system, cause the high variance of health outcomes among the regions. Furthermore, the fast growth of the economy has evoked many environmental challenges and puts much pressure on the population. The severe environmental deterioration, especially of the atmosphere and water bodies, has affected the health of the people living in China. As a result, cancer has become a major public health issue, and an alarming increase in incidence and mortality has been reported. However, cancer incidence and mortality vary in different areas in China. Cancer and cancer treatment disparities have existed for years. This article will discuss the existing health and cancer disparities associated with the risk factors and how these disparities are managed in China.

  1. Rehydration of forensically important larval Diptera specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Michelle R; Pechal, Jennifer L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2011-01-01

    Established procedures for collecting and preserving evidence are essential for all forensic disciplines to be accepted in court and by the forensic community at large. Entomological evidence, such as Diptera larvae, are primarily preserved in ethanol, which can evaporate over time, resulting in the dehydration of specimens. In this study, methods used for rehydrating specimens were compared. The changes in larval specimens with respect to larval length and weight for three forensically important blow fly (Diptera: Calliphoridae) species in North America were quantified. Phormia regina (Meigen), Cochliomyia macellaria (F.), and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) third-instar larvae were collected from various decomposing animals and preserved with three preservation methods (80% ethanol, 70% isopropyl alcohol, and hot-water kill then 80% ethanol). Preservative solutions were allowed to evaporate. Rehydration was attempted with either of the following: 80% ethanol, commercial trisodium phosphate substitute solution, or 0.5% trisodium phosphate solution. All three methods partially restored weight and length of specimens recorded before preservation. Analysis of variance results indicated that effects of preservation, rehydration treatment, and collection animal were different in each species. The interaction between preservative method and rehydration treatment had a significant effect on both P. regina and C. macellaria larval length and weight. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of collection animal on larval C. macellaria measurements. No significant effect was observed in C. rufifacies larval length or weight among the preservatives or treatments. These methods could be used to establish a standard operating procedure for dealing with dehydrated larval specimens in forensic investigations.

  2. Regional Development Disparities In Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana - Craciun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Regional economic integration provides both, developing countries and the least developed, the ability to enjoy the benefits of a larger „European “market, whether it is their home or their adoptive home. This issue gains a larger dimension in the context of economic crisis and euro zone. The argument for this statement is that regional development disparities may negatively affect economic cohesion from European space. There were identified two obstacles of the efficient use of European resources. The first one is the geographic barrier: the inability to make labor division due to barrier restrictions. The second one is the lack of an entrepreneurial culture. The entrepreneurial culture provides the flexibility of economy - in particular, the structural flexibility to cope with changes in the division of labor. These disparities can be gradual changed, and they are primarily result from autonomous technological innovations made ​​in response to depletion of resources or affected environment. Analyzing regional development disparities there were applied well known research methods: analytical and statistical method. The analysis consists on selecting and describing a set of indicators “measures” for regional competitiveness, able to show the situation of the region in metric terms, but also from economic point of view.

  3. DISPARE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Piedade, Isabelle; Tang, Man-Hung Eric; Elemento, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    matrix optimization method that is more accurate in distinguishing true transcription factor binding sites from a negative control set. The initial position weight matrix comes from JASPAR, TRANSFAC or other sources. The main new features are the discriminative nature of the method and matrix width...... factor binding sites. CONCLUSION: When the transcription factor is known, it is more appropriate to use a discriminative approach such as the one presented here to derive its transcription factor-DNA binding properties starting with a matrix, as opposed to performing de novo motif discovery. Generating...

  4. The persistence of American Indian health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David S

    2006-12-01

    Disparities in health status between American Indians and other groups in the United States have persisted throughout the 500 years since Europeans arrived in the Americas. Colonists, traders, missionaries, soldiers, physicians, and government officials have struggled to explain these disparities, invoking a wide range of possible causes. American Indians joined these debates, often suggesting different explanations. Europeans and Americans also struggled to respond to the disparities, sometimes working to relieve them, sometimes taking advantage of the ill health of American Indians. Economic and political interests have always affected both explanations of health disparities and responses to them, influencing which explanations were emphasized and which interventions were pursued. Tensions also appear in ongoing debates about the contributions of genetic and socioeconomic forces to the pervasive health disparities. Understanding how these economic and political forces have operated historically can explain both the persistence of the health disparities and the controversies that surround them.

  5. Empowerment to reduce health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, Nina

    2002-01-01

    This article articulates the theoretical construct of empowerment and its importance for health-enhancing strategies to reduce health disparities. Powerlessness is explored as a risk factor in the context of social determinants, such as poverty, discrimination, workplace hazards, and income inequities. Empowerment is presented and compared with social capital and community capacity as strategies to strengthen social protective factors. A case study of a youth empowerment and policy project in New Mexico illustrates the usefulness of empowerment strategies in both targeting social determinants, such as public policies which are detrimental to youth, and improving community capacities of youth to be advocates for social change. Challenges for future practice and research are articulated.

  6. Adaptation to larval crowding in Drosophila ananassae and Drosophila nasuta nasuta : increased larval competitive ability without increased larval feeding rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARCHANA NAGARAJAN; SHARMILA BHARATHI NATARAJAN; MOHAN JAYARAM; ANANDA THAMMANNA; SUDARSHAN CHARI; JOY BOSE; SHREYAS V. JOIS; AMITABH JOSHI

    2016-06-01

    The standard view of adaptation to larval crowding in fruitflies, built on results from 25 years of multiple experimental evo-lution studies onDrosophila melanogaster , was that enhanced competitive ability evolves primarily through increased larvalfeeding and foraging rate, and increased larval tolerance to nitrogenous wastes, at the cost of efficiency of food conversion tobiomass. These results were at odds from the predictions of classicalK -selection theory, notably the expectation that selec-tion at high density should result in the increase of efficiency of conversion of food to biomass, and were better interpretedthrough the lens of α -selection. We show here that populations ofD. ananassaeandD. n. nasutasubjected to extreme larvalcrowding evolve greater competitive ability and pre-adult survivorship at high density, primarily through a combination ofreduced larval duration, faster attainment of minimum critical size for pupation, greater time efficiency of food conversion tobiomass and increased pupation height, with a relatively small role of increased urea/ammonia tolerance, if at all. This is avery different suite of traits than that seen to evolve under similar selection inD .melanogaster ,andseemstobeclosertotheexpectations from the canonical theory ofK -selection. We also discuss possible reasons for these differences in results acrossthe three species. Overall, the results reinforce the view that our understanding of the evolution of competitive ability in fruit-flies needs to be more nuanced than before, with an appreciation that there may be multiple evolutionary routes through whichhigher competitive ability can be attained.

  7. Quality of Care and Disparities in Obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Elizabeth A; Zeitlin, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Growing attention is being paid to obstetric quality of care as patients are pressing the health care system to measure and improve quality. There is also an increasing recognition of persistent racial and ethnic disparities prevalent in obstetric outcomes. Yet few studies have linked obstetric quality of care with racial and ethnic disparities. This article reviews definitions of quality of care, health disparities, and health equity as they relate to obstetric care and outcomes; describes current efforts and challenges in obstetric quality measurement; and proposes 3 steps in an effort to develop, track, and improve quality and reduce disparities in obstetrics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Disparity map estimation using image pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowski, Mikołaj

    2013-10-01

    The task of a short baseline stereo matching algorithm is to calculate the disparity map given two rectified images of one scene. Most algorithms assume that a maximal possible disparity exists and search all disparities in the range from 1 to this maximal disparity. In the case of large images and wide disparity search range this can be very computationally demanding. In this article a simple coarse to fine hierarchical matching method based on the Gaussian pyramid and local stereo matching is investigated. Such an approach allows significant reduction of the number of disparities searched compared to the full search algorithm. Moreover it is shown, that grouping pixels into simple square regions is in most cases sufficient to avoid significant errors that typically appear at disparity map discontinuities when hierarchical schemes are used. Finally, it is presented that in most cases the quality of the disparity map obtained using the investigated algorithm is of comparable quality to a disparity map obtained using full-search local stereo algorithm.

  9. Linking Diversity and Disparity Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahadeb Sarkar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} The purpose of this paper is to examine links between the diversity measures (Patil and Taillie 1982 and the disparity measures (Lindsay 1994, quantities apparently developed for somewhat different purposes. We demonstrate that numerous diversity measures satisfying all the desirable criteria mentioned by Patil and Taillie can be defined by the generating functions of certain disparities and the associated residual adjustment functions. This provides the statistician and the ecologist a wide class of flexible indices for the statistical measurement of diversity.

  10. Larval development of Evermannia zosterura (Perciformes: Gobiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    González-Navarro, Enrique; Saldierna-Martínez, Ricardo Javier; Aceves-Medina, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Gobiidae is the most specious fish family in the world with almost 2 000 species, however only 11% of them have been described for their larval stages. The entire life cycle information is essential to understand the biology and ecology of this important fish group. Previous studies on zooplankton samples from Ensenada de La Paz, México, have shown the presence of several Gobiidae larvae and juveniles which were identified as Evermania zosterura. The main objective of this work was to describ...

  11. Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Education: Psychology's Role in Understanding and Reducing Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Stephen M.; Mahgoub, Lana

    2016-01-01

    We review the scope and sources of ethnic and racial disparities in education with a focus on the the implications of psychological theory and research for understanding and redressing these disparities. We identify 3 sources of ethnic and racial disparities including (a) social class differences, (b) differential treatment based on ethnic and…

  12. ‘Peer pressure’ in larval Drosophila?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Niewalda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on ‘peer pressure’, that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila.

  13. Health Psychology special series on health disparities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Kazak; J. Bosch; E.A. Klonoff

    2012-01-01

    With the initiation of this new ongoing special series in Health Psychology on health disparities, we will publish articles that highlight ways in which health psychology can contribute to understanding and ameliorating these disparities. We welcome articles for this new special series and anticipat

  14. Role of genomics in eliminating health disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghana V Kashyap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Texas Center for Health Disparities, a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence, presents an annual conference to discuss prevention, awareness education, and ongoing research about health disparities both in Texas and among the national population. The 2014 Annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities brought together experts in research, patient care, and community outreach on the "Role of Genomics in Eliminating Health Disparities." Rapid advances in genomics and pharmacogenomics are leading the field of medicine to use genetics and genetic risk to build personalized or individualized medicine strategies. We are at a critical juncture of ensuring such rapid advances benefit diverse populations. Relatively few forums have been organized around the theme of the role of genomics in eliminating health disparities. The conference consisted of three sessions addressing "Gene-Environment Interactions and Health Disparities," "Personalized Medicine and Elimination of Health Disparities," and "Ethics and Public Policy in the Genomic Era." This article summarizes the basic science, clinical correlates, and public health data presented by the speakers.

  15. Amoebic liver abscess production by Entamoeba dispar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolabella, Silvio S; Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Navarro-García, Fernando; Cerritos, René; Ximénez, Cecilia; Galván-Moroyoqui, José Manuel; Silva, Edward F; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2012-01-01

    Although Entamoeba dispar displays a similar morphology to Entamoeba histolytica, cellular and molecular studies have revealed significant differences between these two amoebae, including the former being characterized as non-pathogenic and the later as pathogenic. However, recent in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that E. dispar strains of different origin are capable of causing liver damage and destroying cell culture lines in the presence of common intestinal bacteria. These results suggested that E. dispar may present pathogenic behavior according to the specific E. dispar strain, culture and environmental conditions. To investigate this possibility, we carried out in vivo and in vitro studies using a xenic strain E. dispar (ICB-ADO) isolated from a symptomatic non-dysenteric Brazilian patient. This strain was able to induce liver necrosis in a hamster model that was more severe than that produced by E. histolytica. The ICB-ADO isolate also caused significantly more destruction of cultured MDCK cells and increased loss of transepithelial resistance than did the E. histolytica. Xenic E. dispar exhibited high proteolytic activity, which was partially inhibited by the addition of cysteine-protease inhibitors. Based on our biochemical and molecular characterization of E. dispar (ICB-ADO) xenic culture and its ability to produce liver abscesses, we conclude that this specific strain can indeed produce tissue damage, distinct from the frequently used non- pathogenic E. dispar SAW 760 strain.

  16. Evolution of increased larval competitive ability in Drosophila melanogaster without increased larval feeding rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANASWINI SARANGI; ARCHANA NAGARAJAN; SNIGDHADIP DEY; JOY BOSE; AMITABH JOSHI

    2016-09-01

    Multiple experimental evolution studies on Drosophila melanogasterin the 1980s and 1990s indicated that enhanced competitive ability evolved primarily through increased larval tolerance to nitrogenous wastes and increased larval feeding and foraging rate, at the cost of efficiency of food conversion to biomass, and this became the widely accepted view of how adaptation to larval crowding evolves in fruitflies. We recently showed that populations of D. ananassaeand D. n. nasuta subjected to extreme larval crowding evolved greater competitive ability without evolving higher feeding rates, primarily through acombination of reduced larval duration, faster attainment of minimum critical size for pupation, greater efficiency of food conversion to biomass, increased pupation height and, perhaps, greater urea/ammonia tolerance. This was a very differentsuite of traits than that seen to evolve under similar selection in D. melanogasterand was closer to the expectations from the theory of K-selection. At that time, we suggested two possible reasons for the differences in the phenotypic correlates ofgreater competitive ability seen in the studies with D. melanogaster and the other two species. First, that D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta had a very different genetic architecture of traits affecting competitive ability compared to the long-term labora-tory populations of D. melanogaster used in the earlier studies, either because the populations of the former two species were relatively recently wild-caught, or by virtue of being different species. Second, that the different evolutionary trajectories in D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta versus D. melanogaster were a reflection of differences in the manner in which larval crowding was imposed in the two sets of selection experiments. The D. melanogaster studies used a higher absolute density of eggs per unit volume of food, and a substantially larger total volume of food, than the studies on D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta. Here, we

  17. Evolution of increased larval competitive ability in Drosophila melanogaster without increased larval feeding rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Manaswini; Nagarajan, Archana; Dey, Snigdhadip; Bose, Joy; Joshi, Amitabh

    2016-09-01

    Multiple experimental evolution studies on Drosophila melanogaster in the 1980s and 1990s indicated that enhanced competitive ability evolved primarily through increased larval tolerance to nitrogenous wastes and increased larval feeding and foraging rate, at the cost of efficiency of food conversion to biomass, and this became the widely accepted view of how adaptation to larval crowding evolves in fruitflies.We recently showed that populations of D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta subjected to extreme larval crowding evolved greater competitive ability without evolving higher feeding rates, primarily through a combination of reduced larval duration, faster attainment of minimum critical size for pupation, greater efficiency of food conversion to biomass, increased pupation height and, perhaps, greater urea/ammonia tolerance. This was a very different suite of traits than that seen to evolve under similar selection in D. melanogaster and was closer to the expectations from the theory of K-selection. At that time, we suggested two possible reasons for the differences in the phenotypic correlates of greater competitive ability seen in the studies with D. melanogaster and the other two species. First, that D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta had a very different genetic architecture of traits affecting competitive ability compared to the long-term laboratory populations of D. melanogaster used in the earlier studies, either because the populations of the former two species were relatively recently wild-caught, or by virtue of being different species. Second, that the different evolutionary trajectories in D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta versus D. melanogaster were a reflection of differences in the manner in which larval crowding was imposed in the two sets of selection experiments. The D. melanogaster studies used a higher absolute density of eggs per unit volume of food, and a substantially larger total volume of food, than the studies on D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta. Here, we

  18. Larval development and settlement of a whale barnacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogata, Yasuyuki; Matsumura, Kiyotaka

    2006-03-22

    Larval development and settlement of whale barnacles have not previously been described, unlike intertidal barnacles. Indeed, the mechanisms of the association between barnacles and whales have not been studied. Here we describe the larval development and settlement of the whale barnacle, Coronula diadema, and possible involvement of a cue from the host in inducing larval settlement. Eight-cell stage embryos were collected from C. diadema on a stranded humpback whale, incubated in filtered seawater for 7 days, and nauplius larvae hatched out. When fed with Chaetoceros gracilis, the nauplii developed to stage VI, and finally metamorphosed to the cypris stage. The larval development looked similar to that of intertidal barnacles with planktotrophic larval stages. The cyprids did not settle in normal seawater, but did settle in polystyrene Petri dishes when incubated in seawater with a small piece of skin tissue from the host whale. This strongly suggests the involvement of a chemical cue from the host whale tissue to induce larval settlement.

  19. Evaluating sampling strategies for larval cisco (Coregonus artedi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J.T.; Stockwell, J.D.; Yule, D.L.; Black, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    To improve our ability to assess larval cisco (Coregonus artedi) populations in Lake Superior, we conducted a study to compare several sampling strategies. First, we compared density estimates of larval cisco concurrently captured in surface waters with a 2 x 1-m paired neuston net and a 0.5-m (diameter) conical net. Density estimates obtained from the two gear types were not significantly different, suggesting that the conical net is a reasonable alternative to the more cumbersome and costly neuston net. Next, we assessed the effect of tow pattern (sinusoidal versus straight tows) to examine if propeller wash affected larval density. We found no effect of propeller wash on the catchability of larval cisco. Given the availability of global positioning systems, we recommend sampling larval cisco using straight tows to simplify protocols and facilitate straightforward measurements of volume filtered. Finally, we investigated potential trends in larval cisco density estimates by sampling four time periods during the light period of a day at individual sites. Our results indicate no significant trends in larval density estimates during the day. We conclude estimates of larval cisco density across space are not confounded by time at a daily timescale. Well-designed, cost effective surveys of larval cisco abundance will help to further our understanding of this important Great Lakes forage species.

  20. Adaptive locomotor behavior in larval zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian

    2011-01-01

    In this study we report that larval zebrafish display adaptive locomotor output that can be driven by unexpected visual feedback. We develop a new assay that addresses visuomotor integration in restrained larval zebrafish. The assay involves a closed-loop environment in which the visual feedback a larva receives depends on its own motor output in a way that resembles freely swimming conditions. The experimenter can control the gain of this closed feedback loop, so that following a given motor output the larva experiences more or less visual feedback depending on whether the gain is high or low. We show that increases and decreases in this gain setting result in adaptive changes in behavior that lead to a generalized decrease or increase of motor output, respectively. Our behavioral analysis shows that both the duration and tail beat frequency of individual swim bouts can be modified, as well as the frequency with which bouts are elicited. These changes can be implemented rapidly, following an exposure to a new gain of just 175 ms. In addition, modifications in some behavioral parameters accumulate over tens of seconds and effects last for at least 30 s from trial to trial. These results suggest that larvae establish an internal representation of the visual feedback expected from a given motor output and that the behavioral modifications are driven by an error signal that arises from the discrepancy between this expectation and the actual visual feedback. The assay we develop presents a unique possibility for studying visuomotor integration using imaging techniques available in the larval zebrafish.

  1. ‘Peer pressure’ in larval Drosophila?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Niewalda; Ines Jeske; Birgit Michels; Bertram Gerber

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on ‘peer pressure’, that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group ...

  2. Microhabitat influence on larval fish assemblages within ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined larval and juvenile fish assemblage structure in relation to microhabitat variables within the St. Louis River estuary, a drowned river mouth of Lake Superior. Fish were sampled in vegetated beds throughout the estuary, across a gradient of vegetation types and densities (including disturbed, preserved and post-restoration sites). Canonical correspondence analysis, relating species abundances to environmental variables revealed that plant species richness, turbidity and aquatic plant cover were most influential in structuring assemblages. Results from this microhabitat analysis at this crucial life stage has potential to inform wetland restoration efforts within the St. Louis River and other Great Lake coastal wetlands. not applicable

  3. Larval morphology of Metaphycus flavus and its role in host attachment and larval cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, A; Kapranas, A; Walker, G P; Garcia-Marí, F; Luck, R F

    2011-06-01

    Metaphycus flavus (Howard) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) is a facultatively gregarious endoparasitoid of soft scales (Hemiptera: Coccidae). When it develops in superparasitised hosts, the larvae often attack and consume brood mates six or more days post oviposition. Under our laboratory conditions (25±1°C and 14 hours of light followed by 18±1°C and ten hours of darkness in 50-70% R.H.), M. flavus eggs hatched three days after oviposition. Measurements of the mandibles and tentorium indicate there are four larval instars, and M. flavus reaches the fourth instar by day six post oviposition, and pupates on day eight. Thus, cannibalism among M. flavus larvae occurs during the fourth instar. During this instar, M. flavus larvae separate from their attachment to the scale cuticle, to which they were tethered by a respiratory structure during the previous three larval instars. Once detached, they are free to move within the scale, which increases the probability of larval encounters and aggressive behaviours. Moreover, the mandibles of the fourth instar are better adapted for fighting than are those of the first three larval instars, since they are larger and more sclerotized. The cranium and mouthparts of M. flavus have four different types of sensory organs, some of which are almost certainly olfactory, an unexpected function for a larva that presumably is surrounded by an aqueous medium where gustatory sensilla would seem to be more appropriate. The cranium also bears two pairs of what appear to be secretory pores.

  4. Global health disparities: crisis in the diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Raymond L

    2004-04-01

    The United States spends more than the rest of the world on healthcare. In 2000, the U.S. health bill was 1.3 trillion dollars, 14.5% of its gross domestic product. Yet, according to the WHO World Health Report 2000, the United States ranked 37th of 191 member nations in overall health system performance. Racial/ethnic disparities in health outcomes are the most obvious examples of an unbalanced healthcare system. This presentation will examine health disparities in the United States and reveal how health disparities among and within countries affect the health and well-being of the African Diaspora.

  5. Racial disparities in pubertal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnitz, Mary Scott; Lodish, Maya B

    2013-09-01

    The question of whether or not children, particularly girls, are entering puberty earlier than they did in the past has been a concern in both the medical community and the general population. A secular trend analysis of the current data on pubertal timing in boys and girls is limited by variations in the study design, the population assessed, and the methods used to determine pubertal development. These differences present a challenge when interpreting the available data, especially when comparing multiple studies. The influence of race on pubertal timing and development had not been assessed before the 1970s. The purpose of this article is to review the reported variations in pubertal timing among different racial/ethnic groups. Data suggest African American girls enter puberty earlier and reach menarche earlier than Caucasian and Hispanic girls. In addition, the trend toward earlier timing of puberty seems to be occurring faster in African American girls compared with Caucasian girls over the past 25 years. While the mechanism and understanding of the cause of racial disparities in pubertal development remain to be discerned, genetic and/or environmental factors may play a role and require further investigation.

  6. Comparison of fixation disparity curve parameters obtained with the Wesson and Saladin fixation disparity cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Janice; Goss, David A; Despirito, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    This study compared fixation curve parameters with two commercially available fixation disparity cards, one that has been available for several years, the Wesson card, and a new one, the Saladin card. Fixation disparity curves were measured on 50 subjects with the Wesson fixation disparity card and the Saladin fixation disparity card. The x intercepts were on average more in the base-in direction with the Wesson card than with the Saladin card. The y intercepts were shifted in the exo direction with the Wesson card compared with the Saladin card. The slope with the Wesson card was steeper than the slope obtained with the Saladin card. The distribution of curve types was also different with the two different instruments. Fixation disparity curves measured with these two instruments are different, and separate norms should be used for each fixation disparity measurement method.

  7. Entamoeba dispar: Could it be pathogenic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    FabrÍcio Oliveira; Elisabeth Neumann; Maria Gomes; Marcelo Caliari

    2015-01-01

      Amebiasis is a disease caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. This ameba can colonize the human intestine and persist as a commensal parasite, similar to Entamoeba dispar, an ameba considered to be non-pathogenic...

  8. Disparity biasing in depth from monocular occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirlin, Inna; Wilcox, Laurie M; Allison, Robert S

    2011-07-15

    Monocular occlusions have been shown to play an important role in stereopsis. Among other contributions to binocular depth perception, monocular occlusions can create percepts of illusory occluding surfaces. It has been argued that the precise location in depth of these illusory occluders is based on the constraints imposed by occlusion geometry. Tsirlin et al. (2010) proposed that when these constraints are weak, the depth of the illusory occluder can be biased by a neighboring disparity-defined feature. In the present work we test this hypothesis using a variety of stimuli. We show that when monocular occlusions provide only partial constraints on the magnitude of depth of the illusory occluders, the perceived depth of the occluders can be biased by disparity-defined features in the direction unrestricted by the occlusion geometry. Using this disparity bias phenomenon we also show that in illusory occluder stimuli where disparity information is present, but weak, most observers rely on disparity while some use occlusion information instead to specify the depth of the illusory occluder. Taken together our experiments demonstrate that in binocular depth perception disparity and monocular occlusion cues interact in complex ways to resolve perceptual ambiguity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms for similarity matching in disparity measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross eGoutcher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early neural mechanisms for the measurement of binocular disparity appear to operate in a manner consistent with cross-correlation-like processes. Consequently, cross-correlation, or cross-correlation-like procedures have been used in a range of models of disparity measurement. Using such procedures as the basis for disparity measurement creates a preference for correspondence solutions that maximise the similarity between local left and right eye image regions. Here, we examine how observers’ perception of depth in an ambiguous stereogram is affected by manipulations of luminance and orientation-based image similarity. Results show a strong effect of coarse-scale luminance similarity manipulations, but a relatively weak effect of finer-scale manipulations of orientation similarity. This is in contrast to the measurements of depth obtained from a standard cross-correlation model. This model shows strong effects of orientation similarity manipulations and weaker effects of luminance similarity. In order to account for these discrepancies, the standard cross-correlation approach may be modified to include an initial spatial frequency filtering stage. The performance of this adjusted model most closely matches human psychophysical data when spatial frequency filtering favours coarser scales. This is consistent with the operation of disparity measurement processes where spatial frequency and disparity tuning are correlated, or where disparity measurement operates in a coarse-to-fine manner.

  10. Larval development of Evermannia zosterura (Perciformes: Gobiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Navarro, Enrique; Saldierna-Martínez, Ricardo Javier; Aceves-Medina, Gerardo

    2014-06-01

    Gobiidae is the most specious fish family in the world with almost 2 000 species, however only 11% of them have been described for their larval stages. The entire life cycle information is essential to understand the biology and ecology of this important fish group. Previous studies on zooplankton samples from Ensenada de La Paz, México, have shown the presence of several Gobiidae larvae and juveniles which were identified as Evermania zosterura. The main objective of this work was to describe the larval stages of this species, widely distributed in the Eastern tropical Pacific. The development of E. zosterura larvae was described based on 66 specimens. A total of 53 specimens were used to describe morphometrics and pigmentation patterns, while 13 specimens were cleared and stained, to obtain meristic characteristics. Cleared specimens had 30 to 31 total vertebrae; dorsal-fin elements: IV; 1, 13-14, anal-fin elements: 1, 13-14, and most had pterygiophore formula 4-111100. The combination of these characteristics confirmed these specimens as E. zosterura. The pigment pattern is similar throughout ontogeny. Larvae are characterized by having three to five dendritic melanophores along the post-anal ventral margin, four to nine smaller melanophores along the ventral margin between the isthmus and anus, and one on the midpoint of the dorsal margin of the tail. There is one small pigment spot on the angle of the jaw, and other on the tip of lower lip. There is an elongated internal pigment under the notochord, between the head and gas bladder. Notochord flexion starts near 3.5mm BL and ends at 4.6mm BL; transformalion to the juvenile stage is at about 13.6mm BL. Our conclusion is that the most useful characters to distinguish this species early-larval stages from those of similar species in the area, are the number of myomeres, the large melanophores (approximately uniformly in size) on the post anal ventral margin, and the elongate internal pigment under the notochord

  11. Turbulence-enhanced prey encounter rates in larval fish : Effects of spatial scale, larval behaviour and size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; MacKenzie, Brian

    1995-01-01

    Turbulent water motion has several effects on the feeding ecology of larval fish and other planktivorous predators. In this paper, we consider the appropriate spatial scales for estimating relative velocities between larval fish predators and their prey, and the effect that different choices...

  12. Sandeel ( Ammodytes marinus ) larval transport patterns in the North Sea from an individual-based hydrodynamic egg and larval model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn; Jensen, Henrik; Mosegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    is modelled by a stochastic, nonlinear degree-day model describing the extended hatch period. The larval growth model is parameterized by individually back-tracking the local physical environment of larval survivors from their catch location and catch time. Using a detailed map of sandeel habitats...

  13. Coastal pollution limits pelagic larval dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puritz, Jonathan B; Toonen, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The ecological impact of large coastal human populations on marine ecosystems remains relatively unknown. Here, we examine the population structure of Patiria miniata, the bat star, and correlate genetic distances with a model based on flow rates and proximity to P. miniata populations for the four major stormwater runoff and wastewater effluent sources of the Southern California Bight. We show that overall genetic connectivity is high (F(ST)~0.005); however, multivariate analyses show that genetic structure is highly correlated with anthropogenic inputs. The best models included both stormwater and wastewater variables and explained between 26.55 and 93.69% of the observed structure. Additionally, regressions between allelic richness and distance to sources show that populations near anthropogenic pollution have reduced genetic diversity. Our results indicate that anthropogenic runoff and effluent are acting as barriers to larval dispersal, effectively isolating a high gene flow species that is virtually free of direct human impact.

  14. Modelling larval movement data from individual bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Chris R; Worton, Bruce J; Deasy, William; Birch, A Nicholas E

    2015-05-01

    We consider modelling the movements of larvae using individual bioassays in which data are collected at a high-frequency rate of five observations per second. The aim is to characterize the behaviour of the larvae when exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. Mixtures of diffusion processes, as well as Hidden Markov models, are proposed as models of larval movement. These models account for directed and localized movements, and successfully distinguish between the behaviour of larvae exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. A simulation study illustrates the advantage of using a Hidden Markov model rather than a simpler mixture model. Practical aspects of model estimation and inference are considered on extensive data collected in a study of novel approaches for the management of cabbage root fly.

  15. The Larval Stage of Echinococcus Granulosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Sokouti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the life cycle of Echinococcus granulosus, eggs of the parasite cannot mature into adult worms without first passing through the larval stage. Regarding the fact that this stage cannot take place in the definitive host, the eggs must look for an intermediate host, such as humans which are considered accidental intermediate hosts, in order to undergo their vital metamorphosis. In the upper gastrointestinal tract of the intermediate host, including humans (but not that of definitive host, the outer chitinous shells of the hexacanth embryos become lysed, enabling the embryos to penetrate the mucosa of the duodenum and upper jejunum to enter mesentric venule and be carried in the portal stream to the liver. Theoretically, a few of the embryos can enter the lymphatics of the intestinal wall and bypassing the liver through the cisterna chyli (1-3. It is believed that the larger amount of deoxycholic acid in the bile of herbivores and humans conjugated principally with glycine is responsible for lysis of the larva‘s protective center cuticle. On the other hand bile salts of carnivores such as dog are relatively poor in deoxy cholic acid which is linked with urine and have no effect on the cuticle of the larvae, which remain in the bowel lumen and developing into adult worms. Thus unlike what is mostly believed, humans do not serve as definitive hosts for the parasite; yet they carry only the larval forms which later penetrate into the villi of small bowel and form hydatid cyst in any organ of body (4-6.

  16. Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusting, Lucy S; Thwing, Julie; Sinclair, David; Fillinger, Ulrike; Gimnig, John; Bonner, Kimberly E; Bottomley, Christian; Lindsay, Steven W

    2013-08-29

    Malaria is an important cause of illness and death in people living in many parts of the world, especially sub-Saharan Africa. Long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) reduce malaria transmission by targeting the adult mosquito vector and are key components of malaria control programmes. However, mosquito numbers may also be reduced by larval source management (LSM), which targets mosquito larvae as they mature in aquatic habitats. This is conducted by permanently or temporarily reducing the availability of larval habitats (habitat modification and habitat manipulation), or by adding substances to standing water that either kill or inhibit the development of larvae (larviciding). To evaluate the effectiveness of mosquito LSM for preventing malaria. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CABS Abstracts; and LILACS up to 24 October 2012. We handsearched the Tropical Diseases Bulletin from 1900 to 2010, the archives of the World Health Organization (up to 11 February 2011), and the literature database of the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (up to 2 March 2011). We also contacted colleagues in the field for relevant articles. We included cluster randomized controlled trials (cluster-RCTs), controlled before-and-after trials with at least one year of baseline data, and randomized cross-over trials that compared LSM with no LSM for malaria control. We excluded trials that evaluated biological control of anopheline mosquitoes with larvivorous fish. At least two authors assessed each trial for eligibility. We extracted data and at least two authors independently determined the risk of bias in the included studies. We resolved all disagreements through discussion with a third author. We analyzed the data using Review Manager 5 software. We included 13 studies; four cluster-RCTs, eight controlled before

  17. Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusting, Lucy S; Thwing, Julie; Sinclair, David; Fillinger, Ulrike; Gimnig, John; Bonner, Kimberly E; Bottomley, Christian; Lindsay, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria is an important cause of illness and death in people living in many parts of the world, especially sub-Saharan Africa. Long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) reduce malaria transmission by targeting the adult mosquito vector and are key components of malaria control programmes. However, mosquito numbers may also be reduced by larval source management (LSM), which targets mosquito larvae as they mature in aquatic habitats. This is conducted by permanently or temporarily reducing the availability of larval habitats (habitat modification and habitat manipulation), or by adding substances to standing water that either kill or inhibit the development of larvae (larviciding). Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of mosquito LSM for preventing malaria. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CABS Abstracts; and LILACS up to 24 October 2012. We handsearched the Tropical Diseases Bulletin from 1900 to 2010, the archives of the World Health Organization (up to 11 February 2011), and the literature database of the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (up to 2 March 2011). We also contacted colleagues in the field for relevant articles. Selection criteria We included cluster randomized controlled trials (cluster-RCTs), controlled before-and-after trials with at least one year of baseline data, and randomized cross-over trials that compared LSM with no LSM for malaria control. We excluded trials that evaluated biological control of anopheline mosquitoes with larvivorous fish. Data collection and analysis At least two authors assessed each trial for eligibility. We extracted data and at least two authors independently determined the risk of bias in the included studies. We resolved all disagreements through discussion with a third author. We analyzed the data using Review Manager 5 software

  18. Morphotype disparity in the Precambrian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Rachael; Reitner, Joachim; Braiser, Martin; Donoghue, Phil; Schirrmeister, Bettina

    2015-04-01

    Prokaryotes have dominated life on Earth for over 2 billion years. Throughout the Precambrian, prokaryotes acted as the major biological impetus for both large and small scale environmental changes. Yet, very little is known about the composition, diversity and evolution of ancient microbial communities due to poor preservation during the Precambrian period. Previous studies of fossils that date to this period relied mainly on light microscopy to identify microfossil morphology and abundance, with limited success. Here we present novel analyses of the microbial remains found in Precambrian stromatolites using Synchrotron Radiation x-Ray Tomographic Microscopy (SRXTM). Microfossils found in samples of three Precambrian deposits, 3.45 Ga Strelley Pool, Australia, 2.1 Ga Gunflint Chert, Canada, and 650 Ma Rasthof Cap Carbonate, Namibia, have been reconstructed in 3D. Based on four scans from each sample, we estimated size and abundance of spheroidal microfossils within those deposits. Our findings show that while cell abundance decreased towards the end of the Precambrian, the biovolume of microfossils within the host rock remained relatively constant. Additionally, both size and disparity increase through time. Constant biovolumes and yet different sizes for these three deposits, point towards a negative correlation of large cell size and cell abundance. This negative correlation indicates that the systems in which these prokaryotes lived may have been biolimited. Both, gas exchange and nutrient uptake in prokaryotes function via diffusion. Therefore, one would expect bacteria to evolve towards an increasing surface to volume ratio. Increased cell sizes, and hence decreased overall surface to volume ratio observed in our data, suggest the influence of other selective factors. Decreased abundance and increased cell size could potentially be associated to changes in nutrient availability and the occurrence of predation. As cells increased in size, more nutrients would

  19. Regional disparities and convergences in America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Blížkovský

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the levels and trends of regional disparity and convergence in the two American macro-regions, NAFTA and MERCOSUR. In the case of NAFTA, 95 micro-regions were analysed (12 in Canada; 32 in Mexico; 51 states in the US. In MERCOSUR, the regions are represented by four countries (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. The analysis covers the period 2000–2008 (or rather 2000 to 2005 for Mexico. The regional disparities were calculated with the Gini coefficient based on nominal GDP, GDP per capita and GDP per capita PPS. Convergence analysis was done with the Disparity Range Coefficient (DRC, the Average Disparity Range Coefficient (ADRC, σ- convergence and β-convergence. The results of regional disparity were as follows. Based on the nominal GDP, it was at high levels in both macro-regions, with a Gini coefficient above 0.55. With the disparities calculated on GDP per capita, the level of regional disparity in both macro-regions was lower at 0.36 in NAFTA and 0.28 in MERCOSUR in 2000. Based on GDP per capita in PPP, the levels were lower than based on the GDP per capita analysis starting at 0.31 in NAFTA and 0.16 in MERCOSUR. The disparities further decreased by half in NAFTA while slightly increasing in MERSCOSUR. The convergence analysis results based on the DRC analysis showed that neither NAFTA nor MERCOSUR regions converged. The speed of divergence varied significantly. The disparities among the richest and poorest regions in GDP per capita increased 6.26 times more than the average GDP per capita in PPP in NAFTA as a whole. It was only 0.52 in MERCOSUR. The ADRC analysis also resulted in divergence trends for both macro-regions but with lower rates. Convergence calculated with the σ- convergence analysis confirmed that both macro-regions diverged. The divergence rate for NAFTA was 1.41% and for MERCOSUR 0.74. Calculated with the β-convergence analysis, the NAFTA region showed a status quo (convergence of 0.01% and a

  20. Motion Parallax is Asymptotic to Binocular Disparity

    CERN Document Server

    Stroyan, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Researchers especially beginning with (Rogers & Graham, 1982) have noticed important psychophysical and experimental similarities between the neurologically different motion parallax and stereopsis cues. Their quantitative analysis relied primarily on the "disparity equivalence" approximation. In this article we show that retinal motion from lateral translation satisfies a strong ("asymptotic") approximation to binocular disparity. This precise mathematical similarity is also practical in the sense that it applies at normal viewing distances. The approximation is an extension to peripheral vision of (Cormac & Fox's 1985) well-known non-trig central vision approximation for binocular disparity. We hope our simple algebraic formula will be useful in analyzing experiments outside central vision where less precise approximations have led to a number of quantitative errors in the vision literature.

  1. The Growing Rural-Urban Disparity in India: Some Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dinesh; Pathak, Minakshee

    2012-10-01

    The paper critically examines the understanding, approach and indicators that have been used to measure the degree of disparity. It is fact that disparity exists everywhere. However, this paper highlights on disparities existing between rural and urban areas. In this context, it talks about 'whyí and 'howí disparities exist between rural and urban areas. The study suggests that 'incomeí is not a sufficient indicator to capture the magnitude of disparities at any level. It is, therefore, necessary to develop some indicators representing human resource development and infrastructure facility to understand the growing rural-urban disparity in India.

  2. Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Joshua D; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Alborn, Hans T; Lavis, Luke D; Stern, David L

    2014-12-12

    Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors, including navigation and aggregation. Several studies have suggested that behavior during the immature larval stages of Drosophila development is influenced by pheromones, but none of these compounds or the pheromone-receptor neurons that sense them have been identified. Here we report a larval pheromone-signaling pathway. We found that larvae produce two novel long-chain fatty acids that are attractive to other larvae. We identified a single larval chemosensory neuron that detects these molecules. Two members of the pickpocket family of DEG/ENaC channel subunits (ppk23 and ppk29) are required to respond to these pheromones. This pheromone system is evolving quickly, since the larval exudates of D. simulans, the sister species of D. melanogaster, are not attractive to other larvae. Our results define a new pheromone signaling system in Drosophila that shares characteristics with pheromone systems in a wide diversity of insects.

  3. Behavioral analysis of the escape response in larval zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ruopei; Girdhar, Kiran; Chemla, Yann; Gruebele, Martin

    The behavior of larval zebrafish is of great interest because the limited number of locomotor neurons in larval zebrafish couples with its rich repertoire of movements as a vertebrate animal. Current research uses a priori-selected parameters to describe their swimming behavior while our lab has built a parameter-free model based on singular value decomposition analysis to characterize it. Our previous work has analyzed the free swimming of larval zebrafish and presented a different picture from the current classification of larval zebrafish locomotion. Now we are extending this work to the studies of their escape response to acoustic stimulus. Analysis has shown intrinsic difference in the locomotion between escape response and free swimming.

  4. Measurements and Counts for Larval and Juvenile Beryx Specimens

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Larval alfonsin (Beryx species) were collected in the vicinity of the Southeast Hancock Seamount. A three-net Tucker trawl (I m2 effective mouth opening and 0.333 mm...

  5. Drosophila nociceptors mediate larval aversion to dry surface environments utilizing both the painless TRP channel and the DEG/ENaC subunit, PPK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne A Johnson

    Full Text Available A subset of sensory neurons embedded within the Drosophila larval body wall have been characterized as high-threshold polymodal nociceptors capable of responding to noxious heat and noxious mechanical stimulation. They are also sensitized by UV-induced tissue damage leading to both thermal hyperalgesia and allodynia very similar to that observed in vertebrate nociceptors. We show that the class IV multiple-dendritic(mdIV nociceptors are also required for a normal larval aversion to locomotion on to a dry surface environment. Drosophila melanogaster larvae are acutely susceptible to desiccation displaying a strong aversion to locomotion on dry surfaces severely limiting the distance of movement away from a moist food source. Transgenic inactivation of mdIV nociceptor neurons resulted in larvae moving inappropriately into regions of low humidity at the top of the vial reflected as an increased overall pupation height and larval desiccation. This larval lethal desiccation phenotype was not observed in wild-type controls and was completely suppressed by growth in conditions of high humidity. Transgenic hyperactivation of mdIV nociceptors caused a reciprocal hypersensitivity to dry surfaces resulting in drastically decreased pupation height but did not induce the writhing nocifensive response previously associated with mdIV nociceptor activation by noxious heat or harsh mechanical stimuli. Larvae carrying mutations in either the Drosophila TRP channel, Painless, or the degenerin/epithelial sodium channel subunit Pickpocket1(PPK1, both expressed in mdIV nociceptors, showed the same inappropriate increased pupation height and lethal desiccation observed with mdIV nociceptor inactivation. Larval aversion to dry surfaces appears to utilize the same or overlapping sensory transduction pathways activated by noxious heat and harsh mechanical stimulation but with strikingly different sensitivities and disparate physiological responses.

  6. Anatomical and physiological evidence for electroreception in larval lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, M

    1988-05-10

    In larval lampreys, the superficial ophthalmic, buccal, and recurrent rami of the anterior lateral line nerve project to the dorsal nucleus of the ipsilateral medulla; the posterior lateral line nerve projects to the medial nucleus bilaterally. The recurrent ramus is the largest source of afferents to the dorsal nucleus. Extracellular recordings from recurrent afferents in the trunk lateral line nerve indicate larval lampreys are sensitive to weak, low-frequency electric fields. Cathodal (outside negative) fields are excitatory; anodal fields are inhibitory.

  7. Contributions for larval development optimization of Homarus gammarus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Tiago Fonseca Sá

    2014-06-01

    The seawater rising temperature resulted in a decrease of intermoult period in all larval development stages and at all tested temperatures, ranging from 4.77 (Z1 to 16.5 days (Z3 at 16°C, whereas at 23°C, ranged from 3:02 (Z1 and 9.75 days (Z3. The results obtained are an extremely useful guide for future optimization of protocols on larval development of H. gammarus.

  8. Basic Gravitational Reflexes in the Larval Frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine how a primitive vertebrate, the bullfrog tadpole, is able to sense and process gravitational stimuli. Because of the phylogenetic similarities of the vestibular systems in all vertebrates, the understanding of the gravitational reflexes in this relatively simple vertebrate should elucidate a skeletal framework on a elementary level, upon which the more elaborate reflexes of higher vertebrates may be constructed. The purpose of this study was to understand how the nervous system of the larval amphibian processes gravitational information. This study involved predominantly electrophysiological investigations of the isolated, alert (forebrain removed) bullfrog tadpole head. The focus of these experiments is threefold: (1) to understand from whole extraocular nerve recordings the signals sent to the eye following static gravitational tilt of the head; (2) to localize neuronal centers responsible for generating these signals through reversible pharmacological ablation of these centers; and (3) to record intracellularly from neurons within these centers in order to determine the single neuron's role in the overall processing of the center. This study has provided information on the mechanisms by which a primitive vertebrate processes gravitational reflexes.

  9. Arrested larval development in cattle nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J; Duncan, M

    1987-06-01

    Most economically important cattle nematodes are able to arrest their larval development within the host - entering a period of dormancy or hypobiosis. Arrested larvae have a low death rate, and large numbers can accumulate in infected cattle during the grazing season. Because of this, outbreaks of disease caused by such nematodes can occur at times when recent infection with the parasites could not have occurred, for example during winter in temperature northern climates when cattle are normally housed. The capacity to arrest is a heritable trait. It is seen as an adaptation by the parasite to avoid further development to its free-living stages during times when the climate is unsuitable for free-living survival. But levels of arrestment can vary markedly in different regions, in different cattle, and under different management regimes. Climatic factors, previous conditioning, host immune status, and farm management all seem to affect arrestment levels. In this article, James Armour and Mary Duncan review the biological basis of the phenomenon, and discuss the apparently conflicting views on how it is controlled.

  10. Turbulence-enhanced prey encounter rates in larval fish : Effects of spatial scale, larval behaviour and size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; MacKenzie, Brian

    1995-01-01

    Turbulent water motion has several effects on the feeding ecology of larval fish and other planktivorous predators. In this paper, we consider the appropriate spatial scales for estimating relative velocities between larval fish predators and their prey, and the effect that different choices...... is consistent with classical coagulation theory. We then demonstrate that differences in larval search strategy (pause- travel versus cruise search) and behaviour (e.g. reactive distance, swimming speed, pause duration) will lead to substantial differences in estimated encounter rates. In general, small larvae...... are more likely to benefit from turbulence-increased encounter than larger larvae. Overall ingestion rate probability (= probability of encounter x probability of successful pursuit) is likely to be highest at moderate-high levels of turbulence. In most larval fish habitats, turbulence levels appear to lie...

  11. Gender Wage Disparities among the Highly Educated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Dan A.; Haviland, Amelia M.; Sanders, Seth G.; Taylor, Lowell J.

    2008-01-01

    We examine gender wage disparities for four groups of college-educated women--black, Hispanic, Asian, and non-Hispanic white--using the National Survey of College Graduates. Raw log wage gaps, relative to non-Hispanic white male counterparts, generally exceed -0.30. Estimated gaps decline to between -0.08 and -0.19 in nonparametric analyses that…

  12. Yardstick competition, fiscal disparities, and equalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allers, Maarten A.

    2012-01-01

    The theory of political yardstick competition states that a comparison of public service levels and tax rates with those in nearby jurisdictions can provide voters with a useful instrument to assess politicians' performance. However, we argue that fiscal disparities bias this yardstick, and that thi

  13. Gender Disparity in Turkish Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findik, Leyla Yilmaz

    2016-01-01

    Turkey has been concerned about gender inequality in education for many years and has implemented various policy instruments. However, gender disparity still seems to prevail today. This study seeks to provide an insight to the gender differences in terms of enrollment rates, level of education, fields of education and number of graduates in…

  14. Yardstick competition, fiscal disparities, and equalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allers, Maarten A.

    2012-01-01

    The theory of political yardstick competition states that a comparison of public service levels and tax rates with those in nearby jurisdictions can provide voters with a useful instrument to assess politicians' performance. However, we argue that fiscal disparities bias this yardstick, and that thi

  15. Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    long suffered from the impacts of health inequalities, racism and overincarceration. Positive changes from pilot programs ought to be coupled with...lecturer for two different college level courses on health and wellness, cancer, and health disparities. 9. Scientific writing and research

  16. MACRO-REGIONAL DISPARITIES IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA OŢIL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic disparities are disparities between levels of economicdevelopment of the areas or regions within a national economy. If economic literature hasfailed to explain the causes of inequalities in economic development of different regions of theEU, this issue became a priority in EU economic policy, especially after the adhesion ofGreece, Spain and Portugal, countries characterized by a lower level of development fromother EU countries and also marked by significant regional imbalances. European Unionsupports reducing disparities between different regions of Member States so that all regionsand their people to benefit from economic and social advantages of the Union. This paper aimsto highlight disparities between the macro-regions in Romania. Regional demarcation criterionin the NUTS system is the population’s number within a territory. Most pertinent argument isthat the goal of all activities in a society lies in meeting the needs of the individual and of thecommunity. This possibility is ensured by a certain level of economic development in the region.Less developed areas of Romania are located in Northern Moldova and in the South EasternRomanian Plain and the more developed areas include, in addition to Bucharest andConstanta, Transylvania and Banat regions.

  17. Teachers' Voices 2: Teaching Disparate Learner Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Anne, Ed.; Hood, Susan, Ed.

    The collection of papers was written by teacher researchers from an adult migrant English program, and consists of reports and discussions of action research on teaching heterogeneous learner groups. Papers include: "Disparate Groups: Exploring Diversity in Practice through Collaborative Action Research" (Anne Burns, Susan Hood); "A Profile of…

  18. Educational Disparities and Conflict: Evidence from Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfaily, Rania; Diab, Hassan; Kulczycki, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the impact of Lebanon's civil war (1975-1991) on disparities in education among the country's main religious sects and across various regions. District of registration is adopted as a proxy for religious affiliation through a novel, detailed classification to assess sectarian differentials by region and regional differentials…

  19. Disparities in the Impact of Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Outdoor > Air Pollution Disparities in the Impact of Air Pollution The burden of air pollution is not evenly shared. Poorer people and some ... studies have explored the differences in harm from air pollution to racial or ethnic groups and people who ...

  20. Determinants of health disparities between Italian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannoni Margherita

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among European countries, Italy is one of the countries where regional health disparities contribute substantially to socioeconomic health disparities. In this paper, we report on regional differences in self-reported poor health and explore possible determinants at the individual and regional levels in Italy. Methods We use data from the "Indagine Multiscopo sulle Famiglie", a survey of aspects of everyday life in the Italian population, to estimate multilevel logistic regressions that model poor self-reported health as a function of individual and regional socioeconomic factors. Next we use the causal step approach to test if living conditions, healthcare characteristics, social isolation, and health behaviors at the regional level mediate the relationship between regional socioeconomic factors and self-rated health. Results We find that residents living in regions with more poverty, more unemployment, and more income inequality are more likely to report poor health and that poor living conditions and private share of healthcare expenditures at the regional level mediate socioeconomic disparities in self-rated health among Italian regions. Conclusion The implications are that regional contexts matter and that regional policies in Italy have the potential to reduce health disparities by implementing interventions aimed at improving living conditions and access to quality healthcare.

  1. Regional disparities and convergences in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Blížkovský

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the disparity and convergence between the 10 and 11 countries of ASEAN and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS respectively and the 31 sub-national regions (provinces in China.The regional disparity levels and trends were analysed using the Gini coefficient between the regions (nominal GDP, GDP per capita and GDP per capita in Purchasing Parity Power, PPP. The convergence analysis was evaluated using the Disparity Range Coefficient (DRC, the Average Disparity Range Coefficient (ADRC, and the σ- and b-convergence. The time period covered was 2000–2008 (ASEAN and CIS and 2000–2006 (China.The results show a relatively high regional disparity between the Asian macro-regions of ASEAN and CIS and much lower disparities between the China sub-regions. The disparities were highest if based on the nominal GDP and lower if based on the DGP per capita. The GDP per capita was lower, between 0.30 to 0.4 for the CIS and China, and around 0.7 in ASEAN. The convergence analysis showed mixed results. Based on the DRC analysis, none of the Asian macro-regions converged. All three macro-regions diverged 1.4 to 12.68 times quicker than the average macro-regional GDP per capita grew, ASEAN being at the divergence top and China at the bottom. Based on the ADRC analysis, all macro-regions also proved to diverge. However, the divergence rates were much lower. For macro-regions China and CIS, the divergence was slower than macro-regional growth, thus their divergence was moderate. On the other side, if the macro-region was calculated using the σ-convergence analysis, the converging macro-regions were ASEAN and China, with 2.13% and 0.47% respectively. CIS was diverging at the speed of 1.25% per year. Based on b-convergence, ASEAN and China were converging (1.54% and 1.32%, and a slow divergence trend was registered for CIS, 1.01%.

  2. CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report--U.S. 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trends and ongoing variations in health disparities and inequalities for selected social and health indicators. This is important for encouraging ... behavioral risk factors for disease, environmental hazards, and social determinants of ... Disparities & Inequalities Report - United States, 2013 ...

  3. Comparison of fixation disparity curve parameters obtained with the Wesson and Saladin fixation disparity cards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ngan, Janice; Goss, David A; Despirito, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    This study compared fixation curve parameters with two commercially available fixation disparity cards, one that has been available for several years, the Wesson card, and a new one, the Saladin card...

  4. Triterpene acids from apple peel inhibit lepidopteran larval midgut lipases and larval growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeller, John T; McGhie, Tony K; Poulton, Joanne; Markwick, Ngaire P

    2014-07-01

    Fruit extracts from apple, kiwifruit, feijoa, boysenberry, and blueberry were screened for the presence of lipase inhibitory compounds against lepidopteran larval midgut crude extracts. From 120 extracts, six showed significant inhibition with an extract from the peel of Malus × domestica cv. "Big Red" showing highest levels of inhibition. Because this sample was the only apple peel sample in the initial screen, a survey of peels from seven apple cultivars was undertaken and showed that, despite considerable variation, all had inhibitory activity. Successive solvent fractionation and LC-MS of cv. "Big Red" apple peel extract identified triterpene acids as the most important inhibitory compounds, of which ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were the major components and oxo- and hydroxyl-triterpene acids were minor components. When ursolic acid was incorporated into artificial diet and fed to Epiphyas postvittana Walker (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera) larvae at 0.16% w/v, a significant decrease in larval weight was observed after 21 days. This concentration of ursolic acid is less than half the concentration reported in the skin of some apple cultivars. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The influence of larval migration and dispersal depth on potential larval trajectories of a deep-sea bivalve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Doreen M.; Eggleston, David B.; Todd, Austin C.; Young, Craig M.; He, Ruoying

    2017-09-01

    Many fundamental questions in marine ecology require an understanding of larval dispersal and connectivity, yet direct observations of larval trajectories are difficult or impossible to obtain. Although biophysical models provide an alternative approach, in the deep sea, essential biological parameters for these models have seldom been measured empirically. In this study, we used a biophysical model to explore the role of behaviorally mediated migration from two methane seep sites in the Gulf of Mexico on potential larval dispersal patterns and population connectivity of the deep-sea mussel "Bathymodiolus" childressi, a species for which some biological information is available. Three possible larval dispersal strategies were evaluated for larvae with a Planktonic Larval Duration (PLD) of 395 days: (1) demersal drift, (2) dispersal near the surface early in larval life followed by an extended demersal period before settlement, and (3) dispersal near the surface until just before settlement. Upward swimming speeds varied in the model based on the best data available. Average dispersal distances for simulated larvae varied between 16 km and 1488 km. Dispersal in the upper water column resulted in the greatest dispersal distance (1173 km ± 2.00), followed by mixed dispersal depth (921 km ± 2.00). Larvae originating in the Gulf of Mexico can potentially seed most known seep metapopulations on the Atlantic continental margin, whereas larvae drifting demersally cannot (237 km ± 1.43). Depth of dispersal is therefore shown to be a critical parameter for models of deep-sea connectivity.

  6. Lossless Compression of Stereo Disparity Maps for 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamarin, Marco; Forchhammer, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Efficient compression of disparity data is important for accurate view synthesis purposes in multi-view communication systems based on the “texture plus depth” format, including the stereo case. In this paper a novel technique for lossless compression of stereo disparity images is presented...... disparity maps for stereo pairs and outperforms different standard solutions for lossless still image compression. Moreover, it provides a progressive representation of disparity data as well as a parallelizable structure....

  7. Ethnic disparities in quality of care for children with asthma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, J.J.N. van; Stronk, K.; Devillé, W.

    2004-01-01

    Studies from the UK and USA found ethnic disparities in asthma treatment for children. Little is known about ethnic disparities in asthma treatment for chidlren in the Netherlands. The aim of this study is to gain insight into ethnic disparities in asthma care for children living in the Nederlands.

  8. Measuring disparities in the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Karen; Bohm, Michele; Keppel, Kenneth

    2008-12-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines a health disparity as a "[health] difference that occurs by gender, race or ethnicity, education or income, disability, geographic location, or sexual orientation." Health equity is achieved by eliminating health disparities or inequalities. Measuring health disparities is a critical first step toward reducing differences in health outcomes. To determine the methods to be used in measuring a health disparity, several decisions must be made, which include: (1) selecting a reference group for the comparison of 2 or more groups; (2) determining whether a disparity should be measured in absolute or in relative terms; (3) opting to measure health outcomes or health indicators expressed as adverse or favorable events; (4) selecting a method to monitor a disparity over time; and (5) choosing to measure a disparity as a pair-wise comparison between 2 groups or in terms of a summary measure of disparity among all groups for a particular characteristic. Different choices may lead to different conclusions about the size and direction of health disparities at a point in time and changes in disparities over time.The objective of this article is to review the methods for measuring health disparities, provide examples of their use, and make specific recommendations for measuring disparities in the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

  9. 41 CFR 60-3.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Disparate treatment. 60-3... treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of..., or members have not been subjected to that standard. Disparate treatment occurs where members of...

  10. Efficient quality enhancement of disparity maps based on alpha matting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosch, Nicole; Nezveda, Matej; Gelautz, Margrit; Seitner, Florian

    2014-03-01

    We propose an efficient disparity map enhancement method that improves the alignment of disparity edges and color edges even in the presence of mixed pixels and provides alpha values for pixels at disparity edges as a byproduct. In contrast to previous publications, the proposed method addresses mixed pixels at disparity edges and does not introduce mixed disparities that can lead to object deformations in synthesized views. The proposed algorithm computes transparencies by performing alpha matting per disparity-layer. These alpha values indicate the degree of affiliation to a disparity-layer and can hence be used as an indicator for a disparity reassignment that aligns disparity edges with color edges and accounts for mixed pixels. We demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed method on various images and corresponding disparity maps, including images that contain fuzzy object borders (e.g., fur). Furthermore, the proposed method is qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated using disparity ground truth and compared to previously published disparity post-processing methods.

  11. Content- and disparity-adaptive stereoscopic image retargeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Weiqing; Hou, Chunping; Zhou, Yuan; Xiang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The paper proposes a content- and disparity-adaptive stereoscopic image retargeting. To simultaneously avoid the saliency content and disparity distortion, firstly, we calculate the image saliency region distortion difference, and conclude the factors causing visual distortion. Then, the proposed method via a convex quadratic programming can simultaneously avoid the distortion of the salient region and adjust disparity to a target area, by considering the relationship of the scaling factor of salient region and the disparity scaling factor. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to successfully adapt the image disparity to the target display screen, while the salient objects remain undistorted in the retargeted stereoscopic image.

  12. Using Linear Agarose Channels to Study Drosophila Larval Crawling Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Heckscher, Ellie S

    2016-11-26

    Drosophila larval crawling is emerging as a powerful model to study neural control of sensorimotor behavior. However, larval crawling behavior on flat open surfaces is complex, including: pausing, turning, and meandering. This complexity in the repertoire of movement hinders detailed analysis of the events occurring during a single crawl stride cycle. To overcome this obstacle, linear agarose channels were made that constrain larval behavior to straight, sustained, rhythmic crawling. In principle, because agarose channels and the Drosophila larval body are both optically clear, the movement of larval structures labeled by genetically-encoded fluorescent probes can be monitored in intact, freely-moving larvae. In the past, larvae were placed in linear channels and crawling at the level of whole organism, segment, and muscle were analyzed(1). In the future, larvae crawling in channels can be used for calcium imaging to monitor neuronal activity. Moreover, these methods can be used with larvae of any genotype and with any researcher-designed channel. Thus the protocol presented below is widely applicable for studies using the Drosophila larva as a model to understand motor control.

  13. Adaptation to divergent larval diets in the medfly, Ceratitis capitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftwich, Philip T; Nash, William J; Friend, Lucy A; Chapman, Tracey

    2017-02-01

    Variation in diet can influence the timing of major life-history events and can drive population diversification and ultimately speciation. Proximate responses of life histories to diet have been well studied. However, there are scant experimental data on how organisms adapt to divergent diets over the longer term. We focused on this omission by testing the responses of a global pest, the Mediterranean fruitfly, to divergent selection on larval diets of different nutritional profiles. Tests conducted before and after 30 generations of nutritional selection revealed a complex interplay between the effects of novel larval dietary conditions on both plastic and evolved responses. There were proximate-only responses to the larval diet in adult male courtship and the frequency of copulation. Males on higher calorie larval diets consistently engaged in more bouts of energetic courtship. In contrast, following selection, larval development time, and egg to adult survival showed evidence of evolved divergence between diet regimes. Adult body size showed evidence for adaptation, with flies being significantly heavier when reared on their "own" diet. The results show the multifaceted responses of individuals to dietary selection and are important in understanding the extreme generalism exhibited by the medfly.

  14. Surveys of larval sealworm (Pseudoterranova decipiens infection in various fish species sampled from Nova Scotian waters between 1988 and 1996, with an assessment of examination procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G McClelland

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Between November 1988 and October 1996, >10,000 fish from the Breton Shelf, Sable Island Bank and the northeastern Gulf of Maine were examined for larval anisakines. Larval sealworm, Pseudoterranova decipiens, occurred in 30 of 39 species surveyed, including 8 new host records, Enchelyopus cimbrius, Lycodes reticulatus, Eumesogrammus praecisus, Lumpenus lumpretaeformis, Lumpenus maculatus, Cryptacanthodes maculatus, Artediellus atlanticus and Triglops murrayi. The parasite was most prevalent and abundant in mature demersal piscivores and benthic consumers. Sealworm densities (nr kg-1 host wt., however, were greatest in small benthophagous fish including mature E. cimbrius, A. atlanticus, T. murrayi and Aspidophoroides monopterygius, and juvenile Hippoglossoides platessoides. ANOVA revealed that geographical disparities in sealworm prevalence and abundance were highly significant in 14 of 20 species tested, although significant disparities between samples from each of the three areas were evident only in H. platessoides. Almost invariably, infection parameters were greatest in fish from Sable Island Bank. ANOVA also indicated that sealworm prevalence and/or abundance increased significantly in Sable Island Bank populations of Gadus morhua, H. platessoides, and seven other species between 1985-1986 and 1989-1990. Routine examinations, in which host flesh was sliced and candled, proved as efficacious as digestion in warm (35° C pepsin-HCl for detection of larval sealworm in the flesh of large frozen fish. Procedures employing fresh (iced samples, digestion at ambient temperature and microscopy are recommended, however, for surveys of small benthic consumers. Many of the sealworm infecting the latter hosts are tiny (2 to 10 mm in length nematodes, which escape detection by routine inspection, and may not survive in warm pepsin-HCl solution.

  15. European Union of the Regional Disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo-Victor Ionescu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals to the idea of the necessity of changing EU’s political approach in order to face to the new inside and global challenges. In order to support this idea, the analysis uses four representative indicators: educational attainment level, hospital beds at 100000 inhabitants, employment rate and unemployment rate. The initial analysis was focused on EU’s regions and pointed out great disparities. A distinct part of the analysis covers Romanian regions. The analysis is realized on two levels: macroregions and NUTS 2 regions. Romania is not an exception from the paper’s approach. The main conclusion of the analysis is that EU arrived into critical point and has to change its political and economic approach in order to reduce and to eliminate the regional disparities and to increase its credibility as global actor.

  16. Bilaterally Weighted Patches for Disparity Map Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fernández Julià

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Visual correspondence is the key for 3D reconstruction in binocular stereovision. Local methods perform block-matching to compute the disparity, or apparent motion, of pixels between images. The simplest approach computes the distance of patches, usually square windows, and assumes that all pixels in the patch have the same disparity. A prominent artifact of the method is the "foreground fattening effet" near depth discontinuities. In order to find a more appropriate support, Yoon and Kweon introduced the use of weights based on color similarity and spatial distance, analogous to those used in the bilateral filter. This paper presents the theory of this method and the implementation we have developed. Moreover, some variants are discussed and improvements are used in the final implementation. Several examples and tests are presented and the parameters and performance of the method are analyzed.

  17. Socially disparate trends in lifespan variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Social inequality trends in life expectancy are not informative as to changes in social disparity in the age-at-death distribution. The purpose of the study was to investigate social differentials in trends and patterns of adult mortality in Denmark. METHODS: Register data on income...... and mortality from 1986 to 2014 were used to investigate trends in life expectancy, life disparity and the threshold age that separates 'premature' and 'late' deaths. Mortality compression was quantified and compared between income quartiles. RESULTS: Since 1986, male life expectancy increased by 4.2 years...... for the lowest income quartile and by 8.4 years for the highest income quartile. The clear compression of mortality apparent in the highest income quartile did not occur for the lowest income quartile. Premature and late deaths accounted both by 2.1 years of the increase in life expectancy in the lowest income...

  18. Explaining ethnic disparities in preterm birth in Argentina and Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehby, George L; Pawluk, Mariela; Nyarko, Kwame A; López-Camelo, Jorge S

    2016-11-22

    Little is understood about racial/ethnic disparities in infant health in South America. We quantified the extent to which the disparity in preterm birth (PTB; Ecuador are explained by household socio-economic, demographic, healthcare use, and geographic location indicators. The samples included 5199 infants born between 2000 and 2011 from Argentina and 1579 infants born between 2001 and 2011 from Ecuador. An Oaxaca-Blinder type decomposition model adapted to binary outcomes was estimated to explain the disparity in PTB risk across groups of variables and specific variables. Maternal use of prenatal care services significantly explained the PTB disparity, by nearly 57% and 30% in Argentina and Ecuador, respectively. Household socio-economic status explained an additional 26% of the PTB disparity in Argentina. Differences in maternal use of prenatal care may partly explain ethnic disparities in PTB in Argentina and Ecuador. Improving access to prenatal care may reduce ethnic disparities in PTB risk in these countries.

  19. Socioeconomic disparities and health: impacts and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Growing socioeconomic disparity is a global concern, as it could affect population health. The author and colleagues have investigated the health impacts of socioeconomic disparities as well as the pathways that underlie those disparities. Our meta-analysis found that a large population has risks of mortality and poor self-rated health that are attributable to income inequality. The study results also suggested the existence of threshold effects (ie, a threshold of income inequality over which the adverse impacts on health increase), period effects (ie, the potential for larger impacts in later years, specifically after the 1990s), and lag effects between income inequality and health outcomes. Our other studies using Japanese national representative survey data and a large-scale cohort study of Japanese older adults (AGES cohort) support the relative deprivation hypothesis, namely, that invidious social comparisons arising from relative deprivation in an unequal society adversely affect health. A study with a natural experiment design found that the socioeconomic gradient in self-rated health might actually have become shallower after the 1997-98 economic crisis in Japan, due to smaller health improvements among middle-class white-collar workers and middle/upper-income workers. In conclusion, income inequality might have adverse impacts on individual health, and psychosocial stress due to relative deprivation may partially explain those impacts. Any study of the effects of macroeconomic fluctuations on health disparities should also consider multiple potential pathways, including expanding income inequality, changes in the labor market, and erosion of social capital. Further studies are needed to attain a better understanding of the social determinants of health in a rapidly changing society.

  20. Disparity in motorcycle helmet use in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyawongpaisa, Paibul; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Rangpueng, Aratta; Jiwattanakulpaisarn, Piyapong; Techakamolsuk, Pimpa

    2013-08-30

    The dispersion of motorcycle related injuries and deaths might be a result of disparity in motorcycle helmet use. This study uses national roadside survey data, injury sentinel surveillance data and other national data sets in 2010 of Thailand, a country with high mortality related to motorcycle injuries, to explore the disparity in helmet use, explanatory factors of the disparity. It also assessed potential agreement and correlation between helmet use rate reported by the roadside survey and the injury sentinel surveillance. This report revealed helmet use rate of 43.7%(95% CI:43.6,43.9) nationwide with the highest rate (81.8%; 95% CI: 44.0,46.4) in Bangkok. Helmet use rate in drivers (53.3%; 95% CI: 53.2,53.8) was 2.5 times higher than that in passengers (19.3%; 95% CI:18.9,19.7). In relative terms (highest-to-lowest ratio,HLR), geographical disparity in helmet use was found to be higher in passengers (HLR = 28.5). Law enforcement activities as indicated by the conviction rate of motorcyclists were significantly associated with the helmet use rate (spline regression coefficient = 3.90, 95% CI: 0.48,7.33). Together with the finding of HLR for conviction rate of 87.24, it is suggested that more equitable improvement in helmet use could be achieved by more equitable distribution of the police force. Finally, we found poor correlation (r = 0.01; p value = 0.76) and no agreement (difference = 34.29%; 95% CI:13.48%, 55.09%) between roadside survey and injury sentinel surveillance in estimating helmet use rate. These findings should be considered a warning for employing injury surveillance to monitor policy implementation of helmet use.

  1. Scalable Combinatorial Tools for Health Disparities Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Langston

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite staggering investments made in unraveling the human genome, current estimates suggest that as much as 90% of the variance in cancer and chronic diseases can be attributed to factors outside an individual’s genetic endowment, particularly to environmental exposures experienced across his or her life course. New analytical approaches are clearly required as investigators turn to complicated systems theory and ecological, place-based and life-history perspectives in order to understand more clearly the relationships between social determinants, environmental exposures and health disparities. While traditional data analysis techniques remain foundational to health disparities research, they are easily overwhelmed by the ever-increasing size and heterogeneity of available data needed to illuminate latent gene x environment interactions. This has prompted the adaptation and application of scalable combinatorial methods, many from genome science research, to the study of population health. Most of these powerful tools are algorithmically sophisticated, highly automated and mathematically abstract. Their utility motivates the main theme of this paper, which is to describe real applications of innovative transdisciplinary models and analyses in an effort to help move the research community closer toward identifying the causal mechanisms and associated environmental contexts underlying health disparities. The public health exposome is used as a contemporary focus for addressing the complex nature of this subject.

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Larval Midgut from the Silkworm (Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The midgut is the major organ for food digestion, nutrient absorption and also a barrier for foreign substance. The 5th-instar larval stage of silkworm is very important for larval growth, development, and silk production. In the present study, we used 2-DE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS to analyze the midgut proteins from the 5th-instar larvae as well as the midgut proteins under starvation condition. A total of 96 proteins were identified in this study; and among them, 69 proteins were observed in midgut for the first time. We also found that the silkworm larval midgut responded to starvation by producing a 10 kDa heat shock protein and a diapause hormone precursor.

  3. [Larval stages of Ascaris lumbricoides: hyaluronan-binding capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-León, Patricia; Foresto, Patricia; Valverde, Juana

    2009-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid has important functions in inflammatory and tissue reparation processes. Owing to the varied strategies of the parasites to evade the host's immune response, as well as the multiple functions and physiological importance of hyaluronic acid, the aim was to study the hyaluronan binding capacity by Ascaris lumbricoides larval stages. Larval concentrates were prepared by hatching A. lumbricoides eggs. The larvae were collected by the Baermann method. The test of serum soluble CD44 detection by Agregation Inhibition was modified. All the larval concentrates presented hyaluronan binding capacity. The obtained results allow to suppose the existence of an hyaluronic acid specific receptor in A. lumbricoides. This receptor eventually might compete with the usual receptors of the host. The parasite might use this mechanism to evade the immune response.

  4. Oestrus ovis larval myiasis among goats in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Shehada, Mahmoud N; Batainah, Tharwat; Abuharfeil, Nizar; Torgerson, P R

    2003-05-30

    From December 1998 to December 1999, heads of 520 local goats slaughtered at the Irbid, Ramtha and Howarra Abattoirs (northern Jordan) were examined for the three larval instars (L(1)-L(3)) of Oestrus ovis. Of 520 heads, 126 (24%) were infested with O. ovis larvae. All three larval instars were observed in both sexes; all age groups were infested in each month of the year. The mean age of the goats sampled was 1.5 years. The numbers of parasites infesting hosts showed a significant (P<0.05) correlation with sheep age (r(sp)=0.31-0.42) for all three larval instars. The numbers of larvae in each host followed an overdispersed distribution, which fit a negative-binomial model (but not a Poisson distribution). There were more parasites recorded in the presence of purulent discharge or laryngitis, fewer in the presence of catarrhal discharge and no association with pharyngitis sinusitis, or rhinitis.

  5. Characterization of anopheline (Diptera: Culicidae) larval habitats in Nouakchott, Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, O Ahmedou Salem Mohamed; Khadijetou, M Lekweiry; Moina, M Hasni; Lassana, Konate; Sébastien, Briolant; Ousmane, Faye; Ali, O Mohamed Salem Boukhary

    2013-12-01

    Despite the increasing number of reported autochthonous malaria cases in Nouakchott and the identification of Anopheles arabiensis as the major malaria vector in this Saharan city, anopheline larval habitats have never been identified so far. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize anopheline larval habitats in Nouakchott. During September and October 2012, samples from pools of rainwater, water discharged from standpipes and household drinking water tanks in the districts of Dar Naim, Teyarett and Arafat were analyzed for the presence/absence of anopheline larvae and physicochemical characterization of breeding habitats. Of the 51 prospected water bodies, eight consisting of seven water discharged from standpipes and one household drinking water tank were productive for Anopheles sp. All emerged anopheline mosquitoes from the positive dipping were morphologically identified as members of the An. gambiae complex. Multivariate regression analyses showed that a salinity up to 0.1 g/l and a shaded situation were respectively protective factors against high larval density in breeding sites (adjusted odds ratio = 0.62, 95% CI [0.44-0.87], p = 0.0052 and adjusted odds ratio = 0.56, 95% CI [0.44-0.71, p <0.0001] and a pH up to 7.61 was a risk factor for high larval density in breeding sites (adjusted odds ratio = 1.56, 95% CI [1.25-1.95], p = 0.0001). The study demonstrated in Nouakchott that despite an arid and dry climate, human practices have contributed to the establishment of favourable environmental conditions for the development of anopheline mosquitoes and, therefore, maintaining malaria transmission in this Saharan city. The core malaria vector control intervention as the use of long-lasting insecicidal nets (LLINs) could be complemented in Nouakchott by larval source control. In this area, appropriate larval control measures may be recommended in line with an integrated vector management (IVM) approach.

  6. Characterization of anopheline (Diptera: Culicidae larval habitats in Nouakchott, Mauritania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ahmedou Salem Mohamed Salem

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Despite the increasing number of reported autochthonous malaria cases in Nouakchott and the identification of Anopheles arabiensis as the major malaria vector in this Saharan city, anopheline larval habitats have never been identified so far. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize anopheline larval habitats in Nouakchott. Methods: During September and October 2012, samples from pools of rainwater, water discharged from standpipes and household drinking water tanks in the districts of Dar Naim, Teyarett and Arafat were analyzed for the presence/absence of anopheline larvae and physicochemical characterization of breeding habitats. Results: Of the 51 prospected water bodies, eight consisting of seven water discharged from standpipes and one household drinking water tank were productive for Anopheles sp. All emerged anopheline mosquitoes from the positive dipping were morphologically identified as members of the An. gambiae complex. Multivariate regression analyses showed that a salinity up to 0.1 g/l and a shaded situation were respectively protective factors against high larval density in breeding sites (adjusted odds ratio = 0.62, 95% CI [0.44-0.87], p = 0.0052 and adjusted odds ratio = 0.56, 95% CI [0.44-0.71, p <0.0001] and a pH up to 7.61 was a risk factor for high larval density in breeding sites (adjusted odds ratio = 1.56, 95% CI [1.25-1.95], p = 0.0001. Interpretation & conclusion: The study demonstrated in Nouakchott that despite an arid and dry climate, human practices have contributed to the establishment of favourable environmental conditions for the development of anopheline mosquitoes and, therefore, maintaining malaria transmission in this Saharan city. The core malaria vector control intervention as the use of long-lasting insecicidal nets (LLINs could be complemented in Nouakchott by larval source control. In this area, appropriate larval control measures may be recommended in line

  7. Effects of beach morphology and waves on onshore larval transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, A.; Reniers, A.; Paris, C. B.; Shanks, A.; MacMahan, J.; Morgan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Larvae of intertidal species grow offshore, and migrate back to the shore when they are ready to settle on their adult substrates. In order to reach the habitat, they must cross the surf zone, which is characterized as a semi-permeable barrier. This is accomplished through physical forcing (i.e., waves and current) as well as their own behavior. Two possible scenarios of onshore larval transport are proposed: Negatively buoyant larvae stay in the bottom boundary layer because of turbulence-dependent sinking behavior, and are carried toward the shore by streaming of the bottom boundary layer; positively buoyant larvae move to the shore during onshore wind events, and sink to the bottom once they encounter high turbulence (i.e., surf zone edge), where they are carried by the bottom current toward the shore (Fujimura et al. 2014). Our biophysical Lagrangian particle tracking model helps to explain how beach morphology and wave conditions affect larval distribution patterns and abundance. Model results and field observations show that larval abundance in the surf zone is higher at mildly sloped, rip-channeled beaches than at steep pocket beaches. Beach attributes are broken up to examine which and how beach configuration factors affect larval abundance. Modeling with alongshore uniform beaches with variable slopes reveal that larval populations in the surf zone are negatively correlated with beach steepness. Alongshore variability enhances onshore larval transport because of increased cross-shore water exchange by rip currents. Wave groups produce transient rip currents and enhance cross-shore exchange. Effects of other wave components, such as wave height and breaking wave rollers are also considered.

  8. Health disparities and gaps in school readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet

    2005-01-01

    The author documents pervasive racial disparities in the health of American children and analyzes how and how much those disparities contribute to racial gaps in school readiness. She explores a broad sample of health problems common to U.S. children, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, asthma, and lead poisoning, as well as maternal health problems and health-related behaviors that affect children's behavioral and cognitive readiness for school. If a health problem is to affect the readiness gap, it must affect many children, it must be linked to academic performance or behavior problems, and it must show a racial disparity either in its prevalence or in its effects. The author focuses not only on the black-white gap in health status but also on the poor-nonpoor gap because black children tend to be poorer than white children. The health conditions Currie considers seriously impair cognitive skills and behavior in individual children. But most explain little of the overall racial gap in school readiness. Still, the cumulative effect of health differentials summed over all conditions is significant. Currie's rough calculation is that racial differences in health conditions and in maternal health and behaviors together may account for as much as a quarter of the racial gap in school readiness. Currie scrutinizes several policy steps to lessen racial and socioeconomic disparities in children's health and to begin to close the readiness gap. Increasing poor children's eligibility for Medicaid and state child health insurance is unlikely to be effective because most poor children are already eligible for public insurance. The problem is that many are not enrolled. Even increasing enrollment may not work: socioeconomic disparities in health persist in Canada and the United Kingdom despite universal public health insurance. The author finds more promise in strengthening early childhood programs with a built-in health component, like Head Start; family

  9. Larval development of Brachiopod Coptothyris grayi (Davidson, 1852) (Brachiopoda, Rhynchonelliformea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, T V; Temereva, E N; Malakhov, V V

    2016-11-01

    The larval development of the Brachiopod Coptothyris grayi (Davidson, 1852) from the Sea of Japan is described for the first time. Ciliated blastula proved to represent the first free-swimming stage. The blastopore is initially formed as a rounded hole stretching later along the anteroposterior axis. The larva is first divided into two lobes (the apical lobe and the trunk); the mantle lobe is formed later as two lateral folds. Two pairs of seta bundles appear in the late stage larvae. The apical larval lobe in brachiopods is supposed to match the pre-oral lobe and anterior part of the trunk with tentacles in phoronids.

  10. Aceitabilidade da terapia larval no tratamento de feridas

    OpenAIRE

    Franco,Letícia Cunha; Franco, Washington Cunha; Barros, Sávio Bertone Lopes; Araújo, Caroline Marinho; Rezende, Hanstter Halisson Alves

    2016-01-01

    Conhecer a opinião de pessoas hospitalizadas acerca da terapia larval como opção terapêutica. Estudo do tipo transversal e descritivo, realizado no setor de clínica médica e cirúrgica de um hospital de ensino, por meio de entrevista. Participaram da pesquisa 105 pessoas, dentre essas, 6 souberam dizer o que é uma bioterapia, 95 afirmaram que utilizariam a terapia larval, 32 se sentiam motivadas em aderir o tratamento devido à possibilidade de diminuir seus níveis de dor e 73 referiram medo em...

  11. The neural basis of visual behaviors in the larval zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian

    2009-12-01

    We review visually guided behaviors in larval zebrafish and summarise what is known about the neural processing that results in these behaviors, paying particular attention to the progress made in the last 2 years. Using the examples of the optokinetic reflex, the optomotor response, prey tracking and the visual startle response, we illustrate how the larval zebrafish presents us with a very promising model vertebrate system that allows neurocientists to integrate functional and behavioral studies and from which we can expect illuminating insights in the near future.

  12. Vertical binocular disparity is encoded implicitly within a model neuronal population tuned to horizontal disparity and orientation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny C A Read

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary visual cortex is often viewed as a "cyclopean retina", performing the initial encoding of binocular disparities between left and right images. Because the eyes are set apart horizontally in the head, binocular disparities are predominantly horizontal. Yet, especially in the visual periphery, a range of non-zero vertical disparities do occur and can influence perception. It has therefore been assumed that primary visual cortex must contain neurons tuned to a range of vertical disparities. Here, I show that this is not necessarily the case. Many disparity-selective neurons are most sensitive to changes in disparity orthogonal to their preferred orientation. That is, the disparity tuning surfaces, mapping their response to different two-dimensional (2D disparities, are elongated along the cell's preferred orientation. Because of this, even if a neuron's optimal 2D disparity has zero vertical component, the neuron will still respond best to a non-zero vertical disparity when probed with a sub-optimal horizontal disparity. This property can be used to decode 2D disparity, even allowing for realistic levels of neuronal noise. Even if all V1 neurons at a particular retinotopic location are tuned to the expected vertical disparity there (for example, zero at the fovea, the brain could still decode the magnitude and sign of departures from that expected value. This provides an intriguing counter-example to the common wisdom that, in order for a neuronal population to encode a quantity, its members must be tuned to a range of values of that quantity. It demonstrates that populations of disparity-selective neurons encode much richer information than previously appreciated. It suggests a possible strategy for the brain to extract rarely-occurring stimulus values, while concentrating neuronal resources on the most commonly-occurring situations.

  13. Vertical Binocular Disparity is Encoded Implicitly within a Model Neuronal Population Tuned to Horizontal Disparity and Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jenny C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Primary visual cortex is often viewed as a “cyclopean retina”, performing the initial encoding of binocular disparities between left and right images. Because the eyes are set apart horizontally in the head, binocular disparities are predominantly horizontal. Yet, especially in the visual periphery, a range of non-zero vertical disparities do occur and can influence perception. It has therefore been assumed that primary visual cortex must contain neurons tuned to a range of vertical disparities. Here, I show that this is not necessarily the case. Many disparity-selective neurons are most sensitive to changes in disparity orthogonal to their preferred orientation. That is, the disparity tuning surfaces, mapping their response to different two-dimensional (2D) disparities, are elongated along the cell's preferred orientation. Because of this, even if a neuron's optimal 2D disparity has zero vertical component, the neuron will still respond best to a non-zero vertical disparity when probed with a sub-optimal horizontal disparity. This property can be used to decode 2D disparity, even allowing for realistic levels of neuronal noise. Even if all V1 neurons at a particular retinotopic location are tuned to the expected vertical disparity there (for example, zero at the fovea), the brain could still decode the magnitude and sign of departures from that expected value. This provides an intriguing counter-example to the common wisdom that, in order for a neuronal population to encode a quantity, its members must be tuned to a range of values of that quantity. It demonstrates that populations of disparity-selective neurons encode much richer information than previously appreciated. It suggests a possible strategy for the brain to extract rarely-occurring stimulus values, while concentrating neuronal resources on the most commonly-occurring situations. PMID:20421992

  14. Factors affecting fungus-induced larval mortality in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhari, S.T.; Middelman, A.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Takken, W.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Entomopathogenic fungi have shown great potential for the control of adult malaria vectors. However, their ability to control aquatic stages of anopheline vectors remains largely unexplored. Therefore, how larval characteristics (Anopheles species, age and larval density), fungus (species

  15. Factors affecting fungus-induced larval mortality in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhari, T.; Middelman, A.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Takken, W.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Entomopathogenic fungi have shown great potential for the control of adult malaria vectors. However, their ability to control aquatic stages of anopheline vectors remains largely unexplored. Therefore, how larval characteristics (Anopheles species, age and larval density), fungus (specie

  16. Biological studies on the snail intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis with a special emphasis on using larval echinostomes as biocontrol agent against larval schistosomes and snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, A A

    2002-12-01

    The present investigation deals with the infectivity of the two snail intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis, Biomphalaria alexandrina and Bulinus truncatus collected from nine drains in Sharkia Governorate, Egypt. The rate of infection among the snails was general low being 0% in many drains. Regarding B. alexandrina, the rate of infection ranged from 4-16%, and in B. truncatus ranged from 4-8%. Infection with larval echinostomes was dominant over larval schistosomes in the two snail vectors. The distribution of larval schistosomes was restricted to the hepatopancreas of the two snail vectors, while larval echinostomes were distributed in head, foot, kidney, haemocoelic cavity, hepatopancreas...etc. The predation of larval schistosomes by larval echinostomes and the severe histopathological effects induced by larval ecbinostomes strongly enhances using them as biocontrol agent. The physico-chemical parameters and pollution condition in the drains seem to have no effect on the process of snails infectivity. It is concluded that larval echinostomes can resist the polluting conditions in the drain. The two snail vectors exhibit very minimal or rare host response against larval echinostomes. Probably, the toxicants and pollutants in the drain may act as stressor that makes the snails much more susceptible to infection by larval trematodes.

  17. Efficiency of selection methods for increased ratio of pupal-larval to adult-larval weight gains in Tribolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, J L; Cobos, P

    1994-01-12

    Four lines of Tribolium castaneum were selected in each of three replicates for increased ratio of (pupal-larval) to (adult-larval) weight gains, using selection for increased (pupal-larval) weight gain (PL), selection for decreased (adult-larval) weight gain (AL), direct selection for the ratio (R) and linear selection index of larval, pupal and adult weights (I), respectively, for four generations. Linear index was calculated with economic weights of m(2) -m(3) , m(3) -m(1) and m(1) -m(2) , respectively, with m(1) , m(2) and m(3) being the means for larval, pupal and adult weights. Selection to increase the ratio is considered to be a method to maximize the mean response in (adult-larval) weight while controlling the response in (pupal-adult) weight, and as a form of antagonistic selection to increase the weight gain during a given age period relative to the gain at another age period. Larval, pupal and adult weights were measured at 14, 21 and 28 days after adult emergence, respectively. The selected proportion was 20 % in all lines. The response observed for the ratio differed significantly among lines (p maximizar la respuesta en (peso de adulto-peso de larva) controlando al tiempo la respuesta en (peso de pupa-peso de adulto), y es una forma de selección antagónica para aumentar la ganancia de peso durante un periodo de edad en relación con la ganancia en peso durante otro periodo. La proporción de selección due el 20 %. La respuesta observada en el cociente difería significativamente entre lineas (p < 0.01), teniendo las líneas I y AL las mayores respuestas. La línea R fue menos efectiva, mientras que la línea PL parecía inapropiada para mejorar el objetiyo de selección. Las respuestas observadas en el denominador y en el numerador fueron positivas en la línea PL, y negativas en las otras tres líneas. Los resultados para este cociente mayor que 1 se comparan con los de otros experimentos para cocientes menores que 1, en los que la selecci

  18. Shifty salamanders: transient trophic polymorphism and cannibalism within natural populations of larval ambystomatid salamanders

    OpenAIRE

    Jefferson, Dale M; Ferrari, Maud CO; Mathis, Alicia; Hobson, Keith A.; Eric R Britzke; Crane, Adam L; Blaustein, Andrew R.; Chivers, Douglas P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many species of ambystomatid salamanders are dependent upon highly variable temporary wetlands for larval development. High larval densities may prompt the expression of a distinct head morphology that may facilitate cannibalism. However, few studies have characterized structural cannibalism within natural populations of larval salamanders. In this study we used two species of larval salamanders, long-toed (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and ringed salamanders (A. annulatum). Head morp...

  19. Integrated mosquito larval source management reduces larval numbers in two highland villages in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imbahale Susan S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In western Kenya, malaria remains one of the major health problems and its control remains an important public health measure. Malaria control is by either use of drugs to treat patients infected with malaria parasites or by controlling the vectors. Vector control may target the free living adult or aquatic (larval stages of mosquito. The most commonly applied control strategies target indoor resting mosquitoes. However, because mosquitoes spend a considerable time in water, targeting the aquatic stages can complement well with existing adult control measures. Methods Larval source management (LSM of malaria vectors was examined in two villages i.e. Fort Ternan and Lunyerere, with the aim of testing strategies that can easily be accessed by the affected communities. Intervention strategies applied include environmental management through source reduction (drainage of canals, land levelling or by filling ditches with soil, habitat manipulation (by provision of shading from arrow root plant, application of Bacillus thuringiensis var israelensis (Bti and the use of predatory fish, Gambusia affinis. The abundance of immature stages of Anopheles and Culex within intervention habitats was compared to that within non-intervention habitats. Results The findings show that in Fort Ternan no significant differences were observed in the abundance of Anopheles early and late instars between intervention and non-intervention habitats. In Lunyerere, the abundance of Anopheles early instars was fifty five times more likely to be present within non-intervention habitats than in habitats under drainage. No differences in early instars abundance were observed between non-intervention and habitats applied with Bti. However, late instars had 89 % and 91 % chance of being sampled from non-intervention rather than habitats under drainage and those applied with Bti respectively. Conclusion Most of these interventions were applied in habitats

  20. Larval Myogenesis in the Articulate Brachiopod Argyrotheca cordata (Risso, 1826)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Wanninger, Andreas Wilhelm Georg

    2008-01-01

    and micromorphological data to this debate, we investigated muscle formation in larvae of the brooding articulate brachiopod Argyrotheca cordata using immunocytochemistry combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Full grown larvae are three-lobed and show two pairs of bristle bundles. During larval development...

  1. Environmental factors limiting fertilisation and larval success in corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Rachael M.; Baird, Andrew H.; Mizerek, Toni L.; Madin, Joshua S.

    2016-12-01

    Events in the early life history of reef-building corals, including fertilisation and larval survival, are susceptible to changes in the chemical and physical properties of sea water. Quantifying how changes in water quality affect these events is therefore important for understanding and predicting population establishment in novel and changing environments. A review of the literature identified that levels of salinity, temperature, pH, suspended sediment, nutrients and heavy metals affect coral early life-history stages to various degrees. In this study, we combined published experimental data to determine the relative importance of sea water properties for coral fertilisation success and larval survivorship. Of the water properties manipulated in experiments, fertilisation success was most sensitive to suspended sediment, copper, salinity, phosphate and ammonium. Larval survivorship was sensitive to copper, lead and salinity. A combined model was developed that estimated the joint probability of both fertilisation and larval survivorship in sea water with different chemical and physical properties. We demonstrated the combined model using water samples from Sydney and Lizard Island in Australia to estimate the likelihood of larvae surviving through both stages of development to settlement competency. Our combined model could be used to recommend targets for water quality in coastal waterways as well as to predict the potential for species to expand their geographical ranges in response to climate change.

  2. The role of individual variation in marine larval dispersal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Berend Nanninga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of individuals among patchy habitats plays a central role in spatial ecology and metapopulation dynamics. Dispersal (e.g. short vs. long is frequently observed to vary non-randomly within populations, indicating that variability among individuals may shape heterogeneity in patterns of connectivity. The concept of context- and condition-dependent dispersal describes the balance between the costs and benefits of dispersal that arises from the interaction of temporal and spatial landscape heterogeneity (the context with phenotypic variability among individuals (the condition. While this hypothesis is widely accepted terrestrial theory, it remains questionable to what extent the concept of adaptive dispersal strategies may apply to marine larval dispersal, a process that is largely determined by stochastic forces. Yet, larvae of many taxa exhibit strong navigational capabilities and there is mounting evidence of widespread intra-specific variability in biological traits that are potentially correlated with dispersal potential. While so far there are few known examples of real larval dispersal polymorphisms, intra-specifically variable dispersal strategies may be common in marine systems. Whether adaptive or not, it is becoming apparent that inter-individual heterogeneity in morphology, behaviour, condition, and life history traits may have critical effects on population-level heterogeneity in dispersal. Here, we explore the eco-evolutionary causes and consequences of intrinsic and extrinsic variability on larval dispersal by synthesizing the existing literature and drawing conceptual parallels from terrestrial theory. We emphasize the potential importance of larval dispersal polymorphisms in marine population dynamics.

  3. Phenology of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little work has been done on the phenology of fish larvae in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. As part of an aquatic invasive species early detection study, we conducted larval fish surveys in the St. Louis River estuary (SLRE) in 2012 and 2013. Using multiple gears in a spatially ba...

  4. Basolateral Cl- channels in the larval bullfrog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillyard, Stanley D.; Rios, K.; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    2002-01-01

    The addition of 150 U/ml nystatin to the mucosal surface of isolated skin from larval bullfrogs increases apical membrane permeability and allows a voltage clamp to be applied to the basolateral membrane. With identical Ringer's solutions bathing either side of the tissue the short-circuit current...

  5. Crustacean biodiversity as an important factor for mosquito larval control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Iris; Duquesne, Sabine; Liess, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Newly established ponds, which are highly dynamic systems with changing levels of biological interactions among species, are common larval mosquito habitats. We investigated the impact of crustacean abundance and taxa diversity on mosquito oviposition and larval development. The effects of the biological larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) on mosquito larvae were monitored according to fluctuations in crustacean communities. Populations of the mosquito Culex pipiens colonized artificial ponds that contained crustacean communities at different time points of colonization by crustaceans: 1) 'no colonization' (no crustaceans), 2) 'simultaneous colonization' by crustaceans and mosquitoes, and 3) 'head-start colonization' by crustaceans (preceding colonization by mosquitoes). All types of ponds were treated with three concentrations of Bti (10, 100, or 1,000 µg/liter). Colonization of all ponds by Cx. pipiens (in terms of oviposition, larval abundance, and larval development) decreased significantly with increasing diversity of crustacean taxa. The total abundance of crustaceans had a minor effect on colonization by Cx. pipiens. The presence of crustaceans increased the sensitivity of Cx. pipiens larvae to Bti treatment by a factor of 10 and delayed the time of recolonization. This effect of Bti was relevant in the short term. In the long term, the presence of Cx. pipiens was determined by crustacean biodiversity. © 2013 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  6. Stretch-activated cation channel from larval bullfrog skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Willumsen, Niels J; Marrero, Mario B

    2010-01-01

    Cell-attached patches from isolated epithelial cells from larval bullfrog skin revealed a cation channel that was activated by applying suction (-1 kPa to -4.5 kPa) to the pipette. Activation was characterized by an initial large current spike that rapidly attenuated to a stable value and showed...... was markedly reduced with N-methyl-D-glucamide (NMDG)-Cl Ringer's solution in the pipette. Neither amiloride nor ATP, which are known to stimulate an apical cation channel in Ussing chamber preparations of larval frog skin, produced channel activation nor did these compounds affect the response to suction....... Stretch activation was not affected by varying the pipette concentrations of Ca(2+) between 0 mmol l(-1) and 4 mmol l(-1) or by varying pH between 6.8 and 8.0. However, conductance was reduced with 4 mmol l(-1) Ca(2+). Western blot analysis of membrane homogenates from larval bullfrog and larval toad skin...

  7. Development of environmental tools for anopheline larval control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imbahale, S.S.; Mweresa, C.K.; Takken, W.; Mukabana, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Malaria mosquitoes spend a considerable part of their life in the aquatic stage, rendering them vulnerable to interventions directed to aquatic habitats. Recent successes of mosquito larval control have been reported using environmental and biological tools. Here, we report the effects

  8. Fruit Fly Liquid Larval Diet Technology Transfer and Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since October 2006, USDA-ARS has been implementing a fruit fly liquid larval diet technology transfer, which has proceeded according to the following steps: (1) Recruitment of interested groups through request; (2) Establishment of the Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) with ARS; (3) Fruit fly liquid...

  9. Development of environmental tools for anopheline larval control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imbahale, S.S.; Mweresa, C.K.; Takken, W.; Mukabana, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Malaria mosquitoes spend a considerable part of their life in the aquatic stage, rendering them vulnerable to interventions directed to aquatic habitats. Recent successes of mosquito larval control have been reported using environmental and biological tools. Here, we report the effects o

  10. The role of individual variation in marine larval dispersal

    KAUST Repository

    Nanninga, Gerrit B.

    2014-12-08

    The exchange of individuals among patchy habitats plays a central role in spatial ecology and metapopulation dynamics. Dispersal is frequently observed to vary non-randomly within populations (e.g., short vs. long), indicating that variability among individuals may shape heterogeneity in patterns of connectivity. The concept of context- and condition-dependent dispersal describes the balance between the costs and benefits of dispersal that arises from the interaction of temporal and spatial landscape heterogeneity (the context) with phenotypic variability among individuals (the condition). While this hypothesis is widely accepted in terrestrial theory, it remains questionable to what extent the concept of adaptive dispersal strategies may apply to marine larval dispersal, a process that is largely determined by stochastic forces. Yet, larvae of many taxa exhibit strong navigational capabilities and there is mounting evidence of widespread intra-specific variability in biological traits that are potentially correlated with dispersal potential. While so far there are few known examples of real larval dispersal polymorphisms, intra-specifically variable dispersal strategies may be common in marine systems. Whether adaptive or not, it is becoming apparent that inter-individual heterogeneity in morphology, behavior, condition, and life history traits may have critical effects on population-level heterogeneity in dispersal. Here, we explore the eco-evolutionary causes and consequences of intrinsic and extrinsic variability on larval dispersal by synthesizing the existing literature and drawing conceptual parallels from terrestrial theory. We emphasize the potential importance of larval dispersal polymorphisms in marine population dynamics.

  11. A staging system for larval cod (Gadus morhua L.)

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    A staging system of larval cod is described. The system is based on the resorption of the yolk mass and the cell layers surrounding it combined with eye, mouth and gut development. A determination key is given. Each stage is described in detail.

  12. Defining gender disparities in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leresche, Linda

    2011-07-01

    Prevalence rates of most musculoskeletal pain conditions are higher among women than men. Reasons for these prevalence disparities likely include sex differences in basic pain mechanisms and gender differences in psychosocial factors. The purposes of this review were to (1) identify reasons for differences in pain prevalence between men and women, (2) assess whether musculoskeletal pain conditions are differently treated in men and women, and (3) identify reasons for sex/gender disparities in pain treatment. A MEDLINE search was conducted using the terms "pain" or "musculoskeletal pain" and "gender differences" or "sex differences" with "health care," "health services," and "physician, attitude." Articles judged relevant were selected for inclusion. WHERE ARE WE NOW?: Higher pain prevalence in women is consistently observed but not well understood. The relative contributions of sex differences in pain mechanisms and gender differences in psychosocial factors (eg, coping, social roles) to explaining differences in prevalence are not yet clear. Gender disparities in the amount of healthcare use for pain may be partially explained by the experience of higher-intensity pain in women. Pain intensity also seems to be a major factor influencing treatment, especially the prescription of medications for acute pain. However, clinicians' gender stereotypes, as well as the clinician's own gender, appear to influence diagnostic and treatment decisions for more persistent pain problems. WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO?: The ultimate goal is optimal pain control for each individual, with gender being one difference between individuals. HOW DO WE GET THERE?: Further research is needed to address all three major purposes, with particular attention to whether gender-specific pain treatment may sometimes be warranted.

  13. Widening economic & social disparities: implications for India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, N J

    2007-10-01

    India is often characterized as an emerging economic super power. The huge demographic dividend, the high quality engineering and management talent, the powerful Indian diaspora and the emerging Indian transnational--kneeling the optimism. In contrast, there is another profile of India which is rather gloomy. This is the country with the largest number of the poor, illiterates and unemployed in the world. High infant mortality, morbidity and widespread anaemia among women and children continue. India suffers from acute economic and social disparities. This article addresses four dimensions of such disparities, viz. regional, rural-urban, social, and gender. There is empirical evidence to indicate that during the last two decades all these disparities have been increasing. As a result of economic reforms, the southern and western States experienced accelerated economic and social development as compared to northern and eastern States. This has led to widening gap in income, poverty and other indicators of development between the two regions. Rural-urban divide also widened in the wake of reforms. While large and medium cities experience unprecedented economic prosperity, the rural areas experience economic stagnation. As a result, there is widespread agrarian distress which results in farmers' suicide and rural unrest. Socially backward sections, especially scheduled castes and tribes (SCs and STs) have gained little from the new prosperity which rewards disproportionately those with assets, skills and higher education. STs have often been victims of development as a result of displacement. The gender gap in social and economic status, traditionally more in India as compared to other societies; has further widened by the economic reforms and globalization. The approach paper to the Eleventh Plan stresses the importance of more inclusive economic growth. It emphasizes the need for bridging the divides discussed in this article. Unless these are achieved in a time

  14. Vibrio anguillarum and larval mortality in a California coastal shellfish hatchery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, L H; Blecka, J; Zebal, R

    1978-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum was isolated as a pathogen in the commercial culture of oyster spat at Pigeon Point, Calif. A water-soluble, heat-stable exotoxin extracted from cultures of the vibrio inhibited larval swimming and contributed to larval mortality. Although the vibrio was insensitive to penicillin in standard plate testing, this antibiotic proved useful in preventing mass larval mortalities in the hatchery.

  15. File list: InP.Lar.05.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Lar.05.AllAg.Larval_brain dm3 Input control Larvae Larval brain SRX1426944,SRX1...426946 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Lar.05.AllAg.Larval_brain.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Lar.20.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lar.20.AllAg.Larval_brain dm3 Histone Larvae Larval brain SRX1426943,SRX1426945... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Lar.20.AllAg.Larval_brain.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Lar.10.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Lar.10.AllAg.Larval_brain dm3 All antigens Larvae Larval brain SRX1426945,SRX14...26944,SRX1426943,SRX1426946 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Lar.10.AllAg.Larval_brain.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Lar.05.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lar.05.AllAg.Larval_brain dm3 Histone Larvae Larval brain SRX1426945,SRX1426943... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Lar.05.AllAg.Larval_brain.bed ...

  19. Foraging behavior of larval cod ( Gadus morhua ) influenced by prey density and hunger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Fish larvae meet diverse environmental conditions at sea, and larval growth and chance of survival depend on a flexible response to environmental variability. The present study focuses on the flexibility of the foraging behaviour of larval cod in a series of laboratory experiments on larval search...

  20. File list: ALL.Lar.05.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Lar.05.AllAg.Larval_brain dm3 All antigens Larvae Larval brain SRX1426945,SRX14...26944,SRX1426946,SRX1426943 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Lar.05.AllAg.Larval_brain.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Lar.50.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lar.50.AllAg.Larval_brain dm3 Histone Larvae Larval brain SRX1426943,SRX1426945... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Lar.50.AllAg.Larval_brain.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Lar.50.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Lar.50.AllAg.Larval_brain dm3 All antigens Larvae Larval brain SRX1426944,SRX14...26943,SRX1426945,SRX1426946 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Lar.50.AllAg.Larval_brain.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Lar.20.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Lar.20.AllAg.Larval_brain dm3 All antigens Larvae Larval brain SRX1426944,SRX14...26943,SRX1426945,SRX1426946 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Lar.20.AllAg.Larval_brain.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Lar.10.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lar.10.AllAg.Larval_brain dm3 Histone Larvae Larval brain SRX1426945,SRX1426943... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Lar.10.AllAg.Larval_brain.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Lar.10.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: InP.Lar.50.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: InP.Lar.20.AllAg.Larval_brain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. Reducing Racial Health Care Disparities: A Social Psychological Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Large health disparities persist between Black and White Americans. The social psychology of intergroup relations suggests some solutions to health care disparities due to racial bias. Three paths can lead from racial bias to poorer health among Black Americans. First is the already well-documented physical and psychological toll of being a target of persistent discrimination. Second, implicit bias can affect physicians’ perceptions and decisions, creating racial disparities in medical treatm...

  9. Food selection in larval fruit flies: dynamics and effects on larval development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Sebastian; Durisko, Zachary; Dukas, Reuven

    2014-01-01

    Selecting food items and attaining a nutritionally balanced diet is an important challenge for all animals including humans. We aimed to establish fruit fly larvae ( Drosophila melanogaster) as a simple yet powerful model system for examining the mechanisms of specific hunger and diet selection. In two lab experiments with artificial diets, we found that larvae deprived of either sucrose or protein later selectively fed on a diet providing the missing nutrient. When allowed to freely move between two adjacent food patches, larvae surprisingly preferred to settle on one patch containing yeast and ignored the patch providing sucrose. Moreover, when allowed to move freely between three patches, which provided either yeast only, sucrose only or a balanced mixture of yeast and sucrose, the majority of larvae settled on the yeast-plus-sucrose patch and about one third chose to feed on the yeast only food. While protein (yeast) is essential for development, we also quantified larval success on diets with or without sucrose and show that larvae develop faster on diets containing sucrose. Our data suggest that fruit fly larvae can quickly assess major nutrients in food and seek a diet providing a missing nutrient. The larvae, however, probably prefer to quickly dig into a single food substrate for enhanced protection over achieving an optimal diet.

  10. Entamoeba dispar: genetic diversity of Iranian isolates based on serine-rich Entamoeba dispar protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, A; Rasti, S; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, E; Kazemi, B; Bandehpour, M; Nochi, Z; Hooshyar, H; Rezaian, M

    2008-12-01

    The nucleotide sequences of Serine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Protein (SREHP) gene have already exhibited stable and significant polymorphism in the gene studies. Serine-rich protein is also present and polymorphic in Entamoeba dispar which called SREDP. The polymorphism of the Serine-Rich Entamoeba dispar Protein (SREDP) gene among 8 isolates obtained from Iranian cyst carriers were analyzed by a nested PCR-RFLP followed by sequencing of the PCR products. From those isolates, six distinct DNA patterns were observed after PCR-RFLP of the nested PCR, whereas sequencing showed 8 different patterns among the isolates. The results demonstrate an extensive genetic variability among Iranian E. dispar isolates. The repeat-containing region of the SREDP was found extensively polymorphic in size, number and order of repeat units. Genetic diversity of Iranian E. dispar isolates based on the SREDP was more polymorphic in comparison of Serine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Protein (SREHP) of the E. histolytica isolates as well as were different from a few known SREDP genes.

  11. Stretch-activated cation channel from larval bullfrog skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Willumsen, Niels J; Marrero, Mario B

    2010-05-01

    Cell-attached patches from isolated epithelial cells from larval bullfrog skin revealed a cation channel that was activated by applying suction (-1 kPa to -4.5 kPa) to the pipette. Activation was characterized by an initial large current spike that rapidly attenuated to a stable value and showed a variable pattern of opening and closing with continuing suction. Current-voltage plots demonstrated linear or inward rectification and single channel conductances of 44-56 pS with NaCl or KCl Ringer's solution as the pipette solution, and a reversal potential (-V(p)) of 20-40 mV. The conductance was markedly reduced with N-methyl-D-glucamide (NMDG)-Cl Ringer's solution in the pipette. Neither amiloride nor ATP, which are known to stimulate an apical cation channel in Ussing chamber preparations of larval frog skin, produced channel activation nor did these compounds affect the response to suction. Stretch activation was not affected by varying the pipette concentrations of Ca(2+) between 0 mmol l(-1) and 4 mmol l(-1) or by varying pH between 6.8 and 8.0. However, conductance was reduced with 4 mmol l(-1) Ca(2+). Western blot analysis of membrane homogenates from larval bullfrog and larval toad skin identified proteins that were immunoreactive with mammalian TRPC1 and TRPC5 (TRPC, canonical transient receptor potential channel) antibodies while homogenates of skin from newly metamorphosed bullfrogs were positive for TRPC1 and TRPC3/6/7 antibodies. The electrophysiological response of larval bullfrog skin resembles that of a stretch-activated cation channel characterized in Xenopus oocytes and proposed to be TRPC1. These results indicate this channel persists in all life stages of anurans and that TRP isoforms may be important for sensory functions of their skin.

  12. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health and Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Sarahn M; Bryant, Allison S

    2017-03-01

    A health disparity is defined as an increased burden of an adverse health outcome or health determinant within a specific subset of the population. There are well-documented racial and ethnic disparities throughout health care at the patient, provider, and health care system levels. As the minority populations within the United States grow to record numbers, it is increasingly important to invest in efforts to characterize, understand, and end racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Inequities in health outcomes and care pose real threats to the entire nation's well-being. Eliminating health disparities is fundamental to the well-being, productivity, and viability of the entire nation.

  13. Fitness consequences of larval exposure to Beauveria bassiana on adults of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogels, Chantal B F; Bukhari, Tullu; Koenraadt, Constantianus J M

    2014-06-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi have shown to be effective in biological control of both larval and adult stages of malaria mosquitoes. However, a small fraction of mosquitoes is still able to emerge after treatment with fungus during the larval stage. It remains unclear whether fitness of these adults is affected by the treatment during the larval stage and whether they are still susceptible for another treatment during the adult stage. Therefore, we tested the effects of larval exposure to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana on fitness of surviving Anopheles stephensi females. Furthermore, we tested whether larval exposed females were still susceptible to re-exposure to the fungus during the adult stage. Sex ratio, survival and reproductive success were compared between non-exposed and larval exposed A. stephensi. Comparisons were also made between survival of non-exposed and larval exposed females that were re-exposed to B. bassiana during the adult stage. Larval treatment did not affect sex ratio of emerging mosquitoes. Larval exposed females that were infected died significantly faster and laid equal numbers of eggs from which equal numbers of larvae hatched, compared to non-exposed females. Larval exposed females that were uninfected had equal survival, but laid a significantly larger number of eggs from which a significantly higher number of larvae hatched, compared to non-exposed females. Larval exposed females which were re-exposed to B. bassiana during the adult stage had equal survival as females exposed only during the adult stage. Our results suggest that individual consequences for fitness of larval exposed females depended on whether a fungal infection was acquired during the larval stage. Larval exposed females remained susceptible to re-exposure with B. bassiana during the adult stage, indicating that larval and adult control of malaria mosquitoes with EF are compatible.

  14. Child poverty and regional disparities in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryurt, Mehmet Ali; Koç, Ismet

    2013-01-01

    The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) defines child poverty as the inability of the child to realize their existing potential due to their inability to access resources across different dimensions of life (income, health, nutrition, education, environment, etc.). On the basis of this definition, an attempt has been made in this study to put forth the disadvantaged positions children have in different dimensions of their lives, specifically by taking regional disparities into account. As the data source, the Turkey Demographic and Health Survey 2008 is used, a survey that consists of detailed information about the different dimensions of child poverty. In this study, in order to measure poverty in four different dimensions (education and work, health and nutrition, family environment, and domestic environment), a total of 25 variables were used and descriptive and multivariate analyses were made in order to highlight the regional disparities in child poverty. Principle components analysis conducted through the use of a deficit approach reveals that the variables closely related with education and health and nutrition were the critical dimensions behind child poverty in Turkey. The results of this study indicate that 22.4% of children in Turkey are poor when various dimensions of life are taken into account; the region with the highest child poverty is Central East Anatolia, at 34.9%, while the region with the lowest rate is East Marmara, at 15.6%.

  15. The Determinants Of Population Health Spatial Disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modranka Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Health of the population is one of the basic factors of social development. The results of empirical studies indicate a number of factors determining the level of health of the population related to access to health care services, the level of environmental pollution and the wealth of society. It must be assumed that the observed disparities in the health depend on distributions of particular determinants. The aim of the article is to assess the significance of the main factors affecting the occurrence of spatial disparities in the level of social development districts NTS-4 in terms of health of the population. The analysis was based on estimates of the Spatial Durbin Model (SDM which takes into account the impact of neighborhood spatial units on level of dependent variable and the explanatory variables. The size of the level of social development in terms of health of the population in the study was approximate by the aggregate value of the index, which is the local component of the Local Human Development Index LHDI.

  16. 杧果毒蛾和莲雾毒蛾幼虫头宽、体长和摄食量测定及其增长规律的研究%A Survey on the Head wide, Body Length, Feed Quantity and the Growth of the Larva of Lymantria marginata Walke and Cifuna sp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘奎

    2003-01-01

    @@ 杧果毒蛾(Lymantria marginata Walke)、莲雾毒蛾(Cifuna sp.)分别是热带果树杧果和莲雾上的重要食叶害虫.近年来,笔者对这两种害虫的生物学习性和室内种群特性作了较为系统的研究.

  17. Numerical simulations of barnacle larval dispersion coupled with field observations on larval abundance, settlement and recruitment in a tropical monsoon influenced coastal marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, Chetan A.; Samiksha, S. V.; George, Grinson; Aboobacker, V. M.; Vethamony, P.; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2012-06-01

    Larval abundance in an area depends on various factors which operate over different spatial and temporal scales. Identifying the factors responsible for variations in larval supply and abundance is important to understand the settlement and recruitment variability of their population in a particular area. In view of this, observations were carried out to monitor the larval abundance, settlement and recruitment of barnacles on a regular basis for a period of two years. The results were then compared with the numerical modelling studies carried out along the west coast of India. Field observations of larval abundance showed temporal variations. The least abundance of larvae was mostly observed during the monsoon season and the peak in abundance was mostly observed during the pre-monsoon season. Numerical simulations also showed a seasonal change in larval dispersion and retention patterns. During pre-monsoon season the larval movement was mostly found towards south and the larvae released from the northern release sites contributed to larval abundance within the estuaries, whereas during the monsoon season the larval movement was mostly found towards north and the larvae released from southern release sites contributed to larval abundance within the estuary. During post-monsoon season, the larval movement was found towards the north in the beginning of the season and is shifted towards the south at the end of the season, but the movement was mostly restricted near to the release sites. Larval supply from the adjacent rocky sites to the estuaries was higher during the pre-monsoon season and the retention of larvae released from different sites within the estuaries was found to be highest during the late post-monsoon and early pre-monsoon season. Maximum larval supply and retention during the pre-monsoon season coincided with maximum larval abundance, settlement and recruitment of barnacles observed in the field studies. These observations showed that the pattern of

  18. Asthma Management Disparities: A Photovoice Investigation with African American Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Agnew, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Disparities in asthma management are a burden on African American youth. The objective of this study is to describe and compare the discourses of asthma management disparities (AMDs) in African American adolescents in Seattle to existing youth-related asthma policies in Washington State. Adolescents participated in a three-session photovoice…

  19. Vector disparity sensor with vergence control for active vision systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Francisco; Diaz, Javier; Gibaldi, Agostino; Sabatini, Silvio P; Ros, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for computing vector disparity for active vision systems as used on robotics applications. The control of the vergence angle of a binocular system allows us to efficiently explore dynamic environments, but requires a generalization of the disparity computation with respect to a static camera setup, where the disparity is strictly 1-D after the image rectification. The interaction between vision and motor control allows us to develop an active sensor that achieves high accuracy of the disparity computation around the fixation point, and fast reaction time for the vergence control. In this contribution, we address the development of a real-time architecture for vector disparity computation using an FPGA device. We implement the disparity unit and the control module for vergence, version, and tilt to determine the fixation point. In addition, two on-chip different alternatives for the vector disparity engines are discussed based on the luminance (gradient-based) and phase information of the binocular images. The multiscale versions of these engines are able to estimate the vector disparity up to 32 fps on VGA resolution images with very good accuracy as shown using benchmark sequences with known ground-truth. The performances in terms of frame-rate, resource utilization, and accuracy of the presented approaches are discussed. On the basis of these results, our study indicates that the gradient-based approach leads to the best trade-off choice for the integration with the active vision system.

  20. Vector Disparity Sensor with Vergence Control for Active Vision Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ros

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an architecture for computing vector disparity for active vision systems as used on robotics applications. The control of the vergence angle of a binocular system allows us to efficiently explore dynamic environments, but requires a generalization of the disparity computation with respect to a static camera setup, where the disparity is strictly 1-D after the image rectification. The interaction between vision and motor control allows us to develop an active sensor that achieves high accuracy of the disparity computation around the fixation point, and fast reaction time for the vergence control. In this contribution, we address the development of a real-time architecture for vector disparity computation using an FPGA device. We implement the disparity unit and the control module for vergence, version, and tilt to determine the fixation point. In addition, two on-chip different alternatives for the vector disparity engines are discussed based on the luminance (gradient-based and phase information of the binocular images. The multiscale versions of these engines are able to estimate the vector disparity up to 32 fps on VGA resolution images with very good accuracy as shown using benchmark sequences with known ground-truth. The performances in terms of frame-rate, resource utilization, and accuracy of the presented approaches are discussed. On the basis of these results, our study indicates that the gradient-based approach leads to the best trade-off choice for the integration with the active vision system.

  1. Poverty and elimination of urban health disparities: challenge and opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stephen B; Quinn, Sandra Crouse

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the intersection of race and poverty, two critical factors fueling persistent racial and ethnic health disparities among urban populations. From the morass of social determinants that shape the health of racial and ethnic communities in our urban centers, we will offer promising practices and potential solutions to eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities.

  2. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in ADHD Diagnosis by Kindergarten Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul L.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Farkas, George; Maczuga, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whether and to what extent racial/ethnic disparities in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis occur by kindergarten entry is currently unknown. We investigated risk factors associated with an ADHD diagnosis by kindergarten entry generally, and specifically whether racial/ethnic disparities in ADHD diagnosis occur by…

  3. Black-white preterm birth disparity: a marker of inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose. The racial disparity in preterrn birth (PTB) is a persistent feature of perinatal epidemiology, inconsistently modeled in the literature. Rather than include race as an explanatory variable, or employ race-stratified models, we sought to directly model the PTB disparity ...

  4. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in ADHD Diagnosis by Kindergarten Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul L.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Farkas, George; Maczuga, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whether and to what extent racial/ethnic disparities in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis occur by kindergarten entry is currently unknown. We investigated risk factors associated with an ADHD diagnosis by kindergarten entry generally, and specifically whether racial/ethnic disparities in ADHD diagnosis occur by…

  5. Black-white preterm birth disparity: a marker of inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose. The racial disparity in preterrn birth (PTB) is a persistent feature of perinatal epidemiology, inconsistently modeled in the literature. Rather than include race as an explanatory variable, or employ race-stratified models, we sought to directly model the PTB disparity ...

  6. Challenges for Multilevel Health Disparities Research in a Transdisciplinary Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, John H.; Lehman, Amy; Hade, Erinn; Ferketich, Amy K.; Sarah, Gehlert; Rauscher, Garth H.; Abrams, Judith; Bird, Chloe E.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous factors play a part in health disparities. Although health disparities are manifested at the level of the individual, other contexts should be considered when investigating the associations of disparities with clinical outcomes. These contexts include families, neighborhoods, social organizations, and healthcare facilities. This paper reports on health disparities research as a multilevel research domain from the perspective of a large national initiative. The Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD) program was established by the NIH to examine the highly dimensional, complex nature of disparities and their effects on health. Because of its inherently transdisciplinary nature, the CPHHD program provides a unique environment in which to perform multilevel health disparities research. During the course of the program, the CPHHD centers have experienced challenges specific to this type of research. The challenges were categorized along three axes: sources of subjects and data, data characteristics, and multilevel analysis and interpretation. The CPHHDs collectively offer a unique example of how these challenges are met; just as importantly, they reveal a broad range of issues that health disparities researchers should consider as they pursue transdisciplinary investigations in this domain, particularly in the context of a large team science initiative. PMID:18619398

  7. Husserl and Heidegger: exploring the disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell-Henry, Tracy; Chapman, Ysanne; Francis, Karen

    2009-02-01

    Introduced as an alternative to empirical science, phenomenology offers nursing an insightful means for understanding nursing phenomena specifically in relation to lived experiences. However, not all phenomenologies were created equal, a point which has left many a nursing researcher not only confused. Furthermore, this confusion might result in the choosing of a philosophical framework that is neither cognizant with the research question nor the epistemological lens through which the researcher operates. Drawing on common nursing examples to illustrate concepts, the authors closely examine and debate the disparities between Husserl's transcendental phenomenology and Heidegger's hermeneutic approach to phenomenology. The aim of the article is to demystify the dense language used and present the fundamental beliefs of each philosopher in a format that is accessible to novice phenomenologists.

  8. Inhibition of Haemonchus contortus larval development by fungal lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Christian; Hertzberg, Hubertus; Butschi, Alex; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Aebi, Markus; Deplazes, Peter; Künzler, Markus; Štefanić, Saša

    2015-08-19

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that are involved in fundamental intra- and extracellular biological processes. They occur ubiquitously in nature and are especially abundant in plants and fungi. It has been well established that certain higher fungi produce lectins in their fruiting bodies and/or sclerotia as a part of their natural resistance against free-living fungivorous nematodes and other pests. Despite relatively high diversity of the glycan structures in nature, many of the glycans targeted by fungal lectins are conserved among organisms of the same taxon and sometimes even among different taxa. Such conservation of glycans between free-living and parasitic nematodes is providing us with a useful tool for discovery of novel chemotherapeutic and vaccine targets. In our study, a subset of fungal lectins emanating from toxicity screens on Caenorhabditis elegans was tested for their potential to inhibit larval development of Haemonchus contortus. The effect of Coprinopsis cinerea lectins - CCL2, CGL2, CGL3; Aleuria aurantia lectin - AAL; Marasmius oreades agglutinin - MOA; and Laccaria bicolor lectin - Lb-Tec2, on cultivated Haemonchus contortus larval stages was investigated using a larval development test (LDT). To validate the results of the toxicity assay and determine lectin binding capacity to the nematode digestive tract, biotinylated versions of lectins were fed to pre-infective larval stages of H. contortus and visualized by fluorescent microscopy. Lectin histochemistry on fixed adult worms was performed to investigate the presence and localisation of lectin binding sites in the disease-relevant developmental stage. Using an improved larval development test we found that four of the six tested lectins: AAL, CCL2, MOA and CGL2, exhibited a dose-dependent toxicity in LDT, as measured by the number of larvae developing to the L3 stage. In the case of AAL, CGL2 and MOA lectin, doses as low as 5 μg/ml caused >95 % inhibition of larval

  9. Learning the specific quality of taste reinforcement in larval Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Michael; Miura, Daisuke; Tanimura, Teiichi; Gerber, Bertram

    2015-01-27

    The only property of reinforcement insects are commonly thought to learn about is its value. We show that larval Drosophila not only remember the value of reinforcement (How much?), but also its quality (What?). This is demonstrated both within the appetitive domain by using sugar vs amino acid as different reward qualities, and within the aversive domain by using bitter vs high-concentration salt as different qualities of punishment. From the available literature, such nuanced memories for the quality of reinforcement are unexpected and pose a challenge to present models of how insect memory is organized. Given that animals as simple as larval Drosophila, endowed with but 10,000 neurons, operate with both reinforcement value and quality, we suggest that both are fundamental aspects of mnemonic processing-in any brain.

  10. Effects of moisture content of food waste on residue separation, larval growth and larval survival in black soldier fly bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jack Y K; Chiu, Sam L H; Lo, Irene M C

    2017-09-01

    In order to foster sustainable management of food waste, innovations in food waste valorization technologies are crucial. Black soldier fly (BSF) bioconversion is an emerging technology that can turn food waste into high-protein fish feed through the use of BSF larvae. The conventional method of BSF bioconversion is to feed BSF larvae with food waste directly without any moisture adjustment. However, it was reported that difficulty has been experienced in the separation of the residue (larval excreta and undigested material) from the insect biomass due to excessive moisture. In addition to the residue separation problem, the moisture content of the food waste may also affect the growth and survival aspects of BSF larvae. This study aims to determine the most suitable moisture content of food waste that can improve residue separation as well as evaluate the effects of the moisture content of food waste on larval growth and survival. In this study, pre-consumer and post-consumer food waste with different moisture content (70%, 75% and 80%) was fed to BSF larvae in a temperature-controlled rotary drum reactor. The results show that the residue can be effectively separated from the insect biomass by sieving using a 2.36mm sieve, for both types of food waste at 70% and 75% moisture content. However, sieving of the residue was not feasible for food waste at 80% moisture content. On the other hand, reduced moisture content of food waste was found to slow down larval growth. Hence, there is a trade-off between the sieving efficiency of the residue and the larval growth rate. Furthermore, the larval survival rate was not affected by the moisture content of food waste. A high larval survival rate of at least 95% was achieved using a temperature-controlled rotary drum reactor for all treatment groups. The study provides valuable insights for the waste management industry on understanding the effects of moisture content when employing BSF bioconversion for food waste recycling

  11. Left behind: cancer disparities in the developed world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Niharika; Crawford, Gregory B; Lemonde, Manon; Rittenberg, Cynthia N; Fernández-Ortega, Paz

    2016-08-01

    Huge advances have been made in cancer treatments over recent decades; however, significant disparities still exist in the developed world on the basis of race, socioeconomic status, education level, geographical location, and immigration status and in the United States, insurance status. Cancer disparities persist in the continuum of cancer care from risk factors, screening, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and end-of-life care. The causes of disparities are complex and multifactorial. The MASCC (Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer) Education Study Group would like to propose a framework of cancer disparities from a social perspective utilizing "social determinants of health" as delineated by the World Health Organization and highlight an unmet need for research and policy innovations to address cancer disparities in developed world.

  12. Philanthropy and disparities: progress, challenges, and unfinished business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Faith; Sessions, Kathryn

    2011-10-01

    Philanthropy has invested millions of dollars to reduce disparities in health care and improve minority health. Grants to strengthen providers' cultural competence, diversify health professions, and collect data have improved understanding of and spurred action on disparities. The persistence of disparities in spite of these advances has shifted philanthropic attention toward strategies to change social, economic, and environmental conditions. We argue that these evolving perspectives, along with earlier groundwork, present new opportunities for funders, especially in combination with progress toward universal health coverage. This article looks at how philanthropy has addressed health disparities over the past decade, with a focus on accomplishments, the work remaining to be done, and how funders can help advance the disparities agenda.

  13. Gender disparities in lipid management: the presence of disparities depends on the quality measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Catherine; Kerr, Eve A; Bernstein, Steven J; Krein, Sarah L

    2006-03-01

    To determine if the use of a more detailed quality measure affected the finding of gender disparities in lipid management. Retrospective cohort study. Study subjects included 2589 patients with diabetes mellitus in a managed care plan in 2000-2001. We compared the quality of lipid management in men and women using the following 3 measures: (1) the traditional screening measure (measurement of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C] level), (2) the LDL-C level (ie, among those with an LDL-C level measured, an LDL-C level or= 130 mg/dL plus statin initiation or intensification). Multivariate models were adjusted for clustering within clinic and for patient age, insulin use, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, congestive heart failure, and number of visits. In unadjusted analyses, using the traditional screening measure, women were less likely to be screened than men (P gender disparity does not persist with the use of a more detailed measure.

  14. Fish larval transport in the coastal waters through ecological modelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    George, G.

    ) numerically tracking the transport of larvae released from spawning sites based on hydrodynamics of the regions, and comparison with measurements (vi) interpreting the data sets generated by numerical simulation studies to infer the nursery areas and seasonal..., L. B. Crowder, J. A. Rice, and E. A. Marschall. Larval size and recruitment mechanisms in fishes: towards a conceptual framework. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 45:1657–1670, 1988. Y. Miyake, S. Kimura, T. Kawamura, T. Horii, H...

  15. Rapid effects of marine reserves via larval dispersal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cudney-Bueno

    Full Text Available Marine reserves have been advocated worldwide as conservation and fishery management tools. It is argued that they can protect ecosystems and also benefit fisheries via density-dependent spillover of adults and enhanced larval dispersal into fishing areas. However, while evidence has shown that marine reserves can meet conservation targets, their effects on fisheries are less understood. In particular, the basic question of if and over what temporal and spatial scales reserves can benefit fished populations via larval dispersal remains unanswered. We tested predictions of a larval transport model for a marine reserve network in the Gulf of California, Mexico, via field oceanography and repeated density counts of recently settled juvenile commercial mollusks before and after reserve establishment. We show that local retention of larvae within a reserve network can take place with enhanced, but spatially-explicit, recruitment to local fisheries. Enhancement occurred rapidly (2 yrs, with up to a three-fold increase in density of juveniles found in fished areas at the downstream edge of the reserve network, but other fishing areas within the network were unaffected. These findings were consistent with our model predictions. Our findings underscore the potential benefits of protecting larval sources and show that enhancement in recruitment can be manifested rapidly. However, benefits can be markedly variable within a local seascape. Hence, effects of marine reserve networks, positive or negative, may be overlooked when only focusing on overall responses and not considering finer spatially-explicit responses within a reserve network and its adjacent fishing grounds. Our results therefore call for future research on marine reserves that addresses this variability in order to help frame appropriate scenarios for the spatial management scales of interest.

  16. Rapid effects of marine reserves via larval dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudney-Bueno, Richard; Lavín, Miguel F; Marinone, Silvio G; Raimondi, Peter T; Shaw, William W

    2009-01-01

    Marine reserves have been advocated worldwide as conservation and fishery management tools. It is argued that they can protect ecosystems and also benefit fisheries via density-dependent spillover of adults and enhanced larval dispersal into fishing areas. However, while evidence has shown that marine reserves can meet conservation targets, their effects on fisheries are less understood. In particular, the basic question of if and over what temporal and spatial scales reserves can benefit fished populations via larval dispersal remains unanswered. We tested predictions of a larval transport model for a marine reserve network in the Gulf of California, Mexico, via field oceanography and repeated density counts of recently settled juvenile commercial mollusks before and after reserve establishment. We show that local retention of larvae within a reserve network can take place with enhanced, but spatially-explicit, recruitment to local fisheries. Enhancement occurred rapidly (2 yrs), with up to a three-fold increase in density of juveniles found in fished areas at the downstream edge of the reserve network, but other fishing areas within the network were unaffected. These findings were consistent with our model predictions. Our findings underscore the potential benefits of protecting larval sources and show that enhancement in recruitment can be manifested rapidly. However, benefits can be markedly variable within a local seascape. Hence, effects of marine reserve networks, positive or negative, may be overlooked when only focusing on overall responses and not considering finer spatially-explicit responses within a reserve network and its adjacent fishing grounds. Our results therefore call for future research on marine reserves that addresses this variability in order to help frame appropriate scenarios for the spatial management scales of interest.

  17. Managing Ammonia Emissions From Screwworm Larval Rearing Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagel, Agustin; Phillips, Pamela; Chaudhury, Muhammad; Skoda, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Mass production, sterilization, and release of screwworms (Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel)) that were competitive in the field significantly contributed to the successful application of the sterile insect technique for eradication of screwworms from continental North America. Metabolic byproducts resulting from protein-rich diets required for larval screwworms lead to ammonia liberation, sometimes at high levels, within the mass rearing facility. Until recently a sodium polyacrylate gel bulking agent was used for the larval media and adsorbed much of the ammonia. A need to replace the gel with an environmentally "friendly" bulking agent, while not increasing ammonia levels in the rearing facility, led to a series of experiments with the objective of developing procedures to reduce ammonia emissions from the larval media bulked with cellulose fiber. Additives of ammonia-converting bacteria, potassium permanganate, and Yucca schidigera Roezl ex Otrgies powder extract, previously reported to reduce ammonia levels in organic environments, were evaluated. Ammonia-converting bacteria did not have a positive effect. Addition of Y. schidigera powder extract (∼1% of total volume), potassium permanganate (∼250 ppm), and a combination of these two additives (at these same concentrations) kept ammonia at equivalent levels as when larval media was bulked with gel. Potassium permanganate also had sufficient antimicrobial properties that the use of formaldehyde in the diet was not necessary. Further testing is needed, at a mass rearing level, before full implementation into the screwworm eradication program. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Social coercion of larval development in an ant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalta, Irene; Amor, Fernando; Cerdá, Xim; Boulay, Raphaël

    2016-04-01

    Ants provide one of the best examples of the division of labor in animal societies. While the queens reproduce, workers generally refrain from laying eggs and dedicate themselves exclusively to domestic tasks. In many species, the small diploid larvae are bipotent and can develop either into workers or queens depending mostly on environmental cues. This generates a conflicting situation between the adults that tend to rear a majority of larvae into workers and the larvae whose individual interest may be to develop into reproductive queens. We tested the social regulation of larval caste fate in the fission-performing ant Aphaenogaster senilis. We first observed interactions between resident workers and queen- and worker-destined larvae in presence/absence of the queen. The results show that workers tend to specifically eliminate queen-destined larvae when the queen is present but not when she is absent or imprisoned in a small cage allowing for volatile pheromone exchanges. In addition, we found that the presence of already developed queen-destined larvae does not inhibit the development of younger still bipotent larvae into queens. Finally, we analyzed the cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of queen- and worker-destined larvae and found no significant quantitative or qualitative difference. Interestingly, the total amount of hydrocarbons on both larval castes is extremely low, which lends credence on the chemical insignificance hypothesis of larval ants. Overall, our results suggest that workers control larval development and police larvae that would develop into queens instead of workers. Such policing behavior is similar in many aspects to what is known of worker policing among adults.

  19. Development of environmental tools for anopheline larval control

    OpenAIRE

    Mweresa Collins K; Imbahale Susan S; Takken Willem; Mukabana Wolfgang R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaria mosquitoes spend a considerable part of their life in the aquatic stage, rendering them vulnerable to interventions directed to aquatic habitats. Recent successes of mosquito larval control have been reported using environmental and biological tools. Here, we report the effects of shading by plants and biological control agents on the development and survival of anopheline and culicine mosquito larvae in man-made natural habitats in western Kenya. Trials consisted ...

  20. Larval connectivity in an effective network of marine protected areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Christie

    Full Text Available Acceptance of marine protected areas (MPAs as fishery and conservation tools has been hampered by lack of direct evidence that MPAs successfully seed unprotected areas with larvae of targeted species. For the first time, we present direct evidence of large-scale population connectivity within an existing and effective network of MPAs. A new parentage analysis identified four parent-offspring pairs from a large, exploited population of the coral-reef fish Zebrasoma flavescens in Hawai'i, revealing larval dispersal distances ranging from 15 to 184 km. In two cases, successful dispersal was from an MPA to unprotected sites. Given high adult abundances, the documentation of any parent-offspring pairs demonstrates that ecologically-relevant larval connectivity between reefs is substantial. All offspring settled at sites to the north of where they were spawned. Satellite altimetry and oceanographic models from relevant time periods indicated a cyclonic eddy that created prevailing northward currents between sites where parents and offspring were found. These findings empirically demonstrate the effectiveness of MPAs as useful conservation and management tools and further highlight the importance of coupling oceanographic, genetic, and ecological data to predict, validate and quantify larval connectivity among marine populations.

  1. A subset of interneurons required for Drosophila larval locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Shingo; Long, Hong; Thomas, John B

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to define the neural circuits generating locomotor behavior have produced an initial understanding of some of the components within the spinal cord, as well as a basic understanding of several invertebrate motor pattern generators. However, how these circuits are assembled during development is poorly understood. We are defining the neural circuit that generates larval locomotion in the genetically tractable fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to study locomotor circuit development. Forward larval locomotion involves a stereotyped posterior-to-anterior segmental translocation of body wall muscle contraction and is generated by a relatively small number of identified muscles, motor and sensory neurons, plus an unknown number of the ~270 bilaterally-paired interneurons per segment of the 1st instar larva. To begin identifying the relevant interneurons, we have conditionally inactivated synaptic transmission of interneuron subsets and assayed for the effects on locomotion. From this screen we have identified a subset of 25 interneurons per hemisegment, called the lateral locomotor neurons (LLNs), that are required for locomotion. Both inactivation and constitutive activation of the LLNs disrupt locomotion, indicating that patterned output of the LLNs is required. By expressing a calcium indicator in the LLNs, we found that they display a posterior-to-anterior wave of activity within the CNS corresponding to the segmental translocation of the muscle contraction wave. Identification of the LLNs represents the first step toward elucidating the circuit generating larval locomotion.

  2. Embryogenesis, hatching and larval development of Artemia during orbital spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, B. S.; Debell, L.; Armbrust, L.; Guikema, J. A.; Metcalf, J.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Developmental biology studies, using gastrula-arrested cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana, were conducted during two flights of the space shuttle Atlantis (missions STS-37 and STS-43) in 1991. Dehydrated cysts were activated, on orbit, by addition of salt water to the cysts, and then development was terminated by the addition of fixative. Development took place in 5 ml syringes, connected by tubing to activation syringes, containing salt water, and termination syringes, containing fixative. Comparison of space results with simultaneous ground control experiments showed that equivalent percentages of naupliar larvae hatched in the syringes (40%). Thus, reactivation of development, completion of embryogenesis, emergence and hatching took place, during spaceflight, without recognizable alteration in numbers of larvae produced. Post-hatching larval development was studied in experiments where development was terminated, by introduction of fixative, 2 days, 4 days, and 8 days after reinitiation of development. During spaceflight, successive larval instars or stages, interrupted by molts, occurred, generating brine shrimp at appropriate larval instars. Naupliar larvae possessed the single naupliar eye, and development of the lateral pair of adult eyes also took place in space. Transmission electron microscopy revealed extensive differentiation, including skeletal muscle and gut endoderm, as well as the eye tissues. These studies demonstrate the potential value of Artemia for developmental biology studies during spa ceflight, and show that extensive degrees of development can take place in this microgravity environment.

  3. Oceanography promotes self-recruitment in a planktonic larval disperser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Peter R.; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; van Sebille, Erik; Waters, Jonathan; Beheregaray, Luciano B.

    2016-01-01

    The application of high-resolution genetic data has revealed that oceanographic connectivity in marine species with planktonic larvae can be surprisingly limited, even in the absence of major barriers to dispersal. Australia’s southern coast represents a particularly interesting system for studying planktonic larval dispersal, as the hydrodynamic regime of the wide continental shelf has potential to facilitate onshore retention of larvae. We used a seascape genetics approach (the joint analysis of genetic data and oceanographic connectivity simulations) to assess population genetic structure and self-recruitment in a broadcast-spawning marine gastropod that exists as a single meta-population throughout its temperate Australian range. Levels of self-recruitment were surprisingly high, and oceanographic connectivity simulations indicated that this was a result of low-velocity nearshore currents promoting the retention of planktonic larvae in the vicinity of natal sites. Even though the model applied here is comparatively simple and assumes that the dispersal of planktonic larvae is passive, we find that oceanography alone is sufficient to explain the high levels of genetic structure and self-recruitment. Our study contributes to growing evidence that sophisticated larval behaviour is not a prerequisite for larval retention in the nearshore region in planktonic-developing species. PMID:27687507

  4. Larval RNA interference in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, David M; Clark-Hachtel, Courtney M; Borràs-Castells, Ferran; Tomoyasu, Yoshinori

    2014-10-13

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, offers a repertoire of experimental tools for genetic and developmental studies, including a fully annotated genome sequence, transposon-based transgenesis, and effective RNA interference (RNAi). Among these advantages, RNAi-based gene knockdown techniques are at the core of Tribolium research. T. castaneum show a robust systemic RNAi response, making it possible to perform RNAi at any life stage by simply injecting double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into the beetle's body cavity. In this report, we provide an overview of our larval RNAi technique in T. castaneum. The protocol includes (i) isolation of the proper stage of T. castaneum larvae for injection, (ii) preparation for the injection setting, and (iii) dsRNA injection. Larval RNAi is a simple, but powerful technique that provides us with quick access to loss-of-function phenotypes, including multiple gene knockdown phenotypes as well as a series of hypomorphic phenotypes. Since virtually all T. castaneum tissues are susceptible to extracellular dsRNA, the larval RNAi technique allows researchers to study a wide variety of tissues in diverse contexts, including the genetic basis of organismal responses to the outside environment. In addition, the simplicity of this technique stimulates more student involvement in research, making T. castaneum an ideal genetic system for use in a classroom setting.

  5. Oceanography promotes self-recruitment in a planktonic larval disperser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Peter R; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; van Sebille, Erik; Waters, Jonathan; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2016-09-30

    The application of high-resolution genetic data has revealed that oceanographic connectivity in marine species with planktonic larvae can be surprisingly limited, even in the absence of major barriers to dispersal. Australia's southern coast represents a particularly interesting system for studying planktonic larval dispersal, as the hydrodynamic regime of the wide continental shelf has potential to facilitate onshore retention of larvae. We used a seascape genetics approach (the joint analysis of genetic data and oceanographic connectivity simulations) to assess population genetic structure and self-recruitment in a broadcast-spawning marine gastropod that exists as a single meta-population throughout its temperate Australian range. Levels of self-recruitment were surprisingly high, and oceanographic connectivity simulations indicated that this was a result of low-velocity nearshore currents promoting the retention of planktonic larvae in the vicinity of natal sites. Even though the model applied here is comparatively simple and assumes that the dispersal of planktonic larvae is passive, we find that oceanography alone is sufficient to explain the high levels of genetic structure and self-recruitment. Our study contributes to growing evidence that sophisticated larval behaviour is not a prerequisite for larval retention in the nearshore region in planktonic-developing species.

  6. Overcoming the Triad of Rural Health Disparities: How Local Culture, Lack of Economic Opportunity, and Geographic Location Instigate Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tami L.; DiClemente, Ralph; Snell, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss how the effects of culture, economy, and geographical location intersect to form a gestalt triad determining health-related disparities in rural areas. Methods: We critically profile each component of the deterministic triad in shaping current health-related disparities in rural areas; evaluate the uniquely composed…

  7. Characterisation of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae larval habitats at ground level and temporal fluctuations of larval abundance in Córdoba, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Grech

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to characterise the ground-level larval habitats of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, to determine the relationships between habitat characteristics and larval abundance and to examine seasonal larval-stage variations in Córdoba city. Every two weeks for two years, 15 larval habitats (natural and artificial water bodies, including shallow wells, drains, retention ponds, canals and ditches were visited and sampled for larval mosquitoes. Data regarding the water depth, temperature and pH, permanence, the presence of aquatic vegetation and the density of collected mosquito larvae were recorded. Data on the average air temperatures and accumulated precipitation during the 15 days prior to each sampling date were also obtained. Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae were collected throughout the study period and were generally most abundant in the summer season. Generalised linear mixed models indicated the average air temperature and presence of dicotyledonous aquatic vegetation as variables that served as important predictors of larval densities. Additionally, permanent breeding sites supported high larval densities. In Córdoba city and possibly in other highly populated cities at the same latitude with the same environmental conditions, control programs should focus on permanent larval habitats with aquatic vegetation during the early spring, when the Cx. quinquefasciatus population begins to increase.

  8. Isolation and culture of larval cells from C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sihui Zhang

    Full Text Available Cell culture is an essential tool to study cell function. In C. elegans the ability to isolate and culture cells has been limited to embryonically derived cells. However, cells or blastomeres isolated from mixed stage embryos terminally differentiate within 24 hours of culture, thus precluding post-embryonic stage cell culture. We have developed an efficient and technically simple method for large-scale isolation and primary culture of larval-stage cells. We have optimized the treatment to maximize cell number and minimize cell death for each of the four larval stages. We obtained up to 7.8×10(4 cells per microliter of packed larvae, and up to 97% of adherent cells isolated by this method were viable for at least 16 hours. Cultured larval cells showed stage-specific increases in both cell size and multinuclearity and expressed lineage- and cell type-specific reporters. The majority (81% of larval cells isolated by our method were muscle cells that exhibited stage-specific phenotypes. L1 muscle cells developed 1 to 2 wide cytoplasmic processes, while L4 muscle cells developed 4 to 14 processes of various thicknesses. L4 muscle cells developed bands of myosin heavy chain A thick filaments at the cell center and spontaneously contracted ex vivo. Neurons constituted less than 10% of the isolated cells and the majority of neurons developed one or more long, microtubule-rich protrusions that terminated in actin-rich growth cones. In addition to cells such as muscle and neuron that are high abundance in vivo, we were also able to isolate M-lineage cells that constitute less than 0.2% of cells in vivo. Our novel method of cell isolation extends C. elegans cell culture to larval developmental stages, and allows use of the wealth of cell culture tools, such as cell sorting, electrophysiology, co-culture, and high-resolution imaging of subcellular dynamics, in investigation of post-embryonic development and physiology.

  9. Larval and post-larval stages of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas are resistant to elevated CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko W K Ginger

    Full Text Available The average pH of surface oceans has decreased by 0.1 unit since industrialization and is expected to decrease by another 0.3-0.7 units before the year 2300 due to the absorption of anthropogenic CO2. This human-caused pH change is posing serious threats and challenges to the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas, especially to their larval stages. Our knowledge of the effect of reduced pH on C. gigas larvae presently relies presumptively on four short-term (<4 days survival and growth studies. Using multiple physiological measurements and life stages, the effects of long-term (40 days exposure to pH 8.1, 7.7 and 7.4 on larval shell growth, metamorphosis, respiration and filtration rates at the time of metamorphosis, along with the juvenile shell growth and structure of the C. gigas, were examined in this study. The mean survival and growth rates were not affected by pH. The metabolic, feeding and metamorphosis rates of pediveliger larvae were similar, between pH 8.1 and 7.7. The pediveligers at pH 7.4 showed reduced weight-specific metabolic and filtration rates, yet were able to sustain a more rapid post-settlement growth rate. However, no evidence suggested that low pH treatments resulted in alterations to the shell ultrastructures (SEM images or elemental compositions (i.e., Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios. Thus, larval and post-larval forms of the C. gigas in the Yellow Sea are probably resistant to elevated CO2 and decreased near-future pH scenarios. The pre-adapted ability to resist a wide range of decreased pH may provide C. gigas with the necessary tolerance to withstand rapid pH changes over the coming century.

  10. Disability, disparate impact, and class actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Michael Ashley; Waterstone, Michael E

    2006-12-01

    Following Title VII's enactment, group-based employment discrimination actions flourished due to disparate impact theory and the class action device. Courts recognized that subordination that defined a group's social identity was also sufficient legally to bind members together, even when relief had to be issued individually. Woven through these cases was a notion of panethnicity that united inherently unrelated groups into a common identity, for example, Asian Americans. Stringent judicial interpretation subsequently eroded both legal frameworks and it has become increasingly difficult to assert collective employment actions, even against discriminatory practices affecting an entire group. This deconstruction has immensely disadvantaged persons with disabilities. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), individual employee claims to accommodate specific impairments, such as whether to install ramps or replace computer screens, have all but eclipsed a coherent theory of disability-based disparate impact law. Moreover, the class action device has been virtually nonexistent in disability discrimination employment cases. The absence of collective action has been especially harmful because the realm of the workplace is precisely where group-based remedies are needed most. Specifically, a crucial but overlooked issue in disability integration is the harder-to-reach embedded norms that require job and policy modifications. The Article argues that pandisability theory serves as an analogue to earlier notions of panethnicity and provides an equally compelling heuristic for determining class identity. It shows that pandisability undergirds ADA public service and public accommodation class actions in which individualized remedy assessments have been accepted as part of group-based challenges to social exclusion. The Article also demonstrates that this broader vision of collective action is consistent with the history underlying the class action device. Taking

  11. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Men's Health: Examining Psychosocial Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tyson H; Hargrove, Taylor W; Griffith, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    This study uses data from the Health and Retirement Study and an approach informed by the Biopsychosocial Model of Racism as a Stressor to examine the extent to which socioeconomic status, stressors, discrimination, and neighborhood conditions are mechanisms underlying racial/ethnic disparities in functional limitations among men. Results reveal that racial/ethnic differences in socioeconomic status, stressors, discrimination, and neighborhood conditions-individually and collectively-account for a substantial proportion of racial/ethnic disparities in functional limitations. Findings suggest that the social determinants of health for men of color need to be more seriously considered in investigations of and efforts to address health disparities.

  12. Trinocular Stereo Matching Based on Correlations Between Baselines and Disparities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANYepeng; GUWeikang

    2004-01-01

    Gray correlation technique is utilized to take the multi-peak feature points with gray correlation coefficients less than a certain range of maximal correlation coefficient as a potential candidate matching set. There exists the maximal correlation between the correct disparities and their corresponding baselines. A trinocular stereo matching algorithm is proposed based on correlations between the baselines and disparities. After computing the correlations between the baselines and disparities, the unique matches can be determined by maximal correlation coefficient. It is proved that the algorithm proposed is valid and credible by 3-D reconstruction on two pairs of actual natural stereo images.

  13. Immigrant-based Disparities in Mental Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauldry, Shawn; Szaflarski, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Studies of immigrant-based disparities in mental health care have been limited by small sample sizes and a lack of measures of different dimensions of acculturation. This study draws on the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions to address these limitations. Results indicate first-generation immigrants have lower rates of utilization for both mood and anxiety disorders. Nativity-based disparities in treatment are particularly notable among people from African and Hispanic origins, while there is little evidence of disparities among people from European origins. Of three dimensions of acculturation, only the identity dimension has a positive association with mental health care utilization. PMID:28845455

  14. Racial disparities in pediatric asthma: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Tanisha D; Graham, LeRoy M; Divgi, Varada

    2011-02-01

    The burden of asthma disproportionately affects children living in economically disadvantaged urban communities. The relationships between ethnicity, genetic differences, lower socioeconomic status, poor medication adherence, greater exposure to environmental triggers, and absence of regular asthma care all contribute to this disparity. This review aims to identify and discuss recent studies on additional factors that may also impact to pediatric asthma disparity. The body of work examined in this review suggests that these disparities are the result of gene-environment interactions, vitamin D metabolism, socioeconomic status, urban environment, healthcare setting, and associated health beliefs.

  15. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Use of Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Carol M; Haidet, Paul; Paterniti, Debora A; Collins, Tracie C; Gordon, Howard S; O'Malley, Kimberly; Petersen, Laura A; Sharf, Barbara F; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Wray, Nelda P; Street, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    African Americans and Latinos use services that require a doctor's order at lower rates than do whites. Racial bias and patient preferences contribute to disparities, but their effects appear small. Communication during the medical interaction plays a central role in decision making about subsequent interventions and health behaviors. Research has shown that doctors have poorer communication with minority patients than with others, but problems in doctor-patient communication have received little attention as a potential cause, a remediable one, of health disparities. We evaluate the evidence that poor communication is a cause of disparities and propose some remedies drawn from the communication sciences. PMID:12542590

  16. Challenges to using a business case for addressing health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Nicole; Somers, Stephen A; Fremont, Allen; Angeles, January; Murphy, Erin K; Hamblin, Allison

    2008-01-01

    The authors consider the challenges to quantifying both the business case and the social case for addressing disparities, which is central to achieving equity in the U.S. health care system. They describe the practical and methodological challenges faced by health plans exploring the business and social cases for undertaking disparity-reducing interventions. Despite these challenges, sound business and quality improvement principles can guide health care organizations seeking to reduce disparities. Place-based interventions may help focus resources and engage health care and community partners who can share in the costs of-and gains from-such efforts.

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-01-0287 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-01-0287 ref|YP_003001967.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 [Lymantria dispa...r] gb|ACL93267.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 [Lymantria dispar] YP_003001967.1 0.044 25% ...

  18. Larval green and white sturgeon swimming performance in relation to water-diversion flows

    OpenAIRE

    Verhille, Christine E.; Poletto, Jamilynn B.; Cocherell, Dennis E.; DeCourten, Bethany; Baird, Sarah; Joseph J Cech; Fangue, Nann A.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known of the swimming capacities of larval sturgeons, despite global population declines in many species due in part to fragmentation of their spawning and rearing habitats by man-made water-diversion structures. Larval green (Acipenser medirostris) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) inhabit the highly altered Sacramento–San Joaquin watershed, making them logical species to examine vulnerability to entrainment by altered water flows. The risk of larval sturgeon entrainment...

  19. Regional Disparities in the Transition Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IBOLYA KURKÓ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The abolishment of the communist regime, the establishment of a democratic legal and institutional system brought important changes in the development of the regional economy of Romania. The old – from an economic point of view – differentiating factors have lost some of their importance, mainly the level of industrialization, which, in the past, was used to measure economic development. In addition, other factors came forward, that correlate more with the economic capacity, but, nowadays, their positive effect can only be increased by the combination of several other factors: foreign investments, as an indicator of regional attractiveness, regional GDP, the level of personal income, and the appreciation of human resources. Today, in the interest of enhancing the competitiveness of the regions a special role is reserved for entrepreneurial activity, the strength of the SME sector, the role of foreign working capital in the local economy, but also the territorial concentration of R&D centers. The study focuses on some aspects of disparities regarding the regional economic structure.

  20. Urban poverty and infant mortality rate disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Mario; Sims, Tammy L; Bruce, Marino A

    2007-04-01

    This study examined whether the relationship between high poverty and infant mortality rates (IMRs) varied across race- and ethnic-specific populations in large urban areas. Data were drawn from 1990 Census and 1992-1994 Vital Statistics for selected U.S. metropolitan areas. High-poverty areas were defined as neighborhoods in which > or = 40% of the families had incomes below the federal poverty threshold. Bivariate models showed that high poverty was a significant predictor of IMR for each group; however, multivariate analyses demonstrate that maternal health and regional factors explained most of the variance in the group-specific models of IMR. Additional analysis revealed that high poverty was significantly associated with minority-white IMR disparities, and country of origin is an important consideration for ethnic birth outcomes. Findings from this study provide a glimpse into the complexity associated with infant mortality in metropolitan areas because they suggest that the factors associated with infant mortality in urban areas vary by race and ethnicity.

  1. LAUGHING AT OURSELVES: REFLECTING MALAYSIAN ETHNIC DISPARITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SWAGATA SINHA ROY

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia’s various ethnic groups make interesting study both sociologically and culturally. With such a heady mix of cultural elements to explore, it is often natural that the many groups stumble upon ‘rare gems’ that reflect their ‘Malaysianess’. Have Malaysians really ever appreciated the many and varied aspects of culture that they are seemingly suddenly thrown into? Do we embrace these happily or are we constantly rejecting them? Fortunately, through the medium of film, we are, from time to time, allowed to reflect on our obvious similarities and even more apparent disparities. In this paper, we explore the culture and perceptions of people from the major ethnic groups that are the human base of this very country. When was it we have last laughed at ourselves … heartily? Nasi Lemak 2.0 provides an interesting, if not disturbing insight into the workings of the Malaysian ‘mind’. Nasi Lemak 2.0 was released on 8th September 2011 and impacted a whole generation of Malaysians. The characters have been well chosen and have done a wonderful job of being representations of the various communities in this nation. Ethnocentrism is a reality and often rears its head, ‘ugly’ or otherwise in several situations. Are we able to grapple with the levels of ethnocentrism that we encounter? These are some of the issues that will trigger much debate and discussion among ourselves and perhaps also reflect our cores.

  2. Nutritional disparities among women in urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Siddharth; Sethi, Vani

    2013-12-01

    The paper presents a wealth quartile analysis of the urban subset of the third round of Demographic Health Survey of India to unmask intra-urban nutrition disparities in women. Maternal thinness and moderate/ severe anaemia among women of the poorest urban quartile was 38.5% and 20% respectively and 1.5-1.8 times higher than the rest of urban population. Receipt of pre- and postnatal nutrition and health education and compliance to iron folic acid tablets during pregnancy was low across all quartiles. One-fourth (24.5%) of households in the lowest urban quartile consumed salt with no iodine content, which was 2.8 times higher than rest of the urban population (8.7%). The study highlights the need to use poor-specific urban data for planning and suggests (i) routine field assessment of maternal nutritional status in outreach programmes, (ii) improving access to food subsidies, subsidized adequately-iodized salt and food supplementation programmes, (iii) identifying alternative iron supplementation methods, and (iv) institutionalizing counselling days.

  3. Cancer survival disparities by health insurance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaoling; Roche, Lisa M; Pawlish, Karen S; Henry, Kevin A

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies found that uninsured and Medicaid insured cancer patients have poorer outcomes than cancer patients with private insurance. We examined the association between health insurance status and survival of New Jersey patients 18-64 diagnosed with seven common cancers during 1999-2004. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals for 5-year cause-specific survival were calculated from Cox proportional hazards regression models; health insurance status was the primary predictor with adjustment for other significant factors in univariate chi-square or Kaplan-Meier survival log-rank tests. Two diagnosis periods by health insurance status were compared using Kaplan-Meier survival log-rank tests. For breast, colorectal, lung, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and prostate cancer, uninsured and Medicaid insured patients had significantly higher risks of death than privately insured patients. For bladder cancer, uninsured patients had a significantly higher risk of death than privately insured patients. Survival improved between the two diagnosis periods for privately insured patients with breast, colorectal, or lung cancer and NHL, for Medicaid insured patients with NHL, and not at all for uninsured patients. Survival from cancer appears to be related to a complex set of demographic and clinical factors of which insurance status is a part. While ensuring that everyone has adequate health insurance is an important step, additional measures must be taken to address cancer survival disparities.

  4. Disparities in renal care in Jalisco, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Renoirte-Lopez, Karina; Marquez-Magaña, Isela

    2010-01-01

    End-stage renal disease represents a serious public health problem in Mexico. Close to 9% of the Mexican population has chronic kidney disease (CKD) and 40,000 patients are on dialysis. However, the fragmentation of our health care system has resulted in unequal access to renal replacement therapy. In addition, poor patients in Jalisco with kidney failure have very advanced disease at the time of dialysis initiation, suggesting lack of access to predialysis care. To address these issues, a number of strategies have been implemented. Among them a renal replacement therapy program for which the cost of treatment is shared by government, patients, industry, and charitable organizations; the implementation of a state-funded hemodialysis program that provides free dialysis for the poor; the establishment of a university-sponsored residency program in nephrology and a postgraduate training in nephrology nursing; and a screening program for early detection and control of CKD. In conclusion, access to renal care is unequal. The extension of the Seguro Popular to cover end-stage renal disease treatment nationwide and the implementation of community screening programs for the detection and control of CKD offers an opportunity to correct the existing disparities in renal care in Jalisco and perhaps in other regions of Mexico.

  5. Disparities in the management of ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jennifer Y; Chen, Ling; Gumer, Arielle R; Tergas, Ana I; Hou, June Y; Burke, William M; Ananth, Cande V; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D

    2017-07-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is common among young women. Treatment can consist of either surgery with salpingectomy or salpingostomy or medical management with methotrexate. In addition to acute complications, treatment of ectopic pregnancy can result in long-term sequelae that include decreased fertility. Little is known about the patterns of care and predictors of treatment in women with ectopic pregnancy. Similarly, data on outcomes for various treatments are limited. We examined the patterns of care and outcomes for women with ectopic pregnancy. Specifically, we examined predictors of medical (vs surgical) management of ectopic pregnancy and tubal conservation (salpingostomy vs salpingectomy) among women who underwent surgery. The Perspective database was used to identify women with a diagnosis of tubal ectopic pregnancy treated from 2006-2015. Perspective is an all-payer database that collects data on patients at hospitals from throughout the United States. Women were classified as having undergone medical treatment, if they received methotrexate, and surgical treatment, if treatment consisted of salpingostomy or salpingectomy. Multivariable models were developed to examine predictors of medical treatment and of tubal conserving salpingostomy among women who were treated surgically. Among the 62,588 women, 49,090 women (78.4%) were treated surgically, and 13,498 women (21.6%) received methotrexate. Use of methotrexate increased from 14.5% in 2006 to 27.3% by 2015 (Pectopic pregnancy. There are significant race- and insurance-related disparities associated with treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Economic disparities between EU states and regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion CIUREA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available EU has 27 Member States representing a community and a market of 493million citizens, which creates further economic and social disparities between thestates and their 271 regions. In a region in four, the GDP (gross domestic product percapita is 75% below the average for the EU-27. Based on the concepts of solidarity andcohesion, regional policy of the European Union favors reducing structural disparitiesbetween EU regions, the balanced development of the community and promoting aneffective equality of opportunity between people. Over the past 50 years, Europeancooperation has helped build highways, sewage plants, bridges, laboratories forbiotechnology. She helped to revive urban areas and neglected activities, throughcountless projects in the poorest regions of the Union.. Two key values: solidarity andcohesion, underlying these projects and the regional policy of the European Union. Theeconomic, social and territorial cohesion will always be at the heart of Europe Strategy2020, a key mechanism for achieving the priorities for a smart growth, sustainable andinclusive in the Member States and regions.

  7. Location Isn't Everything: Timing of Spawning Aggregations Optimizes Larval Replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Megan J; Karnauskas, Mandy; Toews, Carl; Paris, Claire B

    2015-01-01

    Many species of reef fishes form large spawning aggregations that are highly predictable in space and time. Prior research has suggested that aggregating fish derive fitness benefits not just from mating at high density but, also, from oceanographic features of the spatial locations where aggregations occur. Using a probabilistic biophysical model of larval dispersal coupled to a fine resolution hydrodynamic model of the Florida Straits, we develop a stochastic landscape of larval fitness. Tracking virtual larvae from release to settlement and incorporating changes in larval behavior through ontogeny, we found that larval success was sensitive to the timing of spawning. Indeed, propagules released during the observed spawning period had higher larval success rates than those released outside the observed spawning period. In contrast, larval success rates were relatively insensitive to the spatial position of the release site. In addition, minimum (rather than mean) larval survival was maximized during the observed spawning period, indicating a reproductive strategy that minimizes the probability of recruitment failure. Given this landscape of larval fitness, we take an inverse optimization approach to define a biological objective function that reflects a tradeoff between the mean and variance of larval success in a temporally variable environment. Using this objective function, we suggest that the length of the spawning period can provide insight into the tradeoff between reproductive risk and reward.

  8. Cardiorespiratory ontogeny and response to environmental hypoxia of larval spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Ruff, Nicole; Battaglene, Stephen C

    2015-06-01

    Cardiorespiratory function is vital to an organism's ability to respond to environmental stress and analysis of cardiorespiratory capacity of species or life stages can elucidate vulnerability to climate change. Spiny lobsters have one of the most complex pelagic larval life cycles of any invertebrate and recently there has been an unexplained decline in post-larval recruitment for a number of species. We conducted the first analysis of the larval ontogeny of oxygen consumption, heart rate, maxilla 2 ventilation rate and oxyregulatory capacity of the spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi, to gain insight into their vulnerability to ocean change and to investigate life stage specific sensitivity to temperature-dependent oxygen limitation. In normoxia, heart and maxilla 2 ventilation rates increased in early larval development before declining, which we hypothesise is related to the transition from myogenic to neurogenic cardiac control. Maxilla 2 ventilation rate was sensitive to hypoxia at all larval stages, while heart rate was only sensitive to hypoxia in the late phyllosoma stages. Oxygen consumption conformed to environmental hypoxia at all larval stages. Spiny lobster larvae have limited respiratory control due to immature gas exchange physiology, compounded by their exceptionally large size. The lack of oxyregulatory ability suggests that all development stages are vulnerable to changes in sea temperature and oxygen availability. The synergetic stressors of increased temperature and reduced dissolved oxygen in the marine environment will diminish spiny lobster larval performance, increasing the challenge to achieve their extended larval life cycle, which may contribute to declines in post-larval recruitment.

  9. Location Isn't Everything: Timing of Spawning Aggregations Optimizes Larval Replenishment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan J Donahue

    Full Text Available Many species of reef fishes form large spawning aggregations that are highly predictable in space and time. Prior research has suggested that aggregating fish derive fitness benefits not just from mating at high density but, also, from oceanographic features of the spatial locations where aggregations occur. Using a probabilistic biophysical model of larval dispersal coupled to a fine resolution hydrodynamic model of the Florida Straits, we develop a stochastic landscape of larval fitness. Tracking virtual larvae from release to settlement and incorporating changes in larval behavior through ontogeny, we found that larval success was sensitive to the timing of spawning. Indeed, propagules released during the observed spawning period had higher larval success rates than those released outside the observed spawning period. In contrast, larval success rates were relatively insensitive to the spatial position of the release site. In addition, minimum (rather than mean larval survival was maximized during the observed spawning period, indicating a reproductive strategy that minimizes the probability of recruitment failure. Given this landscape of larval fitness, we take an inverse optimization approach to define a biological objective function that reflects a tradeoff between the mean and variance of larval success in a temporally variable environment. Using this objective function, we suggest that the length of the spawning period can provide insight into the tradeoff between reproductive risk and reward.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of larval instars and imago of Oestrus caucasicus (Grunin, 1948 (Diptera: Oestridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guitton C.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Oestrus caucasicus (Grunin, 1948 is a larval parasite of the nasal cavities of Capra caucasica, Capra ibex and Capra pyrenaica. This study is the first description of the parasite using scanning electron microscopy. The first larval instar shows minor differences with Oestrus ovis. The second larval instar shows important synapomorphic features common to Oestrus ovis but, also, distinctive features as the spines-crown or the currycomb-shaped spines. The third larval instar shows many differences with Oestrus ovis, mostly in the ventral and dorsal spines. The imagos of the two species have closely related morphologies. This study is a contribution to a revision of phylogeny of Oestridae family.

  11. Rising CO2 concentrations affect settlement behaviour of larval damselfishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, B. M.; Munday, P. L.; Jones, G. P.

    2012-03-01

    Reef fish larvae actively select preferred benthic habitat, relying on olfactory, visual and acoustic cues to discriminate between microhabitats at settlement. Recent studies show exposure to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) impairs olfactory cue recognition in larval reef fishes. However, whether this alters the behaviour of settling fish or disrupts habitat selection is unknown. Here, the effect of elevated CO2 on larval behaviour and habitat selection at settlement was tested in three species of damselfishes (family Pomacentridae) that differ in their pattern of habitat use: Pomacentrus amboinensis (a habitat generalist), Pomacentrus chrysurus (a rubble specialist) and Pomacentrus moluccensis (a live coral specialist). Settlement-stage larvae were exposed to current-day CO2 levels or CO2 concentrations that could occur by 2100 (700 and 850 ppm) based on IPCC emission scenarios. First, pair-wise choice tests were performed using a two-channel flume chamber to test olfactory discrimination between hard coral, soft coral and coral rubble habitats. The habitat selected by settling fish was then compared among treatments using a multi-choice settlement experiment conducted overnight. Finally, settlement timing between treatments was compared across two lunar cycles for one of the species, P. chrysurus. Exposure to elevated CO2 disrupted the ability of larvae to discriminate between habitat odours in olfactory trials. However, this had no effect on the habitats selected at settlement when all sensory cues were available. The timing of settlement was dramatically altered by CO2 exposure, with control fish exhibiting peak settlement around the new moon, whereas fish exposed to 850 ppm CO2 displaying highest settlement rates around the full moon. These results suggest larvae can rely on other sensory information, such as visual cues, to compensate for impaired olfactory ability when selecting settlement habitat at small spatial scales. However, rising CO2 could cause larvae

  12. Ocean acidification alters temperature and salinity preferences in larval fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistevos, Jennifer C A; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Rossi, Tullio; Connell, Sean D

    2017-02-01

    Ocean acidification alters the way in which animals perceive and respond to their world by affecting a variety of senses such as audition, olfaction, vision and pH sensing. Marine species rely on other senses as well, but we know little of how these might be affected by ocean acidification. We tested whether ocean acidification can alter the preference for physicochemical cues used for dispersal between ocean and estuarine environments. We experimentally assessed the behavioural response of a larval fish (Lates calcarifer) to elevated temperature and reduced salinity, including estuarine water of multiple cues for detecting settlement habitat. Larval fish raised under elevated CO2 concentrations were attracted by warmer water, but temperature had no effect on fish raised in contemporary CO2 concentrations. In contrast, contemporary larvae were deterred by lower salinity water, where CO2-treated fish showed no such response. Natural estuarine water-of higher temperature, lower salinity, and containing estuarine olfactory cues-was only preferred by fish treated under forecasted high CO2 conditions. We show for the first time that attraction by larval fish towards physicochemical cues can be altered by ocean acidification. Such alterations to perception and evaluation of environmental cues during the critical process of dispersal can potentially have implications for ensuing recruitment and population replenishment. Our study not only shows that freshwater species that spend part of their life cycle in the ocean might also be affected by ocean acidification, but that behavioural responses towards key physicochemical cues can also be negated through elevated CO2 from human emissions.

  13. The use of immunostimulants in fish larval aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricknell, Ian; Dalmo, Roy A

    2005-11-01

    The production of fish larvae is often hampered by high mortality rates, and it is believed that most of this economic loss due to infectious diseases is ca. 10% in Western European aquaculture sector. The development of strategies to control the pathogen load and immuno-prophylactic measures must be addressed further to realise the economic "potential" production of marine fish larvae and thus improve the overall production of adult fish. The innate defence includes both humoral and cellular defence mechanisms such as the complement system and the processes played by granulocytes and macrophages. A set of different substances such as beta-glucans, bacterial products, and plant constituents may directly initiate activation of the innate defence mechanisms acting on receptors and triggering intracellular gene activation that may result in production of anti-microbial molecules. These immunostimulants are often obtained from bacterial sources, brown or red algae and terrestrial fungi are also exploited as source of novel potentiating substances. The use of immunostimulants, as dietary supplements, can improve the innate defence of animals providing resistance to pathogens during periods of high stress, such as grading, reproduction, sea transfer and vaccination. The immunomodulation of larval fish has been proposed as a potential method for improving larval survival by increasing the innate responses of the developing animals until its adaptive immune response is sufficiently developed to mount an effective response to the pathogen. To this end it has been proposed that the delivery of immunostimulants as a dietary supplement to larval fish could be of considerable benefit in boosting the animals innate defences with little detriment to the developing animal. Conversely, there is a school of thought that raises the concern of immunomodulating a neotanous animal before its immune system is fully formed as this may adversely affect the development of a normal immune

  14. Defining Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Pain Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mossey, Jana M

    2011-01-01

    ... the disparities.Scientific literature was selectively reviewed addressing pain epidemiology, differences in pain management of non-Hispanic whites versus racial/ethnic minority groups, and patient and physician...

  15. Teaching About Health Care Disparities in the Clinical Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Leonor; Irby, David M.; Harleman, Elizabeth; Fernandez, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Clinical teachers often observe interactions that may contribute to health care disparities, yet may hesitate to teach about them. A pedagogical model could help faculty structure teaching about health care disparities in the clinical setting, but to our knowledge, none have been adapted for this purpose. In this paper, we adapt an established model, Time-Effective Strategies for Teaching (TEST), to the teaching of health care disparities. We use several case scenarios to illustrate the core components of the model: diagnose the learner, teach rapidly to the learner’s need, and provide feedback. The TEST model is straightforward, easy to use, and enables the incorporation of teaching about health care disparities into routine clinical teaching. PMID:20352501

  16. Socio-economic disparities in health system responsiveness in India

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Chetna; Do, Young Kyung

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the magnitude of socio-economic disparities in health system responsiveness in India after correcting for potential reporting heterogeneity by socio-economic characteristics (education and wealth).

  17. Asthma and Health Disparities | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breathing Easier Asthma and Health Disparities Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table ... under 18 years of age, who currently have asthma, 2010 Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic White Non- ...

  18. Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Health Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB Note: Javascript is disabled or ... Other Pacific Islanders MMWR Publications HIV and AIDS Viral Hepatitis STDs Tuberculosis Training and Networking Resources Call for ...

  19. Physician clinical information technology and health care disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcham, Jonathan D; Lutfey, Karen E; Gerstenberger, Eric; Link, Carol L; McKinlay, John B

    2009-12-01

    The authors develop a conceptual framework regarding how information technology (IT) can alter within-physician disparities, and they empirically test some of its implications in the context of coronary heart disease. Using a random experiment on 256 primary care physicians, the authors analyze the relationships between three IT functions (feedback and two types of clinical decision support) and five process-of-care measures. Endogeneity is addressed by eliminating unobserved patient characteristics with vignettes and by proxying for omitted physician characteristics. The results indicate that IT has no effects on physicians' diagnostic certainty and treatment of vignette patients overall. The authors find that treatment and certainty differ by patient age, gender, and race. Consistent with the framework, IT's effects on these disparities are complex. Feedback eliminated the gender disparities, but the relationships differed for other IT functions and process measures. Current policies to reduce disparities and increase IT adoption may be in discord.

  20. Entamoeba dispar strains: analysis of polymorphism in Tunisian isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayed, Soumaya Ben; Bouratbine, Aida

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect intra-species polymorphism in Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar is an important tool for studying geographic distribution and transmission mechanisms. E. dispar and E. histolytica share the same mechanism for transmission among human hosts, and so after differentiation between these species. We studied the intra-species variation and distribution of E. dispar strains obtained from cyst passers, specifically from African students and Tunisian food handlers. We analyzed the polymorphic region of the chitinase protein gene in 13 individuals infected with E. dispar, of which 9 were from Tunisia and 4 from other African countries. We identified 7 different chitinase patterns in Tunisians while the 4 isolates from other countries each had a distinct pattern. Two of the patterns we found have been reported in studies from Mexico and India, possibly indicating worldwide spread of certain strains.

  1. gender disparity in prevalence of depression among patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    KEYWORDS: Gender disparity, depression, systematic review ... set point for usual vicissitudes of life and are overwhelmed by anxiety and ... old or older regardless of country of residence, ... quality and were excluded from the review.

  2. Stereo Disparity through Cost Aggregation with Guided Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Tan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the depth, or equivalently the disparity, of a stereo scene is a challenging problem in computer vision. The method proposed by Rhemann et al. in 2011 is based on a filtering of the cost volume, which gives for each pixel and for each hypothesized disparity a cost derived from pixel-by-pixel comparison. The filtering is performed by the guided filter proposed by He et al. in 2010. It computes a weighted local average of the costs. The weights are such that similar pixels tend to have similar costs. Eventually, a winner-take-all strategy selects the disparity with the minimal cost for each pixel. Non-consistent labels according to left-right consistency are rejected; a densification step can then be launched to fill the disparity map. The method can be used to solve other labeling problems (optical flow, segmentation but this article focuses on the stereo matching problem.

  3. Two new diterpene and sesquiterpene from Pteris dispar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan Ping Gou; Nian Ci Liang; Jie Hou; Li Li; Yan Tian; Chang Yuan Wang; Xun Cui; Bao Jing Zhang; Xiao Chi Ma

    2011-01-01

    A new diterpene and a new sesquiterpene were isolated from Pteris dispar and identified on the basis of spectral data including 2D NMR. Compounds 1 and 2 showed potent cytotoxic activity against KB cell.

  4. The Role of Data in Health Care Disparities in Medicaid...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in The Role of Data in Health Care Disparities in Medicaid Managed Care, published in Volume 2, Issue 4 of the Medicare and Medicaid...

  5. Gender Disparity in Enrolment into Basic Formal Education in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Nneka

    noted that the Yoruba concept of "eko" had a greater emphasis on discipline than the .... and Policy Analysis in Nigeria (1993), confirmed that disparity in access to .... Cultural beliefs and practices which militates against female enrolment in.

  6. Catching large herring larvae: Gear applicability and larval distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    1988-01-01

    given to the influence of gear speed on catching effectiveness. An additional objective was to investigate larval distributional patterns of potential importance to sampling strategy. Gear speed had a pronounced influence on the efficiency of the IKMT. Catches per unit volume filtered decreased to one...... third when speed was increased by one knot. The efficiency of the MIK did not change in the speed range investigated, and this gear was in every case more efficient than the IKMT. Larvae were found to be patchily distributed at the scale of sampling, and the degree of patchiness did not increase when...

  7. Parasites of larval black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanae Jitklang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Parasites of larval black flies are reported for the first time from Thailand, including mermithid nematodes(Mermithidae, microsporidian fungi (Zygomycota, and the fungus Coelomycidium simulii Debaisieux (Blastocladiomycetes.The following nine species of black flies were infected with one or more parasites: Simulium asakoae, S. chamlongi,S. chiangmaiense, S. fenestratum, S. feuerborni, S. nakhonense, S. nodosum, S. quinquestriatum, and S. tani. The prevalenceof patent infections per host species per season was 0.1–7.1% for mermithids, 0.1–6.0% for microsporidia, and 0.1–3.0% forC. simulii.

  8. 俄罗斯远东地区南部枫首毒蛾及其种群增长%Lymantria mathura Moore and an Increase of its Population in the South of the Far East of Russia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GNINENKO Yuri I

    2006-01-01

    枫首毒蛾在普里莫尔斯基地区南部林区严重危害栎树.该虫取食多种树木.在试验室用栎树、桦树和椴树树叶及人工饲料饲养幼虫,结果表明该虫幼虫不取食俄罗斯中部地区树种的叶子.文章介绍了枫首毒蛾种群动态并描述了蛹的形态特征.%The pink gypsy moth, Lymantria mathura Moore,is one of the most dangerous oak pests in woods in southern part of Primorsky region. Here its larvae feed on several tree species. Experimentally in laboratory its larvae were fed on foliage of oak, birch, lime and artificial nutrients. It was found that larvae didn' t consume foliage of tree species from central regions of Russia. Data on pink gypsy moth population dynamics is given. Pupae structure description is available.

  9. How Does Binocular Disparity Affect the Impressions in Viewing Stereograms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ichikawa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined how the size of binocular disparity affects the impressions in different dimensions, as well as apparent depth, in viewing line-contoured stereograms, random dot stereogram, and stereoscopic pictures of naturalistic scenes. We used a semantic differential method with the scales that are related to the different dimensions of impression; evaluation, activity, and potency. The stereograms of naturalistic scenes were selected to give observers strong or weak impressions in different impression dimensions. We prepared the two-depth-layer condition and six-depth-layer condition for those stereograms. The size of binocular disparity between the nearest and farthest layers ranged from 0 to about 70 min of arc. Apparent depth magnitude increased with the increment of disparity size for those stereograms while the increment for the six depth-layer condition was larger than that for the two depth-layer conditions. Regardless of the type of stereograms, for the six depth-layer condition, the rating for the evaluation increased with the size of disparity although, for the two-depth-layer condition, it did not increase at the large disparity size. In addition, the rating for the activity increased with disparity size for both the two depth-layer condition and six depth-layer conditions if the stereogram induced some active impression by itself. These results indicate that the effects of binocular disparity size on apparent depth magnitude and impressions in viewing stereoscopic pictures depend upon the depth structure that is specified by binocular disparity, rather than what the stereogram representationally depicts.

  10. Widening Disparity and its Suppression in a Stochastic Replicator Model

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2016-01-01

    Winner-take-all phenomena are observed in various competitive systems. We find similar phenomena in replicator models with randomly fluctuating growth rates. The disparity between winners and losers increases indefinitely, even if all elements are statistically equivalent. A lognormal distribution describes well the nonstationary time evolution. If a nonlinear load corresponding to progressive taxation is introduced, a stationary distribution is obtained and disparity widening is suppressed.

  11. microRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    related miRNAs and PCa aggressiveness, and 3) determine the associations between genetic polymorphisms in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and plasma levels...final analyses. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, microRNA, racial disparities, African American, genetic polymorphisms, biochemical recurrence...is to identify novel genetic and epigenetic factors that might contribute significantly to racial/ethnic disparity in PCa risk and progression. We

  12. Social, Economic, and Health Disparities Among LGBT Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emlet, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    LGBT older adults are a heterogeneous population with collective and unique strengths and challenges. Health, personal, and economic disparities exist in this group when compared to the general population of older adults, yet subgroups such as transgender and bisexual older adults and individuals living with HIV are at greater risk for disparities and poorer health outcomes. As this population grows, further research is needed on factors that contribute to promoting health equity, while decreasing discrimination and improving competent service delivery.

  13. Temporal Integration of Auditory Stimulation and Binocular Disparity Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Zannoli

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies using visual objects defined by luminance have reported that the auditory event must be presented 30 to 40 ms after the visual stimulus to perceive audiovisual synchrony. In the present study, we used visual objects defined only by their binocular disparity. We measured the optimal latency between visual and auditory stimuli for the perception of synchrony using a method introduced by Moutoussis & Zeki (1997. Visual stimuli were defined either by luminance and disparity or by disparity only. They moved either back and forth between 6 and 12 arcmin or from left to right at a constant disparity of 9 arcmin. This visual modulation was presented together with an amplitude-modulated 500 Hz tone. Both modulations were sinusoidal (frequency: 0.7 Hz. We found no difference between 2D and 3D motion for luminance stimuli: a 40 ms auditory lag was necessary for perceived synchrony. Surprisingly, even though stereopsis is often thought to be slow, we found a similar optimal latency in the disparity 3D motion condition (55 ms. However, when participants had to judge simultaneity for disparity 2D motion stimuli, it led to larger latencies (170 ms, suggesting that stereo motion detectors are poorly suited to track 2D motion.

  14. Disparities in Disability by Educational Attainment Across US States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montez, Jennifer Karas; Zajacova, Anna; Hayward, Mark D

    2017-07-01

    To examine how disparities in adult disability by educational attainment vary across US states. We used the nationally representative data of more than 6 million adults aged 45 to 89 years in the 2010-2014 American Community Survey. We defined disability as difficulty with activities of daily living. We categorized education as low (less than high school), mid (high school or some college), or high (bachelor's or higher). We estimated age-standardized disability prevalence by educational attainment and state. We assessed whether the variation in disability across states occurs primarily among low-educated adults and whether it reflects the socioeconomic resources of low-educated adults and their surrounding contexts. Disparities in disability by education vary markedly across states-from a 20 percentage point disparity in Massachusetts to a 12-point disparity in Wyoming. Disparities vary across states mainly because the prevalence of disability among low-educated adults varies across states. Personal and contextual socioeconomic resources of low-educated adults account for 29% of the variation. Efforts to reduce disparities in disability by education should consider state and local strategies that reduce poverty among low-educated adults and their surrounding contexts.

  15. Practitioner Biases and Child Service Use Disparities: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, Marlys

    2011-01-01

    Disparities by race/ethnicity exist in the use of children's mental health and related services. It is no doubt that many factors contribute to these disparities, but practitioner biases may be partly responsible for disparities. The purpose of this article is to show a potential link between practitioner biases and service use disparities and to…

  16. Phylogeny and forelimb disparity in waterbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Clarke, Julia A

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has shown that the relative proportions of wing components (i.e., humerus, ulna, carpometacarpus) in birds are related to function and ecology, but these have rarely been investigated in a phylogenetic context. Waterbirds including "Pelecaniformes," Ciconiiformes, Procellariiformes, Sphenisciformes, and Gaviiformes form a highly supported clade and developed a great diversity of wing forms and foraging ecologies. In this study, forelimb disparity in the waterbird clade was assessed in a phylogenetic context. Phylogenetic signal was assessed via Pagel's lambda, Blomberg's K, and permutation tests. We find that different waterbird clades are clearly separated based on forelimb component proportions, which are significantly correlated with phylogeny but not with flight style. Most of the traditional contents of "Pelecaniformes" (e.g., pelicans, cormorants, and boobies) cluster with Ciconiiformes (herons and storks) and occupy a reduced morphospace. These taxa are closely related phylogenetically but exhibit a wide range of ecologies and flight styles. Procellariiformes (e.g., petrels, albatross, and shearwaters) occupy a wide range of morphospace, characterized primarily by variation in the relative length of carpometacarpus and ulna. Gaviiformes (loons) surprisingly occupy a wing morphospace closest to diving petrels and penguins. Whether this result may reflect wing proportions plesiomorphic for the waterbird clade or a functional signal is unclear. A Bayesian approach detecting significant rate shifts across phylogeny recovered two such shifts. At the base of the two sister clades Sphenisciformes + Procellariiformes, a shift to an increase evolutionary rate of change is inferred for the ulna and carpometacarpus. Thus, changes in wing shape begin prior to the loss of flight in the wing-propelled diving clade. Several shifts to slower rate of change are recovered within stem penguins. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of

  17. Transdisciplinary cardiovascular and cancer health disparities training: experiences of the centers for population health and health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Ferketich, Amy; Boyington, Josephine; Dugan, Sheila; Garroutte, Eva; Kaufmann, Peter G; Krok, Jessica; Kuo, Alice; Ortega, Alexander N; Purnell, Tanjala; Srinivasan, Shobha

    2015-07-01

    The Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities program promotes multilevel and multifactorial health equity research and the building of research teams that are transdisciplinary. We summarized 5 areas of scientific training for empowering the next generation of health disparities investigators with research methods and skills that are needed to solve disparities and inequalities in cancer and cardiovascular disease. These areas include social epidemiology, multilevel modeling, health care systems or health care delivery, community-based participatory research, and implementation science. We reviewed the acquisition of the skill sets described in the training components; these skill sets will position trainees to become leaders capable of effecting significant change because they provide tools that can be used to address the complexities of issues that promote health disparities.

  18. The importance of accounting for larval detectability in mosquito habitat-association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Matthew; Tsegaye, Admasu Tassew; Ignell, Rickard; Hill, Sharon; Elleby, Rasmus; Feltelius, Vilhelm; Hopkins, Richard

    2016-05-04

    Mosquito habitat-association studies are an important basis for disease control programmes and/or vector distribution models. However, studies do not explicitly account for incomplete detection during larval presence and abundance surveys, with potential for significant biases because of environmental influences on larval behaviour and sampling efficiency. Data were used from a dip-sampling study for Anopheles larvae in Ethiopia to evaluate the effect of six factors previously associated with larval sampling (riparian vegetation, direct sunshine, algae, water depth, pH and temperature) on larval presence and detectability. Comparisons were made between: (i) a presence-absence logistic regression where samples were pooled at the site level and detectability ignored, (ii) a success versus trials binomial model, and (iii) a presence-detection mixture model that separately estimated presence and detection, and fitted different explanatory variables to these estimations. Riparian vegetation was consistently highlighted as important, strongly suggesting it explains larval presence (-). However, depending on how larval detectability was estimated, the other factors showed large variations in their statistical importance. The presence-detection mixture model provided strong evidence that larval detectability was influenced by sunshine and water temperature (+), with weaker evidence for algae (+) and water depth (-). For larval presence, there was also some evidence that water depth (-) and pH (+) influenced site occupation. The number of dip-samples needed to determine if larvae were likely present at a site was condition dependent: with sunshine and warm water requiring only two dips, while cooler water and cloud cover required 11. Environmental factors influence true larval presence and larval detectability differentially when sampling in field conditions. Researchers need to be more aware of the limitations and possible biases in different analytical approaches used to

  19. Effect of Larval Density on Food Utilization Efficiency of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ramos, Juan A; Rojas, M Guadalupe

    2015-10-01

    Crowding conditions of larvae may have a significant impact on commercial production efficiency of some insects, such as Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Although larval densities are known to affect developmental time and growth in T. molitor, no reports were found on the effects of crowding on food utilization. The effect of larval density on food utilization efficiency of T. molitor larvae was studied by measuring efficiency of ingested food conversion (ECI), efficiency of digested food conversion (EDC), and mg of larval weight gain per gram of food consumed (LWGpFC) at increasing larval densities (12, 24, 36, 48, 50, 62, 74, and 96 larvae per dm(2)) over four consecutive 3-wk periods. Individual larval weight gain and food consumption were negatively impacted by larval density. Similarly, ECI, ECD, and LWGpFC were negatively impacted by larval density. Larval ageing, measured as four consecutive 3-wk periods, significantly and independently impacted ECI, ECD, and LWGpFC in a negative way. General linear model analysis showed that age had a higher impact than density on food utilization parameters of T. molitor larvae. Larval growth was determined to be responsible for the age effects, as measurements of larval mass density (in grams of larvae per dm(2)) had a significant impact on food utilization parameters across ages and density treatments (in number of larvae per dm(2)). The importance of mass versus numbers per unit of area as measurements of larval density and the implications of negative effects of density on food utilization for insect biomass production are discussed.

  20. Maternal cortisol stimulates neurogenesis and affects larval behaviour in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Carol; Kurrasch, Deborah M.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2017-01-01

    Excess glucocorticoid transferred from stressed mother to the embryo affects developing vertebrate offspring, but the underlying programming events are unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that increased zygotic glucocorticoid deposition, mimicking a maternal stress scenario, modifies early brain development and larval behaviour in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Cortisol was microinjected into the yolk at one cell-stage, to mimic maternal transfer, and the larvae [96 hours post-fertilization (hpf)] displayed increased activity in light and a reduction in thigmotaxis, a behavioural model for anxiety, suggesting an increased propensity for boldness. This cortisol-mediated behavioural phenotype corresponded with an increase in primary neurogenesis, as measured by incorporation of EdU at 24 hpf, in a region-specific manner in the preoptic region and the pallium, the teleostean homolog of the hippocampus. Also, cortisol increased the expression of the proneural gene neurod4, a marker of neurogenesis, in a region- and development-specific manner in the embryos. Altogether, excess zygotic cortisol, mimicking maternal stress, affects early brain development and behavioural phenotype in larval zebrafish. We propose a key role for cortisol in altering brain development leading to enhanced boldness, which may be beneficial in preparing the offspring to a stressful environment and enhancing fitness. PMID:28098234

  1. Assessing larval connectivity for marine spatial planning in the Adriatic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, L; Kassis, D; Hall-Spencer, J M

    2017-04-01

    There are plans to start building offshore marine renewable energy devices throughout the Mediterranean and the Adriatic has been identified as a key location for wind farm developments. The development of offshore wind farms in the area would provide hard substrata for the settlement of sessile benthos. Since the seafloor of the Adriatic is predominantly sedimentary this may alter the larval connectivity of benthic populations in the region. Here, we simulated the release of larvae from benthic populations along the coasts of the Adriatic Sea using coupled bio-physical models and investigated the effect of pelagic larval duration on dispersal. Our model simulations show that currents typically carry particles from east to west across the Adriatic, whereas particles released along western coasts tend to remain there with the Puglia coast of Italy acting as a sink for larvae from benthic populations. We identify areas of high connectivity, as well as areas that are much more isolated, and discuss how these results can be used to inform marine spatial planning and the licensing of offshore marine renewable energy developments.

  2. Chemical mediation of coral larval settlement by crustose coralline algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebben, J; Motti, C A; Siboni, Nahshon; Tapiolas, D M; Negri, A P; Schupp, P J; Kitamura, Makoto; Hatta, Masayuki; Steinberg, P D; Harder, T

    2015-06-04

    The majority of marine invertebrates produce dispersive larvae which, in order to complete their life cycles, must attach and metamorphose into benthic forms. This process, collectively referred to as settlement, is often guided by habitat-specific cues. While the sources of such cues are well known, the links between their biological activity, chemical identity, presence and quantification in situ are largely missing. Previous work on coral larval settlement in vitro has shown widespread induction by crustose coralline algae (CCA) and in particular their associated bacteria. However, we found that bacterial biofilms on CCA did not initiate ecologically realistic settlement responses in larvae of 11 hard coral species from Australia, Guam, Singapore and Japan. We instead found that algal chemical cues induce identical behavioral responses of larvae as per live CCA. We identified two classes of CCA cell wall-associated compounds--glycoglycerolipids and polysaccharides--as the main constituents of settlement inducing fractions. These algae-derived fractions induce settlement and metamorphosis at equivalent concentrations as present in CCA, both in small scale laboratory assays and under flow-through conditions, suggesting their ability to act in an ecologically relevant fashion to steer larval settlement of corals. Both compound classes were readily detected in natural samples.

  3. Maternal cortisol stimulates neurogenesis and affects larval behaviour in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Carol; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2017-01-18

    Excess glucocorticoid transferred from stressed mother to the embryo affects developing vertebrate offspring, but the underlying programming events are unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that increased zygotic glucocorticoid deposition, mimicking a maternal stress scenario, modifies early brain development and larval behaviour in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Cortisol was microinjected into the yolk at one cell-stage, to mimic maternal transfer, and the larvae [96 hours post-fertilization (hpf)] displayed increased activity in light and a reduction in thigmotaxis, a behavioural model for anxiety, suggesting an increased propensity for boldness. This cortisol-mediated behavioural phenotype corresponded with an increase in primary neurogenesis, as measured by incorporation of EdU at 24 hpf, in a region-specific manner in the preoptic region and the pallium, the teleostean homolog of the hippocampus. Also, cortisol increased the expression of the proneural gene neurod4, a marker of neurogenesis, in a region- and development-specific manner in the embryos. Altogether, excess zygotic cortisol, mimicking maternal stress, affects early brain development and behavioural phenotype in larval zebrafish. We propose a key role for cortisol in altering brain development leading to enhanced boldness, which may be beneficial in preparing the offspring to a stressful environment and enhancing fitness.

  4. Larval habitats of mosquito fauna in Osogbo metropolis, Southwestern Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Monsuru Adebayo Adeleke; Wasiu Olalekan Adebimpe; AbdulWasiu Oladele Hassan; Sunday Olukayode Oladejo; Ismail Olaoye; Ganiyu Olatunji Olatunde; Taiwo Adewole

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To determine the larval habitats of mosquito fauna and possible impact of land use/land cover changes on the epidemiology of mosquito-borne diseases in Osogbo metropolis, Southwestern, Nigeria. Methods: All accessible larval habitats were surveyed between May and September, 2011 in Osogbo metropolis while Land Use/ Land cover of the city was analyzed using 2 Lansat Multispectral Scanner satellite imagery of SPOT 1986 and LANDSAT TM 2009. Results:A total of six species namely, Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Aedes vittatus, Anopheles gambiae complex, Culex quinquefasciatus and Eretmapodite chrysogaster were encountered during the study. The occurrence and contribution of disused tyres was significantly higher (P0.05). The accessible land use/land covered of the study area between 1986 and 2009 showed that the wet land coverage and settlement area increased from 0.19 to 9.09 hectare and 1.00 to 2.01 hectare respectively while the forest area decreased from 60.18 to 50.14 hectare. Conclusion: The contribution of the habitats coupled with the increasing rate of flooded environment which could provide ample breeding sites for mosquitoes call for sustained environmental sanitation and management in Osogbo metropolis.

  5. An accurate method for measuring triploidy of larval fish spawns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Draugelis-Dale, Rassa O.; Glennon, Robert; Kelly, Anita; Brown, Bonnie L.; Morrison, John

    2017-01-01

    A standard flow cytometric protocol was developed for estimating triploid induction in batches of larval fish. Polyploid induction treatments are not guaranteed to be 100% efficient, thus the ability to quantify the proportion of triploid larvae generated by a particular treatment helps managers to stock high-percentage spawns and researchers to select treatments for efficient triploid induction. At 3 d posthatch, individual Grass Carp Ctenopharyngodon idella were mechanically dissociated into single-cell suspensions; nuclear DNA was stained with propidium iodide then analyzed by flow cytometry. Following ploidy identification of individuals, aliquots of diploid and triploid cell suspensions were mixed to generate 15 levels (0–100%) of known triploidy (n = 10). Using either 20 or 50 larvae per level, the observed triploid percentages were lower than the known, actual values. Using nonlinear regression analyses, quadratic equations solved for triploid proportions in mixed samples and corresponding estimation reference plots allowed for predicting triploidy. Thus, an accurate prediction of the proportion of triploids in a spawn can be made by following a standard larval processing and analysis protocol with either 20 or 50 larvae from a single spawn, coupled with applying the quadratic equations or reference plots to observed flow cytometry results. Due to the universality of triploid DNA content being 1.5 times the diploid level and because triploid fish consist of fewer cells than diploids, this method should be applicable to other produced triploid fish species, and it may be adapted for use with bivalves or other species where batch analysis is appropriate.

  6. Development of environmental tools for anopheline larval control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbahale, Susan S; Mweresa, Collins K; Takken, Willem; Mukabana, Wolfgang R

    2011-07-06

    Malaria mosquitoes spend a considerable part of their life in the aquatic stage, rendering them vulnerable to interventions directed to aquatic habitats. Recent successes of mosquito larval control have been reported using environmental and biological tools. Here, we report the effects of shading by plants and biological control agents on the development and survival of anopheline and culicine mosquito larvae in man-made natural habitats in western Kenya. Trials consisted of environmental manipulation using locally available plants, the introduction of predatory fish and/or the use of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) in various combinations. Man-made habitats provided with shade from different crop species produced significantly fewer larvae than those without shade especially for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Larval control of the African malaria mosquito An. gambiae and other mosquito species was effective in habitats where both predatory fish and Bti were applied, than where the two biological control agents were administered independently. We conclude that integration of environmental management techniques using shade-providing plants and predatory fish and/or Bti are effective and sustainable tools for the control of malaria and other mosquito-borne disease vectors.

  7. Mosquito population regulation and larval source management in heterogeneous environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Smith

    Full Text Available An important question for mosquito population dynamics, mosquito-borne pathogen transmission and vector control is how mosquito populations are regulated. Here we develop simple models with heterogeneity in egg laying patterns and in the responses of larval populations to crowding in aquatic habitats. We use the models to evaluate how such heterogeneity affects mosquito population regulation and the effects of larval source management (LSM. We revisit the notion of a carrying capacity and show how heterogeneity changes our understanding of density dependence and the outcome of LSM. Crowding in and productivity of aquatic habitats is highly uneven unless egg-laying distributions are fine-tuned to match the distribution of habitats' carrying capacities. LSM reduces mosquito population density linearly with coverage if adult mosquitoes avoid laying eggs in treated habitats, but quadratically if eggs are laid in treated habitats and the effort is therefore wasted (i.e., treating 50% of habitat reduces mosquito density by approximately 75%. Unsurprisingly, targeting (i.e. treating a subset of the most productive pools gives much larger reductions for similar coverage, but with poor targeting, increasing coverage could increase adult mosquito population densities if eggs are laid in higher capacity habitats. Our analysis suggests that, in some contexts, LSM models that accounts for heterogeneity in production of adult mosquitoes provide theoretical support for pursuing mosquito-borne disease prevention through strategic and repeated application of modern larvicides.

  8. Patterns, causes, and consequences of marine larval dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aloia, Cassidy C; Bogdanowicz, Steven M; Francis, Robin K; Majoris, John E; Harrison, Richard G; Buston, Peter M

    2015-11-10

    Quantifying the probability of larval exchange among marine populations is key to predicting local population dynamics and optimizing networks of marine protected areas. The pattern of connectivity among populations can be described by the measurement of a dispersal kernel. However, a statistically robust, empirical dispersal kernel has been lacking for any marine species. Here, we use genetic parentage analysis to quantify a dispersal kernel for the reef fish Elacatinus lori, demonstrating that dispersal declines exponentially with distance. The spatial scale of dispersal is an order of magnitude less than previous estimates-the median dispersal distance is just 1.7 km and no dispersal events exceed 16.4 km despite intensive sampling out to 30 km from source. Overlaid on this strong pattern is subtle spatial variation, but neither pelagic larval duration nor direction is associated with the probability of successful dispersal. Given the strong relationship between distance and dispersal, we show that distance-driven logistic models have strong power to predict dispersal probabilities. Moreover, connectivity matrices generated from these models are congruent with empirical estimates of spatial genetic structure, suggesting that the pattern of dispersal we uncovered reflects long-term patterns of gene flow. These results challenge assumptions regarding the spatial scale and presumed predictors of marine population connectivity. We conclude that if marine reserve networks aim to connect whole communities of fishes and conserve biodiversity broadly, then reserves that are close in space (<10 km) will accommodate those members of the community that are short-distance dispersers.

  9. Resource Limitation, Controphic Ostracod Density and Larval Mosquito Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raylea Rowbottom

    Full Text Available Aquatic environments can be restricted with the amount of available food resources especially with changes to both abiotic and biotic conditions. Mosquito larvae, in particular, are sensitive to changes in food resources. Resource limitation through inter-, and intra-specific competition among mosquitoes are known to affect both their development and survival. However, much less is understood about the effects of non-culicid controphic competitors (species that share the same trophic level. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated and compared mosquito larval development, survival and adult size in two experiments, one with different densities of non-culicid controphic conditions and the other with altered resource conditions. We used Aedes camptorhynchus, a salt marsh breeding mosquito and a prominent vector for Ross River virus in Australia. Aedes camptorhynchus usually has few competitors due to its halo-tolerance and distribution in salt marshes. However, sympatric ostracod micro-crustaceans often co-occur within these salt marshes and can be found in dense populations, with field evidence suggesting exploitative competition for resources. Our experiments demonstrate resource limiting conditions caused significant increases in mosquito developmental times, decreased adult survival and decreased adult size. Overall, non-culicid exploitation experiments showed little effect on larval development and survival, but similar effects on adult size. We suggest that the alterations of adult traits owing to non-culicid controphic competition has potential to extend to vector-borne disease transmission.

  10. Larval fish dispersal in a coral-reef seascape

    KAUST Repository

    Almany, Glenn R.

    2017-05-23

    Larval dispersal is a critical yet enigmatic process in the persistence and productivity of marine metapopulations. Empirical data on larval dispersal remain scarce, hindering the use of spatial management tools in efforts to sustain ocean biodiversity and fisheries. Here we document dispersal among subpopulations of clownfish (Amphiprion percula) and butterflyfish (Chaetodon vagabundus) from eight sites across a large seascape (10,000 km2) in Papua New Guinea across 2 years. Dispersal of clownfish was consistent between years, with mean observed dispersal distances of 15 km and 10 km in 2009 and 2011, respectively. A Laplacian statistical distribution (the dispersal kernel) predicted a mean dispersal distance of 13–19 km, with 90% of settlement occurring within 31–43 km. Mean dispersal distances were considerably greater (43–64 km) for butterflyfish, with kernels declining only gradually from spawning locations. We demonstrate that dispersal can be measured on spatial scales sufficient to inform the design of and test the performance of marine reserve networks.

  11. The larval alimentary canal of the Antarctic insect, Belgica antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, James B; Miller, Lou Ann; Bee, Charles Mark; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2009-09-01

    On the Antarctica continent the wingless midge, Belgica antarctica (Diptera, Chironomidae) occurs further south than any other insect. The digestive tract of the larval stage of Belgica that inhabits this extreme environment and feeds in detritus of penguin rookeries has been described for the first time. Ingested food passes through a foregut lumen and into a stomodeal valve representing an intussusception of the foregut into the midgut. A sharp discontinuity in microvillar length occurs at an interface separating relatively long microvilli of the stomodeal midgut region, the site where peritrophic membrane originates, from the midgut epithelium lying posterior to this stomodeal region. Although shapes of cells along the length of this non-stomodeal midgut epithelium are similar, the lengths of their microvilli increase over two orders of magnitude from anterior midgut to posterior midgut. Infoldings of the basal membranes also account for a greatly expanded interface between midgut cells and the hemocoel. The epithelial cells of the hindgut seem to be specialized for exchange of water with their environment, with the anterior two-thirds of the hindgut showing highly convoluted luminal membranes and the posterior third having a highly convoluted basal surface. The lumen of the middle third of the hindgut has a dense population of resident bacteria. Regenerative cells are scattered throughout the larval midgut epithelium. These presumably represent stem cells for the adult midgut, while a ring of cells, marked by a discontinuity in nuclear size at the midgut-hindgut interface, presumably represents stem cells for the adult hindgut.

  12. Development of environmental tools for anopheline larval control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mweresa Collins K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria mosquitoes spend a considerable part of their life in the aquatic stage, rendering them vulnerable to interventions directed to aquatic habitats. Recent successes of mosquito larval control have been reported using environmental and biological tools. Here, we report the effects of shading by plants and biological control agents on the development and survival of anopheline and culicine mosquito larvae in man-made natural habitats in western Kenya. Trials consisted of environmental manipulation using locally available plants, the introduction of predatory fish and/or the use of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti in various combinations. Results Man-made habitats provided with shade from different crop species produced significantly fewer larvae than those without shade especially for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Larval control of the African malaria mosquito An. gambiae and other mosquito species was effective in habitats where both predatory fish and Bti were applied, than where the two biological control agents were administered independently. Conclusion We conclude that integration of environmental management techniques using shade-providing plants and predatory fish and/or Bti are effective and sustainable tools for the control of malaria and other mosquito-borne disease vectors.

  13. Numerical simulations of barnacle larval dispersion coupled with field observations on larval abundance, settlement and recruitment in a tropical monsoon influenced coastal marine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.A.; Samiksha S.V.; George, G.; Aboobacker V.M.; Vethamony, P.; Anil, A.C.

    different circumstances. Environmental variability is the main cause for such differences. Larvae are likely to disperse or retain more without settling behavior or mortality factors. Factors such as food availability and predation can also influence... both feeding as well as non-feeding stages, success of larval populations depends on its dispersal/retention to habitats with sufficient food. The non-feeding larval stage (cyprids) can last for several days depending on the stored energy content...

  14. Influences of acid mine drainage and thermal enrichment on stream fish reproduction and larval survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafs, Andrew W.; Horn, C.D.; Mazik, P.M.; Hartman, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Potential effects of acid mine drainage (AMD) and thermal enrichment on the reproduction of fishes were investigated through a larval-trapping survey in the Stony River watershed, Grant County, WV. Trapping was conducted at seven sites from 26 March to 2 July 2004. Overall larval catch was low (379 individuals in 220 hours of trapping). More larval White Suckers were captured than all other species. Vectors fitted to nonparametric multidimensional scaling ordinations suggested that temperature was highly correlated to fish communities captured at our sites. Survival of larval Fathead Minnows was examined in situ at six sites from 13 May to 11 June 2004 in the same system. Larval survival was lower, but not significantly different between sites directly downstream of AMD-impacted tributaries (40% survival) and non-AMD sites (52% survival). The lower survival was caused by a significant mortality event at one site that coincided with acute pH depression in an AMD tributary immediately upstream of the site. Results from a Cox proportional hazard test suggests that low pH is having a significant negative influence on larval fish survival in this system. The results from this research indicate that the combination of low pH events and elevated temperature are negatively influencing the larval fish populations of the Stony River watershed. Management actions that address these problems would have the potential to substantially increase both reproduction rates and larval survival, therefore greatly enhancing the fishery.

  15. Larval developmental rate, metabolic rate and future growth performance in Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serrano, Jonathan Vaz; Åberg, Madelene; Gjoen, Hans Magnus;

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies in salmonids suggest a link between larval developmental rate, metabolic rate, and future growth. However, the connection between growth during exogenous and endogenous feeding is still debated. In the current study, a positive relationship between larval developmental rate, quan...

  16. Batch fertility and larval parameters of the jaguar cichlid (Cichlasoma managuense spawned in the laboratory (ESP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Günther Nonell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Batch fertility and larval parameters of 32 spawns of the jaguar guapote (Cichlasoma managuense in the laboratory were analyzed. Batch fertility was positively correlated with the female weight with spawns between about 3000 to 6000 larvae for females between 100 and 500 g wet weight. No significant correlation was found between larval parameters (fresh weight and % dry weight and female weight.

  17. Ascorbic Acid Influences the Development and Immunocompetence of Larval Heliothis virescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report that ascorbic acid, which is known to be a free radical scavenger, to be important not only in insect development but also in larval resistance to baculovirus infection. We sequentially elevated the ascorbic acid content in diet and evaluated the effect on larval H. virescens development ...

  18. Clutch size in a larval-pupal endoparasitoid: Consequences for fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vet, L.E.M.; Datema, A.; Janssen, A.; Snellen, H.

    1994-01-01

    1. Aphaereta minuta (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a gregarious larval-pupal endoparasitoid of many Diptera species. Several larval instars can be parasitized and the size differences between host species can be considerable. After parasitization, however, the host larva continues to grow and the

  19. Fitness consequences of larval exposure to Beauveria bassiana on adults of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, C.B.F.; Bukhari, T.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi have shown to be effective in biological control of both larval and adult stages of malaria mosquitoes. However, a small fraction of mosquitoes is still able to emerge after treatment with fungus during the larval stage. It remains unclear whether fitness of these adults is af

  20. Utilization of larval and pupal detritus by Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, J J; Clark, T M; Remold, S K

    2014-06-01

    The utilization of detritus sources by mosquito larvae during development may significantly affect adult life history traits and mosquito population growth. Many studies have shown invertebrate carcasses to be an important detritus source in larval habitats, but little is known regarding how invertebrate carcasses are utilized by mosquito larvae. We conducted two studies to investigate the rate of detritus consumption and its effect on larval development and life history traits. Overall, we found that Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus larvae rapidly consumed larval detritus, while pupal detritus was consumed at a significantly slower rate. We also found that the consumption of larval detritus significantly increased larval survivorship and decreased male development time but did not significantly influence female development time or pupal cephalothorax length for either sex. Our results suggest that the direct consumption of larval detritus can support the production of adults in larval habitats that lack allochthonous detritus inputs or where such organic inputs are insufficient. These studies indicate that different forms of invertebrate detritus are utilized in distinct ways by mosquito larvae, and therefore different forms of invertebrate detritus may have distinct effects on larval development and adult life history traits. © 2014 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  1. Fitness consequences of larval exposure to Beauveria bassiana on adults of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, C.B.F.; Bukhari, T.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi have shown to be effective in biological control of both larval and adult stages of malaria mosquitoes. However, a small fraction of mosquitoes is still able to emerge after treatment with fungus during the larval stage. It remains unclear whether fitness of these adults is

  2. Differential growth of larval sprat Sprattus sprattus across a tidal front in the eastern North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    1993-01-01

    distributions of larval sprat were dominated by modes of 12 and 16 mm, and growth rates of these 2 size classes were estimated from a Laird-Gompertz curve of larval size at age. Size at age of larvae was estimated by analysis of sagittal otoliths. Growth rate estimates were highest in the mixed water (absolute...

  3. Biological Strategies of Dermestes maculatus DeGeer (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) at Larval Stages in Different Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, N I; Visciarelli, E C; Centeno, N D

    2016-12-01

    The intraspecific variation in larval instars is a widely distributed phenomenon amongst holometabolous insects. Several factors can affect the number of instars, such as temperature, humidity, and density. Only a few references could be found in the literature because the invariability in the number of larval instars is considered normal, and the issue has raised little to no interest. Despite this, no study to date has intended to assess or focus on the larval development. Here, we analyzed the effect of different rearing temperature on the larval stage of Dermestes maculatus DeGeer (Coleoptera: Dermestidae). The results indicated that at all temperatures, L5 represented a decisive point for individuals as well as the other later larval instars, because the next step to follow was to pupate or molt to the next larval instar. Furthermore, there were mainly two populations, L5 and L6, although in different proportions according to temperature. We also found that at a greater number of instars, the larval development at all temperatures lasted longer. Moreover, the exponential model was the best adjustment in the developmental time of all populations as well as for the accumulated developmental time of L1-L4. Thus, we conclude that random factors such as genetics could probably cause interspecific variability in D. maculatus larval development.

  4. Characterizing the role of disparity information in alleviating visual crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astle, Andrew T; McGovern, David P; McGraw, Paul V

    2014-11-25

    The ability to identify a target is reduced by the presence of nearby objects, a phenomenon known as visual crowding. The extent to which crowding impairs our perception is generally governed by the degree of similarity between a target stimulus and its surrounding flankers. Here we investigated the influence of disparity differences between target and flankers on crowding. Orientation discrimination thresholds for a parafoveal target were first measured when the target and flankers were presented at the same depth to establish a flanker separation that induced a significant elevation in threshold for each individual. Flankers were subsequently fixed at this spatial separation while the disparity of the flankers relative to the target was altered. For all participants, thresholds showed a systematic decrease as flanker-target disparity increased. The resulting tuning function was asymmetric: Crowding was lower when the target was perceived to be in front of the flankers rather than behind. A series of control experiments confirmed that these effects were driven by disparity, as opposed to other factors such as flanker-target separation in three-dimensional (3-D) space or monocular positional offsets used to create disparity. When flankers were distributed over a range of crossed and uncrossed disparities, such that the mean was in the plane of the target, there was an equivalent or greater release of crowding compared to when all flankers were presented at the maximum disparity of that range. Overall, our results suggest that depth cues can reduce the effects of visual crowding, and that this reduction is unlikely to be caused by grouping of flankers or positional shifts in the monocular image.

  5. Partnering health disparities research with quality improvement science in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, K Casey; Raphael, Jean L

    2015-02-01

    Disparities in pediatric health care quality are well described in the literature, yet practical approaches to decreasing them remain elusive. Quality improvement (QI) approaches are appealing for addressing disparities because they offer a set of strategies by which to target modifiable aspects of care delivery and a method for tailoring or changing an intervention over time based on data monitoring. However, few examples in the literature exist of QI interventions successfully decreasing disparities, particularly in pediatrics, due to well-described challenges in developing, implementing, and studying QI with vulnerable populations or in underresourced settings. In addition, QI interventions aimed at improving quality overall may not improve disparities, and in some cases, may worsen them if there is greater uptake or effectiveness of the intervention among the population with better outcomes at baseline. In this article, the authors review some of the challenges faced by researchers and frontline clinicians seeking to use QI to address health disparities and propose an agenda for moving the field forward. Specifically, they propose that those designing and implementing disparities-focused QI interventions reconsider comparator groups, use more rigorous evaluation methods, carefully consider the evidence for particular interventions and the context in which they were developed, directly engage the social determinants of health, and leverage community resources to build collaborative networks and engage community members. Ultimately, new partnerships between communities, providers serving vulnerable populations, and QI researchers will be required for QI interventions to achieve their potential related to health care disparity reduction. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Recruitment of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite Darwin in a tropical estuary: implications of environmental perturbation, reproduction and larval ecology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    variations in recruitment, larval abundance, development and reproduction. Adult conditioning and inter-brood variations were important factors in the larval ecology of this organism. The results indicate that the impulsive release of larvae during breaks...

  7. Descriptions of four larval forms of Nilodosis Kieffer from East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqu Tang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Larval material putatively assigned to the genus Nilodosis Kieffer from Korea, China and Japan has been compared. The results show that the Japanese larval form has the club- to balloon-shaped cephalic setae S7 and S9 in common with the Korean larval form, but it can be separated from the latter by the shape of the inner mandibular teeth and the premandibular teeth. The larval forms from China (Guangdong and Yunnan apparently consist of two independent species. It is most likely that there will be more species in this genus found in Asia. Larvae are mud-sandy bottom-dwellers that can occur in the littoral of lakes and the potamal of larger rivers, up to a maximum depth of 5 meters. The specific larval characters show that it probably is a semi-psammorheophilic predator. doi: 10.5324/fn.v31i0.1406.Published online: 17 October 2012. 

  8. Modelling larval transport in a axial convergence front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, P.

    2010-12-01

    Marine larvae exhibit different vertical swimming behaviours, synchronised by factors such as tidal currents and daylight, in order to aid retention near the parent populations and hence promote production, avoid predation, or to stimulate digestion. This paper explores two types of larval migration in an estuarine axial convergent front which is an important circulatory mechanism in many coastal regions where larvae are concentrated. A parallelised, three-dimensional, ocean model was applied to an idealised estuarine channel which was parameterised from observations of an axial convergent front which occurs in the Conwy Estuary, U.K. (Nunes and Simpson, 1985). The model successfully simulates the bilateral cross-sectional recirculation of an axial convergent front, which has been attributed to lateral density gradients established by the interaction of the lateral shear of the longitudinal currents with the axial salinity gradients. On the flood tide, there is surface axial convergence whereas on the ebb tide, there is (weaker) surface divergence. Further simulations with increased/decreased tidal velocities and with stronger/weaker axial salinity gradients are planned so that the effects of a changing climate on the secondary flow can be understood. Three-dimensional Lagrangian Particle Tracking Models (PTMs) have been developed which use the simulated velocity fields to track larvae in the estuarine channel. The PTMs take into account the vertical migrations of two shellfish species that are commonly found in the Conwy Estuary: (i) tidal migration of the common shore crab (Carcinus maenas) and (ii), diel (daily) migration of the Great scallop (Pecten maximus). These migration behaviours are perhaps the most widespread amongst shellfish larvae and have been compared with passive (drifting) particles in order to assess their relative importance in terms of larval transport. Preliminary results suggest that the net along-estuary dispersal over a typical larval

  9. Larval diapause termination in the bamboo borer, Omphisa fuscidentalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suang, Suphawan; Manaboon, Manaporn; Singtripop, Tippawan; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Yu; Tiansawat, Pimonrat; Neumann, Peter; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2017-01-01

    In insects, juvenile hormone (JH) and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) regulate larval growth and molting. However, little is known about how this cooperative control is terminating larval diapause especially in the bamboo borer, Omphisa fuscidentalis. In both in vivo and in vitro experiments, we here measured the expression levels of genes which were affected by juvenile hormone analogue (JHA: S-methoprene) and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) in diapausing O. fuscidentalis larvae. Corresponding mRNA expression changes in the subesophageal ganglion (SG) and prothoracic gland (PG) were evaluated using qRT-PCR. The data showed similar response patterns of JH receptor gene (OfMet), diapause hormone gene (OfDH-PBAN), ecdysone receptor genes (OfEcR-A and OfEcR-B1) and ecdysone inducible genes (OfBr-C, OfE75A, OfE75B, OfE75C and OfHR3). JHA induced the expressions of OfMet and OfDH-PBAN in both SG and PG, whereas ecdysone receptor genes and ecdysone inducible genes were induced by JHA only in PG. For 20E treatment group, expressions of ecdysone receptor genes and ecdysone inducible genes in both SG and PG were increased by 20E injection. In addition, the in vitro experiments showed that OfMet and OfDH-PBAN were up-regulated by JHA alone, but ecdysone receptor genes and ecdysone inducible genes were up-regulated by JHA and 20E. However, OfMet and OfDH-PBAN in the SG was expressed faster than OfMet and OfDH-PBAN in the PG and the expression of ecdysone receptor genes and ecdysone inducible genes induced by JHA was much later than observed for 20E. These results indicate that JHA might stimulate the PG indirectly via factors (OfMet and OfDH-PBAN) in the SG, which might be a regulatory mechanism for larval diapause termination in O. fuscidentalis. PMID:28369111

  10. Correlated evolution between mode of larval development and habitat in muricid gastropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Paula; Rodríguez-Serrano, Enrique; Fernández, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Larval modes of development affect evolutionary processes and influence the distribution of marine invertebrates in the ocean. The decrease in pelagic development toward higher latitudes is one of the patterns of distribution most frequently discussed in marine organisms (Thorson's rule), which has been related to increased larval mortality associated with long pelagic durations in colder waters. However, the type of substrate occupied by adults has been suggested to influence the generality of the latitudinal patterns in larval development. To help understand how the environment affects the evolution of larval types we evaluated the association between larval development and habitat using gastropods of the Muricidae family as a model group. To achieve this goal, we collected information on latitudinal distribution, sea water temperature, larval development and type of substrate occupied by adults. We constructed a molecular phylogeny for 45 species of muricids to estimate the ancestral character states and to assess the relationship between traits using comparative methods in a Bayesian framework. Our results showed high probability for a common ancestor of the muricids with nonpelagic (and nonfeeding) development, that lived in hard bottoms and cold temperatures. From this ancestor, a pelagic feeding larva evolved three times, and some species shifted to warmer temperatures or sand bottoms. The evolution of larval development was not independent of habitat; the most probable evolutionary route reconstructed in the analysis of correlated evolution showed that type of larval development may change in soft bottoms but in hard bottoms this change is highly unlikely. Lower sea water temperatures were associated with nonpelagic modes of development, supporting Thorson's rule. We show how environmental pressures can favor a particular mode of larval development or transitions between larval modes and discuss the reacquisition of feeding larva in muricids gastropods.

  11. Correlated evolution between mode of larval development and habitat in muricid gastropods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Pappalardo

    Full Text Available Larval modes of development affect evolutionary processes and influence the distribution of marine invertebrates in the ocean. The decrease in pelagic development toward higher latitudes is one of the patterns of distribution most frequently discussed in marine organisms (Thorson's rule, which has been related to increased larval mortality associated with long pelagic durations in colder waters. However, the type of substrate occupied by adults has been suggested to influence the generality of the latitudinal patterns in larval development. To help understand how the environment affects the evolution of larval types we evaluated the association between larval development and habitat using gastropods of the Muricidae family as a model group. To achieve this goal, we collected information on latitudinal distribution, sea water temperature, larval development and type of substrate occupied by adults. We constructed a molecular phylogeny for 45 species of muricids to estimate the ancestral character states and to assess the relationship between traits using comparative methods in a Bayesian framework. Our results showed high probability for a common ancestor of the muricids with nonpelagic (and nonfeeding development, that lived in hard bottoms and cold temperatures. From this ancestor, a pelagic feeding larva evolved three times, and some species shifted to warmer temperatures or sand bottoms. The evolution of larval development was not independent of habitat; the most probable evolutionary route reconstructed in the analysis of correlated evolution showed that type of larval development may change in soft bottoms but in hard bottoms this change is highly unlikely. Lower sea water temperatures were associated with nonpelagic modes of development, supporting Thorson's rule. We show how environmental pressures can favor a particular mode of larval development or transitions between larval modes and discuss the reacquisition of feeding larva in

  12. Social disparities among youth and the impact on their health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreatsoulas C

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Catherine Kreatsoulas,1,* Areej Hassan,2,* SV Subramanian,1 Eric W Fleegler3 1Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 2Division of Adolescent/Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Emergency Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Social disparities among youth have been recognized as an important influence on disease risk later in the life cycle. Despite this, social problems are seldom assessed in a clinical setting. The primary objective of our study was to evaluate the impact of social disparities on the health of youth. Methods: A self-directed, web-based screening system was used to identify social disparities along seven social domains. Participants included youth, aged 15–24 years, recruited from an urban hospital clinic. The main outcome variable, self-rated health, was captured on a 5-point Likert scale. Univariable and multivariable regression models adjusted for sex, age, and race/ethnicity were implemented to assess the association between social problems and self-rated health. Correlation between social disparity problems was estimated using phi coefficient. Results: Among 383 participants, 297 (78% reported at least one social problem. The correlation among social disparity problems was low. Social disparities had an independent effect on self-rated health, and, in a fully adjusted model, disparities in health care access and food insecurity remained significant. The presence of even one social problem was associated with a decrease in overall health (β=0.68, P<0.01. Conclusion: There is a high burden of social disparities among our youth urban hospital population. The presence of even one social problem increases the risk of worsening self-rated health. Evaluating the social disparities among youth in the medical setting can help elucidate

  13. Increasing the capacity of health sciences to address health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Sandra P; Broyles, Shelia L; Rivera, Lourdes M; Reznik, Vivian M

    2009-09-01

    In order to create a cohort of investigators who are engaged in health disparities research, scholarship, and practice, and to increase the amount of funding in the university that is invested in research focused on reducing health disparities, the San Diego EXPORT Center implemented 2 major initiatives: (1) the support of underrepresented minority (URM) junior faculty development and (2) the funding for pilot research grants in health disparities. This paper describes the activities employed by the center and summarizes the outcomes of these two initiatives. Ninety-five percent (18 of 19) URM junior faculty completed the faculty development program, and 83.3% (15 of 18) of the completers are advancing in their academic careers at University of California San Diego (UCSD) and are teaching, working with populations at risk and/or conducting research in health disparities. EXPORT awarded 7 investigators a total of $429186 to conduct pilot research, and 71.4% (5/7) have now obtained $4.7 million in independent extramural funding. The San Diego EXPORT Center has increased the research capacity, strengthened the infrastructure for health disparities research, and created a cohort of successful URM junior faculty who are advancing in their academic careers. These investigators are already changing the climate at UCSD by their leadership activities, research focus, peer-networking, and mentoring of students.

  14. Disparity surveillance of nonfatal motor vehicle crash injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Lin, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The lack of race information for nonfatal motor vehicle crash injuries in the United States has limited the understanding of racial disparities in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs). In this article, we describe a pilot surveillance project in Nebraska that linked crash reports and driver's license records to investigate racial disparity among nonfatal MVC injuries. The project linked 43,157 severely and nonseverely injured drivers from crash reports between 2006 and 2010 to the corresponding state driver's license database so that drivers' race information from each MVC could be retrieved. A log rate model was used to examine the likelihood of MVC injuries by drivers' race along the dimensions of age, sex, and place of residence. Black drivers had 31.6 and 87 percent more severe and nonsevere injuries, respectively, than white drivers. Rural residents were more likely than urban residents to have severe MVC injuries. Controlling for residence status, age, and sex did not alter the basic pattern that black drivers had higher rates of nonfatal MVC injuries. The linkage approach provides an effective way to obtain additional information for MVC injury disparity surveillance. To reduce racial disparities in severe and nonsevere MVC injuries, race-sex-, race-age-, and race-location-specific interventions should be considered based on their significant contributions to disparity.

  15. Disparities in perinatal medicine: preterm birth, stillbirth, and infant mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Catherine Y; Iams, Jay; Goldenberg, Robert; Hauck, Fern R; Willinger, Marian

    2011-04-01

    Infant mortality, stillbirths, and preterm births are major public health priorities with significant disparities based on race and ethnicity. Interestingly, when evaluating the rates over the past 30 to 50 years, the disparity persists in all three and is remarkably consistent. In the United States, the infant mortality rate is 6.7 deaths per 1,000 live births, the stillbirth rate is 6.2 per 1,000 deliveries, and the preterm birth rate is 12.8% of live births. The rates among non-Hispanic African Americans are dramatically higher, nearly double the infant mortality at 13.4 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, nearly double the stillbirth rate at 11.1 stillbirths per 1,000 deliveries, and one third higher with preterm births at 18.4% of live births. Despite numerous conferences, workshops, articles, and investigators focusing on this line of work, the disparities persist and, in some cases, are growing. In this article, we summarize a Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development workshop that focused on these disparities to identify the associated factors to determine their relative contributions, identify gaps in knowledge, and develop specific strategies to address the disparities in the short-term and long-term.

  16. Newly-discovered muscle in the larva of Patella coerulea (Mollusca, Gastropoda) suggests the presence of a larval extensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, Peter; Dictus, Wim J.A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The development of the muscular system of the gastropod mollusc Patella has been thoroughly studied. As a result, two larval retractors, the main and accessory larval retractor, had been described in the larva of Patella. These muscles were supposed to be responsible for the retraction of the larval

  17. Newly-discovered muscle in the larva of Patella coerulea (Mollusca, Gastropoda) suggests the presence of a larval extensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, Peter; Dictus, Wim J.A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The development of the muscular system of the gastropod mollusc Patella has been thoroughly studied. As a result, two larval retractors, the main and accessory larval retractor, had been described in the larva of Patella. These muscles were supposed to be responsible for the retraction of the larval

  18. Feeding competition between larval lake whitefish and lake herring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    1995-01-01

    The potential for competition for food between larval lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and lake herring (C. artedi) 1- to 8-wk of age was explored in a series of 1-h laboratory feeding studies. Feeding started at 2-wk post-hatch. Learning and fish size appear to be more important than prey density at the onset of feeding. Species differed in their feeding behavior and consumption noticeably by 5-wk and substantially by 8-wk. Lake whitefish generally were more aggressive foragers than lake herring, attacking and capturing more prey. At high plankton density at 8-wk, lake herring feeding was depressed in mixed-fish treatments. This difference in competitive food consumption between the two coregonids occurs at a critical life stage, and when combined with other biotic and abiotic factors, may have a significant impact on recruitment.

  19. Embryonic and larval development of Brycon amazonicus (SPIX & AGASSIZ, 1829

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. S. Sampaio Nakauth

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to describe the embryonic and larval development of Brycon amazonicus, featuring the main events up to 50 hours after fertilization (AF. The material was provided by the Aquaculture Training, Technology and Production Center, Presidente Figueiredo (AM. The characterization was based on stereomicroscopic examination of the morphology of eggs, embryos and larvae and comparison with the literature. Matrinxã eggs are free, transparent, and spherical, with a perivitelline space of 0.56 ± 0.3 mm. The successive divisions give rise to cells with 64 blastomeres during the first hour AF. The gastrula stage, beginning 02 h 40 min AF, was characterized by progressive regression cells and the formation of the embryonic axis, leading to differentiation of the head and tail 05 h 30 min AF. From 06 to 09 h AF the somites, notochord, otic and optic vesicles and otoliths were observed, in addition to heart rate and the release of the tail. The larvae hatched at 10 h 30 min AF (29.9 °C, with a total length of 3.56 ± 0.46 mm. Between 19 and 30 h AF, we observed 1 pigmentation and gut formation, 2 branchial arches, 3 pectoral fins, 4 a mouth opening and 5 teeth. Cannibalism was initiated earlier (34 h AF which was associated with rapid yolk absorption (more than 90% until 50 h AF, signaling the need for an exogenous nutritional source. The environmental conditions (especially temperature influenced the time course of some events throughout the embryonic and larval development, suggesting the need for further studies on this subject.

  20. The role of dopamine in Drosophila larval classical olfactory conditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Selcho

    Full Text Available Learning and memory is not an attribute of higher animals. Even Drosophila larvae are able to form and recall an association of a given odor with an aversive or appetitive gustatory reinforcer. As the Drosophila larva has turned into a particularly simple model for studying odor processing, a detailed neuronal and functional map of the olfactory pathway is available up to the third order neurons in the mushroom bodies. At this point, a convergence of olfactory processing and gustatory reinforcement is suggested to underlie associative memory formation. The dopaminergic system was shown to be involved in mammalian and insect olfactory conditioning. To analyze the anatomy and function of the larval dopaminergic system, we first characterize dopaminergic neurons immunohistochemically up to the single cell level and subsequent test for the effects of distortions in the dopamine system upon aversive (odor-salt as well as appetitive (odor-sugar associative learning. Single cell analysis suggests that dopaminergic neurons do not directly connect gustatory input in the larval suboesophageal ganglion to olfactory information in the mushroom bodies. However, a number of dopaminergic neurons innervate different regions of the brain, including protocerebra, mushroom bodies and suboesophageal ganglion. We found that dopamine receptors are highly enriched in the mushroom bodies and that aversive and appetitive olfactory learning is strongly impaired in dopamine receptor mutants. Genetically interfering with dopaminergic signaling supports this finding, although our data do not exclude on naïve odor and sugar preferences of the larvae. Our data suggest that dopaminergic neurons provide input to different brain regions including protocerebra, suboesophageal ganglion and mushroom bodies by more than one route. We therefore propose that different types of dopaminergic neurons might be involved in different types of signaling necessary for aversive and appetitive

  1. Influence of Physiological Stress on Nutrient Stoichiometry in Larval Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschman, Lucas J; Haslett, Savhannah; Fritz, Kelley A; Whiles, Matt R; Warne, Robin W

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to environmental stressors alters animal phenotypes as well as nutrient metabolism, assimilation, and excretion. While stress-induced shifts in nutrient processes are known to alter organismal carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stoichiometry, there has been little exploration of how environmental factors influence phosphorous (P). A better understanding of how P cycling varies with animal physiological state may provide insight into across-scale processes, because P is essential to animal function and ecological processes such as production and decomposition. We tested the effects of predator stress and exogenous glucocorticoids on C∶N∶P stoichiometry of larval amphibians. Glucocorticoids altered nutrient stoichiometry, apparently by modulating ossification and renal function. This reduced whole-body P and significantly increased N∶P. Additionally, elevated glucocorticoids caused a long-term reduction in P excretion. This reduction may reflect an initial unmeasured loss of P that glucocorticoids induce over acute timescales. In contrast, exposure to predator cues had no effect on larval C∶N∶P stoichiometry, which highlights that different stressors have varied effects on the endocrine stress response. Predation, in particular, is ubiquitous in the environment; thus, larvae responding to predators have conserved mechanisms that likely prevent or minimize physiological disruption. These results demonstrate the differing physiological roles of N and P, distinct nutrient demands associated with amphibian metamorphosis, and the contrasting effects that different environmental factors have on the physiological stress response. Our results also suggest that anthropogenic changes to the environment that induce chronic stress in amphibians could affect the biogeochemistry of nutrient-poor environments where they may act as keystone species.

  2. Combining disparate data for decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettings, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Combining information of disparate types from multiple data or model sources is a fundamental task in decision making theory. Procedures for combining and utilizing quantitative data with uncertainties are well-developed in several approaches, but methods for including qualitative and semi-quantitative data are much less so. Possibility theory offers an approach to treating all three data types in an objective and repeatable way. In decision making, biases are frequently present in several forms, including those arising from data quality, data spatial and temporal distribution, and the analyst's knowledge and beliefs as to which data or models are most important. The latter bias is particularly evident in the case of qualitative data and there are numerous examples of analysts feeling that a qualitative dataset is more relevant than a quantified one. Possibility theory and fuzzy logic now provide fairly general rules for quantifying qualitative and semi-quantitative data in ways that are repeatable and minimally biased. Once a set of quantified data and/or model layers is obtained, there are several methods of combining them to obtain insight useful in decision making. These include: various combinations of layers using formal fuzzy logic (for example, layer A and (layer B or layer C) but not layer D); connecting the layers with varying influence links in a Fuzzy Cognitive Map; and using the set of layers for the universe of discourse for agent based model simulations. One example of logical combinations that have proven useful is the definition of possible habitat for valley fever fungus (Coccidioides sp.) using variables such as soil type, altitude, aspect, moisture and temperature. A second example is the delineation of the lithology and possible mineralization of several areas beneath basin fill in southern Arizona. A Fuzzy Cognitive Map example is the impacts of development and operation of a hypothetical mine in an area adjacent to a city. In this model

  3. The Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzemer, William L; Méndez, Marta Rivero; Portillo, Carmen; Padilla, Geraldine; Cuca, Yvette; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the partnership between the schools of nursing at the University of California San Francisco and the University of Puerto Rico to address the need for nursing research on HIV/AIDS health disparities. The partnership led to the creation of the Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities with funding from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research. We provide background information on the disproportionate impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on racial and ethnic minorities, describe the major predictors of health disparities in persons at risk for or diagnosed with HIV/AIDS using the Outcomes Model for Health Care Research, and outline the major components of the Nursing Research Center. The center's goal is to improve health outcomes for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS by enhancing the knowledge base for HIV/AIDS care.

  4. Aerosol challenge of calves with Haemophilus somnus and Mycoplasma dispar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tegtmeier, C.; Angen, Øystein; Grell, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    investigated by recording clinical data, cytokine expression of peripheral blood cells and pathology. Twelve calves were included in the study: Three animals were exposed to H. somnus only, and two to M. dispar only, whereas five were challenged to M. dispar followed by exposure to H. somnus 11-14 days later......, the ability of H. somnus and M. dispar to act as primary pathogens under these conditions were minimal and inconsistent. However, a transient rise in body temperature, a marked granulocytosis and increased levels of interleukin-8 in peripheral blood after inoculation with H. somnus indicated a clear systemic...... response, probably as a consequence of the natural non-specific local and systemic defence mechanisms acting in healthy calves....

  5. Rural-urban disparities of breast cancer patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Bu, Yulan; Gao, Hua

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the rural-urban disparities in breast cancer patients in China. The retrospective study was performed with a total of 2,139 breast cancer patients hospitalized in Qilu Hospital of Shandong University between the years 1997 and 2011. We applied Chi-square analysis to identify significant disparities between rural and urban populations. Logistic regression model was used to estimate factors associated with the adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. Two-fifths of patients were considered rural dwellers. Significant disparities were found in marriage age (p rural-urban differences were also shown in the choice of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (p = 0.0050) and surgical procedures (p rural-urban breast cancer patients exist in China. Interventions to increase early diagnosis of breast cancer among rural area are in need. Further research is needed to investigate potential attitude and perception differences between rural and urban populations with respect to breast cancer preventions and treatments.

  6. Justice, stigma, and the new epidemiology of health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtwright, Andrew M

    2009-02-01

    Recent research in epidemiology has identified a number of factors beyond access to medical care that contribute to health disparities. Among the so-called socioeconomic determinants of health are income, education, and the distribution of social capital. One factor that has been overlooked in this discussion is the effect that stigmatization can have on health. In this paper, I identify two ways that social stigma can create health disparities: directly by impacting health-care seeking behaviour and indirectly through the internalization of negative interpersonal judgments. I then argue that social arrangements that foster self-respect can reduce the impact of stigmatization on health disparities. I conclude by showing how John Rawls' conception of justice can be used to address the intersection of stigma, health, and self-respect, in contrast to critics of his position, who have seen him as excessively focused on the allocation of material goods.

  7. On transaction efficiency and China's Urban-Rural disparity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hongjun; YIN Bocheng

    2006-01-01

    It is recommended for economists to examine China's Urban-Rural disparity from the perspective of transaction efficiency,in that it can provide us with a systematic explanation to both the cases of different countries and development stages.China's Urban-Rural disparity is special and virtually a demonstration of its special transaction efficiency structure.Exploration of China's Urban-Rural disparity from such perspective indicates that,different from those in countries with a market economy,China's case involves many exogenous and contrived factors.Therefore,the solutions are to improve the whole transaction efficiency in the economy,which includes eliminating its regionally unfavorable policies and institutions,and enforcing more favorable and regionally balanced institutional reforms.

  8. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease: potential role in health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaza, Jorge N; Contreras, Sandra; Garcia, Leah A; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Gibbons, Gary; Shohet, Ralph; Martins, David; Norris, Keith C

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), which includes coronary artery disease and stroke, is the leading cause of mortality in the nation. Excess CVD morbidity and premature mortality in the African American community is one of the most striking examples of racial/ ethnic disparities in health outcomes. African Americans also suffer from increased rates of hypovitaminosis D, which has emerged as an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. This overview examines the potential role of hypovitaminosis D as a contributor to racial and ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD). We review the epidemiology of vitamin D and CVD in African Americans and the emerging biological roles of vitamin D in key CVD signaling pathways that may contribute to the epidemiological findings and provide the foundation for future therapeutic strategies for reducing health disparities.

  9. Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Martin; Gerber, Sylvain; Albion Wills, Matthew

    2013-08-01

    There are few putative macroevolutionary trends or rules that withstand scrutiny. Here, we test and verify the purported tendency for animal clades to reach their maximum morphological variety relatively early in their evolutionary histories (early high disparity). We present a meta-analysis of 98 metazoan clades radiating throughout the Phanerozoic. The disparity profiles of groups through time are summarized in terms of their center of gravity (CG), with values above and below 0.50 indicating top- and bottom-heaviness, respectively. Clades that terminate at one of the "big five" mass extinction events tend to have truncated trajectories, with a significantly top-heavy CG distribution overall. The remaining 63 clades show the opposite tendency, with a significantly bottom-heavy mean CG (relatively early high disparity). Resampling tests are used to identify groups with a CG significantly above or below 0.50; clades not terminating at a mass extinction are three times more likely to be significantly bottom-heavy than top-heavy. Overall, there is no clear temporal trend in disparity profile shapes from the Cambrian to the Recent, and early high disparity is the predominant pattern throughout the Phanerozoic. Our results do not allow us to distinguish between ecological and developmental explanations for this phenomenon. To the extent that ecology has a role, however, the paucity of bottom-heavy clades radiating in the immediate wake of mass extinctions suggests that early high disparity more probably results from the evolution of key apomorphies at the base of clades rather than from physical drivers or catastrophic ecospace clearing.

  10. Disparities in attention to HIV-prevention information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Allison; Crause, Candi; Vaid, Awais; Albarracín, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Compared to European-Americans, African-Americans have greater probability of becoming infected with HIV, as well as worse outcomes when they become infected. Therefore, adequate health communications should ensure that they capture the attention of African-Americans and do not perpetuate disadvantages relative to European-Americans. The objective of this report was to examine if racial disparities in attention to health information parallel racial disparities in health outcomes. Participants were clients of a public health clinic (Study 1 n = 64; Study 2 n = 55). Unobtrusive observation in a public health waiting room, message reading times, and response-time on a modified flanker task were used to examine attention to HIV- and flu-information across racial groups. In Study 1, participants were observed for the duration of their time in a public health clinic waiting room (average duration: 31 min). In Study 2, participants completed tasks in a private room at the public health clinic (average duration: 21 min). Across all attention measures, results suggest an interaction between race and information type on attention to health information. In particular, African-Americans differentially attended to information as a function of information type, with decreased attention to HIV- versus flu-information. In contrast, European-Americans attended equally to both HIV- and flu-information. As such, disparities in attention yielded less access to certain health information for African- than European-Americans in a health setting. The identified disparities in attention are particularly problematic because they disadvantage African-Americans at a time of great effort to correct racial disparities. Modifying the framing of health information in ways that ensure attention by all racial groups may be a strategy to increase attention, and thereby reduce disparities in health outcomes. Future research should find solutions that increase attentional access to health

  11. 立体图象对视差性能分析%Performance Analysis of Disparity for Stereoscopic Image Pairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安平; 张兆扬

    2001-01-01

    Disparity is the geometrical difference between images of a stereoscopic pair. In this paper, we give a comprehensive analysis of the statistical characteristics of disparity. Based on experiments, we discuss the relations between disparity, depth and object, relation between block size and disparity estimation, and the influence of error criteria on disparity estimation.

  12. 立体图象对视差性能分析%Performance Analysis of Disparity for Stereoscopic Image Pairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安平; 张兆扬

    2000-01-01

    Disparity is the geometrical difference between images of a stereoscopic pair. In this paper, we give a comprehensive analysis of the statistical characteristics of disparity. Based on experiments, we discuss the relations between disparity, depth and object, relation between block size and disparity estimation, and the influence of error criteria on disparity estimation.

  13. Using Genetic Technologies To Reduce, Rather Than Widen, Health Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caren E; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Dookeran, Keith A; Hampel, Heather; Tin, Adrienne; Maruthur, Nisa M; Schisler, Jonathan C; Henderson, Jeffrey A; Tucker, Katherine L; Ordovás, José M

    2016-08-01

    Evidence shows that both biological and nonbiological factors contribute to health disparities. Genetics, in particular, plays a part in how common diseases manifest themselves. Today, unprecedented advances in genetically based diagnoses and treatments provide opportunities for personalized medicine. However, disadvantaged groups may lack access to these advances, and treatments based on research on non-Hispanic whites might not be generalizable to members of minority groups. Unless genetic technologies become universally accessible, existing disparities could be widened. Addressing this issue will require integrated strategies, including expanding genetic research, improving genetic literacy, and enhancing access to genetic technologies among minority populations in a way that avoids harms such as stigmatization.

  14. The "3 Ds" of school nursing: diversity, determinants, and disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Erin D; Barrows, Beth M

    2013-05-01

    In August 2012, the Health Resources and Services Administration's Division of Nursing hosted a 2-day conference to discuss the three Ds: workforce diversity, social determinants, and health disparities that nurses face every day. In particular they wanted to begin a discussion on how nursing, which is still afield of little diversity, must address the needs of a nation that is quite diverse. The framework of the discussion focused around the need to address health in its complexity of the social determinants and health disparities that exist. The purpose of this article is to personalize these concepts to school nurses.

  15. Interactions between introduced trout and larval salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum) in high-elevation lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, T.; Liss, W.J.; Ganio, L.; Larson, Gary L.; Hoffman, Robert L.; Deimling, E.; Lomnicky, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    The larval stage of the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) is the top vertebrate predator in high-elevation fishless lakes in the North Cascades National Park Service Complex, Washington (U.S.A.). Although most of these high-elevation lakes were naturally fishless, trout have been stocked in many of them. We sought to determine the effects of physicochemical factors and introduced trout on abundance and behavior of A. macrodactylum larvae. Larval salamander densities were estimated by snorkeling. Snorkelers carefully searched through substrate materials within 2 m of the shoreline and recorded the number of larvae observed and if larvae were hidden in benthic substrates. Physicochemical factors were measured in each lake on the same day that snorkel surveys were conducted. In fishless lakes, larval salamander densities were positively related to total Kjeldahl-N concentration and negatively related to lake elevation. Crustacean zooplankton, especially cladocerans, were important food resources for larval A. macrodactylum. Crustacean zooplankton and cladoceran densities were positively related to total Kjeldahl-N, suggesting that increased food resources contributed to increased densities of larval A. macrodactylum. Differences in larval salamander densities between fish and fishless lakes were related to total Kjeldahl-N concentrations and the reproductive status of trout. Mean larval salamander densities for fishless lakes with total Kjeldahl-N amphibians requires an understanding of natural abiotic and biotic factors and processes influencing amphibian distribution and abundance.

  16. Proteomics Insights: Proteins related to Larval Attachment and Metamorphosis of Marine Invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KONDETHIMMANAHALLI eCHANDRAMOULI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The transition in an animal from a pelagic larval stage to a sessile benthic juvenile typically requires major morphological and behavioral changes. Larval competency, attachment and initiation of metamorphosis are thought to be regulated by intrinsic chemical signals and specific sets of proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate larval attachment and metamorphosis in marine invertebrates have yet to be fully elucidated. Despite the many challenges associated with analysis of the larvae proteome, recent proteomic technologies have been used to address specific questions in larval developmental biology. These and other molecular studies have generated substantial amount of information of the proteins and molecular pathways involved in larval attachment and metamorphosis. Furthermore, the results of these studies have shown that systematic changes in protein expression patterns and post-translational modifications (PTM are crucial for the transition from larva to juvenile. The degeneration of larval tissues is mediated by protein degradation, while the development of juvenile organs may require PTM. In terms of application, the identified proteins may serve as targets for antifouling compounds, and biomarkers for environmental stressors. In this review we highlight the strengths and limitations of proteomic tools in the context of the study of marine invertebrate larval biology.

  17. Proteomics insights: proteins related to larval attachment and metamorphosis of marine invertebrates

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2014-10-31

    The transition in an animal from a pelagic larval stage to a sessile benthic juvenile typically requires major morphological and behavioral changes. Larval competency, attachment and initiation of metamorphosis are thought to be regulated by intrinsic chemical signals and specific sets of proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate larval attachment and metamorphosis in marine invertebrates have yet to be fully elucidated. Despite the many challenges associated with analysis of the larvae proteome, recent proteomic technologies have been used to address specific questions in larval developmental biology. These and other molecular studies have generated substantial amount of information of the proteins and molecular pathways involved in larval attachment and metamorphosis. Furthermore, the results of these studies have shown that systematic changes in protein expression patterns and post-translational modifications (PTMs) are crucial for the transition from larva to juvenile. The degeneration of larval tissues is mediated by protein degradation, while the development of juvenile organs may require PTM. In terms of application, the identified proteins may serve as targets for antifouling compounds, and biomarkers for environmental stressors. In this review we highlight the strengths and limitations of proteomic tools in the context of the study of marine invertebrate larval biology.

  18. Expression of Calmodulin and Myosin Light Chain Kinase during Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2012-02-13

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus (= Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca 2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. © 2012 Chen et al.

  19. Susceptibility of cat fleas (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) to fipronil and imidacloprid using adult and larval bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, M K; Vetter, R; Denholm, I; Blagburn, B; Williamson, M S; Kopp, S; Coleman, G; Hostetler, J; Davis, W; Mencke, N; Rees, R; Foit, S; Tetzner, K

    2014-05-01

    The monitoring of the susceptibility offleas to insecticides has typically been conducted by exposing adults on treated surfaces. Other methods such as topical applications of insecticides to adults and larval bioassays on treated rearing media have been developed. Unfortunately, baseline responses of susceptible strains of cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouchè), except for imidacloprid, have not been determined for all on-animal therapies and new classes of chemistry now being used. However, the relationship between adult and larval bioassays of fleas has not been previously investigated. The adult and larval bioassays of fipronil and imidacloprid were compared for both field-collected isolates and laboratory strains. Adult topical bioassays of fipronil and imidacloprid to laboratory strains and field-collected isolates demonstrated that LD50s of fipronil and imidacloprid ranged from 0.11 to 0.40 nanograms per flea and 0.02 to 0.18 nanograms per flea, respectively. Resistance ratios for fipronil and imidacloprid ranged from 0.11 to 2.21. Based on the larval bioassay published for imidacloprid, a larval bioassay was established for fipronil and reported in this article. The ranges of the LC50s of fipronil and imidacloprid in the larval rearing media were 0.07-0.16 and 0.11-0.21 ppm, respectively. Resistance ratios for adult and larval bioassays ranged from 0.11 to 2.2 and 0.58 to 1.75, respectively. Both adult and larval bioassays provided similar patterns for fipronil and imidacloprid. Although the adult bioassays permitted a more precise dosage applied, the larval bioassays allowed for testing isolates without the need to maintain on synthetic or natural hosts.

  20. Larval intraspecific competition for food in the European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéry, D; Monceau, K; Moreau, J

    2014-08-01

    Effective pest management with lower amounts of pesticides relies on accurate prediction of insect pest growth rates. Knowledge of the factors governing this trait and the resulting fitness of individuals is thus necessary to refine predictions and make suitable decisions in crop protection. The European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana, the major pest of grapes in Europe, is responsible for huge economic losses. Larvae very rarely leave the grape bunch on which they were oviposited and thus cannot avoid intraspecific competition. In this study, we determined the impact of intraspecific competition during the larval stage on development and adult fitness in this species. This was tested by rearing different numbers of larvae on an artificial diet and measuring developmental and reproductive life history traits. We found that intraspecific competition during larval development has a slight impact on the fitness of L. botrana. The principal finding of this work is that larval density has little effect on the life history traits of survivors. Thus, the timing of eclosion, duration of subsequent oviposition, fecundity appears to be more uniform in L. botrana than in other species. The main effect of larval crowding was a strong increase of larval mortality at high densities whereas the probability of emergence, sex ratio, pupal mass, fecundity and longevity of mated females were not affected by larval crowding. Owing to increased larval mortality at high larval densities, we hypothesized that mortality of larvae at high densities provided better access to food for the survivors with the result that more food was available per capita and there were no effect on fitness of survivors. From our results, larval crowding alters the reproductive capacity of this pest less than expected but this single factor should now be tested in interaction with limited resources in the wild.

  1. Expression of calmodulin and myosin light chain kinase during larval settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Fan Chen

    Full Text Available Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus ( = Amphibalanus amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM, encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca(2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite.

  2. Does White Clover (Trifolium repens) Abundance in Temperate Pastures Determine Sitona obsoletus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Larval Populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Mark R.; van Koten, Chikako; Cave, Vanessa M.; Chapman, David; Hodgson, Hamish

    2016-01-01

    To determine if host plant abundance determined the size of clover root weevil (CRW) Sitona obsoletus larval populations, a study was conducted over 4 years in plots sown in ryegrass (Lolium perenne) (cv. Nui) sown at either 6 or 30 kg/ha and white clover (Trifolium repens) sown at a uniform rate of 8 kg/ha. This provided a range of % white clover content to investigate CRW population establishment and impacts on white clover survival. Larval sampling was carried out in spring (October) when larval densities are near their spring peak at Lincoln (Canterbury, New Zealand) with % clover measured in autumn (April) and spring (September) of each year. Overall, mean larval densities measured in spring 2012–2015 were 310, 38, 59, and 31 larvae m-2, respectively. There was a significant decline in larval populations between 2012 and 2013, but spring populations were relatively uniform thereafter. The mean % white clover measured in autumns of 2012 to 2015 was 17, 10, 3, and 11%, respectively. In comparison, mean spring % white clover from 2012 to 2015, averaged c. 5% each year. Analysis relating spring (October) larval populations to % white clover measured in each plot in autumn (April) found the 2012 larval population to be statistically significantly larger in the ryegrass 6 kg/ha plots than 30 kg/ha plots. Thereafter, sowing rate had no significant effect on larval populations. From 2013 to 2015, spring larval populations had a negative relationship with the previous autumn % white clover with the relationship highly significant for the 2014 data. When CRW larval populations in spring 2013 to 2015 were predicted from the 2013 to 2015 autumn % white clover, respectively, based on their positive relationship in 2012, the predicted densities were substantially larger than those observed. Conversely, when 2015 spring larval data and % clover was regressed against 2012–2014 larval populations, observed densities tended to be higher than predicted, but the numbers came

  3. Prey size spectra and prey availability of larval and small juvenile cod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    1997-01-01

    stage when viewed on a relative predator/prey size scale. The study is based on stomach analysis of larval/juvenile cod in the size range 10-35 mm from nursery grounds in the North Sea. Stomach contents (species, size) were compared to environmental composition and preference indices were calculated...... prey biomass was highest in the areas of a hydrographic front, where larvae have been shown to concentrate. Changes in prey availability with larval growth depend strongly on specific prey biomass spectra at a given location. Both increasing and decreasing prey availability al increasing larval size...

  4. Catching prey with the antennae - The larval head of Corethrella appendiculata (Diptera: Corethrellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Maria; Beutel, Rolf G; Schneeberg, Katharina

    2016-11-01

    The larval cephalic morphology of Corethrella appendiculata Grabham, 1906 is described and documented in detail. The observed features are compared to conditions found in Chaoboridae, Culicidae, and other culicomorph families. The function of antennae, mouthparts and associated muscles is interpreted based on the morphological results. The prey catching mechanism is compared to what occurs in other predaceous larvae of Culicomorpha. The cephalic larval morphology is discussed with respect to homology and possible phylogenetic implications. The horizontal frontoclypeal antennal grooves and the lateral rows of strongly developed bristles are likely larval autapomorphies of Corethrellidae. The presence of raptorial antennae is a highly unusual apomorphy shared with Chaoboridae. The systematic position of Corethrellidae remains ambiguous.

  5. Does white clover (Trifolium repens abundance in temperate pastures determine Sitona obsoletus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae larval populations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Richard McNeill

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine if host plant abundance determined the size of clover root weevil (CRW Sitona obsoletus larval populations, a study was conducted over four years in plots sown in ryegrass (Lolium perenne (cv. Nui sown at either 6 or 30 kg/ha and white clover (Trifolium repens sown at a uniform rate of 8 kg/ha. This provided a range of % white clover content to investigate CRW population establishment and impacts on white clover survival. Larval sampling was carried out in spring (October when larval densities are near their spring peak at Lincoln (Canterbury, New Zealand with % clover measured in autumn (April and spring (September of each year. Overall, mean larval densities measured in spring 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 were 310, 38, 59 and 31 larvae m-2, respectively. There was a significant decline in larval populations between 2012 and 2013, but spring populations were relatively uniform thereafter. The mean % white clover measured in autumns of 2012 to 2015 was 17, 10, 3 and 11%, respectively. In comparison, mean spring % white clover from 2012 to 2015, averaged c. 5% each year. Analysis relating spring (October larval populations to % white clover measured in each plot in autumn (April found the 2012 larval population to be statistically significantly larger in the ryegrass 6 kg/ha plots than 30 kg/ha plots. Thereafter, sowing rate had no significant effect on larval populations. From 2013 to 2015, spring larval populations had a negative relationship with the previous autumn % white clover with the relationship highly significant for the 2014 data. When CRW larval populations in spring 2013 to 2015 were predicted from the 2013 to 2015 autumn % white clover, respectively, based on their positive relationship in 2012, the predicted densities were substantially larger than those observed. Conversely, when 2015 spring larval data and % clover was regressed against 2012-2014 larval populations, observed densities tended to be higher than predicted

  6. Larval fish assemblages across an upwelling front: Indication for active and passive retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, Maik; Brehmer, Patrice

    2017-03-01

    In upwelling areas, enrichment, concentration and retention are physical processes that have major consequences for larval fish survival. While these processes generally increase larval survival, strong upwelling can also increase mortality due to an offshore transport of larvae towards unfavorable habitats. In 2013 a survey was conducted along the Senegalese coast to investigate the upwelling effect with regard to larval fish assemblages and possible larval fish retention. According to water column characteristics two distinct habitats during an upwelling event were discriminated, i.e. the inshore upwelled water and the transition area over the deepest part of the Senegalese shelf. Along the two areas 42,162 fish larvae were collected representing 133 species within 40 families. Highest larval fish abundances were observed in the inshore area and decreasing abundances towards the transition, indicating that certain fish species make use of the retentive function of the inner shelf area as spawning grounds. Two larval fish assemblages overlap both habitats, which are sharply delimited by a strong upwelling front. One assemblage inhabited the inshore/upwelling area characterized by majorly neritic and pelagic species (Sparidae spp., Sardinella aurita), that seem to take the advantage of a passive retention on the shelf. The second assemblage consisted of a mix of pelagic and mesopelagic species (Engraulis encrasicolus, Carangidae spp. and Myctophidae spp.). Some species of the second assemblage, e.g. horse mackerels (Trachurus trachurus and Trachurus trecae), large finned-lantern fish (Hygophum macrochir) and foureyed sole (Microchirus ocellatus), revealed larval peak occurrences at intermediate and deep water layers, where the near-ground upwelling layer is able to transport larvae back to the shelf. This indicates active larval retention for species that are dominant in the transition area. Diel vertical migration patterns of S. aurita, E. encrasicolus and M

  7. Quality improvement implementation and disparities: the case of the health disparities collaboratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Marshall H

    2011-12-01

    The Health Disparities Collaboratives (HDCs), a quality improvement (QI) collaborative incorporating rapid QI, a chronic care model, and learning sessions, have been implemented in over 900 community health centers across the country. To determine the HDC's effect on clinical processes and outcomes, their financial impact, and factors important for successful implementation. Systematic review of the literature. The HDCs improve clinical processes of care over short-term period of 1 to 2 years, and clinical processes and outcomes over longer period of 2 to 4 years. Most participants perceive that the HDCs are successful and worth the effort. Analysis of the Diabetes Collaborative reveals that it is societally cost-effective, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $33,386 per quality-adjusted life year, but that consistent revenue streams for the initiative do not exist. Common barriers to improvement include lack of resources, time, and staff burnout. Highest ranked priorities for more funding are money for direct patient services, data entry, and staff time for QI. Other common requests for more assistance are help with patient self-management, information systems, and getting providers to follow guidelines. Relatively low-cost ways to increase staff morale and prevent burnout include personal recognition, skills development opportunities, and fair distribution of work. The HDCs have successfully improved quality of care, and the Diabetes Collaborative is societally cost-effective, but policy reforms are necessary to create a sustainable business case for these health centers that serve many uninsured and underinsured populations.

  8. Disparities in neighborhood food environments: implications of measurement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Michael D M; Purciel, Marnie; Yousefzadeh, Paulette; Neckerman, Kathryn M

    2010-01-01

    Public health researchers have begun to map the neighborhood “food environment” and examine its association with the risk of overweight and obesity. Some argue that “food deserts”—areas with little or no provision of fresh produce and other healthy food—may contribute to disparities in obesity, diabetes, and related health problems. While research on neighborhood food environments has taken advantage of more technically sophisticated ways to assess distance and density, in general, it has not considered how individual or neighborhood conditions might modify physical distance and thereby affect patterns of spatial accessibility. This study carried out a series of sensitivity analyses to illustrate the effects on the measurement of disparities in food environments of adjusting for cross-neighborhood variation in vehicle ownership rates, public transit access, and impediments to pedestrian travel, such as crime and poor traffic safety. The analysis used geographic information systems data for New York City supermarkets, fruit and vegetable markets, and farmers' markets and employed both kernel density and distance measures. We found that adjusting for vehicle ownership and crime tended to increase measured disparities in access to supermarkets by neighborhood race/ethnicity and income, while adjusting for public transit and traffic safety tended to narrow these disparities. Further, considering fruit and vegetable markets and farmers' markets, as well as supermarkets, increased the density of healthy food outlets, especially in neighborhoods with high concentrations of Hispanics, Asians, and foreign-born residents and in high-poverty neighborhoods.

  9. Sex Disparities in Arrest Outcomes for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Melissa; Worthen, Meredith G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence arrests have been historically focused on protecting women and children from abusive men. Arrest patterns continue to reflect this bias with more men arrested for domestic violence compared to women. Such potential gender variations in arrest patterns pave the way to the investigation of disparities by sex of the offender in…

  10. Erythrophagocytosis in Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamás-Lara, Daniel; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; González-Robles, Arturo; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Durán-Díaz, Ángel; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human intestinal and liver amebiasis. The extraordinary phagocytic activity of E. histolytica trophozoites has been accepted as one of the virulence mechanisms responsible for their invasive capacity. The recognition of the noninvasive Entamoeba dispar as a different species has raised the question as to whether the lack of pathogenic potential of this ameba correlates with a limited phagocytic capacity. We have therefore compared the process of erythrophagocytosis in both species by means of light and video microscopy, hemoglobin measurement, and the estimation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, we confirmed that E. dispar has lower erythrophagocytic capacity. We also observed by video microscopy a new event of erythrocyte opsonization-like in both species, being more characteristic in E. histolytica. Moreover, E. dispar showed a lower capacity to produce ROS compared with the invasive species and also showed a large population of amoebae that did not engulf any erythrocyte over time. Our results demonstrate that E. histolytica has a higher phagocytic capacity than E. dispar, including a higher rate of production of ROS in the course of ingesting red blood cells.

  11. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-09-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks).

  12. Disparity of radioiodine and radiothallium concentrations in chronic thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimaoka, K.; Parthasarathy, K.L.; Friedman, M.; Rao, U.

    1980-01-01

    Three cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) presented with thyroid nodules, showed disparate uptakes of radioiodine and radiothallium. All patients were clinically euthyroid and had positive antithyroid antibody titers. On cytological and/or pathological examinations, they were consistent with chronic thyroiditis.

  13. Erythrophagocytosis in Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Talamás-Lara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human intestinal and liver amebiasis. The extraordinary phagocytic activity of E. histolytica trophozoites has been accepted as one of the virulence mechanisms responsible for their invasive capacity. The recognition of the noninvasive Entamoeba dispar as a different species has raised the question as to whether the lack of pathogenic potential of this ameba correlates with a limited phagocytic capacity. We have therefore compared the process of erythrophagocytosis in both species by means of light and video microscopy, hemoglobin measurement, and the estimation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. In the present study, we confirmed that E. dispar has lower erythrophagocytic capacity. We also observed by video microscopy a new event of erythrocyte opsonization-like in both species, being more characteristic in E. histolytica. Moreover, E. dispar showed a lower capacity to produce ROS compared with the invasive species and also showed a large population of amoebae that did not engulf any erythrocyte over time. Our results demonstrate that E. histolytica has a higher phagocytic capacity than E. dispar, including a higher rate of production of ROS in the course of ingesting red blood cells.

  14. School Discipline Disparity: Converging Efforts for Better Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okilwa, Nathern S.; Robert, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    School policies and practices have historically lent themselves to disproportionate suspension and expulsion rates based on students' race, gender, and disability. The disparity between racial minorities, particularly Black males, and their White peers has generated concern from various stakeholders. Using Kingdon's ("Agendas, alternatives,…

  15. When does power disparity help or hurt group performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakci, Murat; Greer, Lindred L; Groenen, Patrick J F

    2016-03-01

    Power differences are ubiquitous in social settings. However, the question of whether groups with higher or lower power disparity achieve better performance has thus far received conflicting answers. To address this issue, we identify 3 underlying assumptions in the literature that may have led to these divergent findings, including a myopic focus on static hierarchies, an assumption that those at the top of hierarchies are competent at group tasks, and an assumption that equality is not possible. We employ a multimethod set of studies to examine these assumptions and to understand when power disparity will help or harm group performance. First, our agent-based simulation analyses show that by unpacking these common implicit assumptions in power research, we can explain earlier disparate findings--power disparity benefits group performance when it is dynamically aligned with the power holder's task competence, and harms group performance when held constant and/or is not aligned with task competence. Second, our empirical findings in both a field study of fraud investigation groups and a multiround laboratory study corroborate the simulation results. We thereby contribute to research on power by highlighting a dynamic understanding of power in groups and explaining how current implicit assumptions may lead to opposing findings.

  16. Eliminating Disparities in School Discipline: A Framework for Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Anne; Skiba, Russell J.; Mediratta, Kavitha

    2017-01-01

    Race and gender disparities in school discipline and associated harms have been well documented for decades. Suspension from school can reduce instructional time and impede academic progress for students who may already be lagging in their achievement. This chapter offers a research-based framework for increasing equity in school discipline. The…

  17. Challenges of health measurement in studies of health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgard, Sarah A; Chen, Patricia V

    2014-04-01

    Health disparities are increasingly studied in and across a growing array of societies. While novel contexts and comparisons are a promising development, this commentary highlights four challenges to finding appropriate and adequate health measures when making comparisons across groups within a society or across distinctive societies. These challenges affect the accuracy with which we characterize the degree of inequality, limiting possibilities for effectively targeting resources to improve health and reduce disparities. First, comparisons may be challenged by different distributions of disease and second, by variation in the availability and quality of vital events and census data often used to measure health. Third, the comparability of self-reported information about specific health conditions may vary across social groups or societies because of diagnosis bias or diagnosis avoidance. Fourth, self-reported overall health measures or measures of specific symptoms may not be comparable across groups if they use different reference groups or interpret questions or concepts differently. We explain specific issues that make up each type of challenge and show how they may lead to underestimates or inflation of estimated health disparities. We also discuss approaches that have been used to address them in prior research, note where further innovation is needed to solve lingering problems, and make recommendations for improving future research. Many of our examples are drawn from South Africa or the United States, societies characterized by substantial socioeconomic inequality across ethnic groups and wide disparities in many health outcomes, but the issues explored throughout apply to a wide variety of contexts and inquiries.

  18. Disparities in Overweight and Obesity among US College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Toben F.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Subramanian, S. V.; Cheung, Lilian; Wechsler, Henry

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To examine social disparities and behavioral correlates of overweight and obesity over time among college students. Methods: Multilevel analyses of BMI, physical activity, and television viewing from 2 representative surveys of US college students (n=24,613). Results: Overweight and obesity increased over time and were higher among…

  19. Growing Disparities in Life Expectancy. Economic and Budget Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Joyce; Topoleski, Julie

    2008-01-01

    In a continuation of long-term trends, life expectancy has been steadily increasing in the United States for the past several decades. Accompanying the recent increases, however, is a growing disparity in life expectancy between individuals with high and low income and between those with more and less education. The difference in life expectancy…

  20. Bringing Everyone to the Table to Eradicate School Discipline Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Allison; Mediratta, Kavitha

    2015-01-01

    The Atlantic Philanthropies funded the work of the Positive and Safe Schools Advancing Greater Equity (PASSAGE) initiative, which is a unique approach to ending discipline disparities focused on partnerships between districts and community organizations. Open Society Foundations is considering funding similar work. For this interview, "Voices…

  1. Understanding disparities in Slovenian rural areas: various new indicatiors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cosier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been widely accepted that regional development disparities are multi-faceted: on the one hand they hinder the development potentials of structurally weak rural areas, whilst on the other they stimulate faster development in distinctive, leading areas, thus re-creating old and generating new, more complex, regional differences. The paper focuses on quantitative ways of understanding the nature of rural disparities in Slovenia where the vast majority of national territory is defined as "rural" by OECD indicators. From the methodological perspective, single- and multi-level indicators were observed at the municipal level (LAU-2. Various indicators have been developed, with several looking at new generators of difference as well as indicators tailored to examine development disparities present in Slovenian rural areas. The results gained by extensive quantitative analysis could be used as scientific starting points that could inform rural policy decision makers in various rural regions. The focus on new indicators is particularly important as it highlights the challenges of such research whilst stressing the critical need for continued research into new generators and forms of disparities that may have negative consequences on rural areas, as well as possibly providing opportunities for previously problematic rural areas to address long-term development troubles.

  2. Epidemiology, trends, and disparities in regional anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozowicz, C; Poeran, J; Memtsoudis, S G

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have linked the use of regional anaesthesia to improved outcomes. Epidemiological research on utilization, trends, and disparities in this field is sparse; however, large nationally representative database constructs containing anaesthesia-related data, demographic information, and multiyear files are now available. Together with advances in research methodology and technology, these databases provide the foundation for epidemiological research in anaesthesia. We present an overview of selected studies that provide epidemiological data and describe current anaesthetic practice, trends, and disparities in orthopaedic surgery in particular. This literature suggests that that even among orthopaedic surgical procedures, which are highly amenable to regional anaesthetic techniques, neuraxial anaesthetics and peripheral nerve blocks are used in only a minority of procedures. Trend analyses show that peripheral nerve blocks are gaining in popularity, whereas use of neuraxial anaesthetics is remaining relatively unchanged or even declining over time. Finally, significant disparities and variability in anaesthetic care seem to exist based on demographic and health-care-related factors. With anaesthesia playing an increasingly important part in population-based health-care delivery and evidence indicating improved outcome with use of regional anaesthesia, more research in this area is needed. Furthermore, prevalent disparities and variabilities in anaesthesia practice need to be specified further and addressed in the future.

  3. The larval abdomen of the enigmatic Nannochoristidae (Mecoptera, Insecta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraulob, Maximilian; Wipfler, Benjamin; Hünefeld, Frank; Pohl, Hans; Beutel, Rolf G

    2012-03-01

    External and internal structures of the larval abdomen of Nannochorista are described in detail, with emphasis on the posterior segments. The results are compared with conditions found in other groups of Antliophora, especially the mecopteran subgroups Boreidae and Pistillifera. Like the entire postcephalic body, the larval abdomen of Nannochorista is extremely slender and nearly cylindrical. The anterior segments are largely unmodified. The surface is smooth and lacks any protuberances or prolegs. The term "cloaca" for the posterior membranous pouch of Nannochorista sp. is morphologically unjustified. A list of muscles of segments IX and X is presented. The abdominal musculature was partly homologized following Snodgrass. The muscles of segment X are highly modified. They move the membranous pouch, the anal papillae, and the terminal lobes. The presence of these structures is likely an adaptation to the specific aquatic life style of nannochoristid larvae. The anal papillae are possibly homologous to the 4-lobed terminal attachment apparatus of larvae of Caurinus (Boreidae) and Pistillifera (Panorpidae, Bittacidae, Choristidae) but this is uncertain. The specific condition in both groups, i.e. two retractile papillae with tracheae and Malpighian tubules in Nannochoristidae, and a 4-lobed exposed attachment device in Pistillifera + Boreidae (groundplan) are very likely autapomorphic for both groups, respectively. A slender abdomen with smooth surface is very likely plesiomorphic within Antliophora and Mecopterida. This condition is found in Trichoptera (partim), Nannochoristidae, Siphonaptera, and many basal groups of Diptera. An eruciform or scarabaeiform body shape with a soft, largely unsclerotised cuticle is probably a synapomorphy of Boreidae and Pistillifera. The presence of ventral protuberances resembling prolegs on the anterior segments is an autapomorphy of the latter group. The homology of paired or unpaired terminal appendages of segment X is

  4. A larval dispersion study using lagrangian simulation of particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rodríguez Díaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The continuous displacement of water allows stabilize the temperature and also distributes nutrients and plankton in the ocean and seas permitting the development of organisms and the transfers of larvae from the spawning areas to the habitat where adult fishes can be found. The area of study covers The North Atlantic Ocean so the principal aim of the study is analyze if released particles at the Florida Strait could cross the North Atlantic Ocean and reach the European shelf. To test this, it has simulated Lagrangian trajectories for different numbers of particles or "larvae" with a passive behavior (fixing at a depth of dispersion. It has analyzed the dispersion of those particles by using the data of the components U, V and W from the speed of currents provided by the database SODA which uses an ocean model based on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory MOM2 and data profiles from World Ocean Atlas-94 and from Geosat, ERS-1 and TOPEX/Poseidon satellites. Considering the dispersive nature of the ocean, the simulations were performed by releasing many particles (typically of the order of several thousand and it was also necessary to perform an interpolation process in time and space so that the position of the particles could evolve. The simulations have been run with 5,000 particles and it has been considered a biological parameter (planktonic larval duration, PLD that represents the length of larval life. At this study it has been used PLD for a specific starfish larva (Sclerasterias tanneri larvae that can be found at the Gulf of Mexico at different locations. Particles were released in October at the most oceanward location of the Gulf of Mexico close to the Florida Strait where Sclerasterias tanneri larvae can be found. Those particles have been tracked for 660 days (660 days is the PLD of Sclerasterias tanneri larvae recording their position every 15 days. That it has done for a period of more than 100 years (1901-2010. The period (1901

  5. Disparities in access to effective treatment for infertility in the United States: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    In the United States, economic, racial, ethnic, geographic, and other disparities exist in access to fertility treatment and in treatment outcomes. This opinion examines the factors that contribute to these disparities and proposes actions to address them.

  6. An examination of the impact of executive compensation disparity on corporate social performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hart, T.A.; David, P.; Shao, F.; Fox, C.J.; Westermann-Behaylo, M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between top management team compensation disparity and corporate social performance. We argue that pay structures with high disparity are reflective of transactional, individualistic organizations that foster a shareholder orientation. In contrast, pay structures with

  7. Structural Stigma and Sexual Orientation Disparities in Adolescent Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Jun, Hee-Jin; Corliss, Heather L.; Austin, S. Bryn

    2015-01-01

    Although epidemiologic studies have established the existence of large sexual orientation disparities in illicit drug use among adolescents and young adults, the determinants of these disparities remain understudied. This study sought to determine whether sexual orientation disparities in illicit drug use are potentiated in states that are characterized by high levels of stigma surrounding sexual minorities. State-level structural stigma was coded using a previously established measure based on a 4-item composite index: (1) density of same-sex couples; (2) proportion of Gay-Straight Alliances per public high school; (3) 5 policies related to sexual orientation discrimination (e.g., same-sex marriage, employment non-discrimination); and (4) public opinion toward homosexuality (aggregated responses from 41 national polls). The index was linked to individual-level data from the Growing Up Today Study, a prospective community-based study of adolescents (2000–2010). Sexual minorities report greater illicit drug use than their heterosexual peers. However, for both men and women, there were statistically significant interactions between sexual orientation status and structural stigma, such that sexual orientation disparities in marijuana and illicit drug use were more pronounced in high-structural stigma states than in low-structural stigma states, controlling for individual- and state-level confounders. For instance, among men, the risk ratio indicating the association between sexual orientation and marijuana use was 24% greater in high- versus low-structural stigma states, and for women it was 28% greater in high- versus low-structural stigma states. Stigma in the form of social policies and attitudes may contribute to sexual orientation disparities in illicit drug use. PMID:25753931

  8. Canadian cancer screening disparities: a recent historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, J; Liu, J; Wang, K; Fung, S; Landry, C; Lockwood, G; Zitzelsberger, L; Mai, V

    2015-04-01

    Across Canada, introduction of the Pap test for cervical cancer screening, followed by mammography for breast cancer screening and, more recently, the fecal occult blood test for colorectal cancer screening, has contributed to a reduction in cancer mortality. However, another contribution of screening has been disparities in cancer mortality between certain populations. Here, we explore the disparities associated with breast and cervical cancer screening and preliminary data concerning disparities in colorectal cancer screening. Although some disparities in screening utilization have been successfully reduced over time (for example, mammography and Pap test screening in rural and remote populations), screening utilization data for other populations (for example, low-income groups) clearly indicate that disparities have existed and continue to exist across Canada. Organized screening programs in Canada have been able to successfully engage 80% of women for regular cervical cancer screening and 70% of women for regular mammography screening, but of the women who remain to be reached or engaged in regular screening, those with the least resources, those who are the most isolated, and those who are least culturally integrated into Canadian society as a whole are over-represented. Population differences are also observed for utilization of colorectal cancer screening services. The research literature on interventions to promote screening utilization provides some evidence about what can be done to increase participation in organized screening by vulnerable populations. Adaption and adoption of evidence-based screening promotion interventions can increase the utilization of available screening services by populations that have experienced the greatest burden of disease with the least access to screening services.

  9. Structural stigma and sexual orientation disparities in adolescent drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Jun, Hee-Jin; Corliss, Heather L; Bryn Austin, S

    2015-07-01

    Although epidemiologic studies have established the existence of large sexual orientation disparities in illicit drug use among adolescents and young adults, the determinants of these disparities remain understudied. This study sought to determine whether sexual orientation disparities in illicit drug use are potentiated in states that are characterized by high levels of stigma surrounding sexual minorities. State-level structural stigma was coded using a previously established measure based on a 4-item composite index: (1) density of same-sex couples; (2) proportion of Gay-Straight Alliances per public high school; (3) 5 policies related to sexual orientation discrimination (e.g., same-sex marriage, employment non-discrimination); and (4) public opinion toward homosexuality (aggregated responses from 41 national polls). The index was linked to individual-level data from the Growing Up Today Study, a prospective community-based study of adolescents (2001-2010). Sexual minorities report greater illicit drug use than their heterosexual peers. However, for both men and women, there were statistically significant interactions between sexual orientation status and structural stigma, such that sexual orientation disparities in marijuana and illicit drug use were more pronounced in high-structural stigma states than in low-structural stigma states, controlling for individual- and state-level confounders. For instance, among men, the risk ratio indicating the association between sexual orientation and marijuana use was 24% greater in high- versus low-structural stigma states, and for women it was 28% greater in high- versus low-structural stigma states. Stigma in the form of social policies and attitudes may contribute to sexual orientation disparities in illicit drug use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Larval cannibalism and pupal defense against cannibalism in two species of tenebrionid beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Toshio; Kurauchi, Toshiaki

    2009-08-01

    Cannibalism of pupae by larvae has been documented In many species of Insects, but the features of larval cannibalism and pupal defensive mechanisms against larval cannibalism have been largely Ignored. Pupae of tenebrionld beetles rotate their abdominal segments in a circular motion in response to the tactile stimulation of appendages, including legs, antennae, maxillary pulps, and wings. When the pupal abdominal rotation responses of Tenebrio molitor and Zophobas atratus were completely blocked by transecting the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of the pupae, the appendages of the paralytic pupae became initial, major targets for attack by larval cannibals. The majority of 20 paralytic pupae was cannibalized by 100 larvae within 6 h, and almost all the pupae were killed within 2-3 days. In contrast, only a few pupae of Z. atratus and several pupae of T. molitor were cannibalized when the VNC was Intact. The abdominal rotation response of the pupae thus functions as an effective defense against larval cannibalism.

  11. Strengthened currents override the effect of warming on lobster larval dispersal and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cetina-Heredia, Paulina; Roughan, Moninya; van Sebille, Erik|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831921; Feng, Ming; Coleman, Melinda A.

    2015-01-01

    Human-induced climate change is projected to increase ocean temperature and modify circulation patterns, with potential widespread implications for the transport and survival of planktonic larvae of marine organisms. Circulation affects the dispersal of larvae, whereas temperature impacts larval

  12. Larval salamanders and channel geomorphology are indicators of hydrologic permanence in forested headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulatory agencies need rapid indicators of hydrologic permanence for jurisdictional determinations of headwater streams. Our study objective was to assess the utility of larval salamander presence and assemblage structure and habitat variables for determining stream permanence ...

  13. Anomalies of larval and juvenile shortnose and lost river suckers in upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Larval and juvenile shortnose (Chasmistes brevirostris) and Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) suckers from Upper Klamath Lake, OR, were examined to determine anomaly...

  14. Temperature control of larval dispersal and the implications for marine ecology, evolution, and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mary I; Bruno, John F; Gaines, Steven D; Halpern, Benjamin S; Lester, Sarah E; Kinlan, Brian P; Weiss, Jack M

    2007-01-23

    Temperature controls the rate of fundamental biochemical processes and thereby regulates organismal attributes including development rate and survival. The increase in metabolic rate with temperature explains substantial among-species variation in life-history traits, population dynamics, and ecosystem processes. Temperature can also cause variability in metabolic rate within species. Here, we compare the effect of temperature on a key component of marine life cycles among a geographically and taxonomically diverse group of marine fish and invertebrates. Although innumerable lab studies document the negative effect of temperature on larval development time, little is known about the generality versus taxon-dependence of this relationship. We present a unified, parameterized model for the temperature dependence of larval development in marine animals. Because the duration of the larval period is known to influence larval dispersal distance and survival, changes in ocean temperature could have a direct and predictable influence on population connectivity, community structure, and regional-to-global scale patterns of biodiversity.

  15. A High-Throughput Method for the Analysis of Larval Developmental Phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, María; Geibel, Mirjam; Artal-Sanz, Marta; Merrow, Martha

    2015-10-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans postembryonic development consists of four discrete larval stages separated by molts. Typically, the speed of progression through these larval stages is investigated by visual inspection of the molting process. Here, we describe an automated method to monitor the timing of these discrete phases of C. elegans maturation, from the first larval stage through adulthood, using bioluminescence. The method was validated with a lin-42 mutant strain that shows delayed development relative to wild-type animals and with a daf-2 mutant that shows an extended second larval stage. This new method is inherently high-throughput and will finally allow dissecting the molecular machinery governing the speed of the developmental clock, which has so far been hampered by the lack of a method suitable for genetic screens.

  16. AFSC/RACE/SAP/Foy: Effects of ocean acidification on larval Tanner crab: Kodiak Island, Alaska.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To study the effects of ocean acidification we examined the effects of ocean acidification on the larval stages of the economically important southern Tanner crab,...

  17. Relevance of biofilm bacteria in modulating the larval metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Raghukumar, S.

    Balanus amphitrite, on its larval metamorphosis. The effect of multispecies bacterial film was also assessed. The production of different molecules by the bacteria was influenced by the nutrient media under which they were grown. It was observed...

  18. Measuring larval nematode contamination on cattle pastures: Comparing two herbage sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschave, S H; Levecke, B; Duchateau, L; Vercruysse, J; Charlier, J

    2015-06-15

    Assessing levels of pasture larval contamination is frequently used to study the population dynamics of the free-living stages of parasitic nematodes of livestock. Direct quantification of infective larvae (L3) on herbage is the most applied method to measure pasture larval contamination. However, herbage collection remains labour intensive and there is a lack of studies addressing the variation induced by the sampling method and the required sample size. The aim of this study was (1) to compare two different sampling methods in terms of pasture larval count results and time required to sample, (2) to assess the amount of variation in larval counts at the level of sample plot, pasture and season, respectively and (3) to calculate the required sample size to assess pasture larval contamination with a predefined precision using random plots across pasture. Eight young stock pastures of different commercial dairy herds were sampled in three consecutive seasons during the grazing season (spring, summer and autumn). On each pasture, herbage samples were collected through both a double-crossed W-transect with samples taken every 10 steps (method 1) and four random located plots of 0.16 m(2) with collection of all herbage within the plot (method 2). The average (± standard deviation (SD)) pasture larval contamination using sampling methods 1 and 2 was 325 (± 479) and 305 (± 444)L3/kg dry herbage (DH), respectively. Large discrepancies in pasture larval counts of the same pasture and season were often seen between methods, but no significant difference (P = 0.38) in larval counts between methods was found. Less time was required to collect samples with method 2. This difference in collection time between methods was most pronounced for pastures with a surface area larger than 1 ha. The variation in pasture larval counts from samples generated by random plot sampling was mainly due to the repeated measurements on the same pasture in the same season (residual variance

  19. Toward an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of barnacle larval settlement: A comparative transcriptomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2011-07-29

    Background: The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed biofouler and a model species in intertidal ecology and larval settlement studies. However, a lack of genomic information has hindered the comprehensive elucidation of the molecular mechanisms coordinating its larval settlement. The pyrosequencing-based transcriptomic approach is thought to be useful to identify key molecular changes during larval settlement. Methodology and Principal Findings: Using 454 pyrosequencing, we collected totally 630,845 reads including 215,308 from the larval stages and 415,537 from the adults; 23,451 contigs were generated while 77,785 remained as singletons. We annotated 31,720 of the 92,322 predicted open reading frames, which matched hits in the NCBI NR database, and identified 7,954 putative genes that were differentially expressed between the larval and adult stages. Of these, several genes were further characterized with quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization, revealing some key findings: 1) vitellogenin was uniquely expressed in late nauplius stage, suggesting it may be an energy source for the subsequent non-feeding cyprid stage; 2) the locations of mannose receptors suggested they may be involved in the sensory system of cyprids; 3) 20 kDa-cement protein homologues were expressed in the cyprid cement gland and probably function during attachment; and 4) receptor tyrosine kinases were expressed higher in cyprid stage and may be involved in signal perception during larval settlement. Conclusions: Our results provide not only the basis of several new hypotheses about gene functions during larval settlement, but also the availability of this large transcriptome dataset in B. amphitrite for further exploration of larval settlement and developmental pathways in this important marine species. © 2011 Chen et al.

  20. Hatching and larval export of the intertidal crab Neohelice granulata in Mar Chiquita coastal lagoon, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermina Sánchez Vuichard; Nahuel Farías; Tomás Luppi

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization in the events of the reproductive cycle in female Neohelice granulata Dana, 1851 were studied from samples taken weekly and biweekly from September to December 2006 in the Laguna Mar Chiquita. The timing and larval hatching and synchronicity were inferred from numbers of ovigerous females and observing the stages of embryonic development. Synchronization in larval hatching also was observed in females in experiments in dark for a period of 48 hours, at three different saliniti...

  1. Functional evolution of Ets in echinoderms with focus on the evolution of echinoderm larval skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Mioko; Fujitani, Haruka; Miyamoto, Norio; Komatsu, Miéko; Kiyomoto, Masato; Akasaka, Koji; Wada, Hiroshi

    2010-09-01

    Convergent evolution of echinoderm pluteus larva was examined from the standpoint of functional evolution of a transcription factor Ets1/2. In sea urchins, Ets1/2 plays a central role in the differentiation of larval skeletogenic mesenchyme cells. In addition, Ets1/2 is suggested to be involved in adult skeletogenesis. Conversely, in starfish, although no skeletogenic cells differentiate during larval development, Ets1/2 is also expressed in the larval mesoderm. Here, we confirmed that the starfish Ets1/2 is indispensable for the differentiation of the larval mesoderm. This result led us to assume that, in the common ancestors of echinoderms, Ets1/2 activates the transcription of distinct gene sets, one for the differentiation of the larval mesoderm and the other for the development of the adult skeleton. Thus, the acquisition of the larval skeleton involved target switching of Ets1/2. Specifically, in the sea urchin lineage, Ets1/2 activated a downstream target gene set for skeletogenesis during larval development in addition to a mesoderm target set. We examined whether this heterochronic activation of the skeletogenic target set was achieved by the molecular evolution of the Ets1/2 transcription factor itself. We tested whether starfish Ets1/2 induced skeletogenesis when injected into sea urchin eggs. We found that, in addition to ectopic induction of mesenchyme cells, starfish Ets1/2 can activate some parts of the skeletogenic pathway in these mesenchyme cells. Thus, we suggest that the nature of the transcription factor Ets1/2 did not change, but rather that some unidentified co-factor(s) for Ets1/2 may distinguish between targets for the larval mesoderm and for skeletogenesis. Identification of the co-factor(s) will be key to understanding the molecular evolution underlying the evolution of the pluteus larvae.

  2. The influence of larval competition on Brazilian Wolbachia-infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Heverton Leandro Carneiro; Lopes da Silva, Vanessa; da Rocha Fernandes, Mariana; Logullo, Carlos; Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Moreira, Luciano Andrade

    2016-05-16

    With field releases starting in Brazil, particular interest must be given to understanding how the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis affects Aedes aegypti mosquitoes with a Brazilian genetic background. Currently, there is limited information on how the bacterium affects phenotypic traits such as larval development rate, metabolic reserves and morphometric parameters in Ae. aegypti. Here, we analyze for the first time, the effect of Wolbachia on these key phenotypes and consider how this might impact the potential of the bacterium as a disease control agent in Brazil. We examined the influence of the wMel strain of Wolbachia in laboratory Ae. aegypti with a Brazilian genetic background, reared under different larval densities. Pupae formation was counted daily to assess differences in development rates. Levels of metabolic reserves and morphometric parameters were assessed in adults resulting from each larval condition. wMel infection led to more rapid larval development at higher densities for both males and females, with no effect under less crowded conditions in females. Infection also led to reduced body size at both high and low density, but not at intermediate density, although the scale of this difference was maintained regardless of larval density, in comparison to uninfected individuals. Wing shape also varied significantly between infected and uninfected mosquitoes due to larval density. Glycogen levels in uninfected mosquitoes decreased under higher larval density, but were consistently high with Wolbachia infection, regardless of larval density. We demonstrate that the wMel Wolbachia strain can positively influence some important host fitness traits, and that this interaction is directly linked to the conditions in which the host is reared. Combined with previously published data, these results suggest that this Wolbachia strain could be successfully used as part of the Eliminate Dengue Program in Brazil.

  3. Exposure to 2,4-decadienal negatively impacts upon marine invertebrate larval fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Gary S; Lewis, Ceri; Olive, Peter J W; Bentley, Matthew G

    2005-06-01

    Diatoms liberate volatile, biologically active unsaturated aldehydes following cell damage, which negatively impact upon invertebrate reproductive processes such as fertilization, embryogenesis and larval survival. 2,4-Decadienal is frequently identified among the aldehydes produced and is one of the more biologically active. The majority of studies which have examined the toxic effects of diatom aldehydes to invertebrate reproduction have scored egg production and/or hatching success as indicators of biological impacts. There are very few studies which have dealt specifically with the impacts of diatom-derived aldehydes on larval fitness. Larval stages of the polychaetes Arenicola marina and Nereis virens and the echinoderms Asterias rubens and Psammechinus miliaris exposed to 2,4-decadienal at sub 1 microg ml(-1) concentrations suffered reduced survival over the incubation period (day 1-8 post fertilization) with detectable differences for the polychates at a concentration of 0.005 and 0.01-0.1 microg ml(-1) for the echinoderms. Susceptibility of larval N. virens was investigated using stage specific 24 h exposures at 2,4-decadienal concentrations up to 1.5 microg ml(-1). A clear stage specific effect was found, with earlier larval stages most vulnerable. Nectochaete larvae (9-10 d) showed no reduction in survival at the concentrations assayed. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA), defined as random deviations from perfect bilateral symmetry, was used to analyse fitness of larval P. miliaris exposed to 2,4-decadienal at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5 and 1 microg ml(-1). The degree and frequency of asymmetrical development increased with increasing 2,4-decadienal concentration. Equally, as FA increased larval survival decreased. These results provide further support for the teratogenic nature of 2,4-decadienal and its negative impact on invertebrate larval fitness.

  4. Factors affecting fungus-induced larval mortality in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takken Willem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entomopathogenic fungi have shown great potential for the control of adult malaria vectors. However, their ability to control aquatic stages of anopheline vectors remains largely unexplored. Therefore, how larval characteristics (Anopheles species, age and larval density, fungus (species and concentration and environmental effects (exposure duration and food availability influence larval mortality caused by fungus, was studied. Methods Laboratory bioassays were performed on the larval stages of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi with spores of two fungus species, Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana. For various larval and fungal characteristics and environmental effects the time to death was determined and survival curves established. These curves were compared by Kaplan Meier and Cox regression analyses. Results Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae caused high mortality of An. gambiae and An. stephensi larvae. However, Beauveria bassiana was less effective (Hazard ratio (HR Metarhizium anisopliae. Anopheles stephensi and An. gambiae were equally susceptible to each fungus. Older larvae were less likely to die than young larvae (HR Conclusions This study shows that both fungus species have potential to kill mosquitoes in the larval stage, and that mortality rate depends on fungus species itself, larval stage targeted, larval density and amount of nutrients available to the larvae. Increasing the concentration of fungal spores or reducing the exposure time to spores did not show a proportional increase and decrease in mortality rate, respectively, because the spores clumped together. As a result spores did not provide uniform coverage over space and time. It is, therefore, necessary to develop a formulation that allows the spores to spread over the water surface. Apart from formulation appropriate delivery methods are also necessary to avoid exposing non-target organisms to fungus.

  5. Replenishment success linked to fluctuating asymmetry in larval fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberget, Tove; McCormick, Mark I

    2009-02-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA), defined as random deviations from perfect symmetry, has become a popular tool with which to examine the effects of stress during the development of bilaterally symmetrical organisms. Recent studies have suggested that FA in otoliths may serve as an indicator of stress in fish larvae. We examined the relationship between otolith asymmetry and temporal patterns in the occurrence of late-stage larvae to a tropical reef (i.e. replenishment) for the Caribbean lizardfish, Saurida suspicio (family Synodontidae). Late-stage larvae were collected in light traps over a period of 18 consecutive lunar months in the San Blas Archipelago, Panama. Asymmetry within otolith pairs was calculated from 24 variables: area, perimeter, longest and shortest axis of the otolith and 20 shape descriptors (Fourier harmonics). Otolith asymmetry was correlated strongly with fluctuations in lunar light trap catches. Two measured variables, otolith area and one of the 20 shape descriptors, accounted for 60% of the variability in lunar replenishment of S. suspicio. Individuals from small replenishment pulses exhibited higher levels of asymmetry compared to larvae from large pulses. When dry and wet seasons were analysed separately, otolith asymmetry explained a surprising 70 and 97% of the variation, respectively. Although the generality of these results remain to be tested among other populations and species, otolith asymmetry may be an important indicator, and potentially a predictor, of larval quality and replenishment success.

  6. Positive effects of nonnative invasive Phragmites australis on larval bullfrogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Alta Rogalski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonnative Phragmites australis (common reed is one of the most intensively researched and managed invasive plant species in the United States, yet as with many invasive species, our ability to predict, control or understand the consequences of invasions is limited. Rapid spread of dense Phragmites monocultures has prompted efforts to limit its expansion and remove existing stands. Motivation for large-scale Phragmites eradication programs includes purported negative impacts on native wildlife, a view based primarily on observational results. We took an experimental approach to test this assumption, estimating the effects of nonnative Phragmites australis on a native amphibian. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Concurrent common garden and reciprocal transplant field experiments revealed consistently strong positive influences of Phragmites on Rana catesbeiana (North American bullfrog larval performance. Decomposing Phragmites litter appears to contribute to the effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Positive effects of Phragmites merit further research, particularly in regions where both Phragmites and R. catesbeiana are invasive. More broadly, the findings of this study reinforce the importance of experimental evaluations of the effects of biological invasion to make informed conservation and restoration decisions.

  7. Structural study of the frog Rana temporaria larval stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, J; Villaro, A C; Bodegas, M E; Valverde, E; Sesma, P

    1993-10-01

    The gastric wall of Rana temporaria tadpoles consists of a well-developed mucosa and thin muscular and serosa layers. Three cellular types--mucous, ciliated and endocrine cells--make up the lining epithelium. Different types of endocrine cells exist. Argyrophylic endocrine cells can be recognized in semithin sections of plastic-embedded material while non-argyrophylic endocrine cells can only be identified under the electron microscope. Glands are composed mainly of well-differentiated oxyntic cells and, occasionally, scarce endocrine cells. Oxyntic cells show abundant mitochondria and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, but do not contain zymogen granules as do those present in adults. Secretory canaliculi with microvilli are also well-developed. The lamina propria contains numerous vascular sinuses and nerve bundles which innervate the endothelium and some endocrine cells. The neuroendocrine regulation of frog gastric functions seems therefore to have developed in young tadpoles. Nerve fibers also innervate the muscular propria, which is composed of a single layer of smooth muscle cells. Underlying the muscle, connective fibers and a flattened layer of mesothelial cells make up the serosa. In summary, the structure of the frog larval stomach shows a well-differentiated histological pattern, especially referring to surface epithelium and glands. Some of the histological traits will also be present in adult frogs while others are characteristic of the tadpole's stage.

  8. Distribution of ferric iron in larval lampreys, Petromyzon marinus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S J; Youson, J H

    1988-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of ferric iron in larval lampreys (Petromyzon marinus L.) were investigated using light microscopy and the Prussian blue stain. Animals from various watersheds contained different concentrations of iron, although the sites of deposition were the same for all animals. A major portion of iron is within adipose tissue, while the liver, and cartilage contain predominantly low to trace amounts of iron, respectively. Iron is associated with fibrous connective tissue in several places in the body, and this association may have particular significance in the inner ear. Iron is also located in cells of the meninges. The presence of iron in the epithelial cells of the posterior intestine may reflect elimination of the metal through the extrusion of iron-loaded cells into the intestinal lumen. Iron within mucous cells of the epidermis, suggest elimination of iron during mucous secretion. Iron-loaded cells of bipolar shape are also present in the epidermis, but are particularly prominent around the branchiopore. Low concentrations of iron are observed within in melanin-containing macrophages (melano-macrophages) in regions of iron absorption, erythrophagocytosis, and haemopoiesis. High levels of iron in the epithelia and lumina of pronephric tubules are concomitant with degeneration of this organ. These data are evidence of the wide spread distribution of iron in lamprey tissues and additional evidence for the potential value of lampreys for the study of iron metabolism in vertebrates.

  9. Connectivity dominates larval replenishment in a coastal reef fish metapopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Jones, Geoffrey P; Thorrold, Simon R; Planes, Serge

    2011-10-07

    Direct estimates of larval retention and connectivity are essential to understand the structure and dynamics of marine metapopulations, and optimize the size and spacing of reserves within networks of marine-protected areas (MPAs). For coral reef fishes, while there are some empirical estimates of self-recruitment at isolated populations, exchange among sub-populations has been rarely quantified. Here, we used microsatellite DNA markers and a likelihood-based parentage analysis to assess the relative magnitude of self-recruitment and exchange among eight geographically distinct sub-populations of the panda clownfish Amphiprion polymnus along 30 km of coastline near Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. In addition, we used an assignment/exclusion test to identify immigrants arriving from genetically distinct sources. Overall, 82 per cent of the juveniles were immigrants while 18 per cent were progeny of parents genotyped in our focal metapopulation. Of the immigrants, only 6 per cent were likely to be genetically distinct from the focal metapopulation, suggesting most of the connectivity is among sub-populations from a rather homogeneous genetic pool. Of the 18 per cent that were progeny of known adults, two-thirds dispersed among the eight sub-populations and only one-third settled back into natal sub-populations. Comparison of our data with previous studies suggested that variation in dispersal distances is likely to be influenced by the geographical setting and spacing of sub-populations.

  10. Preference for and learning of amino acids in larval Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Kudow

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Relative to other nutrients, less is known about how animals sense amino acids and how behaviour is organized accordingly. This is a significant gap in our knowledge because amino acids are required for protein synthesis − and hence for life as we know it. Choosing Drosophila larvae as a case study, we provide the first systematic analysis of both the preference behaviour for, and the learning of, all 20 canonical amino acids in Drosophila. We report that preference for individual amino acids differs according to the kind of amino acid, both in first-instar and in third-instar larvae. Our data suggest that this preference profile changes across larval instars, and that starvation during the third instar also alters this profile. Only aspartic acid turns out to be robustly attractive across all our experiments. The essentiality of amino acids does not appear to be a determinant of preference. Interestingly, although amino acids thus differ in their innate attractiveness, we find that all amino acids are equally rewarding. Similar discrepancies between innate attractiveness and reinforcing effect have previously been reported for other tastants, including sugars, bitter substances and salt. The present analyses will facilitate the ongoing search for the receptors, sensory neurons, and internal, homeostatic amino acid sensors in Drosophila.

  11. Preference for and learning of amino acids in larval Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudow, Nana; Miura, Daisuke; Schleyer, Michael; Toshima, Naoko; Gerber, Bertram; Tanimura, Teiichi

    2017-03-15

    Relative to other nutrients, less is known about how animals sense amino acids and how behaviour is organized accordingly. This is a significant gap in our knowledge because amino acids are required for protein synthesis - and hence for life as we know it. Choosing Drosophila larvae as a case study, we provide the first systematic analysis of both the preference behaviour for, and the learning of, all 20 canonical amino acids in Drosophila We report that preference for individual amino acids differs according to the kind of amino acid, both in first-instar and in third-instar larvae. Our data suggest that this preference profile changes across larval instars, and that starvation during the third instar also alters this profile. Only aspartic acid turns out to be robustly attractive across all our experiments. The essentiality of amino acids does not appear to be a determinant of preference. Interestingly, although amino acids thus differ in their innate attractiveness, we find that all amino acids are equally rewarding. Similar discrepancies between innate attractiveness and reinforcing effect have previously been reported for other tastants, including sugars, bitter substances and salt. The present analyses will facilitate the ongoing search for the receptors, sensory neurons, and internal, homeostatic amino acid sensors in Drosophila.

  12. Cannibalistic feeding of larval Trichogramma carverae parasitoids in moth eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslin, Leeane M.; Merritt, David J.

    2005-09-01

    Wasps of the genus Trichogramma parasitise the eggs of Lepidoptera. They may deposit one or many eggs in each host. Survival is high at low density but reaches a plateau as density increases. To reveal the mechanism by which excess larvae die we chose a lepidopteran host that has flattened, transparent eggs and used video microscopy to record novel feeding behaviours and interactions of larval Trichogramma carverae (Oatman and Pinto) at different densities. Single larvae show a rapid food ingestion phase, followed by a period of extensive saliva release. Ultimately the host egg is completely consumed. The larva then extracts excess moisture from the egg, providing a dry environment for pupation. When multiple larvae are present, the initial scramble for food results in the larvae consuming all of the egg contents early in development. All larvae survive if there is sufficient food for all to reach a threshold developmental stage. If not, physical proximity results in attack and consumption of others, continuing until the surviving larvae reach the threshold stage beyond which attacks seem to be no longer effective. The number of larvae remaining at the end of rapid ingestion dictates how many will survive to emerge as adults.

  13. Path Not Found: Disparities in Access to Computer Science Courses in California High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alexis; McAlear, Frieda; Scott, Allison

    2015-01-01

    "Path Not Found: Disparities in Access to Computer Science Courses in California High Schools" exposes one of the foundational causes of underrepresentation in computing: disparities in access to computer science courses in California's public high schools. This report provides new, detailed data on these disparities by student body…

  14. Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities among People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña, Sandra; Parish, Susan; Morales, Miguel A.; Li, Henan; Fujiura, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health disparities are a pervasive public health problem. Emerging research finds similar health disparities among people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) compared to nondisabled adults. However, few studies have examined racial and ethnic health disparities among adults with IDD. Using national data, we…

  15. Free Space Computation From Stochastic Occupancy Grids Based On Iconic Kalman Filtered Disparity Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høilund, Carsten; Moeslund, Thomas B.; Madsen, Claus B.;

    2010-01-01

    variance and increasing the density of the filtered disparity map. Then, a stochastic occupancy grid is calculated from the filtered disparity map, providing a top-down view of the scene where the uncertainty of disparity measurements are taken into account. These occupancy grids are segmented to indicate...

  16. Using temporal seeding to constrain the disparity search range in stereo matching

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndhlovu, T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available for reusing computed disparity estimates on features in a stereo image sequence to constrain the disparity search range. Features are detected on a left image and their disparity estimates are computed using a local-matching algorithm. The features...

  17. Relative impacts of adult movement, larval dispersal and harvester movement on the effectiveness of reserve networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüss, Arnaud; Kaplan, David M; Hart, Deborah R

    2011-01-01

    Movement of individuals is a critical factor determining the effectiveness of reserve networks. Marine reserves have historically been used for the management of species that are sedentary as adults, and, therefore, larval dispersal has been a major focus of marine-reserve research. The push to use marine reserves for managing pelagic and demersal species poses significant questions regarding their utility for highly-mobile species. Here, a simple conceptual metapopulation model is developed to provide a rigorous comparison of the functioning of reserve networks for populations with different admixtures of larval dispersal and adult movement in a home range. We find that adult movement produces significantly lower persistence than larval dispersal, all other factors being equal. Furthermore, redistribution of harvest effort previously in reserves to remaining fished areas ('fishery squeeze') and fishing along reserve borders ('fishing-the-line') considerably reduce persistence and harvests for populations mobile as adults, while they only marginally changes results for populations with dispersing larvae. Our results also indicate that adult home-range movement and larval dispersal are not simply additive processes, but rather that populations possessing both modes of movement have lower persistence than equivalent populations having the same amount of 'total movement' (sum of larval and adult movement spatial scales) in either larval dispersal or adult movement alone.

  18. Larval density dependence in Anopheles gambiae s.s., the major African vector of malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriu, Simon M.; Coulson, Tim; Mbogo, Charles M.; Godfray, H. Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto is the most important vector of malaria in Africa although relatively little is known about the density-dependent processes determining its population size.Mosquito larval density was manipulated under semi-natural conditions using artificial larval breeding sites placed in the field in coastal Kenya; two experiments were conducted: one manipulating the density of a single cohort of larvae across a range of densities and the other employing fewer densities but with the treatments crossed with four treatments manipulating predator access.In the first experiment, larval survival, development rate and the size of the adult mosquito all decreased with larval density (controlling for block effects between 23% and 31% of the variance in the data could be explained by density).In the second experiment, the effects of predator manipulation were not significant, but again we observed strong density dependence in larval survival (explaining 30% of the variance).The results are compared with laboratory studies of A. gambiae larval competition and the few other studies conducted in the field, and the consequences for malaria control are discussed PMID:23163565

  19. The role of internal waves in larval fish interactions with potential predators and prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Adam T.; Cowen, Robert K.; Guigand, Cedric M.; Hare, Jonathan A.; Tang, Dorothy

    2014-09-01

    Tidally driven internal wave packets in coastal environments have the potential to influence patchiness of larval fishes, prey, and gelatinous predators. We used the In Situ Ichthyoplankton Imaging System (ISIIS) to synoptically sample larval fishes, copepods, and planktonic predators (ctenophores, hydromedusae, chaetognaths, and polychaetes) across these predictable features in the summer near Stellwagen Bank, Massachusetts, USA. Full water column profiles and fixed depth transects (∼10 m depth) were used to quantify vertical and horizontal components of the fish and invertebrate distributions during stable and vertically mixed conditions associated with tidally generated internal waves. Larval fishes, consisting mostly of Urophycis spp., Merluccius bilinearis, and Labridae, were concentrated near the surface, with larger sizes generally occupying greater depths. During stable water column conditions, copepods formed a near surface thin layer several meters above the chlorophyll-a maximum that was absent when internal waves were propagating. In contrast, ctenophores and other predators were much more abundant at depth, but concentrations near 10 m increased immediately after the internal hydraulic jump mixed the water column. During the propagation of internal waves, the fine-scale abundance of larval fishes was more correlated with the abundance of gelatinous predators and less correlated with copepods compared to the stable conditions. Vertical oscillations caused by the internal hydraulic jump can disperse patches of zooplankton and force surface dwelling larval fishes into deeper water where probability of predator contact is increased, creating conditions potentially less favorable for larval fish growth and survival on short time scales.

  20. Drosophila Food-Associated Pheromones: Effect of Experience, Genotype and Antibiotics on Larval Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibert, Julien; Farine, Jean-Pierre; Cortot, Jérôme; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Animals ubiquitously use chemical signals to communicate many aspects of their social life. These chemical signals often consist of environmental cues mixed with species-specific signals-pheromones-emitted by conspecifics. During their life, insects can use pheromones to aggregate, disperse, choose a mate, or find the most suitable food source on which to lay eggs. Before pupariation, larvae of several Drosophila species migrate to food sources depending on their composition and the presence of pheromones. Some pheromones derive from microbiota gut activity and these food-associated cues can enhance larval attraction or repulsion. To explore the mechanisms underlying the preference (attraction/repulsion) to these cues and clarify their effect, we manipulated factors potentially involved in larval response. In particular, we found that the (i) early exposure to conspecifics, (ii) genotype, and (iii) antibiotic treatment changed D. melanogaster larval behavior. Generally, larvae-tested either individually or in groups-strongly avoided food processed by other larvae. Compared to previous reports on larval attractive pheromones, our data suggest that such attractive effects are largely masked by food-associated compounds eliciting larval aversion. The antagonistic effect of attractive vs. aversive compounds could modulate larval choice of a pupariation site and impact the dispersion of individuals in nature.

  1. Relative impacts of adult movement, larval dispersal and harvester movement on the effectiveness of reserve networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Grüss

    Full Text Available Movement of individuals is a critical factor determining the effectiveness of reserve networks. Marine reserves have historically been used for the management of species that are sedentary as adults, and, therefore, larval dispersal has been a major focus of marine-reserve research. The push to use marine reserves for managing pelagic and demersal species poses significant questions regarding their utility for highly-mobile species. Here, a simple conceptual metapopulation model is developed to provide a rigorous comparison of the functioning of reserve networks for populations with different admixtures of larval dispersal and adult movement in a home range. We find that adult movement produces significantly lower persistence than larval dispersal, all other factors being equal. Furthermore, redistribution of harvest effort previously in reserves to remaining fished areas ('fishery squeeze' and fishing along reserve borders ('fishing-the-line' considerably reduce persistence and harvests for populations mobile as adults, while they only marginally changes results for populations with dispersing larvae. Our results also indicate that adult home-range movement and larval dispersal are not simply additive processes, but rather that populations possessing both modes of movement have lower persistence than equivalent populations having the same amount of 'total movement' (sum of larval and adult movement spatial scales in either larval dispersal or adult movement alone.

  2. Enhancement of larval RNAi efficiency by over-expressing Argonaute2 in Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqian; Zeng, Baosheng; Ling, Lin; Xu, Jun; You, Lang; Aslam, Abu F M; Tan, Anjiang; Huang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference has been described as a powerful genetic tool for gene functional analysis and a promising approach for pest management. However, RNAi efficiency varies significantly among insect species due to distinct RNAi machineries. Lepidopteran insects include a large number of pests as well as model insects, such as the silkworm, Bombyx mori. However, only limited success of in vivo RNAi has been reported in lepidoptera, particularly during the larval stages when the worms feed the most and do the most harm to the host plant. Enhancing the efficiency of larval RNAi in lepidoptera is urgently needed to develop RNAi-based pest management strategies. In the present study, we investigate the function of the conserved RNAi core factor, Argonaute2 (Ago2), in mediating B. mori RNAi efficiency. We demonstrate that introducing BmAgo2 dsRNA inhibits the RNAi response in both BmN cells and embryos. Furthermore, we establish several transgenic silkworm lines to assess the roles of BmAgo2 in larval RNAi. Over-expressing BmAgo2 significantly facilitated both dsRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting DsRed using dsRNA injection and shRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting BmBlos2 using transgenic shRNA expression. Our results show that BmAgo2 is involved in RNAi in B. mori and provides a promising approach for improving larval RNAi efficiency in B. mori and in lepidopteran insects in general.

  3. Shifty salamanders: transient trophic polymorphism and cannibalism within natural populations of larval ambystomatid salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Dale M; Ferrari, Maud Co; Mathis, Alicia; Hobson, Keith A; Britzke, Eric R; Crane, Adam L; Blaustein, Andrew R; Chivers, Douglas P

    2014-01-01

    Many species of ambystomatid salamanders are dependent upon highly variable temporary wetlands for larval development. High larval densities may prompt the expression of a distinct head morphology that may facilitate cannibalism. However, few studies have characterized structural cannibalism within natural populations of larval salamanders. In this study we used two species of larval salamanders, long-toed (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and ringed salamanders (A. annulatum). Head morphometrics and stable isotopic values of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) were used to identify the presence or absence of structural cannibalism. Weather conditions were also analyzed as a potential factor associated with the expression of cannibalistic morphology. Populations of salamander larvae did not consistently exhibit cannibalistic morphologies throughout collection periods. Larval long-toed salamanders exhibited trophic polymorphisms when relatively lower precipitation amounts were observed. Larval ringed salamanders were observed to be cannibalistic but did not exhibit polymorphisms in this study. Structural cannibalism may be transient in both species; however in long-toed salamanders this morphology is necessary for cannibalism. Ringed salamanders can be cannibalistic without morphological adaptations; however the cannibal morph may prolong the viable time period for cannibalism. Additionally, weather conditions may alter pond hydroperiod, subsequently influencing head morphology and cannibalism.

  4. Larval connectivity of pearl oyster through biophysical modelling; evidence of food limitation and broodstock effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Yoann; Dumas, Franck; Andréfouët, Serge

    2016-12-01

    The black-lip pearl oyster (Pinctada margaritifera) is cultured extensively to produce black pearls, especially in French Polynesia atoll lagoons. This aquaculture relies on spat collection, a process that experiences spatial and temporal variability and needs to be optimized by understanding which factors influence recruitment. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of P. margaritifera larval dispersal to both physical and biological factors in the lagoon of Ahe atoll. Coupling a validated 3D larval dispersal model, a bioenergetics larval growth model following the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory, and a population dynamics model, the variability of lagoon-scale connectivity patterns and recruitment potential is investigated. The relative contribution of reared and wild broodstock to the lagoon-scale recruitment potential is also investigated. Sensitivity analyses pointed out the major effect of the broodstock population structure as well as the sensitivity to larval mortality rate and inter-individual growth variability to larval supply and to the subsequent settlement potential. The application of the growth model clarifies how trophic conditions determine the larval supply and connectivity patterns. These results provide new cues to understand the dynamics of bottom-dwelling populations in atoll lagoons, their recruitment, and discuss how to take advantage of these findings and numerical models for pearl oyster management.

  5. Influence of generation and photoperiod on larval development of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Francesco; Floreani, Chiara; Barro, Paola; Zandigiacomo, Pietro; Montà, Laura Dalla

    2010-10-01

    The influence of generation (under field conditions) and photoperiod (under laboratory conditions) on Lobesia botrana larvae development was studied. Some larvae were collected during three annual generations in two grape-growing areas of northeastern Italy, and others were individually reared in the laboratory from egg to pupa on an artificial diet under two different photoperiod conditions (respectively, daylight 16 h/d [long day {LD}] and 14 h/d [short day {SD}]). The mandible lengths of collected larvae were measured and the data analyzed morphometrically to determine the number of larval instars. In the laboratory study, the number of larval moultings, the mandible length of each instar, the development time from hatching larva to pupa, and the pupal weight were considered. The measurement of mandible lengths of larvae collected in the field indicated the existence of five larval instars in all three annual generations, but the size of the two oldest larval instars was significantly higher for third-generation larvae than for the previous generations. Under laboratory conditions, the larvae usually exhibited five instars, but the mandible lengths of larvae and the pupa size were greater for individuals reared under SD. These also took a greater number of days to develop from hatching larvae to pupae. Because a larger size of the final larval instar occurs in individuals that produce diapausing pupae under SD in both the laboratory and the field, a positive association between larval size and the probability of surviving the winter can be inferred.

  6. Stereomotion speed perception: contributions from both changing disparity and interocular velocity difference over a range of relative disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2004-01-01

    The role of two binocular cues to motion in depth-changing disparity (CD) and interocular velocity difference (IOVD)- was investigated by measuring stereomotion speed discrimination and static disparity discrimination performance (stereoacuity). Speed discrimination thresholds were assessed both for random dot stereograms (RDS), and for their temporally uncorrelated equivalents, dynamic random dot stereograms (DRDS), at relative disparity pedestals of -19, 0, and +19 arcmin. While RDS stimuli contain both CD and IOVD cues, DRDS stimuli carry only CD information. On average, thresholds were a factor of 1.7 higher for DRDS than for RDS stimuli with no clear effect of relative disparity pedestal. Results were similar for approaching and receding targets. Variations in stimulus duration had no significant effect on thresholds, and there was no observed correlation between stimulus displacement and perceived speed, confirming that subjects responded to stimulus speed in each condition. Stereoacuity was equally good for our RDS and DRDS stimuli, showing that the difference in stereomotion speed discrimination performance for these stimuli was not due to any difference in the precision of the disparity cue. In addition, when we altered stereomotion stimulus trajectory by independently manipulating the speeds and directions of its monocular half-images, perceived stereomotion speed remained accurate. This finding is inconsistent with response strategies based on properties of either monocular half-image motion, or any ad hoc combination of the monocular speeds. We conclude that although subjects are able to discriminate stereomotion speed reliably on the basis of CD information alone, IOVD provides a precise additional cue to stereomotion speed perception.

  7. Is the Schwabe Organ a Retained Larval Eye? Anatomical and Behavioural Studies of a Novel Sense Organ in Adult Leptochiton asellus (Mollusca, Polyplacophora Indicate Links to Larval Photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren H Sumner-Rooney

    Full Text Available The discovery of a sensory organ, the Schwabe organ, was recently reported as a unifying feature of chitons in the order Lepidopleurida. It is a patch of pigmented tissue located on the roof of the pallial cavity, beneath the velum on either side of the mouth. The epithelium is densely innervated and contains two types of potential sensory cells. As the function of the Schwabe organ remains unknown, we have taken a cross-disciplinary approach, using anatomical, histological and behavioural techniques to understand it. In general, the pigmentation that characterises this sensory structure gradually fades after death; however, one particular concentrated pigment dot persists. This dot is positionally homologous to the larval eye in chiton trochophores, found in the same neuroanatomical location, and furthermore the metamorphic migration of the larval eye is ventral in species known to possess Schwabe organs. Here we report the presence of a discrete subsurface epithelial structure in the region of the Schwabe organ in Leptochiton asellus that histologically resembles the chiton larval eye. Behavioural experiments demonstrate that Leptochiton asellus with intact Schwabe organs actively avoid an upwelling light source, while Leptochiton asellus with surgically ablated Schwabe organs and a control species lacking the organ (members of the other extant order, Chitonida do not (Kruskal-Wallis, H = 24.82, df = 3, p < 0.0001. We propose that the Schwabe organ represents the adult expression of the chiton larval eye, being retained and elaborated in adult lepidopleurans.

  8. Is the Schwabe Organ a Retained Larval Eye? Anatomical and Behavioural Studies of a Novel Sense Organ in Adult Leptochiton asellus (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) Indicate Links to Larval Photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner-Rooney, Lauren H; Sigwart, Julia D

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a sensory organ, the Schwabe organ, was recently reported as a unifying feature of chitons in the order Lepidopleurida. It is a patch of pigmented tissue located on the roof of the pallial cavity, beneath the velum on either side of the mouth. The epithelium is densely innervated and contains two types of potential sensory cells. As the function of the Schwabe organ remains unknown, we have taken a cross-disciplinary approach, using anatomical, histological and behavioural techniques to understand it. In general, the pigmentation that characterises this sensory structure gradually fades after death; however, one particular concentrated pigment dot persists. This dot is positionally homologous to the larval eye in chiton trochophores, found in the same neuroanatomical location, and furthermore the metamorphic migration of the larval eye is ventral in species known to possess Schwabe organs. Here we report the presence of a discrete subsurface epithelial structure in the region of the Schwabe organ in Leptochiton asellus that histologically resembles the chiton larval eye. Behavioural experiments demonstrate that Leptochiton asellus with intact Schwabe organs actively avoid an upwelling light source, while Leptochiton asellus with surgically ablated Schwabe organs and a control species lacking the organ (members of the other extant order, Chitonida) do not (Kruskal-Wallis, H = 24.82, df = 3, p organ represents the adult expression of the chiton larval eye, being retained and elaborated in adult lepidopleurans.

  9. The disparate histories of binocular vision and binaural hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2017-08-02

    Vision and hearing are dependent on disparities of spatial patterns received by two eyes and on time and intensity differences to two ears. However, the experiences of a single world have masked attention to these disparities. While eyes and ears are paired, there has not been parity in the attention directed to their functioning. Phenomena involving binocular vision were commented upon since antiquity whereas those about binaural hearing are much more recent. This history is compared with respect to the experimental manipulations of dichoptic and dichotic stimuli and the instruments used to stimulate the paired organs. Binocular color mixing led to studies of binaural hearing and direction and distance in visual localization were analyzed before those for auditory localization. Experimental investigations began in the nineteenth century with the invention of instruments like the stereoscope and pseudoscope, soon to be followed by their binaural equivalents, the stethophone and pseudophone.

  10. Persons with disabilities as an unrecognized health disparity population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Gloria L; Walker, Deborah Klein; Correa-De-Araujo, Rosaly

    2015-04-01

    Disability is an emerging field within public health; people with significant disabilities account for more than 12% of the US population. Disparity status for this group would allow federal and state governments to actively work to reduce inequities. We summarize the evidence and recommend that observed differences are sufficient to meet the criteria for health disparities: population-level differences in health outcomes that are related to a history of wide-ranging disadvantages, which are avoidable and not primarily caused by the underlying disability. We recommend future research and policy directions to address health inequities for individuals with disabilities; these include improved access to health care and human services, increased data to support decision-making, strengthened health and human services workforce capacity, explicit inclusion of disability in public health programs, and increased emergency preparedness.

  11. Dual tree fractional quaternion wavelet transform for disparity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanoj; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sukavanam, Nagarajan; Raman, Balasubramanian

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes a novel phase based approach for computing disparity as the optical flow from the given pair of consecutive images. A new dual tree fractional quaternion wavelet transform (FrQWT) is proposed by defining the 2D Fourier spectrum upto a single quadrant. In the proposed FrQWT, each quaternion wavelet consists of a real part (a real DWT wavelet) and three imaginary parts that are organized according to the quaternion algebra. First two FrQWT phases encode the shifts of image features in the absolute horizontal and vertical coordinate system, while the third phase has the texture information. The FrQWT allowed a multi-scale framework for calculating and adjusting local disparities and executing phase unwrapping from coarse to fine scales with linear computational efficiency.

  12. Trends and Disparities in Child Mortality in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, A S

    2012-06-10

    This secondary analysis of Indias National Family Health Survey data assessed India's recent trends in child mortality rates and disparities. Nationally, declines in average child mortality rates from 1992 to 2005 were statistically significant, but declines in inequality were not. Urban areas had lower child mortality rates than rural areas but higher inequalities. Interstate differences in child mortality rates were significant, with rates in the highest-mortality states four to six times higher than in the lowest-mortality states. Significant child health disparities persist despite declines in child mortality rates. Implementing low-cost, effective interventions in districts with the highest number of child deaths could accelerate reductions in child mortality and decrease inequalities.

  13. Socioeconomic and Ethnic Disparities in Periocular Cutaneous Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Talmage; Bingham, Brian; Mawn, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous malignancies make up the majority of periocular tumors diagnosed and treated by ophthalmologists. In this review, we examine literature regarding ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in incidence and clinical outcomes of the three most common cutaneous periocular tumors: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. In all three tumor types, the literature shows an increased incidence among two groups: those with lightly pigmented skin and those of higher socioeconomic status. While incidence is high in these groups, clinical outcomes for these patients tend to be good. Those with lower socioeconomic status and ethnic minorities, on the other hand, have a low incidence but are more likely to have poor clinical outcomes. These disparities are likely the result of both biologic and behavioral differences between patients and could provide opportunities for intervention to change risk perception and improve outcomes.

  14. Blind detection for disparity-coherent stereo video watermarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burini, César; Baudry, Séverine; Doërr, Gwenaël.

    2014-02-01

    Stereo video content calls for new watermarking strategies, e.g. to achieve robustness against virtual view synthesis. Prior works focused either on inserting the watermark in an invariant domain or on guaranteeing that the watermarks introduced in the left and right views are coherent with the disparity of the scene. However, the first approach raises fidelity issues while the second requires side information at detection i.e. the detector is not blind. In this paper, we propose a new blind detection procedure for disparity-coherent watermarks. In a nutshell, the detector relies on cross-correlation to aggregate the scattered pieces of the embedded reference watermark pattern rather than warping the reference pattern according to the parameters of the current view prior to detection. Reported experimental results indicate that this revisited detector successfully manages to retrieve embedded watermarks even after lossy compression.

  15. Distance-near disparity esotropia: can we shrink the gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J P

    2015-02-01

    Distance-near disparity esotropias are a group of heterogenous usually acquired strabismus disorders, where the angle of misalignment at near exceeds that at distance by 10 prism diopters or more, where the accurate correction of refractive errors and ambylopia are important early objectives. These aetiologically diverse entities respond non-uniformally to strabismus surgery and bifocals. The management challenge is one of 'shrinking' the disparity so that the affected individuals can develop and comfortably maintain binocular single vision and/or optimal alignment. Surgical procedures have continued to evolve but none of the current operative procedures are superior for all patients. Subclassifying this strabismus and highlighting publication data from more homogenous clinical series may assist with the optimisation of future management and treatment outcomes.

  16. Disparities in heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Jean; Pettey, Christina; Lefler, Leanne L; Heo, Seongkum

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews literature pertinent to cardiovascular disparities in women, focusing primarily on heart failure (HF). It provides an in-depth look at causes, biological influences, self-management and lack of adherence to HF-treatment guidelines in women. Disparities in treatment of causative factors of HF, such as myocardial infarction and hypertension, contribute to women having poorer HF outcomes than men. This article discusses major contributing reasons for nonadherence to medication regimes for HF in women, including advanced age at time of diagnosis, likelihood of multiple comorbidities, lack of social support and low socioeconomic status. Limited inclusion of women in clinical trials and the scarcity of gender analyses for HF and other cardiovascular diseases continues to limit the applicability of research findings to women.

  17. Intrinsic properties of larval zebrafish neurons in ethanol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Ikeda

    Full Text Available The behavioral effects of ethanol have been studied in multiple animal models including zebrafish. Locomotion of zebrafish larvae is resistant to high concentrations of ethanol in bath solution. This resistance has been attributed to a lower systemic concentration of ethanol in zebrafish when compared with bath solution, although the mechanism to maintain such a steep gradient is unclear. Here we examined whether the intrinsic properties of neurons play roles in this resistance. In order to minimize the contribution of metabolism and diffusional barriers, larvae were hemisected and the anterior half immersed in a range of ethanol concentrations thereby ensuring the free access of bath ethanol to the brain. The response to vibrational stimuli of three types of reticulospinal neurons: Mauthner neurons, vestibulospinal neurons, and MiD3 neurons were examined using an intracellular calcium indicator. The intracellular [Ca(2+] response in MiD3 neurons decreased in 100 mM ethanol, while Mauthner neurons and vestibulospinal neurons required >300 mM ethanol to elicit similar effects. The ethanol effect in Mauthner neurons was reversible following removal of ethanol. Interestingly, activities of MiD3 neurons displayed spontaneous recovery in 300 mM ethanol, suggestive of acute tolerance. Finally, we examined with mechanical vibration the startle response of free-swimming larvae in 300 mM ethanol. Ethanol treatment abolished long latency startle responses, suggesting a functional change in neural processing. These data support the hypothesis that individual neurons in larval zebrafish brains have distinct patterns of response to ethanol dictated by specific molecular targets.

  18. Genetic analysis of Eclosion hormone action during Drosophila larval ecdysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Eileen; Mena, Wilson; Lahr, Eleanor C; Johnson, Erik C; Ewer, John

    2015-12-15

    Insect growth is punctuated by molts, during which the animal produces a new exoskeleton. The molt culminates in ecdysis, an ordered sequence of behaviors that causes the old cuticle to be shed. This sequence is activated by Ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH), which acts on the CNS to activate neurons that produce neuropeptides implicated in ecdysis, including Eclosion hormone (EH), Crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and Bursicon. Despite more than 40 years of research on ecdysis, our understanding of the precise roles of these neurohormones remains rudimentary. Of particular interest is EH; although it is known to upregulate ETH release, other roles for EH have remained elusive. We isolated an Eh null mutant in Drosophila and used it to investigate the role of EH in larval ecdysis. We found that null mutant animals invariably died at around the time of ecdysis, revealing an essential role in its control. Further analyses showed that these animals failed to express the preparatory behavior of pre-ecdysis while directly expressing the motor program of ecdysis. Although ETH release could not be detected, the lack of pre-ecdysis could not be rescued by injections of ETH, suggesting that EH is required within the CNS for ETH to trigger the normal ecdysial sequence. Using a genetically encoded calcium probe, we showed that EH configured the response of the CNS to ETH. These findings show that EH plays an essential role in the Drosophila CNS in the control of ecdysis, in addition to its known role in the periphery of triggering ETH release.

  19. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin-Glutathione Reductase from Larval Taenia crassiceps (Cysticerci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Guevara-Flores

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial thioredoxin-glutathione reductase was purified from larval Taenia crassiceps (cysticerci. The preparation showed NADPH-dependent reductase activity with either thioredoxin or GSSG, and was able to perform thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. At 25∘C specific activities were 437  ±  27 mU mg-1 and 840  ±  49 mU mg-1 with thioredoxin and GSSG, respectively. Apparent Km values were 0.87  ±  0.04  μM, 41  ±  6  μM and 19  ±  10  μM for thioredoxin, GSSG and NADPH, respectively. Thioredoxin from eukaryotic sources was accepted as substrate. The enzyme reduced H2O2 in a NADPH-dependent manner, although with low catalytic efficiency. In the presence of thioredoxin, mitochondrial TGR showed a thioredoxin peroxidase-like activity. All disulfide reductase activities were inhibited by auranofin, suggesting mTGR is dependent on selenocysteine. The reductase activity with GSSG showed a higher dependence on temperature as compared with the DTNB reductase activity. The variation of the GSSG- and DTNB reductase activities on pH was dependent on the disulfide substrate. Like the cytosolic isoform, mTGR showed a hysteretic kinetic behavior at moderate or high GSSG concentrations, but it was less sensitive to calcium. The enzyme was able to protect glutamine synthetase from oxidative inactivation, suggesting that mTGR is competent to contend with oxidative stress.

  20. Visual acuity in larval zebrafish: behavior and histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Kaspar P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual acuity, the ability of the visual system to distinguish two separate objects at a given angular distance, is influenced by the optical and neuronal properties of the visual system. Although many factors may contribute, the ultimate limit is photoreceptor spacing. In general, at least one unstimulated photoreceptor flanked by two stimulated ones is needed to perceive two objects as separate. This critical interval is also referred to as the Nyquist frequency and is according to the Shannon sampling theorem the highest spatial frequency where a pattern can be faithfully transmitted. We measured visual acuity in a behavioral experiment and compared the data to the physical limit given by photoreceptor spacing in zebrafish larvae. Results We determined visual acuity by using the optokinetic response (OKR, reflexive eye movements in response to whole field movements of the visual scene. By altering the spatial frequency we determined the visual acuity at approximately 0.16 cycles/degree (cpd (minimum separable angle = 3.1°. On histological sections we measured the retinal magnification factor and the distance between double cones, that are thought to mediate motion perception. These measurements set the physical limit at 0.24 cpd (2.1°. Conclusion The maximal spatial information as limited by photoreceptor spacing can not be fully utilized in a motion dependent visual behavior, arguing that the larval zebrafish visual system has not matured enough to optimally translate visual information into behavior. Nevertheless behavioral acuity is remarkable close to its maximal value, given the immature state of young zebrafish larvae.

  1. The Analysis of Disparity Evoked Potentials by a New Form of Static Random—Dot Stereograms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChuanHou; XuexinZhang

    1995-01-01

    Purpose:A new form of static random-dot stereograms free of monoular clues was designed as stimulus to elicit disparity evoked potentials.Methods:Disparity evoked potentials were recorded in 40stereo-normal subjects.The stimulator was a white-black static random-dot stereograms generated by a computer and had no monocular clues.Every subject was tested in disparity stim-ulus,zero disparity stimulus,monocuular stimulus and wearing prism condition.Results:A characteristic wide positive wave at about 250ms was consistantly recorded in disparity stimulus,which amy be regarded as evidence of the the pres-ence of stereopsis .In contrast,recordings for zero disparity stimulus,monocular vision,stimulus and wearing prism condition all demonstrated a markedly differ-ence from recording for disparity stimulus.

  2. Health Literacy Explains Racial Disparities in Diabetes Medication Adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Cavanaugh, Kerri; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Kripalani, Sunil; White, Richard O.; Elasy, Tom A; Russell L Rothman

    2011-01-01

    While low health literacy and suboptimal medication adherence are more prevalent in racial/ethnic minority groups than Whites, little is known about the relationship between these factors in adults with diabetes, and whether health literacy or numeracy might explain racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes medication adherence. Previous work in HIV suggests health literacy mediates racial differences in adherence to anti-retroviral treatment, but no study to date has explored numeracy as a media...

  3. Electrophysiological correlates of binocular stereo depth without binocular disparities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Spang

    Full Text Available A small region of background presented to only one eye in an otherwise binocular display may, under certain conditions, be resolved in the visual system by interpreting the region as a small gap between two similar objects placed at different depths, with the gap hidden in one eye by parallax. This has been called monocular gap stereopsis. We investigated the electrophysiological correlate of this type of stereopsis by means of sum potential recordings in 12 observers, comparing VEP's for this stimulus ("Gillam Stereo", Author BG has strong reservations about this term with those for similar stimuli containing disparity based depth and with no depth (flat. In addition we included several control stimuli. The results show a pronounced early negative potential at a latency of around 170 ms (N170 for all stimuli containing non- identical elements, be they a difference caused by binocular disparity or by completely unmatched monocular contours. A second negative potential with latency around 270 ms (N270, on the other hand, is present only with stimuli leading to fusion and the perception of depth. This second component is similar for disparity-based stereopsis and monocular gap, or "Gillam Stereo" although slightly more pronounced for the former. We conjecture that the first component is related to the detection of differences between the images of the two eyes that may then either be fused, leading to stereopsis and the corresponding second potential, or else to inhibition and rivalry without a later trace in the VEP. The finding that that "Gillam Stereo" leads to cortical responses at the same short latencies as disparity based stereopsis indicates that it may partly rely on quite early cortical mechanisms.

  4. Electrophysiological Correlates of Binocular Stereo Depth without Binocular Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, Karoline; Gillam, Barbara; Fahle, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    A small region of background presented to only one eye in an otherwise binocular display may, under certain conditions, be resolved in the visual system by interpreting the region as a small gap between two similar objects placed at different depths, with the gap hidden in one eye by parallax. This has been called monocular gap stereopsis. We investigated the electrophysiological correlate of this type of stereopsis by means of sum potential recordings in 12 observers, comparing VEP's for this stimulus (“Gillam Stereo”, Author BG has strong reservations about this term) with those for similar stimuli containing disparity based depth and with no depth (flat). In addition we included several control stimuli. The results show a pronounced early negative potential at a latency of around 170 ms (N170) for all stimuli containing non- identical elements, be they a difference caused by binocular disparity or by completely unmatched monocular contours. A second negative potential with latency around 270 ms (N270), on the other hand, is present only with stimuli leading to fusion and the perception of depth. This second component is similar for disparity-based stereopsis and monocular gap, or “Gillam Stereo” although slightly more pronounced for the former. We conjecture that the first component is related to the detection of differences between the images of the two eyes that may then either be fused, leading to stereopsis and the corresponding second potential, or else to inhibition and rivalry without a later trace in the VEP. The finding that that “Gillam Stereo” leads to cortical responses at the same short latencies as disparity based stereopsis indicates that it may partly rely on quite early cortical mechanisms. PMID:22876281

  5. Chromosome Imbalance as a Driver of Sex Disparity in Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that men and women exhibit different risks for diverse disorders ranging from metabolic to autoimmune diseases. However, the underlying causes of these disparities remain obscure. Analysis of patients with chromosomal abnormalities, including Turner syndrome (45X) and Klinefelter syndrome (47XXY), has highlighted the importance of X-linked gene dosage as a contributing factor for disease susceptibility. Escape from X-inactivation and X-linked imprinting can result ...

  6. Social disparities among youth and the impact on their health

    OpenAIRE

    Kreatsoulas C; Hassan A.; Subramanian SV; Fleegler EW

    2015-01-01

    Catherine Kreatsoulas,1,* Areej Hassan,2,* SV Subramanian,1 Eric W Fleegler3 1Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 2Division of Adolescent/Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Emergency Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Social disparities among youth have been recognized as an import...

  7. Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    patients. We are exploring its use as a function of race/ ethnicity to determine whether racial disparities exist in access to this new efficacious...Use in Patients with Prostate Cancer. BACKGROUND: In 2011 the Food and Drug Administration approved abiraterone, an oral CYP17 androgen synthesis... ethnicity , marital sta- tus, and tumor grade as categorical variables. Age categories are ordinal with 5-year increments between categories. Race/ ethnicity

  8. Environmental Health Disparities: A Framework Integrating Psychosocial and Environmental Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Gee, Gilbert C.; Payne-Sturges, Devon C

    2004-01-01

    Although it is often acknowledged that social and environmental factors interact to produce racial and ethnic environmental health disparities, it is still unclear how this occurs. Despite continued controversy, the environmental justice movement has provided some insight by suggesting that disadvantaged communities face greater likelihood of exposure to ambient hazards. The exposure–disease paradigm has long suggested that differential “vulnerability” may modify the effects of toxicants on b...

  9. The urodelean Mauthner cell. Morphology of the afferent synapses to the M-cell of larval Salamandra salamandra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioni, C.; De Palma, F.; De Vito, L.; Stefanelli, A. [Rome, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia Animale e dell`Uomo

    1997-12-31

    In the present work the fine morphology and the distribution of the afferent synapses to the Mauthner cell of larval Salamandra salamandra are described. The aim of the study is to characterize the synaptic bed in the larvae of this terrestrial salamander in order to compare it with that of larval axolotl and larval anurans. Four main types of afferent endings have been identified: myelinated club endings, round-vesicle end bulbs, flattened-vesicle end bulbs and spiral fibers endings. The M-cell afferent synaptology of larval stages of terrestrial amphibians is quite similar to that previously observed in larval stages of aquatic species. This fact can be related to the fundamental similarities between the larval lifestyles.

  10. Larval and nurse worker control of developmental plasticity and the evolution of honey bee queen-worker dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linksvayer, T A; Kaftanoglu, O; Akyol, E; Blatch, S; Amdam, G V; Page, R E

    2011-09-01

    Social evolution in honey bees has produced strong queen-worker dimorphism for plastic traits that depend on larval nutrition. The honey bee developmental programme includes both larval components that determine plastic growth responses to larval nutrition and nurse components that regulate larval nutrition. We studied how these two components contribute to variation in worker and queen body size and ovary size for two pairs of honey bee lineages that show similar differences in worker body-ovary size allometry but have diverged over different evolutionary timescales. Our results indicate that the lineages have diverged for both nurse and larval developmental components, that rapid changes in worker body-ovary size allometry may disrupt queen development and that queen-worker dimorphism arises mainly from discrete nurse-provided nutritional environments, not from a developmental switch that converts variable nutritional environments into discrete phenotypes. Both larval and nurse components have likely contributed to the evolution of queen-worker dimorphism.

  11. High-definition three-dimensional television disparity map computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chammem, Afef; Mitrea, Mihai; Prêteux, Françoise

    2012-10-01

    By reconsidering some two-dimensional video inherited approaches and by adapting them to the stereoscopic video content and to the human visual system peculiarities, a new disparity map is designed. First, the inner relation between the left and the right views is modeled by some weights discriminating between the horizontal and vertical disparities. Second, the block matching operation is achieved by considering a visual related measure (normalized cross correlation) instead of the traditional pixel differences (mean squared error or sum of absolute differences). The advanced three-dimensional (3-D) video-new three step search (3DV-NTSS) disparity map (3-D Video-New Three Step Search) is benchmarked against two state-of-the-art algorithms, namely NTSS and full-search MPEG (FS-MPEG), by successively considering two corpora. The first corpus was organized during the 3DLive French national project and regroups 20 min of stereoscopic video sequences. The second one, with similar size, is provided by the MPEG community. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of 3DV-NTSS in both reconstructed image quality (average gains between 3% and 7% in both PSNR and structural similarity, with a singular exception) and computational cost (search operation number reduced by average factors between 1.3 and 13). The 3DV-NTSS was finally validated by designing a watermarking method for high definition 3-D TV content protection.

  12. Income Disparities in Obesity Trends Among California Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastert, Theresa A.; Wolstein, Joelle; Diamant, Allison L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed income-specific trends in obesity rates among a diverse population of California adolescents. Methods. We used data from 17 535 adolescents who responded to the California Health Interview Survey between 2001 and 2007 to examine disparities in obesity prevalence by family income and gender. Results. Between 2001 and 2007, obesity prevalence significantly increased among lower-income adolescents but showed no statistically significant differences among higher-income adolescents after adjustment for age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Although the overall disparity in obesity by family income doubled in this time period, trends were more consistent among male adolescents than among female adolescents. Conclusions. The magnitude of the income disparity in obesity prevalence among California adolescents more than doubled between 2001–2007. The overall leveling off of adolescent obesity prevalence rates could indicate that efforts to decrease childhood obesity are having an impact; however, our results suggest that efforts to prevent childhood obesity may be failing to help adolescents from lower-income families, particularly male adolescents. PMID:20864702

  13. da Vinci decoded: does da Vinci stereopsis rely on disparity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirlin, Inna; Wilcox, Laurie M; Allison, Robert S

    2012-11-01

    In conventional stereopsis, the depth between two objects is computed based on the retinal disparity in the position of matching points in the two eyes. When an object is occluded by another object in the scene, so that it is visible only in one eye, its retinal disparity cannot be computed. Nakayama and Shimojo (1990) found that a precept of quantitative depth between the two objects could still be established for such stimuli and proposed that this precept is based on the constraints imposed by occlusion geometry. They named this and other occlusion-based depth phenomena "da Vinci stereopsis." Subsequent research found quantitative depth based on occlusion geometry in several other classes of stimuli grouped under the term da Vinci stereopsis. However, Nakayama and Shimojo's findings were later brought into question by Gillam, Cook, and Blackburn (2003), who suggested that quantitative depth in their stimuli was perceived based on conventional disparity. In order to understand whether da Vinci stereopsis relies on one type of mechanism or whether its function is stimulus dependent we examine the nature and source of depth in the class of stimuli used by Nakayama and Shimojo (1990). We use three different psychophysical and computational methods to show that the most likely source for depth in these stimuli is occlusion geometry. Based on these experiments and previous data we discuss the potential mechanisms responsible for processing depth from monocular features in da Vinci stereopsis.

  14. Methods Matter: Tracking Health Disparities in Alternative High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen E; Goyal, Mohit; Simonton, Amanda J; Richardson, Rebecca; Morris, Marian; Rew, Lynn

    2017-05-01

    Alternative high school (AHS) students are at-risk for school dropout and engage in high levels of health-risk behaviors that should be monitored over time. They are excluded from most public health surveillance efforts (e.g., Youth Risk Behavior Survey; YRBS), hindering our ability to monitor health disparities and allocate scarce resources to the areas of greatest need. Using active parental consent, we recruited 515 students from 14 AHSs in Texas to take a modified YRBS. We calculated three different participation rates, tracked participation by age of legal consent (≥18 and rate among students students, cooperation rates may be more accurate than participation rates based off of enrollment or attendance. Requiring active consent and not having accurate participation rates may result in surveillance data that are of disparate quality. This threatens to mask the needs of AHS students and perpetuate disparities because we are likely missing the highest-risk students within a high-risk sample and cannot generalize findings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Interdisciplinarity and impact: distinct effects of variety, balance, and disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Thijs, Bart; Glänzel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research is increasingly recognized as the solution to today's challenging scientific and societal problems, but the relationship between interdisciplinary research and scientific impact is still unclear. This paper studies the association between the degree of interdisciplinarity and the number of citations at the paper level. Different from previous studies compositing various aspects of interdisciplinarity into a single indicator, we use factor analysis to uncover distinct dimensions of interdisciplinarity corresponding to variety, balance, and disparity. We estimate Poisson models with journal fixed effects and robust standard errors to analyze the divergent relationships between these three factors and citations. We find that long-term (13-year) citations (1) increase at an increasing rate with variety, (2) decrease with balance, and (3) increase at a decreasing rate with disparity. Furthermore, interdisciplinarity also affects the process of citation accumulation: (1) although variety and disparity have positive effects on long-term citations, they have negative effects on short-term (3-year) citations, and (2) although balance has a negative effect on long-term citations, its negative effect is insignificant in the short run. These findings have important implications for interdisciplinary research and science policy.

  16. Disparities in new graduate transition from multiple stakeholder perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamack, Monica; Rush, Kathy L

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand multiple stakeholder perspectives of new graduate (NG) transition programs. It was part of a larger mixed-methods study (2011) designed to provide a comprehensive assessment of new graduate nurse transition best practices, across six British Columbia health authorities. Data collection involved individual interviews with academic nurse educators (n=4) and separate focus groups with new graduate (n=48) and front-line nurse leaders (n=69). Disparity emerged as the overriding theme and described differences between stakeholder group perspectives, between expectations and reality, and within and across programs. Four disparities emerged: entry-level education and practice, perspectives on employment and career planning, transition program elements and support. Despite general satisfaction with undergraduate preparation, theory-practice gaps were identified. New Graduates experienced misalignments between their employment expectations and their realities. The employed student nurse program in which many new graduates had participated did not always yield employment, but when it did, differences in transitional expectations arose between new graduates and leaders. There was considerable variation across and within provincial new graduate programs with respect to orientation, supernumerary time and preceptorship characteristics, including lack of training. Disparities arose in the nature, amount of and access to support and the monitoring of new graduate progress. Findings reinforced organizational complexities and the importance of communication across education and practice sectors. This paper uncovers the tensions between the perspectives of new graduates and nurse leaders about transitional programs and opens the opportunity to collaborate in aligning the perspectives.

  17. THE IMPACT OF BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT ON REGIONAL DISPARITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Šoltés

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the business environment, as part of the socio-economic situation, indirectly affects a citizen’s quality of life. A “friendly” business environment has a positive effect on job formation, thus helping with employment. A country encourages formation and development of large enterprises through various incentives that reduce regional disparities, especially in less-developed regions. Nevertheless, a huge majority of enterprises in the European Union are small- and medium-sized. Self-employed persons are considered a specific form of business. Their activity is strongly influenced by state policy. This paper analyzes the business environment in regions of the Slovak Republic. Its principal aim is to examine the development of regional disparities and the related quality of citizens’ lives. An evaluation of statistical data of the structure of the business environment in the Slovak Republic indicated a change in legal units in relation to business. Although the number of legal units are stable, the number of legal persons has increased and that of natural persons-entrepreneurs decreased. Deepening of regional disparities was not observed across regions of the Slovak Republic.

  18. Implications of sleep and energy drink use for health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandner, Michael A; Knutson, Kristen L; Troxel, Wendy; Hale, Lauren; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Miller, Kathleen E

    2014-10-01

    The popularity of energy drinks has increased rapidly in the past decade. One of the main reasons people use energy drinks is to counteract effects of insufficient sleep or sleepiness. Risks associated with energy drink use, including those related to sleep loss, may be disproportionately borne by racial minorities and those of lower socioeconomic status. In this review, a brief introduction to the issue of health disparities is provided, population-level disparities and inequalities in sleep are described, and the social-ecological model of sleep and health is presented. Social and demographic patterns of energy drink use are then presented, followed by discussion of the potential ways in which energy drink use may contribute to health disparities, including the following: 1) effects of excessive caffeine in energy drinks, 2) effects of energy drinks as sugar-sweetened beverages, 3) association between energy drinks and risk-taking behaviors when mixed with alcohol, 4) association between energy drink use and short sleep duration, and 5) role of energy drinks in cardiometabolic disease. The review concludes with a research agenda of critical unanswered questions.

  19. Implications of sleep and energy drink use for health disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandner, Michael A; Knutson, Kristen L; Troxel, Wendy; Hale, Lauren; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Miller, Kathleen E

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of energy drinks has increased rapidly in the past decade. One of the main reasons people use energy drinks is to counteract effects of insufficient sleep or sleepiness. Risks associated with energy drink use, including those related to sleep loss, may be disproportionately borne by racial minorities and those of lower socioeconomic status. In this review, a brief introduction to the issue of health disparities is provided, population-level disparities and inequalities in sleep are described, and the social-ecological model of sleep and health is presented. Social and demographic patterns of energy drink use are then presented, followed by discussion of the potential ways in which energy drink use may contribute to health disparities, including the following: 1) effects of excessive caffeine in energy drinks, 2) effects of energy drinks as sugar-sweetened beverages, 3) association between energy drinks and risk-taking behaviors when mixed with alcohol, 4) association between energy drink use and short sleep duration, and 5) role of energy drinks in cardiometabolic disease. The review concludes with a research agenda of critical unanswered questions. PMID:25293540

  20. Night vision goggle luminance disparity and the Pulfrich phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkus, Alan; Task, Harry L.

    2004-09-01

    When night vision goggle (NVG) image intensifier tubes (I2Ts) are replaced during maintenance, the output luminances of the two channels must not exceed a ratio of 1.5 (brighter channel luminance divided by the dimmer channel luminance) in order to meet the current allowed binocular luminance disparity specification. Two studies were performed to investigate the validity of this requirement. The first study estimated thresholds of binocular luminance disparity detection for observers looking through NVGs. For eight observers, the 25% corrected-for-chance probability of detecting an ocular luminance difference, yielded an average ratio of 1.43 indicating that the current 1.5 specification is perhaps too loose. The second study investigated the Pulfrich phenomenon, a pseudo-stereo effect that can be induced by presenting luminance imbalances to the eyes. This study created NVG luminance imbalances using neutral density (ND) filters and then investigated whether or not the various imbalance levels were sufficient to cause the Pulfrich phenomenon to be perceived. Results indicated an imbalance ratio of 1.10 was insufficient to cause the effect to be seen, but a ratio of 1.26 was sufficient (p <= 0.0003) for the effect to be seen, at least part of the time. Based on these results, it is apparent the allowed binocular luminance disparity ratio should probably be tightened to at least 1.3 with a goal of 1.2.

  1. A Persistent Disparity: Smoking in Rural Sexual and Gender Minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Keisa; McElroy, Jane A; Johnson, Andrew O; Munk, Niki; Everett, Kevin D

    2015-03-01

    Sexual and gender minorities (SGM) smoke cigarettes at higher rates than the general population. Historically, research in SGM health issues was conducted in urban populations and recent population-based studies seldom have sufficient SGM participants to distinguish urban from rural. Given that rural populations also tend to have a smoking disparity, and that many SGM live in rural areas, it is vitally important to understand the intersection of rural residence, SGM identity, and smoking. This study analyzes the patterns of smoking in urban and rural SGM in a large sample. We conducted an analysis of 4280 adult participants in the Out, Proud, and Healthy project with complete data on SGM status, smoking status, and zip code. Surveys were conducted at 6 Missouri Pride Festivals and online in 2012. Analysis involved descriptive and bivariate methods, and multivariable logistic regression. We used GIS mapping to demonstrate the dispersion of rural SGM participants. SGM had higher smoking proportion than the non-SGM recruited from these settings. In the multivariable model, SGM identity conferred 1.35 times the odds of being a current smoker when controlled for covariates. Rural residence was not independently significant, demonstrating the persistence of the smoking disparity in rural SGM. Mapping revealed widespread distribution of SGM in rural areas. The SGM smoking disparity persists among rural SGM. These communities would benefit from continued research into interventions targeting both SGM and rural tobacco control measures. Recruitment at Pride Festivals may provide a venue for reaching rural SGM for intervention.

  2. Simulated disparity and peripheral blur interact during binocular fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiello, Guido; Chessa, Manuela; Solari, Fabio; Bex, Peter J

    2014-07-17

    We have developed a low-cost, practical gaze-contingent display in which natural images are presented to the observer with dioptric blur and stereoscopic disparity that are dependent on the three-dimensional structure of natural scenes. Our system simulates a distribution of retinal blur and depth similar to that experienced in real-world viewing conditions by emmetropic observers. We implemented the system using light-field photographs taken with a plenoptic camera which supports digital refocusing anywhere in the images. We coupled this capability with an eye-tracking system and stereoscopic rendering. With this display, we examine how the time course of binocular fusion depends on depth cues from blur and stereoscopic disparity in naturalistic images. Our results show that disparity and peripheral blur interact to modify eye-movement behavior and facilitate binocular fusion, and the greatest benefit was gained by observers who struggled most to achieve fusion. Even though plenoptic images do not replicate an individual’s aberrations, the results demonstrate that a naturalistic distribution of depth-dependent blur may improve 3-D virtual reality, and that interruptions of this pattern (e.g., with intraocular lenses) which flatten the distribution of retinal blur may adversely affect binocular fusion. © 2014 ARVO.

  3. Larval retention and connectivity among populations of corals and reef fishes: history, advances and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. P.; Almany, G. R.; Russ, G. R.; Sale, P. F.; Steneck, R. S.; van Oppen, M. J. H.; Willis, B. L.

    2009-06-01

    The extent of larval dispersal on coral reefs has important implications for the persistence of coral reef metapopulations, their resilience and recovery from an increasing array of threats, and the success of protective measures. This article highlights a recent dramatic increase in research effort and a growing diversity of approaches to the study of larval retention within (self-recruitment) and dispersal among (connectivity) isolated coral reef populations. Historically, researchers were motivated by alternative hypotheses concerning the processes limiting populations and structuring coral reef assemblages, whereas the recent impetus has come largely from the need to incorporate dispersal information into the design of no-take marine protected area (MPA) networks. Although the majority of studies continue to rely on population genetic approaches to make inferences about dispersal, a wide range of techniques are now being employed, from small-scale larval tagging and paternity analyses, to large-scale biophysical circulation models. Multiple approaches are increasingly being applied to cross-validate and provide more realistic estimates of larval dispersal. The vast majority of empirical studies have focused on corals and fishes, where evidence for both extremely local scale patterns of self-recruitment and ecologically significant connectivity among reefs at scales of tens of kilometers (and in some cases hundreds of kilometers) is accumulating. Levels of larval retention and the spatial extent of connectivity in both corals and fishes appear to be largely independent of larval duration or reef size, but may be strongly influenced by geographic setting. It is argued that high levels of both self-recruitment and larval import can contribute to the resilience of reef populations and MPA networks, but these benefits will erode in degrading reef environments.

  4. Larval habitat dynamics and diversity of Culex mosquitoes in rice agro-ecosystem in Mwea, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Shililu, Josephat I; Gu, Weidong; Jacob, Benjamin G; Githure, John I; Novak, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Introduction of irrigation projects in developing nations has often been blamed for aggravating the problem of mosquito-borne diseases by creating ideal larval habitats for vector mosquitoes. However, whereas several studies have demonstrated the relationship between malaria vectors and irrigation, little work has been done on culicine mosquitoes despite their potential in transmission of filariasis and arboviruses and their significant biting nuisance in these areas. This study examined the diversity of Culex mosquito fauna and their larval habitats at two sites (Murinduko and Kiamachiri) in Mwea, Kenya over a 12-month period. The habitat types present at each site within a 200-meter radius around the study village, including randomly selected paddies and canals, were sampled every two weeks to examine the relationship between vegetation cover, water depth, turbidity, and Culex larval counts. Ten culicine species belonging to four genera were identified, with 73.1% of the total collection comprising of Culex duttoni and Cx. quinquefasciatus. Other species collected included Cx. annulioris, Cx. poicilipes, Cx. cinereus, Cx. tigripes, Cx. trifilatus, Aedes spp., Coquilettidia fuscopennata, and Ficalbia splendens. Murinduko was more diverse than Kiamachiri in terms of species richness (10 versus 7 species) and larval habitat diversity (11 versus 8 habitat types). Paddies, canals, and rain pools were the most diverse habitats in terms of species richness, and ditches, rock pools, and tree holes were the least diverse. Principal component and correlation analyses showed a strong association between three Culex species and the measured habitat characteristics. Culex poicilipes was strongly associated with floating vegetation, Cx. annulioris with clean water containing emergent vegetation, and Cx. quinquefasciatus was associated with turbid water. Seasonal changes in larval counts in water reservoirs and pool and ditch habitats were closely associated with rainfall

  5. Muscle organizers in Drosophila: the role of persistent larval fibers in adult flight muscle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, E. R.; Fernandes, J.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    In many organisms muscle formation depends on specialized cells that prefigure the pattern of the musculature and serve as templates for myoblast organization and fusion. These include muscle pioneers in insects and muscle organizing cells in leech. In Drosophila, muscle founder cells have been proposed to play a similar role in organizing larval muscle development during embryogenesis. During metamorphosis in Drosophila, following histolysis of most of the larval musculature, there is a second round of myogenesis that gives rise to the adult muscles. It is not known whether muscle founder cells organize the development of these muscles. However, in the thorax specific larval muscle fibers do not histolyze at the onset of metamorphosis, but instead serve as templates for the formation of a subset of adult muscles, the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs). Because these persistent larval muscle fibers appear to be functioning in many respects like muscle founder cells, we investigated whether they were necessary for DLM development by using a microbeam laser to ablate them singly and in combination. We found that, in the absence of the larval muscle fibers, DLMs nonetheless develop. Our results show that the persistent larval muscle fibers are not required to initiate myoblast fusion, to determine DLM identity, to locate the DLMs in the thorax, or to specify the total DLM fiber volume. However, they are required to regulate the number of DLM fibers generated. Thus, while the persistent larval muscle fibers are not obligatory for DLM fiber formation and differentiation, they are necessary to ensure the development of the correct number of fibers.

  6. Condition of larval red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) relative to environmental variability and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, F. J., Jr.; Filbrun, J. E.; Fang, J.; Ransom, J. T.

    2016-09-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DWHOS) spatially and temporally overlapped with the spawning of many fish species, including Red Snapper, one of the most economically important reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico. To investigate potential impacts of the DWHOS on larval Red Snapper, data from a long-term ichthyoplankton survey off the coast of Alabama were used to examine: (1) larval abundances among pre-impact (2007-2009), impact (2010), and post-impact (2011, 2013) periods; (2) proxies for larval condition (size-adjusted morphometric relationships and dry weight) among the same periods; and (3) the effects of background environmental variation on larval condition. We found that larval Red Snapper were in poorer body condition during 2010, 2011, and 2013 as compared to the 2007-2009 period, a trend that was strongly (and negatively) related to variation in Mobile Bay freshwater discharge. However, larvae collected during and after 2010 were in relatively poor condition even after accounting for variation in freshwater discharge and other environmental variables. By contrast, no differences in larval abundance were detected during these survey years. Taken together, larval supply did not change relative to the timing of the DWHOS, but larval condition was negatively impacted. Even small changes in condition can affect larval survival, so these trends may have consequences for recruitment of larvae to juvenile and adult life stages.

  7. Role of circulation scales and water mass distributions on larval fish habitats in the Eastern Tropical Pacific off Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Chávez, Cristina A.; Beier, Emilio; Sánchez-Velasco, Laura; Barton, Eric Desmond; Godínez, Victor M.

    2015-06-01

    On the basis of five oceanographic cruises carried out in the Eastern Tropical Pacific off Mexico, relationships between the larval fish habitats (areas inhabited by larval fish assemblages) and the environmental circulation scales (mesoscale, seasonal, and interannual) were examined. Analysis of in situ data over a grid of hydrographic stations and oblique zooplankton hauls with bongo net (505 µm) was combined with orthogonal robust functions decomposition applied to altimetry anomalies obtained from satellite. During both cool (March and June) and warm (August and November) periods, Bray-Curtis dissimilarity Index defined three recurrent larval fish habitats which varied in species composition and extent as a function of the environmental scales. The variability of the Tropical larval fish habitat (characterized by high species richness, and dominated by Vinciguerria lucetia, Diogenichthys laternatus, and Diaphus pacificus) was associated with the seasonal changes. The Transitional-California Current larval fish habitat (dominated by V. lucetia and D. laternatus, with lower mean abundance and lower species richness than in the Tropical habitat) and Coastal-and-Upwelling larval fish habitat (dominated by Bregmaceros bathymaster) was associated mainly with mesoscale activity induced by eddies and with coastal upwelling. During February 2010, the Tropical larval fish habitat predominated offshore and the Transitional-California Current larval fish habitat was not present, which we attribute to the effect of El Niño conditions. Thus, the mesoscale, seasonal, and interannual environmental scales affect the composition and extension of larval fish habitats.

  8. Obligate larval inhibition of Ostertagia gruehneri in Rangifer tarandus? Causes and consequences in an Arctic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoar, Bryanne M; Eberhardt, Alexander G; Kutz, Susan J

    2012-09-01

    Larval inhibition is a common strategy of Trichostrongylidae nematodes that may increase survival of larvae during unfavourable periods and concentrate egg production when conditions are favourable for development and transmission. We investigated the propensity for larval inhibition in a population of Ostertagia gruehneri, the most common gastrointestinal Trichostrongylidae nematode of Rangifer tarandus. Initial experimental infections of 4 reindeer with O. gruehneri sourced from the Bathurst caribou herd in Arctic Canada suggested that the propensity for larval inhibition was 100%. In the summer of 2009 we infected 12 additional reindeer with the F1 and F2 generations of O. gruehneri sourced from the previously infected reindeer to further investigate the propensity of larval inhibition. The reindeer were divided into 2 groups and half were infected before the summer solstice (17 June) and half were infected after the solstice (16 July). Reindeer did not shed eggs until March 2010, i.e. 8 and 9 months post-infection. These results suggest obligate larval inhibition for at least 1 population of O. gruehneri, a phenomenon that has not been conclusively shown for any other trichostrongylid species. Obligate inhibition is likely to be an adaptation to both the Arctic environment and to a migratory host and may influence the ability of O. gruehneri to adapt to climate change.

  9. Circulation constrains the evolution of larval development modes and life histories in the coastal ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, James M; Byers, James E; Pappalardo, Paula; Wares, John P; Marshall, Dustin

    2014-04-01

    The evolutionary pressures that drive long larval planktonic durations in some coastal marine organisms, while allowing direct development in others, have been vigorously debated. We introduce into the argument the asymmetric dispersal of larvae by coastal currents and find that the strength of the currents helps determine which dispersal strategies are evolutionarily stable. In a spatially and temporally uniform coastal ocean of finite extent, direct development is always evolutionarily stable. For passively drifting larvae, long planktonic durations are stable when the ratio of mean to fluctuating currents is small and the rate at which larvae increase in size in the plankton is greater than the mortality rate (both in units of per time). However, larval behavior that reduces downstream larval dispersal for a given time in plankton will be selected for, consistent with widespread observations of behaviors that reduce dispersal of marine larvae. Larvae with long planktonic durations are shown to be favored not for the additional dispersal they allow, but for the additional fecundity that larval feeding in the plankton enables. We analyzed the spatial distribution of larval life histories in a large database of coastal marine benthic invertebrates and documented a link between ocean circulation and the frequency of planktotrophy in the coastal ocean. The spatial variation in the frequency of species with planktotrophic larvae is largely consistent with our theory; increases in mean currents lead to a decrease in the fraction of species with planktotrophic larvae over a broad range of temperatures.

  10. Identification of genes differentially expressed during larval molting and metamorphosis of Helicoverpa armigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xiao-Juan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Larval molting and metamorphosis are important physiological processes in the life cycle of the holometabolous insect. We used suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH to identify genes differentially expressed during larval molting and metamorphosis. Results We performed SSH between tissues from a variety of developmental stages, including molting 5th and feeding 6th instar larvae, metamorphically committed and feeding 5th instar larvae, and feeding 5th instar and metamorphically committed larvae. One hundred expressed sequence tags (ESTs were identified and included 73 putative genes with similarity to known genes, and 27 unknown ESTs. SSH results were further characterized by dot blot, Northern blot, and RT-PCR. The expression levels of eleven genes were found to change during larval molting or metamorphosis, suggesting a functional role during these processes. Conclusion These results provide a new set of genes expressed specifically during larval molt or metamorphosis that are candidates for further studies into the regulatory mechanisms of those stage-specific genes during larval molt and metamorphosis

  11. The Drosophila gene RanBPM functions in the mushroom body to regulate larval behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Scantlebury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vertebrates, Ran-Binding Protein in the Microtubule Organizing Center (RanBPM appears to function as a scaffolding protein in a variety of signal transduction pathways. In Drosophila, RanBPM is implicated in the regulation of germ line stem cell (GSC niche organization in the ovary. Here, we addressed the role of RanBPM in nervous system function in the context of Drosophila larval behavior. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report that in Drosophila, RanBPM is required for larval feeding, light-induced changes in locomotion, and viability. RanBPM is highly expressed in the Kenyon cells of the larval mushroom body (MB, a structure well studied for its role in associative learning in Drosophila and other insects. RanBPM mutants do not display major disruption in nervous system morphology besides reduced proliferation. Expression of the RanBPM gene in the Kenyon cells is sufficient to rescue all behavioral phenotypes. Through genetic epistasis experiments, we demonstrate that RanBPM participates with the Drosophila orthologue of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP in the development of neuromuscular junction (NMJ. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that the RanBPM gene functions in the MB neurons for larval behavior. Our results suggest a role for this gene in an FMRP-dependent process. Taken together our findings point to a novel role for the MB in larval behavior.

  12. Evidence and population consequences of shared larval dispersal histories in a marine fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Jeffrey S; Swearer, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    Larval dispersal is disproportionately important for marine population ecolgy and evolution, yet our inability to track individuals severely constrains our understanding of this key process. We analyze otoliths of a small reef fish, the common triplefin (Forsterygion lapillum), to reconstruct individual dispersal histories and address the following questions: (1) How many discrete sets of dispersal histories (dispersal cohorts) contribute to replenishment of focal populations; (2) When do dispersal cohorts converge (a metric of shared dispersal histories among cohorts); and (3) Do these patterns predict spatiotemporal variation in larval supply? We used light traps to quantify larval supply, and otolith microstructure and microchemistry (using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; LA-ICP-MS) to reconstruct daily environmental histories of individuals in their 30-d lead-up to settlement. Our results indicate that a variable number of dispersal cohorts replenish focal populations (range of 2-8, mean of 4.3, standard deviation of 2.8). Convergence times varied (from 0 to > 30 d prior to settlement), and larval supply was negatively correlated with cohort evenness but not with the number of cohorts, or when they converged, indicating disproportionately large contributions from some cohorts (i.e., sweepstakes events). Collectively, our results suggest that larval reef fishes may variably disperse in shoals, to drive local replenishment and connectivity within a metapopulation.

  13. Soundscape manipulation enhances larval recruitment of a reef-building mollusk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee Lillis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine seafloor ecosystems, and efforts to restore them, depend critically on the influx and settlement of larvae following their pelagic dispersal period. Larval dispersal and settlement patterns are driven by a combination of physical oceanography and behavioral responses of larvae to a suite of sensory cues both in the water column and at settlement sites. There is growing evidence that the biological and physical sounds associated with adult habitats (i.e., the “soundscape” influence larval settlement and habitat selection; however, the significance of acoustic cues is rarely tested. Here we show in a field experiment that the free-swimming larvae of an estuarine invertebrate, the eastern oyster, respond to the addition of replayed habitat-related sounds. Oyster larval recruitment was significantly higher on larval collectors exposed to oyster reef sounds compared to no-sound controls. These results provide the first field evidence that soundscape cues may attract the larval settlers of a reef-building estuarine invertebrate.

  14. Blue light-induced immunosuppression in Bactrocera dorsalis adults, as a carryover effect of larval exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, K; Noor, M; Hori, M; Ali, A; Hussain, A; Peng, W; Chang, C-J; Zhang, H

    2017-05-09

    Detrimental effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on living organisms are well understood, little is known about the effects of blue light irradiation. Although a recent study revealed that blue light caused more harmful effects on insects than UV light and blue light irradiation killed insect pests of various orders including Diptera, the effects of blue light on physiology of insects are still largely unknown. Here we studied the effects of blue light irradiation on cuticular melanin in larval and the immune response in adult stage of Bactrocera dorsalis. We also evaluated the effects of blue light exposure in larval stage on various age and mass at metamorphosis and the mediatory role of cuticular melanin in carryover effects of larval stressors across metamorphosis. We found that larvae exposed to blue light decreased melanin contents in their exoskeleton with smaller mass and delayed metamorphosis than insects reared without blue light exposure. Across metamorphosis, lower melanotic encapsulation response and higher susceptibility to Beauveria bassiana was detected in adults that had been exposed to blue light at their larval stage, thereby constituting the first evidence that blue light impaired adult immune function in B. dorsalis as a carryover effect of larval exposure.

  15. Juvenile hormone-mediated termination of larval diapause in the bamboo borer, Omphisa fuscidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singtripop, T; Wanichacheewa, S; Sakurai, S

    2000-01-01

    Larvae of the bamboo borer, Omphisa fuscidentalis are in diapause for more than nine months (Singtripop, T., Wanichaneewa, S., Tsuzuki, S., Sakurai, S. 1999. Larval growth and diapause in a tropical moth, Omphisa fuscidentalis Hampson. Zool. Sci. 16, 725-733). To examine the endocrine mechanisms underlying this larval diapause, we assayed the responsiveness of the diapausing larvae to 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and a juvenile hormone analogue (JHA: S-methoprene). 20E injection caused the larvae to halt movement, followed by deposition of a pupal cuticle. Topical application of JHA induced pupation in a dose-dependent manner. JHA also induced pupation of the larvae whose brains were removed before JHA application. In those larvae, the prothoracic glands became active and competent to respond to brain extracts within seven days after JHA treatment, and the hemolymph ecdysteroid concentration began to increase 12 days after JHA application. These results indicate that JHA stimulates the prothoracic glands of diapausing Omphisa larvae, terminating larval diapause, in contrast with previous findings that JH inhibits the brain-prothoracic gland axis and thus maintains the larval diapause. Current results therefore suggest a novel regulatory mechanism for larval diapause in this species.

  16. Embryogenesis and larval biology of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann I Larsson

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral reefs form spectacular and highly diverse ecosystems in the deep sea but little is known about reproduction, and virtually nothing about the larval biology in these corals. This study is based on data from two locations of the North East Atlantic and documents the first observations of embryogenesis and larval development in Lophelia pertusa, the most common framework-building cold-water scleractinian. Embryos developed in a more or less organized radial cleavage pattern from ∼ 160 µm large neutral or negatively buoyant eggs, to 120-270 µm long ciliated planulae. Embryogenesis was slow with cleavage occurring at intervals of 6-8 hours up to the 64-cell stage. Genetically characterized larvae were sexually derived, with maternal and paternal alleles present. Larvae were active swimmers (0.5 mm s(-1 initially residing in the upper part of the water column, with bottom probing behavior starting 3-5 weeks after fertilization. Nematocysts had developed by day 30, coinciding with peak bottom-probing behavior, and possibly an indication that larvae are fully competent to settle at this time. Planulae survived for eight weeks under laboratory conditions, and preliminary results indicate that these planulae are planktotrophic. The late onset of competency and larval longevity suggests a high dispersal potential. Understanding larval biology and behavior is of paramount importance for biophysical modeling of larval dispersal, which forms the basis for predictions of connectivity among populations.

  17. Nutritional value-dependent and nutritional value-independent effects on Drosophila melanogaster larval behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwedder, Astrid; Pfitzenmaier, Johanna E; Ramsperger, Noel; Apostolopoulou, Anthi A; Widmann, Annekathrin; Thum, Andreas S

    2012-10-01

    Gustatory stimuli allow an organism not only to orient in its environment toward energy-rich food sources to maintain nutrition but also to avoid unpleasant or even poisonous substrates. For both mammals and insects, sugars-perceived as "sweet"-potentially predict nutritional benefit. Interestingly, even Drosophila adult flies are attracted to most high-potency sweeteners preferred by humans. However, the gustatory information of a sugar may be misleading as some sugars, although perceived as "sweet," cannot be metabolized. Accordingly, in adult Drosophila, a postingestive system that additionally evaluates the nutritional benefit of an ingested sugar has been shown to exist. By using a set of seven different sugars, which either offer (fructose, sucrose, glucose, maltodextrin, and sorbitol) or lack (xylose and arabinose) nutritional benefit, we show that Drosophila, at the larval stage, can perceive and evaluate sugars based on both nutrition-dependent and -independent qualities. In detail, we find that larval survival and feeding mainly depend on the nutritional value of a particular sugar. In contrast, larval choice behavior and learning are regulated in a more complex way by nutrition value-dependent and nutrition value-independent information. The simplicity of the larval neuronal circuits and their accessibility to genetic manipulation may ultimately allow one to identify the neuronal and molecular basis of the larval sugar perception systems described here behaviorally.

  18. Characterization and expression of calmodulin gene during larval settlement and metamorphosis of the polychaete Hydroides elegans

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhangfan

    2012-08-01

    The polychaete . Hydroides elegans (Serpulidae, Lophotrochozoa) is a problematic marine fouling organism in most tropical and subtropical coastal environment. Competent larvae of . H. elegans undergo the transition from the swimming larval stage to the sessile juvenile stage with substantial morphological, physiological, and behavior changes. This transition is often referred to as larval settlement and metamorphosis. In this study, we examined the possible involvement of calmodulin (CaM) - a multifunctional calcium metabolism regulator, in the larval settlement and metamorphosis of . H. elegans. A full-length . CaM cDNA was successfully cloned from . H. elegans (. He-CaM) and it contained an open reading frame of 450. bp, encoding 149 amino acid residues. It was highly expressed in 12. h post-metamorphic juveniles, and remained high in adults. . In situ hybridization conducted in competent larvae and juveniles revealed that . He-CaM gene was continuously expressed in the putative growth zones, branchial rudiments, and collar region, suggesting that . He-CaM might be involved in tissue differentiation and development. Our subsequent bioassay revealed that the CaM inhibitor W7 could effectively inhibit larval settlement and metamorphosis, and cause some morphological defects of unsettled larvae. In conclusion, our results revealed that CaM has important functions in the larval settlement and metamorphosis of . H. elegans. © 2012 Elsevier Inc..

  19. Patterning the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLM) of Drosophila: insights from the ablation of larval scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, J. J.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    The six Dorsal Longitudinal flight Muscles (DLMs) of Drosophila develop from three larval muscles that persist into metamorphosis and serve as scaffolds for the formation of the adult fibers. We have examined the effect of muscle scaffold ablation on the development of DLMs during metamorphosis. Using markers that are specific to muscle and myoblasts we show that in response to the ablation, myoblasts which would normally fuse with the larval muscle, fuse with each other instead, to generate the adult fibers in the appropriate regions of the thorax. The development of these de novo DLMs is delayed and is reflected in the delayed expression of erect wing, a transcription factor thought to control differentiation events associated with myoblast fusion. The newly arising muscles express the appropriate adult-specific Actin isoform (88F), indicating that they have the correct muscle identity. However, there are frequent errors in the number of muscle fibers generated. Ablation of the larval scaffolds for the DLMs has revealed an underlying potential of the DLM myoblasts to initiate de novo myogenesis in a manner that resembles the mode of formation of the Dorso-Ventral Muscles, DVMs, which are the other group of indirect flight muscles. Therefore, it appears that the use of larval scaffolds is a superimposition on a commonly used mechanism of myogenesis in Drosophila. Our results show that the role of the persistent larval muscles in muscle patterning involves the partitioning of DLM myoblasts, and in doing so, they regulate formation of the correct number of DLM fibers.

  20. Larval starvation reduces responsiveness to feeding stimuli and does not affect feeding preferences in a butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Tobias; Fischer, Klaus

    2012-07-01

    It is commonly assumed that holometabolic insects such as Lepidoptera rely primarily on larval storage reserves for reproduction. Recent studies though have documented a prominent role of adult-derived carbohydrates for butterfly reproduction. Moreover, a few studies have shown that adult butterflies may also benefit from adult-derived amino acids, at least when larval storage reserves are reduced. Given that in holometabolous insects larval deficiencies are carried over into the adult stage, reduced storage reserves have the potential to modulate adult feeding preferences and responses in order to allow for a successful compensation. We tested this hypothesis here in the fruit-feeding butterfly Bicyclus anynana using larval food stress to manipulate storage reserves. Alcohols (methanol, ethanol, butanol, propanol), sugars (maltose, glucose, fructose, sucrose), and acetic acid acted as feeding stimuli, while butterflies did not respond to other substances such as amino acids, yeast, salts, or vitamins. Contrary to expectations, stressed butterflies showed a weaker response than controls to several feeding stimuli. In preference tests, butterflies preferred sugar solutions containing proline, arginine, glutamic acid, acetic acid, or ethanol over plain sugar solutions, but discriminated against salts. However, there were no general differences among starved and control butterflies. We conclude that larval food-stress does not elicit compensatory feeding behavior such as a stronger preference for amino acids or other essential nutrients in B. anynana. Instead, the stress imposed by a period of starvation yielded negative effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.