WorldWideScience

Sample records for lyman normal-tissue complication

  1. Statistical validation of normal tissue complication probability models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Cheng-Jian; van der Schaaf, Arjen; van t Veld, Aart; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Schilstra, Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the applicability and value of double cross-validation and permutation tests as established statistical approaches in the validation of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A penalized regression method, LASSO (least absolute shrinkage

  2. Statistical validation of normal tissue complication probability models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng-Jian; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Van't Veld, Aart A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Schilstra, Cornelis

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the applicability and value of double cross-validation and permutation tests as established statistical approaches in the validation of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. A penalized regression method, LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator), was used to build NTCP models for xerostomia after radiation therapy treatment of head-and-neck cancer. Model assessment was based on the likelihood function and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Repeated double cross-validation showed the uncertainty and instability of the NTCP models and indicated that the statistical significance of model performance can be obtained by permutation testing. Repeated double cross-validation and permutation tests are recommended to validate NTCP models before clinical use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Statistical Validation of Normal Tissue Complication Probability Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Chengjian, E-mail: c.j.xu@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schaaf, Arjen van der; Veld, Aart A. van' t; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schilstra, Cornelis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Radiotherapy Institute Friesland, Leeuwarden (Netherlands)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability and value of double cross-validation and permutation tests as established statistical approaches in the validation of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. Methods and Materials: A penalized regression method, LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator), was used to build NTCP models for xerostomia after radiation therapy treatment of head-and-neck cancer. Model assessment was based on the likelihood function and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: Repeated double cross-validation showed the uncertainty and instability of the NTCP models and indicated that the statistical significance of model performance can be obtained by permutation testing. Conclusion: Repeated double cross-validation and permutation tests are recommended to validate NTCP models before clinical use.

  4. Impact of statistical learning methods on the predictive power of multivariate normal tissue complication probability models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Cheng-Jian; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van t Veld, Aart A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the impact of different statistical learning methods on the prediction performance of multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In this study, three learning methods, stepwise selection, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator

  5. Quantifying Unnecessary Normal Tissue Complication Risks due to Suboptimal Planning: A Secondary Study of RTOG 0126

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Schmidt, Rachel [Department of Physics, Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas (United States); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Olsen, Lindsey A.; Tan, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pugh, Stephanie [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Seider, Michael J. [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bosch, Walter; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the frequency and clinical severity of quality deficiencies in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol. Methods and Materials: A total of 219 IMRT patients from the high-dose arm (79.2 Gy) of RTOG 0126 were analyzed. To quantify plan quality, we used established knowledge-based methods for patient-specific dose-volume histogram (DVH) prediction of organs at risk and a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model for grade ≥2 rectal complications to convert DVHs into normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). The LKB model was validated by fitting dose-response parameters relative to observed toxicities. The 90th percentile (22 of 219) of plans with the lowest excess risk (difference between clinical and model-predicted NTCP) were used to create a model for the presumed best practices in the protocol (pDVH{sub 0126,top10%}). Applying the resultant model to the entire sample enabled comparisons between DVHs that patients could have received to DVHs they actually received. Excess risk quantified the clinical impact of suboptimal planning. Accuracy of pDVH predictions was validated by replanning 30 of 219 patients (13.7%), including equal numbers of presumed “high-quality,” “low-quality,” and randomly sampled plans. NTCP-predicted toxicities were compared to adverse events on protocol. Results: Existing models showed that bladder-sparing variations were less prevalent than rectum quality variations and that increased rectal sparing was not correlated with target metrics (dose received by 98% and 2% of the PTV, respectively). Observed toxicities were consistent with current LKB parameters. Converting DVH and pDVH{sub 0126,top10%} to rectal NTCPs, we observed 94 of 219 patients (42.9%) with ≥5% excess risk, 20 of 219 patients (9.1%) with ≥10% excess risk, and 2 of 219 patients (0.9%) with ≥15% excess risk. Replanning demonstrated the

  6. Modeling Radiotherapy Induced Normal Tissue Complications: An Overview beyond Phenomenological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassi, Marcello; Strigari, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    An overview of radiotherapy (RT) induced normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models is presented. NTCP models based on empirical and mechanistic approaches that describe a specific radiation induced late effect proposed over time for conventional RT are reviewed with particular emphasis on their basic assumptions and related mathematical translation and their weak and strong points. PMID:28044088

  7. Improving normal tissue complication probability models: the need to adopt a "data-pooling" culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Joseph O; Bentzen, Søren M; Jackson, Andrew; Ten Haken, Randall K; Yorke, Ellen D; Constine, Louis S; Sharma, Ashish; Marks, Lawrence B

    2010-03-01

    Clinical studies of the dependence of normal tissue response on dose-volume factors are often confusingly inconsistent, as the QUANTEC reviews demonstrate. A key opportunity to accelerate progress is to begin storing high-quality datasets in repositories. Using available technology, multiple repositories could be conveniently queried, without divulging protected health information, to identify relevant sources of data for further analysis. After obtaining institutional approvals, data could then be pooled, greatly enhancing the capability to construct predictive models that are more widely applicable and better powered to accurately identify key predictive factors (whether dosimetric, image-based, clinical, socioeconomic, or biological). Data pooling has already been carried out effectively in a few normal tissue complication probability studies and should become a common strategy.

  8. IMPROVING NORMAL TISSUE COMPLICATION PROBABILITY MODELS: THE NEED TO ADOPT A “DATA-POOLING” CULTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jackson, Andrew; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Yorke, Ellen D.; Constine, Louis S.; Sharma, Ashish; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical studies of the dependence of normal tissue response on dose-volume factors are often confusingly inconsistent, as the QUANTEC reviews demonstrate. A key opportunity to accelerate progress is to begin storing high-quality datasets in repositories. Using available technology, multiple repositories could be conveniently queried, without divulging protected health information, to identify relevant sources of data for further analysis. After obtaining institutional approvals, data could then be pooled, greatly enhancing the capability to construct predictive models that are more widely applicable and better powered to accurately identify key predictive factors (whether dosimetric, image-based, clinical, socioeconomic, or biological). Data pooling has already been carried out effectively in a few normal tissue complication probability studies and should become a common strategy. PMID:20171511

  9. Assessment of normal tissue complications following prostate cancer irradiation: Comparison of radiation treatment modalities using NTCP models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takam, Rungdham; Bezak, Eva; Yeoh, Eric E.; Marcu, Loredana [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5000 (Australia) and Department of Medical Physics, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide SA 5000 (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5000 (Australia) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide SA 5000 (Australia); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5000 (Australia) and Faculty of Science, University of Oradea, Oradea 410086 (Romania)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads following several techniques for radiation treatment of prostate cancer were evaluated applying the relative seriality and Lyman models. Methods: Model parameters from literature were used in this evaluation. The treatment techniques included external (standard fractionated, hypofractionated, and dose-escalated) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy (I-125 seeds), and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (Ir-192 source). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum, bladder, and urethra retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems were converted to biological effective dose-based and equivalent dose-based DVHs, respectively, in order to account for differences in radiation treatment modality and fractionation schedule. Results: Results indicated that with hypofractionated 3D-CRT (20 fractions of 2.75 Gy/fraction delivered five times/week to total dose of 55 Gy), NTCP of the rectum, bladder, and urethra were less than those for standard fractionated 3D-CRT using a four-field technique (32 fractions of 2 Gy/fraction delivered five times/week to total dose of 64 Gy) and dose-escalated 3D-CRT. Rectal and bladder NTCPs (5.2% and 6.6%, respectively) following the dose-escalated four-field 3D-CRT (2 Gy/fraction to total dose of 74 Gy) were the highest among analyzed treatment techniques. The average NTCP for the rectum and urethra were 0.6% and 24.7% for LDR-BT and 0.5% and 11.2% for HDR-BT. Conclusions: Although brachytherapy techniques resulted in delivering larger equivalent doses to normal tissues, the corresponding NTCPs were lower than those of external beam techniques other than the urethra because of much smaller volumes irradiated to higher doses. Among analyzed normal tissues, the femoral heads were found to have the lowest probability of complications as most of their volume was irradiated to lower

  10. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented

  11. Hypothyroidism after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Normal tissue complication probability modeling with latent time correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønjom, Marianne Feen; Brink, Carsten; Bentzen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors.......To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors....

  12. Impact of statistical learning methods on the predictive power of multivariate normal tissue complication probability models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng-Jian; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A; van't Veld, Aart A

    2012-03-15

    To study the impact of different statistical learning methods on the prediction performance of multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. In this study, three learning methods, stepwise selection, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), and Bayesian model averaging (BMA), were used to build NTCP models of xerostomia following radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancer. Performance of each learning method was evaluated by a repeated cross-validation scheme in order to obtain a fair comparison among methods. It was found that the LASSO and BMA methods produced models with significantly better predictive power than that of the stepwise selection method. Furthermore, the LASSO method yields an easily interpretable model as the stepwise method does, in contrast to the less intuitive BMA method. The commonly used stepwise selection method, which is simple to execute, may be insufficient for NTCP modeling. The LASSO method is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MO-D-BRF-01: Pediatric Treatment Planning II: The PENTEC Report On Normal Tissue Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constine, L; Hodgson, D; Bentzen, S [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    With advances in multimodality therapy, childhood cancer cure rates approach 80%. However, both radiotherapy and chemotherapy may cause debilitating or even fatal ‘late effects’ that are critical to understand, mitigate, or prevent. QUANTEC identified the uncertainties relating to side-effects of adult treatments, but this is more complicated for children in whom a mosaic of tissues develops at different rates and temporal sequences. Childhood cancer survivors have long life expectancy and may develop treatmentinduced secondary cancers and severe organ/tissue injury decades after treatment. Collaborative long-term observational studies and clinical research programs for survivors of pediatric and adolescent cancer provide some dose-response data for follow-up periods exceeding 40 years. Data analysis is challenging due to the influence of both therapeutic and developmental variables. PENTEC is a group of radiation oncologists, pediatric oncologists, subsepcialty physicians, medical physicists, biomathematic modelers/statisticians, and epidemiologists charged with conducting a critical synthesis of existing literature aiming to: critically analyze radiation dose-volume effects on normal tissue tolerances as a function of age/development in pediatric cancer patients in order to inform treatment planning and improve outcomes for survivors; describe relevant physics issues specific to pediatric radiotherapy; propose dose-volumeoutcome reporting standards to improve the knowledge base to inform future treatment guidelines. PENTEC has developed guidelines for systematic literature reviews, data extraction tolls and data analysis. This education session will discuss:1. Special considerations for normal tissue radiation response of children/adolescents, e.g. the interplay between development and radiotherapy effects.2. Epidemiology of organ/tissue injuries and secondary cancers.3. Exploration of dose-response differences between children and adults4. Methodology for

  14. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defraene, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.defraene@uzleuven.be [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Van den Bergh, Laura [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Haustermans, Karin [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Heemsbergen, Wilma [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lebesque, Joos V. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints

  15. Validation of Normal Tissue Complication Probability Predictions in Individual Patient: Late Rectal Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenenko, Vladimir A., E-mail: vsemenenko@LandauerMP.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Tarima, Sergey S. [Division of Biostatistics, Institute for Health and Society, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Devisetty, Kiran [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Pelizzari, Charles A.; Liauw, Stanley L. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To perform validation of risk predictions for late rectal toxicity (LRT) in prostate cancer obtained using a new approach to synthesize published normal tissue complication data. Methods and Materials: A published study survey was performed to identify the dose-response relationships for LRT derived from nonoverlapping patient populations. To avoid mixing models based on different symptoms, the emphasis was placed on rectal bleeding. The selected models were used to compute the risk estimates of grade 2+ and grade 3+ LRT for an independent validation cohort composed of 269 prostate cancer patients with known toxicity outcomes. Risk estimates from single studies were combined to produce consolidated risk estimates. An agreement between the actuarial toxicity incidence 3 years after radiation therapy completion and single-study or consolidated risk estimates was evaluated using the concordance correlation coefficient. Goodness of fit for the consolidated risk estimates was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Results: A total of 16 studies of grade 2+ and 5 studies of grade 3+ LRT met the inclusion criteria. The consolidated risk estimates of grade 2+ and 3+ LRT were constructed using 3 studies each. For grade 2+ LRT, the concordance correlation coefficient for the consolidated risk estimates was 0.537 compared with 0.431 for the best-fit single study. For grade 3+ LRT, the concordance correlation coefficient for the consolidated risk estimates was 0.477 compared with 0.448 for the best-fit single study. No evidence was found for a lack of fit for the consolidated risk estimates using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test (P=.531 and P=.397 for grade 2+ and 3+ LRT, respectively). Conclusions: In a large cohort of prostate cancer patients, selected sets of consolidated risk estimates were found to be more accurate predictors of LRT than risk estimates derived from any single study.

  16. External validation of a normal tissue complication probability model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in an independent cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønjom, Marianne F; Brink, Carsten; Bentzen, Søren M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism (RIHT) was previously derived in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) discerning thyroid volume (Vthyroid), mean thyroid dose (Dmean), and latency as predictive...

  17. Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) modeling of late rectal bleeding following external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: A Test of the QUANTEC-recommended NTCP model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Mitchell; Agranovich, Alexander; Karvat, Anand; Kwan, Winkle (Fraser Valley Centre, British Columbia Cancer Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada)); Moiseenko, Vitali (Vancouver Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Saleh, Ziad H.; Apte, Aditya A.; Deasy, Joseph O. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology and the Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology, Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)), e-mail: deasyj@mskcc.org

    2010-10-15

    Purpose/background. Validating a predictive model for late rectal bleeding following external beam treatment for prostate cancer would enable safer treatments or dose escalation. We tested the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model recommended in the recent QUANTEC review (quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic). Material and methods. One hundred and sixty one prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer at the British Columbia Cancer Agency in a prospective protocol. The total prescription dose for all patients was 74 Gy, delivered in 2 Gy/fraction. 159 3D treatment planning datasets were available for analysis. Rectal dose volume histograms were extracted and fitted to a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman NTCP model. Results. Late rectal bleeding (>grade 2) was observed in 12/159 patients (7.5%). Multivariate logistic regression with dose-volume parameters (V50, V60, V70, etc.) was non-significant. Among clinical variables, only age was significant on a Kaplan-Meier log-rank test (p=0.007, with an optimal cut point of 77 years). Best-fit Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model parameters (with 95% confidence intervals) were: n = 0.068 (0.01, +infinity); m =0.14 (0.0, 0.86); and TD50 81 (27, 136) Gy. The peak values fall within the 95% QUANTEC confidence intervals. On this dataset, both models had only modest ability to predict complications: the best-fit model had a Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of rs = 0.099 (p = 0.11) and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.62; the QUANTEC model had rs=0.096 (p= 0.11) and a corresponding AUC of 0.61. Although the QUANTEC model consistently predicted higher NTCP values, it could not be rejected according to the chi2 test (p = 0.44). Conclusions. Observed complications, and best-fit parameter estimates, were consistent with the QUANTEC-preferred NTCP model. However, predictive power was low, at least partly because the rectal dose

  18. The effect of customized beam shaping on normal tissue complications in radiation therapy of parotid gland tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keus, R.; Boer, R. de; Lebesque, J. (Nederlands Kanker Inst. ' Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis' , Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Noach, P. (Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands). Department of Radiotherapy)

    1991-07-01

    The impact of customized beam shaping was studied for 5 patients with parotid tumors treated with a paired wedged field technique. For each patient 2 plans were generated. The standard plan had unblocked portals with field sizes defined by the largest target contour found in any CT slice. In the 2nd plan customized beam's view (BEV) designed blocks were added to both beams. The differences in those distributions between the 2 types of plans were evaluated using dose-volume histograms (DVH). As expected, the dose distribution within the target volume showed no difference. However, a considerable sparing of normal tissue was observed for the plans with customized blocks. The volume of un-necessary exposed normal tissue that received more than 90 percent of the prescribed dose, was reduced by a factor of about 4: from 165 to 44 percent on an average, if the volume is expressed as a percentage of the target volume in each patient. In particular, the homolateral mandible showed a mean decrease of 21 percent of integral dose when blocks were used. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were calculated. For a tumor dose of 70 Gy, the average bone necrosis probability was reduced from 8.4 percent (no blocks) to 4.1. percent (blocks). For other normal tissues such as nervous tissue, other soft tissues and bones a substantial reduction of integral dose was found for al patients when individual blocks were used. (author). 10 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs.

  19. Impact of Chemotherapy on Normal Tissue Complication Probability Models of Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Patients Receiving Pelvic Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazan, Jose G.; Luxton, Gary; Kozak, Margaret M.; Anderson, Eric M.; Hancock, Steven L.; Kapp, Daniel S.; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine how chemotherapy agents affect radiation dose parameters that correlate with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients treated with pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (P-IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We assessed HT in 141 patients who received P-IMRT for anal, gynecologic, rectal, or prostate cancers, 95 of whom received concurrent chemotherapy. Patients were separated into 4 groups: mitomycin (MMC) + 5-fluorouracil (5FU, 37 of 141), platinum ± 5FU (Cis, 32 of 141), 5FU (26 of 141), and P-IMRT alone (46 of 141). The pelvic bone was contoured as a surrogate for pelvic bone marrow (PBM) and divided into subsites: ilium, lower pelvis, and lumbosacral spine (LSS). The volumes of each region receiving 5-40 Gy were calculated. The endpoint for HT was grade ≥3 (HT3+) leukopenia, neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Normal tissue complication probability was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. Logistic regression was used to analyze association between HT3+ and dosimetric parameters. Results: Twenty-six patients experienced HT3+: 10 of 37 (27%) MMC, 14 of 32 (44%) Cis, 2 of 26 (8%) 5FU, and 0 of 46 P-IMRT. PBM dosimetric parameters were correlated with HT3+ in the MMC group but not in the Cis group. LSS dosimetric parameters were well correlated with HT3+ in both the MMC and Cis groups. Constrained optimization (0Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model resulted in n=1, m = 0.11, TD{sub 50} = 31 Gy for LSS in the MMC group and n=1, m = 0.27, TD{sub 50} = 35 Gy for LSS in the Cis group. Conclusions: The incidence of HT3+ depends on type of chemotherapy received. Patients receiving P-IMRT ± 5FU have better bone marrow tolerance than those receiving irradiation concurrent with either Cis or MMC. Treatment with MMC has a lower TD{sub 50} and more steeply rising normal tissue complication probability curve compared with treatment with Cis. Dose tolerance of PBM and the LSS subsite may be lower for

  20. Volumetrical changes of liver associated with breathing and its impact to normal tissue complication probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Hee; Kim, Joo Ho; Park, Je Il [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yensei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate geometrical and volumetrical changes of liver due to breathing and its impact to NTCP. In order to attain better treatment results it should be considered deliberately during planning session. Seven patients were examined in this study who have done TACE for accurate tumor margin drawing. After contrast media injection, C-T scan data were obtained in supine position during breathing free, inhalation and exhalation, respectively. For all patients C-T scan were done with same scanning parameters- 5 mm index, 5 mm thickness and pitch 1. Based on C-T data we have measured differences of each variables between breathing status such as changes of total and remained liver volumes, GTV, beam path length and superior to inferior shift. NTCP were calculated using Lyman's effective volume DVH reduction scheme and for this NTCP calculation, the V50 was computed from DVH and each m, n value were referred from Burmans data. The measured total tilter volume and the remained liver volume changed between inspiration and expiration about 1.2-7.7%(mean+2.7%) and 2.5-13.23%(mean=5.8%) respectively, and these results were statistically significant(p>0.1). The GTV difference in each patient varied widely from 1.17% to 30.69%, but this result was not statistically significant. Depending on the breathing status, the beam path length was changed from 0.5 cm to 1.1 cm with the average of 0.7 cm, and it was statistically significant(p=0.006). The measured superior to inferior shifts were ranged from 0.5 cm to 3.74 cm. The NTCPs were changed relatively small in each patient, but the variation was large between the patients. The mean NTCP difference was 10.5%, with the variation ranged from 7% to 23.5%. Variations of liver volume and of beam path length were changed significantly depending on the breathing statues and the range of variation itself was very different between the patients. Since this variance could seriously affect the clinical

  1. Renal tolerance to nonhomogenous irradiation: Comparison of observed effects to predictions of normal tissue complication probability from different biophysical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, M.; Hensley, F.; Gademann, G.; Wannenmacher, M. (Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)); Menke, M. (German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1993-09-01

    A patient series was analyzed retrospectively as an example of whole organ kidney irradiation with an inhomogenous dose distribution to test the validity of biophysical models predicting normal tissue tolerance to radiotherapy. From 1969 to 1984, 142 patients with seminoma were irradiated to the paraaortic region using predominantly rotational techniques which led to variable but partly substantial exposure of the kidneys. Median follow up was 8.2 (2.1-21) years and actuarial 10-year survival (Kaplan-Meier estimate) 82.8%. For all patients 3-dimensional dose distributions were reconstructed and normal tissue complication probabilities for the kidneys were generated from the individual dose volume histograms. To this respect different published biophysical algorithms were introduced in a 3-dimensional-treatment planning system. In seven patients clinically manifest renal impairment was observed (interval 10-84 months). An excellent agreement between predicted and observed effects was seen for two volume-oriented models, whereas complications were overestimated by an algorithm based on critical element assumptions. Should these observations be confirmed and extended to different types of organs corresponding algorithms could easily be integrated into 3-dimensional-treatment planning programs and be used for comparing and judging different plans on a more biologically oriented basis.

  2. Differences in Parotid Dosimetry and Expected Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities in Whole Brain Radiation Plans Covering C1 Versus C2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Andrew; Gordon, John; Vigh, Tyler; Tonkin, Allison; Cannon, George

    2017-05-03

    There is no consensus standard regarding the placement of the inferior field border in whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) plans, with most providers choosing to cover the first versus (vs.) second cervical vertebrae (C1 vs. C2). We hypothesize that extending coverage to C2 may increase predicted rates of xerostomia. Fifteen patients underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation; two WBRT plans were then produced, one covering C2 and the other covering C1. The plans were otherwise standard, and patients were prescribed doses of 25, 30 and 37.5 gray (Gy). Dose-volume statistics were obtained and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were estimated using the Lyman-Burman-Kutcher model. Mean parotid dose and predicted xerostomia rates were compared for plans covering C2 vs. C1 using a two-sided patient-matched t-test. Plans were also evaluated to determine whether extending the lower field border to cover C2 would result in a violation of commonly accepted dosimetric planning constraints. The mean dose to both parotid glands was significantly higher in WBRT plans covering C2 compared to plans covering C1 for all dose prescriptions (pplans covering C2 vs. plans covering C1 (pPlans covering C2 were unable to constrain at least one parotid to plans vs. 9% of plans when C1 was covered. A total parotid dose constraint of plans covering C2 vs. 0% of plans covering C1. Coverage of C2 significantly increases the mean parotid dose and predicted NTCPs and results in more frequent violation of commonly accepted dosimetric planning constraints.

  3. Developing Multivariable Normal Tissue Complication Probability Model to Predict the Incidence of Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis among Breast Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsair-Fwu Lee

    Full Text Available Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (SRP, which decreases quality of life (QoL, is the most common pulmonary complication in patients receiving breast irradiation. If it occurs, acute SRP usually develops 4-12 weeks after completion of radiotherapy and presents as a dry cough, dyspnea and low-grade fever. If the incidence of SRP is reduced, not only the QoL but also the compliance of breast cancer patients may be improved. Therefore, we investigated the incidence SRP in breast cancer patients after hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT to find the risk factors, which may have important effects on the risk of radiation-induced complications.In total, 93 patients with breast cancer were evaluated. The final endpoint for acute SRP was defined as those who had density changes together with symptoms, as measured using computed tomography. The risk factors for a multivariate normal tissue complication probability model of SRP were determined using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO technique.Five risk factors were selected using LASSO: the percentage of the ipsilateral lung volume that received more than 20-Gy (IV20, energy, age, body mass index (BMI and T stage. Positive associations were demonstrated among the incidence of SRP, IV20, and patient age. Energy, BMI and T stage showed a negative association with the incidence of SRP. Our analyses indicate that the risk of SPR following hybrid IMRT in elderly or low-BMI breast cancer patients is increased once the percentage of the ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20-Gy is controlled below a limitation.We suggest to define a dose-volume percentage constraint of IV20< 37% (or AIV20< 310cc for the irradiated ipsilateral lung in radiation therapy treatment planning to maintain the incidence of SPR below 20%, and pay attention to the sequelae especially in elderly or low-BMI breast cancer patients. (AIV20: the absolute ipsilateral lung volume that received more than

  4. Modeling normal tissue complication probability from repetitive computed tomography scans during fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy of the uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, E; Hellebust, T P; Skjønsberg, A; Høgberg, T; Olsen, D R

    2000-07-01

    To calculate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of late radiation effects on the rectum and bladder from repetitive CT scans during fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of the uterine cervix and compare the NTCP with the clinical frequency of late effects. Fourteen patients with cancer of the uterine cervix (Stage IIb-IVa) underwent 3-6 (mean, 4.9) CT scans in treatment position during their course of HDRB using a ring applicator with an Iridium stepping source. The rectal and bladder walls were delineated on the treatment-planning system, such that a constant wall volume independent of organ filling was achieved. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the rectal and bladder walls were acquired. A method of summing multiple DVHs accounting for variable dose per fraction were applied to the DVHs of HDRB and EBRT together with the Lyman-Kutcher NTCP model fitted to clinical dose-volume tolerance data from recent studies. The D(mean) of the DVH from EBRT was close to the D(max) for both the rectum and bladder, confirming that the DVH from EBRT corresponded with homogeneous whole-organ irradiation. The NTCP of the rectum was 19.7% (13.5%, 25. 9%) (mean and 95% confidence interval), whereas the clinical frequency of late rectal sequelae (Grade 3-4, RTOG/EORTC) was 13% based on material from 200 patients. For the bladder the NTCP was 61. 9% (46.8%, 76.9%) as compared to the clinical frequency of Grade 3-4 late effects of 14%. If only 1 CT scan from HDRB was assumed available, the relative uncertainty (standard deviation or SD) of the NTCP value for an arbitrary patient was 20-30%, whereas 4 CT scans provided an uncertainty of 12-13%. The NTCP for the rectum was almost consistent with the clinical frequency of late effects, whereas the NTCP for bladder was too high. To obtain reliable (SD of 12-13%) NTCP values, 3-4 CT scans are needed during 5-7 fractions of HDRB treatments.

  5. Comparison of Dose Response Models for Predicting Normal Tissue Complications from Cancer Radiotherapy: Application in Rat Spinal Cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamus-Górka, Magdalena; Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: panayiotis.mavroidis@ki.se; Lind, Bengt K.; Brahme, Anders [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm S-17176 (Sweden)

    2011-05-18

    Seven different radiobiological dose-response models have been compared with regard to their ability to describe experimental data. The first four models, namely the critical volume, the relative seriality, the inverse tumor and the critical element models are mainly based on cell survival biology. The other three models: the Lyman (Gaussian distribution), the parallel architecture and the Weibull distribution models are semi-empirical and rather based on statistical distributions. The maximum likelihood estimation was used to fit the models to experimental data and the χ{sup 2}-distribution, AIC criterion and F-test were applied to compare the goodness-of-fit of the models. The comparison was performed using experimental data for rat spinal cord injury. Both the shape of the dose-response curve and the ability of handling the volume dependence were separately compared for each model. All the models were found to be acceptable in describing the present experimental dataset (p > 0.05). For the white matter necrosis dataset, the Weibull and Lyman models were clearly superior to the other models, whereas for the vascular damage case, the Relative Seriality model seems to have the best performance although the Critical volume, Inverse tumor, Critical element and Parallel architecture models gave similar results. Although the differences between many of the investigated models are rather small, they still may be of importance in indicating the advantages and limitations of each particular model. It appears that most of the models have favorable properties for describing dose-response data, which indicates that they may be suitable to be used in biologically optimized intensity modulated radiation therapy planning, provided a proper estimation of their radiobiological parameters had been performed for every tissue and clinical endpoint.

  6. Comparison of Dose Response Models for Predicting Normal Tissue Complications from Cancer Radiotherapy: Application in Rat Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Adamus-Górka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Seven different radiobiological dose-response models have been compared with regard to their ability to describe experimental data. The first four models, namely the critical volume, the relative seriality, the inverse tumor and the critical element models are mainly based on cell survival biology. The other three models: the Lyman (Gaussian distribution, the parallel architecture and the Weibull distribution models are semi-empirical and rather based on statistical distributions. The maximum likelihood estimation was used to fit the models to experimental data and the χ2-distribution, AIC criterion and F-test were applied to compare the goodness-of-fit of the models. The comparison was performed using experimental data for rat spinal cord injury. Both the shape of the dose-response curve and the ability of handling the volume dependence were separately compared for each model. All the models were found to be acceptable in describing the present experimental dataset (p > 0.05. For the white matter necrosis dataset, the Weibull and Lyman models were clearly superior to the other models, whereas for the vascular damage case, the Relative Seriality model seems to have the best performance although the Critical volume, Inverse tumor, Critical element and Parallel architecture models gave similar results. Although the differences between many of the investigated models are rather small, they still may be of importance in indicating the advantages and limitations of each particular model. It appears that most of the models have favorable properties for describing dose-response data, which indicates that they may be suitable to be used in biologically optimized intensity modulated radiation therapy planning, provided a proper estimation of their radiobiological parameters had been performed for every tissue and clinical endpoint.

  7. Tumor control and normal tissue complications in BNCT treatment of nodular melanoma: A search for predictive quantities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, S.J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, (1429) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917, (1033) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: srgonzal@cnea.gov.ar; Casal, M. [Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Av. San Martin 5481, (1417) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pereira, M.D. [Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Av. San Martin 5481, (1417) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, PAV 22393 (Argentina); Santa Cruz, G.A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, (1429) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Carando, D.G. [CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917, (1033) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dpto. de Matematica, Pab. I Ciudad Universitaria, UBA, (1428) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Blaumann, H. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, (1429) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonomi, M. [CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917, (1033) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Calzetta Larrieu, O.; Feld, D.; Fernandez, C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, (1429) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gossio, S. [FCEyN, Pab. II Ciudad Universitaria, UBA, (1428) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jimenez Rebagliatti, R.; Kessler, J.; Longhino, J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, (1429) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Menendez, P. [Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Av. San Martin 5481, (1417) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Nievas, S. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, (1429) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Roth, B.M.C [Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Av. San Martin 5481, (1417) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Liberman, S.J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, (1429) Cdad. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-07-15

    A previous work concerning tumor control and skin damage in cutaneous melanoma treatments with BNCT has been extended to include doses, volumes and responses of 104 subcutaneous lesions from all patients treated in Argentina. Acute skin reactions were also scored for these patients, and cumulative dose-area histograms and dose-based figures of merit for skin were calculated. Broadening the tumor response analysis with the latest data showed that the (minimum or mean) tumor dose is not a good predictor of the observed clinical outcome by itself. However, when the tumor volume was included in the model as second explicative variable, the dose increases its significance and becomes a critical variable jointly with the volume (p-values<0.05). A preliminary analysis to estimate control doses for two groups of tumor sizes revealed that for small tumor volumes (< 0.1 cm{sup 3}) doses greater than 20 Gy-Eq produce a high tumor control (> 80%). However, when tumor volumes are larger than 0.1 cm{sup 3}, control is moderate (< 40%) even for minimum doses up to 40 Gy-Eq. Some quantities based on skin doses, areas and complication probabilities were proposed as candidates for predicting the severity of the early skin reactions. With the current data, all the evaluated figures of merit derived similar results: ulceration is present among the cases for which these quantities take the highest values.

  8. Identification of Patient Benefit From Proton Therapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients Based on Individual and Subgroup Normal Tissue Complication Probability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobi, Annika, E-mail: Annika.Jakobi@OncoRay.de [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Bandurska-Luque, Anna [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Stützer, Kristin; Haase, Robert; Löck, Steffen [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Wack, Linda-Jacqueline [Section for Biomedical Physics, University Hospital for Radiation Oncology, Eberhard Karls Universät Tübingen (Germany); Mönnich, David [Section for Biomedical Physics, University Hospital for Radiation Oncology, Eberhard Karls Universät Tübingen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, Tübingen (Germany); Thorwarth, Daniela [Section for Biomedical Physics, University Hospital for Radiation Oncology, Eberhard Karls Universät Tübingen (Germany); and others

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine, by treatment plan comparison along with normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling, whether a subpopulation of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) could be identified that would gain substantial benefit from proton therapy in terms of NTCP. Methods and Materials: For 45 HNSCC patients, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was compared to intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Physical dose distributions were evaluated as well as the resulting NTCP values, using modern models for acute mucositis, xerostomia, aspiration, dysphagia, laryngeal edema, and trismus. Patient subgroups were defined based on primary tumor location. Results: Generally, IMPT reduced the NTCP values while keeping similar target coverage for all patients. Subgroup analyses revealed a higher individual reduction of swallowing-related side effects by IMPT for patients with tumors in the upper head and neck area, whereas the risk reduction of acute mucositis was more pronounced in patients with tumors in the larynx region. More patients with tumors in the upper head and neck area had a reduction in NTCP of more than 10%. Conclusions: Subgrouping can help to identify patients who may benefit more than others from the use of IMPT and, thus, can be a useful tool for a preselection of patients in the clinic where there are limited PT resources. Because the individual benefit differs within a subgroup, the relative merits should additionally be evaluated by individual treatment plan comparisons.

  9. Variation of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) estimates of radiation-induced hypothyroidism in relation to changes in delineation of the thyroid gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønjom, Marianne Feen; Brink, Carsten; Laugaard Lorenzen, Ebbe

    2015-01-01

    Background. To examine the variations of risk-estimates of radiation-induced hypothyroidism (HT) from our previously developed normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in relation to variability of delineation of the thyroid...... gland. Patients and methods. In a previous study for development of an NTCP model for HT, the thyroid gland was delineated in 246 treatment plans of patients with HNSCC. Fifty of these plans were randomly chosen for re-delineation for a study of the intra- and inter-observer variability of thyroid......-observer variability resulted in a mean difference in thyroid volume and Dmean of 0.4 cm(3) (SD ± 1.6) and -0.5 Gy (SD ± 1.0), respectively, and 0.3 cm(3) (SD ± 1.8) and 0.0 Gy (SD ± 1.3) for inter-observer variability. The corresponding mean differences of NTCP values for radiation-induced HT due to intra- and inter...

  10. Increase in tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities in advanced head-and-neck cancer for dose-escalated intensity-modulated photon and proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika eJakobi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Presently used radio-chemotherapy regimens result in moderate local control rates for patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Dose escalation (DE may be an option to improve patient outcome, but may also increase the risk of toxicities in healthy tissue. The presented treatment planning study evaluated the feasibility of two DE levels for advanced HNSCC patients, planned with either intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMXT or proton therapy (IMPT.Materials and Methods:For 45 HNSCC patients, IMXT and IMPT treatment plans were created including DE via a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB in the high-risk volume, while maintaining standard fractionation with 2 Gy per fraction in the remaining target volume. Two DE levels for the SIB were compared: 2.3 Gy and 2.6 Gy. Treatment plan evaluation included assessment of tumor control probabilities (TCP and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP.Results:An increase of approximately 10% in TCP was estimated between the DE levels. A pronounced high-dose rim surrounding the SIB volume was identified in IMXT treatment. Compared to IMPT, this extra dose slightly increased the TCP values and to a larger extent the NTCP values. For both modalities, the higher DE level led only to a small increase in NTCP values (mean differences < 2% in all models, except for the risk of aspiration, which increased on average by 8% and 6% with IMXT and IMPT, respectively, but showed a considerable patient dependence. Conclusions:Both DE levels appear applicable to patients with IMXT and IMPT since all calculated NTCP values, except for one, increased only little for the higher DE level. The estimated TCP increase is of relevant magnitude. The higher DE schedule needs to be investigated carefully in the setting of a prospective clinical trial, especially regarding toxicities caused by high local doses that lack a sound dose response description, e.g., ulcers.

  11. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Analysis of Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Undergoing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Cisplatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Daniel R.; Song, William Y. [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, Vancouver Cancer Centre, BC (Canada); Rose, Brent S.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J. [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased bowel radiation dose is associated with acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using a previously derived normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Methods: Fifty patients with Stage I-III cervical cancer undergoing IMRT and concurrent weekly cisplatin were analyzed. Acute GI toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, excluding upper GI events. A logistic model was used to test correlations between acute GI toxicity and bowel dosimetric parameters. The primary objective was to test the association between Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity and the volume of bowel receiving {>=}45 Gy (V{sub 45}) using the logistic model. Results: Twenty-three patients (46%) had Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity. The mean (SD) V{sub 45} was 143 mL (99). The mean V{sub 45} values for patients with and without Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity were 176 vs. 115 mL, respectively. Twenty patients (40%) had V{sub 45} >150 mL. The proportion of patients with Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity with and without V{sub 45} >150 mL was 65% vs. 33% (p = 0.03). Logistic model parameter estimates V50 and {gamma} were 161 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 60-399) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.04-0.63), respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increased V{sub 45} was associated with an increased odds of Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity (odds ratio 2.19 per 100 mL, 95% CI 1.04-4.63, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that increasing bowel V{sub 45} is correlated with increased GI toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing IMRT and concurrent cisplatin. Reducing bowel V{sub 45} could reduce the risk of Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity by approximately 50% per 100 mL of bowel spared.

  12. SU-E-T-214: Comparison of Treatment Techniques for Dupuytren’s Contracture and Risk Assessment of Normal Tissue Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arentsen, L; Lopater, Z; Dusenbery, K; Gerbi, B [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Duputren’s contracture (DC) is a benign disease characterized by abnormal thickening of the fascial surfaces of the hands or feet causing curling of the surface, functional impairment, weakness, and pain. The purpose of the investigation is to describe the radiation treatment approaches, compare these techniques, and discuss the potential side effects and complications of these techniques. Methods: Early stage DC has been treated with 120 kVp X rays but also with high-energy electrons or photons. High-energy electrons have been the radiation of choice but severe contracture of the hand makes it difficult to produce a plan with acceptable dose uniformity. High-energy photons can overcome this difficulty either by directing a beam onto the palmer or back of the surface of the hand, including bolus to maximize the surface dose. We calculated the dose to the bone for the 120 kVp treatment using published %DD data and mass energy absorption coefficients for bone and muscle. Results: The dose to underlying bone from megavoltage photons and electrons is essentially the same, but dose to the bone for using 120 kVp can be 4–5 times greater due to the photoelectric effect. For the 30 Gy dose deliver using this technique, the dose to the bone could be 84–105 Gy after taking the penetration of the beam into account. After radiotherapy, there is often decreased osteoblastic activity and vascular fibrosis that leads to osteitis, atrophy, and decreased metabolic bone activity. Incidence of fractures occurs routinely above 60 Gy with higher doses potentially leading to higher incidences of bone complications. Conclusion: Radiation therapy for DC using low-energy X rays can deliver a prohibitively high dose to the underlying bone potentially leading to severe bone complications.

  13. Radioprotection of normal tissue cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Patrick; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten [Heidelberg University, Department of Radiation Oncology Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Improvements of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and systemic therapy have resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity is still dose limiting. Several strategies have been pursued with the goal to develop substances which may prevent or reduce damage to normal tissue. Drugs applied before radiotherapy are called radioprotectors; those given after radiotherapy to reduce long-term effects are radiomitigators. Despite more than 50 years of research, until now only two substances, amifostine and palifermin, have overcome all obstacles of clinical approval and are applied during radiotherapy of head and neck cancer or total body irradiation, respectively. However, better understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response has allowed the development of several highly promising drugs functioning as scavengers of reactive oxygen species or targeting specific molecules involved in regulation of cell death pathways or cell cycle arrest. The present review describes the major targets for radioprotectors or radiomitigators currently tested in clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Verbesserungen in der Radiotherapie in Kombination mit Chirurgie und Chemotherapie fuehrten zu erhoehten Ueberlebensraten von Tumorpatienten. Trotzdem sind Strahlenfolgen am Normalgewebe weiterhin dosislimitierend. Verschiedene Ansaetze wurden verfolgt, um Substanzen zu entwickeln, die Normalgewebstoxizitaeten verhindern oder verringern. Medikamente, die vor der Radiotherapie verabreicht werden, heissen Radioprotektoren, solche die danach gegeben werden, um langfristige Effekte zu reduzieren, Radiomitigatoren. Trotz mehr als 50 Jahre Forschung ueberwanden nur zwei Substanzen, Amifostin und Palifermin, alle Huerden der klinischen Pruefung und sind fuer die Anwendung waehrend der Radiotherapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren bzw. bei Ganzkoerperbestrahlung zugelassen. Jedoch erlaubte das bessere Verstaendnis der Signalwege

  14. Normal tissue dose conformality measures to guide radiotherapy fractionation decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myerson, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To determine conditions under which hypofractionation could be favorable for a normal tissue--even if tumor [{alpha}/{beta}] exceeds the normal tissue's [{alpha}/{beta}]. Methods: The hypofractionation sufficiency condition (HSC) for an organ is defined as a dose conformality constraint such that, if satisfied, a family of tumor control probability isoeffective fractionation schemes will show decreasing normal tissue complication probability with decreasing number of fractions. Results: In the extended equivalent uniform dose (EUD) model [obtained by replacing dose with linear quadratic (LQ) 2 Gy equivalent dose], the HSC for a normal organ is proven to be satisfied if a suitably weighted average of the relative dose [hypofractionation sufficiency index (HSI)] is less than the ratio of normal tissue to tumor [{alpha}/{beta}]. The HSI is determined solely by dose distribution and the normal tissue volume factor, ''a.'' If the HSC is satisfied for every normal tissue of concern, then there is a therapeutic gain with hypofractionation. The corresponding multifractionation sufficiency condition (therapeutic gain with increasing number of fractions) and multifractionation sufficiency index (MSI) are also derived. A sample clinical case is presented. Conclusions: Within the context of the LQ/EUD models, conformality measures (HSI and MSI) can be used to inform fractionation decisions.

  15. Stem Cell Therapies for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Side Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benderitter, Marc; Caviggioli, Fabio; Chapel, Alain; Coppes, Robert P.; Guha, Chandan; Klinger, Marco; Malard, Olivier; Stewart, Fiona; Tamarat, Radia; Van Luijk, Peter; Limoli, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Targeted irradiation is an effective cancer therapy but damage inflicted to normal tissues surrounding the tumor may cause severe complications. While certain pharmacologic strategies can temper the adverse effects of irradiation, stem cell therapies provide unique opportunities for

  16. Stem Cell Therapies for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Side Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benderitter, Marc; Caviggioli, Fabio; Chapel, Alain; Coppes, Robert P.; Guha, Chandan; Klinger, Marco; Malard, Olivier; Stewart, Fiona; Tamarat, Radia; Van Luijk, Peter; Limoli, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Targeted irradiation is an effective cancer therapy but damage inflicted to normal tissues surrounding the tumor may cause severe complications. While certain pharmacologic strategies can temper the adverse effects of irradiation, stem cell therapies provide unique opportunities for re

  17. Project Lyman

    CERN Document Server

    McCandliss, Stephan R; Blair, William P; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Feldman, Paul D; Meurer, Gerhardt R; Dixon, William V; Sahnow, David J; Neufeld, David A; Lupu, Roxana E; Fleming, Brian; Smee, Stephen A; Andersson, B G; Moseley, Samuel H; Kutyrev, Alexander S; Li, Mary J; Sonneborn, George; Siegmund, Oswald H W; Vallerga, John V; Welsh, Barry Y; Stiavelli, Massimo; Windhorst, Rogier A; Shapley, Alice E

    2008-01-01

    We explore the design of a space mission, Project Lyman, which has the goal of quantifying the ionization history of the universe from the present epoch to a redshift of z ~ 3. Observations from WMAP and SDSS show that before a redshift of z >~ 6 the first collapsed objects, possibly dwarf galaxies, emitted Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation shortward of 912 A, reionizing most of the universe. How LyC escapes from galactic environments, whether it induces positive or negative feedback on the local and global collapse of structures, and the role played by clumping, molecules, metallicity and dust are major unanswered theoretical questions, requiring observational constraint. Numerous intervening Lyman limit systems, which frustrate the detection of LyC from high z objects, thin below z ~ 3 where there are a few objects with apparently very high fesc. At low z there are only controversial detections and a handful of upper limits. A wide-field multi-object spectroscopic survey with moderate spectral and spatial res...

  18. Oxygen delivery in irradiated normal tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiani, M.F.; Ansari, R. [Univ. of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States). School of Biomedical Engineering; Gaber, M.W. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure significantly alters the structure and function of microvascular networks, which regulate delivery of oxygen to tissue. In this study we use a hamster cremaster muscle model to study changes in microvascular network parameters and use a mathematical model to study the effects of these observed structural and microhemodynamic changes in microvascular networks on oxygen delivery to the tissue. Our experimental observations indicate that in microvascular networks while some parameters are significantly affected by irradiation (e.g. red blood cell (RBC) transit time), others remain at the control level (e.g. RBC path length) up to 180 days post-irradiation. The results from our mathematical model indicate that tissue oxygenation patterns are significantly different in irradiated normal tissue as compared to age-matched controls and the differences are apparent as early as 3 days post irradiation. However, oxygen delivery to irradiated tissue was not found to be significantly different from age matched controls at any time between 7 days to 6 months post-irradiation. These findings indicate that microvascular late effects in irradiated normal tissue may be due to factors other than compromised tissue oxygenation. (author)

  19. Lyman Alpha Control

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Daniel Stefaniak

    2015-01-01

    This document gives an overview of how to operate the Lyman Alpha Control application written in LabVIEW along with things to watch out for. Overview of the LabVIEW code itself as well as the physical wiring of and connections from/to the NI PCI-6229 DAQ box is also included. The Lyman Alpha Control application is the interface between the ALPHA sequencer and the HighFinesse Wavelength Meter as well as the Lyman Alpha laser setup. The application measures the wavelength of the output light from the Lyman Alpha cavity through the Wavelength Meter. The application can use the Wavelength Meter’s PID capabilities to stabilize the Lyman Alpha laser output as well as switch between up to three frequencies.

  20. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O' Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  1. Oncopression: gene expression compendium for cancer with matched normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Chulhee

    2017-07-01

    Expression profile of normal tissue is primary source to find genes showing aberrant expression pattern specific in matched cancer tissue, but sample number of normal control in public gene expression repositories is disproportionally small compared to cancer and scattered in several datasets. We built oncopression by integrating several datasets into one large dataset for comprehensive analysis about 25 types of human cancers including 20 640 cancer samples and 6801 normal control profiles. Expression profiles in cancers can be directly compared to normal tissue counterparts. Validity of the integration was tested using immunohistochemical staining results and principal component analysis. We have utilized the pre-release version of oncopression to identify cancer-specific genes in several studies. Free access at http://www.oncopression.com and all expression data are available for download at the site. cchoi@kaist.ac.kr or jungsullee@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Normal tissue toxicity after small field hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Constine Louis S; Milano Michael T; Okunieff Paul

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic body radiation (SBRT) is an emerging tool in radiation oncology in which the targeting accuracy is improved via the detection and processing of a three-dimensional coordinate system that is aligned to the target. With improved targeting accuracy, SBRT allows for the minimization of normal tissue volume exposed to high radiation dose as well as the escalation of fractional dose delivery. The goal of SBRT is to minimize toxicity while maximizing tumor control. This review ...

  3. A Compendium of Canine Normal Tissue Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Briggs; Melissa Paoloni; Qing-Rong Chen; Xinyu Wen; Javed Khan; Chand Khanna

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our understanding of disease is increasingly informed by changes in gene expression between normal and abnormal tissues. The release of the canine genome sequence in 2005 provided an opportunity to better understand human health and disease using the dog as clinically relevant model. Accordingly, we now present the first genome-wide, canine normal tissue gene expression compendium with corresponding human cross-species analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Affymetrix platf...

  4. Ara-C cytokinetic studies in normal tissues in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallavicini, M.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The importance of including normal tissues in the design of cytokinetic-based chemotherapeutic schedules is becoming increasingly apparent. However, the lack of rapid analytical techniques to obtain quantitative cytokinetic data on target subpopulations in heterogenous normal tissues, such as the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic system, has limited the inclusion of these tissues in therapy design. Once target subpopulations are identified and/or discriminated, flow cytometry in conjunction with radioactivity measurements by liquid scintillation counting can be used to rapidly obtain quantitative cytokinetic data during drug therapy. The present paper reviews our current cytokinetic techniques and the applications and limitations of these techniques in the analysis of Ara-C induced perturbations in the small intestine and hematopoetic system. Cell cycle information both prior to and 30 hrs following a single Ara-C treatment was obtained in the intestinal crypts and femoral marrow population using radioactive precursor uptake and flow cytometric techniques. In addition, the relationship between crypt cell survival and animal lethality following Ara-C treatment was determined to better understand the impact of a damage to a regenerative population on the ''clinical endpoint'' of animal survival. Understanding the principles behind the normal tissue toxicity which occurs during multidose treatment will hopefully allow modulation of this toxicity through the rational design of optimal chemotherapeutic schedules.

  5. Ara-C cytokinetic studies in normal tissues in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavicini, M G; Gray, J W

    1982-01-01

    The importance of including normal tissues in the design of cytokinetic-based chemotherapeutic schedules is becoming increasingly apparent. However, the lack of rapid analytical techniques to obtain quantitative cytokinetic data on target subpopulations in heterogenous normal tissues, such as the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic system, has limited the inclusion of these tissues in therapy design. Once target subpopulations are identified and/or discriminated, flow cytometry in conjunction with radioactivity measurements by liquid scintillation counting can be used to rapidly obtain quantitative cytokinetic data during drug therapy. The present paper reviews our current cytokinetic techniques and the applications and limitations of these techniques in the analysis of Ara-C-induced perturbations in the small intestine and hematopoietic system. Cell cycle information both prior to and 30 hrs following a single Ara-C treatment was obtained in the intestinal crypts and femoral marrow population using radioactive precursor uptake and flow cytometric techniques. In addition, the relationship between crypt cell survival and animal lethality following Ara-C treatment was determined to better understand the impact of a damage to a regenerative population on the "clinical endpoint" of animal survival. Understanding the principles behind the normal tissue toxicity which occurs during multidose treatment will hopefully allow modulation of this toxicity through the rational design of optimal chemotherapeutic schedules.

  6. A Compendium of Canine Normal Tissue Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing-Rong; Wen, Xinyu; Khan, Javed; Khanna, Chand

    2011-01-01

    Background Our understanding of disease is increasingly informed by changes in gene expression between normal and abnormal tissues. The release of the canine genome sequence in 2005 provided an opportunity to better understand human health and disease using the dog as clinically relevant model. Accordingly, we now present the first genome-wide, canine normal tissue gene expression compendium with corresponding human cross-species analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings The Affymetrix platform was utilized to catalogue gene expression signatures of 10 normal canine tissues including: liver, kidney, heart, lung, cerebrum, lymph node, spleen, jejunum, pancreas and skeletal muscle. The quality of the database was assessed in several ways. Organ defining gene sets were identified for each tissue and functional enrichment analysis revealed themes consistent with known physio-anatomic functions for each organ. In addition, a comparison of orthologous gene expression between matched canine and human normal tissues uncovered remarkable similarity. To demonstrate the utility of this dataset, novel canine gene annotations were established based on comparative analysis of dog and human tissue selective gene expression and manual curation of canine probeset mapping. Public access, using infrastructure identical to that currently in use for human normal tissues, has been established and allows for additional comparisons across species. Conclusions/Significance These data advance our understanding of the canine genome through a comprehensive analysis of gene expression in a diverse set of tissues, contributing to improved functional annotation that has been lacking. Importantly, it will be used to inform future studies of disease in the dog as a model for human translational research and provides a novel resource to the community at large. PMID:21655323

  7. A compendium of canine normal tissue gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Briggs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our understanding of disease is increasingly informed by changes in gene expression between normal and abnormal tissues. The release of the canine genome sequence in 2005 provided an opportunity to better understand human health and disease using the dog as clinically relevant model. Accordingly, we now present the first genome-wide, canine normal tissue gene expression compendium with corresponding human cross-species analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Affymetrix platform was utilized to catalogue gene expression signatures of 10 normal canine tissues including: liver, kidney, heart, lung, cerebrum, lymph node, spleen, jejunum, pancreas and skeletal muscle. The quality of the database was assessed in several ways. Organ defining gene sets were identified for each tissue and functional enrichment analysis revealed themes consistent with known physio-anatomic functions for each organ. In addition, a comparison of orthologous gene expression between matched canine and human normal tissues uncovered remarkable similarity. To demonstrate the utility of this dataset, novel canine gene annotations were established based on comparative analysis of dog and human tissue selective gene expression and manual curation of canine probeset mapping. Public access, using infrastructure identical to that currently in use for human normal tissues, has been established and allows for additional comparisons across species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data advance our understanding of the canine genome through a comprehensive analysis of gene expression in a diverse set of tissues, contributing to improved functional annotation that has been lacking. Importantly, it will be used to inform future studies of disease in the dog as a model for human translational research and provides a novel resource to the community at large.

  8. Genetic variation in normal tissue toxicity induced by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popanda, Odilia, E-mail: o.popanda@dkfz.de [Division of Epigenomics and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Marquardt, Jens Uwe [Division of Epigenomics and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Chang-Claude, Jenny [Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schmezer, Peter [Division of Epigenomics and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-10

    Radiotherapy is an important weapon in the treatment of cancer, but adverse reactions developing in the co-irradiated normal tissue can be a threat for patients. Early reactions might disturb the usual application schedule and limit the radiation dose. Late appearing and degenerative reactions might reduce or destroy normal tissue function. Genetic markers conferring the ability to identify hyper-sensitive patients in advance would considerably improve therapy. Association studies on genetic variation and occurrence of side effects should help to identify such markers. This survey includes published studies and novel data from our own laboratory. It illustrates the presence of candidate polymorphisms in genes involved in the cellular response to irradiation which could be used as predictive markers for radiosensitivity in breast or prostate cancer patients. For other tumor types such as head and neck cancers or brain tumors, the available data are much more limited. In any case, further validation of these markers is needed in large patient cohorts with systematically recorded data on side effects and patient characteristics. Genetic variation contributing to radiosensitivity should be screened on a broader basis using newly developed, more comprehensive approaches such as genome-wide association studies.

  9. Incorporating Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms Into the Lyman Model to Improve Prediction of Radiation Pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li Minghuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xu Ting; Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yuan Xianglin [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Yu Jinming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu Zhensheng; Yin Ming; Guan Xiaoxiang; Wang Lie; Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Martel, Mary [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with DNA repair, cell cycle, transforming growth factor-{beta}, tumor necrosis factor and receptor, folic acid metabolism, and angiogenesis can significantly improve the fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation pneumonitis (RP) risk among patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Sixteen SNPs from 10 different genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, APEX1, MDM2, TGF{beta}, TNF{alpha}, TNFR, MTHFR, MTRR, and VEGF) were genotyped in 141 NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy. The LKB model was used to estimate the risk of severe (grade {>=}3) RP as a function of mean lung dose (MLD), with SNPs and patient smoking status incorporated into the model as dose-modifying factors. Multivariate analyses were performed by adding significant factors to the MLD model in a forward stepwise procedure, with significance assessed using the likelihood-ratio test. Bootstrap analyses were used to assess the reproducibility of results under variations in the data. Results: Five SNPs were selected for inclusion in the multivariate NTCP model based on MLD alone. SNPs associated with an increased risk of severe RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, TNF{alpha}, XRCC1 and APEX1. With smoking status included in the multivariate model, the SNPs significantly associated with increased risk of RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, and XRCC3. Bootstrap analyses selected a median of 4 SNPs per model fit, with the 6 genes listed above selected most often. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that SNPs can significantly improve the predictive ability of the Lyman MLD model. With a small number of SNPs, it was possible to distinguish cohorts with >50% risk vs <10% risk of RP when they were exposed to high MLDs.

  10. The Lyman alpha reference sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, M.; Östlin, G.; Schaerer, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on new imaging observations of the Lyman alpha emission line (Lyα), performed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that comprise the backbone of the Lyman alpha Reference Sample. We present images of 14 starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.028 Lyman alpha emission line (Lyα), performed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that comprise the backbone of the Lyman alpha Reference Sample. We present images of 14 starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.028

  11. Normal tissue toxicity after small field hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constine Louis S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stereotactic body radiation (SBRT is an emerging tool in radiation oncology in which the targeting accuracy is improved via the detection and processing of a three-dimensional coordinate system that is aligned to the target. With improved targeting accuracy, SBRT allows for the minimization of normal tissue volume exposed to high radiation dose as well as the escalation of fractional dose delivery. The goal of SBRT is to minimize toxicity while maximizing tumor control. This review will discuss the basic principles of SBRT, the radiobiology of hypofractionated radiation and the outcome from published clinical trials of SBRT, with a focus on late toxicity after SBRT. While clinical data has shown SBRT to be safe in most circumstances, more data is needed to refine the ideal dose-volume metrics.

  12. Normal tissue toxicity after small field hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Michael T; Constine, Louis S; Okunieff, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation (SBRT) is an emerging tool in radiation oncology in which the targeting accuracy is improved via the detection and processing of a three-dimensional coordinate system that is aligned to the target. With improved targeting accuracy, SBRT allows for the minimization of normal tissue volume exposed to high radiation dose as well as the escalation of fractional dose delivery. The goal of SBRT is to minimize toxicity while maximizing tumor control. This review will discuss the basic principles of SBRT, the radiobiology of hypofractionated radiation and the outcome from published clinical trials of SBRT, with a focus on late toxicity after SBRT. While clinical data has shown SBRT to be safe in most circumstances, more data is needed to refine the ideal dose-volume metrics. PMID:18976463

  13. EGFR-inhibitors, radiotherapy and normal tissue toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    will be explained with references to the current knowledge of the biology of skin toxicity. Treatment options for acute side-effects in skin and mucosa after bio-radiotherapy is rarely causal. A few attempts have been done; some of them aiming to rephosphorylate the EGFreceptor in the skin with vitamin K3. The talk......EGFR-inhibitors have been used in several clinical settings during the last decade and side-effects related to normal tissues like the skin, mucosa and kidney has been well described. However, when EGFR-inhibitors are combined with radiotherapy, then different skin and mucosa toxicity profiles can...... will discuss the available data from these studies. Across several tumour sites and for different EGFR-inhibitors, a correlation between skin toxicity and tumour response has also been documented. The reason for this correlation is not obvious but probably related to genetic alterations or certain genetic...

  14. Genetic markers for prediction of normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsner, Jan; Andreassen, Christian Nicolaj; Overgaard, Jens

    2008-01-01

    haplotypes, and handling of confounding factors. Finally, candidate gene studies elucidating the genetic component of radiation-induced morbidity and the functional consequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms by studying intermediate phenotypes will be discussed. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Apr......During the last decade, a number of studies have supported the hypothesis that there is an important genetic component to the observed interpatient variability in normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy. This review summarizes the candidate gene association studies published so far on the risk...... of radiation-induced morbidity and highlights some recent successful whole-genome association studies showing feasibility in other research areas. Future genetic association studies are discussed in relation to methodological problems such as the characterization of clinical and biological phenotypes, genetic...

  15. Toward Signaling-Driven Biomarkers Immune to Normal Tissue Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, John C.; Rusay, Matthew; Shan, Roger; Kelton, Conor; Gaykalova, Daria A.; Fertig, Elana J.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ochs, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to discover a minimally invasive pathway-specific biomarker that is immune to normal cell mRNA contamination for diagnosing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Using Elsevier’s MedScan natural language processing component of the Pathway Studio software and the TRANSFAC database, we produced a curated set of genes regulated by the signaling networks driving the development of HNSCC. The network and its gene targets provided prior probabilities for gene expression, which guided our CoGAPS matrix factorization algorithm to isolate patterns related to HNSCC signaling activity from a microarray-based study. Using patterns that distinguished normal from tumor samples, we identified a reduced set of genes to analyze with Top Scoring Pair in order to produce a potential biomarker for HNSCC. Our proposed biomarker comprises targets of the transcription factor (TF) HIF1A and the FOXO family of TFs coupled with genes that show remarkable stability across all normal tissues. Based on validation with novel data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), measured by RNAseq, and bootstrap sampling, the biomarker for normal vs. tumor has an accuracy of 0.77, a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.54, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.82. PMID:26884679

  16. Extensive Hidden Genomic Mosaicism Revealed in Normal Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattathil, Selina; Scheet, Paul

    2016-03-03

    Genomic mosaicism arising from post-zygotic mutation has recently been demonstrated to occur in normal tissue of individuals ascertained with varied phenotypes, indicating that detectable mosaicism may be less an exception than a rule in the general population. A challenge to comprehensive cataloging of mosaic mutations and their consequences is the presence of heterogeneous mixtures of cells, rendering low-frequency clones difficult to discern. Here we applied a computational method using estimated haplotypes to characterize mosaic megabase-scale structural mutations in 31,100 GWA study subjects. We provide in silico validation of 293 previously identified somatic mutations and identify an additional 794 novel mutations, most of which exist at lower aberrant cell fractions than have been demonstrated in previous surveys. These mutations occurred across the genome but in a nonrandom manner, and several chromosomes and loci showed unusual levels of mutation. Our analysis supports recent findings about the relationship between clonal mosaicism and old age. Finally, our results, in which we demonstrate a nearly 3-fold higher rate of clonal mosaicism, suggest that SNP-based population surveys of mosaic structural mutations should be conducted with haplotypes for optimal discovery.

  17. Extensive Hidden Genomic Mosaicism Revealed in Normal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattathil, Selina; Scheet, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Genomic mosaicism arising from post-zygotic mutation has recently been demonstrated to occur in normal tissue of individuals ascertained with varied phenotypes, indicating that detectable mosaicism may be less an exception than a rule in the general population. A challenge to comprehensive cataloging of mosaic mutations and their consequences is the presence of heterogeneous mixtures of cells, rendering low-frequency clones difficult to discern. Here we applied a computational method using estimated haplotypes to characterize mosaic megabase-scale structural mutations in 31,100 GWA study subjects. We provide in silico validation of 293 previously identified somatic mutations and identify an additional 794 novel mutations, most of which exist at lower aberrant cell fractions than have been demonstrated in previous surveys. These mutations occurred across the genome but in a nonrandom manner, and several chromosomes and loci showed unusual levels of mutation. Our analysis supports recent findings about the relationship between clonal mosaicism and old age. Finally, our results, in which we demonstrate a nearly 3-fold higher rate of clonal mosaicism, suggest that SNP-based population surveys of mosaic structural mutations should be conducted with haplotypes for optimal discovery. PMID:26942289

  18. Radiation effect in normal tissue. Principles of damage and protection; Strahlenwirkung am Normalgewebe. Prinzipien der Schaedigung und Protektion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Onkologie

    2010-07-01

    The curative effectivity of external or internal radiotherapy necessitates exposure of normal tissues with significant radiation doses, and hence must be associated with an accepted rate of side effects. These complications can not a priori be considered as an indication of a too aggressive therapy. Based on the time of first diagnosis, early (acute) and late (chronic) radiation sequelae in normal tissues can be distinguished. Early reactions per definition occur within 90 days after onset of the radiation exposure. They are based on impairment of cell production in turnover tissues, which in face of ongoing cell loss results in hypoplasia and eventually a complete loss of functional cells. The latent time is largely independent of dose and is defined by tissue biology (turnover time). Usually, complete healing of early reactions is observed. Late radiation effects can occur after symptom-free latent times of months to many years, with an inverse dependence of latency on dose. Late normal tissue changes are progressive and usually irreversible. They are based on a complex interaction of damage to various cell populations (organ parenchyma, connective tissue, capillaries), with a contribution from macrophages. Late effects are sensitive for a reduction in dose rate (recovery effects). A number of biologically based strategies for protection of normal tissues or for amelioration of radiation effects was and still is tested in experimental systems, yet, only a small fraction of these approaches has so far been introduced into clinical studies. One advantage of most of the methods is that they may be effective even if the treatment starts way after the end of radiation exposure. For a clinical exploitation, hence, the availability of early indicators for the progression of subclinical damage in the individual patient would be desirable. Moreover, there is need to further investigate the molecular pathogenesis of normal tissue effects in more detail, in order to

  19. SU-D-18A-04: Quantifying the Ability of Tumor Tracking to Spare Normal Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, A; Buzurovic, I; Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Lewis, J [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Center, Harvard Medical Sc, Boston, MA (United States); Mishra, P [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Seco, J [Mass General Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumor tracking allows for smaller tissue volumes to be treated, potentially reducing normal tissue damage. However, tumor tracking is a more complex treatment and has little benefit in some scenarios. Here we quantify the benefit of tumor tracking for a range of patients by estimating the dose of radiation to organs at risk and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for both standard and tracking treatment plans. This comparison is performed using both patient 4DCT data and extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) digital phantoms. Methods: We use 4DCT data for 10 patients. Additionally, we generate digital phantoms with motion derived from measured patient long tumor trajectories to compare standard and tracking treatment plans. The standard treatment is based on the average intensity projection (AIP) of 4DCT images taken over a breath cycle. The tracking treatment is based on doses calculated on images representing the anatomy at each time point. It is assumed that there are no errors in tracking the target. The NTCP values are calculated based on RTOG guidelines. Results: The mean reduction in the mean dose delivered was 5.5% to the lungs (from 7.3 Gy to 6.9 Gy) and 4.0% to the heart (from 12.5 Gy to 12.0 Gy). The mean reduction in the max dose delivered was 13% to the spinal cord (from 27.6 Gy to 24.0 Gy), 2.5% to the carina (from 31.7 Gy to 30.9 Gy), and 15% to the esophagus (from 69.6 Gy to 58.9 Gy). The mean reduction in the probability of 2nd degree radiation pneumonitis (RP) was 8.7% (3.1% to 2.8%) and the mean reduction in the effective volume was 6.8% (10.8% to 10.2%). Conclusions: Tumor tracking has the potential to reduce irradiation of organs at risk, and consequentially reduce the normal tissue complication probability. The benefits vary based on the clinical scenario. This study is supported by Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  20. Influence of daily imaging on plan quality and normal tissue toxicity for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katharina; Heitfeld, Marina; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian; Dzierma, Yvonne

    2017-01-10

    Modern radiotherapy offers various possibilities for image guided verification of patient positioning. Different clinically relevant IGRT (image guided radiotherapy) scenarios were considered with regard to their influence on dosimetric plan quality and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). This study is based on treatment plans of 50 prostate patients. We evaluate the clinically performed IGRT and simulate the influence of different daily IGRT scenarios on plan quality. Imaging doses of planar and cone-beam-CT (CBCT) images for three different energies (6 MV, 1 MV and 121 kV) were added to the treatment plans. The plan quality of the different scenarios was assessed by a visual inspection of the dose distribution and dose-volume-histogram (DVH) and a statistical analysis of DVH criteria. In addition, an assessment of the normal tissue complication probability was performed. Daily 1MV-CBCTs result in undesirable high dose regions in the target volume. The DVH shows that the scenarios with actual imaging performed, daily kV-CBCT and daily 6MV imaging (1x CBCT, 4x planar images per week) do not differ exceedingly from the original plan; especially imaging with daily kV-CBCT has little influence to the sparing of organs at risk. In contrast, daily 1MV- CBCT entails an additional dose of up to two fraction doses. Due to the additional dose amount some DVH constraints for plan acceptability could no longer be satisfied, especially for the daily 1MV-CBCT scenario. This scenario also shows increased NTCP for the rectum. Daily kV-CBCT has negligible influence on plan quality and is commendable for the clinical routine. If no kV-modality is available, a daily IGRT scenario with one CBCT per week and planar axial images on the other days should be preferred over daily MV-CBCT.

  1. Volume effects of late term normal tissue toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonta, Dacian Viorel

    Modeling of volume effects for treatment toxicity is paramount for optimization of radiation therapy. This thesis proposes a new model for calculating volume effects in gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. The radiobiological and the pathological basis for this model and its relationship to other models are detailed. A review of the radiobiological experiments and published clinical data identified salient features and specific properties a biologically adequate model has to conform to. The new model was fit to a set of actual clinical data. In order to verify the goodness of fit, two established NTCP models and a non-NTCP measure for complication risk were fitted to the same clinical data. The method of fit for the model parameters was maximum likelihood estimation. Within the framework of the maximum likelihood approach I estimated the parameter uncertainties for each complication prediction model. The quality-of-fit was determined using the Aikaike Information Criterion. Based on the model that provided the best fit, I identified the volume effects for both types of toxicities. Computer-based bootstrap resampling of the original dataset was used to estimate the bias and variance for the fitted parameter values. Computer simulation was also used to estimate the population size that generates a specific uncertainty level (3%) in the value of predicted complication probability. The same method was used to estimate the size of the patient population needed for accurate choice of the model underlying the NTCP. The results indicate that, depending on the number of parameters of a specific NTCP model, 100 (for two parameter models) and 500 patients (for three parameter models) are needed for accurate parameter fit. Correlation of complication occurrence in patients was also investigated. The results suggest that complication outcomes are correlated in a patient, although

  2. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: Samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Carrington, Rhys [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  3. Late-responding normal tissue cells benefit from high-precision radiotherapy with prolonged fraction delivery times via enhanced autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiwei; Zheng, Rong; Xie, Guozhu; Liao, Guixiang; Du, Shasha; Ren, Chen; Li, Rong; Lin, Xiaoshan; Hu, Daokun; Yuan, Yawei

    2015-01-01

    High-precision radiotherapy (HPR) has established its important role in the treatment of tumors due to its precise dose distribution. Given its more complicated delivery process, HPR commonly requires more fraction delivery time (FDT). However, it is unknown whether it has an identical response of prolonged FDT on different normal tissues. Our results showed that fractionated irradiation with prolonged FDTs (15, 36, and 50 minutes) enhanced cell surviving fractions for normal tissue cells compared with irradiation with an FDT of 2 minutes. However, the late-responding normal cell line HEI-OC1 was more responsive to prolonged FDTs and demonstrated higher surviving fractions and significantly decreased apoptosis and DNA damage compared to the acute-responding normal cell line HaCaT. Increased autophagy mediated via the ATM-AMPK pathway was observed in HEI-OC1 cells compared with HaCaT cells when irradiated with prolonged FDTs. Furthermore, treatment with the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or ATM inhibitor KU55933 resulted in enhanced ROS accumulation and attenuation of the effect of prolonged FDT-mediated protection on irradiated HEI-OC1 cells. Our results indicated that late-responding normal tissue cells benefitted more from prolonged FDTs compared with acute-responding tissue cells, which was mainly attributed to enhanced cytoprotective autophagy mediated via the ATM/AMPK signaling pathway. PMID:25766900

  4. Simulating the Lyman Alpha Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Machacek, M E; Anninos, P; Meiksin, A; Norman, M L; Machacek, Marie E.; Bryan, Greg L.; Anninos, Peter; Meiksin, Avery; Norman, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we review the importance of the Lyman alpha forest as a probe of structure formation in the universe. We first discuss the statistics used to describe the Lyman alpha forest and the numerical techniques used to produce simulated spectra of the forest from a given cosmological model. We then discuss the physical picture of the absorbing structures that emerges from these numerical simulations. Finally, we comment on how two of the statistics, the slope of the column density distribution and the b parameter distribution, may be used to constrain competing cosmologies.

  5. Estimate of normal tissue damage in treatment planning for stereotactic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benassi, M. (Laboratorio Fisica Medica e Sistemi Esperti, C.R.S., Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Begnozzi, L. (Laboratorio Fisica Medica e Sistemi Esperti, C.R.S., Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Gentile, F.P. (Laboratorio Fisica Medica e Sistemi Esperti, C.R.S., Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Chiatti, L. (Laboratorio Fisica Medica e Sistemi Esperti, C.R.S., Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Carpino, S. (Laboratorio Fisica Medica e Sistemi Esperti, C.R.S., Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy))

    1993-10-01

    A personal computer (PC) system was developed to perform treatment planning for radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy. These techniques of irradiation of the brain may be accomplished with a linear accelerator by performing several non-coplanar arcs of a highly collimated beam focused at a fixed point. The PC system allows the acquisition, reconstruction and the visualization of the target volume from CT or MR images, and then it permits to calculate a three-dimensional (3-D) dose distribution due to small photon beams and to visualize it. The software calculates not only total dose distribution, administered fractionated or in single fraction, but also in NTD2 (normalized total dose) predicted to have a biological effect equivalent to the single irradiation. The choice of the best technique is supported by the dose volume histograms (DVH) calculation and by an estimate of complication probability to the brain normal tissue (NTCP). The algorithm for NTCP calculation is based on two models: The linear quadratic and the logistic. A comparison of three different dose calculations for a typical cerebral target volume is presented to demonstrate the system performances. (orig.)

  6. Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC): An Introduction to the Scientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, Søren M.; Constine, Louis S.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Eisbruch, Avi; Jackson, Andrew; Marks, Lawrence B.; Haken, Randall K. Ten; Yorke, Ellen D.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in dose/volume/outcome (or normal tissue complication probability, NTCP) modeling since the seminal Emami paper from 1991 are reviewed. There has been some progress with an increasing number of studies on large patient samples with three-dimensional dosimetry. Nevertheless, NTCP models are not ideal. Issues related to the grading of side effects, selection of appropriate statistical methods, testing of internal and external model validity, and quantification of predictive power and statistical uncertainty, all limit the usefulness of much of the published literature. Synthesis (meta-analysis) of data from multiple studies is often impossible due to sub-optimal primary analysis, insufficient reporting and variations in the models and predictors analyzed. Clinical limitations to the current knowledge-base includes the need for more data on the effect of patient-related co-factors, interactions between dose-distribution and cytotoxic or molecular targeted agents, and the effect of dose fractions and overall treatment time in relation to non-uniform dose distributions. Research priorities for the next 5 to 10 years are proposed. PMID:20171515

  7. Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC): an introduction to the scientific issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, Søren M; Constine, Louis S; Deasy, Joseph O; Eisbruch, Avi; Jackson, Andrew; Marks, Lawrence B; Ten Haken, Randall K; Yorke, Ellen D

    2010-03-01

    Advances in dose-volume/outcome (or normal tissue complication probability, NTCP) modeling since the seminal Emami paper from 1991 are reviewed. There has been some progress with an increasing number of studies on large patient samples with three-dimensional dosimetry. Nevertheless, NTCP models are not ideal. Issues related to the grading of side effects, selection of appropriate statistical methods, testing of internal and external model validity, and quantification of predictive power and statistical uncertainty, all limit the usefulness of much of the published literature. Synthesis (meta-analysis) of data from multiple studies is often impossible because of suboptimal primary analysis, insufficient reporting and variations in the models and predictors analyzed. Clinical limitations to the current knowledge base include the need for more data on the effect of patient-related cofactors, interactions between dose distribution and cytotoxic or molecular targeted agents, and the effect of dose fractions and overall treatment time in relation to nonuniform dose distributions. Research priorities for the next 5-10 years are proposed.

  8. What Powers Lyman alpha Blobs?

    CERN Document Server

    Ao, Y; Beelen, A; Henkel, C; Cen, R; De Breuck, C; Francis, P; Kovacs, A; Lagache, G; Lehnert, M; Mao, M; Menten, K M; Norris, R; Omont, A; Tatemastu, K; Weiss, A; Zheng, Z

    2015-01-01

    Lyman alpha blobs (LABs) are spatially extended lyman alpha nebulae seen at high redshift. The origin of Lyman alpha emission in the LABs is still unclear and under debate. To study their heating mechanism(s), we present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of the 20 cm radio emission and Herschel PACS and SPIRE measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) emission towards the four LABs in the protocluster J2143-4423 at z=2.38. Among the four LABs, B6 and B7 are detected in the radio with fluxes of 67+/-17 microJy and 77+/-16 microJy, respectively, and B5 is marginally detected at 3 sigma (51+/-16 microJy). For all detected sources, their radio positions are consistent with the central positions of the LABs. B6 and B7 are obviously also detected in the FIR. By fitting the data with different templates, we obtained redshifts of 2.20$^{+0.30}_{-0.35}$ for B6 and 2.20$^{+0.45}_{-0.30}$ for B7 which are consistent with the redshift of the lyman alpha emission within uncertainties, indicating that both ...

  9. Distinct Effects of Ionizing Radiation on In vivo Murine Kidney and Brain Normal Tissue Gene Expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weiling Zhao; Eric Y. Chuang; Mark Mishra; Rania Awwad; Kheem Bisht; Lunching Sun; Phuongmai Nguyen; J. Daniel Pennington; Tony Jau Cheng Wang; C. Matthew Bradbury; Lei Huang; Zhijun Chen; Gil Bar-Sela; Michael E.C. Robbins; David Gius

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing awareness that radiation-induced normal tissue injury in late-responding organs, such as the brain, kidney, and lung, involves complex and dynamic responses between multiple cell...

  10. Mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity and implications for future clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae Ho; Jenrow, Kenneth A; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    To summarize current knowledge regarding mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue injury and medical countermeasures available to reduce its severity. Advances in radiation delivery using megavoltage and intensity-modulated radiation therapy have permitted delivery of higher doses of radiation to well-defined tumor target tissues. Injury to critical normal tissues and organs, however, poses substantial risks in the curative treatment of cancers, especially when radiation is administered ...

  11. Normal tissue studies in radiation oncology: A systematic review of highly cited articles and citation patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Nieder, Carsten; Andratschke, Nicolaus H.; GROSU, ANCA L.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the cornerstones of modern multidisciplinary cancer treatment. Normal tissue tolerance is critical as radiation-induced side effects may compromise organ function and quality of life. The importance of normal tissue research is reflected by the large number of scientific articles, which have been published between 2006 and 2010. The present study identified important areas of research as well as seminal publications. The article citation rate is among the potential...

  12. The normal tissue sparing obtained with simultaneous treatment of pelvic lymph nodes and bladder using intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soendergaard, Jimmi; Hoeyer, Morten; Wright, Pauliina; Grau, Cai; Muren, Ludvig Paul (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)); Petersen, Joergen B. (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2009-02-15

    We have implemented an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol for simultaneous irradiation of bladder and lymph nodes. In this report, doses to normal tissue from IMRT and our previous conformal sequential boost technique are compared. Material and methods. Sixteen patients with urinary bladder cancer were treated using a six-field dynamic IMRT beam arrangement delivering 60 Gy to the bladder and 48 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for relevant normal tissues (bowel, bowel cavity, rectum and femoral heads) for the IMRT plans were compared with corresponding DVHs from our previous conformal sequential boost technique. Calculations of the generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose (gEUD) were performed for the bowel, with a reference volume of 200 cm3 and a volume effect parameter k = 4, as well as for the rectum, using k = 12. Acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) RTOG toxicity was recorded. Results. Statistical significant normal tissue sparing was obtained by IMRT. For the bowel, a significant reduction was obtained at all dose levels between 20 and 50 Gy (p < 0.05), e.g. from 180 to 121 cm3 at 50 Gy, while the gEUD was reduced from 58 to 53 Gy (p < 0.05). Similar patterns were seen for the bowel cavity. For the rectum, IMRT reduced the maximum dose as well as the volumes receiving more than 50 and 60 Gy (p < 0.05), e.g. from 72 to 48 cm3 at 50 Gy. The rectum gEUD was reduced from 55 to 53 Gy (p < 0.05). For the femoral heads, IMRT reduced the maximum dose as well as the volumes above all dose levels. The rate of acute peak Grade 2 GI RTOG complications was 38% after IMRT. Conclusion. IMRT to the urinary bladder and elective lymph nodes result in considerable normal tissue sparing compared to conformal sequential boost technique. This has paved the way for further studies combining IMRT with image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in bladder cancer.

  13. Selective radioprotection of normal tissues by bowman-birk proteinase inhibitor (BBI) in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittmann, K.; Toulany, M.; Peter Rodemann, H. [Div. of Radiobiology and Environmental Research, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Classen, J.; Heinrich, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Milas, L. [Dept. of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The Univ. of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Background and purpose: the efficacy of radiotherapy is limited by the response of normal tissues within the radiation field. The application of normal-tissue-specific radioprotectors may improve the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to explore the in vivo normal-tissue radioprotective potential of Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor (BBI), which acts as a normal-cell-specific radioprotector in vitro. Material and methods: the leg contracture assay in mice, a model system assessing radiation-induced fibrotic processes, was used. To determine whether BBI acts also as a radioprotector of tumors (i.e., FSA and FSAII), the tumor growth delay assay was used. Results: radiation induced leg contracture in mice with a maximum of about 8 mm at day 150 after irradiation. Treatment of mice with 100 mg/kg BBI before irradiation reduced leg contracture by > 4 mm, by about 50% (p < 0.05, t-test). Doses < 100 mg/kg were ineffective, and doses > 100 mg/kg did not further increase the degree of radioprotection. By contrast, BBI did not induce radioprotection of either TP53-mutated FSA or TP53-normal FSAII tumor xenografts in mice, which argues for normal-tissue-specific effect. Conclusion: BBI acts as a potent selective normal-tissue radioprotector in vitro and in vivo, apparently without protecting tumors, and thus has the potential to improve clinical radiotherapy. (orig.)

  14. Improved normal tissue protection by proton and X-ray microchannels compared to homogeneous field irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girst, S; Marx, C; Bräuer-Krisch, E; Bravin, A; Bartzsch, S; Oelfke, U; Greubel, C; Reindl, J; Siebenwirth, C; Zlobinskaya, O; Multhoff, G; Dollinger, G; Schmid, T E; Wilkens, J J

    2015-09-01

    The risk of developing normal tissue injuries often limits the radiation dose that can be applied to the tumour in radiation therapy. Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), a spatially fractionated photon radiotherapy is currently tested at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) to improve normal tissue protection. MRT utilizes an array of microscopically thin and nearly parallel X-ray beams that are generated by a synchrotron. At the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich focused proton microbeams ("proton microchannels") are studied to improve normal tissue protection. Here, we comparatively investigate microbeam/microchannel irradiations with sub-millimetre X-ray versus proton beams to minimize the risk of normal tissue damage in a human skin model, in vitro. Skin tissues were irradiated with a mean dose of 2 Gy over the irradiated area either with parallel synchrotron-generated X-ray beams at the ESRF or with 20 MeV protons at SNAKE using four different irradiation modes: homogeneous field, parallel lines and microchannel applications using two different channel sizes. Normal tissue viability as determined in an MTT test was significantly higher after proton or X-ray microchannel irradiation compared to a homogeneous field irradiation. In line with these findings genetic damage, as determined by the measurement of micronuclei in keratinocytes, was significantly reduced after proton or X-ray microchannel compared to a homogeneous field irradiation. Our data show that skin irradiation using either X-ray or proton microchannels maintain a higher cell viability and DNA integrity compared to a homogeneous irradiation, and thus might improve normal tissue protection after radiation therapy.

  15. Stem Cell Therapy to Reduce Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, Rob P.; van der Goot, Annemieke; Lombaert, Isabelle M. A.

    Normal tissue damage after radiotherapy is still a major problem in cancer treatment. Stem cell therapy may provide a means to reduce radiation-induced side effects and improve the quality of life of patients. This review discusses the current status in stem cell research with respect to their

  16. Tumor control and normal tissue toxicity: The two faces of radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oorschot, B.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis discusses the two contrasting sides of radiotherapy: tumor control and normal tissue toxicity. On one hand, radiation treatment aims to target the tumor with the highest possible radiation dose, inducing as much lethal DNA damage as possible. On the other hand however, escalation of the

  17. Lyman Alpha Spicule Observatory (LASO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, P. C.; Allred, J. C.; Airapetian, V.; Gong, Q.; Mcintosh, S. W.; De Pontieu, B.; Fontenla, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Lyman Alpha Spicule Observatory (LASO) sounding rocket will observe small-scale eruptive events called "Rapid Blue-shifted Events" (RBEs) [Rouppe van der Voort et al., 2009], the on-disk equivalent of Type-II spicules, and extend observations that explore their role in the solar coronal heating problem [De Pontieu et al., 2011]. LASO utilizes a new and novel optical design to simultaneously observe two spatial dimensions at 4.2" spatial resolution (2.1" pixels) over a 2'x2' field of view with high spectral resolution of 66mÅ (33mÅ pixels) across a broad 20Å spectral window. This spectral window contains three strong chromospheric and transition region emissions and is centered on the strong Hydrogen Lyman-α emission at 1216Å. This instrument makes it possible to obtain new data crucial to the physical understanding of these phenomena and their role in the overall energy and momentum balance from the upper chromosphere to lower corona. LASO was submitted March 2011 in response to the ROSES SHP-LCAS call.

  18. SU-E-J-264: Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Derived Features to Quantify Radiotherapy-Induced Normal Tissue Morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thor, M; Tyagi, N; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-derived features as indicators of Radiotherapy (RT)-induced normal tissue morbidity. We also investigate the relationship between these features and RT dose in four critical structures. Methods: We demonstrate our approach for four patients treated with RT for base of tongue cancer in 2005–2007. For each patient, two MRI scans (T1-weighted pre (T1pre) and post (T1post) gadolinium contrast-enhancement) were acquired within the first six months after RT. The assessed morbidity endpoint observed in 2/4 patients was Grade 2+ CTCAEv.3 trismus. Four ipsilateral masticatory-related structures (masseter, lateral and medial pterygoid, and the temporal muscles) were delineated on both T1pre and T1post and these scans were co-registered to the treatment planning CT using a deformable demons algorithm. For each structure, the maximum and mean RT dose, and six MRI-derived features (the second order texture features entropy and homogeneity, and the first order mean, median, kurtosis, and skewness) were extracted and compared structure-wise between patients with and without trismus. All MRI-derived features were calculated as the difference between T1pre and T1post, ΔS. Results: For 5/6 features and all structures, ΔS diverged between trismus and non-trismus patients particularly for the masseter, lateral pterygoid, and temporal muscles using the kurtosis feature (−0.2 vs. 6.4 for lateral pterygoid). Both the maximum and mean RT dose in all four muscles were higher amongst the trismus patients (with the maximum dose being up to 25 Gy higher). Conclusion: Using MRI-derived features to quantify RT-induced normal tissue complications is feasible. We showed that several features are different between patients with and without morbidity and that the RT dose in all investigated structures are higher amongst patients with morbidity. MRI-derived features, therefore, has the potential to

  19. Lyman-alpha emission in star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Lee W.; Huchra, John P.; Geller, Margaret J.; O'Brien, Paul; Wilson, Robert

    1988-01-01

    IUE observations of five blue, low-metallicity, star-forming galaxies sufficiently redshifted to permit detection of Lyman-alpha are reported. The galaxies with metallicities 0.1 time solar or more have weak or absent Lyman-alpha emission. There is evidence for increasing Lyman-alpha emission with decreasing metallicity. The reduction of Lyman-alpha fluxes from recombination values is attributed to absorption of multiply scattered Lyman-alpha by dust.

  20. Clinical objectives and normal tissue responses in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peckham, M.J.; Collis, C.H. (Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (UK). Surrey Branch; Royal Marsden Hospital, London (UK))

    1981-01-01

    It is clear that the risk of toxicity to normal tissues in combined therapy is reduced by separating drug administration and radiation exposure in time. The short-term interaction of drugs and radiation aimed at producing enhanced tumour cell kill is difficult to demonstrate in vivo in animal experiments and unlikely to be important in clinical practice. Increased toxicity of normal tissues in man has been manifest both in terms of early and late reactions and probably also in carcinogenesis. In the latter context choice of drug and possibly sequencing may be important in minimising the risk of tumour induction. There are few experimental studies examining moderately long time intervals between drug and radiation exposure. The administration of chemotherapy prior to irradiation may be less toxic than the converse sequence, although clinical data supporting this contention are limited at the present time.

  1. Indentation loading response of a resonance sensor--discriminating prostate cancer and normal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalkanen, Ville; Andersson, Britt M; Bergh, Anders; Ljungberg, Börje; Lindahl, Olof A

    2013-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men worldwide. Mechanical properties of prostate tissue are promising for distinguishing prostate cancer from healthy prostate tissue. The aim was to investigate the indentation loading response of a resonance sensor for discriminating prostate cancer tissue from normal tissue. Indentation measurements were done on prostate tissue specimens ex vivo from 10 patients from radical prostatectomy. The measurement areas were analysed using standard histological methods. The stiffness parameter was linearly dependent on the loading force (average R(2 )= 0.90) and an increased loading force caused a greater stiffness contrast of prostate cancer vs normal tissue. The accuracy of the stiffness contrast was assessed by the ROC curve with the area under the curve being 0.941 for a loading force of 12.8 mN. The results are promising for the development of a resonance sensor instrument for detecting prostate cancer.

  2. Normal tissue studies in radiation oncology: A systematic review of highly cited articles and citation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Carsten; Andratschke, Nicolaus H; Grosu, Anca L

    2014-09-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the cornerstones of modern multidisciplinary cancer treatment. Normal tissue tolerance is critical as radiation-induced side effects may compromise organ function and quality of life. The importance of normal tissue research is reflected by the large number of scientific articles, which have been published between 2006 and 2010. The present study identified important areas of research as well as seminal publications. The article citation rate is among the potential indicators of scientific impact. Highly cited articles, arbitrarily defined as those with ≥15 citations, were identified via a systematic search of the citation database, Scopus. Up to 608 articles per year were published between 2006 and 2010, however, distribution, clinical prevention or mitigation studies are critical and must receive higher priority, funding and attention.

  3. MicroRNA and target gene expression based clustering of oral cancer, precancer and normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Roshni; Singh, Richa; Chattopadhyay, Esita; Ray, Anindita; Sarkar, Navonil De; Aich, Ritesh; Paul, Ranjan Rashmi; Pal, Mousumi; Roy, Bidyut

    2016-11-15

    Development of oral cancer is usually preceded by precancerous lesion. Despite histopathological diagnosis, development of disease specific biomarkers continues to be a promising field of study. Expression of miRNAs and their target genes was studied in oral cancer and two types of precancer lesions to look for disease specific gene expression patterns. Expression of miR-26a, miR-29a, miR-34b and miR-423 and their 11 target genes were determined in 20 oral leukoplakia, 20 lichen planus and 20 cancer tissues with respect to 20 normal tissues using qPCR assay. Expression data were, then, used for cluster analysis of normal as well as disease tissues. Expression of miR-26a and miR-29a was significantly down regulated in leukoplakia and cancer tissues but up regulated in lichen planus tissues. Expression of target genes such as, ADAMTS7, ATP1B1, COL4A2, CPEB3, CDK6, DNMT3a and PI3KR1 was significantly down regulated in at least two of three disease types with respect to normal tissues. Negative correlations between expression levels of miRNAs and their targets were observed in normal tissues but not in disease tissues implying altered miRNA-target interaction in disease state. Specific expression profile of miRNAs and target genes formed separate clusters of normal, lichen planus and cancer tissues. Our results suggest that alterations in expression of selected miRNAs and target genes may play important roles in development of precancer to cancer. Expression profiles of miRNA and target genes may be useful to differentiate cancer and lichen planus from normal tissues, thereby bolstering their role in diagnostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Induction in myeloid leukemic cells of genes that are expressed in different normal tissues

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Using DNA microarray and cluster analysis of expressed genes in a cloned line (M1-t-p53) of myeloid leukemic cells, we have analyzed the expression of genes that are preferentially expressed in different normal tissues. Clustering of 547 highly expressed genes in these leukemic cells showed 38 genes preferentially expressed in normal hematopoietic tissues and 122 other genes preferentially expressed in different normal non-hematopoietic tissues including neuronal tissues, muscle, liver and te...

  5. Plasminogen activators in normal tissue and carcinomas of the human oesophagus and stomach.

    OpenAIRE

    Sier, C. F.; Verspaget, H W; Griffioen, G.; GANESH, S.; Vloedgraven, H. J.; Lamers, C B

    1993-01-01

    Carcinogenesis in the human colon is associated with a marked increase of urokinase type plasminogen activator and a decrease of tissue type plasminogen activator. This study was performed to determine the concentrations of urokinase type plasminogen activator and tissue type plasminogen activator in normal tissue and carcinomas along the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract. Activity and antigen levels of both activators were determined in homogenates of endoscopically obtained biopsies ...

  6. EXPRESSION MECHANISM AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF NOB1 IN GASTRIC CANCER TISSUE AND ADJACENT NORMAL TISSUE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W-P; Liu, X; Yang, Y; Liu, Y-F

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the effect and relationship of NOB1 in the development of gastric cancer, based on an analysis of NOB1expression in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent tissue. Thirty gastric cancer tissue samples taken during surgery with complete pathological data and their related adjacent normal tissue were examined in this study. NOB1 protein expression in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Real-time PCR was used to detect NOB1 mRNA expression, which provided a basis on which to explore the clinical pathological characteristics for patients with gastric cancer. Results show that NOB1 protein in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue were diffusely expressed both in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The positive expression rate in gastric cancer tissue was 73%, higher than that in adjacent normal tissue (47%). Both the reference NAPDH and NOB1 amplification are reflected in the amplification curve in standard S-shape and the unimodal solubility curve which was not altered by non-specific amplification and primer dimer. NOB1 mRNA relative expression in cancer tissue was 4.899∓1.412. NOB1 expression had no direct relationship with the patients’ age, gender, tumor differentiation or infiltration degree, lymphatic metastasis, distant metastasis nor pTNM periodization, but was directly related to the size of the tumor. All the findings in this paper suggest that NOB1 can be one of the focuses for diagnosing and treating gastric cancer and that its protein expression is likely to increase with the growth of tumor, thus playing a great role in the incidence and development of gastric cancer.

  7. High quality and quantity Genome-wide germline genotypes from FFPE normal tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgelas Ann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although collections of formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE samples exist, sometimes representing decades of stored samples, they have not typically been utilized to their full potential. Normal tissue from such samples would be extremely valuable for generation of genotype data for individuals who cannot otherwise provide a DNA sample. Findings We extracted DNA from normal tissue identified in FFPE tissue blocks from prostate surgery and obtained complete genome wide genotype data for over 500,000 SNP markers for these samples, and for DNA extracted from whole blood for 2 of the cases, for comparison. Four of the five FFPE samples of varying age and amount of tissue had identifiable normal tissue. We obtained good quality genotype data for between 89 and 99% of all SNP markers for the 4 samples from FFPE. Concordance rates of over 99% were observed for the 2 samples with DNA from both FFPE and from whole blood. Conclusions DNA extracted from normal FFPE tissue provides excellent quality and quantity genome-wide genotyping data representing germline DNA, sufficient for both linkage and association analyses. This allows genetic analysis of informative individuals who are no longer available for sampling in genetic studies.

  8. Mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity and implications for future clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Ho; Jenrow, Kenneth A.; Brown, Stephen L. [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit (United States)

    2014-09-15

    To summarize current knowledge regarding mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue injury and medical countermeasures available to reduce its severity. Advances in radiation delivery using megavoltage and intensity-modulated radiation therapy have permitted delivery of higher doses of radiation to well-defined tumor target tissues. Injury to critical normal tissues and organs, however, poses substantial risks in the curative treatment of cancers, especially when radiation is administered in combination with chemotherapy. The principal pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of tissue stem cells and progenitor cells and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Emerging concepts of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity suggest that the recovery and repopulation of stromal stem cells remain chronically impaired by long-lived free radicals, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines resulting in progressive damage after radiation exposure. Better understanding the mechanisms mediating interactions among excessive generation of reactive oxygen species, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated macrophages, and role of bone marrow-derived progenitor and stem cells may provide novel insight on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury of tissues. Further understanding the molecular signaling pathways of cytokines and chemokines would reveal novel targets for protecting or mitigating radiation injury of tissues and organs.

  9. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 2. Normal tissue specific sites and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue sites in the human body. Considers in detail the detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects and discusses prognostic outcomes. Clearly presents radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects. Provides the most current evidence-based medicine for cancer care survivorship guidelines. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 2 of this two-volume work comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue anatomic sites in the human body. The detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects are all considered in detail, and prognostic outcomes are discussed. Radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects are clearly presented. The text is accompanied by numerous supportive illustrations and tables.

  10. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Liver; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: le foie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bari, B.; Mornex, F. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1 et EA3738, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Pointreau, Y. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital Bretonneau, CHU de Tours, centre regional universitaire de cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, 37 - Tours (France); Rio, E. [Service de radiotherapie, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer Nantes-Atlantique, 44 - Saint-Herblain (France); Mirabel, X. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, 59 - Lille (France)

    2010-07-15

    The liver is a large abdominal organ in the right hypondrium. Because of its anatomical situation, it is near many abdominal PTVs as well as some lower thoracic PVTs. The liver could also be at the same time the target (for irradiation of liver metastases or primary liver tumours) and organ at risk (OAR). Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is radio-biologically the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), i.e., the clinical event limiting the total dose that could be delivered. This review describes radiobiological criteria justifying the NTCP data, and recommendations for conformal 3D radiotherapy and stereotactic liver irradiation. (authors)

  11. Intraoperative near-infrared imaging can distinguish cancer from normal tissue but not inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Holt

    Full Text Available Defining tumor from non-tumor tissue is one of the major challenges of cancer surgery. Surgeons depend on visual and tactile clues to select which tissues should be removed from a patient. Recently, we and others have hypothesized near-infrared (NIR imaging can be used during surgery to differentiate tumors from normal tissue.We enrolled 8 canines and 5 humans undergoing cancer surgery for NIR imaging. The patients were injected with indocyanine green (ICG, an FDA approved non-receptor specific NIR dye that accumulates in hyperpermeable tissues, 16-24 hours prior to surgery. During surgery, NIR imaging was used to discriminate the tumor from non-tumor tissue.NIR imaging identified all tumors with a mean signal-to-background ratio of 6.7. Optical images were useful during surgery in discriminating normal tissue from cancer. In 3 canine cases and 1 human case, the tissue surrounding the tumor was inflamed due to obstruction of the vascular supply due to mass effect. In these instances, NIR imaging could not distinguish tumor tissue from tissue that was congested, edematous and did not contain cancer.This study shows that NIR imaging can identify tumors from normal tissues, provides excellent tissue contrast, and it facilitates the resection of tumors. However, in situations where there is significant peritumoral inflammation, NIR imaging with ICG is not helpful. This suggests that non-targeted NIR dyes that accumulate in hyperpermeable tissues will have significant limitations in the future, and receptor-specific NIR dyes may be necessary to overcome this problem.

  12. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To implement the 'plan-do-check-act' (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues ('gold' contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes {>=}8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose

  13. Damped Lyman-α Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, P.; Ledoux, C.

    Recently, Prochaska & Wolfe (1997) have used Keck spectra of 17 DLA absorbers to investigate the kinematics of the neutral gas using unsaturated low excitation transitions such as Si iiλ 1808. They show that the absorption profiles are inconsistent with models of galactic haloes with random motions, spherically infalling gas and slowly rotating hot disks. The CDM model (Kauffmann 1996) is rejected as it produces disks with rotation velocities too small to account for the large observed velocity broadening of the absorption lines. Models of thick disks (h ~0.3 R, where h is the vertical scale and R the radius) with large rotational velocity (v 225kms-1) can reproduce the data. By combining new data on five damped systems with information gathered in the literature, we study the kinematics of the low and high-ionization phases in a sample of 26 damped Lyman-α systems in the redshift range 1.17 - 4.38. We show that the broader the line the more asymmetric, as expected in case rotation dominates the line broadening. However this correlation does not hold for velocities larger than 150 km/s indicating that evidence for rotational motions if any is restricted to velocity broadenings Δ V 200kms-1 are peculiar with kinematics consistent with random motions. They show sub-systems as those expected if the objects are in the process of merging.

  14. Biomarkers and surrogate endpoints for normal-tissue effects of radiation therapy: the importance of dose-volume effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, Søren M.; Parliament, Matthew; Deasy, Joseph O.; Dicker, Adam; Curran, Walter J.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2012-01-01

    Biomarkers are of interest for predicting or monitoring normal tissue toxicity of radiation therapy. Advances in molecular radiobiology provide novel leads in the search for normal tissue biomarkers with sufficient sensitivity and specificity to become clinically useful. This paper reviews examples of studies of biomarkers as predictive markers, as response markers or as surrogate endpoints for radiation side-effects. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are briefly discussed in the context of candidate gene and genome wide association studies. The importance of adjusting for radiation dose distribution in normal tissue biomarker studies is underlined. Finally, research priorities in this field are identified and discussed. PMID:20171510

  15. Clinical evaluation of normal tissue toxicity induced by ionizing radiation in cases of laryngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Adriano de Paula; Marques, Gustavo Inacio de Gomes; Soares, Renata da Bastos Ascenco; Dourado, Juliana Castro Dourado [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Goias (PUCGO), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Dept. of Medicine; Mendonca, Yuri de Abreu, E-mail: renata.soares@pucgoias.edu.br [Goias Association Against Cancer, Goiania, GO (Brazil). Lab. of Radiobiology and Oncogenetics

    2012-07-01

    Laryngeal cancer is the second most frequent head and neck cancer in the Brazilian male population. For treatment, radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy is now used in substitution for total laryngectomy, becoming the standard treatment for advanced larynx cancer cases, with the aim of organ preservation. However, this method needs assessment of the side effects caused to normal tissue and organ functionality after treatment and the relation of these clinical factors to the individual characteristics of patients. Thus, the clinical characteristics of 229 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy were evaluated by medical records analysis in relation to normal tissue radiosensibility. Significant relations between smoking (p = 0.018) and combined chemoradiotherapy assistance (p = 0.03) were identified with high frequency of treatment suspension cases. The application of combined chemoradiotherapy also resulted in a higher incidence of oral mucositis (p = 0.04), xerostomia (p = 0.001) and treatment side effects to GIT (p = 0.04). Advanced clinical staging was associated with worse prognosis (p = 0.002) and a higher occurrence of treatment failure (p < 0.001). Radiotherapy was also less effective depending on the primary tumor location (p = 0.001). (author)

  16. Metabolic imaging in microregions of tumors and normal tissues with bioluminescence and photon counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Klieser, W.; Walenta, S.; Paschen, W.; Kallinowski, F.; Vaupel, P.

    1988-08-03

    A method has been developed for metabolic imaging on a microscopic level in tumors, tumor spheroids, and normal tissues. The technique makes it possible to determine the spatial distribution of glucose, lactate, and ATP in absolute terms at similar locations within tissues or cell aggregates. The substrate distributions are registered in serial cryostat sections from tissue cryobiopsies or from frozen spheroids with the use of bioluminescence reactions. The light emission is measured directly by a special imaging photon counting system enabling on-line image analysis. The technique has been applied to human breast cancer xenografts, to spheroids originating from a human colon adenocarcinoma, and to skeletal rat muscle. Preliminary data obtained indicate that heterogeneities in the substrate distributions measured are much more pronounced in tumors than in normal tissue. There was no obvious correlation among the three quantities measured at similar locations within the tissues. The distribution of ATP corresponded well with the histological structure of larger spheroids; values were low in the necrotic center and high in the viable rim of these cell aggregates.

  17. Distribution of the anticancer drugs doxorubicin, mitoxantrone and topotecan in tumors and normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krupa J; Trédan, Olivier; Tannock, Ian F

    2013-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic analyses estimate the mean concentration of drug within a given tissue as a function of time, but do not give information about the spatial distribution of drugs within that tissue. Here, we compare the time-dependent spatial distribution of three anticancer drugs within tumors, heart, kidney, liver and brain. Mice bearing various xenografts were treated with doxorubicin, mitoxantrone or topotecan. At various times after injection, tumors and samples of heart, kidney, liver and brain were excised. Within solid tumors, the distribution of doxorubicin, mitoxantrone and topotecan was limited to perivascular regions at 10 min after administration and the distance from blood vessels at which drug intensity fell to half was ~25-75 μm. Although drug distribution improved after 3 and 24 h, there remained a significant decrease in drug fluorescence with increasing distance from tumor blood vessels. Drug distribution was relatively uniform in the heart, kidney and liver with substantially greater perivascular drug uptake than in tumors. There was significantly higher total drug fluorescence in the liver than in tumors after 10 min, 3 and 24 h. Little to no drug fluorescence was observed in the brain. There are marked differences in the spatial distributions of three anticancer drugs within tumor tissue and normal tissues over time, with greater exposure to most normal tissues and limited drug distribution to many cells in tumors. Studies of the spatial distribution of drugs are required to complement pharmacokinetic data in order to better understand and predict drug effects and toxicities.

  18. Relativistic effects in Lyman-alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Iršič, Vid; Viel, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We present the calculation of the Lyman-alpha (Lyman-$\\alpha$) transmitted flux fluctuations with full relativistic corrections to the first order. Even though several studies exist on relativistic effects in galaxy clustering, this is the first study to extend the formalism to a different tracer of underlying matter at unique redshift range ($z = 2 - 5$). Furthermore, we show a comprehensive application of our calculations to the Quasar- Lyman-$\\alpha$ cross-correlation function. Our results indicate that the signal of relativistic effects can be as large as 30% at Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale, which is much larger than anticipated and mainly due to the large differences in density bias factors of our tracers. We construct an observable, the anti-symmetric part of the cross- correlation function, that is dominated by the relativistic signal and offers a new way to measure the relativistic terms at relatively small scales. The analysis shows that relativistic effects are important when considerin...

  19. Unique Astrophysics in the Lyman Ultraviolet

    CERN Document Server

    Tumlinson, Jason; Kriss, Gerard; France, Kevin; McCandliss, Stephan; Sembach, Ken; Fox, Andrew; Tripp, Todd; Jenkins, Edward; Beasley, Matthew; Danforth, Charles; Shull, Michael; Stocke, John; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, Christopher; Froning, Cynthia; Green, James; Oliveira, Cristina; Fullerton, Alex; Blair, Bill; Kruk, Jeff; Sonneborn, George; Penton, Steven; Wakker, Bart; Prochaska, Xavier; Vallerga, John; Scowen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is unique and groundbreaking science to be done with a new generation of UV spectrographs that cover wavelengths in the "Lyman Ultraviolet" (LUV; 912 - 1216 Ang). There is no astrophysical basis for truncating spectroscopic wavelength coverage anywhere between the atmospheric cutoff (3100 Ang) and the Lyman limit (912 Ang); the usual reasons this happens are all technical. The unique science available in the LUV includes critical problems in astrophysics ranging from the habitability of exoplanets to the reionization of the IGM. Crucially, the local Universe (z <= 0.1) is entirely closed to many key physical diagnostics without access to the LUV. These compelling scientific problems require overcoming these technical barriers so that future UV spectrographs can extend coverage to the Lyman limit at 912 Ang.

  20. Utility of Normal Tissue-to-Tumor {alpha}/{beta} Ratio When Evaluating Isodoses of Isoeffective Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Jin Jianyue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Chang, Albert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve a better understanding of the effect of the number of fractions on normal tissue sparing for equivalent tumor control in radiation therapy plans by using equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) isoeffect calculations. Methods and Materials: The simple linear quadratic (LQ) model was assumed to be valid up to 10 Gy per fraction. Using the model, we formulated a well-known mathematical equality for the tumor prescription dose and probed and solved a second mathematical problem for normal tissue isoeffect. That is, for a given arbitrary relative isodose distribution (treatment plan in percentages), 2 isoeffective tumor treatment regimens (N fractions of the dose D and n fractions of the dose d) were denoted, which resulted in the same BED (corresponding to 100% prescription isodose). Given these situations, the LQ model was further exploited to mathematically establish a unique relative isodose level, z (%), for the same arbitrary treatment plan, where the BED to normal tissues was also isoeffective for both fractionation regimens. Results: For the previously stated problem, the relative isodose level z (%), where the BEDs to the normal tissue were also equal, was defined by the normal tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratio divided by the tumor {alpha}/{beta} times 100%. Fewer fractions offers a therapeutic advantage for those portions of the normal tissue located outside the isodose surface, z, whereas more fractions offer a therapeutic advantage for those portions of the normal tissue within the isodose surface, z. Conclusions: Relative isodose-based treatment plan evaluations may be useful for comparing isoeffective tumor regimens in terms of normal tissue effects. Regions of tissues that would benefit from hypofractionation or standard fractionation can be identified.

  1. Model-integrated estimation of normal tissue contamination for cancer SNP allelic copy number data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjernqvist, Susann; Rydén, Tobias; Greenman, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    SNP allelic copy number data provides intensity measurements for the two different alleles separately. We present a method that estimates the number of copies of each allele at each SNP position, using a continuous-index hidden Markov model. The method is especially suited for cancer data, since it includes the fraction of normal tissue contamination, often present when studying data from cancer tumors, into the model. The continuous-index structure takes into account the distances between the SNPs, and is thereby appropriate also when SNPs are unequally spaced. In a simulation study we show that the method performs favorably compared to previous methods even with as much as 70% normal contamination. We also provide results from applications to clinical data produced using the Affymetrix genome-wide SNP 6.0 platform.

  2. Methylation profiling of 48 candidate genes in tumor and matched normal tissues from breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zibo; Guo, Xinwu; Wu, Yepeng; Li, Shengyun; Yan, Jinhua; Peng, Limin; Xiao, Zhi; Wang, Shouman; Deng, Zhongping; Dai, Lizhong; Yi, Wenjun; Xia, Kun; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Gene-specific methylation alterations in breast cancer have been suggested to occur early in tumorigenesis and have the potential to be used for early detection and prevention. The continuous increase in worldwide breast cancer incidences emphasizes the urgent need for identification of methylation biomarkers for early cancer detection and patient stratification. Using microfluidic PCR-based target enrichment and next-generation bisulfite sequencing technology, we analyzed methylation status of 48 candidate genes in paired tumor and normal tissues from 180 Chinese breast cancer patients. Analysis of the sequencing results showed 37 genes differentially methylated between tumor and matched normal tissues. Breast cancer samples with different clinicopathologic characteristics demonstrated distinct profiles of gene methylation. The methylation levels were significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, with basal-like and luminal B tumors having the lowest and the highest methylation levels, respectively. Six genes (ACADL, ADAMTSL1, CAV1, NPY, PTGS2, and RUNX3) showed significant differential methylation among the 4 breast cancer subtypes and also between the ER +/ER- tumors. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis, we identified a panel of 13 hypermethylated genes as candidate biomarkers that performed a high level of efficiency for cancer prediction. These 13 genes included CST6, DBC1, EGFR, GREM1, GSTP1, IGFBP3, PDGFRB, PPM1E, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, TNFRSF10D, and WRN. Our results provide evidence that well-defined DNA methylation profiles enable breast cancer prediction and patient stratification. The novel gene panel might be a valuable biomarker for early detection of breast cancer.

  3. First stars in Damped Lyman Alpha systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvadori, Stefania; Ferrara, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    In order to characterize Damped Lyman Alpha systems (DLAs) potentially host- ing first stars, we present a novel approach to investigate DLAs in the context of Milky Way (MW) formation, along with their connection with the most metal-poor stars and local dwarf galaxies. The merger tree method previo

  4. First stars in Damped Lyman Alpha systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvadori, Stefania; Ferrara, Andrea

    In order to characterize Damped Lyman Alpha systems (DLAs) potentially host- ing first stars, we present a novel approach to investigate DLAs in the context of Milky Way (MW) formation, along with their connection with the most metal-poor stars and local dwarf galaxies. The merger tree method

  5. Io's SO2 Atmosphere Viewed in Silhouette by Jupiter Lyman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Roth, Lorenz; Feaga, Lori M.; Becker, Tracy M.; Tsang, Constantine; Jessup, Kandis-Lea; Grava, Cesare

    2016-10-01

    We report a new technique for mapping Io's SO2 vapor distribution. Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) instrument observed Io during four Jupiter transit events to obtain medium resolution far-UV spectral images near the Lyman-α wavelength of 121.6 nm. Jupiter's bright Lyman-α dayglow provides a background light source for opacity measurements, much like during a stellar occultation or transiting exoplanet event. Peaks in the photoabsorption cross-sections for sulfur dioxide occur near 122 nm, with resulting absorptions raising the altitude where a tangential line of sight opacity of tau=1 is detected up to resolvable distances above the disk. This method of measuring column densities along lines of sight above the limb complements Lyman-α reflectance imaging and other methods for measuring Io's SO2 gas. For example, interpretation of Io's surface reflected components at far-UV wavelengths is complicated by SO2 frost features being correlated with regions of known volcanic outgassing activity, while Jupiter's Lyman-α dayglow provides a more spatially uniform background light source. Initial examination of these near-terminator limb observations with STIS confirms the findings from previous Lyman-α disk reflectance imaging using STIS's G140L mode (e.g., Feldman et al., GRL, 2000; Feaga et al. 2009) that Io's polar SO2 density is roughly an order of magnitude lower than found at the equator. As Strobel & Wolven (2001) described it, Io appears to wear its dayside atmosphere as "a belt" around the equator. We describe detailed simulations, now underway, that incorporate the STIS point spread function and consideration of additional attenuation by atmospheric hydrogen atoms, which are produced by charge exchange reactions between magnetospheric protons and Io's atmosphere.

  6. Simulation study of pO2 distribution in induced tumour masses and normal tissues within a microcirculation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mao; Li, Yan; Wen, Peng Paul

    2014-01-01

    The biological microenvironment is interrupted when tumour masses are introduced because of the strong competition for oxygen. During the period of avascular growth of tumours, capillaries that existed play a crucial role in supplying oxygen to both tumourous and healthy cells. Due to limitations of oxygen supply from capillaries, healthy cells have to compete for oxygen with tumourous cells. In this study, an improved Krogh's cylinder model which is more realistic than the previously reported assumption that oxygen is homogeneously distributed in a microenvironment, is proposed to describe the process of the oxygen diffusion from a capillary to its surrounding environment. The capillary wall permeability is also taken into account. The simulation study is conducted and the results show that when tumour masses are implanted at the upstream part of a capillary and followed by normal tissues, the whole normal tissues suffer from hypoxia. In contrast, when normal tissues are ahead of tumour masses, their pO2 is sufficient. In both situations, the pO2 in the whole normal tissues drops significantly due to the axial diffusion at the interface of normal tissues and tumourous cells. As the existence of the axial oxygen diffusion cannot supply the whole tumour masses, only these tumourous cells that are near the interface can be partially supplied, and have a small chance to survive.

  7. Hypomethylation of L1 retrotransposons in colorectal cancer and adjacent normal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Catherine M; Martin, David I; Ward, Robyn L

    2004-03-01

    Malignant cells often exhibit perturbations in the pattern of cytosine methylation. Hypermethylation of CpG islands has been extensively documented, but genome-wide hypomethylation is also a common feature of malignant cells. The bulk of cytosine methylation in the mammalian genome occurs on repetitive elements. This study analysed the methylation status of L1 retrotransposons in colorectal cancer. Methylation-sensitive Southern blotting was used to determine L1 promoter methylation in colon tumours, adjacent normal tissue, and normal colonic mucosa from healthy individuals. Hypomethylation of L1 promoter sequences was detected in all tumours but was also detected in the histologically normal colonic mucosa of 6 of 19 cancer patients, even at a considerable distance from the tumour. L1 hypomethylation was not detected in matched normal peripheral blood, lymph node or smooth muscle tissue from cancer patients or in the colonic mucosa of 14 healthy individuals. We also assayed for the total proportion of methylated CpG in normal bowel specimens from normal and colon cancer patients. Normal mucosa from cancer patients exhibited lower levels of genomic methylation than the mucosa from healthy individuals, and levels were significantly lower in those patients exhibiting L1 promoter hypomethylation. These results suggest that genomic hypomethylation is an early event in tumourigenesis. Progressive demethylation of L1 promoter sequences could lead to disturbance of normal gene expression and facilitate the process of neoplastic progression.

  8. The patterns and expression of KDR in normal tissues of human internal organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianfei; Zhu, Huijun; Wang, Xudong; Tang, Qi; Huang, Hua; Wu, Kerong; Zhu, Jin; Feng, Zhenqing; Shi, Gongshen

    2011-12-01

    KDR has been implicated for playing an important role in the formation of new blood vessels and in solid tumor growth. It was considered as one of the most important regulators of angiogenesis and a key target in anticancer treatment. In the present study, we characterized KDR mRNA and protein expression in normal tissues of perinatal and adult tissues using One-step Real-Time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry with a self-made anti-KDR antibody. The expression of KDR mRNA and protein in perinatal internal organs were all higher than in adult organs including brain, kidney, liver, lung and heart, respectively. KDR protein was presented in the cell plasma membrane of human internal tissues. The expression of KDR protein was raised in macrophage of spleen, and decreased in neurons of brain, myocardium, bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar epithelial cell, proximal and distal tubules cells, and hepatic cells with the maturity process of human organs. Notably, the order of KDR protein expression from highest to lowest is as follows: brain, liver, heart, kidney, and lung in adult tissues with statistically significant. It follows that how to balance the potential therapeutic side effect with human internal organs in targeted therapy of over-expressing KDR tumor.

  9. The Function of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1 in Normal Tissues and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A. Walsh, Li Qin, Jean Ching-Yi Tien, Leonie S. Young, Jianming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1995, the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1 was identified as the first authentic steroid receptor coactivator. Since then, the SRC proteins have remained at the epicenter of coregulator biology, molecular endocrinology and endocrine-related cancer. Cumulative works on SRC-1 have shown that it is primarily a nuclear receptor coregulator and functions to construct highly specific enzymatic protein complexes which can execute efficient and successful transcriptional activation of designated target genes. The versatile nature of SRC-1 enables it to respond to steroid dependent and steroid independent stimulation, allowing it to bind across many families of transcription factors to orchestrate and regulate complex physiological reactions. This review highlights the multiple functions of SRC-1 in the development and maintenance of normal tissue functions as well as its major role in mediating hormone receptor responsiveness. Insights from genetically manipulated mouse models and clinical data suggest SRC-1 is significantly overexpressed in many cancers, in particular, cancers of the reproductive tissues. SRC-1 has been associated with cellular proliferation and tumor growth but its major tumorigenic contributions are promotion and execution of breast cancer metastasis and mediation of resistance to endocrine therapies. The ability of SRC-1 to coordinate multiple signaling pathways makes it an important player in tumor cells' escape of targeted therapy.

  10. Optical redox imaging indices discriminate human breast cancer from normal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2016-11-01

    Our long-term goal was to investigate the potential of incorporating redox imaging technique as a breast cancer (BC) diagnosis component to increase the positive predictive value of suspicious imaging finding and to reduce unnecessary biopsies and overdiagnosis. We previously found that precancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. We also revealed abnormal mitochondrial redox state in cancerous specimens from three BC patients. Here, we extend our study to include biopsies of 16 patients. Tissue aliquots were collected from both apparently normal and cancerous tissues from the affected cancer-bearing breasts shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen and scanned with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the three-dimensional cryogenic NADH/Fp (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/oxidized flavoproteins) fluorescence imager. We found both Fp and NADH in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled that in the normal tissues (pcancerous tissues (pcancer with reasonable sensitivity and specificity. Our findings suggest that the optical redox imaging technique can provide parameters independent of clinical factors for discriminating cancer from noncancer breast tissues in human patients.

  11. STUDY OF ECK GENE EXON-3 FROM HUMAN NORMAL TISSUE AND BREAST CANCER CELL LINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑶琛; 孔令洪; 王一理; 司履生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish a method cloning the exon 3 of eck gene from normal tissue and ZR-75-1 cell line (a human breast cancer cell line)and study whether these genes exist mutant. Methods Designed a pair of specific primers and amplified the exon 3 of eck gene fragment from the extracted genomic DNA derived from normal epithelial cells from skin tissue and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively by PCR technique. Transformed the E.coil. JM109 with recombinant plamids constructed by inserting the amplified fragments into medium vector pUCm-T and sequenced these amplified fragments after primary screening of endonuclease restriction digestion and PCR amplification. Results ① Obtained the genomic DNA of human normal epithelial cells and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively. ② Obtained the amplified fragments of human exon 3 of eck gene through PCR technique. ③ Obtained the cloning vectors of exon 3 of eck gene of human normal epithelial cells and ZR-75-1 cell line respectively. ④ ZR-75-1 cell line exists mutation of nucleotides. Conclusion Successfully established the method of cloning the human exon 3 of eck gene and found some mutations in the detected samples. This study lays a foundation for further studying the function of eck gene in tumorgenesis.

  12. ACCURATE ACCUMULATION OF DOSE FOR IMPROVED UNDERSTANDING OF RADIATION EFFECTS IN NORMAL TISSUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffray, David A.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Brock, Kristy K.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Tomé, W. A.

    2013-01-01

    The actual distribution of radiation dose accumulated in normal tissues over the complete course of radiation therapy is, in general, poorly quantified. Differences in the patient anatomy between planning and treatment can occur gradually (e.g., tumor regression, resolution of edema) or relatively rapidly (e.g., bladder filling, breathing motion) and these undermine the accuracy of the planned dose distribution. Current efforts to maximize the therapeutic ratio require models that relate the true accumulated dose to clinical outcome. The needed accuracy can only be achieved through the development of robust methods that track the accumulation of dose within the various tissues in the body. Specific needs include the development of segmentation methods, tissue-mapping algorithms, uncertainty estimation, optimal schedules for image-based monitoring, and the development of informatics tools to support subsequent analysis. These developments will not only improve radiation outcomes modeling but will address the technical demands of the adaptive radiotherapy paradigm. The next 5 years need to see academia and industry bring these tools into the hands of the clinician and the clinical scientist. PMID:20171508

  13. SU-E-T-573: Normal Tissue Dose Effect of Prescription Isodose Level Selection in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q; Lei, Y; Zheng, D; Zhu, X; Wahl, A; Lin, C; Zhou, S; Zhen, W [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dose fall-off in normal tissue for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases planned with different prescription isodose levels (IDLs), by calculating the dose dropping speed (DDS) in normal tissue on plans computed with both Pencil Beam (PB) and Monte-Carlo (MC) algorithms. Methods: The DDS was calculated on 32 plans for 8 lung SBRT patients. For each patient, 4 dynamic conformal arc plans were individually optimized for prescription isodose levels (IDL) ranging from 60% to 90% of the maximum dose with 10% increments to conformally cover the PTV. Eighty non-overlapping rind structures each of 1mm thickness were created layer by layer from each PTV surface. The average dose in each rind was calculated and fitted with a double exponential function (DEF) of the distance from the PTV surface, which models the steep- and moderate-slope portions of the average dose curve in normal tissue. The parameter characterizing the steep portion of the average dose curve in the DEF quantifies the DDS in the immediate normal tissue receiving high dose. Provided that the prescription dose covers the whole PTV, a greater DDS indicates better normal tissue sparing. The DDS were compared among plans with different prescription IDLs, for plans computed with both PB and MC algorithms. Results: For all patients, the DDS was found to be the lowest for 90% prescription IDL and reached a highest plateau region for 60% or 70% prescription. The trend was the same for both PB and MC plans. Conclusion: Among the range of prescription IDLs accepted by lung SBRT RTOG protocols, prescriptions to 60% and 70% IDLs were found to provide best normal tissue sparing.

  14. Lyman Break Galaxies in the NGST Era

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, H C; Papovich, C; Ferguson, Henry C.; Dickinson, Mark; Papovich, Casey

    2002-01-01

    With SIRTF and NGST in the offing, it is interesting to examine what the stellar populations of z~3 galaxies models imply for the existence and nature of Lyman-break galaxies at higher redshift. To this end, we ``turn back the clock'' on the stellar population models that have been fit to optical and infrared data of Lyman-break galaxies at z~3. The generally young ages (typically 10^8 +- 0.5 yr) of these galaxies imply that their stars were not present much beyond z=4. For smooth star-formation histories SFR(t) and Salpeter IMFs, the ionizing radiation from early star-formation in these galaxies would be insufficient to reionize the intergalactic medium at z~6, and the luminosity density at z~4 would be significantly lower than observed. We examine possible ways to increase the global star-formation rate at higher redshift without violating the stellar-population constraints at z~3.

  15. Lyman Spitzer: Life, Times, and Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-01

    Lyman Spitzer was one of the major figures of twentieth centurytheoretical astrophysics. Over more than fifty years,he kept up sustained research of his own, on problems concerningthe interstellar medium, star formation, and galaxies.In addition he was a major influence on observationalprogrammes, and created a thriving school of theoretical astrophysicsat Princeton University along with a strong plasmaphysics programme. This article brings out his contributions,placing them in context.

  16. Lyman edges in AGN accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerny, B. (Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw (Poland)); Pojmanski, G. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Obserwatorium Astronomiczne)

    1990-07-01

    We show that the basic difference in the two principal approaches to predictions of the Lyman edge in an accretion disc lies in the implicit assumption about the density of the radiating gas. Independent from the details, models predict a broad range of the edge sizes, both in absorption and in emission. Observed spectra do not exhibit any strong feature at 912 A but may still be consistent with an accretion disc mechanism if more advanced theory is developed. (author).

  17. Quantifying Distributions of Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Cen, Renyue

    2015-01-01

    Simulations have indicated that most of the escaped Lyman continuum photons escape through a minority of solid angles with near complete transparency, with the remaining majority of the solid angles largely opaque, resulting in a very broad and skewed probability distribution function (PDF) of the escape fraction when viewed at different angles. Thus, the escape fraction of Lyman continuum photons of a galaxy observed along a line of sight merely represents the properties of the interstellar medium along that line of sight, which may be an ill-representation of true escape fraction of the galaxy averaged over its full sky. Here we study how Lyman continuum photons escape from galaxies at $z=4-6$, utilizing high-resolution large-scale cosmological radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. We compute the PDF of the mean escape fraction ($\\left$) averaged over mock observational samples, as a function of the sample size, compared to the true mean (had you an infinite sample size). We find that, when the sample size is...

  18. Texture classification of normal tissues in computed tomography using Gabor filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettori, Lucia; Bashir, Alia; Hasemann, Julie

    2007-03-01

    The research presented in this article is aimed at developing an automated imaging system for classification of normal tissues in medical images obtained from Computed Tomography (CT) scans. Texture features based on a bank of Gabor filters are used to classify the following tissues of interests: liver, spleen, kidney, aorta, trabecular bone, lung, muscle, IP fat, and SQ fat. The approach consists of three steps: convolution of the regions of interest with a bank of 32 Gabor filters (4 frequencies and 8 orientations), extraction of two Gabor texture features per filter (mean and standard deviation), and creation of a Classification and Regression Tree-based classifier that automatically identifies the various tissues. The data set used consists of approximately 1000 DIACOM images from normal chest and abdominal CT scans of five patients. The regions of interest were labeled by expert radiologists. Optimal trees were generated using two techniques: 10-fold cross-validation and splitting of the data set into a training and a testing set. In both cases, perfect classification rules were obtained provided enough images were available for training (~65%). All performance measures (sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy) for all regions of interest were at 100%. This significantly improves previous results that used Wavelet, Ridgelet, and Curvelet texture features, yielding accuracy values in the 85%-98% range The Gabor filters' ability to isolate features at different frequencies and orientations allows for a multi-resolution analysis of texture essential when dealing with, at times, very subtle differences in the texture of tissues in CT scans.

  19. On radiation damage to normal tissues and its treatment. Pt. 2; Anti-inflammatory drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalowski, A.S. (MRC Cyclotron Unit, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    In addition to transiently inhibiting cell cycle progression and sterilizing those cells capable of proliferation, irradiation disturbs the homeostasis effected by endogenous mediators of intercellular communication (humoral component of tissue response to radiation). Changes in the mediator levels may modulate radiation effects either by a assisting a return to normality (e.g., through a rise in H-type cell lineage-specific growth factors) or by aggravating the damage. The latter mode is illustrated with reports on changes in eicosanoid levels after irradiation and on results of empirical treatment of radiation injuries with anti-inflammatory drugs. Prodromal, acute and chronic effects of radiation are accompanied by excessive production of eicosanoids (prostaglandins, prostacyclin, thromboxanes and leukotrienes). These endogenous mediators of inflammatory reactions may be responsible for the vasodilatation, vasoconstriction, increased microvascular permeability, thrombosis and chemotaxis observed after radiation exposure. Glucocorticoids inhibit eicosanoid synthesis primarily by interfering with phospholipase A[sub 2] whilst non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prevent prostaglandin/thromboxane synthesis by inhibiting cycloxygenase. When administered after irradiation on empirical grounds, drugs belonging to both groups tend to attenuate a range of prodomal, acute and chronic effects of radiation in man and animals. Taken together, these two sets of observations are highly suggestive of a contribution of humoral factors to the adverse responses of normal tissues and organs to radiation. A full account of radiation damage should therefore consist of complementary descriptions of cellular and humoral events. Further studies on anti-inflammatory drug treatment of radiation damage to normal organs are justified and desirable. (orig.).

  20. Dermatan sulfate domains defined by the novel antibody GD3A12, in normal tissues and ovarian adenocarcinomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, G.B. ten; Yamada, S.; Kobayashi, F.; Purushothaman, A.; Westerlo, E.M.A. van de; Bulten, J.; Malmstrom, A.; Sugahara, K.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2009-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate (DS) expression in normal tissue and ovarian cancer was investigated using the novel, phage display-derived antibody GD3A12 that was selected against embryonic glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Antibody GD3A12 was especially reactive with DS rich in IdoA-GalNAc4S disaccharide units. IdoA

  1. Impact of different IMRT techniques to improve conformity and normal tissue sparing in upper esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin E Amin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for cervical esophageal cancer is challenging. Although IMRT techniques using inverse planning algorithms are facilitating the treatment planning process, the irradiation dose to the normal tissues can be a critical issue. This study was performed to investigate the effect of beam numbers and their directions and local optimization on: (1 dose conformity and homogeneity to the planning target volume (PTV and (2 dose to the organ at risks (OARs.Methods: Four upper esophageal cancer cases were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. Eight IMRT plans were generated for each case with the same dose-volume constraints but with different beam numbers and arrangements. Local optimization using regular structures drawn automatically around the PTV with margins from 0.5-1.5 cm was performed. IMRT plans were evaluated with respect to isodose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVHs parameters, homogeneity index (HI, and conformity index (CI. The statistical comparison between the types of plans was done using the One Way ANOVA test.Results: The results showed that IMRT using three or five beams was not sufficient to obtain good dose optimization. The seven field plans showed the best coverage for the PTV with tolerable doses for the OARs, and the beam orientation was very critical. Increasing beams (Bs number from 7 to 13 did not show significant differences in the PTV coverage, while the mean lung dose was increased. The PTV coverage were 95.1, 95.1, 98.1, 97.3, 97.3, 97.3, 97.0, and 97.0% for 3Bs, 5Bs, 7Bs, 9Bs, 13Bs, 7Bs(30, 7Bs(60 (beam angles were changed from 0o to 30o and 60o, and 7Bs(R (seven IMRT plans with ring, respectively. The mean heart dose did not exceed 0.36 Gy with p < 0.05. For lung doses, the best plan was the one with 9Bs which reduced lung volume doses V20Gy (% and V30Gy (%, and reduced mean lung dose from 5.4 to 4.5 Gy with p < 0.05 for 7Bs(R plans. IMRT improved the

  2. Sparing of normal tissues with volumetric arc radiation therapy for glioblastoma: single institution clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Tina Marie; McAleer, Mary Frances; Levy, Lawrence B; Yang, James N

    2017-05-02

    Patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) require radiotherapy as part of definitive management. Our institution has adopted the use of volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) due to superior sparing of the adjacent organs at risk (OARs) compared to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Here we report our clinical experience by analyzing target coverage and sparing of OARs for 90 clinical treatment plans. VMAT and IMRT patient cohorts comprising 45 patients each were included in this study. For all patients, the planning target volume (PTV) received 50 Gy in 30 fractions, and the simultaneous integrated boost PTV received 60 Gy. The characteristics of the two patient cohorts were examined for similarity. The doses to target volumes and OARs, including brain, brainstem, hippocampi, optic nerves, eyes, and cochleae were then compared using statistical analysis. Target coverage and normal tissue sparing for six patients with both clinical IMRT and VMAT plans were analyzed. PTV coverage of at least 95% was achieved for all plans, and the median mean dose to the boost PTV differed by only 0.1 Gy between the IMRT and VMAT plans. Superior sparing of the brainstem was found with VMAT, with a median difference in mean dose being 9.4 Gy. The ipsilateral cochlear mean dose was lower by 19.7 Gy, and the contralateral cochlea was lower by 9.5 Gy. The total treatment time was reduced by 5 min. The difference in the ipsilateral hippocampal D100% was 12 Gy, though this is not statistically significant (P = 0.03). VMAT for GBM patients can provide similar target coverage, superior sparing of the brainstem and cochleae, and be delivered in a shorter period of time compared with IMRT. The shorter treatment time may improve clinical efficiency and the quality of the treatment experience. Based on institutional clinical experience, use of VMAT for the treatment of GBMs appears to offer no inferiority in comparison to IMRT and may offer distinct advantages, especially for

  3. Lyman continuum galaxies and the escape fraction of Lyman break galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Jeff; Garel, Thibault; Diaz, C Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 3-4 are targeted to measure the fraction of Lyman continuum (LyC) flux that escapes from high redshift galaxies. However, z ~ 3-4 LBGs are identified using the Lyman break technique which preferentially selects galaxies with little or no LyC. We re-examine the standard LBG selection criteria by performing spectrophotometry on composite spectra constructed from 794 U_nGR-selected z ~ 3 LBGs from the literature while adding LyC flux of varying strengths. The modified composite spectra accurately predict the range of redshifts, properties, and LyC flux of LBGs in the literature that have spectroscopic LyC measurements while predicting the existence of a significant fraction of galaxies outside the standard selection region. These galaxies, termed Lyman continuum galaxies (LCGs), are expected to have high levels of LyC flux and are estimated to have a number density ~30-50 percent that of the LBG population. We define R_obs(U_n) as the relative fraction of observed LyC flux, int...

  4. Lyman-alpha spectral properties of five newly discovered Lyman continuum emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Verhamme, A; Schaerer, D; Izotov, Y; Worseck, G; Thuan, T X; Guseva, N

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported the discovery of five low redshift Lyman continuum (LyC) emitters (LCEs, hereafter) with absolute escape fractions fesc(LyC) ranging from 6 to 13%, higher than previously found, and which more than doubles the number of low redshift LCEs.We use these observations to test theoretical predictions about a link between the characteristics of the Lyman-alpha (Lya) line from galaxies and the escape of ionising photons. We analyse the Lya spectra of eight LCEs of the local Universe observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (our five leakers and three galaxies from the litterature), and compare their strengths and shapes to the theoretical criteria and comparison samples of local galaxies: the Lyman Alpha Reference Survey, Lyman Break Analogs, Green Peas, and the high-redshift strong LyC leaker Ion2. Our LCEs are found to be strong Lya emitters, with high equivalent widths, EW(Lya)> 70 {\\AA}, and large Lya escape fractions, fesc(Lya) > 20%. The Lya prof...

  5. Fluctuations in the High-Redshift Lyman-Werner and Lyman-alpha Radiation Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Holzbauer, Lauren N

    2011-01-01

    We use a new method to model fluctuations of the Lyman-Werner (LW) and Lyman-alpha radiation backgrounds at high redshift. At these early epochs the backgrounds are symptoms of a universe newly lit with its first stars. LW photons (11.5-13.6 eV) are of particular interest because they dissociate molecular hydrogen, the primary coolant in the first minihalos. By using a variation of the halo model, we efficiently generate power spectra for any choice of radiation background. We find that the LW power spectrum typically traces the matter power spectrum at large scales but turns over at the scale corresponding to the effective `horizon' of LW photons (~100 comoving Mpc), unless the sources are extremely rare. The series of horizons that characterize the Lyman-alpha flux profile shape the fluctuations of that background in a similar fashion, though those imprints are washed out once one considers fluctuations in the brightness temperature of the 21-cm signal. The Lyman-alpha background strongly affects the redshi...

  6. Lyman alpha SMM/UVSP absolute calibration and geocoronal correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1987-01-01

    Lyman alpha observations from the Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft were analyzed and provide instrumental calibration details. Specific values of the instrument quantum efficiency, Lyman alpha absolute intensity, and correction for geocoronal absorption are presented.

  7. The visibility of Lyman Alpha Emitters during reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Dayal, Pratika; Ferrara, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We present the first Lyman Alpha Emitter (LAE) study that combines: (i) cosmological SPH simulations run using GADGET-2, (ii) radiative transfer simulations (CRASH), and (iii) a previously developed LAE model. This complete LAE model accounts for the intrinsic LAE Lyman Alpha/continuum luminosity, dust enrichment and Lyman Alpha transmission through the intergalactic medium (IGM), to quantify the effects of reionization, dust and velocity fields on the Lyman Alpha and UV Luminosity Functions (LF). We find that a model neglecting dust sorely fails to reproduce either the slope or the magnitude of the observed Lyman Alpha and UV LFs. Clumped dust is required to simultaneously fit the observed UV and Lyman Alpha LFs, such that the intrinsic Lyman Alpha-to-continuum luminosity is enhanced by a factor f_alpha/f_c ~ 1.5 (3.7) excluding (including) peculiar velocities. The higher value including velocity fields arises since LAEs reside in large potential wells and inflows decrease their Lyman Alpha transmission. For...

  8. Cosmological adventures in the Lyman forest

    CERN Document Server

    Cristiani, S

    1995-01-01

    The properties of the Lyman-\\alpha absorptions observed in the spectra of QSOs are reviewed: the distribution of column densities and Doppler widths, the redshift evolution, the ``inverse effect'', the clustering. By interpreting the statistics of the line parameters insight is gained about the nature of the absorbers, their sizes, temperatures, confining agents. On the basis of the ``inverse effect'' it is possible to estimate the ultraviolet background radiation at high redshift and, linking this information with the limits on the Gunn-Peterson optical depth, the density of the diffuse part of the intergalactic medium is derived. Future prospects are briefly discussed.

  9. Lyman-alpha observations of astrospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Linsky, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Charge-exchange reactions between outflowing stellar wind protons and interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms entering a stellar astrosphere produce a region of piled-up-decelerated neutral hydrogen called the hydrogen wall. Absorption by this gas, which is observed in stellar Lyman-alpha emission lines, provides the only viable technique at this time for measuring the mass-loss rates of F-M dwarf stars. We describe this technique, present an alternative way for understanding the relation of mass-loss rate with X-ray emission, and identify several critical issues.

  10. Early changes of volume and spatial location in target and normal tissues caused by IMRT for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwu; Liu, Ping; Chen, Wenjuan; Bai, Penggang; Li, Jiangshan; Ni, Xiaolei; Chen, Kaiqiang; Li, Qixin

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the early changes of volume and spatial location in target and normal tissues caused by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer. Forty patients with cervical cancer were included in this study and treated by IMRT. Computed tomography (CT) was performed before radiotherapy and when the patient had received 27 Gy in 15 fractions. After image registration, the volume of interest (VOI) for the targets and organs at risk was delineated by clinicians on the CT images. Changes of volume, spatial location and Dice similarity were calculated for all VOIs. There were significant changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) in the primary tumor (GTV-T) with t = 8.304 (p<0.01) and visible pelvic lymph nodes (GTV-N) with t = 4.996 (p<0.01) caused by IMRT. The mean volume differences for GTV-T and GTV-N were 38.64% ± 19.50% (range 3.16%-86.49%) and 42.49% ± 25.68% (range 2.79%-87.42%), respectively. Among the organs at risk, the bladder had the greatest volume change with 55.13% ± 33.40% (range 3.25%-116.01%). The Dice similarity for GTV-T and GTV-N was 0.50 ± 0.18 (range 0.10-0.85) and 0.31 ± 0.20 (range 0.00-0.71), respectively. The rectum had the least Dice similarity among the normal tissues, with a mean value of 0.57 ± 0.14 (range 0.18-0.76). There were significant changes in volume and spatial location of the target and normal tissues after 27 Gy IMRT. In order to maintain the radiation dose to the targets and minimize the radiation to normal tissues, it is necessary to modify the radiotherapy planning.

  11. Gene expression arrays as a tool to unravel mechanisms of normal tissue radiation injury and prediction of response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacqueline JCM Kruse; Fiona A Stewart

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been a rapid increase in the use of microarray technology in the field of cancer research. The majority of studies use microarray analysis of tumor biopsies for profiling of molecular characteristics in an attempt to produce robust classifiers for prognosis. There are now several published gene sets that have been shown to predict for aggressive forms of breast cancer, where patients are most likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy and tumors most likely to develop distant metastases, or be resistant to treatment. The number of publications relating to the use of microarrays for analysis of normal tissue damage, after cancer treatment or genotoxic exposure, is much more limited. A PubMed literature search was conducted using the following keywords and combination of terms: radiation, normal tissue, microarray, gene expression profiling, prediction. With respect to normal tissue radiation injury, microarrays have been used in three ways: (1) to generate gene signatures to identify sensitive and resistant populations (prognosis); (2) to identify sets of biomarker genes for estimating radiation exposure, either accidental or as a result of terrorist attack (diagnosis); (3) to identify genes and pathways involved in tissue response to injury (mechanistic). In this article we will review all (relevant) papers that covered our literature search criteria on microarray technology as it has been applied to normal tissue radiation biology and discuss how successful this has been in defining predisposition markers for radiation sensitivity or how it has helped us to unravel molecular mechanisms leading to acute and late tissue toxicity. We also discuss some of the problems and limitations in application and interpretation of such data.

  12. Lipidomic differentiation between human kidney tumors and surrounding normal tissues using HILIC-HPLC/ESI-MS and multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cífková, Eva; Holčapek, Michal; Lísa, Miroslav; Vrána, David; Melichar, Bohuslav; Študent, Vladimír

    2015-09-01

    The characterization of differences among polar lipid classes in tumors and surrounding normal tissues of 20 kidney cancer patients is performed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The detailed analysis of identified lipid classes using relative abundances of characteristic ions in negative- and positive-ion modes is used for the determination of more than 120 individual lipid species containing attached fatty acyls of different chain length and double bond number. Lipid species are described using relative abundances, providing a better visualization of lipidomic differences between tumor and normal tissues. The multivariate data analysis methods using unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) and supervised orthogonal partial least square (OPLS) are used for the characterization of statistically significant differences in identified lipid species. Ten most significant up- and down-regulated lipids in OPLS score plots are also displayed by box plots. A notable increase of relative abundances of lipids containing four and more double bonds is detected in tumor compared to normal tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Masses of Lyman Break Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Joel R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    Data on galaxies at high redshift, identified by the Lyman-break photometric technique, can teach us about how galaxies form and evolve. The stellar masses and other properties of such Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) depend sensitively on the details of star formation. In this paper we consider three different star formation prescriptions, and use semi-analytic methods applied to the now-standard ΛCDM theory of hierarchical structure formation to show how these assumptions about star formation affect the predicted masses of the stars in these galaxies and the masses of the dark matter halos that host them. We find that, within the rather large uncertainties, recent estimates of the stellar masses of LBGs from multi-color photometry are consistent with the predictions of all three models. However, the estimated stellar masses are more consistent with the predictions of two of the models in which star formation is accelerated at high redshifts z ≳ 3, and of these models the one in which many of the LBGs are merger-driven starbursts is also more consistent with indications that many high redshift galaxies are gas rich. The clustering properties of LBGs have put some constraints on the masses of their host halos, but due to similarities in the halo occupation of the three models we consider and degeneracies between model parameters, current constraints are not yet sufficient to distinguish between realistic models.

  14. The Masses of Lyman Break Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Primack, Joel R; Somerville, R S; Primack, Joel R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2001-01-01

    Data on galaxies at high redshift, identified by the Lyman-break photometric technique, can teach us about how galaxies form and evolve. The stellar masses and other properties of such Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) depend sensitively on the details of star formation. In this paper we consider three different star formation prescriptions, and use semi-analytic methods applied to the now-standard $\\Lambda$CDM theory of hierarchical structure formation to show how these assumptions about star formation affect the predicted masses of the stars in these galaxies and the masses of the dark matter halos that host them. We find that, within the rather large uncertainties, recent estimates of the stellar masses of LBGs from multi-color photometry are consistent with the predictions of all three models. However, the estimated stellar masses are more consistent with the predictions of two of the models in which star formation is accelerated at high redshifts $z\\gsim3$, and of these models the one in which many of the LBGs...

  15. GHRS Observations of the Lyman $\\alpha$ Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, S L

    1996-01-01

    I review the results obtained using the GHRS on low redshift Lyman alpha absorbers. Until the advent of HST and the GHRS, the existence of such absorbers was doubted. The confirmation of their existence, in one of the first GHRS GTO team results to be published, must rank as one of the HSTs most interesting results. The GHRS resolution allows us to probe equivalent widths well below those detectable with the FOS, and has led to a number of interesting new questions. One example is the apparent disagreement between the GHRS result that there are many Lyman alpha absorbers which are not associated with luminous galaxies, and FOS studies which suggest that all such absorbers have a nearby galaxy causing them. This almost certainly shows that the equivalent width (or column density) range reachable by the GHRS includes gas from a wide range of causes, and not only the halos of luminous galaxies. With these data, we are seeing the debris left over from Galaxy formation, material flung out from galaxy interactions ...

  16. Characterizing Lyman Alpha Scattering in Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Joanna; Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens; Östlin, Göran; Gronwall, Caryl

    2017-01-01

    The hydrogen emission line of Lyman alpha (Lyα) has long been recognized as key to studying high redshift star-forming galaxies. However, due to the resonance of the emission line, the path that a Lyα photon takes from emission to eventual escape from the galaxy is essentially a mystery. This scattering poses a problem for using Lyα as a key emission feature of galaxies because it results in Lyα not being observed in all star-forming galaxies, and, in galaxies where it is observed, the place where the photon is originally emitted and where it is observed are two very different things. We discuss here how the Lyman-Alpha Reference Sample (LARS) provides a unique sample of 14 nearby (0.02 Space Telescope imaging. We compare the Lyα/Hα ratios with those expected from pure dust attenuation models, finding that in some cases significant positive departures are found on small scales, consistent with geometrical effects being important on sizes comparable to the HII regions. We then develop a simple scattering model in which we are able to estimate the average path length a Lyα photon travels with respect to non-resonant radiation, and quantifiy the excess dust optical depth to which Lyα radiation may be susceptible.

  17. Molecular hydrogen in Lyman Alpha Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Vallini, Livia; Ferrara, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We present a physically motivated model to estimate the molecular hydrogen (H2) content of high-redshift (z~5.7,6.6) Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) extracted from a suite of cosmological simulations. We find that the H2 mass fraction, (f_H2), depends on three main LAE physical properties: (a) star formation rate, (b) dust mass, and (c) cold neutral gas mass. At z~5.7, the value of f_H2 peaks and ranges between 0.5-0.9 for intermediate mass LAEs with stellar mass M_* ~ 10^{9-10} solar mass, decreasing for both smaller and larger galaxies. However, the largest value of the H2 mass is found in the most luminous LAEs. These trends also hold at z\\sim6.6, although, due to a lower dust content, f_H2(z=6.6)\\sim0.5 f_H2(z=5.7) when averaged over all LAEs; they arise due to the interplay between the H2 formation/shielding controlled by dust and the intensity of the ultraviolet (UV) Lyman-Werner photo-dissociating radiation produced by stars. We then predict the carbon monoxide (CO) luminosities for such LAEs and check tha...

  18. Local Tumor Control and Normal Tissue Toxicity of Pulsed Low-Dose Rate Radiotherapy for Recurrent Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigates (1 local tumor control and (2 normal tissue toxicity of pulsed low-dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR for recurrent lung cancer. Methods: For study 1, nude mice were implanted with A549 tumors and divided into the following 3 groups: (1 control (n = 10, (2 conventional radiotherapy (RT; n = 10, and (3 PLDR (n = 10. Tumor-bearing mice received 2 Gy daily dose for 2 consecutive days. Weekly magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumor growth monitoring. For study 2, 20 mice received 8 Gy total body irradiation either continuously (n = 10 or 40 × 0.2 Gy pulses with 3-minute intervals (n = 10. Results: For study 1, both conventional RT and PLDR significantly inhibited the growth of A549 xenografts compared with the control group (>35% difference in the mean tumor volume; P .05. For study 2, the average weight was 20.94 ± 1.68 g and 25.69 ± 1.27 g and the survival time was 8 days and 12 days for mice treated with conventional RT and PLDR (P < .05, respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that PLDR could control A549 tumors as effectively as conventional RT, and PLDR induced much less normal tissue toxicity than conventional RT. Thus, PLDR would be a good modality for recurrent lung cancers. Advances in Knowledge: This article reports our results of an in vivo animal investigation of PLDR for the treatment of recurrent cancers, which may not be eligible for treatment because of the dose limitations on nearby healthy organs that have been irradiated in previous treatments. This was the first in vivo study to quantify the tumor control and normal tissue toxicities of PLDR using mice with implanted tumors, and our findings provided evidence to support the clinical trials that employ PLDR treatment techniques.

  19. Interstitial fluid pressure: A novel biomarker to monitor photo-induced drug uptake in tumor and normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavin, Sabrina; Wang, Xingyu; Zellweger, Matthieu; Gonzalez, Michel; Bensimon, Michaël; Wagnières, Georges; Krueger, Thorsten; Ris, Hans-Beat; Gronchi, Fabrizio; Perentes, Jean Y

    2017-10-01

    Low-dose photodynamic therapy PDT (photoinduction) can modulate tumor vessels and enhance the uptake of liposomal cisplatin (Lipoplatin®) in pleural malignancies. However, the photo-induction conditions must be tightly controlled as overtreatment shuts down tumor vessels and enhances normal tissue drug uptake. In a pleural sarcoma and adenocarcinoma rat model (n = 12/group), we applied photoinduction (0.0625 mg/kg Visudyne®, 10 J/cm(2) ) followed by intravenous Lipoplatin® (5 mg/kg) administration. Tumor and normal tissue IFP were assessed before and up to 1 hour following photoinduction. Lipoplatin® uptake was determined 60 minutes following photoinduction. We then treated the pleura of tumor-free minipigs with high dose photodynamic therapy (PDT) (0.0625 mg/kg Visudyne®, 30 J/cm(2) , n = 5) followed by Lipoplatin (5 mg/kg) administration. In rodents, photoinduction resulted in a significant decrease of IFP (P parabola. In minipigs, high dose photodynamic treatment resulted in pleural IFP increase of some animals which predicted higher Lipoplatin® uptake levels. Normal and tumor vasculatures react differently to PDT. Continuous IFP monitoring in normal and tumor tissues is a promising biomarker of vessel photoinduction. Moderate drop in tumor with no change in normal tissue IFP are predictive of specific Lipoplatin® uptake by cancer following PDT. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:773-780, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Markers of fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition demonstrate field cancerization in histologically normal tissue adjacent to breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Kristina A.; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Mai, Minh; Vargas, Keith M.; Jones, Anna C.; Vo, Phung; Butler, Kimberly S.; Joste, Nancy E.; Bisoffi, Marco; Griffith, Jeffrey K

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a field of genetically altered but histologically normal tissue extends 1 cm or more from the margins of human breast tumors. The extent, composition and biological significance of this field are only partially understood, but the molecular alterations in affected cells could provide mechanisms for limitless replicative capacity, genomic instability and a microenvironment that supports tumor initiation and progression. We demonstrate by microarray, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry a signature of differential gene expression that discriminates between patient-matched, tumor-adjacent histologically normal breast tissues located 1 cm and 5 cm from the margins of breast adenocarcinomas (TAHN-1 and TAHN-5, respectively). The signature includes genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, wound healing, fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Myofibroblasts, which are mediators of wound healing and fibrosis, and intra-lobular fibroblasts expressing MMP2, SPARC, TGF-β3, which are inducers of EMT, were both prevalent in TAHN-1 tissues, sparse in TAHN-5 tissues, and absent in normal tissues from reduction mammoplasty. Accordingly, EMT markers S100A4 and vimentin were elevated in both luminal and myoepithelial cells, and EMT markers α-smooth muscle actin and SNAIL were elevated in luminal epithelial cells of TAHN-1 tissues. These results identify cellular processes that are differentially activated between TAHN-1 and TAHN-5 breast tissues, implicate myofibroblasts as likely mediators of these processes, provide evidence that EMT is occurring in histologically normal tissues within the affected field and identify candidate biomarkers to investigate whether or how field cancerization contributes to the development of primary or recurrent breast tumors. PMID:21105047

  1. Distinctive Glycerophospholipid Profiles of Human Seminoma and Adjacent Normal Tissues by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Timothy A.; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Mattarozzi, Monica; Cheng, Liang; Beck, Stephen D. W.; Bianchi, Federica; Cooks, R. Graham

    2011-08-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) has been successfully used to discriminate between normal and cancerous human tissue from different anatomical sites. On the basis of this, DESI-MS imaging was used to characterize human seminoma and adjacent normal tissue. Seminoma and adjacent normal paired human tissue sections (40 tissues) from 15 patients undergoing radical orchiectomy were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen and sectioned to 15 μm thickness and thaw mounted to glass slides. The entire sample was two-dimensionally analyzed by the charged solvent spray to form a molecular image of the biological tissue. DESI-MS images were compared with formalin-fixed, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained slides of the same material. Increased signal intensity was detected for two seminolipids [seminolipid (16:0/16:0) and seminolipid (30:0)] in the normal tubule testis tissue; these compounds were undetectable in seminoma tissue, as well as from the surrounding fat, muscle, and blood vessels. A glycerophosphoinositol [PI(18:0/20:4)] was also found at increased intensity in the normal testes tubule tissue when compared with seminoma tissue. Ascorbic acid (i.e., vitamin C) was found at increased amounts in seminoma tissue when compared with normal tissue. DESI-MS analysis was successfully used to visualize the location of several types of molecules across human seminoma and normal tissues. Discrimination between seminoma and adjacent normal testes tubules was achieved on the basis of the spatial distributions and varying intensities of particular lipid species as well as ascorbic acid. The increased presence of ascorbic acid within seminoma compared with normal seminiferous tubules was previously unknown.

  2. Lyman Continuum Emission from Galaxies at z~3.4

    CERN Document Server

    Steidel, C C; Adelberger, K L

    2000-01-01

    We report the detection of significant Lyman continuum flux in the composite spectrum of 29 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) with redshifts = 3.40+/-0.09. After correction for opacity due to intervening absorption using a new composite QSO spectrum evaluated at the same redshift, the ratio of emergent flux density at 1500 \\AA in the rest frame to that in the Lyman continuum is L(1500)/L(900) = 4.6 +/- 1.0. If the relative intensity of the inferred escaping Lyman continuum radiation is typical of LBGs at z ~ 3 (the galaxies in this sample are drawn from the bluest quartile of LBG spectral energy distributions due to known selection effects), then observed LBGs produce about 5 times more H-ionizing photons per unit co-moving volume than QSOs at z ~ 3. The associated contribution to the metagalactic ionizing radiation field is J_{\

  3. Stellar Mass Function of Lyman Break Galaxies: Theoretical Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Liang; HUANG Yong-Qing; LIU Nian-Hua; LAI Zhen-Quan; SHU Cheng-Gang

    2006-01-01

    @@ Adopting the observational distributions of star formation rates and half-light radii of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) in the rest frame UV, we investigate empirically the predicted stellar mass function for LBGs.

  4. [Tyrosine-protein kinase activity in breast neoplasm. Comparison with activity obtained in benign diseases and in normal tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierart, J; Oñate, E; Klaassen, R; Cid, L; Gutierrez, S; Talbot, E; Ross, E; Zambrano, C; Burmeister, R; Puchi, M

    1995-02-01

    Tyrosine protein kinase (TPK) activity is associated to malignant cellular transformation. This work compares TPK activity in 27 surgical biopsy samples of mammary carcinoma, 10 samples of fibroadenomas, 13 samples of fibrocystic breast disease and 27 samples of normal mammary tissue. TPK activity was determined in tissue homogenates using (Val5) angiotensin II as exogenous substrate. In samples of mammary carcinoma, TPK activity was 33.86 +/- 31.98 pmol P32/mg protein/30 min. This value was significantly higher that those observed in fibrocystic disease (3.92 +/- 2.35), fibroadenomas (13.86 +/- 10.9) and normal tissue (3.56 +/- 3.02).

  5. Origin of the Lyman excess in early-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cesaroni, R; Beltrán, M T; Molinari, S; Olmi, L; Treviño-Morales, S P

    2016-01-01

    Ionized regions around early-type stars are believed to be well-known objects, but until recently, our knowledge of the relation between the free-free radio emission and the IR emission has been observationally hindered by the limited angular resolution in the far-IR. The advent of Herschel has now made it possible to obtain a more precise comparison between the two regimes, and it has been found that about a third of the young HII regions emit more Lyman continuum photons than expected, thus presenting a Lyman excess. With the present study we wish to distinguish between two scenarios that have been proposed to explain the existence of the Lyman excess: (i) underestimation of the bolometric luminosity, or (ii) additional emission of Lyman-continuum photons from an accretion shock. We observed an outflow (SiO) and an infall (HCO+) tracer toward a complete sample of 200 HII regions, 67 of which present the Lyman excess. Our goal was to search for any systematic difference between sources with Lyman excess and ...

  6. Increased forearm blood flow in longstanding Type 1 diabetic patients without microvascular complications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurp, P.J.M. van; Lenders, J.W.M.; Tack, C.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: According to the 'haemodynamic hypothesis', chronic hyperglycaemia induces an increase in tissue perfusion that predisposes to microangiopathy. We hypothesized that patients with longstanding diabetes mellitus (DM), who have not developed microvascular complications, would have normal tissue p

  7. Protons Offer Reduced Normal-Tissue Exposure for Patients Receiving Postoperative Radiotherapy for Resected Pancreatic Head Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Romaine C., E-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonsville, FL (United States); Huh, Soon N. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonsville, FL (United States); Prado, Karl L.; Yi, Byong Y.; Sharma, Navesh K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ho, Meng W.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li, Zuofeng [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonsville, FL (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential role for adjuvant proton-based radiotherapy (PT) for resected pancreatic head cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2008 and November 2008, 8 consecutive patients with resected pancreatic head cancers underwent optimized intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. IMRT plans used between 10 and 18 fields and delivered 45 Gy to the initial planning target volume (PTV) and a 5.4 Gy boost to a reduced PTV. PTVs were defined according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 radiotherapy guidelines. Ninety-five percent of PTVs received 100% of the target dose and 100% of the PTVs received 95% of the target dose. Normal tissue constraints were as follows: right kidney V18 Gy to <70%; left kidney V18 Gy to <30%; small bowel/stomach V20 Gy to <50%, V45 Gy to <15%, V50 Gy to <10%, and V54 Gy to <5%; liver V30 Gy to <60%; and spinal cord maximum to 46 Gy. Optimized two- to three-field three-dimensional conformal proton plans were retrospectively generated on the same patients. The team generating the proton plans was blinded to the dose distributions achieved by the IMRT plans. The IMRT and proton plans were then compared. A Wilcoxon paired t-test was performed to compare various dosimetric points between the two plans for each patient. Results: All proton plans met all normal tissue constraints and were isoeffective with the corresponding IMRT plans in terms of PTV coverage. The proton plans offered significantly reduced normal-tissue exposure over the IMRT plans with respect to the following: median small bowel V20 Gy, 15.4% with protons versus 47.0% with IMRT (p = 0.0156); median gastric V20 Gy, 2.3% with protons versus 20.0% with IMRT (p = 0.0313); and median right kidney V18 Gy, 27.3% with protons versus 50.5% with IMRT (p = 0.0156). Conclusions: By reducing small bowel and stomach exposure, protons have the potential to reduce the acute and late toxicities of postoperative chemoradiation in this setting.

  8. Geocoronal Lyman Alpha Observations with COS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ake, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    The time-tagged mode of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) provides a convenient method of studying the orbital variation of geocoronal Lyman-alpha emission at the altitude of HST. We have analyzed G130M blank sky exposures from scheduled STIS parallels and observations for which the target acquisition failed. We supplement these with observations of WD standard stars from flat field and sensitivity monitoring programs where the stellar Lyα profile can be modeled and its contribution to the geocoronal emission removed. Data were corrected for time-dependent sensitivity changes and gain sag. The measurements have been fit by an analytical model based on the orbital position of HST and the angle between the target and the Earth as seen from HST. The Lyα emission varies from less than 2 kR for a target observed at orbit midnight to 37 kR for one observed at the bright Earth limb at orbit noon. A long-term trend of increasing flux is evident, consistent with solar Lyα measurements by SOLSTICE on SORCE as the next solar maximum is approached. We expect the irradiance at solar maximum to be at least 50-55 kR. This level still should not trigger local count rate violations for the FUV detector, but will accelerate gain sag of the microchannel plates in the regions where Lyα falls.

  9. Isolating the Lyman Alpha Forest BAO Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Evslin, Jarah

    2016-01-01

    A 2.5-3 sigma discrepancy has been reported between the baryonic acoustic oscillation peak (BAO) in the Lyman alpha forest at z=2.34 and the best fit Planck LCDM cosmology. To isolate the origin of the tension, we consider unanchored BAO, in which the standard BAO ruler is not calibrated, eliminating any dependence on cosmology before redshift z=2.34. We consider BOSS BAO measurements at z=0.32, 0.57 and 2.34, using the full 2-dimensional constraints on the best and worst determined combinations of the angular and line of sight BAO scale, as well as isotropic BAO measurements by 6dF and SDSS at z=0.106 and z=0.15. We find that the z>0.43 data alone is in 2.8 sigma of tension with LCDM with or without the Planck best fit values of the mass fraction and the BAO scale, indicating that the tension arises not from the LCDM parameters but from the dark energy evolution itself at 0.57

  10. A hybrid electron and photon IMRT planning technique that lowers normal tissue integral patient dose using standard hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Florin

    2012-06-01

    To present a mixed electron and photon IMRT planning technique using electron beams with an energy range of 6-22 MeV and standard hardware that minimizes integral dose to patients for targets as deep as 7.5 cm. Ten brain cases, two lung, a thyroid, an abdominal, and a parotid case were planned using two planning techniques: a photon-only IMRT (IMRT) versus a mixed modality treatment (E+IMRT) that includes an enface electron beam and a photon IMRT portion that ensures a uniform target coverage. The electron beam is delivered using a regular cutout placed in an electron cone. The electron energy was chosen to provide a good trade-off between minimizing integral dose and generating a uniform, deliverable plan. The authors choose electron energies that cover the deepest part of PTV with the 65%-70% isodose line. The normal tissue integral dose, the dose for ring structures around the PTV, and the volumes of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isosurfaces were used to compare the dose distributions generated by the two planning techniques. The normal tissue integral dose was lowered by about 20% by the E+IMRT plans compared to the photon-only IMRT ones for most studied cases. With the exception of lungs, the dose reduction associated to the E+IMRT plans was more pronounced further away from the target. The average dose ratio delivered to the 0-2 cm and the 2-4 cm ring structures for brain patients for the two planning techniques were 89.6% and 70.8%, respectively. The enhanced dose sparing away from the target for the brain patients can also be observed in the ratio of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isodose line volumes for the two techniques, which decreases from 85.5% to 72.6% and further to 65.1%, respectively. For lungs, the lateral electron beams used in the E+IMRT plans were perpendicular to the mostly anterior/posterior photon beams, generating much more conformal plans. The authors proved that even using the existing electron delivery hardware, a mixed electron/photon planning

  11. - X (1)Sigma(+)((g)) (v ''=0) Lyman bands in H-2 and HD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, U.; Reinhold, E.M.; Lange, de C.A.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2006-01-01

    - X (1)Sigma(+) (v" = 0) Lyman bands in HD are presented using a narrow bandwidth vacuum ultraviolet laser system combined with an accurate frequency calibration. These measurements complete the recently published data on the Lyman frequency transitions of Philip.

  12. Hydrogen Lyman-alpha and Lyman-beta radiances and profiles in polar coronal holes

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Hui; Curdt, Werner; Vial, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    The hydrogen Lyman-alpha plays a dominant role in the radiative energy transport in the lower transition region, and is important for the stud- ies of transition-region structure as well as solar wind origin. We investigate the Ly-alpha profiles obtained by SUMER in coronal holes and quiet Sun. In a subset of these observations, also the Hi Lyman-beta, Si iii, and O vi lines were (quasi-) simultaneously recorded. We find that the distances between the two peaks of Ly-alpha profiles are larger in coronal holes than in the quiet Sun, indicating a larger opacity in coronal holes. This difference might result from the different magnetic structures or the different radiation fields in the two regions. Most of the Ly-beta profiles in the coronal hole have a stronger blue peak, in contrast to those in quiet-Sun regions. Whilst in both regions the Ly-alpha profiles are stronger in the blue peak. Although the asymmetries are likely to be produced by differential flows in the solar atmosphere, their detailed formation ...

  13. Radioprotection by WR-151327 against the late normal tissue damage in mouse hind legs from gamma ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Satoru; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [and others

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the protective effect of WR-151327 on late radiation-induced damaged to normal tissues in mice, the right hind legs of mice with or without WR-151327 administration (400 mg/kg) were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs gamma rays. Leg contracture and skin shrinkage assays were performed at 380 days after irradiation. The mice were killed on day 400 postirradiation and histological sections of the legs were made. The thickness of the dermis, epidermis, and skin (dermis plus epidermis) was measured. The muscular area of the legs and the posterior knee angle between the femur and tibia were also measured. The left hind legs were similarly assessed as nonirradiated controls. Group means and standard deviations were calculated and dose-response curves were drawn for every endpoint. Then, the dose modifying factor (DMF) for each endpoint and the correlations among endpoints were determined. Latae damage assayed by leg contracture and skin shrinkage progressed with increasing radiation dose. However, it was reduced by drug treatment. The significant effect was indicated for skin shrinkage by a DMF of 1.8 at 35%. The DMF for leg contracture was 1.3 at 6 mm. In the irradiated legs, epidermal hyperplasia and dermal fibrosis in the skin, muscular atrophy, and extension disturbance of the knee joint were observed. These changes progressed with increasing radiation dose. Skin damage assayed by the present endpoints was also reduced by drug treatment by DMFs of 1.4 to 1.7. However, DMFs for damage to the muscle and knee were not determined because no isoeffect was observed. There were good correlations between leg contracture or skin shrinkage and the other endpoints in both untreated and drug-treated mice. WR-151327 has the potential to protect against radiation-induced late normal tissue damage. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. The puzzle of the lyman continuum polarization of qsos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Shields

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediante espectropolarimetr a reciente de cuasares se ha encontrado un sor- prendente incremento en la polarizaci on del cont nuo de Lyman en varios objetos. Discutimos algunos intentos recientes para explicar este hecho, que incluyen el papel de la absorci on de Lyman en PG 1222+228. Presentamos nuevos resultados te oricos que involucran dispersi on por electrones en una corona caliente o en un viento por encima de un disco de acreci on, y la polarizaci on que resulta del efecto relativista de la radiaci on que regresa. Potencialemente estos mecanismos pueden alcanzar niveles de polarizaci on observables en longitudes de onda cortas, pero ninguno logra ex- plicar cuantitativamente los incrementos en la polarizaci on del cont nuo de Lyman. Se requiere urgentemente mayor capacidad para llevar a cabo espectropolarimetr a en el ultravioleta desde sat elites para esclarecer este fen omeno.

  15. Lyman-alpha Emission From Cosmic Structure I: Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Kollmeier, Juna A; Davé, Romeel; Gould, Andrew; Katz, Neal; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Weinberg, David H

    2009-01-01

    We present predictions for the fluorescent Lyman-alpha emission signature arising from photoionized, optically thick structures in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) cosmological simulations of a Lambda-CDM universe using a Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha radiative transfer code. We calculate the expected Lyman-alpha image and 2-dimensional spectra for gas exposed to a uniform ultraviolet ionizing background as well as gas exposed additionally to the photoionizing radiation from a local quasar, after correcting for the self-shielding of hydrogen. As a test of our numerical methods and for application to current observations, we examine simplified analytic structures that are uniformly or anisotropically illuminated. We compare these results with recent observations. We discuss future observing campaigns on large telescopes and realistic strategies for detecting fluorescence owing to the ambient metagalactic ionization and in regions close to bright quasars. While it will take hundreds of hours on the current genera...

  16. Low-redshift evolution of the Lyman $\\alpha$ Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Theuns, T; Efstathiou, G P

    1998-01-01

    The low-redshift evolution of the intergalactic medium is investigated using hydrodynamic cosmological simulations. The assumed cosmological model is a critical density cold dark matter universe. The imposed uniform background of ionizing radiation has the amplitude, shape and redshift evolution as computed from the observed quasar luminosity function by Haardt & Madau. We have analysed simulated Lyman-alpha spectra using Voigt-profile fitting, mimicking the procedure with which quasar spectra are analysed. Our simulations reproduce the observed evolution of the number of Lyman-alpha absorption lines over the whole observed interval of z=0.5 to z=4. In particular, our simulations show that the decrease in the rate of evolution of Lyman-alpha absorption lines at z< 2, as observed by Hubble Space Telescope, can be explained by the steep decline in the photo-ionizing background resulting from the rapid decline in quasar numbers at low redshift.

  17. Indirect Evidence for Escaping Lyman Continuum Photons in Local Lyman Break Galaxy Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael; Heckman, Timothy M.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Overzier, Roderik

    2015-01-01

    A population of early star-forming galaxies is the leading candidate for the re-ionization of the universe. It is still unclear, however, what conditions and physical processes would enable a significant fraction of the ionizing photons to escape from these gas-rich galaxies. In addition, studies of high redshift galaxies have yet to uncover a large sample of galaxies with the required high escape fraction of ionizing photons.We have uncovered a sample of local analogs to high-redshift, star-forming Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) called Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) catalogs. These galaxies are remarkably similar to LBGs in their properties-- morphology, size, UV luminosity, SFR, mass, velocity dispersion, metallicity and dust content. We obtained HST COS far-UV spectroscopy plus ancillary multi-waveband data of a sample of 22 LBAs to look for indirect evidence of escaping ionizing radiation (leakiness).We measure three parameters: (1) the residual intensity in the cores of saturated interstellar low-ionization absorption-lines, which indicates incomplete covering by that gas in the galaxy. (2) The relative amount of blue-shifted Lyman alpha line emission, which can indicate the existence of holes in the neutral hydrogen on the front-side of the galaxy outflow, and (3) the relative weakness of the [SII] optical emission lines that trace matter-bounded HII regions. We find all three diagnostics agree well with one another. Finally, we find the strongest correlation between these leakiness indicators and both the compactness of the galactic star-forming region (size and star formation rate/area) and the speed of the galactic outflow. This suggests that extreme feedback- a high intensity of ionizing radiation and strong pressure from both radiation and a hot galactic wind- combines to create significant holes in the neutral gas. These results not only shed new light on the physical

  18. Prevention of normal tissue complications in radiation therapy of head and neck cancer : the role of 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.B. Wijers (Oda)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn The Netherlands. head and neck cancer (3.9%) ranks the eighth most frequemly diagnoscd malignant tumor. Radiation therapy (IIT) plays an important role in the treatmem of patients with head and neck cancer, as they constitute approximately 6% of those treated in a routine radiation th

  19. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for late rectal bleeding, stool frequency and fecal incontinence after radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaake, Wouter; van der Schaaf, Arjen; van Dijk, Lisanne V.; Bongaerts, Alfons H. H.; van den Bergh, Alfons C. M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Curative radiotherapy for prostate cancer may lead to anorectal side effects, including rectal bleeding, fecal incontinence, increased stool frequency and rectal pain. The main objective of this study was to develop multivariable NTCP models for these side effects. Material a

  20. Dose reduction to normal tissues as compared to the gross tumor by using intensity modulated radiotherapy in thoracic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla NK

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT is a powerful tool, which might go a long way in reducing radiation doses to critical structures and thereby reduce long term morbidities. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of IMRT in reducing the dose to the critical normal tissues while maintaining the desired dose to the volume of interest for thoracic malignancies. Materials and methods During the period January 2002 to March 2004, 12 patients of various sites of malignancies in the thoracic region were treated using physical intensity modulator based IMRT. Plans of these patients treated with IMRT were analyzed using dose volume histograms. Results An average dose reduction of the mean values by 73% to the heart, 69% to the right lung and 74% to the left lung, with respect to the GTV could be achieved with IMRT. The 2 year disease free survival was 59% and 2 year overall survival was 59%. The average number of IMRT fields used was 6. Conclusion IMRT with inverse planning enabled us to achieve desired dose distribution, due to its ability to provide sharp dose gradients at the junction of tumor and the adjacent critical organs.

  1. Correlations between clinical normal tissue radiosensitivity and single nucleotide polymorphisms in ATM, XRCC1, XRCC3, APEX, SOD2, and TGF-B1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsner, Jan; Andreassen, Christian Nicolaj; Overgaard, Marie

    Cancer patients exhibit large patient-to-patient variability in normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. Several observations indicate that the variation in normal tissue sensitivity is influenced by genetic factors. However, little is known about the genetic variations underlying inter......-individual differences when unselected cancer patients undergo radiotherapy. To address the genetic basis of variations in radiation-induced normal tissue reactions, different lines of experiments can be pursued. We are using a 'candidate gene approach' where we analyse subsets of genetic variants in genes involved...... in biological pathways suspected to underlie phenotypes of interest. These variants can be either common alterations like single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs, or rare variants in potential susceptibility loci like ATM. In parallel, we are using microarray analysis on normal fibroblasts isolated from patients...

  2. Identification of reliable reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in oral squamous cell carcinomas compared to adjacent normal tissues in the F344 rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinjian; McCormick, David L

    2016-08-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) induced in F344 rats by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) demonstrate considerable phenotypic similarity to human oral cancers and the model has been widely used for carcinogenesis and chemoprevention studies. Molecular characterization of this model needs reliable reference genes (RGs) to avoid false- positive and -negative results for proper interpretation of gene expression data between tumor and adjacent normal tissues. Microarray analysis of 11 pairs of OSCC and site-matched phenotypically normal oral tissues from 4-NQO-treated rats identified 10 stably expressed genes in OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues (p>0.5, CVexpression analysis. We successfully identified Hsp90ab1 as a stable RG in 4-NQO-induced OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues in F344 rats. The combination of two stably expressed genes may be a better option for gene normalization in tissue samples.

  3. Enhanced direct collapse due to Lyman {\\alpha} feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Jarrett L

    2016-01-01

    We assess the impact of trapped Lyman {\\alpha} cooling radiation on the formation of direct collapse black holes (DCBHs). We apply a one-zone chemical and thermal evolution model, accounting for the photodetachment of H$^-$ ions, precursors to the key coolant H$_{\\rm 2}$, by Lyman {\\alpha} photons produced during the collapse of a cloud of primordial gas in an atomic cooling halo at high redshift. We find that photodetachment of H$^-$ by trapped Lyman {\\alpha} photons can lower the level of the H$_{\\rm 2}$-dissociating background radiation field required for DCBH formation substantially, dropping the critical flux by up to an order of magnitude. This translates into a large increase in the expected number density of DCBHs in the early Universe, and implies that DCBHs may be the seeds for the BHs residing in the centers of a significant fraction of galaxies today. We find that detachment of H$^-$ by Lyman {\\alpha} has the strongest impact on the critical flux for the relatively high background radiation temper...

  4. The nature of proximate damped Lyman α systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellison, S.L.; Prochaska, J.X.; Hennawi, J.; Lopez, S.; Usher, C.; Wolfe, A.M.; Russell, D.M.; Benn, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    We present high-resolution echelle spectra of seven proximate damped Lyman α (PDLA) systems. The relative velocity separation of each PDLA from the background quasar is ΔV < 3000 km s−1. Combining our sample with a further nine PDLAs from the literature we compare the chemical properties of the prox

  5. Broadband distortion modeling in Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest BAO fitting

    CERN Document Server

    Blomqvist, Michael; Bautista, Julian E; Ariño, Andreu; Busca, Nicolás G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Slosar, Anže; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Margala, Daniel; Schneider, Donald P; Vazquez, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorption observed in the spectra of high-redshift quasars has been used as a tracer of large-scale structure by means of the three-dimensional Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest auto-correlation function at redshift $z\\simeq 2.3$, but the need to fit the quasar continuum in every absorption spectrum introduces a broadband distortion that is difficult to correct and causes a systematic error for measuring any broadband properties. We describe a $k$-space model for this broadband distortion based on a multiplicative correction to the power spectrum of the transmitted flux fraction that suppresses power on scales corresponding to the typical length of a Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest spectrum. Implementing the distortion model in fits for the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak position in the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest auto-correlation, we find that the fitting method recovers the input values of the linear bias parameter $b_{F}$ and the redshift-space distortion parameter $\\beta_{F}$ for mock dat...

  6. Oxygen sensitivity of krypton and Lyman-alpha hygrometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van A.; Kohsiek, W.; Bruin, de H.A.R.

    2003-01-01

    The oxygen sensitivity of krypton and Lyman-¿ hygrometers is studied. Using a dewpoint generator and a controlled nitrogen/oxygen flow the extinction coefficients of five hygrometers associated with the third-order Taylor expansion of the Lambert¿Beer law around reference conditions for oxygen and f

  7. Exploring 21CM - Lyman Alpha Emitter Synergies for SKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dayal, Pratika; Hutter, Anne; Müller, Volker; Trott, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    We study the signatures of reionization and ionizing properties of the early galaxies in the cross-correlations between the 21cm emission from the spin-flip transition of neutral hydrogen (H I ) and the underlying galaxy population, in particular a sub-population of galaxies visible as Lyman Alpha E

  8. Perfusion changes in the RIF-1 tumour and normal tissues after carbogen and nicotinamide, individually and combined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honess, D. J.; Bleehen, N. M.

    1995-01-01

    The strategy of combining carbogen breathing and nicotinamide to overcome chronic and acute hypoxia respectively is being evaluated clinically. The effects of both agents individually and in combination on relative perfusion of 400-700 mm3 RIF-1 tumours and normal tissues were measured by 86Rb extraction. Carbogen breathing alone for 6 min increased relative tumour perfusion by 50-70% compared with control at flow rates of 50 to 200 ml min-1, but the effect was lost at 300 ml min-1. All flow rates also produced similar increases in relative perfusion of lung, of between 36% and 58%, and smaller increases in skin, of between 20% and 34%. The minimum breathing time at 150 ml min-1 to produce a significant increase in relative tumour perfusion was 4.5 min, and the effect was maintained up to 9 min. Nicotinamide alone at 1000 mg kg-1 60 min before assay did not alter relative tumour perfusion. Comparing the combination of nicotinamide with 6 min carbogen breathing at 150 ml min-1 with carbogen breathing alone showed no difference in relative tumour perfusion; increases were of 36% and 42% respectively. Nicotinamide-induced alterations in microcirculation associated with reduction of acute hypoxia have therefore not been detected by 86Rb extraction. The perfusion-enhancing effect of carbogen in this tumour is probably an important component of its radiosensitising ability, in addition to its known ability to increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, and should be taken into consideration in clinical studies. PMID:7779707

  9. Reduced Activity of Double-Strand Break Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Late Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oorschot, Bregje van, E-mail: b.vanoorschot@amc.uva.nl [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hovingh, Suzanne E. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Moerland, Perry D. [Bioinformatics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Medema, Jan Paul; Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrieling, Harry [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Franken, Nicolaas A.P. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical parameters and DNA damage response as possible risk factors for radiation toxicity in the setting of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Clinical parameters of 61 prostate cancer patients, 34 with (overresponding, OR) and 27 without (non-responding, NR) severe late radiation toxicity were assembled. In addition, for a matched subset the DNA damage repair kinetics (γ-H2AX assay) and expression profiles of DNA repair genes were determined in ex vivo irradiated lymphocytes. Results: Examination of clinical data indicated none of the considered clinical parameters to be correlated with the susceptibility of patients to develop late radiation toxicity. Although frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induced immediately after irradiation were similar (P=.32), significantly higher numbers of γ-H2AX foci were found 24 hours after irradiation in OR compared with NR patients (P=.03). Patient-specific γ-H2AX foci decay ratios were significantly higher in NR patients than in OR patients (P<.0001). Consequently, NR patients seem to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) more efficiently than OR patients. Moreover, gene expression analysis indicated several genes of the homologous recombination pathway to be stronger induced in NR compared with OR patients (P<.05). A similar trend was observed in genes of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway (P=.09). This is congruent with more proficient repair of DNA DSBs in patients without late radiation toxicity. Conclusions: Both gene expression profiling and DNA DSB repair kinetics data imply that less-efficient repair of radiation-induced DSBs may contribute to the development of late normal tissue damage. Induction levels of DSB repair genes (eg, RAD51) may potentially be used to assess the risk for late radiation toxicity.

  10. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Cardiac structures; Dose de tolerance des tissus sains: le coeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyen, J. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Giraud, P. [Universite Rene-Descartes Paris 5, 75 - Paris (France); Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Faculte de medecine de Creteil, universite Paris 12, 94 - Creteil (France); Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, CHU Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France)

    2010-07-15

    Radiation thoracic tumors may be associated with cardiac toxicity because of the central position of the heart in the thorax. The present review aims to describe the cardiotoxicity during radiotherapy of different tumor sites most associated with this complication and the risk factors of cardiotoxicity during radiation therapy. Medline literature searches were performed using the following cardiac - heart - radiotherapy - toxicity - cardiotoxicity - breast cancer - lymphoma. Cardiac toxicity after breast cancer and mediastinal lymphoma is the most reported radiation-induced complication. The most frequent clinical complications are pericarditis, congestive heart failure, and heart infarction. These events are mostly asymptomatic. Thus clinicians have to give particular attention to these complications. Anthracycline treatment is a major risk factor for additional cardiotoxicity during radiotherapy with a synergistic effect. Correction of cardiovascular risk is an important point of the prevention of heart complications. Total dose delivered to the planned target volume (PTV), the dose per fraction and the irradiated volume were correlated to the risk of cardiotoxicity. Volume of heart receiving 35 Gy must be inferior to 30% and dose per fraction should not exceed 2 Gy when dose of prescription exceeds 30 Gy. Maximum heart distance (maximal thickness of heart irradiated) must be less than 1 cm during irradiation of breast cancer. Modern irradiation techniques seem to be associated with a limited risk of heart complication. The use of anthracycline, other cardio-toxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies should incite for great caution by performing a careful treatment planning and optimisation. (authors)

  11. The effect of uterine motion and uterine margins on target and normal tissue doses in intensity modulated radiation therapy of cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, J J; Weiss, E; Abayomi, O K; Siebers, J V; Dogan, N, E-mail: jjgordon@vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, PO Box 980058, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States)

    2011-05-21

    In intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of cervical cancer, uterine motion can be larger than cervix motion, requiring a larger clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margin around the uterine fundus. This work simulates different motion models and margins to estimate the dosimetric consequences. A virtual study used image sets from ten patients. Plans were created with uniform margins of 1 cm (PTV{sub A}) and 2.4 cm (PTV{sub C}), and a margin tapering from 2.4 cm at the fundus to 1 cm at the cervix (PTV{sub B}). Three inter-fraction motion models (MM) were simulated. In MM1, all structures moved with normally distributed rigid body translations. In MM2, CTV motion was progressively magnified as one moved superiorly from the cervix to the fundus. In MM3, both CTV and normal tissue motion were magnified as in MM2, modeling the scenario where normal tissues move into the void left by the mobile uterus. Plans were evaluated using static and percentile DVHs. For a conventional margin (PTV{sub A}), quasi-realistic uterine motion (MM3) reduces fundus dose by about 5 Gy and increases normal tissue volumes receiving 30-50 Gy by {approx}5%. A tapered CTV-to-PTV margin can restore fundus and CTV doses, but will increase normal tissue volumes receiving 30-50 Gy by a further {approx}5%.

  12. Cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in patients treated with cisplatin-based chemoradiation: lack of correlation between normal tissues and primary tumor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebers, F.J.; Pluim, D.; Hart, A.A.M.; Verheij, M.; Balm, A.J.M.; Fons, G.; Rasch, C.R.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Bartelink, H.; Begg, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this study, the formation of cisplatin-DNA adducts after concurrent cisplatin-radiation and the relationship between adduct-formation in primary tumor tissue and normal tissue were investigated. METHODS: Three intravenous cisplatin-regimens, given concurrently with radiation, were studie

  13. Cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in patients treated with cisplatin-based chemoradiation: lack of correlation between normal tissues and primary tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebers, F.J.P.; Pluim, D.; Hart, A.A.M.; Verheij, M.; Balm, A.J.M.; Fons, G.; Rasch, C.R.N.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Bartelink, H.; Begg, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the formation of cisplatin-DNA adducts after concurrent cisplatin-radiation and the relationship between adduct-formation in primary tumor tissue and normal tissue were investigated. Methods: Three intravenous cisplatin-regimens, given concurrently with radiation, were stu

  14. A preclinical study on the rescue of normal tissue by nicotinic acid in high-dose treatment with APO866, a specific nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Thougaard, Annemette V; Jensen, Peter Buhl;

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase APO866 is a promising cancer drug currently in phase II clinical trials in oncology. Here, we present a strategy for increasing the therapeutic potential of APO866 through the rescue of normal tissues by coadministration of nicotinic acid (Vitamin...

  15. Role of endothelium in radiation-induced normal tissue damages; Role de l'endothelium dans les dommages radio-induits aux tissus sains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliat, F

    2007-05-15

    More than half of cancers are treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver enough ionising radiation to destroy cancer cells without exceeding the level that the surrounding healthy cells can tolerate. Unfortunately, radiation-induced normal tissue injury is still a dose limiting factor in the treatment of cancer with radiotherapy. The knowledge of normal tissue radiobiology is needed to determine molecular mechanisms involved in normal tissue pathogenic pathways in order to identify therapeutic targets and develop strategies to prevent and /or reduce side effects of radiation therapy. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced injury. Our work shows that endothelial cells promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration and fibro-genic phenotype after irradiation. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time the importance of PAI-1 in radiation-induced normal tissue damage suggesting that PAI-1 may represent a molecular target to limit injury following radiotherapy. We describe a new role for the TGF-b/Smad pathway in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced damages. TGF-b/Smad pathway is involved in the fibro-genic phenotype of VSMC induced by irradiated EC as well as in the radiation-induced PAI-1 expression in endothelial cells. (author)

  16. HDR monotherapy for prostate cancer: A simulation study to determine the effect of catheter displacement on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina); M.A. Roos (Martin); S. Aluwini (Shafak)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The aim of this study was to systematically analyse the effect of catheter displacements both on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation in fractionated high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, using a simulation study, and to define tolerances for catheter displacemen

  17. On the Diffuse Lyman-alpha Halo Around Lyman-alpha Emitting Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lake, Ethan; Cen, Renyue; Sadoun, Raphael; Momose, Rieko; Ouchi, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Ly$\\alpha$ photons scattered by neutral hydrogen atoms in the circumgalactic media or produced in the halos of star-forming galaxies are expected to lead to extended Ly$\\alpha$ emission around galaxies. Such low surface brightness Ly$\\alpha$ halos (LAHs) have been detected by stacking Ly$\\alpha$ images of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. We study the origin of LAHs by performing radiative transfer modeling of nine $z=3.1$ Lyman-Alpha Emitters (LAEs) in a high resolution hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulation. We develop a method of computing the mean Ly$\\alpha$ surface brightness profile of each LAE by effectively integrating over many different observing directions. Without adjusting any parameters, our model yields an average Ly$\\alpha$ surface brightness profile in remarkable agreement with observations. We find that observed LAHs can not be accounted for solely by photons originating from the central LAE and scattered to large radii by hydrogen atoms in the circumgalactic gas. Instead, Ly$\\alpha$ em...

  18. Antiepidermal growth factor variant III scFv fragment: effect of radioiodination method on tumor targeting and normal tissue clearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Sriram [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Vaidyanathan, Ganesan [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Kuan, C.-T. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Bigner, Darell D. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States) and Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)]. E-mail: zalut001@duke.edu

    2006-01-15

    Introduction: MR1-1 is a single-chain Fv (scFv) fragment that binds with high affinity to epidermal growth factor receptor variant III, which is overexpressed on gliomas and other tumors but is not present on normal tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate four different methods for labeling MR1-1 scFv that had been previously investigated for the radioiodinating of an intact anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (anti-EGFRvIII) monoclonal antibody (mAb) L8A4. Methods: The MR1-1 scFv was labeled with {sup 125}I/{sup 131}I using the Iodogen method, and was also radiohalogenated with acylation agents bearing substituents that were positively charged-N-succinimidyl-3-[*I]iodo-5-pyridine carboxylate and N-succinimidyl-4-guanidinomethyl-3-[*I]iodobenzoate ([*I]SGMIB)-and negatively charged-N-succinimidyl-3-[*I]iodo-4-phosphonomethylbenzoate ([*I]SIPMB). In vitro internalization assays were performed with the U87MG{delta}EGFR cell line, and the tissue distribution of the radioiodinated scFv fragments was evaluated in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous U87MG{delta}EGFR xenografts. Results and Conclusion: As seen previously with the anti-EGFRvIII IgG mAb, retention of radioiodine activity in U87MG{delta}EGFR cells in the internalization assay was labeling method dependent, with SGMIB and SIPMB yielding the most prolonged retention. However, unlike the case with the intact mAb, the results of the internalization assays were not predictive of in vivo tumor localization capacity of the labeled scFv. Renal activity was dependent on the nature of the labeling method. With MR1-1 labeled using SIPMB, kidney uptake was highest and most prolonged; catabolism studies indicated that this uptake primarily was in the form of {epsilon}-N-3-[*I]iodo-4-phosphonomethylbenzoyl lysine.

  19. The potential for dose dumping in normal tissues with IMRT for pelvic and H&N cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Nandanuri M S; Mazur, Andrzej K; Sampath, Seshadri; Osian, Adrian; Sood, Brij M; Ravi, Akkamma; Nori, Dattatreyudu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the potential for dose dumping in normal tissues (>85% of prescription dose) and to analyze effectiveness of techniques used in reducing dose dumping during IMRT. Two hundred sixty-five intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for 55 patients with prostate, head-and-neck (H&N), and cervix cancers with 6-MV photon beams and >5 fields were reviewed to analyze why dose dumping occurred, and the techniques used to reduce dose dumping. Various factors including gantry angles, depth of beams (100-SSD), duration of optimization, severity of dose-volume constraints (DVC) on normal structures, and spatial location of planning treatment volumes (PTV) were reviewed in relation to dose dumping. In addition, the effect of partial contouring of rectum in beam's path on dose dumping in rectum was studied. Dose dumping occurred at d(max) in 17 pelvic cases (85% to 129%). This was related to (1) depth of beams (100 SSD [source-to-skin distance]), (2) PTV located between normal structures with DVC, and (3) relative lack of rectum and bladder in beam's path. Dose dumping could be reduced to 85% by changing beam angles and/or DVC for normal structures in 5 cases and by creating "phantom structures" in 12 cases. Decreasing the iterations (duration of optimization) also reduced dose dumping and monitor units (MUs). Part of uncontoured rectum, if present in the field, received a higher dose than the contoured rectum with DVC, indicating that complete delineation of normal structures and DVC is necessary to prevent dose dumping. In H&N, when PTV extends inadvertently into air beyond the body even by a few millimeters, dose dumping occurred in beam's path (220% for 5-field and 170%, 7-field plans). Keeping PTV margins within body contour reduced this type of dose dumping. Beamlet optimization, duration of optimization, spatial location of PTV, and DVC on PTV and normal structures has the potential to cause dose dumping. However, these

  20. Oligo dements Se, Zn, Mn Plus Lachesin Muta as Radioprotectors of Normal Tissues and Radiosensitizers 9 p.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crescenti, E. J.; Rovera, E. S.; Croci, M.; Medina, V.; Cricco, G.; Mohamad, N.; Martin, G.; Nunez, M.; Bergoc, R. M.

    2004-07-01

    The in vitro effect of O-LM on radiosensitivity of different human cell lines and the in vivo tolerance to high doses of ionizing radiation induced by the combination of Se, Zm and Mn plus Lachesis muta (O-LM) was evaluated. Sprague-Dawley rats received whole-body irradiation with a single dose (2 to 15 Gy) employing a ''137Cs source of 189 TB{sub q} (7.7 Gy/min). A half of rats received daily se O-LM starting 10 days before irradiation. these animals receiving 8, 10, and 12mGy showed significantly higher survival versus controls (p<0.0001, 0.003 and 0.0083, respectively). ''30LD{sub 5}0 value for O-LM treated rats was 9,6 Gy vs. 5.8 Gy for controls (p<0.0001). the protective effect of O-LM was also in vivo evaluated on small intestine and bone marrow of nude mice irradiated with a single whole-body dose of 10 Gy. Mice were sacrificed 5 days after irradiation. Mice receiving se daily O-LM starting 90 days before irradiation, showed better villous and crypts conservation, lack of oedema and vascular damage in comparison to controls. Bone marrows of treated animals showed grade I-II aplasia instead of grade III aplasia in control ones. For in vitro studies, MDA-231 cells (human breast carcinoma) and HBL-100 (normal mammary epithelium) were irradiated with 0-10 Gy employing the same source. Cell cultures were treated with O-Lm for 24 hs previous and up to 24 hs post-irradiation. Number of colonies over 50 cells where counted after 10 days. Cell surviving curves indicated that O-LM produced a significant decrease (p<0.001) in survival of transformed cells while no difference was observed in normal HBL-100. These results demonstrated a protective effect on normal tissues exerted by O-LM for in vivo high doses of ionizing irradiation and a significant increase in radiosensitivity ono the transformed MDA-231cells but not in normal HBL-100 cells. (Author) 11 refs.

  1. Modeling the Lyman-alpha Forest in Collisionless Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sorini, Daniele; Lukić, Zarija; Hennawi, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamic simulations can accurately predict the properties of the intergalactic medium (IGM), but only under the condition of retaining high spatial resolution necessary to resolve density fluctuations in the IGM. This resolution constraint prohibits simulating large volumes, such as those probed by BOSS and future surveys, like DESI and 4MOST. To overcome this limitation, we present Iteratively Matched Statistics (IMS), a novel method to accurately model the Lyman-alpha forest with collisionless N-body simulations, where the relevant density fluctuations are unresolved. We use a small-box, high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation to obtain the probability distribution function (PDF) and the power spectrum of the real-space Lyman-alpha forest flux. These two statistics are iteratively mapped onto a pseudo-flux field of an N-body simulation, which we construct from the matter density. We demonstrate that our method can perfectly reproduce line-of-sight observables, such as the PDF and power spe...

  2. New interpretations of extraterrestrial Lyman-alpha observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, P. W.; Fahr, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    The solar Lyman-alpha radiation pressure affects the orbits and the velocities of the interstellar particles entering the solar system. This leads to enhanced particle losses in the heliosphere, since particles spend a longer time crossing it. This causes a stronger decrease of the density with decreasing distances from the sun than had been calculated without accounting for the radiation pressure. Furthermore, the emission pattern of the solar Lyman-alpha radiation is anisotropic and rotates with the sun in a 27-day period. This causes a temporal change in the location of the intensity extrema. At the same time it produces hydrogen density anisotropies with extrema deviating in their directions from those which had been calculated without consideration of the radiation pressure.

  3. The Environmental Impact of Lyman-break Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tasker, E J; Bryan, Greg L.; Tasker, Elizabeth J.

    2006-01-01

    We perform cosmological simulations of galaxies forming at z=3 using the hydrodynamics grid code, Enzo. By selecting the largest galaxies in the volume to correspond to Lyman-break galaxies, we construct observational spectra of the HI flux distribution around these objects, as well as column densities of CIV and OVI throughout a refined region. We successfully reproduce the most recent observations of the mean HI flux in the close vicinity of Lyman-break galaxies but see no evidence for the proximity effect in earlier observations. While our galaxies do return metals to the IGM, their quantity and volume appears to be somewhat less than observed. We conclude that either we do not adequately resolve galactic winds, or that at least some of the intergalactic metal enrichment is by early epoch objects whose mass is smaller than our minimum resolved halo mass.

  4. The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Kano, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N..; Ishikawa, R.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Hara, H.; hide

    2014-01-01

    To Understand energy release process in the Sun including solar flares, it is essentially important to measure the magnetic field of the atmosphere of the Sun. Magnetic field measurement of the upper layers (upper chromosphere and above) was technically difficult and not well investigated yet. Upper chromosphere and transition region magnetic field measurement by Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) sounding rocket to be launched in 2015. The proposal is already selected and developments of the flight components are going.

  5. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: The mandible; Dose de tolerance des tissus sains: la mandibule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, A.; Bensadoun, R.J. [Service d' oncologie radiotherapie, PRC, CHU de la Miletrie, 86 - Poitiers (France)

    2010-07-15

    Describing dose constraints for organs at risk in external beam radiotherapy is a key-point in order to maximize the therapeutic ratio. In head and neck irradiation, mandible is frequently exposed to ionising radiation-related complications. Those complications will be exposed after a short description of anatomical and physiopathological aspects. A literature search was performed using the Pubmed-Medline database, with following keywords (Osteoradionecrosis, Radiotherapy, Mandible, Toxicity, Organ at risk, Trismus). Incidence and dose constraints will be reported. The incidence of osteoradionecrosis decreased since the 1990, but it remains a dreaded late complication of head and neck cancer radiotherapy. It essentially occurs with cumulative doses of 66 Gy on the mandible (standard fractionation) applied to a significant volume. Respecting oral care is crucial to avoid this kind of complication. The respect of the dose-constraint described should not lead to under treat tumor bed in a curative intent. Trismus related to ionising radiation is poorly described. Literature data cannot lead to describe precise dose constraints. (authors)

  6. NICMOS Snapshot Survey of Damped Lyman Alpha Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, J W; Colbert, James W.; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    We image 19 quasars with 22 damped Lyman alpha (DLA) systems using the F160W filter and the Near-Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, in both direct and coronagraphic modes. We reach 5 sigma detection limits of ~H=22 in the majority of our images. We compare our observations to the observed Lyman-break population of high-redshift galaxies, as well as Bruzual & Charlot evolutionary models of present-day galaxies redshifted to the distances of the absorption systems. We predict H magnitudes for our DLAs, assuming they are producing stars like an L* Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) at their redshift. Comparing these predictions to our sensitivity, we find that we should be able to detect a galaxy around 0.5-1.0 L* (LBG) for most of our observations. We find only one new possible candidate, that near LBQS0010-0012. This scarcity of candidates leads us to the conclusion that most DLA systems are not drawn from a normal LBG luminosity function nor a local galaxy luminosity fun...

  7. Lyman Break Galaxies and the Reionization of the Intergalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, H C; Papovich, C; Ferguson, Henry C.; Dickinson, Mark; Papovich, Casey

    2002-01-01

    Near-infrared observations of Lyman-break galaxies at redshifts z~3 are beginning to provide constraints on ages, star-formation histories, dust content, metallicities, and stellar masses. At present, uncertainties of more than an order of magnitude are typical for many of these parameters. It is nonetheless interesting to ask what the stellar-population models imply for the existence and luminosities of Lyman-break galaxies at higher redshift. To this end we examine the inferred star-formation rates in two well-studied samples of galaxies as a function of redshift out to z = 10 for various best-fit and limiting cases. Taken at face value, the generally young ages (typically 10^8 +- 0.5 yr) of the z = 3 Lyman break galaxies imply that their stars were not present much beyond z=4. By z = 6 the cosmic star-formation rate from the progenitors of these galaxies is less than 10% of star-formation rate at z=3 +- 0.5, even for maximally-old models, provided the derivative of the star-formation rate SFR(t) is monoton...

  8. Individualized 3D Reconstruction of Normal Tissue Dose for Patients With Long-term Follow-up: A Step Toward Understanding Dose Risk for Late Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Angela [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K.; Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moseley, Joanne L. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hodgson, David C., E-mail: David.Hodgson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Understanding the relationship between normal tissue dose and delayed radiation toxicity is an important component of developing more effective radiation therapy. Late outcome data are generally available only for patients who have undergone 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3D normal tissue dosimetry derived from reconstructed 2D treatment plans in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional lung, heart, and breast volumes were reconstructed from 2D planning radiographs for HL patients who received mediastinal radiation therapy. For each organ, a reference 3D organ was modified with patient-specific structural information, using deformable image processing software. Radiation therapy plans were reconstructed by applying treatment parameters obtained from patient records to the reconstructed 3D volumes. For each reconstructed organ mean dose (D{sub mean}) and volumes covered by at least 5 Gy (V{sub 5}) and 20Gy (V{sub 20}) were calculated. This process was performed for 15 patients who had both 2D and 3D planning data available to compare the reconstructed normal tissue doses with those derived from the primary CT planning data and also for 10 historically treated patients with only 2D imaging available. Results: For patients with 3D planning data, the normal tissue doses could be reconstructed accurately using 2D planning data. Median differences in D{sub mean} between reconstructed and actual plans were 0.18 Gy (lungs), -0.15 Gy (heart), and 0.30 Gy (breasts). Median difference in V{sub 5} and V{sub 20} were less than 2% for each organ. Reconstructed 3D dosimetry was substantially higher in historical mantle-field treatments than contemporary involved-field mediastinal treatments: average D{sub mean} values were 15.2 Gy vs 10.6 Gy (lungs), 27.0 Gy vs 14.3 Gy (heart), and 8.0 Gy vs 3.2 Gy (breasts). Conclusions: Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorbed dose

  9. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid affects {gamma}H2AX expression in osteosarcoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor and normal tissue cell lines after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattmann, C.; Oertel, S.; Thiemann, M.; Weber, K.J.; Schmezer, P.; Zelezny, O.; Lopez Perez, R.; Kulozik, A.E.; Debus, J.; Ehemann, V. [Univ. Children' s Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology, Immunology and Pulmology

    2012-02-15

    Osteosarcoma and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors are tumor entities with varying response to common standard therapy protocols. Histone acetylation affects chromatin structure and gene expression which are considered to influence radiation sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the combination therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and irradiation on atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors and osteosarcoma compared to normal tissue cell lines. Clonogenic assay was used to determine cell survival. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) were examined by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE) as well as by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining involving flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and immunoblot analysis. SAHA lead to an increased radiosensitivity in tumor but not in normal tissue cell lines. {gamma}H2AX expression as an indicator for DSB was significantly increased when SAHA was applied 24 h before irradiation to the sarcoma cell cultures. In contrast, {gamma}H2AX expression in the normal tissue cell lines was significantly reduced when irradiation was combined with SAHA. Analysis of initial DNA fragmentation and fragment rejoining by PFGE, however, did not reveal differences in response to the SAHA pretreatment for either cell type. SAHA increases radiosensitivity in tumor but not normal tissue cell lines. The increased H2AX phosphorylation status of the SAHA-treated tumor cells post irradiation likely reflects its delayed dephosphorylation within the DNA damage signal decay rather than chromatin acetylation-dependent differences in the overall efficacy of DSB induction and rejoining. The results support the hypothesis that combining SAHA with irradiation may provide a promising strategy in the treatment of solid tumors. (orig.)

  10. Long-term effects of an intracavitary treatment with californium-252 on normal tissue. [Swine, /sup 226/Ra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Beamer, J.L.; Mahony, T.D.; Cross, F.T.; Lund, J.E.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1976-01-01

    About one hundred fifty swine were exposed to either radium-226 or californium-252 sources in the uterine cervix to determine an RBE for both acute and long-term effects. That value for early changes in the tissues at risk in the treatment of cervical cancer was between 6.2 and 6.8. The incidence of complications increased with time after exposure, especially among animals treated with /sup 252/Cf. Analysis of rectal injury showed that ulceration occurred frequently within a year postexposure at doses between 1600 and 2400 rad calculated at 2 cm lateral to the source midline. Fat necrosis and smooth muscle atrophy, resulting in a local rectal stricture, were delayed changes observed in some animals. The lower ureter was the site for a greater frequency of complications than the GI tract. Ureteral stricture often occurred at doses of 1200 rad from /sup 252/Cf and 7000 rad from /sup 226/Ra. Observation of delayed effects in the uterine-cervix in animals held up to 4 years postexposure indicate that the RBE for /sup 252/Cf may be increased to a value as high as 18, while repair may have even decreased it to about 5.6 in the rectum. Fifty swine are still being observed for long-term effects after doses above 800 rad from /sup 252/Cf and 5000 rad from /sup 226/Ra.

  11. Statistical Properties of Diffuse Lyman-alpha Halos around Star-forming Galaxies at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Momose, Rieko; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yuma, Suraphong; Mori, Masao; Umemura, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    We present statistical properties of diffuse Lyman-alpha halos (LAHs) around high-$z$ star-forming galaxies with large Subaru samples of Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at $z=2.2$. We make subsamples defined by the physical quantities of LAEs' central Lyman-alpha luminosities, UV magnitudes, Lyman-alpha equivalent widths, and UV slopes, and investigate LAHs' radial surface brightness (SB) profiles and scale lengths $r_n$ as a function of these physical quantities. We find that there exist prominent LAHs around LAEs with faint Lyman-alpha luminosities, bright UV luminosities, and small Lyman-alpha equivalent widths in cumulative radial Lyman-alpha SB profiles. We confirm this trend with the anti-correlation between $r_n$ and Lyman-alpha luminosities (equivalent widths) based on the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient that is $\\rho=-0.9$ ($-0.7$) corresponding to the $96\\%$ ($93\\%$) confidence level, although the correlation between $r_n$ and UV magnitudes is not clearly found in the rank correlation coefficien...

  12. Lyman alpha emission from the first galaxies : Implications of UV backgrounds and the formation of molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Spaans, Maarten; Zaroubi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Lyman alpha line is a robust tracer of high redshift galaxies. We present estimates of Lyman alpha emission from a protogalactic halo illuminated by UV background radiation fields with various intensities. For this purpose, we performed cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with the adaptive me

  13. Lyman alpha emission from the first galaxies : Implications of UV backgrounds and the formation of molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Spaans, Maarten; Zaroubi, S.

    The Lyman alpha line is a robust tracer of high redshift galaxies. We present estimates of Lyman alpha emission from a protogalactic halo illuminated by UV background radiation fields with various intensities. For this purpose, we performed cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with the adaptive

  14. The Lyman β forest as a cosmic thermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iršič, Vid [The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, I-34151 Trieste (Italy); Viel, Matteo, E-mail: virsic@ictp.it, E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of high resolution hydrodynamic simulations in terms of Lyman α and Lyman β one dimensional flux power spectra P{sub αα} and P{sub ββ}). In particular, we focus on the behaviour that the flux auto-power spectra and cross-power spectra P{sub αβ}) display when the intergalactic medium (IGM) thermal history is changed in a range of values that bracket a reference model, while cosmological parameters are kept fixed to best fit the cosmic microwave background data. We present empirical fits that describe at the sub-percent level the dependence of the power spectra on the thermal parameters. At the largest scales, the power spectra show a constant bias between each other that is set by the parameters describing the IGM thermal state. The cross-power spectrum has an oscillatory pattern and crosses zero at a scale which depends on T{sub 0}, the IGM temperature at the mean density, for reasonable values of the power-law index γ of the IGM temperature-density relation T=T{sub 0}(1+δ){sup γ-1}). By performing a Fisher matrix analysis, we find that the power spectrum P{sub ββ} is more sensitive to the thermal history than P{sub αα} alone, due to the fact that it probes denser regions than Lyman α. When we combine the power and cross spectra the constraints on γ can be improved by a factor ∼ 4, while the constraints on T{sub 0} improve by a factor of ∼ 2. We address the role of signal-to-noise and resolution by mocking realistic observations and we conclude that the framework presented in this work can significantly improve the knowledge of the IGM thermal state, which will in turn guarantee better constraints on IGM-derived cosmological parameters.

  15. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Ovaries; Tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: les ovaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, E.; Champetier, C.; Zaccariotto, A.; Duberge, T.; Guerder, C. [Departement de radiotherapie, hopital de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France); Pointreau, Y. [Service Corad, pole Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Ortholan, C. [Service de radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Chauvet, B. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2010-07-15

    Clinical situations requiring protections of ovaries are mainly paediatric irradiations and pre-menopausal pelvic irradiations. The main complication of ovarian irradiation is the induced castration. Ovaries are extremely radiosensitive organs with strong interpersonal variations. The castrative effect of irradiation depends mainly on two factors: patient's age and the dose delivered to ovaries. The surgical technique of ovarian transposition allows to minimize the dose received by ovaries by taking them away, out of irradiation fields; the aim is to exclude them from the volume receiving 5 Gy or more, and if possible from those receiving 2 Gy. This technique becomes integrated into a multidisciplinary approach of conservation of fertility for patients exposed to other cytotoxic treatments. (authors)

  16. Complications - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications - national data. This data set includes national-level data the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  17. Complications - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Complications measures - state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and...

  18. Complications - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications - provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)...

  19. Pregnancy Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy complications Complications of pregnancy are health problems that ... pregnancy. Expand all | Collapse all Health problems before pregnancy Before pregnancy, make sure to talk to your ...

  20. Lyman-alpha radiation hydrodynamics of galactic winds before cosmic reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Radiation from the first stars and galaxies initiated the dramatic phase transition marking an end to the cosmic dark ages. The emission and absorption signatures from the Lyman-alpha transition of neutral hydrogen have been indispensable in extending the observational frontier for high-redshift galaxies into the epoch of reionization. Lyman-alpha radiative transfer provides clues about the processes leading to Lyman-alpha escape from individual galaxies and the subsequent transmission through the intergalactic medium. Cosmological simulations incorporating Lyman-alpha radiative transfer enhance our understanding of fundamental physics by supplying the inferred spectra and feedback on the gas. We discuss the dynamical impact of Lyman-alpha radiation pressure on galaxy formation throughout cosmic reionization with the first fully coupled Lyman-alpha radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. We self-consistently follow the chemistry, cooling, self-gravity, and ionizing radiation in protogalaxies and find that Lyman-alpha radiation pressure turns out to be dynamically important in several spherically symmetric simulations. As a case in point we apply our model to the COSMOS redshift 7 (CR7) galaxy at z = 6.6, which exhibits a +160 km/s velocity offset between the Lyman-alpha and HeII line peaks. We find that a massive black hole with a nonthermal Compton-thick spectrum is able to reproduce the observed Lyman-alpha signatures as a result of higher photon trapping and longer potential lifetime. We conclude with a general discussion of Lyman-alpha radiation in the first galaxies by considering simulations that cover the expected range of halo and source properties.

  1. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in XRCC3 and Radiation-Induced Adverse Effects on Normal Tissue: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Zhe Song

    Full Text Available The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3 protein plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The relationship between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue remains inconclusive. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to elucidate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue. All eligible studies up to December 2014 were identified through a search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases. Seventeen studies involving 656 cases and 2193 controls were ultimately included in this meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratios (ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to evaluate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced normal tissue adverse effects. We found that the XRCC3 p.Thr241Met (rs861539 polymorphism was significantly associated with early adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 1.99, 95%CI: 1.31-3.01, P = 0.001. A positive association lacking statistical significance with late adverse effects was also identified (OR = 1.28, 95%CI: 0.97-1.68, P = 0.08. In addition, the rs861539 polymorphism was significantly correlated with a higher risk of adverse effects induced by head and neck area irradiation (OR = 2.41, 95%CI: 1.49-3.89, p = 0.0003 and breast irradiation (OR = 1.41, 95%CI: 1.02-1.95, p = 0.04, whereas the correlation was not significant for lung irradiation or pelvic irradiation. Furthermore, XRCC3 rs1799794 polymorphism may have a protective effect against late adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 0.47, 95%CI: 0.26-0.86, P = 0.01. Well-designed large-scale clinical studies are required to further validate our results.

  2. A Preliminary Study on Racial Differences in HMOX1, NFE2L2, and TGFβ1 Gene Polymorphisms and Radiation-Induced Late Normal Tissue Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Asim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D. [Department of Biostatistics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Ning, Yi [Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Reshko, Leonid B.; Cardnell, Robert J.G.; Alam, Omair; Rabender, Christopher S.; Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Walker, Linda; Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Mikkelsen, Ross B., E-mail: rmikkels@vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: This study tested whether racial differences in genetic polymorphisms of 4 genes involved in wound repair and response to radiation can be used to predict the occurrence of normal tissue late effects of radiation therapy and indicate potential therapeutic targets. Methods and Materials: This prospective study examined genetic polymorphisms that modulate the expression of 4 genes involved in inflammation and fibrosis and response to radiation (HMOX1, NFE2L2, NOS3, and TGFβ1). DNA from blood samples of 179 patients (∼80% breast and head and neck) collected at the time of diagnosis by their radiation oncologist as exhibiting late normal tissue toxicity was used for the analysis. Patient demographics were as follows: 56% white, 43% African American, 1% other. Allelic frequencies of the different polymorphisms of the participants were compared with those of the general American population stratified by race. Twenty-six additional patients treated with radiation, but without toxicity at 3 months or later after therapy, were also analyzed. Results: Increased frequency of a long GT repeat in the HMOX1 promoter was associated with late effects in both African American and white populations. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) rs1800469 in the TGFβ1 promoter and the rs6721961 SNP in the NFE2L2 promoter were also found to significantly associate with late effects in African Americans but not whites. A combined analysis of these polymorphisms revealed that >90% of African American patients with late effects had at least 1 of these minor alleles, and 58% had 2 or more. No statistical significance was found relating the studied NOS3 polymorphisms and normal tissue toxicity. Conclusions: These results support a strong association between wound repair and late toxicities of radiation. The presence of these genetic risk factors can vary significantly among different ethnic groups, as demonstrated for some of the SNPs. Future studies should account for the

  3. A preclinical study on the rescue of normal tissue by nicotinic acid in high-dose treatment with APO866, a specific nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Thougaard, Annemette V; Jensen, Peter Buhl

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase APO866 is a promising cancer drug currently in phase II clinical trials in oncology. Here, we present a strategy for increasing the therapeutic potential of APO866 through the rescue of normal tissues by coadministration of nicotinic acid (Vitamin...... B(3)). We examined the toxicity profile of APO866 in B6D2F1 mice and the effect of oral administration of nicotinic acid on tissue toxicity. Nicotinic acid (50 mg/kg) protects mice from death and severe toxicity from an APO866 dose (60 mg/kg) four times the monotherapy maximum tolerated dose (15 mg...

  4. Lyman-alpha Forests cool Warm Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, Julien; Yèche, Christophe; Magneville, Christophe; Viel, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    The free-streaming of keV-scale particles impacts structure growth on scales that are probed by the Lyman-alpha forest of distant quasars. Using an unprecedentedly large sample of medium-resolution QSO spectra from the ninth data release of SDSS, along with a state-of-the-art set of hydrodynamical simulations to model the Lyman-alpha forest in the non-linear regime, we issue the tightest bounds to date on pure dark matter particles: $m_X \\gtrsim 4.35 \\: \\rm{keV}$ (95% CL) for early decoupled thermal relics such as a hypothetical gravitino, and its corresponding bound for a non-resonantly produced right-handed neutrino $m_s \\gtrsim 31.7 \\: \\rm{keV}$ (95% CL). Thanks to SDSS-III data featuring smaller uncertainties and covering a larger redshift range than SDSS-I data, our bounds improve upon those established by previous works and are further at odds with a purely non-resonantly produced sterile neutrino as dark matter.

  5. The Lyman-$\\alpha$ signature of the first galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Aaron; Bromm, Volker; Milosavljević, Miloš

    2014-01-01

    We present the Cosmic Lyman-$\\alpha$ Transfer code (COLT), a new massively parallel Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code, to simulate Lyman-$\\alpha$ (Ly$\\alpha$) resonant scattering through neutral hydrogen as a probe of the first galaxies. We explore the interaction of centrally produced Ly$\\alpha$ radiation with the host galactic environment. The Ly$\\alpha$ photons emitted from the luminous starburst region escape with characteristic features in the line profile depending on the density distribution, ionization structure, and bulk velocity fields. For example, the presence of anisotropic ionization exhibits a tall peak close to line centre with a skewed tail that drops off gradually. Furthermore, moderate (~10 km/s) outflow produces an amplified peak redward of line centre. Idealized models of first galaxies explore the effect of mass, anisotropic H II regions, and radiation pressure driven winds on Ly$\\alpha$ observables. We employ mesh refinement to resolve critical structures. We also post-process an ab i...

  6. The Lyman-beta forest as a cosmic thermometer

    CERN Document Server

    Iršič, Vid

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of high resolution hydrodynamic simulations in terms of Lyman-alpha and Lyman-beta one dimensional flux power spectra ($P_{\\alpha\\alpha}$ and $P_{\\beta\\beta}$). In particular, we focus on the behaviour that the flux auto-power spectra and cross-power spectra ($P_{\\alpha\\beta}$) display when the intergalactic medium (IGM) thermal history is changed in a range of values that bracket a reference model, while cosmological parameters are kept fixed to best fit the cosmic microwave background data. We present empirical fits that describe at the sub-percent level the dependence of the power spectra on the thermal parameters. At the largest scales, the power spectra show a constant bias between each other that is set by the parameters describing the IGM thermal state. The cross-power spectrum has an oscillatory pattern and crosses zero at a scale which depends on $T_0$, the IGM temperature at the mean density, for reasonable values of the power-law index $\\gamma$ of the IGM tempera...

  7. Lyman-alpha Forest Constraints on Decaying Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Mei-Yu; Peter, Annika H G; Zentner, Andrew R; Purcell, Chris W

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of high-resolution N-body simulations of decaying dark matter cosmologies focusing on the statistical properties of the transmitted Lyman-alpha forest flux in the high-redshift intergalactic medium. In this type of model a dark matter particle decays into a slightly less massive stable dark matter daughter particle and a comparably light particle. The small mass splitting provides a non-relativistic kick velocity V_k to the daughter particle resulting in free-streaming and subsequent damping of small-scale density fluctuations. Current Lyman-alpha forest power spectrum measurements probe comoving scales up to ~ 2-3 h^-1 Mpc at redshifts z ~ 2-4, providing one of the most robust ways to probe cosmological density fluctuations on relatively small scales. The suppression of structure growth due to the free-streaming of dark matter daughter particles also has a significant impact on the neutral hydrogen cloud distribution, which traces the underlying dark matter distribution well at high re...

  8. The Dynamical Masses, Densities, and Star Formation Scaling Relations of Lyman Alpha Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rhoads, James E; Finkelstein, Steven L; Fynbo, Johan P U; McLinden, Emily M; Richardson, Mark L A; Tilvi, Vithal S

    2013-01-01

    We present the first dynamical mass measurements for Lyman alpha galaxies at high redshift, based on velocity dispersion measurements from rest-frame optical emission lines and size measurements from HST imaging, for a sample of nine galaxies drawn from four surveys. These measurements enable us to study the nature of Lyman alpha galaxies in the context of galaxy scaling relations. The resulting dynamical masses range from 1e9 to 1e10 solar masses. We also fit stellar population models to our sample, and use them to plot the Lyman alpha sample on a stellar mass vs. line width relation. Overall, the Lyman alpha galaxies follow well the scaling relation established by observing star forming galaxies at lower redshift (and without regard for Lyman alpha emission), though in 1/3 of the Lyman alpha galaxies, lower-mass fits are also acceptable. In all cases, the dynamical masses agree with established stellarmass-linewidth relation. Using the dynamical masses as an upper limit on gas mass, we show that Lyman alpha...

  9. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Lyman Alpha Emission at z=4.4

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelstein, Steven L; Windhorst, Rogier A; Ryan, Russell E; Hathi, Nimish P; Finkelstein, Keely D; Anderson, Jay; Grogin, Norman A; Koekemoer, Anton M; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Mutchler, Max; Rhoads, James E; McCarthy, Patrick J; O'Connell, Robert W; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E; Calzetti, Daniela; Disney, Michael J; Dopita, Michael A; Frogel, Jay A; Hall, Donald N B; Holtzman, Jon A; Kimble, Randy A; Luppino, Gerard; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Silk, Joseph I; Trauger, John T; Walker, Alistair R; Whitmore, Bradley C; Young, Erick T

    2010-01-01

    We present the highest redshift detections of resolved Lyman alpha emission, using Hubble Space Telescope/ACS F658N narrowband-imaging data taken in parallel with the Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science program in the GOODS CDF-S. We detect Lyman alpha emission from three spectroscopically confirmed z = 4.4 Lyman alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs), more than doubling the sample of LAEs with resolved Lyman alpha emission. Comparing the light distribution between the rest-frame ultraviolet continuum and narrowband images, we investigate the escape of Lyman alpha photons at high redshift. While our data do not support a positional offset between the Lyman alpha and rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) continuum emission, the half-light radii in two out of the three galaxies are significantly larger in Lyman alpha than in the rest-frame UV continuum. This result is confirmed when comparing object sizes in a stack of all objects in both bands. Additionally, the narrowband flux detected with HST is significantly less than...

  10. The Impact of Different Physical Processes on the Statistics of Lyman-limit and Damped Lyman-alpha Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Altay, Gabriel; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C M; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2013-01-01

    We compute the z = 3 neutral hydrogen column density distribution function f(NHI) for 19 simulations drawn from the OWLS project using a post-processing correction for self-shielding calculated with full radiative transfer of the ionising background radiation. We investigate how different physical processes and parameters affect the abundance of Lyman-limit systems (LLSs) and damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (DLAs) including: i) metal-line cooling; ii) the efficiency of feedback from SNe and AGN; iii) the effective equation of state for the ISM; iv) cosmological parameters; v) the assumed star formation law and; vi) the timing of hydrogen reionization . We find that the normalisation and slope, D = d log10 f /d log10 NHI, of f(NHI) in the LLS regime are robust to changes in these physical processes. Among physically plausible models, f(NHI) varies by less than 0.2 dex and D varies by less than 0.18 for LLSs. This is primarily due to the fact that these uncertain physical processes mostly affect star-forming gas w...

  11. The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample: V. The impact of neutral ISM kinematics and geometry on Lyman Alpha escape

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger E; Östlin, Göran; Duval, Florent; Orlitová, Ivana; Verhamme, Anne; Mas-Hesse, J Miguel; Schaerer, Daniel; Cannon, John M; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Sandberg, Andreas; Guaita, Lucia; Adamo, Angela; Atek, Hakim; Herentz, E Christian; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Melinder, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We present high-resolution far-UV spectroscopy of the 14 galaxies of the Lyman Alpha Reference Sample; a sample of strongly star-forming galaxies at low redshifts ($0.028 < z < 0.18$). We compare the derived properties to global properties derived from multi band imaging and 21 cm HI interferometry and single dish observations, as well as archival optical SDSS spectra. Besides the Lyman $\\alpha$ line, the spectra contain a number of metal absorption features allowing us to probe the kinematics of the neutral ISM and evaluate the optical depth and and covering fraction of the neutral medium as a function of line-of-sight velocity. Furthermore, we show how this, in combination with precise determination of systemic velocity and good Ly$\\alpha$ spectra, can be used to distinguish a model in which separate clumps together fully cover the background source, from the "picket fence" model named by Heckman et al. (2011). We find that no one single effect dominates in governing Ly$\\alpha$ radiative transfer and ...

  12. Exploring the Feasibility of Dose Escalation Positron Emission Tomography-Positive Disease with Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and the Effects on Normal Tissue Structures for Thoracic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Lehendrick M., E-mail: lehendrickt@yahoo.com [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center School of Health Professions, Medical Dosimetry Program, Houston, TX (United States); Howard, Joshua A.; Dehghanpour, Pouya; Barrett, Renee D. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center School of Health Professions, Medical Dosimetry Program, Houston, TX (United States); Rebueno, Neal; Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Vedam, Sastry [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Klopp, Ann; Komaki, Ritsuko; Welsh, James W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The pattern of failure is one of the major causes of mortality among thoracic patients. Studies have shown a correlation between local control and dose. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has resulted in conformal dose distributions while limiting dose to normal tissue. However, thoracic malignancies treated with IMRT to highly conformal doses up to 70 Gy still have been found to fail. Thus, the need for dose escalation through simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) may prove effective in minimizing reoccurrences. For our study, 28 thoracic IMRT plans were reoptimized via dose escalation to the gross tumor volume (GTV) and planning target volume (PTV) of 79.2 Gy and 68.4 Gy, respectively. Reoccurrences in surrounding regions of microscopic disease are rare therefore, dose-escalating regional nodes (outside GTV) were not included. Hence, the need to edit GTV margins was acceptable for our retrospective study. A median dose escalation of approximately 15 Gy (64.8-79.2 Gy) via IMRT using SIB was deemed achievable with minimal percent differences received by critical structures compared with the original treatment plan. The target's mean doses were significantly increased based on p-value analysis, while the normal tissue structures were not significantly changed.

  13. Glucose transporter Glut-1 is detectable in peri-necrotic regions in many human tumor types but not normal tissues: Study using tissue microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airley, Rachel; Evans, Andrew; Mobasheri, Ali; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2010-05-20

    The hypoxic tumor microenvironment is associated with malignant progression and poor treatment response. The glucose transporter Glut-1 is a prognostic factor and putative hypoxia marker. So far, studies of Glut-1 in cancer have utilized conventional immunohistochemical analysis in a series of individual biopsy or surgical specimens. Tissue microarrays, however, provide a rapid, inexpensive means of profiling biomarker expression. To evaluate hypoxia markers, tissue cores must show the architectural features of hypoxia; i.e. viable tissue surrounding necrotic regions. Glut-1 may be a useful biomarker to validate tissue microarrays for use in studies of hypoxia-regulated genes in cancer. In this study, we carried out immunohistochemical detection of Glut-1 protein in many tumor and normal tissue types in a range of tissue microarrays. Glut-1 was frequently found in peri-necrotic regions, occurring in 9/34 lymphomas, 6/12 melanomas, and 5/16 glioblastomas; and in 43/54 lung, 22/84 colon, and 23/60 ovarian tumors. Expression was rare in breast (6/40) and prostate (1/57) tumors, and in normal tissue, was restricted to spleen, tongue, and CNS endothelium. In conclusion, tissue microarrays enable the observation of Glut-1 expression in peri-necrotic regions, which may be linked to hypoxia, and reflect previous studies showing differential Glut-1 expression across tumor types and non-malignant tissue.

  14. Transcriptome profiling of the cancer, adjacent non-tumor and distant normal tissues from a colorectal cancer patient by deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan'an Wu

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the world. A genome-wide screening of transcriptome dysregulation between cancer and normal tissue would provide insight into the molecular basis of CRC initiation and progression. Compared with microarray technology, which is commonly used to identify transcriptional changes, the recently developed RNA-seq technique has the ability to detect other abnormal regulations in the cancer transcriptome, such as alternative splicing, novel transcripts or gene fusion. In this study, we performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing at ~50× coverage on CRC, adjacent non-tumor and distant normal tissue. The results revealed cancer-specific, differentially expressed genes and differential alternative splicing, suggesting that the extracellular matrix and metabolic pathways are activated and the genes related to cell homeostasis are suppressed in CRC. In addition, one tumor-restricted gene fusion, PRTEN-NOTCH2, was also detected and experimentally confirmed. This study reveals some common features in tumor invasion and provides a comprehensive survey of the CRC transcriptome, which provides better insight into the complexity of regulatory changes during tumorigenesis.

  15. From Mirrors to Windows: Lyman-Alpha Radiative Transfer in a Very Clumpy Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Gronke, Max; McCourt, Michael; Oh, S Peng

    2016-01-01

    Lyman-Alpha (Ly$\\alpha$) is the strongest emission line in the Universe and is frequently used to detect and study the most distant galaxies. Because Lya is a resonant line, photons typically scatter prior to escaping; this scattering process complicates the interpretation of Ly$\\alpha$ spectra, but also encodes a wealth of information about the structure and kinematics of neutral gas in the galaxy. Modeling the Ly$\\alpha$ line therefore allows us to study tiny-scale features of the gas, even in the most distant galaxies. Curiously, observed Ly$\\alpha$ spectra can be modeled successfully with very simple, homogeneous geometries (such as an expanding, spherical shell), whereas more realistic, multiphase geometries often fail to reproduce the observed spectra. This seems paradoxical since the gas in galaxies is known to be multiphase. In this Letter, we show that spectra emerging from extremely clumpy geometries with many clouds along the line of sight converge to the predictions from simplified, homogeneous mo...

  16. The Curious Case of Lyman Alpha Emitters: Growing Younger from z ~ 3 to z ~ 2?

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Gawiser, Eric; Guaita, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    Lyman Alpha Emitting (LAE) galaxies are thought to be progenitors of present-day L* galaxies. Clustering analyses have suggested that LAEs at z ~ 3 might evolve into LAEs at z ~ 2, but it is unclear whether the physical nature of these galaxies is compatible with this hypothesis. Several groups have investigated the properties of LAEs using spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, but direct comparison of their results is complicated by inconsistencies in the treatment of the data and in the assumptions made in modeling the stellar populations, which are degenerate with the effects of galaxy evolution. By using the same data analysis pipeline and SED fitting software on two stacked samples of LAEs at z = 3.1 and z = 2.1, and by eliminating several systematic uncertainties that might cause a discrepancy, we determine that the physical properties of these two samples of galaxies are dramatically different. LAEs at z = 3.1 are found to be old (age ~ 1 Gyr) and metal-poor (Z Z_Sun). The difference in the obse...

  17. Minimally Parametric Constraints on the Primordial Power Spectrum from Lyman-alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Simeon

    2010-01-01

    Current analyses of the Lyman-alpha forest assume that the primordial power spectrum of density perturbations obeys a simple power law, a strong theoretical assumption which should be tested. Employing a large suite of numerical simulations which drop this assumption, we reconstruct the shape of the primordial power spectrum using Lyman-alpha data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our method combines a minimally parametric framework with cross-validation, a technique used to avoid over-fitting the data. Future work will involve predictions for the upcoming Baryon Oscillation Sky Survey (BOSS), which will provide new Lyman-alpha data with vastly decreased statistical errors.

  18. The Lyman α forest in a blazar-heated Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchwein, Ewald; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Broderick, Avery E.; Chang, Philip

    2012-06-01

    It has been realized only recently that TeV emission from blazars can significantly heat the intergalactic medium (IGM) by pair-producing high-energy electrons and positrons, which in turn excite vigorous plasma instabilities, leading to a local dissipation of the pairs' kinetic energy. In this work, we use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to model the impact of this blazar heating on the Lyman α forest at intermediate redshifts (z˜ 2-3). We find that blazar heating produces an inverted temperature-density relation in the IGM and naturally resolves many of the problems present in previous simulations of the forest that included photoionization heating alone. In particular, our simulations with blazar heating simultaneously reproduce the observed effective optical depth and temperature as a function of redshift, the observed probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the transmitted flux, and the observed flux power spectra, over the full redshift range 2 sum of thermally broadened individual lines, we find superb agreement with the observed lower cut-off of the linewidth distribution and abundances of neutral hydrogen column densities per unit redshift. Using the most recent constraints on the cosmic ultraviolet (UV) background, this excellent agreement with observations does not require rescaling the amplitude of the UV background - a procedure that was routinely used in the past to match the observed level of transmitted flux. We also show that our blazar-heated model matches the data better than standard simulations even when such a rescaling is allowed. This concordance between Lyman α data and simulation results, which are based on the most recent cosmological parameters, also suggests that the inclusion of blazar heating alleviates previous tensions on constraints for σ8 derived from Lyman α measurements and other cosmological data. Finally, we show that blazar heating dramatically alters the volume-weighted temperature PDF, implying an

  19. Cataract complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Yorston

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Any eye surgeon, no matter how experienced, will occasionally encounter a serious cataract complication. Although complications may be devastating for the patient and are always distressing for the surgeon, are they really a major issue for VISION 2020? The evidence says that they are.

  20. Hydrodynamical Simulations of the Lyman $\\alpha$ Forest Model Comparisons

    CERN Document Server

    Machacek, M E; Meiksin, A; Anninos, P; Thayer, D; Norman, M L; Zhang, Y

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the Lyman alpha forest as predicted by numerical simulations for a range of currently viable cosmological models. This is done in order to understand the dependencies of the forest on cosmological parameters. Focusing on the redshift range from two to four, we show that: (1) most of the evolution in the distributions of optical depth, flux and column density can be understood by simple scaling relations, (2) the shape of optical depth distribution is a sensitive probe of the amplitude of density fluctuations on scales of a few hundred kpc, (3) the mean of the b distribution (a measure of the width of the absorption lines) is also very sensitive to fluctuations on these scales, and decreases as they increase. We perform a preliminary comparison to observations, where available. A number of other properties are also examined, including the evolution in the number of lines, the two-point flux distribution and the HeII opacity.

  1. Reproducing the Kinematics of Damped Lyman-alpha Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Simeon; Neeleman, Marcel; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2014-01-01

    We examine the kinematic structure of Damped Lyman-alpha Systems (DLAs) in a series of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations using the AREPO code. We are able to match the distribution of velocity widths of associated low ionisation metal absorbers substantially better than earlier work. Our simulations produce a population of DLAs dominated by halos with virial velocities around 70 km/s, consistent with a picture of relatively small, faint objects. In addition, we reproduce the observed correlation between velocity width and metallicity and the equivalent width distribution of SiII. Some discrepancies of moderate statistical significance remain; too many of our spectra show absorption concentrated at the edge of the profile and there are slight differences in the exact shape of the velocity width distribution. We show that the improvement over previous work is mostly due to our strong feedback from star formation and our detailed modelling of the metal ionisation state.

  2. Detecting Damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ Absorbers with Gaussian Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Garnett, Roman; Bird, Simeon; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We develop an automated technique for detecting damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) along spectroscopic sightlines to quasi-stellar objects (QSOs or quasars). The detection of DLAs in large-scale spectroscopic surveys such as SDSS-III sheds light on galaxy formation at high redshift, showing the nucleation of galaxies from diffuse gas. We use nearly 50 000 QSO spectra to learn a novel tailored Gaussian process model for quasar emission spectra, which we apply to the DLA detection problem via Bayesian model selection. We propose models for identifying an arbitrary number of DLAs along a given line of sight. We demonstrate our method's effectiveness using a large-scale validation experiment, with excellent performance. We also provide a catalog of our results applied to 162 861 spectra from SDSS-III data release 12.

  3. Sample variance and Lyman-alpha forest transmission statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rollinde, Emmanuel; Schaye, Joop; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    We compare the observed probability distribution function of the transmission in the \\HI\\ Lyman-alpha forest, measured from the UVES 'Large Programme' sample at redshifts z=[2,2.5,3], to results from the GIMIC cosmological simulations. Our measured values for the mean transmission and its PDF are in good agreement with published results. Errors on statistics measured from high-resolution data are typically estimated using bootstrap or jack-knife resampling techniques after splitting the spectra into chunks. We demonstrate that these methods tend to underestimate the sample variance unless the chunk size is much larger than is commonly the case. We therefore estimate the sample variance from the simulations. We conclude that observed and simulated transmission statistics are in good agreement, in particular, we do not require the temperature-density relation to be 'inverted'.

  4. An excess of damped Lyman alpha galaxies near QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, D M; Ellison, S L; Benn, Chris R.; Ellison, Sara L.; Russell, David M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a sample of 33 damped Lyman alpha systems (DLAs) discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) whose absorption redshifts (z_abs) are within 6000 km/s of the QSO's systemic redshift (z_sys). Our sample is based on 731 2.5 = 2e20 cm^-2. The derived number density of DLAs per unit redshift, n(z), within v < 6000 km/s is higher (3.5 sigma significance) by almost a factor of 2 than that of intervening absorbers observed in the SDSS DR3, i.e. there is evidence for an overdensity of galaxies near the QSOs. This provides a physical motivation for excluding DLAs at small velocity separations in surveys of intervening 'field' DLAs. In addition, we find that the overdensity of proximate DLAs is independent of the radio-loudness of the QSO, consistent with the environments of radio-loud and radio-quiet QSOs being similar.

  5. Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Lyman Alpha Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Michael L; Harkness, Robert

    2009-01-01

    We use hydrodynamic cosmological simulations in a (600 Mpc)^3 volume to study the observability of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the intergalactic medium as probed by Lyman alpha forest (LAF) absorption. The large scale separation between the wavelength of the BAO mode (~150 Mpc) and the size of LAF absorbers (~100 kpc) makes this a numerically challenging problem. We report on several 2048^3 simulations of the LAF using the ENZO code. We adopt WMAP5 concordance cosmological parameters and power spectrum including BAO perturbations. 5000 synthetic HI absorption line spectra are generated randomly piercing the box face. We calculate the cross-correlation function between widely separated pairs. We detect the BAO signal at z=3 where theory predicts to moderate statistical significance.

  6. The Lyman α signature of the first galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Bromm, Volker; Milosavljević, Miloš

    2015-06-01

    We present the Cosmic Lyman α Transfer code, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, to simulate Lyman α (Lyα) resonant scattering through neutral hydrogen as a probe of the first galaxies. We explore the interaction of centrally produced Lyα radiation with the host galactic environment. Lyα photons emitted from the luminous starburst region escape with characteristic features in the line profile depending on the density distribution, ionization structure, and bulk velocity fields. For example, anisotropic ionization exhibits a tall peak close to line centre with a skewed tail that drops off gradually. Idealized models of first galaxies explore the effect of mass, anisotropic H II regions, and radiation pressure driven winds on Lyα observables. We employ mesh refinement to resolve critical structures. We also post-process an ab initio cosmological simulation and examine images captured at various distances within the 1 Mpc3 comoving volume. Finally, we discuss the emergent spectra and surface brightness profiles of these objects in the context of high-z observations. The first galaxies will likely be observed through the red damping wing of the Lyα line. Observations will be biased towards galaxies with an intrinsic red peak located far from line centre that reside in extensive H II super bubbles, which allows Hubble flow to sufficiently redshift photons away from line centre and facilitate transmission through the intergalactic medium. Even with gravitational lensing to boost the luminosity this preliminary work indicates that Lyα emission from stellar clusters within haloes of Mvir Telescope.

  7. The Lyman alpha reference sample. VII. Spatially resolved Hα kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herenz, Edmund Christian; Gruyters, Pieter; Orlitova, Ivana; Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Cannon, John M.; Roth, Martin M.; Bik, Arjan; Pardy, Stephen; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Adamo, Angela; Atek, Hakim; Duval, Florent; Guaita, Lucia; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Melinder, Jens; Puschnig, Johannes; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger E.; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne

    2016-03-01

    We present integral field spectroscopic observations with the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer of all 14 galaxies in the z ~ 0.1 Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS). We produce 2D line-of-sight velocity maps and velocity dispersion maps from the Balmer α (Hα) emission in our data cubes. These maps trace the spectral and spatial properties of the LARS galaxies' intrinsic Lyα radiation field. We show our kinematic maps that are spatially registered onto the Hubble Space Telescope Hα and Lyman α (Lyα) images. We can conjecture a causal connection between spatially resolved Hα kinematics and Lyα photometry for individual galaxies, however, no general trend can be established for the whole sample. Furthermore, we compute the intrinsic velocity dispersion σ0, the shearing velocity vshear, and the vshear/σ0 ratio from our kinematic maps. In general LARS galaxies are characterised by high intrinsic velocity dispersions (54 km s-1 median) and low shearing velocities (65 km s-1 median). The vshear/σ0 values range from 0.5 to 3.2 with an average of 1.5. It is noteworthy that five galaxies of the sample are dispersion-dominated systems with vshear/σ0 1. Our result indicates that turbulence in actively star-forming systems is causally connected to interstellar medium conditions that favour an escape of Lyα radiation. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).The reduced data cubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A78

  8. Incase of Same Region Treatment by using a Tomotherapy and a Linear Accelerator Absorbed Dose Evaluation of Normal Tissues and a Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Geum Seong; Kim, Chang Uk; Kim, Hoi Nam; Heo, Gyeong Hun; Song, Jin Ho; Hong, Joo Yeong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic University Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    Treating same region with different modalities there is a limit to evaluate the total absorbed dose of normal tissues. The reason is that it does not support to communication each modalities yet. In this article, it evaluates absorbed dose of the patients who had been treated same region by a tomotherapy and a linear accelerator. After reconstructing anatomic structure with a anthropomorphic phantom, administrate 45 Gy to a tumor in linac plan system as well as prescribe 15 Gy in tomotherapy plan system for make an ideal treatment plan. After the plan which made by tomoplan system transfers to the oncentra plan system for reproduce plan under the same condition and realize total treatment plan with summation 45 Gy linac treatment plan. To evaluate the absorbed dose of two different modalities, do a comparative study both a simple summation dose values and integration dose values. Then compare and analyze absorbed dose of normal tissues and a tumor with the patients who had been exposured radiation by above two different modalities. The result of compared data, in case of minimum dose, there are big different dose values in spleen (12.4%). On the other hand, in case of the maximum dose, it reports big different in a small bowel (10.2%) and a cord (5.8%) in head and neck cancer patients, there presents that oral (20.3%), right lens (7.7%) in minimum dose value. About maximum dose, it represents that spinal (22.5), brain stem (12%), optic chiasm (8.9%), Rt lens (11.5%), mandible (8.1%), pituitary gland (6.2%). In case of Rt abdominal cancer patients, there represents big different minimum dose as Lt kidney (20.3%), stomach (8.1%) about pelvic cancer patients, it reports there are big different in minimum dose as a bladder (15.2%) as well as big different value in maximum dose as a small bowel (5.6%), a bladder (5.5%) in addition, making treatment plan it is able us to get. In case of comparing both simple summation absorbed dose and integration absorbed dose, the

  9. Mapping High-Velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha Emission from Supernova 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Garnavich, Peter; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Lundqvist, Peter; Smith, Nathan; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope images of high-velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha emission in the outer debris of SN 1987A. The H-alpha images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock. For the first time we observe emission from the reverse shock surface well above and below the equatorial ring, suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the H-alpha imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock front, in the velocity intervals (-7,500 < V(sub obs) < -2,800 km/s) and (1,000 < V(sub obs) < 7,500 km/s), ?M(sub H) = 1.2 × 10(exp -3) M/ y. We also present the first Lyman-alpha imaging of the whole remnant and new Chandra X-ray observations. Comparing the spatial distribution of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission, we observe that the majority of the high-velocity Lyman-alpha emission originates interior to the equatorial ring. The observed Lyman-alpha/H-alpha photon ratio, R(L-alpha/H-alpha) approx. = 17, is significantly higher than the theoretically predicted ratio of approx. = 5 for neutral atoms crossing the reverse shock front. We attribute this excess to Lyman-alpha emission produced by X-ray heating of the outer debris. The spatial orientation of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission suggests that X-ray heating of the outer debris is the dominant Lyman-alpha production mechanism in SN 1987A at this phase in its evolution.

  10. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  11. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  12. Diphtheria Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  13. Dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for large prostate volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: mcbiagioli@yahoo.com [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: to evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and methods: one hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results: median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p-0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions: dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. (author)

  14. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurposeTo evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes.Materials and MethodsOne hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38% unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.ResultsMedian follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3% patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17% patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04. There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity.ConclusionsDosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes.

  15. Expression of alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (P504s) in various malignant neoplasms and normal tissues: astudy of 761 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong; Fanger, Gary R; Woda, Bruce A; Banner, Barbara F; Algate, Paul; Dresser, Karen; Xu, Jiangchun; Chu, Peiguo G

    2003-08-01

    Alpha-methylacyl CoA racemase (AMACR), also known as P504S, plays an important role in peroxisomal beta-oxidation of branched-chain fatty acids. It has recently been shown that AMACR is highly expressed in prostate cancer and that it may be an important diagnostic marker for prostate carcinoma. However, little is known about expression of AMACR in normal tissues and other malignant tumors. In this study, we investigated expression of AMACR in 539 malignant tumors and 222 normal human tissues of various types by immunohistochemical analysis. mRNA levels of AMACR in normal organs and in selected tumors were assessed by real time PCR. In normal tissue, high expression of AMACR mRNA was identified in liver, kidney and salivary gland, while AMACR protein was detected in liver (hepatocytes), kidney (tubular epithelial cells), lung (only bronchial epithelial cells), and gallbladder (only mucosal epithelial cells). High expression of AMACR mRNA was found in prostate, liver, and kidney cancers but rarely in stomach and bladder cancers. A high percent of adenocarcinomas arising from these organs express AMACR, including 17 of 21 (81%) of hepatocellular carcinomas and 18 of 24 (75%) of renal cell carcinomas. In addition, carcinomas arising from tissues normally not expressing AMACR were also positive for the antigen, including 17 of 18 (94%) prostate carcinomas, 9 of 29 (31%) of urothelial carcinomas, and 4 of 15 (27%) of gastric adenocarcinomas. Two hundred and fifty cases of adenocarcinomas from lung, breast, pancreas, bile duct, adrenal gland, salivary gland, ovary, thyroid and endometrium were negative or rarely positive for AMACR. Neuroendocrine carcinomas rarely expressed AMACR. Melanomas, squamous cell carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, soft tissue tumors (including epithelioid sarcomas and synovial sarcoma), thymomas, and germ cell tumors were negative for AMACR. Our data provide important baseline information for using AMACR in clinical practice and also are valuable

  16. Copernicus measurement of the Jovian Lyman-alpha emission and its aeronomical significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, S. K.; Kerr, R. B.; Upson, W. L., II; Festou, M. C.; Donahue, T. M.; Barker, E. S.; Cochran, W. D.; Bertaux, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the intensity of the Lyman-alpha emission is a good indicator of the principal aeronomical processes on the major planets. The high-resolution ultraviolet spectrometer aboard the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory Copernicus was used in 1980 April and May to detect the Jovian Lyman-alpha emission by spectroscopically discriminating it from other Doppler shifted Lyman-alpha emissions such as those of the geocorona, and the interplanetary medium. Taking into consideration the reported emission data, it appears that an unusually large energy input due to the particle precipitation in the auroral region must have been responsible for the large observed Lyman-alpha intensity during the Voyager encounter. At most other times, the observed Jovian Lyman-alpha intensity can be explained, within the range of statistical uncertainty, by a model that takes into consideration the solar EUV flux, the solar Lyman-alpha flux, the high exospheric temperature, and the eddy diffusion coefficient without energy input from the auroral sources.

  17. Discovery of a very Lyman-α-luminous quasar at z = 6.62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koptelova, Ekaterina; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan; Yu, Po-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Ping; Guo, Jhen-Kuei

    2017-02-02

    Distant luminous quasars provide important information on the growth of the first supermassive black holes, their host galaxies and the epoch of reionization. The identification of quasars is usually performed through detection of their Lyman-α line redshifted to 0.9 microns at z > 6.5. Here, we report the discovery of a very Lyman-α luminous quasar, PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 at redshift z = 6.618, selected based on its red colour and multi-epoch detection of the Lyman-α emission in a single near-infrared band. The Lyman-α line luminosity of PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 is unusually high and estimated to be 0.8 × 10(12) Solar luminosities (about 3% of the total quasar luminosity). The Lyman-α emission of PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 shows fast variability on timescales of days in the quasar rest frame, which has never been detected in any of the known high-redshift quasars. The high luminosity of the Lyman-α line, its narrow width and fast variability resemble properties of local Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies which suggests that the quasar is likely at the active phase of the black hole growth accreting close or even beyond the Eddington limit.

  18. Discovery of a very Lyman-α-luminous quasar at z = 6.62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koptelova, Ekaterina; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan; Yu, Po-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Ping; Guo, Jhen-Kuei

    2017-01-01

    Distant luminous quasars provide important information on the growth of the first supermassive black holes, their host galaxies and the epoch of reionization. The identification of quasars is usually performed through detection of their Lyman-α line redshifted to 0.9 microns at z > 6.5. Here, we report the discovery of a very Lyman-α luminous quasar, PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 at redshift z = 6.618, selected based on its red colour and multi-epoch detection of the Lyman-α emission in a single near-infrared band. The Lyman-α line luminosity of PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 is unusually high and estimated to be 0.8 × 1012 Solar luminosities (about 3% of the total quasar luminosity). The Lyman-α emission of PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 shows fast variability on timescales of days in the quasar rest frame, which has never been detected in any of the known high-redshift quasars. The high luminosity of the Lyman-α line, its narrow width and fast variability resemble properties of local Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies which suggests that the quasar is likely at the active phase of the black hole growth accreting close or even beyond the Eddington limit. PMID:28150701

  19. Complicated rhinosinusitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, F.S.

    2016-01-01

    Complicated rhinosinusitis: a title chosen for its multi-interpretable nature. In the Oxford dictionary ‘complicated’ is defined as ‘consisting of many interconnecting parts or elements’ and ‘involving many different and confusing aspects’ as well as ‘involving complications’ in medicine. It is the

  20. Constraining the End of Reionization with Deep Lyman-alpha Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Intae; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Livermore, Rachael C.; Wold, Isak; Larson, Rebecca L.

    2017-06-01

    An immediately accessible method for studying the intergalactic medium in the reionization era is to measure the equivalent width distribution of Lyman-alpha emission from continuum-selected galaxies with follow-up spectroscopy. To search for Lyman-alpha emission from galaxies at z = 5.5-8.2, we are performing ultra-deep spectroscopic observations of candidate galaxies from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. We utilize data from the DEIMOS (optical) and MOSFIRE (near-infrared) spectrographs on the Keck 10-meter telescopes, ensuring the comprehensive wavelength coverage of Lyman-alpha emission at z ~ 6-8. We have a total of 1169 hours of spectroscopic integration of galaxies at z > 6: 738 hours for 123 galaxies with DEIMOS and 432 hours for 69 galaxies with MOSFIRE with the additional optical spectroscopic data of our sample galaxies in the GOODS-S field from VLT VANDELS survey. The Lyman-alpha fraction, the ratio of galaxies with detected Lyman-alpha emission to the number of all candidate galaxies observed, is directly measured with the completeness test of our data set by constructing detailed simulations of mock emission lines, which consider observational conditions (e.g., observational depth, wavelength coverage, and sky emission) and the probability distribution function of galaxy photometric redshifts. We present the early result on the Lyman-alpha emission equivalent width distribution of galaxies at z ~ 6 from our analysis of the DEIMOS spectroscopic dataset, determining robust upper limits on the Lyman-alpha emission.

  1. TU-F-12A-09: GLCM Texture Analysis for Normal-Tissue Toxicity: A Prospective Ultrasound Study of Acute Toxicity in Breast-Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T; Yang, X; Curran, W; Torres, M [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphologic and structural integrity of the breast glands using sonographic textural analysis, and identify potential early imaging signatures for radiation toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Thirty-eight patients receiving breast RT participated in a prospective ultrasound imaging study. Each participant received 3 ultrasound scans: 1 week before RT (baseline), and at 6-week and 3-month follow-ups. Patients were imaged with a 10-MHz ultrasound on the four quadrant of the breast. A second order statistical method of texture analysis, called gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), was employed to assess RT-induced breast-tissue toxicity. The region of interest (ROI) was 28 mm × 10 mm in size at a 10 mm depth under the skin. Twenty GLCM sonographic features, ratios of the irradiated breast and the contralateral breast, were used to quantify breast-tissue toxicity. Clinical assessment of acute toxicity was conducted using the RTOG toxicity scheme. Results: Ninety-seven ultrasound studies (776 images) were analyzed; and 5 out of 20 sonographic features showed significant differences (p < 0.05) among the baseline scans, the acute toxicity grade 1 and 2 groups. These sonographic features quantified the degree of tissue damage through homogeneity, heterogeneity, randomness, and symmetry. Energy ratio value decreased from 108±0.05 (normal) to 0.99±0.05 (Grade 1) and 0.84±0.04 (Grade 2); Entropy ratio value increased from 1.01±0.01 to 1.02±0.01 and 1.04±0.01; Contrast ratio value increased from 1.03±0.03 to 1.07±0.06 and 1.21±0.09; Variance ratio value increased from 1.06±0.03 to 1.20±0.04 and 1.42±0.10; Cluster Prominence ratio value increased from 0.98±0.02 to 1.01±0.04 and 1.25±0.07. Conclusion: This work has demonstrated that the sonographic features may serve as imaging signatures to assess radiation-induced normal tissue damage. While these findings need to be validated in a larger cohort, they suggest

  2. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Further Reduces Normal Tissue Exposure During Definitive Therapy for Locally Advanced Distal Esophageal Tumors: A Dosimetric Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gomez, Daniel; Palmer, Matthew B.; Riley, Beverly A.; Mayankkumar, Amin V.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Likhacheva, Anna; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously found that {<=} 75% of treatment failures after chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer appear within the gross tumor volume and that intensity-modulated (photon) radiotherapy (IMRT) might allow dose escalation to the tumor without increasing normal tissue toxicity. Proton therapy might allow additional dose escalation, with even lower normal tissue toxicity. In the present study, we compared the dosimetric parameters for photon IMRT with that for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for unresectable, locally advanced, distal esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Four plans were created for each of 10 patients. IMPT was delivered using anteroposterior (AP)/posteroanterior beams, left posterior oblique/right posterior oblique (LPO/RPO) beams, or AP/LPO/RPO beams. IMRT was delivered with a concomitant boost to the gross tumor volume. The dose was 65.8 Gy to the gross tumor volume and 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume in 28 fractions. Results: Relative to IMRT, the IMPT (AP/posteroanterior) plan led to considerable reductions in the mean lung dose (3.18 vs. 8.27 Gy, p < .0001) and the percentage of lung volume receiving 5, 10, and 20 Gy (p {<=} .0006) but did not reduce the cardiac dose. The IMPT LPO/RPO plan also reduced the mean lung dose (4.9 Gy vs. 8.2 Gy, p < .001), the heart dose (mean cardiac dose and percentage of the cardiac volume receiving 10, 20, and 30 Gy, p {<=} .02), and the liver dose (mean hepatic dose 5 Gy vs. 14.9 Gy, p < .0001). The IMPT AP/LPO/RPO plan led to considerable reductions in the dose to the lung (p {<=} .005), heart (p {<=} .003), and liver (p {<=} .04). Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, IMPT for distal esophageal cancer lowered the dose to the heart, lung, and liver. The AP/LPO/RPO beam arrangement was optimal for sparing all three organs. The dosimetric benefits of protons will need to be tailored to each patient according to their specific cardiac and pulmonary risks. IMPT for

  3. Lyman Break Galaxies at z~5 Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, I; Tamura, N; Ando, M; Wada, S; Watanabe, C; Akiyama, M; Aoki, K

    2003-01-01

    (abridged) We present results of a search for Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 5 in a 618 square-arcmin field including the HDF-N taken by Subaru Prime Focus Camera. Utilizing the published redshift data of the HDF-N and its flanking fields, the color selection criteria are chosen so that LBGs are picked out most efficiently and least contaminated by foreground objects. The numbers of LBG candidates detected are 310 in 23.0 < I_c < 25.5. The rest-frame UV luminosity function(LF) of LBGs at z ~ 5 is derived statistically. The fraction of contamination is estimated to be ~50% in the faintest magnitude range. The completeness of the survey is ~80% at the bright part of the sample, and ~20% in the faintest magnitude range (25.0 < I_c <= 25.5). The LF of LBG candidates at z ~ 5 does not show a significant difference from those at z ~ 3 and 4, though there might be a slight decrease in the fainter part. The UV luminosity density within the observational limit is 0.56 - 0.69 times smaller than that obt...

  4. Extended Lyman-alpha emission from cold accretion streams

    CERN Document Server

    Rosdahl, J

    2011-01-01

    {Abridged} We investigate the observability of cold accretion streams at redshift 3 via Lyman-alpha radiation and the feasibility of cold accretion as the main driver behind giant Lya blobs (LABs). We run cosmological zoom simulations focusing on 3 halos spanning two orders of magnitude in mass, from 10^11 to 10^13 solar masses. We use a version of the AMR code Ramses that includes radiative transfer of UV photons, and we employ a refinement strategy that allows us to resolve accretion streams in their natural environment to an unprecedented level. For the first time, we self-consistently model self-shielding in the cold streams from the cosmological UV background, which enables us to accurately predict their temperatures, ionization states and Lya luminosities. We find the efficiency of gravitational heating in cold streams in a ~10^11 solar mass halo is around 10-20% throughout most of the halo but reaching much higher values close to the center. As a result most of the Lya luminosity comes from the circumg...

  5. Project Lyman: Quantifying 11 Gyrs of Metagalactic Ionizing Background Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    McCandliss, Stephan R; Bergvall, Nils; Bianchi, Luciana; Bridge, Carrie; Bogosavljevic, Milan; Cohen, Seth H; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; Dixon, W Van Dyke; Ferguson, Harry; Friedman, Peter; Hayes, Matthew; Howk, J Christopher; Inoue, Akio; Iwata, Ikuru; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Kriss, Gerard; Kruk, Jeffrey; Kutyrev, Alexander S; Leitherer, Claus; Meurer, Gerhardt R; Prochaska, Jason X; Sonneborn, George; Stiavelli, Massimo; Teplitz, Harry I; Windhorst, Rogier A

    2012-01-01

    The timing and duration of the reionization epoch is crucial to the emergence and evolution of structure in the universe. The relative roles that star-forming galaxies, active galactic nuclei and quasars play in contributing to the metagalactic ionizing background across cosmic time remains uncertain. Deep quasar counts provide insights into their role, but the potentially crucial contribution from star-formation is highly uncertain due to our poor understanding of the processes that allow ionizing radiation to escape into the intergalactic medium (IGM). The fraction of ionizing photons that escape from star-forming galaxies is a fundamental free parameter used in models to "fine-tune" the timing and duration of the reionization epoch that occurred somewhere between 13.4 and 12.7 Gyrs ago (redshifts between 12 > z > 6). However, direct observation of Lyman continuum (LyC) photons emitted below the rest frame \\ion{H}{1} ionization edge at 912 \\AA\\ is increasingly improbable at redshifts z > 3, due to the stead...

  6. Chemical evolution and nature of Damped Lyman-Alpha systems

    CERN Document Server

    Calura, F; Vladilo, G

    2003-01-01

    We study the nature of Damped Lyman -Alpha systems (DLAs) by means of a comparison between observed abundances and models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type. In particular, we compare for the first time the abundance ratios as functions of metallicity and redshift with dust-corrected data. We have developed detailed models following the evolution of several chemical elements (H, D, He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Fe, Ni and Zn) for elliptical, spiral and irregular galaxies. Each of the models is calibrated to reproduce the main features of a massive elliptical, the Milky Way and the LMC, respectively. In addition, we run some models also for dwarf irregular starburst galaxies. All the models share the same uptodate nucleosynthesis prescriptions but differ in their star formation histories. The role of SNe of different type (II, Ia) is studied in each galaxy model together with detailed and up to date nucleosynthesis prescriptions. Our main conclusions are: 1) when dust depletion is ...

  7. Dust properties of Lyman break galaxies in cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Thompson, Robert; Choi, Jun-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations have indicated the existence of dust in high-redshift galaxies, however, the dust properties in them are still unknown. Here we present theoretical constraints on dust properties in Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z=3 by post-processing a cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation with radiative transfer calculations. We calculate the dust extinction in 2800 dark matter halos using the metallicity information of individual gas particles in our simulation. We use only bright galaxies with rest-frame UV magnitude M_1700 < -20 mag, and study the dust size, dust-to-metal mass ratio, and dust composition. From the comparison of calculated color excess between B and V-band (i.e., E(B-V)) and the observations, we constrain the typical dust size, and show that the best-fitting dust grain size is ~ 0.05 micron, which is consistent with the results of theoretical dust models for Type-II supernova. Our simulation with the dust extinction effect can naturally reproduce the observed rest...

  8. A Lyman Break Galaxy Candidate at z~9

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, Alaina L; Colbert, James W; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry I; McCarthy, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of a z~9 Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) candidate, selected from the NICMOS Parallel Imaging Survey as a J-dropout with J110 - H160 = 1.7. Spitzer/IRAC photometry reveals that the galaxy has a blue H160 - 3.6 um color, and a spectral break between 3.6 and 4.5 um. We interpret this break as the Balmer break, and derive a best-fit photometric redshift of z~9. We use Monte Carlo simulations to test the significance of this photometric redshift, and show a 96% probability of z>7. We estimate a lower limit to the comoving number density of such galaxies at z~9 of phi > 3.8 x 10^{-6} Mpc^{-3}. If the high redshift of this galaxy is confirmed, this will indicate that the luminous end of the rest-frame UV luminosity function has not evolved substantially from z~ 9 to z~3. Still, some small degeneracy remains between this z~9 model and models at z~2-3; deep optical imaging (reaching I ~ 29 AB) can rule out the lower-z models.

  9. Damped Lyman Alpha Systems in Galaxy Formation Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Pontzen, Andrew; Pettini, Max; Booth, C M; Stinson, Greg; Wadsley, James; Brooks, Alyson; Quinn, Thomas; Haehnelt, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the population of z=3 damped Lyman alpha absorbers (DLAs) in a recent series of high resolution galaxy formation simulations. The simulations are of interest because they form at z=0 some of the most realistic disk galaxies to date. No free parameters are available in the simulations: these have been fixed by physical and z=0 observational constraints, and thus our study provides a genuine consistency test. The precise role of DLAs in galaxy formation remains in debate, but they provide a number of strong constraints on the nature of our simulated bound systems at z=3 because of their coupled information on neutral H I densities, kinematics, metallicity and estimates of star formation activity. Our results, without any parameter-tuning, closely match the observed incidence rate and column density distributions of DLAs. Our simulations are the first to reproduce the distribution of metallicities (with a median of Z_{DLA} = Z_{solar}/20) without invoking observationally unsupported mechanisms suc...

  10. Coupling the emission of ionizing radiation and Lyman alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    The class of objects that reionized intergalactic hydrogen remains an observational and theoretical problem that is in contention for being the most prominent puzzle piece in contemporary astrophysics. The current consensus - determined almost entirely by ruling out bright active galaxies - is that the process was possibly begun and almost certainly finished by faint, lower-mass galaxies forming their early generations of stars. Recent observations of z 3 galaxies may even have identified the analog populations.However understanding how the emitted ionizing power of galaxies is causally related to their {robustly determined} physical properties is not a study that can be performed at high-z: neither the spatial information nor the standard multi-wavelength diagnostics are available. Moreover, on a case-by-case basis, the intervening IGM absorption is impossible to determine. These considerations have spawned a number of detailed studies with UV space telescopes, the synthesis of which however is that a characteristic population of Lyman continuum {LyC} emitting objects has not yet been identified. We show in this proposal that we have identified a characteristic trait in galaxy spectra that is highly indicative of LyC emission, by combining {a} high-z phenomenological studies, {b} new high-resolution UV spectra of local galaxies, and {c} sophisticated models of radiation transport. Believing that we have determined the signature, we propose to test the new hypothesis with deep spectroscopic observations with HST/COS under the Cycle 21 UV initiative.

  11. The Lyman-alpha Forest as a Cosmological Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, D H; Katz, N; Kollmeier, J A; Weinberg, David H.; Dav'e, Romeel; Katz, Neal; Kollmeier, Juna A.

    2003-01-01

    We review recent developments in the theory of the Lyman-alpha forest and their implications for the role of the forest as a test of cosmological models. Simulations predict a relatively tight correlation between the local Lya optical depth and the local gas or dark matter density. Statistical properties of the transmitted flux can constrain the amplitude and shape of the matter power spectrum at high redshift, test the assumption of Gaussian initial conditions, and probe the evolution of dark energy by measuring the Hubble parameter H(z). Simulations predict increased Lya absorption in the vicinity of galaxies, but observations show a Lya deficit within Delta_r ~ 0.5 Mpc/h (comoving). We investigate idealized models of "winds" and find that they must eliminate neutral hydrogen out to comoving radii ~1.5 Mpc/h to marginally explain the data. Winds of this magnitude suppress the flux power spectrum by \\~0.1 dex but have little effect on the distribution function or threshold crossing frequency. In light of the...

  12. The redshift evolution of Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Valageas, P; Silk, J

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for the Lyman-alpha absorbers that treats all objects (from the low-density forest clouds to the dense damped systems) in a unified description. This approach is consistent with an earlier model of galaxies (luminosity function, metallicity) but also with the known description of the density field in the small-scale non-linear regime. We consider two cosmological models: a critical universe $\\Omega=1$ with a CDM power-spectrum, and an open CDM universe with $\\Omega_0=0.3$, $\\Lambda=0$. We reproduce the available data on column density distribution as a function of redshift, the value of the main new parameter, the background ionizing UV flux, being consistent with the observed limits. This allows a quantitatively trustable analytical description of the opacity, mass, size, velocity dispersion and metallicity of these absorbers, over a range of column densities spanning 10 orders of magnitude. Moreover, together with an earlier model of galaxy formation this draws a unified picture of the re...

  13. Interplanetary Lyman $\\alpha$ line profiles: variations with solar activity cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Quemerais, E; Bertaux, J L; Koutroumpa, D; Clarke, J; Kyrola, E; Schmidt, W; Qu\\'emerais, Eric; Lallement, Rosine; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Clarke, John; Kyrola, Erkki; Schmidt, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Interplanetary Lyman alpha line profiles are derived from the SWAN H cell data measurements. The measurements cover a 6-year period from solar minimum (1996) to after the solar maximum of 2001. This allows us to study the variations of the line profiles with solar activity. These line profiles were used to derive line shifts and line widths in the interplanetary medium for various angles of the LOS with the interstellar flow direction. The SWAN data results were then compared to an interplanetary background upwind spectrum obtained by STIS/HST in March 2001. We find that the LOS upwind velocity associated with the mean line shift of the IP \\lya line varies from 25.7 km/s to 21.4 km/s from solar minimum to solar maximum. Most of this change is linked with variations in the radiation pressure. LOS kinetic temperatures derived from IP line widths do not vary monotonically with the upwind angle of the LOS. This is not compatible with calculations of IP line profiles based on hot model distributions of interplanet...

  14. The Stellar Populations and Evolution of Lyman Break Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Papovich, C; Ferguson, H C; Papovich, Casey; Dickinson, Mark; Ferguson, Henry C.

    2001-01-01

    Using deep near-IR and optical observations of the HDF-N from the HST NICMOS and WFPC2 and from the ground, we examine the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at 2.0 < z < 3.5. The UV-to-optical rest-frame SEDs of the galaxies are much bluer than those of present-day spiral and elliptical galaxies, and are generally similar to those of local starburst galaxies with modest amounts of reddening. We use stellar population synthesis models to study the properties of the stars that dominate the light from LBGs. Under the assumption that the star-formation rate is continuous or decreasing with time, the best-fitting models provide a lower bound on the LBG mass estimates. LBGs with ``L*'' UV luminosities are estimated to have minimum stellar masses ~ 10^10 solar masses, or roughly 1/10th that of a present-day L* galaxy. By considering the effects of a second component of maximally-old stars, we set an upper bound on the stellar masses that is ~ 3-8 times the minimum estimate. We...

  15. Lyman continuum leaking AGN in the SSA22 field

    CERN Document Server

    Micheva, Genoveva; Inoue, Akio K

    2016-01-01

    Subaru/SuprimeCam narrowband photometry of the SSA22 field reveals the presence of four Lyman continuum (LyC) candidates among a sample of 14 AGN. Two show offsets and likely have stellar LyC in nature or are foreground contaminants. The remaining two LyC candidates are Type I AGN. We argue that the average LyC escape fraction of high redshift quasars is not likely to be unity, as often assumed in the literature. From direct measurement we obtain the average LyC-to-UV flux density ratio and ionizing emissivity for a number of AGN classes and find it at least a factor of two lower than values obtained assuming f_esc = 1. Comparing to recent Ly{\\alpha} forest measurements, AGNs at redshift z\\sim3 make up at most \\sim20% and as little as 3% of the total ionizing budget. Our results suggest that AGNs are unlikely to dominate the ionization budget of the Universe at high redshifts.

  16. Lyman Alpha Signatures from Direct Collapse Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstra, Mark; Sobral, David

    2016-01-01

    `Direct collapse black holes' (DCBHs) provide possible seeds for supermassive black holes that exist at redshifts as high as z~7. We study Lyman Alpha (Lya) radiative transfer through simplified representations of the DCBH-scenario. We find that gravitational heating of the collapsing cloud gives rise to a Lya cooling luminosity of up to ~ 1e38(M_gas/1e6 Msun)^2 erg/s. The Lya production rate can be significantly larger during the final stages of collapse, but collisional deexcitation efficiently suppresses the emerging Lya flux. Photoionization by a central source boosts the Lya luminosity to L~1e43(M_BH/1e6 M_sun) erg/s during specific evolutionary stages of the cloud, where M_BH denotes the mass of the black hole powering this source. We predict that the width and velocity off-set of the Lya spectral line range from a few tens to few thousands km/s, depending sensitively on the evolutionary state of the cloud. We also compare our predictions to observations of CR7 (Sobral et al. 2015), a luminous Lya emitt...

  17. Lyman-Werner UV escape fractions from primordial haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Anna T. P.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2015-12-01

    Population III (Pop III) stars can regulate star formation in the primordial Universe in several ways. They can ionize nearby haloes, and even if their ionizing photons are trapped by their own haloes, their Lyman-Werner (LW) photons can still escape and destroy H2 in other haloes, preventing them from cooling and forming stars. LW escape fractions are thus a key parameter in cosmological simulations of early reionization and star formation but have not yet been parametrized for realistic haloes by halo or stellar mass. To do so, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of LW UV escape from 9-120 M⊙ Pop III stars in 105-107 M⊙ haloes with ZEUS-MP. We find that photons in the LW lines (i.e. those responsible for destroying H2 in nearby systems) have escape fractions ranging from 0 to 85 per cent. No LW photons escape the most massive halo in our sample, even from the most massive star. Escape fractions for photons elsewhere in the 11.18-13.6 eV energy range, which can be redshifted into the LW lines at cosmological distances, are generally much higher, being above 60 per cent for all but the least massive stars in the most massive haloes. We find that shielding of H2 by neutral hydrogen, which has been neglected in most studies to date, produces escape fractions that are up to a factor of 3 smaller than those predicted by H2 self-shielding alone.

  18. The z ~ 4 Lyman Break Galaxies: Colors and Theoretical Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Idzi, R; Papovich, C; Ferguson, H C; Giavalisco, M; Kretchmer, C; Lotz, J; Idzi, Rafal; Somerville, Rachel; Papovich, Casey; Ferguson, Henry C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Kretchmer, Claudia; Lotz, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    We investigate several fundamental properties of z ~ 4 Lyman-break galaxies by comparing observations with the predictions of a semi-analytic model based on the Cold Dark Matter theory of hierarchical structure formation. We use a sample of B_{435}-dropouts from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, and complement the ACS optical B_{435}, V_{606}, i_{775}, and z_{850} data with the VLT ISAAC J, H, and K_{s} observations. We extract B_{435}-dropouts from our semi-analytic mock catalog using the same color criteria and magnitude limits that were applied to the observed sample. We find that the i_{775} - K_{s} colors of the model-derived and observed B_{435}-dropouts are in good agreement. However, we find that the i_{775}-z_{850} colors differ significantly, indicating perhaps that either too little dust or an incorrect extinction curve have been used. Motivated by the reasonably good agreement between the model and observed data we present predictions for the stellar masses, star formation rates, and ag...

  19. Lyman Alpha Emitters in the Hierarchically Clustering Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    We present a new theoretical model for the luminosity functions (LFs) of Lyman alpha (Lya) emitting galaxies in the framework of hierarchical galaxy formation. We extend a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation that reproduces a number of observations for local galaxies, without changing the original model parameters but introducing a physically-motivated modelling to describe the escape fraction of Lya photons from host galaxies (f_esc). Though a previous study using a hierarchical clustering model simply assumed a constant and universal value of f_esc, we incorporate two new effects on f_esc: extinction by interstellar dust and galaxy-scale outflow induced as a star formation feedback. It is found that the new model nicely reproduces all the observed Lya LFs of the Lya emitters (LAEs) at different redshifts in z ~ 3--6. Our model predicts that galaxies with strong outflows and f_esc ~ 1 are dominant in the observed LFs, which is consistent with available observations while the simple universal f_esc model ...

  20. Lyman-Werner UV Escape Fractions from Primordial Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Schauer, Anna T P; Glover, Simon C O; Klessen, Ralf S

    2015-01-01

    Population III stars can regulate star formation in the primordial Universe in several ways. They can ionize nearby halos, and even if their ionizing photons are trapped by their own halos, their Lyman-Werner (LW) photons can still escape and destroy H$_2$ in other halos, preventing them from cooling and forming stars. LW escape fractions are thus a key parameter in cosmological simulations of early reionization and star formation but have not yet been parametrized for realistic halos by halo or stellar mass. To do so, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of LW UV escape from 9--120 M$_{\\odot}$ Pop III stars in $10^5$ to $10^7$ M$_{\\odot}$ halos with ZEUS-MP. We find that photons in the LW lines (i.e. those responsible for destroying H$_{2}$ in nearby systems) have escape fractions ranging from 0% to 85%. No LW photons escape the most massive halo in our sample, even from the most massive star. Escape fractions for photons elsewhere in the 11.18--13.6~eV energy range, which can be redshifted into t...

  1. The Metallicity evolution of Damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ systems

    CERN Document Server

    Savaglio, S; Stiavelli, M

    1999-01-01

    We have collected absorption line measurements of 70 Damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) systems, mostly coming from high resolution data, to investigate the chemical evolution of galaxies in the redshift interval 0.0 < z < 4.4. In doing that, we have adopted the most general approach used so far, i.e. the dust depletion corrections are obtained by comparing the element abundances with four depletion patterns observed in the Milky Way. The best solution, obtained through chi^2 minimization, gives as output parameters the global DLA metallicity and the dust-to-metals ratio. Clear evolution of the metallicity vs. redshift is found, with average values going from ~1/30 solar at z~4.1 to dispersion around the average regression is significantly larger than the errors (i.e. ~0.45 dex average dispersion relative to ~0.14 dex error), indicating that the class of DLAs include objects with a range of evolutionary histories and/or initial conditions, such as total mass, formation time, matter spatial distribution, etc. We a...

  2. Lyman continuum leaking AGN in the SSA22 field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Genoveva; Iwata, Ikuru; Inoue, Akio K.

    2017-02-01

    Subaru/SuprimeCam narrow-band photometry of the SSA22 field reveals the presence of four Lyman continuum (LyC) candidates among a sample of 14 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two show offsets and likely have stellar LyCin nature or are foreground contaminants. The remaining two LyC candidates are type I AGN. We argue that the average LyC escape fraction of high-redshift, low-luminosity AGN is not likely to be unity, as often assumed in the literature. From direct measurement we obtain the average LyC-to-UV flux density ratio and ionizing emissivity for a number of AGN classes and find it at least a factor of 2 lower than values obtained assuming fesc = 1. Comparing to recent Ly α forest measurements, AGNs at redshift z ˜ 3 make up at most ˜12 per cent and as little as ˜5 per cent of the total ionizing budget. Our results suggest that AGNs are unlikely to dominate the ionization budget of the Universe at high redshifts.

  3. Giant Lyman-Alpha Nebulae in the Illustris Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Gronke, Max

    2016-01-01

    Several `giant' Lyman-$\\alpha$ (Ly$\\alpha$) nebulae with extent $\\gtrsim 300\\,$kpc and observed Ly$\\alpha$ luminosity of $\\gtrsim 10^{44}\\,{\\rm erg}\\,{\\rm s}^{-1}\\,{\\rm cm}^{-2}\\,{\\rm arcsec}^{-2}$ have recently been detected, and it has been speculated that their presence hints at a substantial cold gas reservoir in small cool clumps not resolved in modern hydro-dynamical simulations. We use the Illustris simulation to predict the Ly$\\alpha$ emission emerging from large halos ($M > 10^{11.5}M_{\\odot}$) at $z\\sim 2$ and thus test this model. We consider both AGN and star driven ionization, and compared the simulated surface brightness maps, profiles and Ly$\\alpha$ spectra to a model where most gas is clumped below the simulation resolution scale. We find that while the cold clumps boost the Ly$\\alpha$ luminosity especially in the outer regions of the halo -- as expected by previous work -- with Illustris no additional clumping is necessary to explain the extents and luminosities of the `giant Ly$\\alpha$ nebul...

  4. Complication probability models for radiation-induced heart valvular dysfunction: do heart-lung interactions play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cella

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare different normal tissue complication probability (NTCP models for predicting heart valve dysfunction (RVD following thoracic irradiation.All patients from our institutional Hodgkin lymphoma survivors database with analyzable datasets were included (n = 90. All patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a median total dose of 32 Gy. The cardiac toxicity profile was available for each patient. Heart and lung dose-volume histograms (DVHs were extracted and both organs were considered for Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB and Relative Seriality (RS NTCP model fitting using maximum likelihood estimation. Bootstrap refitting was used to test the robustness of the model fit. Model performance was estimated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC.Using only heart-DVHs, parameter estimates were, for the LKB model: D50 = 32.8 Gy, n = 0.16 and m = 0.67; and for the RS model: D50 = 32.4 Gy, s = 0.99 and γ = 0.42. AUC values were 0.67 for LKB and 0.66 for RS, respectively. Similar performance was obtained for models using only lung-DVHs (LKB: D50 = 33.2 Gy, n = 0.01, m = 0.19, AUC = 0.68; RS: D50 = 24.4 Gy, s = 0.99, γ = 2.12, AUC = 0.66. Bootstrap result showed that the parameter fits for lung-LKB were extremely robust. A combined heart-lung LKB model was also tested and showed a minor improvement (AUC = 0.70. However, the best performance was obtained using the previously determined multivariate regression model including maximum heart dose with increasing risk for larger heart and smaller lung volumes (AUC = 0.82.The risk of radiation induced valvular disease cannot be modeled using NTCP models only based on heart dose-volume distribution. A predictive model with an improved performance can be obtained but requires the inclusion of heart and lung volume terms, indicating that heart

  5. Effect of Whole-abdominal Irradiation on Penetration Depth of Doxorubicin in Normal Tissue After Pressurized Intraperitoneal Aerosol Chemotherapy (PIPAC) in a Post-mortem Swine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosrawipour, Veria; Khosrawipour, Tanja; Hedayat-Pour, Yousef; Diaz-Carballo, David; Bellendorf, Alexander; Böse-Ribeiro, Hugo; Mücke, Ralph; Mohanaraja, Nirushika; Adamietz, Irenäus Anton; Fakhrian, Khashayar

    2017-04-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the impact of whole-abdominal irradiation on local penetration of doxorubicin into the peritoneum and the abdominal organs in a post-mortem swine model. Doxorubicin was aerosolized into the abdominal cavity of swine at a pressure of 12 mmHg CO2 at room temperature (25°). One swine was subjected to pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy (PIPAC) using Micropump(©) without irradiation; the second one received 2 Gy and the third one 7 Gy whole-abdominal irradiation, 15 min prior to PIPAC application. Samples of the peritoneal surface were extracted at different positions from within the abdominal cavity. In-tissue doxorubicin penetration was measured using fluorescence microscopy on frozen thin sections. The depth of penetration of doxorubicin was found to be wide-ranging, between 17 μm on the surface of the stomach and 348 μm in the small intestine. The penetration depth into the small intestine was 348 μm, 312 μm and 265 μm for PIPAC alone, PIPAC with 2 Gy irradiation and PIPAC with 7 Gy irradiation, respectively (pdoxorubicin penetration into normal tissue in the post-mortem swine model. A reduction of doxorubicin penetration was observed after application of higher irradiation doses. Further studies are warranted to determine if irradiation can be used safely as chemopotentiating agent for patients with peritoneal metastases treated with PIPAC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Computing Intrinsic Lyman-alpha Fluxes of F5 V to M5 V Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Linsky, Jeffrey L; Ayres, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha emission line dominates the far-ultraviolet spectra of late-type stars and is a major source for photodissociation of important molecules including H2O, CH4, and CO2 in exoplanet atmospheres. The incident flux in this line illuminating an exoplanet's atmosphere cannot be measured directly as neutral hydrogen in the interstellar medium (ISM) attenuates most of the flux reaching the Earth. Reconstruction of the intrinsic Lyman-alpha line has been accomplished for a limited number of nearby stars, but is not feasible for distant or faint host stars. We identify correlations connecting the intrinsic Lyman-alpha flux with the flux in other emission lines formed in the stellar chromosphere, and find that these correlations depend only gradually on the flux in the other lines. These correlations, which are based on HST spectra, reconstructed Lyman-alpha line fluxes, and irradiance spectra of the quiet and active Sun, are required for photochemical models of exoplanet atmospheres when intrinsic Lyman-...

  7. First Detection of Cosmic Microwave Background Lensing and Lyman-{\\alpha} Forest Bispectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Doux, Cyrille; Aubourg, Eric; Ganga, Ken; Lee, Khee-Gan; Spergel, David N; Tréguer, Julien

    2016-01-01

    We present the first detection of a correlation between the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest and cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing. For each Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest in SDSS-III/BOSS DR12, we correlate the one-dimensional power spectrum with the CMB lensing convergence on the same line of sight from Planck. This measurement constitutes a position-dependent power spectrum, or a squeezed bispectrum, and quantifies the non-linear response of the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest power spectrum to a large-scale overdensity. The signal is measured at 5~$\\sigma$ and is consistent with the $\\Lambda$CDM expectation. We measure the linear and non-linear biases of the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest with respect to the dark matter distribution. This new observable provides a consistency check for the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest as a large-scale structure probe and tests our understanding of the relation between intergalactic gas and dark matter. In the future, it could be used to test hydrodynamical simulations and calibrate the relation between the Ly...

  8. Direct Detection of Lyman Continuum Escape from Local Starburst Galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Leitherer, Claus; Lee, Janice C; Oey, M S

    2016-01-01

    We report on the detection of Lyman continuum radiation in two nearby starburst galaxies. Tol 0440-381, Tol 1247-232 and Mrk 54 were observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescopes. The three galaxies have radial velocities of ~13,000 km/s, permitting a ~35 A window on the restframe Lyman continuum shortward of the Milky Way Lyman edge at 912 A. The chosen instrument configuration using the G140L grating covers the spectral range from 912 to 2,000 {\\AA}. We developed a dedicated background subtraction method to account for temporal and spatial background variations of the detector, which is crucial at the low flux levels around 912 A. This modified pipeline allowed us to significantly improve the statistical and systematic detector noise and will be made available to the community. We detect Lyman continuum in all three galaxies. However, we conservatively interpret the emission in Tol 0440-381 as an upper limit due to possible contamination by geocoronal Lyman series lines. ...

  9. Two-phase equilibrium and molecular hydrogen formation in damped Lyman-alpha systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liszt, H S

    2002-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen is quite underabundant in damped Lyman-alpha systems at high redshift, when compared to the interstellar medium near the Sun. This has been interpreted as implying that the gas in damped Lyman-alpha systems is warm. like the nearby neutral intercloud medium, rather than cool, as in the clouds which give rise to most H I absorption in the Milky Way. Other lines of evidence suggest that the gas in damped Lyman-alpha systems -- in whole or part -- is actually cool; spectroscopy of neutral and ionized carbon, discussed here, shows that the damped Lyman-alpha systems observed at lower redshift z $$ 2.8 are warm (though not devoid of H2). To interpret the observations of carbon and hydrogen we constructed detailed numerical models of H2 formation under the conditions of two-phase thermal equilibrium, like those which account for conditions near the Sun, but with varying metallicity, dust-gas ratio, $etc$. We find that the low metallicity of damped Lyman-alpha systems is enough to suppress H2 form...

  10. The Lyman alpha Reference Sample VI: Lyman alpha escape from the edge-on disk galaxy Mrk1486

    CERN Document Server

    Duval, Florent; Hayes, Matthew; Zackrisson, Erik; Verhamme, Anne; Orlitova, Ivana; Adamo, Angela; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Cannon, John M; Laursen, Peter; Rivera-Thorsen, Thoger; Herenz, E Christian; Gruyters, Pieter; Mas-Hesse, J Miguel; Kunth, Daniel; Sandberg, Andreas; Schaerer, Daniel; Mansson, Tore

    2015-01-01

    While numerical simulations suggest that the strength of the Lyman alpha (Lya) line of star-forming disk galaxies strongly depends on the inclination at which they are observed (i.e. from edge-on to face-on, we expect to see a change from an attenuated Lya line to a strong Lya emission line), recent observations with the Hubble space telescope (HST) have highlighted few low-redshift highly inclined (edge-on) disk galaxies that breaks this trend. We aim to understand how a strong Lya emission line is able to escape from one of those inclined disk galaxies, named Mrk1486 (z=0.0338). For that purpose we used a large set of HST imaging and spectroscopic data to investigate both the ISM structure and the dominant source of Lya radiation inside Mrk1486. Moreover, we used a 3D Monte Carlo Lya radiation transfer code to study the radiative transfer of Lya and UV continuum photons inside a 3D geometry of neutral hydrogen (HI) and dust that models the ISM structure at the galaxy center. The analysis of IFU Halpha spect...

  11. A connection between extremely strong Damped Lyman-alpha Systems and Lyman-alpha Emitting Galaxies at small impact parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Noterdaeme, P; Paris, I; Cai, Z; Finley, H; Ge, J; Pieri, M M; York, D G

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of ~100 high redshift (z~2-4) extremely strong damped Lyman-alpha systems (ESDLA, with N(HI)>0.5x10^22 cm^-2) detected in quasar spectra from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey SDSS-III DR11. We study the neutral hydrogen, metal, and dust content of this elusive population of absorbers and confirm our previous finding that the high column density end of the N(HI) frequency distribution has a relatively shallow slope with power-law index -3.6, similar to what is seen from 21-cm maps in nearby galaxies. The stacked absorption spectrum indicates a typical metallicity ~1/20th solar, similar to the mean metallicity of the overall DLA population. The relatively small velocity extent of the low-ionisation lines suggests that ESDLAs do not arise from large-scale flows of neutral gas. The high column densities involved are in turn more similar to what is seen in DLAs associated with gamma-ray burst afterglows (GRB-DLAs), which are known to occur close to star forming regions. This indicates...

  12. Lyman α emission from the first galaxies: signatures of accretion and infall in the presence of line trapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Spaans, M.; Zaroubi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of the first galaxies is accompanied by large accretion flows and virialization shocks, during which the gas is shock heated to temperatures of similar to 10(4) K, leading to potentially strong fluxes in the Lyman alpha line. Indeed, a number of Lyman alpha blobs have been detected at

  13. Lyman α emission from the first galaxies : Signatures of accretion and infall in the presence of line trapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latif, M.A.; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Spaans, Maarten; Zaroubi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of the first galaxies is accompanied by large accretion flows and virialization shocks, during which the gas is shock heated to temperatures of ˜104 K, leading to potentially strong fluxes in the Lyman α line. Indeed, a number of Lyman α blobs have been detected at high redshift. In th

  14. Lyman α emission from the first galaxies: signatures of accretion and infall in the presence of line trapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Spaans, M.; Zaroubi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of the first galaxies is accompanied by large accretion flows and virialization shocks, during which the gas is shock heated to temperatures of ˜104 K, leading to potentially strong fluxes in the Lyman α line. Indeed, a number of Lyman α blobs have been detected at high redshift. In th

  15. Lyman alpha emission from the first galaxies : signatures of accretion and infall in the presence of line trapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Spaans, M.; Zaroubi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of the first galaxies is accompanied by large accretion flows and virialization shocks, during which the gas is shock heated to temperatures of similar to 10(4) K, leading to potentially strong fluxes in the Lyman alpha line. Indeed, a number of Lyman alpha blobs have been detected at

  16. Lyman α emission from the first galaxies: signatures of accretion and infall in the presence of line trapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Spaans, M.; Zaroubi, S.

    The formation of the first galaxies is accompanied by large accretion flows and virialization shocks, during which the gas is shock heated to temperatures of similar to 10(4) K, leading to potentially strong fluxes in the Lyman alpha line. Indeed, a number of Lyman alpha blobs have been detected at

  17. Variability of Lyman-alpha and the ultraviolet continuum of 3C 446

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Kinney, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    IUE observations have been conducted over the 1230-3175 A range for the violently variable quasar 3C 446, beginning in June 1980, at intervals of 1.2, 2.2, 0.5, and 0.4 yr. Strong absorption of the continuum was found below 1830 A, probably corresponding to a Lyman edge at z of 1.00 + or - 0.01. The absence of Mg II 2798 A absorption implies that the column density is in the lower end of the range, unless the gas is metal-poor. The Lyman-alpha emission line was detected in five spectra; relative to the number of ionizing protons, the line strengths are the same as in normal quasars, and line equivalent widths are small due to the continuum's rise redward of 912 A, which is much steeper than in normal quasars. The Lyman-alpha line and the nearby continuum vary so as to maintain constant equivalent width.

  18. A possible solution to the Lyman/Balmer line problem in hot DA white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Preval, S P; Badnell, N R; Holberg, J B; Hubeny, I

    2014-01-01

    Arguably, the best method for determining the effective temperature ($T_{\\mathrm{eff}}$) and surface gravity (log $g$) of a DA white dwarf is by fitting the Hydrogen Lyman and Balmer absorption features. However, as has been shown for white dwarfs with $T_{\\mathrm{eff}}$>50,000K, the calculated value from the Lyman and Balmer lines are discrepant, which worsens with increasing temperature. Many different solutions have been suggested, ranging from the input physics used to calculate the models, to interstellar reddening. We will focus on the former, and consider three variables. The first is the atomic data used, namely the number of transitions included in line blanketing treatments and the photoionization cross sections. The second is the stark broadening treatment used to synthesise the Lyman and Balmer line profiles, namely the calculations performed by Lemke (1997) and Tremblay & Bergeron (2009). Finally, the third is the atmospheric content. The model grids are calculated with a pure H composition, ...

  19. Minimally Parametric Power Spectrum Reconstruction from the Lyman-alpha Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Simeon; Viel, Matteo; Verde, Licia

    2010-01-01

    Current results from the Lyman alpha forest assume that the primordial power spectrum of density perturbations follows a simple power law form. We present the first analysis of Lyman alpha data to study the effect of relaxing this strong assumption on primordial and astrophysical constraints. We perform a large suite of numerical simulations, using them to calibrate a minimally parametric framework for describing the power spectrum. Combined with cross-validation, a statistical technique which prevents over-fitting of the data, this framework allows us to reconstruct the power spectrum shape without strong prior assumptions. We find no evidence for deviation from scale-invariance; our analysis also shows that current Lyman alpha data do not have sufficient statistical power to robustly probe the shape of the power spectrum at these scales. In contrast, the ongoing Baryon Oscillation Sky Survey (BOSS) will be able to do so with high precision. Furthermore, this near-future data will be able to break degeneraci...

  20. Bias, redshift space distortions and primordial nongaussianity of nonlinear transformations: application to Lyman alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Seljak, Uros

    2012-01-01

    On large scales a nonlinear transformation of matter density field can be viewed as a biased tracer of the density field itself. A nonlinear transformation also modifies the redshift space distortions in the same limit, giving rise to a velocity bias. In models with primordial nongaussianity a nonlinear transformation generates a scale dependent bias on large scales. We derive analytic expressions for these for a general nonlinear transformation. These biases can be expressed entirely in terms of the one point distribution function (PDF) of the final field and the parameters of the transformation. Our analysis allows one to devise nonlinear transformations with nearly arbitrary bias properties, which can be used to increase the signal in the large scale clustering limit. We apply the results to the ionizing equilibrium model of Lyman-alpha forest, in which Lyman-alpha flux F is related to the density perturbation delta via a nonlinear transformation. Velocity bias can be expressed as an average over the Lyman...

  1. Lyman-alpha and CIII] Emission in z=7-9 Galaxies: Accelerated Reionization Around Luminous Star Forming Systems?

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Daniel P; Charlot, Stephane; Chevallard, Jacopo; Tang, Mengtao; Belli, Sirio; Zitrin, Adi; Mainali, Ramesh; Gutkin, Julia; Vidal-Garcia, Alba; Bouwens, Rychard; Oesch, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    We discuss new Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations of four luminous galaxies at z~7-9 selected to have intense optical line emission by Roberts-Borsani et al. (2016). Previous follow-up has revealed Lyman-alpha in two of the four galaxies. Our new MOSFIRE observations confirm that Lyman-alpha is present in the entire sample. We detect Lyman-alpha emission in COS-zs7-1, confirming its redshift as z=7.154, and we detect Lyman-alpha in EGS-zs8-2 at z=7.477, verifying a tentative detection presented in an earlier study. The ubiquity of Lyman-alpha in this sample is puzzling given that the IGM is likely significantly neutral over 77 is expected to be strongly luminosity-dependent, with the most effective transmission occurring in systems with intense star formation.

  2. The most metal-rich damped Lyman alpha systems at z>1.5 I: The Data

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, Trystyn A M; Prochaska, J Xavier; Ellison, Sara L; Wolfe, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    We present HIRES observations for 30 damped Lyman alpha systems, selected on the basis of their large metal column densities from previous, lower resolution data. The measured metal column densities for Fe, Zn, S, Si, Cr, Mn, and Ni are provided for these 30 systems. Combined with previously observed large metal column density damped Lyman alpha systems, we present a sample of 44 damped Lyman alpha systems observed with high resolution spectrographs (R~30000). These damped Lyman alpha systems probe the most chemically evolved systems at redshifts greater than 1.5. We discuss the context of our sample with the general damped Lyman alpha population, demonstrating that we are probing the top 10% of metal column densities with our sample. In a companion paper, we will present an analysis of the sample's elemental abundances in the context of galactic chemical enrichment.

  3. Predicting Lyman-alpha and Mg II Fluxes from K and M Dwarfs Using GALEX Ultraviolet Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L; Peacock, Sarah; Barman, Travis S

    2014-01-01

    A star's UV emission can greatly affect the atmospheric chemistry and physical properties of closely orbiting planets with the potential for severe mass loss. In particular, the Lyman-alpha emission line at 1216 Angstroms, which dominates the far-ultraviolet spectrum, is a major source of photodissociation of important atmospheric molecules such as water and methane. The intrinsic flux of Lyman-alpha, however, cannot be directly measured due to the absorption of neutral hydrogen in the interstellar medium and contamination by geocoronal emission. To date, reconstruction of the intrinsic Lyman-alpha line based on Hubble Space Telescope spectra has been accomplished for 46 FGKM nearby stars, 28 of which have also been observed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Our investigation provides a correlation between published intrinsic Lyman-alpha and GALEX far- and near-ultraviolet chromospheric fluxes for K and M stars. The negative correlations between the ratio of the Lyman-alpha to the GALEX fluxes reveal ...

  4. Lyman α radiation hydrodynamics of galactic winds before cosmic reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical impact of Lyman α (Lyα) radiation pressure on galaxy formation depends on the rate and duration of momentum transfer between Lyα photons and neutral hydrogen gas. Although photon trapping has the potential to multiply the effective force, ionizing radiation from stellar sources may relieve the Lyα pressure before appreciably affecting the kinematics of the host galaxy or efficiently coupling Lyα photons to the outflow. We present self-consistent Lyα radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of high-z galaxy environments by coupling the Cosmic Lyα Transfer code (COLT) with spherically symmetric Lagrangian frame hydrodynamics. The accurate but computationally expensive Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations are feasible under the one-dimensional approximation. The initial starburst drives an expanding shell of gas from the centre and in certain cases, Lyα feedback significantly enhances the shell velocity. Radiative feedback alone is capable of ejecting baryons into the intergalactic medium (IGM) for protogalaxies with a virial mass of Mvir ≲ 108 M⊙. We compare the Lyα signatures of Population III stars with 105 K blackbody emission to that of direct collapse black holes with a non-thermal Compton-thick spectrum and find substantial differences if the Lyα spectra are shaped by gas pushed by Lyα radiation-driven winds. For both sources, the flux emerging from the galaxy is reprocessed by the IGM such that the observed Lyα luminosity is reduced significantly and the time-averaged velocity offset of the Lyα peak is shifted redward.

  5. Rapid Discrimination of Malignant Breast Lesions from Normal Tissues Utilizing Raman Spectroscopy System: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of In Vitro Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ke; Zhu, Chenjing; Ma, Xuelei; Jia, Hongyuan; Wei, Zhigong; Xiao, Yue; Xu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Raman spectroscopy system in the detection of malignant breast lesions through a systemic review and meta-analysis of published studies. We conducted a comprehensive literature search of PubMed and Embase from 2000 to June 2015. Published studies that evaluated the diagnostic performance of Raman spectroscopy in distinguishing malignant breast lesions from benign lesions and normal tissues were included in our study. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was derived. A Revised Tool for the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies guidelines was used to assess the quality of included studies. The initial search produced a total of 157 articles after removing duplicates. Nine studies (8 in vitro and 1 in vivo) were eligible in this meta-analysis. We analyzed the eight in vitro studies with 1756 lesions, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of Raman spectroscopy system for the diagnosis of malignant breast lesions were 0.92 (95% CI 0.86-0.96) and 0.97 (97% CI 0.93-0.98), respectively. Diagnostic odds ratio was 266.70 (95% CI 89.38-795.79), and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was 0.98 (95% CI 0.97-0.99). Significant heterogeneity was found between studies. There was no evidence of considerable publication bias. Raman spectroscopy system is an optical diagnostic technology with great value for detecting malignant breast lesions. At the same time, it has advantages of being non-invasive, real-time, and easy to use. Thus it deserves to be further explored for intra-operatory breast tumor margin detection.

  6. A comparison of mantle versus involved-field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma: reduction in normal tissue dose and second cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tony

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL survivors who undergo radiotherapy experience increased risks of second cancers (SC and cardiac sequelae. To reduce such risks, extended-field radiotherapy (RT for HL has largely been replaced by involved field radiotherapy (IFRT. While it has generally been assumed that IFRT will reduce SC risks, there are few data that quantify the reduction in dose to normal tissues associated with modern RT practice for patients with mediastinal HL, and no estimates of the expected reduction in SC risk. Methods Organ-specific dose-volume histograms (DVH were generated for 41 patients receiving 35 Gy mantle RT, 35 Gy IFRT, or 20 Gy IFRT, and integrated organ mean doses were compared for the three protocols. Organ-specific SC risk estimates were estimated using a dosimetric risk-modeling approach, analyzing DVH data with quantitative, mechanistic models of radiation-induced cancer. Results Dose reductions resulted in corresponding reductions in predicted excess relative risks (ERR for SC induction. Moving from 35 Gy mantle RT to 35 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERR for female breast and lung cancer by approximately 65%, and for male lung cancer by approximately 35%; moving from 35 Gy IFRT to 20 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERRs approximately 40% more. The median reduction in integral dose to the whole heart with the transition to 35 Gy IFRT was 35%, with a smaller (2% reduction in dose to proximal coronary arteries. There was no significant reduction in thyroid dose. Conclusion The significant decreases estimated for radiation-induced SC risks associated with modern IFRT provide strong support for the use of IFRT to reduce the late effects of treatment. The approach employed here can provide new insight into the risks associated with contemporary IFRT for HL, and may facilitate the counseling of patients regarding the risks associated with this treatment.

  7. Next-generation sequencing of RNA and DNA isolated from paired fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of human cancer and normal tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Hedegaard

    Full Text Available Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues are an invaluable resource for clinical research. However, nucleic acids extracted from FFPE tissues are fragmented and chemically modified making them challenging to use in molecular studies. We analysed 23 fresh-frozen (FF, 35 FFPE and 38 paired FF/FFPE specimens, representing six different human tissue types (bladder, prostate and colon carcinoma; liver and colon normal tissue; reactive tonsil in order to examine the potential use of FFPE samples in next-generation sequencing (NGS based retrospective and prospective clinical studies. Two methods for DNA and three methods for RNA extraction from FFPE tissues were compared and were found to affect nucleic acid quantity and quality. DNA and RNA from selected FFPE and paired FF/FFPE specimens were used for exome and transcriptome analysis. Preparations of DNA Exome-Seq libraries was more challenging (29.5% success than that of RNA-Seq libraries, presumably because of modifications to FFPE tissue-derived DNA. Libraries could still be prepared from RNA isolated from two-decade old FFPE tissues. Data were analysed using the CLC Bio Genomics Workbench and revealed systematic differences between FF and FFPE tissue-derived nucleic acid libraries. In spite of this, pairwise analysis of DNA Exome-Seq data showed concordance for 70-80% of variants in FF and FFPE samples stored for fewer than three years. RNA-Seq data showed high correlation of expression profiles in FF/FFPE pairs (Pearson Correlations of 0.90 +/- 0.05, irrespective of storage time (up to 244 months and tissue type. A common set of 1,494 genes was identified with expression profiles that were significantly different between paired FF and FFPE samples irrespective of tissue type. Our results are promising and suggest that NGS can be used to study FFPE specimens in both prospective and retrospective archive-based studies in which FF specimens are not available.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  9. SU-D-16A-01: A Novel Method to Estimate Normal Tissue Dose for Radiotherapy Patients to Support Epidemiologic Studies of Second Cancer Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jung, J; Pelletier, C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Kim, J [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient cohort of second cancer study often involves radiotherapy patients with no radiological images available: We developed methods to construct a realistic surrogate anatomy by using computational human phantoms. We tested this phantom images both in a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse) and a custom Monte Carlo (MC) transport code. Methods: We used a reference adult male phantom defined by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The hybrid phantom which was originally developed in Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) and polygon mesh format was converted into more common medical imaging format. Electron density was calculated from the material composition of the organs and tissues and then converted into DICOM format. The DICOM images were imported into the Eclipse system for treatment planning, and then the resulting DICOM-RT files were imported into the MC code for MC-based dose calculation. Normal tissue doses were calculation in Eclipse and MC code for an illustrative prostate treatment case and compared to each other. Results: DICOM images were generated from the adult male reference phantom. Densities and volumes of selected organs between the original phantom and ones represented within Eclipse showed good agreements, less than 0.6%. Mean dose from Eclipse and MC code match less than 7%, whereas maximum and minimum doses were different up to 45%. Conclusion: The methods established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support epidemiological studies of second cancer in cancer survivors treated by radiotherapy. We also work on implementing body size-dependent computational phantoms to better represent patient's anatomy when the height and weight of patients are available.

  10. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells.

  11. Lyman-α forest constraints on decaying dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Yu; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Peter, Annika H. G.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Purcell, Chris W.

    2013-12-01

    We present an analysis of high-resolution N-body simulations of decaying dark matter cosmologies focusing on the statistical properties of the transmitted Lyman-α (Lyα) forest flux in the high-redshift intergalactic medium (IGM). In this type of model a dark matter particle decays into a slightly less massive stable dark matter daughter particle and a comparably light particle. The small mass splitting provides a nonrelativistic kick velocity Vk=cΔM/M to the daughter particle resulting in free-streaming and subsequent damping of small-scale density fluctuations. Current Lyα forest power spectrum measurements probe comoving scales up to ˜2-3h-1Mpc at redshifts z˜2-4, providing one of the most robust ways to probe cosmological density fluctuations on relatively small scales. The suppression of structure growth due to the free-streaming of dark matter daughter particles also has a significant impact on the neutral hydrogen cloud distribution, which traces the underlying dark matter distribution well at high redshift. We exploit Lyα forest power spectrum measurements to constrain the amount of free-streaming of dark matter in such models and thereby place limits on decaying dark matter based only on the dynamics of cosmological perturbations without any assumptions about the interactions of the decay products. We use a suite of dark-matter-only simulations together with the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation to derive the Lyα flux distribution. We argue that this approach should be sufficient for our main purpose, which is to demonstrate the power of the Lyα forest to constrain decaying dark matter models. We find that Sloan Digital Sky Survey 1D Lyα forest power spectrum data place a lifetime-dependent upper limit Vk≲30-70km/s for decay lifetimes ≲10Gyr. This is the most stringent model-independent bound on invisible dark matter decays with small mass splittings. For larger mass splittings (large Vk), Lyα forest data restrict the dark matter

  12. The dosimetric impact of daily setup error on target volumes and surrounding normal tissue in the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algan, Ozer, E-mail: oalgan@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Jamgade, Ambarish; Ali, Imad; Christie, Alana; Thompson, J. Spencer; Thompson, David; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence [Department of Radiation Oncology, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2012-01-01

    parameter for the surrounding normal tissue except for the dose received by the penile bulb and the right hip. Our dosimetric evaluation suggests significant underdosing with inaccurate target localization and emphasizes the importance of accurate patient setup and target localization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of intrafraction organ motion, rotation, and deformation on doses delivered to target volumes.

  13. The dosimetric impact of daily setup error on target volumes and surrounding normal tissue in the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algan, Ozer; Jamgade, Ambarish; Ali, Imad; Christie, Alana; Thompson, J Spencer; Thompson, David; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of daily setup error and interfraction organ motion on the overall dosimetric radiation treatment plans. Twelve patients undergoing definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments for prostate cancer were evaluated in this institutional review board-approved study. Each patient had fiducial markers placed into the prostate gland before treatment planning computed tomography scan. IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Each patient was treated to a dose of 8100 cGy given in 45 fractions. In this study, we retrospectively created a plan for each treatment day that had a shift available. To calculate the dose, the patient would have received under this plan, we mathematically "negated" the shift by moving the isocenter in the exact opposite direction of the shift. The individualized daily plans were combined to generate an overall plan sum. The dose distributions from these plans were compared with the treatment plans that were used to treat the patients. Three-hundred ninety daily shifts were negated and their corresponding plans evaluated. The mean isocenter shift based on the location of the fiducial markers was 3.3 ± 6.5 mm to the right, 1.6 ± 5.1 mm posteriorly, and 1.0 ± 5.0 mm along the caudal direction. The mean D95 doses for the prostate gland when setup error was corrected and uncorrected were 8228 and 7844 cGy (p 1200 cGy and for the PTV8100 could approach almost 2000 cGy when comparing corrected against uncorrected plans. There was no statistically significant difference in the D35 parameter for the surrounding normal tissue except for the dose received by the penile bulb and the right hip. Our dosimetric evaluation suggests significant underdosing with inaccurate target localization and emphasizes the importance of accurate patient setup and target localization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of intrafraction organ motion, rotation

  14. Clinical Validation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation of Multiple Target Volumes and Normal Tissue (Swallowing/Mastication) Structures in the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teguh, David N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Levendag, Peter C., E-mail: p.levendag@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Voet, Peter W.J.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Han Xiao; Wolf, Theresa K.; Hibbard, Lyndon S. [Elekta-CMS Software, Maryland Heights, MO 63043 (United States); Nowak, Peter; Akhiat, Hafid; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    . Conclusion: Multiple-subject ABAS of computed tomography images proved to be a useful novel tool in the rapid delineation of target and normal tissues. Although editing of the autocontours is inevitable, a substantial time reduction was achieved using editing, instead of manual contouring (180 vs. 66 min).

  15. Large-scale 3D mapping of the intergalactic medium using the Lyman Alpha Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Ozbek, Melih; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2016-01-01

    Maps of the large-scale structure of the Universe at redshifts 2-4 can be made with the Lyman-alpha forest which are complementary to low redshift galaxy surveys. We apply the Wiener interpolation method of Caucci et al. to construct three-dimensional maps from sets of Lyman-alpha forest spectra taken from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We mimic some current and future quasar redshift surveys (BOSS, eBOSS and MS-DESI) by choosing similar sightline densities. We use these appropriate subsets of the Lyman-alpha absorption sightlines to reconstruct the full three dimensional Lyman-alpha flux field and perform comparisons between the true and the reconstructed fields. We study global statistical properties of the intergalactic medium (IGM) maps with auto-correlation and cross-correlation analysis, slice plots, local peaks and point by point scatter. We find that both the density field and the statistical proper- ties of the IGM are recovered well enough that the resulting IGM maps can be meaningfully cons...

  16. The LyAlpha Line Profiles of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies: Fast Winds and Lyman Continuum Leakage

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Crystal L; Henry, Alaina; Soto, Kurt T; Danforth, Charles W; Wong, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph far-ultraviolet (far-UV) spectroscopy and Keck Echellete optical spectroscopy of 11 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), a rare population of local galaxies experiencing massive gas inflows, extreme starbursts, and prominent outflows. We detect H Lyman alpha emission from 8 ULIRGs and the companion to IRAS09583+4714. In contrast to the P Cygni profiles often seen in galaxy spectra, the H Lyman alpha profiles exhibit prominent, blueshifted emission out to Doppler shifts exceeding -1000 km/s in three HII-dominated and two AGN-dominated ULIRGs. To better understand the role of resonance scattering in shaping the H Lyman alpha line profiles, we directly compare them to non-resonant emission lines in optical spectra. We find that the line wings are already present in the intrinsic nebular spectra, and scattering merely enhances the wings relative to the line core. The H Lyman alpha attenuation (as measured in the COS aperture) ranges from that ...

  17. Diagnosing galactic feedback with the line broadening in the low redshift Lyman-alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Viel, M; Bolton, J S; Kim, T -S; Puchwein, E; Nasir, F; Wakker, B P

    2016-01-01

    We compare the low redshift (z ~ 0.1) Lyman-alpha forest from hydrodynamical simulations with data from the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph (COS). We find tension between the observed number of lines with b-parameters in the range 25-45 km/s and the predictions from simulations that incorporate either vigorous feedback from active galactic nuclei or that exclude feedback altogether. The gas in these simulations is, respectively, either too hot to contribute to the Lyman-alpha absorption or too cold to produce the required line widths. Matching the observed b-parameter distribution therefore requires feedback processes that thermally or turbulently broaden the absorption features without collisionally (over-)ionising hydrogen. This suggests the Lyman-alpha forest b-parameter distribution is a valulable diagnostic of galactic feedback in the low redshift Universe. We furthermore confirm the low redshift Lyman-alpha forest column density distribution is better reproduced by an ultraviolet background with an HI photo-...

  18. A deep search for 21-cm absorption in high redshift damped Lyman-alpha systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanekar, N; Chengalur, JN

    2003-01-01

    We present deep GMRT 21-cm absorption spectra of 10 damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs), of which 8 are at redshifts zgreater than or similar to1.3. HI absorption was detected in only one DLA, the z=0.5318 absorber toward PKS 1629+12. This absorber has been identified with a luminous spiral galaxy; th

  19. Lyman alpha emission from the first galaxies: Implications of UV backgrounds and the formation of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A; Spaans, M; Zaroubi, S

    2011-01-01

    The Lyman alpha line is a robust tracer of high redshift galaxies. We present estimates of Lyman alpha emission from a protogalactic halo illuminated by UV background radiation fields with various intensities. For this purpose, we performed cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH, including a detailed network for primordial chemistry,comprising the formation of primordial molecules, a multi-level model for the hydrogen atom as well as the photo-ionization and photo-dissociation processes in a UV background. We find that the presence of a background radiation field J_21 excites the emission of Lyman alpha photons, increasing the Lyman alpha luminosity up to two orders of magnitude. For a halo of \\sim 10^10 M_sun, we find that a maximum flux of 5 \\times 10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1 is obtained for J21 \\times f_esc = 0.1, where f_esc is the escape fraction of the ionizing radiation. Depending on the environmental conditions, the flux may vary by three orders of magnitude. For...

  20. A Lyman-alpha tunable acousto-optic filter for detecting superthermal flare protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop and characterize a narrow-band, tunable filter for use near the Lyman-alpha line of hydrogen at 121.6 nm. Such a filter could form the critical component of an instrument to observe asymmetries in the solar Lyman-alpha line, caused by energetic protons accelerated during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Characteristic charge-exchange nonthermal emission at Lyman alpha should be produced when sub-MeV protons are injected into the chromosphere, but no instrument suitable for their detection has been developed. Such an instrument would require a narrow-band (less than 0.01 nm) tunable filter with aperture and throughput consistent with imaging a solar active region at 0.1 second intervals. The development of acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) suitable for use as compact, simple tunable filters for astronomical work suggested an investigation into the use of an AOTF at Lyman-alpha.

  1. An Ultraluminous Lyman Alpha Emitter with a Blue Wing at z=6.6

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, E M; Songaila, A; Barger, A J; Rosenwasser, B; Wold, I

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of the most luminous high-redshift Lyman Alpha Emitting galaxy (LAE) yet seen, with log L(Ly alpha) = 43.9 ergs/s. The galaxy -- COSMOS Lyman alpha 1, or COLA1 -- was detected in a search for ultra-luminous LAEs with Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope. It was confirmed to lie at z = 6.593 based on a Lyman alpha line detection obtained from followup spectroscopy with the DEIMOS spectrograph on Keck2. COLA1 is the first very high-redshift LAE to show a multi-component Lyman alpha line profile with a blue wing, which suggests that it could lie in a highly ionized region of the intergalactic medium and could have significant infall. If this interpretation is correct, then ultra-luminous LAEs like COLA1 offer a unique opportunity to determine the properties of the HII regions around these galaxies which will help in understanding the ionization of the z ~ 7 intergalactic medium.

  2. Lyman alpha emission in starbursts: implications for galaxies at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Mas-Hesse, J M; Tenorio-Tagle, G; Leitherer, C; Terlevich, R J; Terlevich, E

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a high resolution UV 2-D spectroscopic survey of star forming galaxies observed with HST-STIS. Our main aim was to map the Lyman alpha profiles to learn about the gas kinematics and its relation with the escape of Lyman alpha photons and to detect extended Lyman alpha emission due to scattering in gaseous halos. We have combined our data with previously obtained UV spectroscopy on other three star-forming galaxies. We find that the P-Cygni profile is spatially extended, smooth and spans several kiloparsecs covering a region much larger than the starburst itself. We propose a scenario whereby an expanding super-shell is generated by the interaction of the combined stellar winds and supernova ejecta from the young starbursts, with an extended low density halo. The variety of observed Lyman alpha profiles both in our sample and in high redshift starbursts is explained as phases in the time evolution of the super-shell expanding into the disk and halo of the host galaxy. The observed sha...

  3. Lyman alpha line formation in starbursting galaxies I. Moderately thick, dustless, and static HI media

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H; Lee, H M; Ahn, Sang-Hyeon; Lee, Hee-Won; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the Lyman alpha line transfer in nearby and high redshift starbursting galaxies, where the effect of high optical depths and the role of dust in the scattering medium are expected to be conspicuous and should be treated in a very careful manner. We present our first results in dustless, static, and uniform HI media with moderate optical depths \\tau_0=10^{3-7}, where \\tau_0 is the line center optical depth of Lyman alpha and temperatures T=10^{1-4}K using a Monte Carlo code. We investigate the basic physics of the line transfer and confirm the criterion of a\\tau_0>10^3 for the validity of diffusion approximation suggested by Neufeld in 1990, where $a$ is the Voigt parameter. Adopting the model suggested by Tenorio-Tagle et al. in 1999, we performed a detailed calculation on the Lyman alpha line formation for each evolutionary stage of an expanding supershell. The emergent Lyman alpha profiles are characterized by the double peaks and the absorption trough at the line center. It is found that the...

  4. The evolution of neutral gas in damped Lyman α systems from the XQ-100 survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Ellison, S. L.; Prochaska, J. X.

    2015-01-01

    We present a sample of 38 intervening Damped Lyman $\\alpha$ (DLA) systems identified towards 100 $z>3.5$ quasars, observed during the XQ-100 survey. The XQ-100 DLA sample is combined with major DLA surveys in the literature. The final combined sample consists of 742 DLAs over a redshift range app...

  5. A Search for z>6.5 Lyman-alpha Emitting Galaxies with WISP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Micaela B.; Scarlata, Claudia; Dai, Yu Sophia; Rafelski, Marc; Baronchelli, Ivano; Colbert, James W.; Dominguez, Alberto; Hathi, Nimish P.; Henry, Alaina L.; Malkan, Matthew Arnold; Martin, Crystal L.; Mehta, Vihang; Pahl, Anthony; Ross, Nathaniel; Rutkowski, Michael J.; Teplitz, Harry I.; WISP Team

    2016-01-01

    The observed number density of Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies at z>6 provides an important probe of the reionization history of the universe. Because Lyman-alpha photons are very sensitive to the presence of neutral hydrogen, the evolution of the galaxy number density above redshift 6 can be used as a measurement on the progress of reionization. However, the Lyman-alpha luminosity function is currently poorly constrained at high-z. We present the results of a systematic search for Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at redshifts of ~6.5 to 7.5 using the HST WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) survey. WISP's uncorrelated fields are well-suited to the study of bright LAEs, minimizing the effects of clustering introduced by a patchy reionization. From the 30 deepest WISP fields, we compile a sample of single-line emitters, confirm redshifts with broadband colors, and identify LAE candidates that have "dropped out" (are undetected at the 1 sigma level) of the WFC3 UVIS filters. By combining our results with other z~7 studies, we determine whether the number density of LAEs evolves past z~6.5.

  6. Discovery of a faint, star-forming, multiply lensed, Lyman-α blob

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caminha, G. B.; Karman, W.; Rosati, P.; Caputi, K. I.; Arrigoni Battaia, F.; Balestra, I.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Nonino, M.; Vanzella, E.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a multiply lensed Lyman-α blob (LAB) behind the galaxy cluster AS1063 using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The background source is at z = 3.117 and is intrinsically faint compared to almost all previously reported LABs. We

  7. The Lyman-alpha forest in f(R) modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, Christian; Springel, Volker

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of chameleon-type f(R) gravity with the goal to assess whether the impact of such models is detectable in absorption line statistics. We carry out a set of hydrodynamical simulations with the cosmological simulation code MG-GADGET, including star formation and cooling effects, and create synthetic Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorption spectra from the simulation outputs. We statistically compare simulations with f(R) and ordinary general relativity, focusing on flux probability distribution functions (PDFs) and flux power-spectra, an analysis of the column density and line width distributions, as well as the matter power spectrum. We find that the influence of f(R) gravity on the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest is rather small. Even models with strong modifications of gravity, like $|\\bar{f}_{R0}| = 10^{-4}$, do not change the statistical Lyman-$\\alpha$ properties by more than 10%. The column density and line width distributions are hardl...

  8. Volume-effect and radiotherapy [2]. Part 2: volume-effect and normal tissue; Effet volume en radiotherapie [2]. Deuxieme partie: volume et tolerance des tissus sains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huchet, A.; Caudry, M.; Trouette, R.; Vendrely, V.; Causse, N.; Recaldini, L.; Maire, J.P. [Hopital Saint Andre, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Oscar-Lambret, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France); Atlan, D. [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-10-01

    The first part of our work has focused on the relationship bet men tumor Volume and tumor control. Indeed, it is well known that the importance of irradiated volume could be a main parameter of radiation-induced complications. Numerous mathematical models have described the correlation between the irradiated volume and the risk of adverse effects. These models should predict the complication rate of each treatment planning. At the present time late effects have been the most studied. In this report we firstly propose a review of different mathematical models described for volume effect. Secondly, we will discuss whether these theoretical considerations can influence our view of radiation treatment planning optimization. (authors)

  9. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) Maps of the Permanently Shaded Regions (PSR) at the Lunar Poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Paul; Retherford, Kurt; Gladstone, Randall; Stern, Alan; Egan, Anthony; Miles, Paul; Parker, Joel; Kaufmann, David; Horvath, David; Greathouse, Thomas; Versteeg, Maartem; Steffl, Andrew; Mukherjee, Joey; Davis, Michael; Slater, David; Bayless, Amanda; Feldmann, Paul; Hurley, Dana; Pryor, Wayne; Hendrix, Amanda

    2013-04-01

    The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) instrument on-board LRO is a UV spectrograph covering the spectral range of 57-196 nm. We present Lyman-alpha and far-UV albedo maps of the north and south poles. These maps indicate that the coldest, permanently shadowed regions (PSR) in deep polar craters have significantly lower Lyman-alpha albedo than the surrounding regions, which is best explained by a high surface porosity there - possibly related to the accumulation of volatile frosts.

  10. Aeronomy, a 20th Century emergent science: the role of solar Lyman series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kockarts

    Full Text Available Aeronomy is, by definition, a multidisciplinary science which can be used to study the terrestrial atmosphere, as well as any planetary atmosphere and even the interplanetary space. It was officially recognized in 1954 by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics. The major objective of the present paper is to show how aeronomy developed since its infancy. The subject is so large that a guide-line has been chosen to see how aeronomy affects our atmospheric knowledge. This guideline is the solar Lyman alpha radiation which has different effects in the solar system. After a short description of the origins of aeronomy the first observations of this line are summarized since the beginning of the space age. Then the consequences of these observations are analyzed for the physics and chemistry of the neutral terrestrial atmosphere. New chemical processes had to be introduced, as well as new transport phenomena. Solar Lyman alpha also influences the structure of the Earth’s ionosphere, particularly the D-region. In the terrestrial exosphere, solar Lyman alpha scattered resonantly by atomic hydrogen is at present the only way to estimate this constituent in an almost collisionless medium. Since planetary atmospheres also contain atomic hydrogen, the Lyman alpha line has been used to deduce the abundance of this constituent. The same is true for the interplanetary space where Lyman alpha observations can be a good tool to determine the concentration. The last section of the paper presents a question which is intended to stimulate further research in aeronomy.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry; thermosphere – composition and chemistry – history of geophysics (atmospheric sciences

  11. Immunohistochemical study of the Nrf2 pathway in colorectal cancer: Nrf2 expression is closely correlated to Keap1 in the tumor and Bach1 in the normal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Liang-Che; Fan, Chung-Wei; Tseng, Wen-Ko; Chen, Jim-Ray; Chein, Hui-Ping; Hwang, Cheng-Cheng; Hua, Chung-Ching

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a contributing factor in the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. The Nrf2 [nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2; NFE2L2] pathway is one of the major cellular defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. This study investigated the expression of the Nrf2 pathway in colorectal cancer. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue arrays consisting of the tumor, adjacent normal, and distant normal tissues from the resected specimens of 83 colorectal cancer patients were subjected to immunohistochemical (IHC) staining with antibodies against Nrf2, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), p21, P62, Parkinson protein 7 (Park7), prohibitin, BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1), CD34 and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). The mean IHC density of each IHC staining was digitally analyzed. The results showed that molecules of the Nrf2 pathway were actively expressed, with different expression profiles among the tumor and normal tissues. The oxidative stress, represented by the mean IHC staining density of 8-OHdG, did not differ but was correlated with the expressions of different Nrf2 pathway molecules to a varied extent in tumor and normal tissues of colorectal cancer. Keap1 [estimate, 0.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.19-0.79] and Bach1 (estimate, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.11-0.38) were significant predictors for the expression of 8-OHdG and had the closest proximity to Nrf2 in the cluster dendrogram of the tumor and distant normal tissues, respectively. Advanced stage (estimate, 14.9; 95% CI, 2.99-26.8) and current smoker (estimate, 15.6; 95% CI, 1.92-29.3) were significant predictors with high estimates for Bach1 in the adjacent and distant normal tissues, respectively. In colorectal cancer, the molecules of the Nrf2 pathway have different expression profiles and a difference in their importance, especially Keap1 and Bach1, related to Nrf2 and oxidative stress among tumor and normal tissues.

  12. Dust properties of Lyman-break galaxies at z ~ 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Márquez, J.; Burgarella, D.; Heinis, S.; Buat, V.; Lo Faro, B.; Béthermin, M.; López-Fortín, C. E.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Hurley, P.; Ibar, E.; Ilbert, O.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Lemaux, B. C.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Rodighiero, G.; Salvato, M.; Scott, D.; Taniguchi, Y.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, L.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Since the mid-1990s, the sample of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) has been growing thanks to the increasing sensitivities in the optical and in near-infrared telescopes for objects at z> 2.5. However, the dust properties of the LBGs are poorly known because the samples are small and/or biased against far-infrared (far-IR) or submillimeter (submm) observations. Aims: This work explores from a statistical point of view the far-IR and submm properties of a large sample of LBGs at z ~ 3 that cannot be individually detected from current far-IR observations. Methods: We select a sample of 22, 000 LBGs at 2.5 luminosity (LFUV), UV continuum slope (βUV), and stellar mass (M∗) to better sample their variety. We stack in PACS (100 and 160 μm) images from PACS Evolution Probe survey (PEP), SPIRE (250, 350 and 500 μm) images from the Herschel Multi-tied Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) programs, and AzTEC (1.1 mm) images from the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). Our stacking procedure corrects the biases induced by galaxy clustering and incompleteness of our input catalogue in dense regions. Results: We obtain the full infrared spectral energy distributions (SED) of subsamples of LBGs and derive the mean IR luminosity as a function of LFUV, βUV, and M∗. The average IRX (or dust attenuation) is roughly constant over the LFUV range, with a mean of 7.9 (1.8 mag). However, it is correlated with βUV, AFUV = (3.15 ± 0.12) + (1.47 ± 0.14) βUV, and stellar mass, log (IRX) = (0.84 ± 0.11)log (M∗/ 1010.35) + 1.17 ± 0.05. We investigate using a statistically controlled stacking analysis as a function of (M∗, βUV), the dispersion of the IRX-βUV and IRX-M∗ plane. On the one hand, the dust attenuation shows a departure of up to 2.8 mag above the mean IRX-βUV relation when log (M∗ [ M⊙ ]) increases from 9.75 to 11.5 in the same βUV bin. This strongly suggests that M∗ plays an important role in shaping the IRX-βUV plane. On the other hand

  13. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: The stomach; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: l'estomac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberdiac, P. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital de Bellevue, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France); Mineur, L. [Unite d' oncologie digestive et radiotherapie, institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2010-07-15

    In the following article, we will discuss general issues relating to acute and late gastric's radiation toxicities. The tolerance of the stomach to complete or partial organ irradiation is more un-appreciated than for most other organs. We consulted the Medline database via PubMed and used the key words gastric - radiotherapy - toxicity. Currently, 60 Gy or less is prescribed in gastric radiation therapy. Acute clinical toxicity symptoms are predominantly nausea and vomiting. Although there is a general agreement that the whole stomach tolerance is for doses of 40 to 45 Gy without unacceptable complication, it is well established that a stomach dose of 35 Gy increases the risk of ulcer complications. (authors)

  14. Lyman alpha emission from the first galaxies: Signatures of accretion and infall in the presence of line trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A; Spaans, M; Zaroubi, S

    2011-01-01

    The formation of the first galaxies is accompanied by large accretion flows and virialization shocks, during which the gas is shock-heated to temperatures of $\\sim10^4$ K, leading to potentially strong fluxes in the Lyman alpha line. Indeed, a number of Lyman alpha blobs has been detected at high redshift. In this letter, we explore the origin of such Lyman alpha emission using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that include a detailed model of atomic hydrogen as a multi-level atom and the effects of line trapping with the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH. We see that baryons fall into the center of a halo through cold streams of gas, giving rise to a Lyman alpha luminosity of at least $\\rm 10^{44} erg s^{-1}$ at $\\rm z=4.7$, similar to observed Lyman alpha blobs. We find that a Lyman alpha flux of $\\rm 5.0\\times 10^{-17} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ emerges from the envelope of the halo rather than its center, where the photons are efficiently trapped. Such emission can be probed in detail with the upcoming J...

  15. Correlation of tissue-plasma partition coefficients between normal tissues and subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines in mouse as a prediction tool of drug penetration in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Patrick; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Salphati, Laurent; Liederer, Bianca M

    2013-04-01

    Understanding drug distribution and accumulation in tumors would be informative in the assessment of efficacy in targeted therapy; however, existing methods for predicting tissue drug distribution focus on normal tissues and do not incorporate tumors. The main objective of this study was to describe the relationships between tissue-plasma concentration ratios (Kp ) of normal tissues and those of subcutaneous xenograft tumors under nonsteady-state conditions, and establish regression equations that could potentially be used for the prediction of drug levels in several human tumor xenografts in mouse, based solely on a Kp value determined in a normal tissue (e.g., muscle). A dataset of 17 compounds was collected from the literature and from Genentech. Tissue and plasma concentration data in mouse were obtained following oral gavage or intraperitoneal administration. Linear regression analyses were performed between Kp values in several normal tissues (muscle, lung, liver, or brain) and those in human tumor xenografts (CL6, EBC-1, HT-29, PC3, U-87, MCF-7-neo-Her2, or BT474M1.1). The tissue-plasma ratios in normal tissues reasonably correlated with the tumor-plasma ratios in CL6, EBC-1, HT-29, U-87, BT474M1.1, and MCF-7-neo-Her2 xenografts (r(2) in the range 0.62-1) but not with the PC3 xenograft. In general, muscle and lung exhibited the strongest correlation with tumor xenografts, followed by liver. Regression coefficients from brain were low, except between brain and the glioblastoma U-87 xenograft (r(2) in the range 0.62-0.94). Furthermore, reasonably strong correlations were observed between muscle and lung and between muscle and liver (r(2) in the range 0.67-0.96). The slopes of the regressions differed depending on the class of drug (strong vs. weak base) and type of tissue (brain vs. other tissues and tumors). Overall, this study will contribute to our understanding of tissue-plasma partition coefficients for tumors and facilitate the use of physiologically

  16. Exploring the Overabundance of ULXs in Metal- and Dust-poor Local Lyman Break Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Zych, Antara R.; Lehmer, Bret; Fragos, Tassos; Hornschemeier, Ann; Yukita, Mihoko; Zezas, Andreas; Ptak, Andy

    2016-02-01

    We have studied high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) populations within two low-metallicity, starburst galaxies, Haro 11 and VV 114. These galaxies serve as analogs to high-redshift (z\\gt 2) Lyman break galaxies and, within the larger sample of Lyman break analogs (LBAs), they are sufficiently nearby (crowded lower-luminosity HMXBs using the star-forming galaxy XLF and then vary the XLF normalizations and bright-end slopes until we reproduce the observed point source luminosity distributions. We find that these LBAs have a shallower bright-end slope ({γ }2=1.90) than the standard XLF ({γ }2=2.73). If we conservatively assume that the brightest X-ray source from each galaxy is powered by an accreting supermassive black hole rather than an HMXB and eliminate these sources from consideration, the luminosity distribution becomes poorly constrained but does appear to be consistent with a standard XLF.

  17. LRO-Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) Observations of the GRAIL Impact Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Greathouse, T. K.; Hurley, D. M.; Gladstone, G. R.; Hayne, P. O.; Paige, D. A.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Sefton-Nash, E.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Colaprete, A.; Kaufmann, D. E.; Miles, P. F.; Grava, C.; Throop, H.; Feldman, P. D.; Hendrix, A. R.; Pryor, W. R.; Stubbs, T. J.; Glenar, D. A.; Parker, J. W.; Stern, S. A.

    2013-10-01

    The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) UV spectrograph on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was positioned to directly view the expanding gas plumes from the two GRAIL spacecraft impacts on 17 December 2012. LAMP detected resonantly scattered emissions from Hg and H atoms in the sunlit regions of these plumes. The spectral, spatial, and light-curve analyses used in these gas detections are consistent with previous LAMP observations of the LCROSS impact into the permanently shadowed region of Cabeus crater. LAMP's detection of atomic H by Lyman-α emission at the Moon (a first) was facilitated by pointing at the nightside surface to eliminate sky background noise. Volatile transport of Hg and H species is known to concentrate them near the poles, and in the context of LRO-Diviner temperature measurements of these high-latitude (75.6° N) impact sites the LAMP detections address this process.

  18. Detection of Lyman continuum absorption in the BL Lacertae object PKS 0735+178

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of the Lyman edge in the BL Lac object PKS 0735+178 at the absorption red shift determined by optical measurements leads to a lower limit for the column density of atomic hydrogen, N(H I) not less than 4(17)/sq cm. The Lyman-alpha absorption line appears to have been detected, but only an approximate upper limit can be obtained from the data, of the order of 2(19)/sq cm. This amount of atomic hydrogen is less than that for a line of sight through the disk of a normal spiral galaxy. It is suggested that the absorbing material exists either in the halo of a galaxy or in the tenuous, extended, gaseous disk of a galaxy.

  19. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  20. Large Area Lyman Alpha Survey: Finding Young Galaxies at z=4.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J.; Dey, A.; Stern, D.; Spinrad, H.

    Strong Lyα emission is a signpost of young stars and the absence of dust and thus indicates young galaxies. To find such a population of young galaxies at z=4.5 we started the Large Area Lyman Alpha survey (LALA). This survey achieves an unprecedented combination of volume and sensitivity by using narrow-band filters on a large format (36' × 36') camera on the 4 meter telescope at KPNO. The volume density and star-formation contribution of the Lyα emitters at z=4.5 is comparable to that of Lyman break galaxies. With many candidates and a few spectroscopic confirmations in hand we discuss what the properties of Lyα emitters imply for galaxy and star formation in the early universe.

  1. Performance Characterization of UV Science Cameras Developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, P.; Kobayashi, K.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Hyde, D.; Robertson, B.; Beabout, D.; Beabout, B.; Stewart, M.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-alpha and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-alpha polarization in the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1 percent in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1 percent polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. Coating the e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detectors with Lumogen-E coating allows for a relatively high (30 percent) quantum efficiency at the Lyman-alpha line. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with 10 e-/pixel/second dark current, 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 +/- 0.5 and 1.0 percent residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  2. On the selection of damped Lyman α systems using Mg II absorption at 2 < zabs < 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, T. A. M.; Ellison, S. L.; Prochaska, J. X.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Lopez, S.; D'Odorico, V.; Becker, G.; Christensen, L.; Cupani, G.; Denney, K.; Worseck, G.

    2017-01-01

    The XQ-100 survey provides optical and near-infrared coverage of 36 blindly selected, intervening damped Lyman α systems (DLAs) at 2 frame equivalent width (W0^{2796}) at these redshifts. Of the 29 DLAs with clean Mg II profiles, we find that six (20 per cent of DLAs) have W0^{2796} effect on the H I-weighted mean metallicity.

  3. A study of the Lyman-$\\alpha$ line profile in DBA white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Genest-Beaulieu, C

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen abundances in DBA white dwarfs determined from optical or UV spectra have been reported to differ significantly in some studies. We revisit this problem using our own model atmospheres and synthetic spectra, and present a theoretical investigation of the Lyman-$\\alpha$ line profile as a function of effective temperature and hydrogen abundance. We identify one possible solution to this discrepancy and show considerable improvement from a detailed analysis of optical and UV spectra of DBA stars.

  4. The Reionization and Galaxy Evolution Probed by z=7 Lyman Alpha Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Kazuaki; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Totani, Tomonori; Nagashima, Masahiro; Morokuma, Tomoki; Furusawa, Hisanori; Hattori, Takashi; Matsuda, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Ouchi, Masami

    2007-01-01

    We made a narrowband NB973 (bandwidth of 200A at 9755A) imaging of the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) and found two z=7 Lyman alpha emitter (LAE) candidates down to NB973=24.9. Carrying out deep follow-up spectroscopy, we identified one of them as a real z=6.96 LAE. This has shown that galaxy formation was in progress just 750 Myr after the Big Bang. Meanwhile, the Lyman alpha line luminosity function of LAE is known to decline from z=5.7 to 6.6 in the SDF. L* at z=6.6 is 40-60% of that at z=5.7. We also confirm that the number density of z=7 LAE is only 17% of the density at z=6.6 comparing the latest SDF LAE samples. This series of significant decreases in LAE density with increasing redshift can be the result of galaxy evolution during these epochs. However, using the UV continuum luminosity functions of LAEs, those of Lyman break galaxies, and a LAE evolution model based on the hierarchical clustering, we find that galaxy evolution alone cannot explain all the decrease in density. This extra density deficit can ...

  5. An extreme [OIII] emitter at $z=3.2$: a low metallicity Lyman continuum source

    CERN Document Server

    de Barros, S; Amorín, R; Castellano, M; Siana, B; Grazian, A; Suh, H; Balestra, I; Vignali, C; Verhamme, A; Zamorani, G; Mignoli, M; Hasinger, G; Comastri, A; Pentericci, L; Pérez-Montero, E; Fontana, A; Giavalisco, M; Gilli, R

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] We investigate the physical properties of a Lyman continuum emitter candidate at $z=3.212$ with photometric coverage from $U$ to MIPS 24$\\mu$m band and VIMOS/VLT and MOSFIRE/Keck spectroscopy. Investigation of the UV spectrum confirms a direct spectroscopic detection of the Lyman continuum emission with $S/N>5$. Non-zero Ly$\\alpha$ flux at the systemic redshift and high Lyman-$\\alpha$ escape fraction suggest a low HI column density. The weak C and Si low-ionization absorption lines are also consistent with a low covering fraction along the line of sight. The [OIII]$\\lambda\\lambda4959,5007+\\mathrm{H}\\beta$ equivalent width is one of the largest reported for a galaxy at $z>3$ ($\\mathrm{EW}([\\mathrm{OIII}]\\lambda\\lambda4959,5007+\\mathrm{H}\\beta) \\simeq 1600\\AA$, rest-frame) and the NIR spectrum shows that this is mainly due to an extremely strong [OIII] emission. The large observed [OIII]/[OII] ratio ($>10$) and high ionization parameter are consistent with prediction from photoionization models in ca...

  6. A Low Upper Limit to the Lyman Continuum Emission of two galaxies at z 3

    CERN Document Server

    Giallongo, E; D'Odorico, S; Fontana, A

    2002-01-01

    Long exposure, long-slit spectra have been obtained in the UV/optical bands for two galaxies at z=2.96 and z=3.32 to investigate the fraction of ionizing UV photons escaping from high redshifts galaxies. The two targets are among the brightest galaxies discovered by Steidel and collaborators and they have different properties in terms of Lyman-alpha emission and dust reddening. No significant Lyman continuum emission has been detected. The noise level in the spectra implies an upper limit of f_{rel,esc}\\equiv 3 f(900)/f(1500)< 16% for the relative escape fraction of ionizing photons, after correction for absorption by the intervening intergalactic medium. This upper limit is 4 times lower than the previous detection derived from a composite spectrum of 29 Lyman break galaxies at z 3.4. If this value is typical of the escape fraction of the z 3 galaxies, and is added to the expected contribution of the QSO population, the derived UV background is in good agreement with the one derived by the proximity effec...

  7. New Constraints on the Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction at z~1.3

    CERN Document Server

    Siana, Brian; Colbert, James; Ferguson, Henry C; Dickinson, Mark; Brown, Thomas M; Conselice, Christopher J; de Mello, Duilia F; Gardner, Jonathan P; Giavalisco, Mauro; Menanteau, Felipe

    2007-01-01

    We examine deep far-ultraviolet (1600 Angstrom) imaging of the Hubble Deep Field-North (HDFN) and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) to search for leaking Lyman continuum radiation from starburst galaxies at z~1.3. There are 21 (primarily sub-L*) galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts between 1.1Lyman continuum ratio, f_1500/f_700, and allowing a conversion from f_700 limits to relative escape fractions. We show that previous high-redshift studies may have underestimated the amplitude of the Lyman Break, and thus the relative escape fraction, by a factor of ~2. Once the starburst age and intergalactic HI absorption are accounted for, 18 galaxies in our sample have limits to the relative escape fraction, f_esc,rel < 1.0 with some limits as low as f_esc,rel < 0.10 and a sta...

  8. Clustering and lifetime of Lyman Alpha Emitters in the Epoch of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Hutter, Anne; Müller, Volker

    2015-01-01

    We calculate Lyman Alpha Emitter (LAE) angular correlation functions (ACFs) at $z\\simeq6.6$ and the fraction of lifetime (for the 100 Myrs preceding $z\\simeq6.6$) galaxies spend as Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) with/without Lyman Alpha (Ly\\alpha) emission using a model that combines SPH cosmological simulations (GADGET-2), dust attenuation and a radiative transfer code (pCRASH). The ACFs are a powerful tool that significantly narrows the 3D parameter space allowed by LAE Ly$\\alpha$ and UV luminosity functions (LFs) alone. With this work, we simultaneously constrain the escape fraction of ionizing photons $f_{esc}=0.05-0.5$, the mean fraction of neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) $\\leq 0.01$ and the dust-dependent ratio of the escape fractions of Ly$\\alpha$ and UV continuum photons $f_\\alpha/f_c=0.6-1.2$. Our results show that reionization has the largest impact on the amplitude of the ACFs, and its imprints are clearly distinguishable from those of $f_{esc}$ and $f_\\alpha/f_c$. We also show that...

  9. The Lyman Alpha Imaging-Monitor Experiment (LAIME) for TESIS/CORONAS-PHOTON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, L.; Koutchmy, S.; Kuzin, S.; Lamy, P.; Malherbe, J.-M.; Noëns, J.-C.

    LAIME the Lyman Alpha Imaging-Monitor Experiment is a remarkably simple no mechanisms and compact 100x100x400 mm full Sun imager to be flown with TESIS on the CORONAS-PHOTON mission launch expected before mid-2008 As such it will be the only true chromospheric imager to be flown in the next years supporting TESIS EUV-XUV imaging SDO and the Belgian LYRA Lyman Alpha flux monitor on the ESA PROBA-2 microsatellite launch expected in September 2007 We will give a short description of this unique O60 mm aperture imaging telescope dedicated to the investigating of the magnetic sources of solar variability in the UV and chromospheric and coronal disruptive events rapid waves Moreton waves disparitions brusques of prominences filaments eruptions and CMEs onset The resolution pixel is 2 7 arcsec the field of view 1 4 solar radius and the acquisition cadence could be as high as 1 image minute The back thinned E2V CCD in the focal plane is using frame transfer to avoid shutter and mechanisms Further more the double Lyman Alpha filtering allows a 40 AA FWHM bandwidth and excellent rejection yet providing a vacuum seal design of the telescope MgF2 entrance window Structural stability of the telescope focal length 1 m is preserved by a 4-INVAR bars design with Aluminium compensation in a large pm 10 o around 20 o

  10. No Evidence for Lyman-alpha Emission in Spectroscopy of z > 7 Candidate Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Caruana, Joseph; Wilkins, Stephen M; Stanway, Elizabeth R; Lacy, Mark; Jarvis, Matt J; Lorenzoni, Silvio; Hickey, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    We present Gemini/GNIRS spectroscopic observations of 4 z-band (z~7) dropout galaxies and VLT/XSHOOTER observations of one z-band dropout and 3 Y-band (z~8-9) dropout galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, which were selected with Wide Field Camera 3 imaging on the Hubble Space Telescope. We find no evidence of Lyman-alpha emission with a typical 5-sigma sensitivity of 5X10^-18erg/cm^2/s, and we use the upper limits on Lyman-alpha flux and the broad-band magnitudes to constrain the rest-frame equivalent widths for this line emission. Accounting for incomplete spectral coverage, we survey 3.0 z-band dropouts and 2.9 Y-band dropouts to a Lyman-alpha rest-frame equivalent width limit > 120Ang (for an unresolved emission line); for an equivalent width limit of 50Ang the effective numbers of drop-outs surveyed fall to 1.2 z-band drop-outs and 1.5 Y-band drop-outs. A simple model where the fraction of high rest-frame equivalent width emitters follows the trend seen at z=3-6.5 is inconsistent with our non-detectio...

  11. The Lyman-alpha Reference Sample: I. Survey outline and first results for Markarian 259

    CERN Document Server

    Östlin, Göran; Duval, Florent; Sandberg, Andreas; Rivera-Thorsen, Thoger; Marquart, Thomas; Orlitova, Ivana; Adamo, Angela; Melinder, Jens; Guaita, Lucia; Atek, Hakim; Cannon, John M; Gruyters, Pieter; Herenz, Edmund Christian; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Mas-Hesse, J Miguel; Micheva, Genoveva; Pardy, Hector Oti-Floranes Stephen A; Roth, Martin M; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha reference sample (LARS) is a program with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that provides a sample of local universe laboratory galaxies in which to study the astrophysics of the visibility and strength of the Lyman-alpha (Lya) line of hydrogen. This article presents an overview of the survey, its selection function and HST imaging observations. The sample was selected from the GALEX+SDSS catalogue at z=0.028-0.19, in order to allow Lya to be captured with combinations of long pass filters in the Solar Blind Channel (SBC) of HST/ACS. In addition, LARS utilises Halpha and Hbeta narrow, and U, B, i broad-band imaging with ACS and WFC3. In order to study galaxies in which large numbers of Lya photons are produced we demanded an Halpha equivalent width > 100{\\AA}. The sample of 14 galaxies covers far UV (FUV) luminosities that overlaps with those of high-z Lya emitters and Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). We present the reduction steps used to obtain the Lya images, including our LARS eXtraction softwa...

  12. The Impact of Lyman alpha Trapping on the Formation of Primordial Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A; Spaans, M

    2010-01-01

    Numerous cosmological simulations have been performed to study the formation of the first objects. We present the results of high resolution 3-D cosmological simulations of primordial objects formation using the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH by including in an approximate manner the radiative transfer effects of Lyman alpha photons. We compare the results of a Lyman alpha trapping case inside gas clouds with atomic and molecular hydrogen cooling cases.The principal objective of this research is to follow the collapse of a zero metallicity halo with an effective equation of state (that accounts for the trapping) and to explore the fate of a halo in each of the three cases, specifically, the impact of thermodynamics on fragmentation of halos.Our results show that in the case of Lyman alpha trapping, fragmentation is halted and a massive object is formed at the center of a halo. The temperature of the gas remains well above $10^{4}$ K and the halo is not able to fragment to stellar masses. In the atomic co...

  13. Exploring the nature of the Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitter CR7

    CERN Document Server

    Hartwig, Tilman; Magg, Mattis; Bromm, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S; Glover, Simon C O; Whalen, Daniel J; Pellegrini, Eric W; Volonteri, Marta

    2015-01-01

    CR7 is the brightest Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitter observed at $z>6$, which shows very strong Lyman-$\\alpha$ and HeII 1640 \\AA\\ line luminosities, but no metal line emission. Previous studies suggest that CR7 hosts either young primordial stars with a total stellar mass of $\\sim 10^7\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ or a black hole of $\\sim 10^6\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$. Here, we explore different formation scenarios for CR7 with a semianalytical model, based on the random sampling of dark matter merger trees. We find that primordial stars cannot account for the observed line luminosities because of their short lifetimes and because of early metal enrichment. Black holes that are the remnants of the first stars are either not massive enough, or reside in metal-polluted haloes, ruling out this possible explanation of CR7. Our models instead suggest that direct collapse black holes, which form in metal-free haloes exposed to large Lyman-Werner fluxes, are more likely the origin of CR7. However, this result is derived under optimistic ass...

  14. Narrowband Lyman-Continuum Imaging of Galaxies at z ~ 2.85

    CERN Document Server

    Mostardi, Robin E; Nestor, Daniel B; Steidel, Charles C; Reddy, Naveen A

    2013-01-01

    We present results from a survey for z~2.85 Lyman-Continuum (LyC) emission in the HS1549+1933 field and place constraints on the amount of ionizing radiation escaping from star-forming galaxies. Using a custom narrowband filter (NB3420) tuned to wavelengths just below the Lyman limit at z>=2.82$, we probe the LyC spectral region of 49 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and 70 Lya-emitters (LAEs) spectroscopically confirmed at z>=2.82, as well as 58 z~2.85 LAE photometric candidates. Four LBGs and 19 LAEs are detected in NB3420. Using V-band data probing the rest-frame non-ionizing UV, we observe that many NB3420-detected galaxies exhibit spatial offsets between their LyC and non-ionizing UV emission and are characterized by extremely blue NB3420-V colors, corresponding to low ratios of non-ionizing to ionizing radiation (F_UV/F_LyC) that are in tension with current stellar population synthesis models. We measure average values of (F_UV/F_LyC) for our spectroscopically confirmed LBG and LAE samples, correcting for fo...

  15. The HST/ACS+WFC3 Survey for Lyman Limit Systems. II. Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gabor; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Madau, Piero

    2013-03-01

    We present the first science results from our Hubble Space Telescope survey for Lyman limit absorption systems (LLS) using the low dispersion spectroscopic modes of the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. Through an analysis of 71 quasars, we determine the incidence frequency of LLS per unit redshift and per unit path length, l(z) and l(X), respectively, over the redshift range 1 Prochaska et al. and place constraints on the evolution of λ912 mfp with redshift, including an estimate of the "breakthrough" redshift of z = 1.6. Consistent with results at higher z, we find that a significant fraction of the opacity for absorption of ionizing photons comes from systems with N H I <=1017.5 cm-2 with a value for the total Lyman opacity of τLyman eff = 0.40 ± 0.15. Finally, we determine that at minimum, a 5-parameter (4 power law) model is needed to describe the column density distribution function f(N H I , X) at z ~ 2.4, find that f(N H I , X) undergoes no significant change in shape between z ~ 2.4 and z ~ 3.7, and provide our best fit model for f(N H I , X).

  16. Exploring the nature of the Lyman-α emitter CR7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Tilman; Latif, Muhammad A.; Magg, Mattis; Bromm, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Pellegrini, Eric W.; Volonteri, Marta

    2016-10-01

    CR7 is the brightest Lyman-α emitter observed at z > 6, which shows very strong Lyman-α and He II 1640 Å line luminosities, but no metal-line emission. Previous studies suggest that CR7 hosts either young primordial stars with a total stellar mass of ˜107 M⊙ or a black hole of ≳106 M⊙. Here, we explore different formation scenarios for CR7 with a semi-analytical model, based on the random sampling of dark matter merger trees. We are unable to reproduce the observational constraints with a primordial stellar source, given our model assumptions, due to the short stellar lifetimes and the early metal enrichment. Black holes that are the remnants of the first stars are either not massive enough, or reside in metal-polluted haloes, ruling out this possible explanation of CR7. Our models instead suggest that direct collapse black holes, which form in metal-free haloes exposed to large Lyman-Werner fluxes, are more likely the origin of CR7. However, this result is derived under optimistic assumptions and future observations are necessary to further constrain the nature of CR7.

  17. Chemistry of a protoplanetary disk with grain settling and Lyman alpha radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fogel, Jeffrey K J; Bergin, Edwin A; Calvet, Nuria; Semenov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We present results from a model of the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks. In our models we directly calculate the changing propagation and penetration of a high energy radiation field with Lyman alpha radiation included. We also explore the effect on our models of including dust grain settling. We find that, in agreement with earlier studies, the evolution of dust grains plays a large role in determining how deep the UV radiation penetrates into the disk. Significant grain settling at the midplane leads to much smaller freeze-out regions and a correspondingly larger molecular layer, which leads to an increase in column density for molecular species such as CO, CN and SO. The inclusion of Lyman alpha radiation impacts the disk chemistry through specific species that have large photodissociation cross sections at 1216 A. These include HCN, NH3 and CH4, for which the column densities are decreased by an order of magnitude or more due to the presence of Lyman alpha radiation in the UV spectrum. A few spe...

  18. The Non-Linear Power Spectrum of the Lyman Alpha Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Arinyo-i-Prats, Andreu; Viel, Matteo; Cen, Renyue

    2015-01-01

    The Lyman alpha forest power spectrum has been measured on large scales by the BOSS survey in SDSS-III at $z\\sim 2.3$, has been shown to agree well with linear theory predictions, and has provided the first measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations at this redshift. However, the power at small scales, affected by non-linearities, has not been well examined so far. We present results from a variety of hydrodynamic simulations to predict the redshift space non-linear power spectrum of the Lyman Alpha transmission for several models, testing the dependence on resolution and box size. A new fitting formula is introduced to facilitate the comparison of our simulation results with observations and other simulations. The non-linear power spectrum has a generic shape determined by a transition scale from linear to non-linear anisotropy, and a Jeans scale below which the power drops rapidly. In addition, we predict the two linear bias factors of the Lyman Alpha forest and provide a better physical interpretation of ...

  19. Search for a direction in the forest of Lyman-$\\alpha$

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    We report the first test of isotropy of the Universe in the matter dominated epoch using the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest data from the high redshift quasars ($z>2$) from SDSS-III BOSS-DR9 datasets. Using some specified data cuts, we obtain the probability distribution function (PDF) of the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest transmitted flux and use the statistical moments of the PDF to address the isotropy of the Universe. In an isotropic Universe one would expect the transmitted flux to have consistent statistical characteristics in different parts of the sky. We trisect the total survey area of 3275 ${\\rm deg}^2$ along the galactic latitude and using quadrant convention. We also make three subdivisions in the data for three different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNR). Finally we obtain and compare the statistical moments in the mean redshifts of 2.3, 2.6 and 2.9. We find, that the moments from all patches agree at all redshifts and at all SNRs, within 3$\\sigma$ uncertainties. Since Lyman-$\\alpha$ transmitted flux directly maps the...

  20. Reconnaissance of the TRAPPIST-1 exoplanet system in the Lyman-α line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrier, V.; Ehrenreich, D.; Wheatley, P. J.; Bolmont, E.; Gillon, M.; de Wit, J.; Burgasser, A. J.; Jehin, E.; Queloz, D.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.

    2017-02-01

    The TRAPPIST-1 system offers the opportunity to characterize terrestrial, potentially habitable planets orbiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star. We performed a four-orbit reconnaissance with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope to study the stellar emission at Lyman-α, to assess the presence of hydrogen exospheres around the two inner planets, and to determine their UV irradiation. We detect the Lyman-α line of TRAPPIST-1, making it the coldest exoplanet host star for which this line has been measured. We reconstruct the intrinsic line profile, showing that it lacks broad wings and is much fainter than expected from the stellar X-ray emission. TRAPPIST-1 has a similar X-ray emission as Proxima Cen but a much lower Ly-α emission. This suggests that TRAPPIST-1 chromosphere is only moderately active compared to its transition region and corona. We estimated the atmospheric mass loss rates for all planets, and found that despite a moderate extreme UV emission the total XUV irradiation could be strong enough to strip the atmospheres of the inner planets in a few billions years. We detect marginal flux decreases at the times of TRAPPIST-1b and c transits, which might originate from stellar activity, but could also hint at the presence of extended hydrogen exospheres. Understanding the origin of these Lyman-α variations will be crucial in assessing the atmospheric stability and potential habitability of the TRAPPIST-1 planets.

  1. Numerical Simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest - A comparison of Gadget-2 and Enzo

    CERN Document Server

    Regan, J A; Viel, M; Regan, John A.; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2006-01-01

    We compare simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest performed with two different hydrodynamical codes, Gadget-2 and Enzo. A comparison of the dark matter power spectrum for simulations run with identical initial conditions show differences of 1-3% at the scales relevant for quantitative studies of the Lyman-alpha forest. This allows a meaningful comparison of the effect of the different implementations of the hydrodynamic part of the two codes. Using the same cooling and heating algorithm in both codes the differences in the temperature and the density probability distribution function are of the order of 10%. These differences can be mainly attributed to a slight mismatch in the resolution. The differences are smaller than or equal to the effects of boxsize and resolution on these statistics. Once resolution effects are taken into account the differences in the flux power spectrum - the statistics most widely used for estimating the matter power spectrum and cosmological parameters from Lyman-alpha forest data ...

  2. Spatial correlation between submillimetre and Lyman-alpha galaxies in the SSA 22 protocluster

    CERN Document Server

    Tamura, Yoichi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Iono, Daisuke; Wilson, Grant W; Yun, Min S; Takata, Tadafumi; Matsuda, Yuichi; Tosaki, Tomoka; Ezawa, Hajime; Perera, Thushara A; Scott, Kimberly S; Austermann, Jason E; Hughes, David H; Aretxaga, Itziar; Chung, Aeree; Oshima, Tai; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Kawabe, Ryohei; 10.1038/nature07947

    2009-01-01

    Lyman-alpha emitters are thought to be young, low-mass galaxies with ages of ~10^8 yr. An overdensity of them in one region of the sky (the SSA 22 field) traces out a filamentary structure in the early Universe at a redshift of z = 3.1 (equivalent to 15 per cent of the age of the Universe) and is believed to mark a forming protocluster. Galaxies that are bright at (sub)millimetre wavelengths are undergoing violent episodes of star formation, and there is evidence that they are preferentially associated with high-redshift radio galaxies, so the question of whether they are also associated with the most significant large-scale structure growing at high redshift (as outlined by Lyman-alpha emitters) naturally arises. Here we report an imaging survey of 1,100-um emission in the SSA 22 region. We find an enhancement of submillimetre galaxies near the core of the protocluster, and a large-scale correlation between the submillimetre galaxies and the low-mass Lyman-alpha emitters, suggesting synchronous formation of ...

  3. A Spectroscopic Search for Leaking Lyman Continuum at z~0.7

    CERN Document Server

    Bridge, Carrie R; Siana, Brian; Scarlata, Claudia; Conselice, Christopher J; Ferguson, Henry C; Brown, Thomas M; Salvato, Mara; Rudie, Gwen C; de Mello, Duilia F; Colbert, James; Gardner, Jonathan P; Giavalisco, Mauro; Armus, Lee

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of rest-frame, UV slitless spectroscopic observations of a sample of 32 z~0.7 Lyman break galaxy (LBG) analogs in the COSMOS field. The spectroscopic search was performed with the Solar Blind Channel (SBC) on Hubble Space Telescope. We report the detection of leaking Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation from an AGN-starburst composite. While we find no direct detections of LyC emission in the remainder of our sample, we achieve individual lower limits (3 sigma) of the observed non-ionizing UV to LyC flux density ratios, f_{nu}(1500A)/f_{nu}(830A) of 20 to 204 (median of 73.5) and 378.7 for the stack. Assuming an intrinsic Lyman break of 3.4 and an intergalactic medium (IGM) transmission of LyC photons along the line of sight to the galaxy of 85% we report an upper limit for the relative escape fraction in individual galaxies of 0.02 - 0.19 and a stacked 3 sigma upper limit of 0.01. We find no indication of a relative escape fraction near unity as seen in some LBGs at z~3. Our UV spectra achi...

  4. Limits on Lyman Continuum escape from z=2.2 H-alpha emitting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sandberg, A; Melinder, J; Bik, A; Guaita, L

    2015-01-01

    The leakage of Lyman continuum photons from star forming galaxies is an elusive parameter. When observed, it provides a wealth of information on star formation in galaxies and the geometry of the interstellar medium, and puts constraints on the role of star forming galaxies in the reionization of the universe. H-alpha-selected galaxies at z~2 trace the highest star formation population at the peak of cosmic star formation history, providing a base for directly measuring Lyman continuum escape. Here we present this method, and highlight its benefits as well as caveats. We also use the method on 10 H-alpha emitters in the Chandra Deep Field South at z=2.2, also imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope in the ultraviolet. We find no individual Lyman continuum detections, and our stack puts a 5 sigma upper limit on the average absolute escape fraction of <24%, consistent with similar studies. With future planned observations, the sample sizes would rapidly increase and the method presented here would provide ver...

  5. Spatial correlation between submillimetre and Lyman-alpha galaxies in the SSA 22 protocluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Iono, Daisuke; Wilson, Grant W; Yun, Min S; Takata, Tadafumi; Matsuda, Yuichi; Tosaki, Tomoka; Ezawa, Hajime; Perera, Thushara A; Scott, Kimberly S; Austermann, Jason E; Hughes, David H; Aretxaga, Itziar; Chung, Aeree; Oshima, Tai; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2009-05-07

    Lyman-alpha emitters are thought to be young, low-mass galaxies with ages of approximately 10(8) yr (refs 1, 2). An overdensity of them in one region of the sky (the SSA 22 field) traces out a filamentary structure in the early Universe at a redshift of z approximately 3.1 (equivalent to 15 per cent of the age of the Universe) and is believed to mark a forming protocluster. Galaxies that are bright at (sub)millimetre wavelengths are undergoing violent episodes of star formation, and there is evidence that they are preferentially associated with high-redshift radio galaxies, so the question of whether they are also associated with the most significant large-scale structure growing at high redshift (as outlined by Lyman-alpha emitters) naturally arises. Here we report an imaging survey of 1,100-microm emission in the SSA 22 region. We find an enhancement of submillimetre galaxies near the core of the protocluster, and a large-scale correlation between the submillimetre galaxies and the low-mass Lyman-alpha emitters, suggesting synchronous formation of the two very different types of star-forming galaxy within the same structure at high redshift. These results are in general agreement with our understanding of the formation of cosmic structure.

  6. The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey: Constraints on the Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction Distribution of Lyman--Break Galaxies at 3.4

    CERN Document Server

    Vanzella, E; Inoue, A; Nonino, M; Fontanot, F; Cristiani, S; Grazian, A; Dickinson, M; Stern, D; Tozzi, P; Giallongo, E; Ferguson, H; Spinrad, H; Boutsia, K; Fontana, A; Rosati, P

    2010-01-01

    We use ultra-deep ultraviolet VLT/VIMOS intermediate-band and VLT/FORS1 narrow-band imaging in the GOODS Southern field to derive limits on the distribution of the escape fraction (f_esc) of ionizing radiation for L >~ L*(z=3) Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at redshift 3.4--4.5. Only one LBG, at redshift z=3.795, is detected in its Lyman continuum (LyC; S/N~5.5), the highest redshift galaxy currently known with a direct detection. Its ultraviolet morphology is quite compact (R_eff=0.8, kpc physical). Three out of seven AGN are also detected in their LyC, including one at redshift z=3.951 and z850 = 26.1. From stacked data (LBGs) we set an upper limit to the average f_esc in the range 5%--20%, depending on the how the data are selected (e.g., by magnitude and/or redshift). We undertake extensive Monte Carlo simulations that take into account intergalactic attenuation, stellar population synthesis models, dust extinction and photometric noise in order to explore the moments of the distribution of the escaping radi...

  7. Observed Faraday Effects in Damped Lyman-Alpha Absorbers and Lyman Limit Systems: The Magnetised Environment of Galactic Building Blocks at Redshift=2

    CERN Document Server

    Farnes, J S; Gaensler, B M; Haverkorn, M; O'Sullivan, S P; Curran, S J

    2016-01-01

    Protogalactic environments are typically identified using quasar absorption lines, and these galactic building blocks can manifest as Damped Lyman-Alpha Absorbers (DLAs) and Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs). We use radio observations of Faraday effects to test whether DLAs and LLSs host a magnetised medium, by combining DLA and LLS detections throughout the literature with 1.4 GHz polarization data from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). We obtain a control, a DLA, and a LLS sample consisting of 114, 19, and 27 lines-of-sight respectively - all of which are polarized at $\\ge8\\sigma$ to ensure Rician bias is negligible. Using a Bayesian framework, we are unable to detect either coherent or random magnetic fields in DLAs: the regular coherent magnetic fields within the DLAs must be $\\le2.8$ $\\mu$G, and the lack of depolarization is consistent with the weakly magnetised gas in DLAs being non-turbulent and quiescent. However, we find mild suggestive evidence that LLSs have coherent magnetic fields: after controlling for t...

  8. First results from Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS): first simultaneous detection of Lyman-{\\alpha} emission and Lyman break from a galaxy at z=7.51

    CERN Document Server

    Tilvi, V; Malhotra, S; Finkelstein, S L; Rhoads, J E; Windhorst, R; Grogin, N A; Koekemoer, A; Zakamska, N; Ryan, R; Christensen, L; Hathi, N; Pharo, J; Joshi, B; Yang, H; Gronwall, C; Cimatti, A; Walsh, J; OConnell, R; Straughn, A; Ostlin, G; Rothberg, B; Livermore, R C; Hibon, P; Gardner, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies at high redshifts provide a valuable tool to study cosmic dawn, and therefore it is crucial to reliably identify these galaxies. Here, we present an unambiguous and first simultaneous detection of both the Lyman-\\alpha emission and the Lyman break from a z = 7.512+/- 0.004 galaxy, observed in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with G102 grism on Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6{\\sigma}) in multiple observational position angles (PA), with total integrated Ly{\\alpha} line flux of 1.06+/- 0.12 e10-17erg s-1cm-2. The line flux is nearly a factor of four higher than the previous MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations of faint Ly{\\alpha} emission at {\\lambda} = 1.0347{\\mu}m, yielding z = 7.5078+/- 0.0004. This is consistent with other recent observations implying that ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy underestimates total emission line fluxes, and if confirmed, can have strong implications for reionization studies that are based on gro...

  9. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Peripheral nerves; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: les nerfs peripheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques de Figueiredo, B.; Dejean, C.; Sargos, P.; Kantor, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Bergonie, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Huchet, A.; Mamou, N. [Service d' oncologie medicale et de radiotherapie, CHU Saint-Andre, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Loiseau, H. [Service de neurochirurgie, CHU Pellegrin, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2010-07-15

    Plexopathies and peripheral neuropathies appear progressively and with several years delay after radiotherapy. These lesions are observed principally after three clinical situations: supraclavicular and axillar irradiations for breast cancer, pelvic irradiations for various pathologies and limb irradiations for soft tissue sarcomas. Peripheral nerves and plexus (brachial and lumbosacral) are described as serial structures and are supposed to receive less than a given maximum dose linked to the occurrence of late injury. Literature data, mostly ancient, define the maximum tolerable dose to a threshold of 60 Gy and highlight also a great influence of fractionation and high fraction doses. For peripheral nerves, most frequent late effects are pain with significant differences of occurrence between 50 and 60 Gy. At last, associated pathologies (diabetes, vascular pathology, neuropathy) and associated treatments have probably to be taken into account as additional factors, which may increase the risk of these late radiation complications. (authors)

  10. Tolerance of normal tissues to radiation therapy: Ear; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: l'oreille

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleury, B. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Lapeyre, M. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Jean-Perrin, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2010-07-15

    The main objective of this work was to describe, based on a literature survey, the radiation-induced toxicity of the ear and to try to establish the limiting dose. The limiting toxicity was the sensorineural hearing loss. A dose-effect relationship has been described by several authors. Thirty to 40% of patients who are irradiated for head and neck cancer are concerned, but the intensity of the hearing loss tends to depend on the exact localisation of the primary tumour: nasopharyngeal irradiations, paranasal sinusal and parotid irradiation are at greater risk of complication. High frequencies are more vulnerable than the lower ones. Age of patients, as well as baseline hearing abilities, deeply influence the issue. As far as possible, the dose to the inner ear (the cochlea more precisely) should be kept under 40 Gy. In case of association with other causes of toxicity (such as age, low baseline value, association to cisplatin), this dose should be as low as possible. Should carcinologic constraints lead to toxic doses, then patients should be properly informed. (authors)

  11. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Spinal cord; Tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: moelle epiniere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habrand, J.L. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Centre de protontherapie, institut Curie, 91 - Orsay (France); Drouet, F. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2010-07-15

    Radiation myelopathy is one of the most dreadful complications of radiation therapy. Despite multiple animal experiments and human autopsic series, its pathogenesis remains largely unknown. In most instances, the classical aspect of myelomalacia combines glial and vascular injuries in various sequences. Recent studies point out the role of oligo-dendrocytes and their precursors, as well as of intercellular mediators (cytokines and stress molecules). The clinical presentation comprises a spectrum of non specific neurological symptoms whose evolution is sometimes regressive but more commonly progressive and life-threatening. Usually, it occurs following a latent period of six months to two years after irradiation of the cervical, thoracic or upper lumbar spine to a dose in excess of 50 Gy, conventionally fractionated. Nonetheless, these typical features can be altered by extrinsic factors, such as hypo fractionation/acceleration of the dose, multiple surgical procedures, chemotherapy especially mega therapy, or neurotoxic drugs. Conversely, hyperfractionated regimens that take into account protracted half-time repair of sublethal damages to the CNS, as well as sophisticated estimates of the dose to the cord and QA programs during the treatment course minimize such risks. (authors)

  12. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Larynx and pharynx; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: larynx et pharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debelleix, C. [Service de radiotherapie, centre hospitalier Dax-Cote d' Argent, 40 - Dax (France); Service de radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Andre, CHU de Bordeaux, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Pointreau, Y.; Calais, G. [Service de radiotherapie, centre regional universitaire de cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, hopital Bretonneau, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, 37 - Tours (France); Pointreau, Y. [CNRS, UMR 6239 Genetique, immunotherapie, chimie et cancer, 37 - Tours (France); Laboratoire de pharmacologie-toxicologie, CHRU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Lafond, C.; Denis, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, clinique Victor-Hugo, 72 - Le Mans (France); Bourhis, J.H. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2010-07-15

    For head and neck cancers, the radiation dose usually needed to sterilize a macroscopic tumour is at least 70 Gy in conventional fractionation. In the larynx, this dose level enables optimal tumour control while exposing the patient to a limited risk of severe complications. For oropharynx and nasopharynx tumors, it is sometimes possible to limit the dose received by the larynx according to the extent of the primary lesion. Thus, if the tumour constraints permit, the maximum dose to the larynx must be less than 63 to 66 Gy. To reduce the risk of laryngeal edema, it is recommended if possible to limit the mean non-involved larynx dose to 40 to 45 Gy. In the pharynx, literature's data suggested to minimize the volume of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles receiving a dose greater than or equal to 60 Gy. Limiting the volume receiving a dose greater than or equal to 50 Gy reduces the risk of dysphagia. These dose constraints should be tailored to each patient taking into account the extent of the initial primary lesion, the possible addition of chemotherapy or a modified fractionation radiotherapy. (authors)

  13. Discordant assessment of tumor biomarkers by histopathological and molecular assays in the EORTC randomized controlled 10041/BIG 03-04 MINDACT trial breast cancer : Intratumoral heterogeneity and DCIS or normal tissue components are unlikely to be the cause of discordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, Giuseppe; Slaets, Leen; de Snoo, Femke A; Bogaerts, Jan; Russo, Leila; van't Veer, Laura; Rutgers, Emiel J T; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J; Stork-Sloots, Lisette; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Glas, Annuska M; Cardoso, Fatima

    2016-02-01

    Accurate identification of breast cancer patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant systemic therapies is crucial. Better understanding of differences between methods can lead to an improved ER, PgR, and HER-2 assessment. The purpose of this preplanned translational research is to investigate the correlation of central IHC/FISH assessments with microarray mRNA readouts of ER, PgR, and HER-2 status in the MINDACT trial and to determine if any discordance could be attributed to intratumoral heterogeneity or the DCIS and normal tissue components in the specimens. MINDACT is an international, prospective, randomized, phase III trial investigating the clinical utility of MammaPrint in selecting patients with early breast cancer for adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 6694 patients). Gene-expression data were obtained by TargetPrint; IHC and/or FISH were assessed centrally (n = 5788; 86 %). Macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of centrally submitted FFPE blocks identified 1427 cases for which the very same sample was submitted for gene-expression analysis. TargetPrint ER had a positive agreement of 98 %, and a negative agreement of 95 % with central pathology. Corresponding figures for PgR were 85 and 94 % and for HER-2 72 and 99 %. Agreement of mRNA versus central protein was not different when the same or a different portion of the tumor tissue was analyzed or when DCIS and/or normal tissue was included in the sample subjected to mRNA assays. This is the first large analysis to assess the discordance rate between protein and mRNA analysis of breast cancer markers, and to look into intratumoral heterogeneity, DCIS, or normal tissue components as a potential cause of discordance. The observed difference between mRNA and protein assessment for PgR and HER-2 needs further research; the present analysis does not support intratumoral heterogeneity or the DCIS and normal tissue components being likely causes of the discordance.

  14. An application trial with oriental medicine against radiation complication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Yukimasa; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Sasaki, Yasuhito (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-11-01

    Late radiation complications have been the inevitable obstacles for radio-therapy, since the normal tissue damage restricts the maximum tumor dose. Recently, this limitation has been alleviated owing to the technological development in the field of radiation treatment devices. However, the treatment dose in case of radical and prophylactic irradiation cannot be adequately reduced, and acute radiation complications present another hurdle. Results of our preliminary trials with an oriental medicine to overcome the specified acute complication were favorable. We started a new trial with combined oriental medicines against various features of acute complications. Sixty-five cases were registered as the group administered oriental medicine (O group), thirty-two cases as conventionally treated group (C group) and forty-one cases as control group without medication (N group). They were analyzed according to the kind of symptoms. The improvement of sore throat, diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome was more significant in the O group than in the C group. The effect on nausea was roughly equal between O and C groups. The effects of oriental medicines for the passage disturbance and the stomatitis were the same. The results of O group and C group were better than those of N group in every symptom. Acute radiation complication can be interpreted as unbalanced local liquid distribution from the oriental medical point of view, which is considered as a good indication of intermediate type in oriental medicines. Precise individualization will be required to control acute radiation complications more efficiently. (author).

  15. Three Lyman-alpha Emitters at z approx 6: Early GMOS/Gemini Data from the GLARE Project

    CERN Document Server

    Stanway, E R; Bunker, A J; Abraham, R G; Hook, I; Rhoads, J; McCarthy, P J; Boyle, B; Colless, M; Crampton, D; Couch, W; Jorgensen, I; Malhotra, S; Murowinski, R; Roth, K; Savaglio, S; Tsvetanov, Z I; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Glazebrook, Karl; Bunker, Andrew J.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Hook, Isobel; Rhoads, James; Carthy, Patrick J. Mc; Boyle, Brian; Colless, Matthew; Crampton, David; Couch, Warrick; J{\\o}rgensen, Inger; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Murowinski, Rick; Roth, Kathy; Savaglio, Sandra; Tsvetanov., Zlatan

    2004-01-01

    We report spectroscopic detection of three z \\sim 6 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies, in the vicinity of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, from the early data of the Gemini Lyman-alpha at Reionisation Era (GLARE) project. Two objects, GLARE#3001 (z =5.79) and GLARE#3011 (z =5.94), are new detections and are fainter in z' (z'_AB = 26.37 and 27.15) than any continuum-selected objects previously detected in Lyman-alpha. A third object, GLARE#1042 (z =5.83) has previously been detected in line emission from the ground; we report here a new spectroscopic continuum detection. Gemini/GMOS-S spectra of these objects, obtained using nod & shuffle, are presented together with a discussion of their photometric properties. All three objects were selected for spectroscopy via the i-drop Lyman Break technique, the two new detections from the GOODS v1.0 imaging data. The red i'-z' colors and high equivalent widths of these objects suggest a high-confidence z>5 Lyman-alpha identification of the emission lines. This brings the to...

  16. The ionizing photon production efficiency of compact z~0.3 Lyman continuum leakers and comparison with high redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schaerer, D; Verhamme, A; Orlitova, I; Thuan, T X; Worseck, G; Guseva, N

    2016-01-01

    We have recently discovered five Lyman continuum leaking galaxies at z~0.3, selected for their compactness, intense star-formation, and high [OIII]/[OII] ratio (Izotov et al. 2016ab). Here we derive their ionizing photon production efficiency, a fundamental quantity for inferring the number of photons available to reionize the Universe, for the first time for galaxies with confirmed strong Lyman continuum escape (fesc~6-13%). We find an ionizing photon production per unit UV luminosity, which is a factor 2-6 times higher than the canonical value when reported to their observed UV luminosity. After correction for extinction this value is close to the canonical value. The properties of our five Lyman continuum leakers are found to be very similar to those of the confirmed z=3.218 leaker Ion2 from de Barros et al. (2016) and very similar to those of typical star-forming galaxies at z>~6. Our results suggest that UV bright galaxies at high-z such as Lyman break galaxies can be Lyman continuum leakers and that the...

  17. Spectroscopy of 7 Radio-Loud QSOs at 2Lyman-alpha Nebulae Accreting onto Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Roche, Nathan; Binette, Luc

    2014-01-01

    We performed long-slit optical spectroscopy (GTC-OSIRIS) of 6 radio-loud QSOs at redshifts $2Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitting nebulae, and detect extended Lyman-$\\alpha$ emission for 4, with surface brightness $\\sim10^{-16}$ ergs $\\rm cm^{-2}s^{-1}arcsec^{-2}$ and line width FWHM 400-1100 (mean 863) km $\\rm s^{-1}$. We also observed the $z\\simeq 5.9$ radio-loud QSO, SDSS J2228+0110, and find evidence of a $\\geq 10$ kpc extended Lyman-$\\alpha$ emission nebula, a new discovery for this high-redshift object. Spatially-resolved kinematics of the 5 nebulae are examined by fitting the Lyman-$\\alpha$ wavelength at a series of positions along the slit. We found the line-of-sight velocity $\\Delta(v)$ profiles to be relatively flat. However, 3 of the nebulae appear systematically redshifted by 250-460 km $\\rm s^{-1}$ relative to the Lyman-$\\alpha$ line of the QSO (with no offset for the other two), which we argue is evidence for infall. One of these (Q0805+046) had a small ($...

  18. Lyman alpha emission from the first galaxies: implications of UV backgrounds and the formation of molecules : implications of UV backgrounds and the formation of molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Spaans, M.; Zaroubi, S.

    The Lyman alpha line is a robust tracer of high redshift galaxies. We present estimates of Lyman alpha emission from a protogalactic halo illuminated by UV background radiation fields with various intensities. For this purpose, we performed cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with the adaptive

  19. 类星体对的Lyman-α吸收线和发射线的相互关系%Relation between the Lyman-α Emission and Absorption Lines of Quasar Pairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李有兵; 吕连忠; 彭青松

    2008-01-01

    通过探究类星体对的Lyman-α的吸收线和发射线的等值宽度,研究了它们之间可能存在的相互关系.研究了来自SDSS巡天的12对中等分辨率的类星体对.发现Lyman-α的发射线和吸收线的等值宽度没有任何的相关性.它支持了前人的建议,即背景类星体的Lyman-α吸收线来自前景类星体附近的光学厚吸收体,而Lyman-α的发射线来自前景类星体本身.%We investigated the relation between the Lyman-α emission and absorption lines of quasar pairs by exploring possible correlation between the equivalent widths of the two kinds of lines. We used 12 moderately resolved quasar pairs from the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey (SDSS) for the study, where the equivalent widths of the Lyman-α emission lines of the foreground quasars are available in literature. The equivalent widths of the corresponding Ly-α absorption lines of the background quasars were measured from their spectra data downloaded from the SDSS web-site. We found no correlation between rest-frame equivalent widths of the Ly-α emission and absorption lines, favoring the previous suggestion that the Ly-α absorption lines in background quasars are due to optically thick absorbers near the foreground quasars, and the Ly-α emission lines originate from the foreground quasars themselves.

  20. A Deep HST Search for Escaping Lyman Continuum Flux at z~1.3: Evidence for an Evolving Ionizing Emissivity

    CERN Document Server

    Siana, Brian; Ferguson, Henry C; Brown, Thomas M; Giavalisco, Mauro; Dickinson, Mark; Chary, Ranga-Ram; de Mello, Duilia F; Conselice, Christopher J; Bridge, Carrie R; Gardner, Jonathan P; Colbert, James W; Scarlata, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    We have obtained deep Hubble Space Telescope far-UV images of 15 starburst galaxies at z~1.3 in the GOODS fields to search for escaping Lyman continuum photons. These are the deepest far-UV images m_{AB}=28.7, 3\\sigma, 1" diameter) over this large an area (4.83 arcmin^2) and provide the best escape fraction constraints for any galaxy at any redshift. We do not detect any individual galaxies, with 3\\sigma limits to the Lyman Continuum (~700 \\AA) flux 50--149 times fainter (in f_nu) than the rest-frame UV (1500 \\AA) continuum fluxes. Correcting for the mean IGM attenuation (factor ~2), as well as an intrinsic stellar Lyman Break (~3), these limits translate to relative escape fraction limits of f_{esc,rel}4 and reionization of the intergalactic medium at z>6. [Abridged

  1. The Lyman-$\\alpha$ emission in local Star-Forming Galaxies Scenario and Connection with Primeval Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kunth, D; Terlevich, R J; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    1998-01-01

    We review the Lyan alpha emission in local star-forming galaxies. In most cases as already shown by the IUE, the emission is absent or much weaker than expected. This occurs because Lyman alpha photons can be resonantly scattered by the neutral gas and destroyed by even very low amounts of dust. However new Hubble Space Telescope observations (HST) indicate that other factors such as the velocity structure of the gas play a crucial role. Gas flows are likely to occur as powered by the kinetic energy released via stellar winds and supernova. We propose a scenario based on the hydrodynamics of superbubbles powered by massive bursts of star formation that naturally accounts for the variety of Lyman alpha line detections in star-forming galaxies. We caution with the attempts to derive the co-moving star formation rate at high redshift from Lyman alpha emission searches.

  2. The Contribution of HI-rich Galaxies to the Damped Lyman-alpha Absorber Population at z=0

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, S E; Schneider, Jessica L. Rosenberg & Stephen E.

    2003-01-01

    We present a study of the expected properties of the low redshift damped Lyman-alpha absorber population determined from a sample of HI-selected galaxies in the local universe. We use measurements of the number density and HI cross-section of galaxies to show that the total HI cross-section at column densities sufficient to produce damped Lyman-alpha absorption is consistent with no evolution of the absorber population. We also find that the dN/dz distribution is dominated by galaxies with HI masses near 10^9 M_solar. However, because of the large dispersion in the correlation between HI mass and stellar luminosity, we find that the distribution of dN/dz as a function of L_J is nearly flat. Additionally, we demonstrate that the linewidths of the HI-selected galaxies are roughly consistent with the kinematics of damped Lyman-alpha absorbers.

  3. Green Peas and diagnostics for Lyman continuum leaking in star-forming dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, Trinh

    2014-10-01

    One of the key questions in observational cosmology is the identification of the sources responsible for cosmic reionization. The general consensus is that a population of faint low-mass galaxies must be responsible for the bulk of the ionizing photons. However, attempts at identifying individual galaxies showing Lyman continuum (LyC) leakage have so far not been successful, both at high and low redshifts. We propose here to observe directly the LyC of five so-called "Green Pea" (GP) galaxies. GPs share many of the properties of the Lyman Break galaxies at high z (compactness, low mass, low metallicity, high specific star formation rate, gas-rich and clumpy morphology) and may constitute local examples of the long sought-after LyC leaking galaxies. The five GPs have been identified by searching the Sloan Data Release 10 spectral data base of 2 million spectra for non-AGN emission-line objects that meet the following criteria: high [OIII]5007/[OII]3727 ratios, large GALEX FUV fluxes, and redshifted enough (z~0.3) so that the LyC is shifted into the sensitive spectral range of COS. Our unique GP sample will allow us to combine for the first time four fundamental tests for LyC leaking in galaxies and validate their usefulness as LyC leaking indicators : 1) direct measurements of the LyC; 2) high [OIII]/[OII] ratios; 3) characteristics of the Lyman alpha line profile; and 4) residual intensities in the low-ionization ISM absorption UV lines.

  4. A New Population of High Redshift, Dusty Lyman-Alpha Emitters and Blobs Discovered by WISE

    CERN Document Server

    Bridge, Carrie R; Borys, Colin J K; Petty, Sara; Benford, Dominic; Eisenhardt, Peter; Farrah, Duncan; Griffith, Roger L; Jarrett, Tom; Stanford, S Adam; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Wright, Edward L; Wu, Jingwen

    2012-01-01

    We report a new technique to select 1.610^{13-14}L_sun) and warm colors, typically larger than submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) and dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs). These traits are commonly associated with the dust being energized by intense AGN activity. We hypothesize that the combination of spatially extended Lyman-alpha, large amounts of warm IR-luminous dust, and rarity (implying a short-lived phase) can be explained if the galaxies are undergoing strong `feedback' transforming them from an extreme dusty starburst to a QSO.

  5. Mapping High-velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha Emission from Supernova 1987A

    OpenAIRE

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Garnavich, Peter; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Lundqvist, Peter; Smith, Nathan; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    We present new {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} images of high-velocity H-$\\alpha$ and Lyman-$\\alpha$ emission in the outer debris of SN~1987A. The H-$\\alpha$ images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock. For the first time we observe emission from the reverse shock surface well above and below the equatorial ring, suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the H$\\alpha$ imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms cr...

  6. Abundances in Damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ Systems and Chemical Evolution of High Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, L; Barlow, T A; Lu, Limin; Sargent, Wallace L.W.; Barlow, Thomas A.

    1997-01-01

    Recent abundance measurements in damped Lyman-alpha galaxies, supplemented with unpublished Keck observations, are discussed. The metallicity distribution with cosmic time is examined for clues about the degree of enrichment, the onset of initial star formation, and the nature of the galxies. The relative abundances of the elements are compared with the abundnce pattern in Galactic halo stars and in the Sun, taking into account of the effects of dust depletion, in order to gain insight into the stellar processes and the time scales by which the enrichment occurred.

  7. Lyman-alpha observations of comets West 1976 VI and P d'Arrest 1976 XI with Copernicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festou, M. C.; Keller, H. U.; Bertaux, J. L.; Barker, E. S.

    1983-02-01

    Lyman-alpha observations by the Copernicus satellite have been used to determine the production rates of hydrogen atoms of comets West 1976 VI and P/d'Arrest 1976 XI at a time when they were dynamically active (splitting or outburst of the nucleus). The observed Lyman-alpha line widths are in agreement with those observed in comet Kobayashi-Berger-Milon 1975 IX and, consequently, do not contradict the assumption that the H atoms are produced by the photodissociation of water vapor, even in CO(plus) rich comets..

  8. Effect of the EGFR density of breast cancer cells on nuclear importation, in vitro cytotoxicity, and tumor and normal-tissue uptake of [111In]DTPA-hEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Meiduo; Scollard, Deborah; Chan, Conrad; Chen, Paul; Vallis, Katherine; Reilly, Raymond M

    2007-11-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor(s) (EGFR) density on the importation and nuclear localization of 111In-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid human epidermal growth factor ([111In]DTPA-hEGF) in breast cancer (BC) cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts and normal tissues in vivo in athymic mice, as well as on its cytotoxicity and tumor and normal-tissue distribution. The internalization and nuclear importation of [111In]DTPA-hEGF were measured in MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, BT-474 and MDA-MB-468 BC cells (10(4), 2 x 10(5), 6 x 10(5) and 10(6) EGFR/cell, respectively). The molecular size (Mr) distribution and immunoreactivity of nuclear radioactivity were characterized. Tumor and normal-tissue uptake of [111In]DTPA-hEGF in athymic mice implanted subcutaneously with BC xenografts were compared. Nuclear radioactivity in the tumor, lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen and colon was measured. There was a direct association between EGFR density and the nuclear localization of [111In]DTPA-hEGF in BC cells; nuclear importation approached saturation at 6 x 10(5) EGFR/cell. Almost all nuclear radioactivities exhibited an Mr of >100 kDa; immunoreactivity with anti-hEGF, anti-EGFR and anti-importin beta 1 antibodies was detected. The efflux of nuclear radioactivity was slowest for MDA-MB-468 cells. Cytotoxicity was correlated with EGFR expression. Uptake was greater in MDA-MB-468 than in MCF-7 xenografts and improved with preinjection of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled DTPA-hEGF. Nuclear importation was higher in liver, kidney and spleen cells than in tumor cells. [111In]DTPA-hEGF is translocated to the nucleus of BC cells complexed with EGFR and importin beta1. Nuclear importation and cytotoxicity are effected by EGFR density. The absence of hepatic and renal toxicities in [111In]DTPA-hEGF cannot be explained by a low efficiency of nuclear importation.

  9. Expression analysis of mammaglobin A (SCGB2A2 and lipophilin B (SCGB1D2 in more than 300 human tumors and matching normal tissues reveals their co-expression in gynecologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiansen Glen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammaglobin A (SCGB2A2 and lipophilin B (SCGB1D2, two members of the secretoglobin superfamily, are known to be co-expressed in breast cancer, where their proteins form a covalent complex. Based on the relatively high tissue-specific expression pattern, it has been proposed that the mammaglobin A protein and/or its complex with lipophilin B could be used in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. In view of these clinical implications, the aim of the present study was to analyze the expression of both genes in a large panel of human solid tumors (n = 309, corresponding normal tissues (n = 309 and cell lines (n = 11, in order to evaluate their tissue specific expression and co-expression pattern. Methods For gene and protein expression analyses, northern blot, dot blot hybridization of matched tumor/normal arrays (cancer profiling arrays, quantitative RT-PCR, non-radioisotopic RNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used. Results Cancer profiling array data demonstrated that mammaglobin A and lipophilin B expression is not restricted to normal and malignant breast tissue. Both genes were abundantly expressed in tumors of the female genital tract, i.e. endometrial, ovarian and cervical cancer. In these four tissues the expression pattern of mammaglobin A and lipophilin B was highly concordant, with both genes being down-, up- or not regulated in the same tissue samples. In breast tissue, mammaglobin A expression was down-regulated in 49% and up-regulated in 12% of breast tumor specimens compared with matching normal tissues, while lipophilin B was down-regulated in 59% and up-regulated in 3% of cases. In endometrial tissue, expression of mammaglobin A and lipophilin B was clearly up-regulated in tumors (47% and 49% respectively. Both genes exhibited down-regulation in 22% of endometrial tumors. The only exceptions to this concordance of mammaglobin A/lipophilin B expression were normal and malignant tissues of

  10. Pregnancy Complications: Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preeclampsia Preeclampsia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... even if you’re feeling fine. What is preeclampsia? Preeclampsia is a condition that can happen after ...

  11. Complications and Deaths - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hip/knee complication measure, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  12. Complications and Deaths - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, the Agency for Healthcare Research and...

  13. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  14. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  15. Mechanisms of diabetic complications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forbes, Josephine M; Cooper, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    .... These complications occur in the majority of individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Among the most prevalent microvascular complications are kidney disease, blindness, and amputations, with current therapies only slowing disease progression...

  16. Eye Complications in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  17. Lyman-alpha Blobs Like Company : The Discovery of A Candidate 100 kpc Lyman-alpha Blob Near to A Radio Galaxy with A Giant Lyman-alpha halo, B3 J2330+3927 at z=3.1

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, Y; Morimoto, N; Smail, Ian; De Breuck, C; Ohta, K; Kodama, T; Inoue, A K; Hayashino, T; Kousai, K; Nakamura, E; Horie, M; Yamada, T; Kitamura, M; Saitô, T; Taniguchi, Y; Tanaka, I; Hibon, P

    2009-01-01

    We present the discovery of a candidate of giant radio-quiet Lyman-alpha (Lya) blob (RQLAB) in a large-scale structure around a high-redshift radio galaxy (HzRG) lying in a giant Lya halo, B3 J2330+3927 at redshift z=3.087. We obtained Lya imaging around B3 J2330+3927 with Subaru/Suprime-Cam to search for Lya emitters (LAEs) and absorbers (LAAs) at redshift z=3.09+-0.03. We detected candidate 127 LAEs and 26 LAAs in the field of view of 31' x 24'. We found that B3 J2330+3927 is surrounded by a 130 kpc Lya halo and a large-scale (60 x 20 comoving Mpc) filamentary structure. The large-scale structure contains one prominent local density peak with an overdensity of greater than 5, which is 8' (15 comoving Mpc) away from B3 J2330+3927. In this peak, we discovered a candidate 100 kpc RQLAB. The existence of both types of Lya nebulae in the same large-scale structure suggests that giant Lya nebulae need special large-scale environments to form. On smaller scales, however, the location of B3 J2330+3927 is not a sign...

  18. Detection of high Lyman continuum leakage from four low-redshift compact star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Y I; Thuan, T X; Worseck, G; Orlitova, I; Verhamme, A

    2016-01-01

    Following our first detection reported in Izotov et al. (2016), we present the detection of Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation of four other compact star-forming galaxies observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These galaxies, at redshifts of z~0.3, are characterized by high emission-line flux ratios [OIII]5007/[OII]3727 > 5. The escape fractions of the LyC radiation fesc(LyC) in these galaxies are in the range of ~6%-13%, the highest values found so far in low-redshift star-forming galaxies. Narrow double-peaked Lyalpha emission lines are detected in the spectra of all four galaxies, compatible with predictions for Lyman continuum leakers. We find escape fractions of Lyalpha, fesc(Lyalpha) ~60%-90%, among the highest known for Lyalpha emitters (LAEs). Surface brightness profiles produced from the COS acquisition images reveal bright star-forming regions in the center and exponential discs in the outskirts with disc scale lengths alpha in the range ~0.6-1.4 k...

  19. Searching for candidates of Lyman continuum sources - revisiting the SSA22 field

    CERN Document Server

    Micheva, Genoveva; Inoue, Akio K; Matsuda, Yuichi; Yamada, Toru; Hayashino, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    We present the largest to date sample of hydrogen Lyman continuum (LyC) emitting galaxies at any redshift, with $18$ LyA Emitters (LAEs) and $7$ Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs), obtained from the SSA22 field with Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The sample is based on the $136$ LBGs and $159$ LAEs observed in the field, all with spectroscopically confirmed redshifts, and they are selected as galaxies with counterpart in a narrow-band filter image which traces LyC at $z\\geq 3.06$. Many LyC candidates show a spatial offset between the rest-frame non-ionizing ultraviolet (UV) detection and the LyC-emitting substructure or between the LyA emission and LyC. Statistically it is highly unlikely that all candidates in our sample are contaminants, and there should be $\\sim9$ and $\\sim2$ viable LyC candidates among the LAEs and LBGs. There is some evidence for a positive LyC/LyA correlation, suggesting that both LyC and LyA escape via a similar mechanism. "Standard" SED models cannot explain the observed LyC LAEs colors, instead requir...

  20. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Low-redshift Damped Lyman-alpha Quasar Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Chun, M R; Kulkarni, V P; Takamiya, M; Chun, Mark R.; Gharanfoli, Soheila; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Takamiya, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out a high angular resolution near-infrared imaging study of the fields of 6 quasars with 7 strong absorption line systems at z < 0.5, using the Hokupa'a adaptive optics system and the QUIRC near-infrared camera on the Gemini-North telescope. These absorption systems include 4 classical damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (DLAs), 2 sub-DLAs, and one Lyman-limit system. Images were obtained in the H or K' filters with FWHM between 0.2"-0.5" with the goal of detecting the absorbing galaxies and identifying their morphologies. Features are seen at projected separations of 0.5"-16.0" from the quasars and all of the fields show features at less than 2" separation. We find candidate absorbers in all of the seven systems. With the assumption that some of these are associated with the absorbers, the absorbers are low luminosity < 0.1 L*_H or L*_K; we do not find any large bright candidate absorbers in any of our fields. Some fields show compact features that are too faint for quantitative morphology, b...

  1. Lenses in the forest: cross--correlation of the Lyman-alpha flux with CMB lensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallinotto, Alberto; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys. /Fermilab; Das, Sudeep; /Princeton U. Observ. /Princeton U.; Spergel, David N.; /Princeton U. Observ. /APC, Paris; Viel, Matteo; /Trieste Observ. /INFN, Trieste

    2009-03-01

    We present a theoretical estimate for a new observable: the cross-correlation between the Lyman-{alpha}-flux fluctuations in quasar (QSO) spectra and the convergence of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as measured along the same line-of-sight. As a first step toward the assessment of its detectability, we estimate the signal-to-noise ratio using linear theory. Although the signal-to-noise is small for a single line-of-sight and peaks at somewhat smaller redshifts than those probed by the Lyman-{alpha} forest, we estimate a total signal-to-noise of 9 for cross-correlating QSO spectra of SDSSIII with Planck and 20 for cross-correlating with a future polarization based CMB experiment. The detection of this effect would be a direct measure of the neutral hydrogen-matter cross-correlation and could provide important information on the growth of structures at large scales in a redshift range which is still poorly probed by observations.

  2. Probing the Physical Properties of z=4.5 Lyman Alpha Emitters with Spitzer

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelstein, Keely D; Tilvi, Vithal; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E; Grogin, Norman A; Pirzkal, Norbert; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T; Mobasher, Bahram; Pakzad, Sabrina; Salmon, Brett; Wang, Junzian

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from a stellar population modeling analysis of a sample of 162 z=4.5, and 14 z=5.7 Lyman alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the Bootes field, using deep Spitzer/IRAC data at 3.6 and 4.5 um from the Spitzer Lyman Alpha Survey, along with Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS and WFC3 imaging at 1.1 and 1.6 um for a subset of the LAEs. This represents one of the largest samples of high-redshift LAEs imaged with Spitzer IRAC. We find that 30/162 (19%) of the z=4.5 LAEs and 9/14 (64%) of the z=5.7 LAEs are detected at >3-sigma in at least one IRAC band. Individual z=4.5 IRAC-detected LAEs have a large range of stellar mass, from 5x10^8 to 10^11 Msol. One-third of the IRAC-detected LAEs have older stellar population ages of 100 Myr - 1 Gyr, while the remainder have ages < 100 Myr. A stacking analysis of IRAC-undetected LAEs shows this population to be primarily low mass (8 -- 20 x 10^8 Msol) and young (64 - 570 Myr). We find a correlation between stellar mass and the dust-corrected ultraviolet-bas...

  3. The impact of feedback from galaxy formation on the Lyman-alpha transmitted flux

    CERN Document Server

    Viel, Matteo; Booth, Craig M

    2012-01-01

    The forest of Lyman-alpha absorption lines seen in the spectra of distant quasars has become an important probe of the distribution of matter in the Universe. We use large, hydrodynamical simulations from the OWLS project to investigate the effect of feedback from galaxy formation on the probability distribution function and the power spectrum of the Lyman-alpha transmitted flux. While metal-line cooling is unimportant, both galactic outflows from massive galaxies driven by active galactic nuclei and winds from low-mass galaxies driven by supernovae have a substantial impact on the flux statistics. At redshift z=2.25, the effects on the flux statistics are of a similar magnitude as the statistical uncertainties of published data sets. The changes in the flux statistics are not due to differences in the temperature-density relation of the photo-ionised gas. Instead, they are caused by changes in the density distribution and in the fraction of hot, collisionally ionised gas. It may be possible to disentangle as...

  4. Absorption signatures of warm-hot gas at low redshift: Broad Lyman-Alpha Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Tepper-García, Thorsten; Schaye, Joop; Booth, Craig M; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Theuns, Tom

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the physical state of HI absorbing gas at low redshift (z=0.25) using a subset of cosmological, hydrodynamic simulations from the OWLS project, focusing in particular on broad (b_HI > 40 km/s) Lyman-Alpha absorbers (BLAs), which are believed to originate in shock-heated gas in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). Our fiducial model, which includes radiative cooling by heavy elements and feedback by supernovae and active galactic nuclei, predicts that by z=0.25 nearly 60 per cent of the gas mass ends up at densities and temperatures characteristic of the WHIM and we find that half of this fraction is due to outflows. The standard HI observables (distribution of HI column densities N_HI, distribution of Doppler parameters b_HI, b_HI - N_HI correlation) and the BLA line number density predicted by our simulations are in remarkably good agreement with observations. BLAs arise in gas that is hotter, more highly ionised and more enriched than the gas giving rise to typical Lyman-Alpha forest abs...

  5. The primordial deuterium abundance of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-alpha system

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Ryan; Nollett, Kenneth M; Jorgenson, Regina

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and analysis of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) system currently known, which also displays the Lyman series absorption lines of neutral deuterium. The average [O/H] abundance of this system is [O/H] = -2.804 +/- 0.015, which includes an absorption component with [O/H] = -3.07 +/- 0.03. Despite the unfortunate blending of many weak D I absorption lines, we report a precise measurement of the deuterium abundance of this system. Using the six highest quality and self-consistently analyzed measures of D/H in DLAs, we report tentative evidence for a subtle decrease of D/H with increasing metallicity. This trend must be confirmed with future high precision D/H measurements spanning a range of metallicity. A weighted mean of these six independent measures provides our best estimate of the primordial abundance of deuterium, 10^5 (D/H)_P = 2.547 +/- 0.033 (log_10 (D/H)_P = -4.5940 +/- 0.0056). We perform a series of detailed Monte Carlo calculations of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BB...

  6. The visibility of Lyman Alpha Emitters: constraining reionization, ionizing photons and dust

    CERN Document Server

    Hutter, A; Partl, A M; Müller, V

    2014-01-01

    We couple state of the art cosmological simulations (GADGET-2) with a dust model and a radiative transfer code (pCRASH) to build a complete model for high-redshift Lyman Alpha emitters (LAEs). Due to poor constraints available on the escape fraction of HI ionizing photons (f_esc) from galaxies, we use five different values f_esc=0.05,0.25,0.5,0.75,0.95 to post-process the cosmological simulation with pCRASH. Starting from a completely neutral Universe, we run pCRASH until reionization is complete, i.e. the average neutral hydrogen (HI) fraction drops to ~ 10^-4. For a given f_esc and combination, the only free-parameter left to match model results to observations is the relative escape of Lyman Alpha (Lya) and continuum photons from the galactic environment (f_\\alpha/f_c). Starting from a scenario wherein dust is homogeneously distributed (f_\\alpha/f_c ~ 0.68), we find that the observed LAE UV and Lya luminosity functions (LFs) jointly constrain f_esc ~ 0.05 and and f_\\alpha/f_c such that a decrease in th...

  7. The Impact of Unresolved Turbulence on the Escape Fraction of Lyman Continuum Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarzadeh, M.; Scannapieco, E.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the relation between the turbulent Mach number ({ M }) and the escape fraction of Lyman continuum photons ({f}{esc}) in high-redshift galaxies. Approximating the turbulence as isothermal and isotropic, we show that the increase in the variance in column densities from { M }=1 to { M }=10 causes {f}{esc} to increase by ≈ 25%, and the increase from { M }=1 to { M }=20 causes {f}{esc} to increases by ≈ 50% for a medium with opacity τ ≈ 1. At a fixed Mach number, the correction factor for escape fraction relative to a constant column density case scales exponentially with the opacity in the cell, which has a large impact for simulated star-forming regions. Furthermore, in simulations of isotropic turbulence with full atomic/ionic cooling and chemistry, the fraction of HI drops by a factor of ≈ 2.5 at { M }≈ 10 even when the mean temperature is ≈ 5× {10}3 {{K}}. If turbulence is unresolved, these effects together enhance {f}{esc} by a factor \\gt 3 at Mach numbers above 10. Such Mach numbers are common at high redshifts where vigorous turbulence is driven by supernovae, gravitational instabilities, and merger activity, as shown both by numerical simulations and observations. These results, if implemented in the current hydrodynamical cosmological simulations to account for unresolved turbulence, can boost the theoretical predictions of the Lyman Continuum photon escape fraction and further constrain the sources of reionization.

  8. Performance Characterization of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) CCD Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Reyann; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Champey, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket instrument currently being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), and other partners. The goal of this instrument is to observe and detect the Hanle effect in the scattered Lyman-Alpha UV (121.6nm) light emitted by the Sun's chromosphere. The polarized spectrum imaged by the CCD cameras will capture information about the local magnetic field, allowing for measurements of magnetic strength and structure. In order to make accurate measurements of this effect, the performance characteristics of the three on- board charge-coupled devices (CCDs) must meet certain requirements. These characteristics include: quantum efficiency, gain, dark current, read noise, and linearity. Each of these must meet predetermined requirements in order to achieve satisfactory performance for the mission. The cameras must be able to operate with a gain of 2.0+/- 0.5 e--/DN, a read noise level less than 25e-, a dark current level which is less than 10e-/pixel/s, and a residual non- linearity of less than 1%. Determining these characteristics involves performing a series of tests with each of the cameras in a high vacuum environment. Here we present the methods and results of each of these performance tests for the CLASP flight cameras.

  9. Exploring the Overabundance of ULXs in Metal- and Dust-poor Local Lyman Break Analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Basu-Zych, Antara R; Fragos, Tassos; Hornschemeier, Ann; Yukita, Mihoko; Zezas, Andreas; Ptak, Andy

    2016-01-01

    We have studied high mass X-ray binary (HMXB) populations within two low-metallicity, starburst galaxies, Haro 11 and VV 114. These galaxies serve as analogs to high-redshift (z>2) Lyman break galaxies, and within the larger sample of Lyman break analogs (LBAs) are sufficiently nearby (10^{39}$ erg/s; ultraluminous X-ray sources, ULXs) in these low-metallicity galaxies, based on 8 detected ULXs. Comparing with the star-forming galaxy X-ray luminosity function (XLF) presented by Mineo et al. (2012), Haro 11 and VV 114 host ~4 times more L$_X>10^{40}$ erg/s sources than expected given their SFRs. We simulate the effects of source blending from crowded lower luminosity HMXBs using the star-forming galaxy XLF and then vary the XLF shapes until we reproduce the observed point source luminosity distributions. We find that these LBAs have a shallower bright end slope than the standard XLF. If we conservatively assume that the brightest X-ray source from each galaxy is powered by an AGN rather than a HMXB and elimina...

  10. No overdensity of Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxies around a quasar at z~5.7

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucchelli, C; Decarli, R; Farina, E P; Venemans, B P; Walter, F; Overzier, R

    2016-01-01

    Bright quasars, observed when the Universe was less than one billion years old (z>5.5), are known to host massive black holes (~10$^{9}$ M$_{\\odot}$), and are thought to reside in the center of massive dark matter overdensities. In this picture, overdensities of galaxies are expected around high redshift quasars. However, observations based on the detection of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) around these quasars do not offer a clear picture: this may be due to the uncertain redshift constraints of LBGs, which are selected through broad-band filters only. To circumvent such uncertainties, we here perform a search for Lyman Alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the field of the quasar PSO J215.1512-16.0417 at z~5.73, through narrow band, deep imaging with FORS2 at the VLT. We study an area of 37 arcmin$^{2}$, i.e. ~206 comoving Mpc$^{2}$ at the redshift of the quasar. We find no evidence for an overdensity of LAEs in the quasar field with respect to blank field studies. Possible explanations for these findings include ...

  11. The 21-cm signature of the first stars during the Lyman-Werner feedback era

    CERN Document Server

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Visbal, Eli; Tseliakhovich, Dmitriy; Hirata, Christopher M

    2012-01-01

    The formation of the first stars is an exciting frontier area in astronomy. Early redshifts z ~ 20 have become observationally promising as a result of a recently recognized effect of a supersonic relative velocity between the dark matter and gas. This effect produces prominent structure on 100 comoving Mpc scales, which makes it much more feasible to detect 21-cm fluctuations from the epoch of first heating. We use semi-numerical hybrid methods to follow for the first time the joint evolution of the X-ray and Lyman-Werner radiative backgrounds, including the effect of the supersonic streaming velocity on the cosmic distribution of stars. We incorporate self-consistently the negative feedback on star formation induced by the Lyman-Werner radiation, which dissociates molecular hydrogen and thus suppresses gas cooling. We find that the feedback delays the X-ray heating transition by a Delta z ~ 2, but leaves a promisingly large fluctuation signal over a broad redshift range. The large-scale power spectrum is pr...

  12. The Cosmic Evolution of the Metallicity Distribution of Ionized Gas Traced by Lyman Limit Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J Christopher; Prochaska, J Xavier; Fumagalli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from our KODIAQ Z survey aimed to determine the metallicity distribution and physical properties of the partial and full Lyman limit systems (pLLSs and LLSs; 16.22, which probe gas in the interface regions between the intergalactic medium and galaxies. We study 31 HI-selected pLLSs and LLSs at 2.3Lyman alpha absorbers (DLAs) at any given z, and this fraction remains relatively constant from z<1 to z~2-4. There is therefore a reservoir of metal-poor cool gas at all z that ma...

  13. The Keck+Magellan Survey for Lyman Limit Absorption III: Sample Definition and Column Density Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J Xavier; Fumagalli, Michele; Bernstein, Rebecca A; Burles, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    We present an absorption-line survey of optically thick gas clouds -- Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs) -- observed at high dispersion with spectrometers on the Keck and Magellan telescopes. We measure column densities of neutral hydrogen NHI and associated metal-line transitions for 157 LLSs at z=1.76-4.39 restricted to 10^17.3 < NHI < 10^20.3. An empirical analysis of ionic ratios indicates an increasing ionization state of the gas with decreasing NHI and that the majority of LLSs are highly ionized, confirming previous expectations. The Si^+/H^0 ratio spans nearly four orders-of-magnitude, implying a large dispersion in the gas metallicity. Fewer than 5% of these LLSs have no positive detection of a metal transition; by z~3, nearly all gas that is dense enough to exhibit a very high Lyman limit opacity has previously been polluted by heavy elements. We add new measurements to the small subset of LLS (~5-10) that may have super-solar abundances. High Si^+/Fe^+ ratios suggest an alpha-enhanced medium whereas ...

  14. Indirect Evidence for Escaping Ionizing Photons in Local Lyman Break Galaxy Analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandroff, Rachael; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Overzier, Roderik; Leitherer, Claus

    2015-01-01

    A population of early star-forming galaxies is the leading candidate for the re-ionization of the universe. It is still unclear what conditions and physical processes would enable a significant fraction of the ionizing photons to escape from these gas-rich galaxies. In this paper we present the results of the analysis of HST COS far-UV spectroscopy plus ancillary multi-waveband data of a sample of 22 low-redshift galaxies that are good analogs to typical star-forming galaxies at high-redshift. We measure three parameters that provide indirect evidence of the escape of ionizing radiation: (1) the residual intensity in the cores of saturated interstellar low-ionization absorption-lines. (2) The relative amount of blue-shifted Lyman alpha line emission, and (3) the relative weakness of the [SII] optical emission lines. We use these diagnostics to rank-order our sample in terms of likely leakiness, noting that a direct measure of escaping Lyman continuum has recently been made for one of the leakiest members of o...

  15. Detection of HI in Emission in the Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxy Haro 11

    CERN Document Server

    Pardy, Stephen A; Östlin, Göran; Hayes, Matthew; Bergvall, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present the first robust detection of HI 21 cm emission in the blue compact galaxy Haro 11 using the 100m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Haro 11 is a luminous blue compact galaxy with emission in both Lyman Alpha and the Lyman continuum. We detect (5.1 $\\pm$ 0.7 $\\times$10$^8$) M$_{\\odot}$ of HI gas at an assumed distance of 88 Mpc, making this galaxy HI deficient compared to other local galaxies with similar optical properties. Given this small HI mass, Haro 11 has an elevated M$_{H2}$/M$_{HI}$ ratio and a very low gas fraction compared to most local galaxies, and contains twice as much mass in ionized hydrogen as in neutral hydrogen. The HI emission has a linewidth of 71 kms$^{-1}$ and is offset 60 kms$^{-1}$ redward of the optical line center. It is undergoing a starburst after a recent merger which has elevated the star formation rate, and will deplete the gas supply in $<$ 0.2 Gyr. Although this starburst has elevated the SFR compared to galaxies with similar HI masses and linewidths, H...

  16. Spectroscopic confirmation of two Lyman break galaxies at redshift beyond 7

    CERN Document Server

    Vanzella, E; Fontana, A; Grazian, A; Castellano, M; Boutsia, K; Cristiani, S; Dickinson, M; Gallozzi, S; Giallongo, E; Giavalisco, M; Maiolino, R; Moorwood, A; Paris, D; Santini, P

    2010-01-01

    We report the spectroscopic confirmation of two Lyman break galaxies at redshift > 7. The galaxies were observed as part of an utra-deep spectroscopic campaign with FORS2 at the ESO/VLT for the confirmation of z~7 "z--band dropout'' candidates selected from our VLT/Hawk-I imaging survey. Both galaxies show a prominent emission line at 9735A and 9858A respectively: the lines have fluxes around ~ 1-1.2 x 10^(-17) erg/s/cm2 and exhibit a sharp decline on the blue side and a tail on the red side. The asymmetry is quantitatively comparable to the observed asymmetry in z~6 Lya lines, where absorption by neutral hydrogen in the IGM truncates the blue side of the emission line profile. We carefully evaluate the possibility that the galaxies are instead at lower redshift and we are observing either [OII], [OIII] or Ha emission: however from the spectroscopic and the photometric data we conclude that there are no other plausible identifications, except for Lya at redshift > 7, making these the first robust Lyman break ...

  17. Star Formation from DLA Gas in the Outskirts of Lyman Break Galaxies at z~3

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Marc; Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence for spatially extended low surface brightness emission around Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) in the V-band image of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, corresponding to the z~3 rest-frame FUV light, which is a sensitive measure of Star Formation Rates (SFRs). We find that the covering fraction of molecular gas at z~3 is not adequate to explain the emission in the outskirts of LBGs, while the covering fraction of neutral atomic-dominated hydrogen gas at high redshift is sufficient. We develop a theoretical framework to connect this emission around LBGs to the expected emission from neutral H I gas i.e., Damped Lyman Alpha systems (DLAs), using the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation. Working under the hypothesis that the observed FUV emission in the outskirts of LBGs is from in-situ star formation in atomic-dominated hydrogen gas, the results suggest that the SFR efficiency in such gas at z~3 is between factors of 10 and 50 lower than predictions based on the local KS relation. The total star formation r...

  18. Damped and sub-damped Lyman-alpha absorbers in z > 4 QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Guimaraes, Rodney; De Carvalho, Reinaldo Ramos; Djorgovski, George; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Castro, Sandra; Poppe, Paulo Da Rocha; Aghaee, Ali

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a survey for damped (DLA, log N(H I) > 20.3) and sub-damped Lyman-? systems (19.5 2.55 along the lines-of-sight to 77 quasars with emission redshifts in the range 4 19.5 are detected of which 40 systems are damped Lyman-? systems for an absorption length of ?X = 378. About half of the lines of sight of this homogeneous survey have never been investigated for DLAs. We study the evolution with redshift of the cosmological density of the neutral gas and ?nd, consis- tently with previous studies at similar resolution, that ?DLA,H I decreases at z > 3.5. The overall cosmological evolution of ?HI shows a peak around this redshift. The H I column density distribution for log N(H I) ? 20.3 is ?tted, consistently with previous surveys, with a single power-law of index ? ? -1.8$\\pm$0.25. This power-law overpredicts data at the high-end and a second, much steeper, power-law (or a gamma function) is needed. There is a ?attening of the function at lower H I column densities with an index of ? ?...

  19. Lyman-alpha constraints on warm and on warm-plus-cold dark matter models

    CERN Document Server

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Viel, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    We revisit Lyman-alpha bounds on the dark matter mass in Lambda Warm Dark Matter (Lambda-WDM) models, and derive new bounds in the case of mixed Cold plus Warm models (Lambda-CWDM), using a set up which is a good approximation for several theoretically well-motivated dark matter models. We combine WMAP5 results with two different Lyman-alpha data sets, including observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We pay a special attention to systematics, test various possible sources of error, and compare the results of different statistical approaches. Expressed in terms of the mass of a non-resonantly produced sterile neutrino, our bounds read m_NRP > 8 keV (frequentist 99.7% confidence limit) or m_NRP > 12.1 keV (Bayesian 95% credible interval) in the pure Lambda-WDM limit. For the mixed model, we obtain limits on the mass as a function of the warm dark matter fraction F_WDM. Within the mass range studied here (5 keV < m_NRP < infinity), we find that any mass value is allowed when F_WDM < 0.6 (freque...

  20. Complications of blepharoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morax, Serge; Touitou, Valerie

    2006-12-01

    The complications of blepharoplasty are infrequent, most often minor and transient, and rarely major and permanent with functional or aesthetic consequences. Treatment is above all preventive with screening of "at risk" patients in whom blepharoplasty would be contra-indicated. Patients must be informed of possible risks through informative booklets stressing the most important points. The complications may affect vision. Partial or complete visual loss due to ischemic optic neuropathy, or rarely to compression of the ocular globe by intraorbital hemorrhage, is the most serious complication. Other visual complications include oculomotor disorders, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, epiphora, and chemosis of lymphatic origin. Eyelid complications are more frequent: ptosis of the upper eyelid or lagophthalmia caused by incorrect resection of the skin, scarring, and eyelid fold anomalies. The most severe aesthetic complication is the malposition of the lower eyelid resulting in retraction, lagophthalmia, ectropion, deformation of the external canthus, or lower eyelid tissue relaxation. These malpositions are often minor, sometimes reversible, but they can be major, with psychological, aesthetic, and functional consequences. Other local complications include enophthalmia and hypo- or hypercorrection. General complications may include pigmentation anomalies or infections extending as far as the orbital fat tissue. Finally, complications observed after the newer procedures of laser surgery include ectropion, burns and residual redness. Complications related to periocular injections of filling material are also mentioned. The discussion of these complications is followed by a comprehensive review of the prevention, diagnosis and management of the complications after blepharoplasty.

  1. Complicated Horseshoe Kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. S.; Kim, S. R.; Cha, K. S.; Park, S. S. [Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Horseshoe kidney is an important urological anomaly when it is complicated or accompanied by other diseases. Recently we have experienced four cases of horseshoe kidney which were complicated with hydronephrosis, renal stone and adrenal pheochromocytoma. With review of literatures, we emphasize the importance of detection of these complications.

  2. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  3. Complications of strabismus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott E Olitsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All surgeries carry risks of complications, and there is no way to avoid ever having a complication. Strabismus surgery is no different in this regard. There are methods to reduce the risk of a complication during or after surgery, and these steps should always be taken. When a complication occurs, it is important to first recognize it and then manage it appropriately to allow for the best outcome possible. This article will discuss some of the more common and/or most devastating complications that can occur during or after strabismus surgery as well as thoughts on how to avoid them and manage them should they happen.

  4. [Complications of urinary calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joual, A; Fekak, H; Rabii, R; el Moussasoui, A; Benjelloun, S

    1996-01-01

    Urinary stones is a frequent disease whose renal complications can engage both functional and vital prognosis. We report 769 complicated cases observed 10 years. The diagnosis was made by intravenous urography and ultrasonography. 607 cases were mechanical complications, 582 hydronephrosis, 25 anuria, 262 were infectious complications, 82 chronic pyelonephritis, 60 pyonephrosis, 10 perinephric abscess. Treatment included adapted antibiotic therapy, ureteral catheter in case of anuria ; surgical extraction of the stone nephrectomy was performed in 100 patients. Results were generally good. 9 patients had endstage chronic renal failure. The high frequency of urinary stone complications is due to the fact that most patients consult late. The diagnosis must obviously be made.

  5. Trident: A three-pronged galaxy survey. I. Lyman alpha emitting galaxies at z~2 in GOODS North

    CERN Document Server

    Sandberg, A; Östlin, G; Hayes, M; Kiaeerad, F

    2015-01-01

    Context. Lyman alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) are used to probe the distant universe and are therefore important for galaxy evolution studies and for providing clues to the nature of the epoch of reionization, but the exact circumstances under which Lyman alpha escapes a galaxy are still not fully understood. Aims. The Trident project is designed to simultaneously examine Lyman alpha, H-alpha and Lyman Continuum emission from galaxies at redshift z~2, thus linking together these three aspects of ionising radiation in galaxies. In this paper, we outline the strategy of this project and examine the properties of LAEs in the GOODS North field. Methods. We performed a narrowband LAE survey in GOODS North using existing and two custom made filters at the Nordic Optical Telescope with MOSCA. We use complementary broad band archival data in the field to make a careful candidate selection and perform optical to near-IR SED fitting. We also estimate far-infrared luminosities by matching our candidates to detections in...

  6. The Lyman-alpha forest of a Lyman Break Galaxy VLT Spectra of MS1512-cB58 at z=2.724

    CERN Document Server

    Savaglio, S; Padovani, P

    2001-01-01

    The high redshift galaxy MS1512-cB58 (z=2.724, m_V=20.64) has been observed with the very efficient high resolution echelle spectrograph VLT/UVES. Although this is a very challenging observational program for a Southern hemisphere telescope (the galaxy is located at +36 deg declination), high resolution spectra (FWHM ~ 26 km/s) have revealed, with unprecedented detail along a galaxy sight line, the Lyman-alpha forest due to intervening clouds in the intergalactic medium (IGM). The mean depression D_A due to IGM absorption blueward of the galaxy Ly-alpha wavelength and the number density dn/dz of Ly-alpha clouds have been compared with equivalent results obtained for QSO sight lines at similar redshifts. Our results indicate a possible excess of absorption close to the galaxy. The mean depression at ~ 150 h_65^-1 Mpc comoving (Omega_m=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7) from the galaxy is D_A=0.36+/-0.03, to be compared with 0.22+/-0.04, expected from a best fit to QSO sight lines. In the same region (z=2.610), the number ...

  7. Extended complications of urethroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam S. Al-Qudah

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: An extensive study of complications following urethroplasty has never been published. We present 60 urethroplasty patients who were specifically questioned to determine every possible early and late complication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective chart review of urethroplasty patients between August 2000 and March 2004. An "open format" questioning style allowed maximal patient reporting of all complications, no matter how minor. RESULTS: 60 patients underwent 62 urethroplasties (24 anterior anastomotic, 19 buccal mucosal and 10 fasciocutaneous, 9 posterior anastomotic with mean follow-up of 29 months. Early complications occurred in 40%, but only 3% were major (rectal injury and urosepsis. Early minor complications included scrotal swelling, scrotal ecchymosis and urinary urgency. Late complications occurred in 48%, but only 18% were significant (erectile dysfunction, chordee and fistula. Late minor complications included a feeling of wound tightness, scrotal numbness and urine spraying. Fasciocutaneous urethroplasty caused the most significant complications, and buccal mucus urethroplasty the least, while also resulting in the lowest recurrence rate (0%. CONCLUSIONS: Serious complications after urethroplasty (3% early and 18% late appear similar to those reported elsewhere, but minor bothersome complications appear to occur in much higher numbers than previously published (39% early and 40% late. While all the early complications were resolved and most (97% were minor, less than half of the late complications were resolved, although most (82% were minor. These complication rates should be considered when counseling urethroplasty patients, and generally tend to support the use of buccal mucosal onlay urethroplasty as it had the lowest rate of serious side effects.

  8. THE HST/ACS+WFC3 SURVEY FOR LYMAN LIMIT SYSTEMS. II. SCIENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Meara, John M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael' s College. One Winooski Park, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gabor; Madau, Piero [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Chen, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 640 S. Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We present the first science results from our Hubble Space Telescope survey for Lyman limit absorption systems (LLS) using the low dispersion spectroscopic modes of the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. Through an analysis of 71 quasars, we determine the incidence frequency of LLS per unit redshift and per unit path length, l(z) and l(X), respectively, over the redshift range 1 < z < 2.6, and find a weighted mean of l(X) =0.29 {+-} 0.05 for 2.0 < z < 2.5 through a joint analysis of our sample and that of Ribaudo et al. Through stacked spectrum analysis, we determine a median (mean) value of the mean free path to ionizing radiation at z = 2.4 of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} = 243(252) h {sup -1}{sub 72} Mpc, with an error on the mean value of {+-}43 h {sup -1}{sub 72} Mpc. We also re-evaluate the estimates of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} from Prochaska et al. and place constraints on the evolution of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} with redshift, including an estimate of the ''breakthrough'' redshift of z = 1.6. Consistent with results at higher z, we find that a significant fraction of the opacity for absorption of ionizing photons comes from systems with N{sub H{sub I}} {<=}10{sup 17.5} cm{sup -2} with a value for the total Lyman opacity of {tau}{sup Lyman}{sub eff} = 0.40 {+-} 0.15. Finally, we determine that at minimum, a 5-parameter (4 power law) model is needed to describe the column density distribution function f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X) at z {approx} 2.4, find that f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X) undergoes no significant change in shape between z {approx} 2.4 and z {approx} 3.7, and provide our best fit model for f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X).

  9. New approach for precise computation of Lyman-α forest power spectrum with hydrodynamical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borde, Arnaud; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Rossi, Graziano; Viel, Matteo; Bolton, James S.; Yèche, Christophe; LeGoff, Jean-Marc; Rich, Jim

    2014-07-01

    Current experiments are providing measurements of the flux power spectrum from the Lyman-α forests observed in quasar spectra with unprecedented accuracy. Their interpretation in terms of cosmological constraints requires specific simulations of at least equivalent precision. In this paper, we present a suite of cosmological N-body simulations with cold dark matter and baryons, specifically aiming at modeling the low-density regions of the inter-galactic medium as probed by the Lyman-α forests at high redshift. The simulations were run using the GADGET-3 code and were designed to match the requirements imposed by the quality of the current SDSS-III/BOSS or forthcoming SDSS-IV/eBOSS data. They are made using either 2 × 7683 simeq 1 billion or 2 × 1923 simeq 14 million particles, spanning volumes ranging from (25 Mpc h-1)3 for high-resolution simulations to (100 Mpc h-1)3 for large-volume ones. Using a splicing technique, the resolution is further enhanced to reach the equivalent of simulations with 2 × 30723 simeq 58 billion particles in a (100 Mpc h-1)3 box size, i.e. a mean mass per gas particle of 1.2 × 105Msolar h-1. We show that the resulting power spectrum is accurate at the 2% level over the full range from a few Mpc to several tens of Mpc. We explore the effect on the one-dimensional transmitted-flux power spectrum of four cosmological parameters (ns, σ8, Ωm and H0) and two astrophysical parameters (T0 and γ) that are related to the heating rate of the intergalactic medium. By varying the input parameters around a central model chosen to be in agreement with the latest Planck results, we built a grid of simulations that allows the study of the impact on the flux power spectrum of these six relevant parameters. We improve upon previous studies by not only measuring the effect of each parameter individually, but also probing the impact of the simultaneous variation of each pair of parameters. We thus provide a full second-order expansion, including

  10. [Complications of operative hysteroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, A; Bretelle, F; Cravello, L; Ronda, I; Roger, V; Blanc, B

    2003-05-24

    Assess the prevalence and severity of the various complications of operative hysteroscopy, the context in which they occur and the treatments proposed. A single-center observational study from 1/1/90 to 1/1/99 including 2,116 surgical hysteroscopies (resection of a fibroma (782) or polyp (422), section of a septate uterus (199), synechia uteri (90) and endometrectomy (623)). There were 74 complications (3.5%). The most frequent was uterine perforation (34 cases (1.61%)). There were 13 cases of haemorrhage (0.61%), 16 cases of post-surgical fever (0.76%) and 11 metabolic complications (0.47%). Synechia uteri was the surgical intervention with the greatest risk of complications. The complications of surgical hysteroscopy are rare and relatively benign. Uterine perforation appears to predominate. In our study, the risk of complication was enhanced in the case of synechia uteri.

  11. Sigmoid volvulus complicating pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Utpal

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Sigmoid volvulus complicating pregnancy is an extremely rare complication with fewer than 76 cases reported in literature. We report a case of sigmoid volvulus complicating pregnancy. The sigmoid colon was resected and Hartman′s colostomy was performed. The patient had a successful recovery. Aggressive resuscitation followed by early surgical intervention should be undertaken to reduce maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality.

  12. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  13. Complications of nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Jin Park

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome (NS is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox, thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism, hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension, cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia, acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception. The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS.

  14. Complications of mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Biljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation of the lungs, as an important therapeutic measure, cannot be avoided in critically ill patients. However, when machines take over some of vital functions there is always a risk of complications and accidents. Complications associated with mechanical ventilation can be divided into: 1 airway-associated complications; 2 complications in the response of patients to mechanical ventilation; and 3 complications related to the patient’s response to the device for mechanical ventilation. Complications of artificial airway may be related to intubation and extubation or the endotracheal tube. Complications of mechanical ventilation, which arise because of the patient’s response to mechanical ventilation, may primarily cause significant side effects to the lungs. During the last two decades it was concluded that mechanical ventilation can worsen or cause acute lung injury. Mechanical ventilation may increase the alveolar/capillary permeability by overdistension of the lungs (volutrauma, it can exacerbate lung damage due to the recruitment/derecruitment of collapsed alveoli (atelectrauma and may cause subtle damages due to the activation of inflammatory processes (biotrauma. Complications caused by mechanical ventilation, beside those involving the lungs, can also have significant effects on other organs and organic systems, and can be a significant factor contributing to the increase of morbidity and mortality in critically ill of mechanically ventilated patients. Complications are fortunately rare and do not occur in every patient, but due to their seriousness and severity they require extensive knowledge, experience and responsibility by health-care workers.

  15. Pollen Dispersal by Catapult: Experiments of Lyman J. Briggs on the Flower of Mountain Laurel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R.; Hermann, Paula M.; Kirkham, M. B.; Landa, Edward R.

    2014-09-01

    The flower of Kalmia latifolia L. employs a catapult mechanism that flings its pollen to considerable distances. Physicist Lyman J. Briggs investigated this phenomenon in the 1950s after retiring as longtime director of the National Bureau of Standards, attempting to explain how hydromechanical effects inside the flower's stamen could make it possible. Briggs's unfinished manuscript implies that liquid under negative pressure generates stress, which, superimposed on the stress generated from the flower's growth habit, results in force adequate to propel the pollen as observed. With new data and biophysical understanding to supplement Briggs's experimental results and research notes, we show that his postulated negative-pressure mechanism did not play the exclusive and crucial role that he credited to it, though his revisited investigation sheds light on various related processes. Important issues concerning the development and reproductive function of Kalmia flowers remain unresolved, highlighting the need for further biophysical advances.

  16. A Lyman Break Galaxy in the Epoch of Reionization from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Grism Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Stern, Daniel K.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Dickinson, Mark; Pirzkal, Norbert; Spinrad, Hyron; Reddy, Naveen; Dey, Arjun; Hathi, Nimish; hide

    2013-01-01

    Slitless grism spectroscopy from space offers dramatic advantages for studying high redshift galaxies: high spatial resolution to match the compact sizes of the targets, a dark and uniform sky background, and simultaneous observation over fields ranging from five square arcminutes (HST) to over 1000 square arcminutes (Euclid). Here we present observations of a galaxy at z = 6.57 the end of the reioinization epoch identified using slitless HST grism spectra from the PEARS survey (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) and reconfirmed with Keck + DEIMOS. This high redshift identification is enabled by the depth of the PEARS survey. Substantially higher redshifts are precluded for PEARS data by the declining sensitivity of the ACS grism at greater than lambda 0.95 micrometers. Spectra of Lyman breaks at yet higher redshifts will be possible using comparably deep observations with IR-sensitive grisms.

  17. The distribution of Lyman-limit absorption systems during and after reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Crociani, Daniela; Moscardini, Lauro; Furlanetto, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Lyman-limit absorption systems can play many important roles during and after cosmological reionization. Unfortunately, due to the prohibitively large dynamic range required, it is impossible to self-consistently include these systems in cosmological simulations. Using fast and versatile semi-numeric simulations, we systematically explore the spatial distribution of absorption systems during and following reionization. We self-calibrate the resulting number of absorbers to the mean free path (mfp) of the ionizing ultraviolet background (UVB), and present results at a given mfp and neutral hydrogen fraction. We use a simple optical depth criterion to identify the locations of absorbers. Our approach is fairly robust to uncertainties such as missing subgrid structure. Unlike at lower redshifts where the UVB is relatively uniform, at higher redshifts the fluctuations in the UVB and the HII morphology of reionization can drive the large-scale distribution of absorption systems. Specifically, we find that absorber...

  18. Constraints on ionising photon production from the large-scale Lyman-alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya; Verde, Licia

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the z~2.5 Lyman-alpha forest on large scales encodes information about the galaxy and quasar populations that keep the intergalactic medium photoionized. We present the first forecasts for constraining the populations with data from current and next-generation surveys. At a minimum the forest should tell us whether galaxies or, conversely, quasars dominate the photon production. The number density and clustering strength of the ionising sources might be estimated to sub-10% precision with a DESI-like survey if degeneracies (e.g., with the photon mean-free-path, small-scale clustering power normalization and potentially other astrophysical effects) can be broken by prior information. We demonstrate that, when inhomogeneous ionisation is correctly handled, constraints on dark energy do not degrade.

  19. A search for Lyman Break Galaxies at z>8 in the NICMOS Parallel Imaging Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, A L; Colbert, J W; Siana, B; Teplitz, H I; McCarthy, P; Yan, L; Henry, Alaina L.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Colbert, James W.; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry I.; Carthy, Patrick Mc

    2007-01-01

    We have selected 14 J-dropout Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) candidates with J110 - H160 > 2.5 from the NICMOS Parallel Imaging Survey. This survey consists of 135 square arcminutes of imaging in 228 independent sight lines, reaching average 5 sigma sensitivities of J110 = 25.8 and H160 = 25.6 (AB). Distinguishing these candidates from dust reddened star forming galaxies at z ~ 2-3 is difficult, and will require longer wavelength observations. We consider the likelihood that any J-dropout LBGs exist in this survey, and find that if L*(z=9.5) is significantly brighter than L*(z=6) (a factor of four), then a few J-dropout LBGs are likely. A similar increase in luminosity has been suggested by Eyles et al. and Yan et al., but the magnitude of this increase is uncertain.

  20. Investigating the Metallicity Evolution of Sub-damped Lyman alpha Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konchady, Tarini; Jorgenson, Regina

    2017-01-01

    A clear understanding of the production and build up of metals across cosmic time is a key ingredient to any theory of galaxy formation and evolution. We present chemical abundance measurements for a sample of ~20 sub-damped Lyman alpha systems (subDLAs) detected in the absorption spectra of high redshift quasars taken by the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) on the Keck II telescope. The sample contains absorbers with neutral hydrogen column densities of 1019.0 Metal line column densities were measured using the apparent optical depth method while neutral hydrogen column densities were measured via Voigt profile fitting. We compare our measurements to those of DLAs and subDLAs from the literature to investigate the potential differences in metallicity evolution between these types of galaxies.

  1. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Lyman Break Galaxies as Progenitors of Spheroids in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, M; Kobayashi, N; Ohta, K; Iwata, I

    2007-01-01

    In order to reveal the stellar mass distribution of z~3 galaxies, we are conducting deep imaging observations of U-dropout Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) with Adaptive Optics (AO) systems in K-band, which corresponds to rest-frame V-band of z~3 galaxies. The results of the Subaru intensive-program observations with AO36/NGS/IRCS indicate that 1) the K-band peaks of some of the LBGs brighter than K=22.0 mag show significant offset from those in the optical images, 2) the z~3 Mv* LBGs and serendipitously observed Distant Red Galaxies (DRGs) have flat profiles similar to disk galaxies in the local universe (i.e., Sersic with n2 systems among the luminous z~3 LBGs and DRGs, and their strong spatial clustering, we infer that the dense n2 spheroids of nearby galaxies through relaxations due to major merger events.

  2. Lyman-alpha radiation hydrodynamics of galactic winds before cosmic reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Aaron; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical impact of Lyman-alpha (Ly{\\alpha}) radiation pressure on galaxy formation depends on the rate and duration of momentum transfer between Ly{\\alpha} photons and neutral hydrogen gas. Although photon trapping has the potential to multiply the effective force, ionizing radiation from stellar sources may relieve the Ly{\\alpha} pressure before appreciably affecting the kinematics of the host galaxy or efficiently coupling Ly{\\alpha} photons to the outflow. We present self-consistent Ly{\\alpha} radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of high-$z$ galaxy environments by coupling the Cosmic Ly{\\alpha} Transfer code (COLT) with spherically symmetric Lagrangian frame hydrodynamics. The accurate but computationally expensive Monte-Carlo radiative transfer calculations are feasible under the one-dimensional approximation. In certain cases Ly{\\alpha} feedback significantly enhances the velocity of the shell of gas expanding around a central source. Radiative feedback alone is capable of ejecting baryons into the i...

  3. Diagnostics of MCF plasmas using Lyman-{alpha} fluorescence excited by one or two photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voslamber, D

    1998-11-01

    Laser-induced Lyman-{alpha} fluorescence of the hydrogen isotopes is investigated with regard to diagnostic applications in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. A formal analysis is presented for two excitation schemes: one-photon and Doppler-free two-photon excitation. The analysis includes estimates of the expected experimental errors arising from the photon noise and from the sensitivity of the observed fluorescence signals to variations of the plasma and laser parameters. Both excitation schemes are suitable primarily for application in the plasma edge, but even in the plasma bulk of large machines they can still be applied in combination with a diagnostic neutral beam. The two-photon excitation scheme is particularly attractive because it involves absorption spectra that are resolved within the Doppler width. This implies a large diagnostic potential and in particular offers a way to measure the deuterium-tritium fuel mix in fusion reactors. (author) 37 refs.

  4. Statistical properties of damped Lyman-alpha systems from Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR12

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Simeon; Ho, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    We present new estimates for the statistical properties of damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs). We compute the column density distribution function at $z>2$, the line density, $\\mathrm{d}N/\\mathrm{d}X$, and the neutral hydrogen density, $\\Omega_\\mathrm{DLA}$. Our estimates are derived from the DLA catalogue of \\cite{Garnett:2016}, which uses the SDSS--III DR12 quasar spectroscopic survey. This catalogue provides a probability that a given spectrum contains a DLA, allowing us to use even the noisiest data without biasing our results and thus substantially increase our sample size. We measure a non-zero column density distribution function at $95\\%$ confidence for all column densities $N_\\mathrm{HI} 4$. We show that our results are insensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectra, but that there is a residual dependence on quasar redshift for $z<2.5$, which may be due to remaining systematics in our analysis.

  5. A metallicity-spin temperature relation in damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kanekar, Nissim; Briggs, Frank H; Chengalur, Jayaram N

    2009-01-01

    We report evidence for an anti-correlation between spin temperature $T_s$ and metallicity [Z/H], detected at $3.6 \\sigma$ significance in a sample of 26 damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) at redshifts $0.09 1.7$ have low metallicities, [Z/H] $< -1$, implying that the HI in high-$z$ DLAs is predominantly warm. The anti-correlation between $T_s$ and [Z/H] is consistent with the presence of a mass-metallicity relation in DLAs, suggested by the tight correlation between DLA metallicity and the kinematic widths of metal lines. Most high-$z$ DLAs are likely to arise in galaxies with low masses ($M_{\\rm vir} < 10^{10.5} M_\\odot$), low metallicities ([Z/H]$< -1$, and low cold gas fractions.

  6. A CROSS-CHECK FOR H0 FROM LYMAN- α FOREST AND BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. C. Busti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to infer the Hubble constant H0 through the observed mean transmitted flux from high-redshift quasars and the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs. A semi-analytical model for the cosmological-independent volume density distribution function was adopted; it allowed us to obtain constraints on the cosmological parameters once a moderate knowledge of the Inter Galactic Medium (IGM parameters is assumed. Our analysis, based on two different samples of Lyman-α forest and the BAO measurement, restricts (h, Ωm to the intervals 0.19 ≤ Ωm ≤ 0.23 and 0.53 ≤ h ≤ 0.82 (1σ. Although the constraints are weaker compared with other estimates, we point out that, with a bigger sample and a better knowledge of the IGM, this method could provide complementary results to measure the Hubble constant independently of the cosmic distance ladder.

  7. AXUV bolometer and Lyman-α camera systems on the TCV tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, A. W.; Weisen, H.; Zabolotsky, A.; Duval, B. P.; Pitts, R. A.; Wischmeier, M.; Lavanchy, P.; Marmillod, Ph.; Pochon, G.

    2004-10-01

    A set of seven twin slit cameras, each containing two 20-element linear absolute extreme ultraviolet photodiode arrays, has been installed on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable. One array in each camera will operate as a bolometer and the second as a Lyman-alpha (Lα) emission monitor for estimating the recycled neutral flux. The camera configuration was optimized by simulations of tomographic reconstructions of the expected Lα emission. The diagnostic will provide spatial and temporal resolution (10 μs) of the radiated power and the Lα emission that is considerably higher than previously achieved. This optimism is justified by extensive experience with prototype systems, which include first measurements of Lα light from the divertor.

  8. Low-Redshift Lyman Limit Systems as Diagnostics of Cosmological Inflows and Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Hafen, Z; Angles-Alcazar, D; Keres, D; Feldmann, R; Chan, T K; Quataert, E; Murray, N; Hopkins, P F

    2016-01-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with stellar feedback from the FIRE project to study the physical nature of Lyman limit systems (LLSs) at z~2) tend to have higher metallicities ([X/H] ~ -0.5) while very low metallicity ([X/H] < -2) LLSs are typically associated with gas infalling from the intergalactic medium. However, most LLSs occupy an intermediate region in metallicity-radial velocity space, for which there is no clear trend between metallicity and radial kinematics. Metal-enriched inflows arise in the FIRE simulations as a result of galactic winds that fall back onto galaxies at low redshift. The overall simulated LLS metallicity distribution has a mean (standard deviation) [X/H] = -0.9 (0.4) and does not show significant evidence for bimodality, in contrast to recent observational studies but consistent with LLSs arising from halos with a broad range of masses and metallicities.

  9. Stationary inverted Lyman population formed from incandescently heated hydrogen gas with certain catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Randell L; Ray, Paresh C; Mayo, Robert M [BlackLight Power, Inc., 493 Old Trenton Road, Cranbury, NJ 08512 (United States)

    2003-07-07

    A new chemically generated plasma source is reported. The presence of gaseous Rb{sup +} or K{sup +} ions with thermally dissociated hydrogen formed a low applied temperature, extremely low voltage plasma called a resonant transfer or rt-plasma having strong vacuum ultraviolet emission. We propose an energetic catalytic reaction involving a resonant energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and Rb{sup +} or 2K{sup +} since Rb{sup +} to Rb{sup 2+}, 2K{sup +} to K + K{sup 2+}, and K to K{sup 3+} each provide a reaction with a net enthalpy equal to the potential energy of atomic hydrogen. Remarkably, a stationary inverted Lyman population was observed; thus, these catalytic reactions may pump a cw HI laser as predicted by a collisional radiative model used to determine that the observed overpopulation was above threshold.

  10. The spin temperature of high-redshift damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kanekar, N; Smette, A; Ellison, S L; Ryan-Weber, E V; Momjian, E; Briggs, F H; Lane, W M; Chengalur, J N; Delafosse, T; Grave, J; Jacobsen, D; de Bruyn, A G

    2013-01-01

    We report results from a programme aimed at investigating the temperature of neutral gas in high-redshift damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs). This involved (1) HI 21cm absorption studies of a large DLA sample, (2) VLBI studies to measure the low-frequency quasar core fractions, and (3) optical/ultraviolet spectroscopy to determine DLA metallicities and velocity widths. Including literature data, our sample consists of 37 DLAs with estimates of the spin temperature $T_s$ and the covering factor. We find a strong $4\\sigma$) difference between the $T_s$ distributions in high-z (z>2.4) and low-z (z1 sub-sample. Since z>1 DLAs have angular diameter distances comparable to or larger than those of the background quasars, they have similar efficiency in covering the quasars. Low covering factors in high-z DLAs thus cannot account for the observed redshift evolution in spin temperatures. (Abstract abridged.)

  11. Direct Method Gas Phase Oxygen Abundances of 4 Lyman Break Analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Jonathan S; Pogge, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    We measure the gas-phase oxygen abundances in 4 Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) using auroral emission lines to derive direct abundances. The direct method oxygen abundances of these objects are generally consistent with the empirically-derived strong-line method values, confirming that these objects are low oxygen abundance outliers from the Mass-Metallicity (MZ) relation defined by star forming SDSS galaxies. We find slightly anomalous excitation conditions (Wolf-Rayet features) that could potentially bias the empirical estimates towards high values if caution is not exercised in the selection of the strong-line calibration used. The high rate of star formation and low oxygen abundance of these objects is consistent with the predictions of the Fundamental Metallicity Relation (FMR), in which the infall of relatively unenriched gas simultaneously triggers an episode of star formation and dilutes ISM of the host galaxy.

  12. Cosmochemistry, cosmology and fundamental constants: High-resolution spectroscopy of damped Lyman-alpha systems

    CERN Document Server

    Quast, R; Smette, A; Garcet, O; Ledoux, C; López, S; Wisotzki, L

    2004-01-01

    Spectroscopy of QSO absorption lines provides essential observational input for the study of nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution of galaxies at high redshift. But new observations may indicate that present chemical abundance data are biased due to deficient spectral resolution and unknown selection effects: Recent high-resolution spectra reveal the hitherto unperceived chemical nonuniformity of molecular hydrogen-bearing damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) systems, and the novel H/ESO DLA survey produces compelling evidence for faint QSOs being attenuated by dust. We present a revised analysis of the molecular hydrogen-bearing DLA complex toward HE 0515-4414 showing nonuniform differential depletion of chemical elements onto dust grains, and introduce to the H/ESO DLA survey and its implications. Conclusively, we aim at starting an unbiased chemical abundance database established on high-resolution spectroscopic observations. New data to probe the temperature-redshift relation predicted by standard cosmology and to t...

  13. A cross-check for H0 from Lyman-α Forest and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busti, V. C.; Guimarães, R. N.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2016-04-01

    A new method is proposed to infer the Hubble constant H0 through the observed mean transmitted flux from high-redshift quasars and the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). A semi-analytical model for the cosmological-independent volume density distribution function was adopted; it allowed us to obtain constraints on the cosmological parameters once a moderate knowledge of the Inter Galactic Medium (IGM) parameters is assumed. Our analysis, based on two different samples of Lyman-α forest and the BAO measurement, restricts (h, Ωm) to the intervals 0.19 ≤ Ωm ≤ 0.23 and 0.53 ≤ h ≤ 0.82 (1σ). Although the constraints are weaker compared with other estimates, we point out that, with a bigger sample and a better knowledge of the IGM, this method could provide complementary results to measure the Hubble constant independently of the cosmic distance ladder.

  14. High-Redshift Star Formation in a Time-Dependent Lyman-Werner Background

    CERN Document Server

    Visbal, Eli; Terrazas, Bryan; Bryan, Greg L; Barkana, Rennan

    2014-01-01

    The first generation of stars produces a background of Lyman-Werner (LW) radiation which can photo-dissociate molecular hydrogen, increasing the mass of dark matter halos required to host star formation. Previous studies have determined the critical mass required for efficient molecular cooling with a constant LW background. However, the true background is expected to increase rapidly at early times. Neglecting this evolution could underestimate star formation in small halos that may have started to cool in the past when the LW intensity was much lower. Background evolution is a large source of uncertainty in pre-reionization predictions of the cosmological 21cm signal, which can be observed with future radio telescopes. To address this, we perform zero-dimentional one-zone calculations that follow the density, chemical abundances, and temperature of gas in the central regions of dark matter halos, including hierarchical growth and an evolving LW background. We begin by studying the physics of halos subjected...

  15. The Lyman-alpha forest in a blazar-heated Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Puchwein, Ewald; Springel, Volker; Broderick, Avery E; Chang, Philip

    2011-01-01

    It has been realised only recently that TeV emission from blazars can significantly heat the intergalactic medium (IGM) by pair-producing high-energy electrons and positrons, which in turn excite vigorous plasma instabilities, leading to a local dissipation of the pairs' kinetic energy. In this work, we use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to model the impact of this induced blazar heating on the Lyman-alpha forest at intermediate redshifts (z~2-3). We find that blazar heating produces an inverted equation-of-state in the IGM and naturally resolves many of the problems present in previous simulations of the forest that included photoionisation heating alone. In particular, our simulation results simultaneously reproduce the observed effective optical depth and temperature as a function of redshift, the observed probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the transmitted flux, and the observed flux power spectra, over the full redshift range 2

  16. The BOSS Lyman-alpha Forest Sample from SDSS Data Release 9

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Bartsch, Leslie E; Carithers, William; Dawson, Kyle S; Kirkby, David; Lundgren, Britt; Margala, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pieri, Matthew M; Schlegel, David J; Weinberg, David H; Yeche, Christophe; Aubourg, Eric; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blomquist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S; Borde, Arnaud; Brewington, Howard; Busca, Nicolas G; Croft, Rupert A C; Delubac, Timothee; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Hennawi, Joseph F; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Miralda-Escude, Jordi; Myers, Adam D; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Paris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Rich, James; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Schneider, Donald P; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Slosar, Anze; Spergel, David N; Suzuki, Nao; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A

    2012-01-01

    We present the BOSS Lyman-alpha (Lya) Forest Sample from SDSS Data Release 9, comprising 54,468 quasar spectra with zqso > 2.15 suitable for Lya forest analysis. This data set probes the intergalactic medium with absorption redshifts 2.0 1216 Ang), extrapolated into the forest region and normalized by a linear function to fit the expected evolution of the Lya forest mean-flux. The estimated continuum errors are ~5% rms. We also discuss possible systematics arising from uncertain spectrophotometry and artifacts in the flux calibration; global corrections for the latter are provided. Our sample provides a convenient starting point for users to analyze clustering in BOSS Lya forest data, and it provides a fiducial data set that can be used to compare results from different analyses of baryon acoustic oscillations in the Lya forest. The full data set is available from the SDSS-III DR9 web site.

  17. A systematic study of Lyman-Alpha transfer through outflowing shells: Model parameter estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Gronke, Max; Dijkstra, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Outflows promote the escape of Lyman-$\\alpha$ (Ly$\\alpha$) photons from dusty interstellar media. The process of radiative transfer through interstellar outflows is often modelled by a spherically symmetric, geometrically thin shell of gas that scatters photons emitted by a central Ly$\\alpha$ source. Despite its simplified geometry, this `shell model' has been surprisingly successful at reproducing observed Ly$\\alpha$ line shapes. In this paper we perform automated line fitting on a set of noisy simulated shell model spectra, in order to determine whether degeneracies exist between the different shell model parameters. While there are some significant degeneracies, we find that most parameters are accurately recovered, especially the HI column density ($N_{\\rm HI}$) and outflow velocity ($v_{\\rm exp}$). This work represents an important first step in determining how the shell model parameters relate to the actual physical properties of Ly$\\alpha$ sources. To aid further exploration of the parameter space, we ...

  18. Studying Lyman-alpha escape and reionization in Green Pea galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Gronke, Max; Leitherer, Claus; Wofford, Aida; Dijkstra, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Green Pea galaxies are low-redshift galaxies with extreme [OIII]5007 emission line. We built the first statistical sample of Green Peas observed by HST/COS and used them as analogs of high-z Lyman-alpha emitters to study Ly-alpha escape and Ly-alpha sizes. Using the HST/COS 2D spectra, we found that Ly-alpha sizes of Green Peas are larger than the UV continuum sizes. We found many correlations between Ly-alpha escape fraction and galactic properties -- dust extinction, Ly-alpha kinematic features, [OIII]/[OII] ratio, and gas outflow velocities. We fit an empirical relation to predict Ly-alpha escape fraction from dust extinction and Ly-alpha red-peak velocity. In the JWST era, we can use this relation to derive the IGM HI column density along the line of sight of each high-z Ly-alpha emitter and probe the reionization process.

  19. Spatially Resolved Emission of a z~3 Damped Lyman Alpha Galaxy with Keck/OSIRIS IFU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Holly; Jorgenson, Regina

    2017-01-01

    The damped Lyman alpha (DLA) class of galaxies contains most of the neutral hydrogen gas over cosmic time. Few DLAs have been detected directly, which limits our knowledge of fundamental properties like size and mass. We present Keck/OSIRIS infrared integral field spectroscopy (IFU) observations of a DLA that was first detected in absorption toward a background quasar. Our observations use the Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system to reduce the point-spread function of the quasar, making it possible to spatially resolve the DLA emission. We map this emission in O[III] 5007 Å. At redshift z~3, this DLA represents one of the highest redshift DLAs mapped with IFU spectroscopy. We present measurements of the star formation rate, metallicity, and gas mass of the galaxy.This project was supported in part by the NSF REU grant AST-1358980 and by the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  20. Voyager measurements of hydrogen Lyman-α diffuse emission from the Milky Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallement, Rosine; Quémerais, Eric; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Sandel, Bill R; Izmodenov, Vlad

    2011-12-23

    Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha (Lyα) emission from galaxies is currently measured and used in cosmology as an indicator of star formation. Until now, the Milky Way emission has not been detected, owing to far brighter local sources, including the H (hydrogen) glow, i.e., solar Lyα radiation backscattered by interstellar atoms that flow within the solar system. Because observations from the Voyager spacecraft, now leaving the heliosphere, are decreasingly affected by the H glow, the ultraviolet spectrographs are detecting Lyα diffuse emission from our Galaxy. The surface brightness toward nearby star-forming regions is about 3 to 4 rayleighs. The escape fraction of the radiation from the brightest H II regions is on the order of 3% and is highly spatially variable. These results will help in constraining models of Lyα radiation transfer in distant galaxies.

  1. Wandering in the Lyman-alpha forest: a study of dark matter-dark radiation interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Rebecca; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Dvorkin, Cora

    2017-09-01

    The amplitude of large-scale matter fluctuations inferred from the observed Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) cluster mass function and from weak gravitational lensing studies, when taken at face value, is in tension with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). In this work, we revisit whether this possible discrepancy can be attributed to new interactions in the dark matter sector. Focusing on a cosmological model where dark matter interacts with a dark radiation species until the epoch of matter-radiation equality, we find that measurements of the Lyman-alpha flux power spectrum from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey provide no support to the hypothesis that new dark matter interactions can resolve the possible tension between CMB and large-scale structure (LSS). Indeed, while the addition of dark matter-dark radiation interactions leads to an improvement of 2Δ&ln;Script L=12 with respect to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model when only CMB, BAO, and LSS data are considered, the inclusion of Lyman-alpha data reduces the improvement of the fit to 2Δ&ln;Script L=6 relative to ΛCDM . We thus conclude that the statistical evidence for new dark matter interactions (largely driven by the Planck SZ dataset) is marginal at best, and likely caused by systematics in the data. We also perform a Fisher forecast analysis for the reach of a future dataset composed of a CMB-S4 experiment combined with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope galaxy survey. We find that the constraint on the effective number of fluid-like dark radiation species, Δ Nfluid, will be improved by an order of magnitude compared to current bounds.

  2. The Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction of the Cosmic Horseshoe: A Test of Indirect Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasei, Kaveh; Siana, Brian; Shapley, Alice E.; Quider, Anna M.; Alavi, Anahita; Rafelski, Marc; Steidel, Charles C.; Pettini, Max; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2016-11-01

    High-redshift star-forming galaxies are likely responsible for the reionization of the universe, yet direct detection of their escaping ionizing (Lyman continuum [LyC]) photons has proven to be extremely challenging. In this study, we search for escaping LyC of the Cosmic Horseshoe, a gravitationally lensed, star-forming galaxy at z = 2.38 with a large magnification of ∼24. Transmission at wavelengths of low-ionization interstellar absorption lines in the rest-frame ultraviolet suggests a patchy, partially transparent interstellar medium. This makes it an ideal candidate for direct detection of the LyC. We obtained a 10-orbit Hubble near-UV image using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/UVIS F275W filter that probes wavelengths just below the Lyman limit at the redshift of the Horseshoe in an attempt to detect escaping LyC radiation. After fully accounting for the uncertainties in the opacity of the intergalactic medium (IGM) and accounting for the charge transfer inefficiency in the WFC3 CCDs, we find a 3σ upper limit for the relative escape fraction of {f}{esc,{rel}}\\lt 0.08. This value is a factor of five lower than the value (0.4) predicted by the 40% transmission in the low-ion absorption lines. Though possible, it is unlikely that the nondetection is due to a high-opacity line of sight through the IGM (\\lt 20% chance). We discuss several possible causes for the discrepancy between the escape fraction and the covering fraction and consider the implications for future attempts at both direct LyC detection and indirect estimates of the escape fraction.

  3. Revisiting the Lyman Continuum Escape Crisis: Predictions for z > 6 from Local Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisst, Andreas L.

    2016-10-01

    The intrinsic escape fraction of ionizing Lyman continuum photons ({f}{{esc}}) is crucial to understanding whether galaxies are capable of reionizing the neutral hydrogen in the early universe at z > 6. Unfortunately, it is not possible to access {f}{{esc}} at z > 4 with direct observations, and the handful of measurements from low-redshift galaxies consistently find {f}{{esc}} 6 by combining the (sparsely populated) relation between [{{O}} {{III}}]/[{{O}} {{II}}] and {f}{{esc}} with the redshift evolution of [{{O}} {{III}}]/[{{O}} {{II}}] as predicted from local high-z analogs selected by their Hα equivalent width. We find {f}{{esc}}={5.7}-3.3+8.3 % at z = 6 and {f}{{esc}}={10.4}-6.3+15.5 % at z = 9 for galaxies with {log}(M/{M}⊙ )˜ 9.0 (errors given as 1σ). However, there is a negative correlation with stellar mass and we find up to 50% larger {f}{{esc}} per 0.5 dex decrease in stellar mass. The population-averaged escape fraction increases according to {f}{{esc}}={f}{{esc,0}}{((1+z)/3)}α , with f esc,0 = (2.3 ± 0.05)% and α = 1.17 ± 0.02 at z > 2 for {log}(M/{M}⊙ )˜ 9.0. With our empirical prediction of {f}{{esc}} (thus fixing an important, previously unknown variable) and further reasonable assumptions on clumping factor and the production efficiency of Lyman continuum photons, we conclude that the average population of galaxies is just capable of reionizing the universe by z ˜ 6.

  4. First Constraints on Fuzzy Dark Matter from Lyman-α Forest Data and Hydrodynamical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iršič, Vid; Viel, Matteo; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Bolton, James S.; Becker, George D.

    2017-07-01

    We present constraints on the masses of extremely light bosons dubbed fuzzy dark matter (FDM) from Lyman-α forest data. Extremely light bosons with a de Broglie wavelength of ˜1 kpc have been suggested as dark matter candidates that may resolve some of the current small scale problems of the cold dark matter model. For the first time, we use hydrodynamical simulations to model the Lyman-α flux power spectrum in these models and compare it to the observed flux power spectrum from two different data sets: the XQ-100 and HIRES/MIKE quasar spectra samples. After marginalization over nuisance and physical parameters and with conservative assumptions for the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) that allow for jumps in the temperature of up to 5000 K, XQ-100 provides a lower limit of 7.1 ×10-22 eV , HIRES/MIKE returns a stronger limit of 14.3 ×10-22 eV , while the combination of both data sets results in a limit of 20 ×10-22 eV (2 σ C.L.). The limits for the analysis of the combined data sets increases to 37.5 ×10-22 eV (2 σ C.L.) when a smoother thermal history is assumed where the temperature of the IGM evolves as a power law in redshift. Light boson masses in the range 1 - 10 ×10-22 eV are ruled out at high significance by our analysis, casting strong doubts that FDM helps solve the "small scale crisis" of the cold dark matter models.

  5. SU-C-BRC-01: A Monte Carlo Study of Out-Of-Field Doses From Cobalt-60 Teletherapy Units Intended for Historical Correlations of Dose to Normal Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroccia, H [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Olguin, E [Gainesville, FL (United States); Culberson, W [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Mendenhall, N [UF Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Bolch, W [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Innovations in radiotherapy treatments, such as dynamic IMRT, VMAT, and SBRT/SRS, result in larger proportions of low-dose regions where normal tissues are exposed to low doses levels. Low doses of radiation have been linked to secondary cancers and cardiac toxicities. The AAPM TG Committee No.158 entitled, ‘Measurements and Calculations of Doses outside the Treatment Volume from External-Beam Radiation Therapy’, has been formed to review the dosimetry of non-target and out-of-field exposures using experimental and computational approaches. Studies on historical patients can provide comprehensive information about secondary effects from out-of-field doses when combined with long-term patient follow-up, thus providing significant insight into projecting future outcomes of patients undergoing modern-day treatments. Methods: We present a Monte Carlo model of a Theratron-1000 cobalt-60 teletherapy unit, which historically treated patients at the University of Florida, as a means of determining doses located outside the primary beam. Experimental data for a similar Theratron-1000 was obtained at the University of Wisconsin’s ADCL to benchmark the model for out-of-field dosimetry. An Exradin A12 ion chamber and TLD100 chips were used to measure doses in an extended water phantom to 60 cm outside the primary field at 5 and 10 cm depths. Results: Comparison between simulated and experimental measurements of PDDs and lateral profiles show good agreement for in-field and out-of-field doses. At 10 cm away from the edge of a 6×6, 10×10, and 20×20 cm2 field, relative out-of-field doses were measured in the range of 0.5% to 3% of the dose measured at 5 cm depth along the CAX. Conclusion: Out-of-field doses can be as high as 90 to 180 cGy assuming historical prescription doses of 30 to 60 Gy and should be considered when correlating late effects with normal tissue dose.

  6. COMPLICATIONS OF PERCUTANEOUS NEPHROLITHOTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The increasing global prevalence of nephrolithiasis continues to burden the health care delivery systems of developing nations. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL is considered the standard treatment for many types of calculi. This study focuses on the complications of PCNL in private practice setting at a peripheral center using the modified Clavien system and role of Guy’s stone score as a predictor of stone free rate and complications. METHODS This is a prospective cohort study of 480 patients who underwent PCNL during August 2011 to July 2015. The complications were classified according to modified Clavien system and correlated with the stone complexity as per the Guy’s stone score. RESULTS It was found that overall 120 complications were reported in 480 patients with the incidence of complications of Grade I, II, IIIa, IIIb, IVb being 48 (10%, 38 (7.9%, 15 (3.5%, 12 (2.5% and 4 (0.8% respectively. As per the Guy’s stone score there were 336, 104 and 40 cases belonging to GSS I, II and III respectively. All grades of complications were more common in GSS II and III. The stone clearance was found to be complete in 95%, 82% and 75% of GSS I, II, III respectively. CONCLUSION The stone complexity is related to complication rate and GSS helps to predict stone free rate and complications

  7. Pellagra complicating Crohn's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, I.; Millard, L

    1995-01-01

    We report a 53-year-old patient with clinical features of pellagra as a complication of Crohn's disease. His symptoms improved rapidly on taking oral nicotinic acid and vitamin B complex. We suggest the paucity of reported cases of pellagra in Crohn's disease is a reflection of poor recognition of this complication.

  8. Bulimia Nervosa - medical complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Philip S; Rylander, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    As with anorexia nervosa, there are many medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa. In bulimia nervosa, these complications are a direct result of both the mode and the frequency of purging behaviours. For the purposes of this article, we will review in detail the many complications of the two major modes of purging, namely, self-induced vomiting and laxative abuse; these two account for more than 90% of purging behaviours in bulimia nervosa. Some of these complications are potentially extremely dangerous and need to be well understood to effectively treat patients with bulimia nervosa. Other methods of purging, such as diuretic abuse, are much less frequently utilized and will only be mentioned briefly. In a subsequent article, the treatments of these medical complications will be presented.

  9. [Complications of blepharoplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morax, S

    2004-06-01

    Blepharoplasty complications are infrequent, most often minor and transitory, rarely major and permanent with functional or esthetic consequences. Treatment is above all preventive: screening at risk patients with a history of ophthalmic problems, but also general illnesses that would contraindicate blepharoplasty. Patients must be informed of possible risks through informative booklets with the most important points underlined. Complications can be purely ophthalmological, the more serious sequelae being partial or complete visual loss due to ischemic optical neuropathy, with very poor prognosis, or more rarely compression of the ocular globe by intraorbital hemorrhage, which has a better prognosis provided the origins are quickly recognized and treated immediately. Other visual complications include oculomotor problems, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, epiphora, and chemosis of lymphatic origin. Eyelid complications are more frequent: ptosis on the upper eyelid or lagophthalmia caused by incorrect resection of the skin, scarring and eyelid fold anomalies. The most serious esthetic complication is the malposition of the lower eyelid, which can manifest as retraction, lagophthalmia, ectropion, deformation of the external canthus, or lower eyelid tissue relaxation. These malpositions are quite often minor, sometimes reversible, but at times major, with psychological, esthetic and functional consequences that are difficult for the patient. Other local complications also arise: enophthalmia with a sunken lid, as well as under- and overcorrection. General complications can include scarring related to pigmentation problems and residual hematomas, and exceptionally infections going as far as the orbital fat tissue. Finally, other complications are related to new laser surgical techniques that are responsible for ectropion of the lower eyelid and even burns or residual redness, or complications related to periocular injections of filling material. A comprehensive review of

  10. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azuddin, A. Yusof [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 53000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Rahman, I. Abdul; Mohamed, F. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Siah, N. J. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 53000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saadc, M. [Department of Oncology, University Malaya Medical Center, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ismail, F. [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60{sub rectum}, rectal mean dose and NTCP{sub rectum} with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  11. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Siah, N. J.; Mohamed, F.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60rectum, rectal mean dose and NTCPrectum with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  12. Isolated limb perfusion and external beam radiotherapy for soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity: long-term effects on normal tissue according to the LENT-SOMA scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoven-Gondrie, Miriam L; Thijssens, Katja M J; Geertzen, Jan H B; Pras, Elisabeth; van Ginkel, Robert J; Hoekstra, Harald J

    2008-05-01

    With the combined treatment procedure of isolated limb perfusion (ILP), delayed surgical resection and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for locally advanced soft tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities, limb salvage rates of more than 80% can be achieved. However, long-term damage to the healthy surrounding tissue cannot be prevented. We studied the late effects on the normal tissue using the LENT-SOMA scoring system. A total of 32 patients-median age 47 (range 14-71) years-were treated for a locally advanced STS with ILP, surgical resection and often adjuvant 60-70 Gy EBRT. After a median follow-up of 88 (range 17-159) months, the patients were scored, using the LENT-SOMA scales, for the following late tissue damage: muscle/soft tissue, peripheral nerves, skin/subcutaneous tissue and vessels. According to the individual SOM parameters of the LENT-SOMA scales, 20 patients (63%) scored grade-3 toxicity on one or more separate items, reflecting severe symptoms with a negative impact on daily activities. Of these patients, 3 (9%) even scored grade-4 toxicity on some of the parameters, denoting irreversible functional damage necessitating major therapeutic intervention. In evaluating long-term morbidity after a combined treatment procedure for STS of the extremity, using modified LENT-SOMA scores, two-thirds of patients were found to have experienced serious late toxic effects.

  13. Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2008-01-01

    and electrophysiological abnormalities, an entity that is different from alcoholic heart muscle disease. Being clinically latent, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy can be unmasked by physical or pharmacological strain. Consequently, caution should be exercised in the case of stressful procedures, such as large volume paracentesis......Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central, splanchnic and peripheral circulation, and haemodynamic changes caused by humoral and nervous dysregulation. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy implies systolic and diastolic dysfunction....... The clinical significance of cardiovascular complications and cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is an important topic for future research, and the initiation of new randomised studies of potential treatments for these complications is needed.  ...

  14. Exploring the overabundance of ultraluminous X-ray sources in metal- and dust-poor local Lyman break analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Zych, Antara; Lehmer, Bret; Fragos, Tassos; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Zezas, Andreas; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We have studied high mass X-ray binary (HMXB) populations within two low-metallicity, starburst galaxies, Haro 11 and VV 114. These galaxies serve as analogs to high-redshift (z > 2) Lyman break galaxies, and within the larger sample of Lyman break analogs (LBAs) are sufficiently nearby (1039 erg s-1 ultraluminous X-ray sources, ULXs) in these low-metallicity galaxies, based on 8 detected ULXs. Comparing with the star-forming galaxy X-ray luminosity function (XLF), Haro 11 and VV 114 host ~4 times more LX>1040 erg s-1 sources than expected given their SFRs. We simulate the effects of source blending from crowded lower luminosity HMXBs using the star-forming galaxy XLF and then vary the XLF normalizations and bright-end slopes until we reproduce the observed point source luminosity distributions. Based on this analysis, we find that these LBAs have a shallower bright end slope than the standard XLF.

  15. Laboratory studies of UV emissions of H2 by electron impact - The Werner- and Lyman-band systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, J. M.; Srivastava, S. K.; Yung, Y. L.

    1982-01-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet electron-impact-induced fluorescence emissions of H2 were studied for the Lyman and Werner band systems in the range of 120-170 nm, using an optical system containing a photomultiplier and a spectrometer, over an energy range from threshold to 400 eV. The emission cross sections for the Lyman and Werner transitions at 100 eV are determined. The cross-section ratio is in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and experimental data for the optical oscillator strengths. The cross-section for cascading to the B state is stated as a percentage of the total emission cross section at both 100 and 300 eV, increasing substantially at 20 eV. The vibrational population distribution of the B state is found to be a function of electron-impact energy as the importance of cascading relative to direct excitation changes with electron-impact energy.

  16. Resolution of the discrepancy between Balmer alpha emission rates, the solar Lyman beta flux, and models of geocoronal hydrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, A.-C.; Meier, R. R.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New satellite Balmer alpha measurements and solar Lyman beta flux and line profile measurements, together with new measurements of the zodiacal light intensity used in correcting both ground and satellite Balmer alpha measurements for the effects of the Fraunhofer line in the zodiacal light, have been used in a reevaluation of the long-standing discrepancy between ground-based Balmer alpha emission rates and other geocoronal hydrogen parameters. The solar Lyman beta line center flux is found to be (4.1 plus or minus 1.3) billion photons per sq cm per sec per angstrom at S(10.7) equals 110 and, together with a current hydrogen model which has 92,000 atoms per cu cm at 650 km for T(inf) equals 950 K, gives good agreement between calculated Balmer alpha emission rates and the ground-based and satellite measurements.

  17. Diagnosing the reionization of the universe - The absorption spectrum of the intergalactic medium and Lyman alpha clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Mark L.; Shapiro, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal and ionization evolution of a uniform intergalactic medium composed of H and He and undergoing reionization is studied. The diagnosis of the metagalactic ionizing radiation background at z of about three using metal line ratios for Lyman limit quasar absorption line systems is addressed. The use of the He II Gunn-Peterson effect to diagnose the reionization source and/or nature of the Hy-alpha forest clouds is considered.

  18. Performance Characterization of UV Science Cameras Developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, Patrick; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Cirtin, Jonathan; Hyde, David; Robertson, Bryan; Beabout, Brent; Beabout, Dyana; Stewart, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-alpha and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-alpha polarization in the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1% in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1% polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. Coating the e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detectors with Lumogen-E coating allows for a relatively high (30%) quantum efficiency at the Lyman-$\\alpha$ line. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with =10 e- /pixel/second dark current, = 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 and =0.1% residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  19. Infection and Other Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) National Lymphedema Network is now hiring! The NLN is looking ... and improve your overall health. Other Complications of Lymphedema The sudden onset of swelling anywhere in the ...

  20. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  1. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  2. Complications of Mumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Serology Publications and Resources Multimedia MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  3. Complications of Circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Krill

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, circumcision is a commonly performed procedure. It is a relatively safe procedure with a low overall complication rate. Most complications are minor and can be managed easily. Though uncommon, complications of circumcision do represent a significant percentage of cases seen by pediatric urologists. Often they require surgical correction that results in a significant cost to the health care system. Severe complications are quite rare, but death has been reported as a result in some cases. A thorough and complete preoperative evaluation, focusing on bleeding history and birth history, is imperative. Proper selection of patients based on age and anatomic considerations as well as proper sterile surgical technique are critical to prevent future circumcision-related adverse events.

  4. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge.

  5. Dental Implant Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  6. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  7. Neurologic complications in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pace

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic side effects related to cancer therapy are a common problem in oncology practice. These complications can negatively affect the management of the patient, because they can inhibit treatment and diminish quality of life. Therefore specific skills are required to recognise symptoms and clinical manifestations. This review focuses on the most common neurologic complications to improve physician’s familiarity in determining the aetiology of these symptoms.

  8. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey II: Intrinsic Lyman Alpha and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectra of K and M Dwarfs with Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Youngblood, Allison; Loyd, R O Parke; Linsky, Jeffrey L; Redfield, Seth; Schneider, P Christian; Wood, Brian E; Brown, Alexander; Froning, Cynthia; Miguel, Yamila; Rugheimer, Sarah; Walkowicz, Lucianne

    2016-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions of low-mass (K- and M-type) stars play a critical role in the heating and chemistry of exoplanet atmospheres, but are not observationally well-constrained. Direct observations of the intrinsic flux of the Lyman alpha line (the dominant source of UV photons from low-mass stars) are challenging, as interstellar HI absorbs the entire line core for even the closest stars. To address the existing gap in empirical constraints on the UV flux of K and M dwarfs, the MUSCLES HST Treasury Survey has obtained UV observations of 11 nearby M and K dwarfs hosting exoplanets. This paper presents the Lyman alpha and extreme-UV spectral reconstructions for the MUSCLES targets. Most targets are optically inactive, but all exhibit significant UV activity. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to correct the observed Lyman alpha profiles for interstellar absorption, and we employ empirical relations to compute the extreme-UV spectral energy distribution from the intrinsic L...

  9. On the inversion of the scattering polarization and the Hanle effect signals in the hydrogen Lyman-$\\alpha$ line

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, R; Belluzzi, L; Sainz, R Manso; Stepan, J; Bueno, J Trujillo; Goto, M; Tsuneta, S

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements in the upper chromosphere and above, where the gas-to-magnetic pressure ratio $\\beta$ is lower than unity, are essential for understanding the thermal structure and dynamical activity of the solar atmosphere. Recent developments in the theory and numerical modeling of polarization in spectral lines have suggested that information on the magnetic field of the chromosphere-corona transition region could be obtained by measuring the linear polarization of the solar disk radiation at the core of the hydrogen Lyman-$\\alpha$ line at 121.6~nm, which is produced by scattering processes and the Hanle effect. The Chromospheric Lyman-$\\alpha$ Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) sounding rocket experiment aims to measure the intensity (Stokes $I$) and the linear polarization profiles ($Q/I$ and $U/I$) of the hydrogen Lyman-$\\alpha$ line. In this paper we clarify the information that the Hanle effect can provide by applying a Stokes inversion technique based on a database search. The database contains a...

  10. Sowing Black Hole Seeds: Forming Direct Collapse Black Holes With Realistic Lyman-Werner Radiation Fields in Cosmological Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Dunn, Glenna; Bellovary, Jillian M.; Christensen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Luminous quasars detected at redshifts z > 6 require that the first black holes form early and grow to ~109 solar masses within one Gyr. Our work uses cosmological simulations to study the formation and early growth of direct collapse black holes. In the pre-reionization epoch, molecular hydrogen (H2) causes gas to fragment and form Population III stars, but Lyman-Werner radiation can suppress H2 formation and allow gas to collapse directly into a massive black hole. The critical flux required to inhibit H2 formation, Jcrit, is hotly debated, largely due to the uncertainties in the source radiation spectrum, H2 self-shielding, and collisional dissociation rates. Here, we test the power of the direct collapse model in a non-uniform Lyman-Werner radiation field, using an updated version of the SPH+N-body tree code Gasoline with H2 non-equilibrium abundance tracking, H2 cooling, and a modern SPH implementation. We vary Jcrit from 30 to 104 J21 to study the effect on seed black holes, focusing on black hole formation as a function of environment, halo mass, metallicity, and proximity of the Lyman-Werner source. We discuss the constraints on massive black hole occupation fraction in the quasar epoch, and implications for reionization, high-redshift X-ray background radiation, and gravitational waves.

  11. Lyman- photodissociation of CH3CFCl2 (HCFC-141b): Quantum yield and translational energy of hydrogen atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Almuth Laeuter; Hans-Robert Volpp; Jai P Mittal; Rajesh K Vatsa

    2007-07-01

    The collision-free, room temperature gas-phase photodissociation dynamics of CH3CFCl2 (HCFC-141b) was studied using Lyman- laser radiation (121.6 nm) by the laser photolysis/laserinduced fluorescence `pump/probe’ technique. Lyman- radiation was used both to photodissociate the parent molecule and to detect the nascent H atom products via (22P → 12S) laser-induced fluorescence. Absolute H atom quantum yield, H = (0.39 ± 0.09) was determined by calibration method in which CH4 photolysis at 121.6 nm was used as a reference source of well-defined H atom concentrations. The line shapes of the measured H atom Doppler profiles indicate a Gaussian velocity distribution suggesting the presence of indirect H atom formation pathways in the Lyman- photodissociation of CH3CFCl2. The average kinetic energy of H atoms calculated from Doppler profiles was found to be T(lab) = (50 ± 3) kJ/mol. The nearly statistical translational energy together with the observed Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution indicates that for CH3CFCl2 the H atom forming dissociation process comes closer to the statistical limit.

  12. COMPARISON OF PIONEER 10, VOYAGER 1, AND VOYAGER 2 ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS WITH ANTI-SOLAR LYMAN-ALPHA BACKSCATTER SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayock, B.; Zank, G. P.; Heerikhuisen, J., E-mail: brian.fayock@gmail.com, E-mail: garyp.zank@gmail.com, E-mail: jacob.heerikhuisen@uah.edu [Department of Physics and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    Observations made by ultraviolet (UV) detectors on board Pioneer 10, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2 can be used to analyze the distribution of neutral hydrogen throughout the heliosphere, including the interaction regions of the solar wind and local interstellar medium. Previous studies of the long-term trend of decreasing intensity with increasing heliocentric distance established the need for more sophisticated heliospheric models. Here we use state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) neutral models to simulate Lyman-alpha backscatter as would be seen by the three spacecrafts, exploiting a new 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code under solar minimum conditions. Both observations and simulations of the UV backscatter intensity are normalized for each spacecraft flight path at {approx}15 AU, and we focus on the slope of decreasing intensity over an increasing heliocentric distance. Comparisons of simulations with Voyager 1 Lyman-alpha data results in a very close match, while the Pioneer 10 comparison is similar due to normalization, but not considered to be in agreement. The deviations may be influenced by a low resolution of photoionization in the 3D MHD-neutral model, a lack of solar cycle activity in our simulations, and possibly issues with instrumental sensitivity. Comparing the slope of Voyager 2 and the simulated intensities yields an almost identical match. Our results predict a large increase in the Lyman-alpha intensity as the hydrogen wall is approached, which would signal an imminent crossing of the heliopause.

  13. [Complications of cesarean deliveries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgeirsdottir, Heiddis; Hardardottir, Hildur; Bjarnadottir, Ragnheidur I

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the rate of complications which accompany cesarean sections at Landspitali University Hospital (LSH). All deliveries by cesarean section from July 1st 2001 to December 31st 2002 were examined in a retrospective manner. Information was collected from maternity records regarding the operation and its complications if they occurred, during or following the operation. During this period 761 women delivered by cesarean section at LSH. The overall complication rate was 35,5%. The most common complications were; blood loss > or =1000 ml (16.5%), post operative fever (12.2%), extension from the uterine incision (7.2%) and need for blood transfusion (4.3%). Blood transfusion was most common in women undergoing cesarean section after attempted instrumental vaginal delivery (20%). Fever and extension from the uterine incision were most common in women undergoing cesarean section after full cervical dilation without attempt of instrumental delivery (19,4%). These complications were least likely to occur if the patient underwent an elective cesarean section. Complications following cesarean section are common, especially if labor is advanced. Each indication for an operative delivery should be carefully weighed and the patient informed accordingly.

  14. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies.

  16. Construction of subtracted cDNA libraries of gastrocarcinoma and normal tissue with suppression subtractive hybridization and their quality analysis%人胃癌抑制消减cDNA文库的构建及文库质量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴岚军; 毛秉智; 王升启

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To construct subtracted cDNA libraries of stomach tumors and normal stomach tissue using suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH).Methods: cDNA Library subtraction was performed using the protocol described in the Clontech PCR-Select cDNA Subtraction Kit. cDNA was synthesized from 2 μg of poly A+RNA from the tumor and normal tissues using AMV reverse transcriptase. The tester and driver cDNAs were digested with RsaⅠ, a four-base-cutting restriction enzyme that yields blunt ends. The tester cDNA was then subdivided into two portions, and each was ligated with different cDNA adaptor. Two hybridizations were performed. In the first, an excess of driver was added to each sample of tester. Hybridization kinetics led to equalization and enrichment of differentially expressed sequences. During the second hybridization, the two primary hybridization samples were mixed together without denaturing and thus the templates were generated from differentially expressed sequences for PCR amplification. Using suppression PCR, only differentially expressed sequences were amplified exponentially and after second PCR amplification the background was reduced and differentially expressed sequences were further enriched. The cDNAs were then directly inserted into a T/A cloning vector to generate a stomach tumor-specific subtracted cDNA library. Results: The amplified library contained 800 positive clones. Plasmid inserts were PCR amplified and showed 250-700 bp inserts. Conclusions: The successfully constructed subtracted cDNA library of gastrocarcinoma and normal tissue enables us to compare two populations of mRNA and obtain clones of genes that expressed in one population but not in the other.The characterization of these genes will allow them to be exploited for their diagnostic and therapeutic potentials.%目的:构建人胃癌抑制消减cDNA文库,为进一步大批量筛选、克隆胃癌特异性表达的基因奠定基础。方法:从胃癌和

  17. EVIDENCE FOR ELEVATED X-RAY EMISSION IN LOCAL LYMAN BREAK GALAXY ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu-Zych, Antara R.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Ptak, Andrew F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Goncalves, Thiago S. [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ladeira Pedro Antonio 43, Saude, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, CEP 22240-060 (Brazil); Fragos, Tassos [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Overzier, Roderik A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Schiminovich, David, E-mail: antara.r.basu-zych@nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Our knowledge of how X-ray emission scales with star formation at the earliest times in the universe relies on studies of very distant Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). In this paper, we study the relationship between the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity (L{sub X}), assumed to originate from X-ray binaries (XRBs), and star formation rate (SFR) in ultraviolet (UV) selected z < 0.1 Lyman break analogs (LBAs). We present Chandra observations for four new Galaxy Evolution Explorer selected LBAs. Including previously studied LBAs, Haro 11 and VV 114, we find that LBAs demonstrate L{sub X}/SFR ratios that are elevated by {approx}1.5{sigma} compared to local galaxies, similar to the ratios found for stacked LBGs in the early universe (z > 2). Unlike some of the composite LBAs studied previously, we show that these LBAs are unlikely to harbor active galactic nuclei, based on their optical and X-ray spectra and the spatial distribution of the X-rays in three spatially extended cases. Instead, we expect that high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) dominate the X-ray emission in these galaxies, based on their high specific SFRs (sSFRs {identical_to} SFR/M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1}), which suggest the prevalence of young stellar populations. Since both UV-selected populations (LBGs and LBAs) have lower dust attenuations and metallicities compared to similar samples of more typical local galaxies, we investigate the effects of dust extinction and metallicity on the L{sub X}/SFR for the broader population of galaxies with high sSFRs (>10{sup -10} yr{sup -1}). The estimated dust extinctions (corresponding to column densities of N{sub H} < 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) are expected to have insignificant effects on observed L{sub X}/SFR ratio for the majority of galaxy samples. We find that the observed relationship between L{sub X}/SFR and metallicity appears consistent with theoretical expectations from XRB population synthesis models. Therefore, we conclude that lower metallicities, related to

  18. Evidence for Black Hole Growth in Local Analogs to Lyman Break Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew; Heckman, Timothy M.; Overzier, Roderik A.; Hornschemeier, Ann; LaMassa, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used XMM-Newton to observe six Lyman break analogs (LBAs): members of the rare population of local galaxies that have properties that are very similar to distant Lyman break galaxies. Our six targets were specifically selected because they have optical emission-line properties that are intermediate between starbursts and Type 2 (obscured) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our new X-ray data provide an important diagnostic of the presence of an AGN. We find X-ray luminosities of order 10(sup 42) erg per second and ratios of X-ray to far-IR lummositles that are higher than values in pure starburst galaxies by factors ranging from approximately 3 to 30. This strongly suggests the presence of an AGN in at least some of the galaxies. The ratios of the luminosities of the hard (2-10 keV) X-ray to [O III] emission line are low by about an order of magnitude compared with Type 1 AGN, but are consistent with the broad range seen in Type 2 AGN. Either the AGN hard X-rays are significantly obscured or the [O III] emission is dominated by the starburst. We searched for an iron emission line at approximately 6.4 ke V, which is a key feature of obscured AGNs, but only detected emission at the approximately 2sigma level. Finally, we find that the ratios of the mid-infrared (24 micrometer) continuum to [O III]lambda 5007 luminosities in these LBAs are higher than the values for Type 2 AGN by an average of 0.8 dex. Combining all these clues, we conclude that an AGN is likely to be present, but that the bolometric luminosity is produced primarily by an intense starburst. If these black holes are radiating at the Eddington limit, their masses would lie in the range of 10(sup 5) - 10(sup 6) solar mass. These objects may offer ideal local laboratories to investigate the processes by which black holes grew in the early universe.

  19. A High-Resolution Hubble Space Telescope Study of Apparent Lyman Continuum Leakers at z~3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostardi, R. E.; Shapley, A. E.; Steidel, C. C.; Trainor, R. F.; Reddy, N. A.; Siana, B.

    2015-09-01

    We present U336V606J125H160 follow-up Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of 16 z ˜ 3 candidate Lyman continuum (LyC) emitters in the HS1549+1919 field. With these data, we obtain high spatial-resolution photometric redshifts of all sub-arcsecond components of the LyC candidates in order to eliminate foreground contamination and identify robust candidates for leaking LyC emission. Of the 16 candidates, we find one object with a robust LyC detection that is not due to foreground contamination. This object (MD5) resolves into two components; we refer to the LyC-emitting component as MD5b. MD5b has an observed 1500 Å to 900 Å flux-density ratio of {({F}{UV}/{F}{LyC})}{obs}=4.0+/- 2.0, compatible with predictions from stellar population synthesis models. Assuming minimal IGM absorption, this ratio corresponds to a relative (absolute) escape fraction of {f}{esc,{rel}}{MD5{{b}}} = 75%-100% ({f}{esc,{abs}}{MD5{{b}}} = 14%-19%). The stellar population fit to MD5b indicates an age of ≲50 Myr, which is in the youngest 10% of the HST sample and the youngest third of typical z ˜ 3 Lyman break galaxies, and may be a contributing factor to its LyC detection. We obtain a revised, contamination-free estimate for the comoving specific ionizing emissivity at z = 2.85, indicating (with large uncertainties) that star-forming galaxies provide roughly the same contribution as QSOs to the ionizing background at this redshift. Our results show that foreground contamination prevents ground-based LyC studies from obtaining a full understanding of LyC emission from z ˜ 3 star-forming galaxies. Future progress in direct LyC searches is contingent upon the elimination of foreground contaminants through high spatial-resolution observations, and upon acquisition of sufficiently deep LyC imaging to probe ionizing radiation in high-redshift galaxies.

  20. Damped and sub-damped Lyman-α absorbers in z > 4 QSOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, R.; Petitjean, P.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Noterdaeme, P.; Castro, S.; Poppe, P. C. Da R.; Aghaee, A.

    2009-12-01

    We present the results of a survey of damped (DLA, log~N(H i)>20.3) and sub-damped Lyman-α systems (19.5 2.55 along the lines-of-sight to 77 quasars with emission redshifts in the range 419.5 were detected of which 40 systems are damped Lyman-α systems for an absorption length of Δ X = 378. About half of the lines of sight of this homogeneous survey have never been investigated for DLAs. We study the evolution with redshift of the cosmological density of the neutral gas and find, consistent with previous studies at similar resolution, that ΩDLA, H_I decreases at z>3.5. The overall cosmological evolution of Ω_HI shows a peak around this redshift. The H i column density distribution for log N(H i)≥20.3 is fitted, consistent with previous surveys, with a single power-law of index α ˜ -1.8 ±0.25. This power-law overpredicts data at the high-end and a second, much steeper, power-law (or a gamma function) is needed. There is a flattening of the function at lower H i column densities with an index of α ˜ -1.4 for the column density range log N(H i)=19.5-21. The fraction of H i mass in sub-DLAs is of the order of 30%. The H i column density distribution does not evolve strongly from z˜ 2.5 to z˜ 4.5. The observations reported here were obtained with the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the California Association for Research in Astronomy, a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Tables 1, 2 and Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Lyman alpha emitting galaxies at high redshift: Direct detection of young galaxies in a young universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Steven Arthur

    An early result of galaxy formation theory was the prediction that the copious ionizing radiation produced in nascent galaxies undergoing their first starbursts should in turn produce a strong Lya emission line. We report on our efforts to detect and characterize primeval galaxies by searching for this expected Lya signature with two observational techniques: serendipitous slit spectroscopy, and narrowband imaging selection. In Part I, we describe our serendipitous slit spectroscopy survey of the Hubble Deep Field and its environs, which resulted in a catalog of 74 spectroscopic redshifts spanning 0.10 5. Follow-up observations at higher resolution resulted in the additional serendipitous detection of a strong Lya-emitting galaxy at z = 5.190 (ES1). At the time of its discovery, ES1 was one of only nine known galaxies at z > 5, and was the sixth most distant known galaxy. The unprecedented spectral purity of the observation offers evidence for a galaxy-scale outflow with a. velocity of v > 300 km s -1 , consistent with wind speeds observed in powerful local starbursts (typically 10 2 to 10 3 km s -1 ), and with simulations of the late- stage evolution of Lya emission in star-forming systems. Our final serendipitous detection is the remarkable source CXOHDFN J123635.6+621424, which is both the highest redshift known spiral galaxy, and a rare example of a high redshift, hard X-ray-emitting Type II AGN. Significantly, all of these results were acquired with no direct allocation of telescope time. In Part II, we report on our implementation of narrowband imaging selection, with which we traded redshift coverage for survey volume, focusing on the systematic study of galaxies at a particular epoch in favor of chasing that rare, most-distant object. This effort resulted in a catalog of 76 z [approximate] 4.5 Lya-emitting galaxies spectroscopically-confirmed in campaigns of Keck/LRIS and Keck/DEIMOS follow-up observations to candidates selected in the Large Area Lyman

  2. Complications after Hip Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Christopher M.; Clohisy, John C.; Beaule, Paul; Kelly, Bryan T.; Giveans, Russell; Stone, Rebecca M.; Samuelson, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: There is very little published literature looking at comprehensive complication rates after hip arthroscopy with current techniques and indications. Methods: Between 01/2011 and 11/2012, 1,026 consecutive hips (507 males, 519 females) with a mean age of 31.2 years (range 12 - 73) underwent hip arthroscopy at three institutions. The diagnosis, demographic information, and procedures were recorded, and a validated complications grading classification for hip joint surgery (Clavian classification) was utilized for all patients prospectively. Results: There were 951 primary hip arthroscopies and 75 revision hip arthroscopies. Arthroscopy was performed for FAI in 936 hips (91.2%), and 760 hips (74.1%) had a labral repair and 229 hips (22.3%) had a labral debridement. The most common event (18.7% of hips) noted was post-operative sensory disturbance adjacent to the portals or involving the distal anterolateral thigh consistent with LFC nerve disturbance. This was typically not noticed by patients and found on physical examination and only persisted beyond 6 months in 7 hips (0.7%). Iatrogenic chondral injury was noted for 20 hips (1.9%), iatrogenic labral puncture in 11 hips (1.1%), superficial portal infection in 6 hips (0.6%), sensory deficit about the foot in 9 hips (0.9%), deep venous thrombosis in 3 hips (0.3%), pulminary embolism in 1 hip (0.1%), pulmonary edema in 1 hip (0.1%), wound hematoma in 2 hips (0.2%), perineal numbness (pudendal nerve) in 9 hips (0.9%), heterotopic ossification in 4 hips (0.4%), reflex sympathetic dystrophy in 1 hip (0.1%) and wound/skin (traction) dehiscence in 1 hips (0.1%). There were no femoral neck fractures, iatrogenic instability, AVN, or extra-abdominal fluid extravasation in this cohort. The overall complication rate not including temporary periportal and thigh numbness (sequalae) was 6.9% (71 hips). Overall 88.7% had a grade 1, 5.6% Grade 2, 4.2% grade 3, and 1.4% grade 4 complication. There was no difference in the

  3. Thrombophilia in complicated pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Şahin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the incidence and etiology of pregnancy complications associated with thrombophilic factors. Methods: Fifty-four patients with complicated pregnancy and 40 healthy pregnant subjects were included the study. Factor V Leiden (FVL mutation, protein S, protein C, anti-thrombin deficiency levels were investigated. Results: Of the 54 patients with complicated pregnancy, 29 had preeclampsia, 18 had intra uterine growth retardation, and 7 had intrauterine fetal loss. The most common defect was FVL mutation. FVL mutations in patient group and the control group were 27.2% and 10%, respectively, which were statistically significant. The protein S, protein C, and anti-thrombin deficiencies were found higher in the patient group compared to control (p>0.05 for each. Conclusion: FVL mutation was found higher in patient group compared to the control group, Protein C deficiency and anti-thrombin deficiency were related to preeclampsia but not other pregnancy complications. Clinicians should take into account the thrombophilia in complicated pregnancy, especially preeclampsia. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 497-502

  4. [Surgical complications of pancreatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvanet, A

    2008-01-01

    The mortality for pancreatectomy has decreased to a very low level in recent years but morbidity remains high. The most frequent post-operative complications of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) are delayed gastric emptying (DGE) in 20% and pancreatic fistula (PF) in 10-15%. DGE is associated with other abdominal complications in half the cases; these must be delineated by CT scan and specifically treated. Isolated DGE usually resolves within three weeks with the use of nasogastric suction and pro-kinetic drugs. FP following PD may be preventable with the use of temporary trans-jejunal intubation of Wirsung's duct or by intussusception of the pancreatic margin into the jejunal lumen. FP occurring after PD will heal with conservative management (total parenteral nutrition, peripancreatic drainage, somatostatin analogues) in 80-90% of cases but secondary complications such as peritonitis, arterial erosion and pseudo-aneurysm may be life-threatening. Early hemorrhage (in the first 48-72 hours) must be treated by re-operation. Late hemorrhage (usually secondary to PF) and ischemic complications are rare (3% and 1% respectively), difficult to treat, and associated with high mortality. PF is also the main complication of distal pancreatectomy and enucleation of pancreatic tumors (10-20% and 30% respectively). These PF resolve with conservative treatment in more than 95% of cases but may justify an ERCP sphincterotomy if drainage is prolonged. After medial pancreatectomy, PF occurs in 20-30% of cases, arising from either of the two transected pancreatic surfaces.

  5. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  6. Placenta associated pregnancy complications in pregnancies complicated with placenta previa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yael Baumfeld; Reli Herskovitz; Zehavi Bar Niv; Salvatore Andrea Mastrolia; Adi Y. Weintraub

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of our study was to examine the hypothesis that pregnancies complicated with placenta previa have an increased risk of placental insufficiency associated pregnancy complications...

  7. [Complications of tubal sterilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, W E

    1986-05-01

    In Europe and the US, tubal sterilization by laparoscopy has become the most widely used technique for female sterilization. The overall rate of intra- and postoperative complications differs between 0.145% and 0.85% in the numerous studies which have been done. This means 1 severe complication in 120-700 laparoscopic sterilizations. The lethality of tubal sterilization by laparoscopy lies between 3-10 deaths/100,000 interventions. The so-called "post-tubal ligation syndrome" is a rare complication. The overall pregnancy rate after tubal sterilization is 3-10/1000 women. The rate of ectopic pregnancy is very high and varies between 13.6% and 90%. Only 5% of the sterilized women show dissatisfaction. Several factors are relevant with regard to psychological sequelae and must be considered before tubal sterilization can be performed. 1 of the most important is the individual comprehensive counselling of the female or the couple prior to the sterilization.

  8. Complication with intraosseous access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intraosseous access (IO) is indicated if vascular access cannot be quickly established during resuscitation. Complication rates are estimated to be low, based on small patient series, model or cadaver studies, and case reports. However, user experience with IO use in real...... physicians, anesthesiologists and pediatricians. RESULTS: 1,802 clinical cases of IO use was reported by n=386 responders. Commonly reported complications with establishing IO access were patient discomfort/pain (7.1%), difficulties with penetration of periosteum with IO needle (10.3%), difficulties...... with aspiration of bone marrow (12.3%), and bended/broken needle (4.0%). When using an established IO access the reported complications were difficulties with injection fluid and drugs after IO insertion (7.4%), slow infusion (despite use of pressure bag) (8.8%), displacement after insertion (8...

  9. Ionized Gas in Damped Lyman Alpha Protogalaxies II. Comparison Between Models and the Kinematic Data

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, A M; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2000-01-01

    We test semi-analytic models for galaxy formation with accurate kinematic data of damped Lyman alpha protogalaxies (DLAs) presented in the companion paper I. The models envisage centrifugally supported exponential disks at the centers of dark matter halos which are filled with ionized gas undergoing radial infall to the disks. The halo masses are drawn from cross-section weighted mass distributions predicted by CDM cosmogonies, or by the null hypothesis (TF model) that the dark matter mass distribution has not evolved since z ~ 3. In our models, C IV absorption lines detected in DLAs arise in infalling ionized clouds while the low-ion absorption lines arise from neutral gas in the disks. Using Monte Carlo methods we find: (a) The CDM models are incompatible with the low-ion statistics at more than 99% confidence whereas some TF models cannot be excluded at more than 88% confidence. (b) Both CDM and TF models agree with the observed distribution of C IV velocity widths. (c) The CDM models generate differences ...

  10. Elemental Abundances in Two High Column Density Damped Lyman Alpha Systems at z < 1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, S M; Howk, J C; Wolfe, A M; Rao, Sandhya M.; Prochaska, Jason X.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2004-01-01

    We present Keck/HIRES abundance measurements and metal-line kinematic profiles of the damped Lyman alpha systems (DLAs) towards the quasars Q0933+733 (z_abs=1.479) and Q0948+433 (z_abs=1.233). These two DLAs have among the five highest HI column densities at any redshift: N(HI)=4.2E21 cm^{-2}. The metal-line data, presented here for the first time, reveal that these DLAs are noteworthy for several other reasons as well. 1) The Q0933+733 DLA exhibits simple kinematic structure with unusually narrow velocity widths as measured from its unsaturated metal lines (delta v=16 km/s). At 2.6% solar, it has the second lowest metallicity at z -1) and a significant alpha-enhancement. The strong metal lines of this DLA have made possible the detection of TiII1910, CoII2012, and MgI2026. 3) We find that the relative gas-phase abundances of both DLAs follow the general trend seen at high redshift, e.g., enhanced Zn/Fe and Si/Fe, and sub-solar Mn/Fe, indicating that there is little evolution in the nucleosynthetic patterns o...

  11. The physical properties of z>2 Lyman limit systems: new constraints for feedback and accretion models

    CERN Document Server

    Fumagalli, Michele; Prochaska, J Xavier

    2015-01-01

    We study the physical properties of a homogeneous sample of 157 optically-thick absorption line systems at redshifts ~1.8-4.4, selected from a high-dispersion spectroscopic survey of Lyman limit systems (LLSs). By means of multiple ionisation models and Bayesian techniques, we derive the posterior probability distribution functions for the density, metallicity, temperature, and dust content of the absorbing gas. We find that z>2 LLSs are highly ionised with ionisation parameters between -32 are characterised by a broad unimodal distribution over >4 orders of magnitude, with a peak at log Z/Zsun~-2. LLSs are metal poor, significantly less enriched than DLAs, with ~70% of the metallicity PDF below log Z/Zsun19 rapidly evolves with redshift, with a ten-fold increase between z~2.1-3.6 (~1.5 Gyr). Based on this sample, we find that LLSs at z=2.5-3.5 account for ~15% of all the metals produced by UV-selected galaxies. The implications for theories of cold gas accretion and metal ejection from galaxies are also disc...

  12. Star Formation in the First Galaxies I: Collapse Delayed by Lyman-Werner Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Federrath, Christoph; Dubey, Anshu; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the process of metal-free star formation in the first galaxies with a high-resolution cosmological simulation. We consider the cosmologically motivated scenario in which a strong molecule-destroying Lyman-Werner (LW) background inhibits effective cooling in low-mass haloes, delaying star formation until the collapse or more massive haloes. Only when molecular hydrogen (H2) can self-shield from LW radiation, which requires a halo capable of cooling by atomic line emission, will star formation be possible. To follow the formation of multiple gravitationally bound objects, at high gas densities we introduce sink particles which accrete gas directly from the computational grid. We find that in a 1 Mpc^3 (comoving) box, runaway collapse first occurs in a 3x10^7 M_sun dark matter halo at z~12 assuming a background intensity of J21=100. Due to a runaway increase in the H2 abundance and cooling rate, a self-shielding, supersonically turbulent core develops abruptly with ~10^4 M_sun in cold gas availabl...

  13. Doppler speeds of the hydrogen Lyman lines in solar flares from EVE

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Stephen A; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen Lyman lines provide important diagnostic information about the dynamics of the chromosphere, but there have been few systematic studies of their variability during flares. We investigate Doppler shifts in these lines in several flares, and use these to calculate plasma speeds. We use spectral data from the Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph B (MEGS-B) detector of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. MEGS-B obtains full-disk spectra of the Sun at a resolution of 0.1nm in the range 37-105 nm, which we analyse using three independent methods. The first method performs Gaussian fits to the lines, and compares the quiet-Sun centroids with the flaring ones to obtain the Doppler shifts. The second method uses cross-correlation to detect wavelength shifts between the quiet-Sun and flaring line profiles. The final method calculates the "center-of-mass" of the line profile, and compares the quiet-Sun and flaring centroids to obtain the shift. In ...

  14. The descendents of Lyman Break Galaxies in galaxy clusters spatial distribution and orbital properties

    CERN Document Server

    Governato, F; Moore, B; Quinn, T; Stadel, J; Lake, G; Brera-Merate, O A

    2000-01-01

    We combine semi-analytical methods with a ultra-high resolution simulation of a galaxy cluster (of mass 2.3 10^14h-1Msolar, and 4 10^6 particles within its virial radius) formed in a standard CDM universe to study the spatial distribution and orbital properties of the present-day descendents of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). At the present time only five (out of 12) of halos containing LBGs survive as separate entities inside the cluster virial radius. Their circular velocities are in the range 200 - 550 km/sec. Seven halos merged together to form the central object at the very center of the cluster. Using semi-analytical modeling of galaxy evolution we show that descendents of halos containing LBGs now host giant elliptical galaxies. Galaxy orbits are radial, with a pericenter to apocenter ratio of about 1:5. The orbital eccentricities of LBGs descendents are statistically indistinguishable from those of the average galaxy population inside the cluster, suggesting that the orbits of these galaxies are not sign...

  15. C, N, O Abundances in the Most Metal-Poor Damped Lyman alpha Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pettini, Max; Steidel, Charles C; Chaffee, Fred H

    2007-01-01

    This study focuses on some of the most metal-poor damped Lyman alpha absorbers known in the spectra of high redshift QSOs, using new and archival observations obtained with UV-sensitive echelle spectrographs on the Keck and VLT telescopes. The weakness and simple velocity structure of the absorption lines in these systems allows us to measure the abundances of several elements, and in particular those of C, N, and O, a group that is difficult to study in DLAs of more typical metallicities. We find that when the oxygen abundance is less than about 1/100 of solar, the C/O ratio in high redshift DLAs and sub-DLAs matches that of halo stars of similar metallicity and shows higher values than expected from galactic chemical evolution models based on conventional stellar yields. Furthermore, there are indications that at these low metallicities the N/O ratio may also be above simple expectations and may exhibit a minimum value, as proposed by Centurion and her collaborators in 2003. Both results can be interpreted ...

  16. Discovery of Lyman Break Galaxies at z~7 from the ZFOURGE Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Tilvi, V; Tran, K -V H; Labbe, I; Spitler, L R; Straatman, C M S; Persson, S E; Monson, A; Glazebrook, K; Quadri, R F; van Dokkum, P; Ashby, M L N; Faber, S M; Fazio, G G; Finkelstein, S L; Ferguson, H C; Grogin, N A; Kacprzak, G G; Kelson, D D; Koekemoer, A M; Murphy, D; McCarthy, P J; Newman, J A; Salmon, B; Willner, S P

    2013-01-01

    Star-forming galaxies at redshifts z>6 are likely responsible for the reionization of the universe, and it is important to study the nature of these galaxies. We present three candidates for z~7 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) from a 155 arcmin^2 area in the CANDELS/COSMOS field imaged by the deep FourStar Galaxy Evolution (zFourGE) survey. The FourStar medium-band filters provide the equivalent of R~10 spectroscopy, which cleanly distinguishes between z~7 LBGs and brown dwarf stars. The distinction between stars and galaxies based on an object's angular size can become unreliable even when using HST imaging; there exists at least one very compact z~7 candidate (FWHM~0.5-1 kpc) that is indistinguishable from a point source. The medium-band filters provide narrower redshift distributions compared with broad-band-derived redshifts. The UV luminosity function derived using the three z~7 candidates is consistent with previous studies, suggesting an evolution at the bright end (MUV -21.6 mag) from z~7 to z~5. Fitting ...

  17. Deep R-band counts of z~3 Lyman break galaxy candidates with the LBT

    CERN Document Server

    Boutsia, K; Giallongo, E; Castellano, M; Pentericci, L; Fontana, A; Fiore, F; Gallozzi, S; Cusano, F; Paris, D; Speziali, R; Testa, V

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We present a deep multiwavelength imaging survey (UGR) in 3 different fields, Q0933, Q1623, and COSMOS, for a total area of ~1500arcmin^2. The data were obtained with the Large Binocular Camera on the Large Binocular Telescope. Methods. To select our Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates, we adopted the well established and widely used color-selection criterion (U-G vs. G-R). One of the main advantages of our survey is that it has a wider dynamic color range for U-dropout selection than in previous studies. This allows us to fully exploit the depth of our R-band images, obtaining a robust sample with few interlopers. In addition, for 2 of our fields we have spectroscopic redshift information that is needed to better estimate the completeness of our sample and interloper fraction. Results. Our limiting magnitudes reach 27.0(AB) in the R band (5\\sigma) and 28.6(AB) in the U band (1\\sigma). This dataset was used to derive LBG candidates at z~3. We obtained a catalog with a total of 12264 sources down to the ...

  18. The effect of dust geometry on the Lyman-alpha output of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Scarlata, C; Teplitz, H I; Panagia, N; Hayes, M; Siana, B; Rau, A; Francis, P; Caon, A; Pizzella, A; Bridge, C

    2009-01-01

    We present the optical spectroscopic follow-up of 31 z=0.3 Lyman-alpha (Lya) emitters, previously identified by Deharveng et al. (2008). We find that 17% of the Lya emitters have line ratios that require the hard ionizing continuum produced by an AGN. The uniform dust screen geometry traditionally used in studies similar to ours is not able to simultaneously reproduce the observed high Lya/Halpha and Halpha/Hbeta line ratios. We consider different possibilities for the geometry of the dust around the emitting sources. We find that also a uniform mixture of sources and dust does not reproduce the observed line ratios. Instead, these are well reproduced by a clumpy dust screen. This more realistic treatment of the geometry results in extinction corrected (Lya/Halpha)_C values consistent with Case B recombination theory, whereas a uniform dust screen model would imply values (Lya/Halpha)_C higher than 8.7. Our analysis shows that there is no need to invoke "ad-hoc" multi phase media in which the Lya photons only...

  19. HeII emission in Lyman-alpha nebulae: AGN or cooling radiation?

    CERN Document Server

    Scarlata, C; Teplitz, H I; Bridge, C; Francis, P; Palunas, P; Siana, B; Williger, G M; Woodgate, B

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of an extended Lyman-alpha (Lya) nebula located in a known overdensity at z~2.38. The data include multiwavelength photometry covering the rest-frame spectral range from 0.1 to 250um, and deep optical spectra of the sources associated with the extended emission. Two galaxies are associated with the Lya nebula. One of them is a dust enshrouded AGN, while the other is a powerful starburst, forming stars at >~600 Msol/yr. We detect the HeII emission line at 1640A in the spectrum of the obscured AGN, but detect no emission from other highly ionized metals (CIV or NV) as is expected from an AGN. One scenario that simultaneously reproduces the width of the detected emission lines, the lack of CIV emission, and the geometry of the emitting gas, is that the HeII and the Lya emission are the result of cooling gas that is being accreted on the dark matter halo of the two galaxies, Ly1 and Ly2. Given the complexity of the environment associated with our Lya nebula it is possible that various mechanism...

  20. About AGN ionization echoes, thermal echoes, and ionization deficits in low redshift Lyman-alpha blobs

    CERN Document Server

    Schirmer, Mischa; Levenson, Nancy A; Fu, Hai; Davies, Rebecca L; Keel, William C; Torrey, Paul; Bennert, Vardha N; Pancoast, Anna; Turner, James E H

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 14 Lyman-alpha blobs (LABs) at z~0.3, existing at least 4-7 billion years later in the Universe than all other LABs known. Their optical diameters are 20-70 kpc, and GALEX data imply Ly-alpha luminosities of (0.4-6.3)x10^43 erg/s. Contrary to high-z LABs, they live in low-density areas. They are ionized by AGN, suggesting that cold accretion streams as a power source must deplete between z=2 and z=0.3. We also show that transient AGN naturally explain the ionization deficits observed in many LABs: Their Ly-alpha and X-ray fluxes decorrelate below 10^6 years because of the delayed escape of resonantly scattering Ly-alpha photons. High Ly-alpha luminosities do not require currently powerful AGN, independent of obscuration. Chandra X-ray data reveal intrinsically weak AGN, confirming the luminous optical nebulae as impressive ionization echoes. For the first time, we also report mid-infrared thermal echoes from the dusty tori. We conclude that the AGN have faded by 3-4 orders of magnit...