WorldWideScience

Sample records for lying gas clouds

  1. Low-lying excitations in a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Christopher; Hoinka, Sascha; Dyke, Paul; Lingham, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the low-lying excitation spectrum of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) crossover using Bragg spectroscopy. By focussing the Bragg lasers onto the central volume of the cloud we can probe atoms at near-uniform density allowing measurement of the homogeneous density-density response function. The Bragg wavevector is set to be approximately half of the Fermi wavevector to probe the collective response. Below the superfluid transition temperature the Bragg spectra dominated by the Bogoliubov-Anderson phonon mode. Single particle excitations become visible at energies greater than twice the pairing gap. As interactions are tuned from the BCS to BEC regime the phonon and single particle modes separate apart and both the pairing gap and speed of sound can be directly read off in certain regions of the crossover. Single particle pair-breaking excitations become heavily suppressed as interactions are tuned from the BCS to BEC regimes.

  2. STS-31 Discovery, OV-103, is hidden in low-lying clouds after KSC liftoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, is hidden in low-lying cloud cover as it rises above Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B just after its liftoff at 8:33:51.0492 am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). The glow of the solid rocket booster (SRB) and the space shuttle main engine (SSME) firings appears just below the cloud cover and is reflected in the nearby waterway (foreground). An exhaust plume trails from OV-103 and its SRBs and covers the launch pad area.

  3. STS-31 Discovery, OV-103, rockets through low-lying clouds after KSC liftoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rides above the firey glow of the solid rocket boosters (SRBs) and space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) and a long trail of exhaust as it heads toward Earth orbit. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B is covered in an exhaust cloud moments after the liftoff of OV-103 at 8:33:51.0492 am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). The exhaust plume pierces the low-lying clouds as OV-103 soars into the clear skies above. A nearby waterway appears in the foreground.

  4. Design Private Cloud of Oil and Gas SCADA System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Miao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system is computer control system based on supervisory. SCADA system is very important to oil and gas pipeline engineering. Cloud computing is fundamentally altering the expectations for how and when computing, storage and networking resources should be allocated, managed and consumed. In order to increase resource utilization, reliability and availability of oil and gas pipeline SCADA system, the SCADA system based on cloud computing is proposed in the paper. This paper introduces the system framework of SCADA system based on cloud computing and the realization details about the private cloud platform of SCADA system.

  5. True-Amplitude Seismic Imaging Beneath Gas Clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghazali, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    A gas cloud is a region of gas accumulation in the subsurface, which can severely deteriorate the seismic data quality from deeper reflectors. Due to complex wave propagation through the anomaly and the resulting transmission imprint on the reflections from below this area, the image below the gas c

  6. True-Amplitude Seismic Imaging Beneath Gas Clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghazali, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    A gas cloud is a region of gas accumulation in the subsurface, which can severely deteriorate the seismic data quality from deeper reflectors. Due to complex wave propagation through the anomaly and the resulting transmission imprint on the reflections from below this area, the image below the gas c

  7. Local and nonlocal advected invariants and helicities in magnetohydrodynamics and gas dynamics I: Lie dragging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.; Dasgupta, B.; McKenzie, J. F.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper advected invariants and conservation laws in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and gas dynamics are obtained using Lie dragging techniques. There are different classes of invariants that are advected or Lie dragged with the flow. Simple examples are the advection of the entropy S (a 0-form), and the conservation of magnetic flux (an invariant 2-form advected with the flow). The magnetic flux conservation law is equivalent to Faraday's equation. The gauge condition for the magnetic helicity to be advected with the flow is determined. Different variants of the helicity in ideal fluid dynamics and MHD including: fluid helicity, cross helicity and magnetic helicity are investigated. The fluid helicity conservation law and the cross-helicity conservation law in MHD are derived for the case of a barotropic gas. If the magnetic field lies in the constant entropy surface, then the gas pressure can depend on both the entropy and the density. In these cases the conservation laws are local conservation laws. For non-barotropic gases, we obtain nonlocal conservation laws for fluid helicity and cross helicity by using Clebsch variables. These nonlocal conservation laws are the main new results of the paper. Ertel's theorem and potential vorticity, the Hollman invariant, and the Godbillon-Vey invariant for special flows for which the magnetic helicity is zero are also discussed.

  8. Star formation in metal-poor gas clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, Simon C O

    2012-01-01

    Observations of molecular clouds in metal-poor environments typically find that they have much higher star formation rates than one would expect based on their observed CO luminosities and the molecular gas masses that are inferred from them. This finding can be understood if one assumes that the conversion factor between CO luminosity and H2 mass is much larger in these low metallicity systems than in nearby molecular clouds. However, it is unclear whether this is the only factor at work, or whether the star formation rate of the clouds is directly sensitive to the metallicity of the gas. To investigate this, we have performed numerical simulations of the coupled dynamical, chemical and thermal evolution of model clouds with metallicities ranging from 0.01 Z_solar to Z_solar. We find that the star formation rate in our model clouds has little sensitivity to the metallicity. Reducing the metallicity of the gas by two orders of magnitude delays the onset of star formation in the clouds by no more than a cloud ...

  9. Hydrodynamical Models of Gas Cloud - Galaxy Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, M.; Dinge, D.; Jones, T.; Benjamin, B.

    1999-05-01

    Clouds of neutral hydrogen falling toward the Galactic plane with a speed of about 100 km/s or more are among those considered to be "high velocity clouds" (HVCs). As HVCs are often observed approaching the midplane, the collision of such clouds with the gaseous disk of the Galaxy has been proposed as a precursor event to the phenomena known as "supershells" and as a catalyst to star formation. While many previous analytic calculations have assumed that ram pressure of the resisting medium was negligible, and a ballistic approximation was valid, observations showing a correlation between speed and increased height above the plane, the opposite of what is expected for free fall, suggest otherwise. Benjamin & Danly suggested in 1997 that clouds falling at terminal velocity provide a simple explanation for the observed velocity distribution. In this work, numerical models are used to test the above hypotheses with clouds falling through a more modern model of the interstellar medium than that used in the seminal work by Tenorio-Tagle et al. (TT) in 1987. With the addition of more dense material to the model background, clouds were still able to form supershell-like remnants, though star formation does not appear to be triggered. Further, though agreement was not perfect, the terminal velocity model was found to be a better approximation for these clouds' fall than the ballistic case. Cooling was a physical process included in TT's work which was not included here, but was found to be non-negligible. Simulations which include a cooling algorithm must be done to confirm these results. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST96-19438.

  10. Local and Nonlocal Advected Invariants and Helicities in Magnetohydrodynamics and Gas Dynamics I: Lie Dragging Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Gary M; McKenzie, James F; Hu, Qiang; Zank, Gary P

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss conservation laws in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and gas dynamics associated with advected invariants. The invariants in some cases, can be related to fluid relabelling symmetries associated with the Lagrangian map. There are different classes of invariants that are advected or Lie dragged with the flow. Simple examples are the advection of the entropy S (a 0-form), and the conservation of magnetic flux (an invariant 2-form advected with the flow). The magnetic flux conservation law is equivalent to Faraday's equation. We discuss the gauge condition required for the magnetic helicity to be advected with the flow. The conditions for the cross helicity to be an invariant are discussed. We discuss the different variants of helicity in fluid dynamics and in MHD, including: fluid helicity, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. The fluid helicity conservation law and the cross helcity conservation law in MHD are derived for the case of a barotropic gas. If the magnetic field lies in th...

  11. Dense and diffuse gas in dynamically active clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Garrod, R T; Rawlings, J M C

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the chemical and observational implications of repetitive transient dense core formation in molecular clouds. We allow a transient density fluctuation to form and disperse over a period of 1 Myr, tracing its chemical evolution. We then allow the same gas immediately to undergo further such formation and dispersion cycles. The chemistry of the dense gas in subsequent cycles is similar to that of the first, and a limit cycle is reached quickly (2 - 3 cycles). Enhancement of hydrocarbon abundances during a specific period of evolution is the strongest indicator of previous dynamical history. The molecular content of the diffuse background gas in the molecular cloud is expected to be strongly enhanced by the core formation and dispersion process. Such enhancement may remain for as long as 0.5 Myr. The frequency of repetitive core formation should strongly determine the level of background molecular enhancement. We also convolve the emission from a synthesised dark cloud, comprised of ensembles of t...

  12. Hot gas in the large magellanic cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Hua Chu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Debido a su cercanía, su orientación casi de frente y la baja extinción externa e interna, la Nube Mayor de Magallanes (LMC es un laboratorio excelente para estudiar la estructura física del medio interestelar (ISM. Estudios del gas de la LMC en el óptico y en el radio han mostrado estructuras interestelares que van de unos cuantos parsecs hasta más de 1000 pc. Los mosaicos hechos con ROSAT en rayos-X muestran la abundancia del gas caliente a 106 K, el cual a veces está rodeado de grandes cascarones, pero el resto no parece estar asociado a ninguna estructura interestelar visible. Las observaciones de rayos-X han sido analizadas para determinar las condiciones físicas del gas caliente. Para determinar su origen, la distribución del gas caliente puede ser comparada con la del gas más frío y con la de las estrellas masivas. Observaciones UV de líneas de absorción de iones de alta ionización como C IV, N V y O VI, pueden ser usadas para estudiar las interfases del gas a 106 K con el gas más frío y para dar restricciones sobre la localización de ambos a lo largo de la línea de visión.

  13. Massive Gas Cloud Speeding Toward Collision With Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    "The leading edge of this cloud is already interacting with gas from our Galaxy," said Felix J. Lockman, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), leader of a team of astronomers who used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to study the object. The scientists presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, Texas. The cloud, called Smith's Cloud, after the astronomer who discovered it in 1963, contains enough hydrogen to make a million stars like the Sun. Eleven thousand light-years long and 2,500 light-years wide, it is only 8,000 light-years from our Galaxy's disk. It is careening toward our Galaxy at more than 150 miles per second, aimed to strike the Milky Way's disk at an angle of about 45 degrees. "This is most likely a gas cloud left over from the formation of the Milky Way or gas stripped from a neighbor galaxy. When it hits, it could set off a tremendous burst of star formation. Many of those stars will be very massive, rushing through their lives quickly and exploding as supernovae. Over a few million years, it'll look like a celestial New Year's celebration, with huge firecrackers going off in that region of the Galaxy," Lockman said. When Smith's Cloud was first discovered, and for decades after, the available images did not have enough detail to show whether the cloud was part of the Milky Way, something being blown out of the Milky Way, or something falling in. Lockman and his colleagues used the GBT to make an extremely detailed study of hydrogen in Smith's Cloud. Their observations included nearly 40,000 individual pointings of the giant telescope to cover the cloud with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. Smith's Cloud is about 15 degrees long in the sky, 30 times the width of the full moon. "If you could see this cloud with your eyes, it would be a very impressive sight in the night sky," Lockman said. "From tip to tail it would cover almost as much sky as

  14. The polytropic equation of state of primordial gas clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, M; Silk, J

    2005-01-01

    The polytropic equation of state (EOS) of primordial gas clouds with modest enrichment is computed, motivated by the recent observations of very Fe-deficient stars, [Fe/H] similar to 10(-3.5) to 10(-5), such as HE 0107 -5240 and CS 29498-043. These stars are overabundant, relative to Fe, in C and O.

  15. gravitational collapse of a molecular gas cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Arreaga-Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos los resultados de un conjunto de simulaciones num ericas dedi- cadas a estudiar el colapso gravitacional de una nube de gas interestelar, r gidamente rotante, aislada y esf ericamente sim etrica. Usamos una ecuaci on de estado barotr opica (beos por brevedad que depende de la densidad de la nube y que incluye una densidad cr tica como par ametro libre, crit. Durante el colapso tem- prano, cuando crit, la beos se comporta como una ecuaci on de estado del gas ideal. Para el colapso posterior, cuando crit, la beos incluye un t ermino adicional que toma en cuenta el calentamiento del gas debido a la contracci on gravi- tacional. Investigamos la ocurrencia de fragmentaci on r apida en la nube para lo cual usamos cuatro valores diferentes de la crit. Trabajamos con dos tipos de modelos de colapso, de acuerdo con el per l radial inicial de la densidad.

  16. Dark Gas in the Translucent Cloud MBM 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Ryan; Paglione, T.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray studies of nearby molecular clouds show some residual emission after removing emission derived from spatial maps of HI and CO. This residual emission is called “dark gas” and it represents molecular hydrogen not traced by CO. We study the gamma-ray emission from MBM 12, a nearby translucent cloud. These clouds have very low column density which allows UV radiation from the interstellar radiation field to penetrate through the entire cloud. The UV irradiation creates large photodissociation regions in the cloud, where a significant amount of CO is dissociated into atomic carbon. The neutral and ionized atomic carbon should trace the molecular hydrogen in these regions. MBM 12 is free of known sources of high energy cosmic rays, such as OB associations or supernova remnants, and it is both close and extended enough that we expect it to be resolvable in gamma-rays with the Fermi LAT. This makes it an ideal laboratory to identify whether other molecular tracers, such as atomic carbon, can trace the dark gas. We compare the gamma-ray emission with spatial maps of HI, CO, dust, CI, and CII to try to identify the source of the dark gas.

  17. Properties of Diffuse Molecular Gas in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Studies of the interstellar medium in the lower-metallicity Magellanic Clouds explore somewhat different environmental conditions from those typically probed in our own Galactic ISM. Recent studies based on optical/UV spectra of SMC and LMC targets, for example, have revealed unexpected differences in gas-phase abundance patterns {for various atomic and molecular species} and have begun to explore the effects of differences in metallicity on the atomic-to-molecular transition and resulting molecular fraction f{H_2} - a key aspect in the formation of molecular clouds. We propose a more detailed study of the abundances, depletions, and local physical conditions characterizing diffuse molecular material in the Magellanic Clouds, using STIS E140H and E230M spectra of two sight lines with N{H_2} > 10^20 cm^-2 {both probing the outskirts of molecular clouds seen in CO emission}. The two STIS settings will include lines from various neutral and ionized species {with a range in depletion behavior}, several C I multiplets, and several bands of CO and C_2. By probing and characterizing the atomic-to-molecular transition in the Magellanic Clouds, we will address key issues regarding the effects of differences in metallicity on the relationship between the atomic and molecular gas in galaxies; on cloud structure, physical conditions, and diffuse cloud chemistry; and on the composition and properties of interstellar dust. The results of this project should thus aid in the interpretation of observations of atomic and molecular material in more distant low-metallicity systems.

  18. VLT Observations of the Gas Cloud G2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillessen, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, we discovered a small, compact gas cloud G2 that is falling on a near-radial orbit toward the massive black hole in the Galactic Center. The orbit is well-constrained and the pericenter passage will occur in early 2014. Our data beautifully show that G2 gets tidally sheared apart due to the massive black hole's force. We expect that in addition to the tidal effects, hydrodynamics will become important when G2 collides with the hot ambient gas around Sgr A*. This might be a unique opportunity in the next years to observe how gas feeds a massive black hole.

  19. Rapid formation of molecular clouds from turbulent atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, S. C. O.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    The characteristic lifetimes of molecular clouds remain uncertain and a topic of frequent debate, with arguments having recently been advanced both in support of short-lived clouds, with lifetimes of a few Myr or less (see e.g. Elmegreen 2000; Hartmann et al. 2001) and in support of much longer-lived clouds, with lifetimes of the order of 10 Myr or more (see e.g. Tassis & Mouschovias, 2004; Goldsmith & Li, 2005). An argument that has previously been advanced in favour of longer lived clouds is the apparent difficulty involved in converting sufficient atomic hydrogen to molecular hydrogen within the short timescale required by the rapid cloud formation scenario. However, previous estimates of the time required for this conversion to occur have not taken into account the effects of the supersonic turbulence which is inferred to be present in the atomic gas. In this contribution, we present results from a set of high resolution three-dimensional simulations of turbulence in gravitationally unstable atomic gas. These simulations were performed using a modified version of the ZEUS-MP hydrodynamical code (Norman 2000), and include a detailed treatment of the thermal balance of the gas and of the formation of molecular hydrogen. The effects of photodissociation of H2 by the Galactic UV field are also included, with a simple local approximation used to compute the effects of H2 self-shielding. The results of our simulations demonstrate that H2 formation occurs rapidly in turbulent atomic gas. Starting from purely atomic gas, large quantities of molecular gas can be produced on timescales of less than a Myr, given turbulent velocity dispersions and magnetic field strengths consistent with observations. Moreover, as our simulations underestimate the effectiveness of H2 self-shielding and dust absorption, we can be confident that the molecular fractions which we compute are strong lower limits on the true values. The formation of large quantities of molecular gas on the

  20. On The Gas Temperature of Molecular Cloud Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Juvela, M

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the uncertainties affecting the temperature profiles of dense cores of interstellar clouds. In regions shielded from external ultraviolet radiation, the problem is reduced to the balance between cosmic ray heating, line cooling, and the coupling between gas and dust. We show that variations in the gas phase abundances, the grain size distribution, and the velocity field can each change the predicted core temperatures by one or two degrees. We emphasize the role of non-local radiative transfer effects that often are not taken into account, for example, when modelling the core chemistry. These include the radiative coupling between regions of different temperature and the enhanced line cooling near the cloud surface. The uncertainty of the temperature profiles does not necessarily translate to a significant error in the column density derived from observations. However, depletion processes are very temperature sensitive and a two degree difference can mean that a given molecule no longer traces t...

  1. Evolution of binary seeds in collapsing protostellar gas clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Satsuka, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Suguru; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    We perform three dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of gas accretion onto the seeds of binary stars to investigate their short-term evolution. Our simulation setup is more realistic compared to the previous works by taking into account of dynamically evolving envelope with non-uniform distribution of gas density and angular momentum of accreting flow. Our initial condition includes a seed binary and a surrounding gas envelope, modelling the phase of core collapse of gas cloud when the fragmentation has already occurred. We assume that the seed binary has no eccentricity and no growth by gas accretion. The envelope is assumed to be an isothermal gas with no self-gravity. We run multiple simulations with different values of initial mass ratio $q_0$ (the ratio of secondary over primary mass) and gas temperature, and find a critical value of $q_{\\rm c} = 0.25$ which distinguishes the later evolution of mass ratio $q$ as a function of time. If $q_0 \\ga q_{\\rm c}$, the secondary seed grow...

  2. Spinning gas clouds: III. Solutions of minimal energy with precession

    CERN Document Server

    Gaffet, B

    2003-01-01

    We consider the model of rotating and expanding gas cloud originally proposed by Ovsiannikov (1956 Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 111 47) and Dyson (1968 J. Math. Mech. 18 91). Under the restricting assumptions of an adiabatic index gamma = 5/3 and of vorticity-free motion, this has been shown (Gaffet 2001 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 34 2097) to be a Liouville integrable Hamiltonian system. In the present work, we consider the precessing solutions where the cloud does not retain a fixed rotation axis. Choosing for definiteness a particular set of constants of motion (which corresponds to a minimum of the energy), we show that a separation of variables occurs, and that the equations of motion are reducible to the form of a Riccati equation, whose integration merely involves an elliptic integral.

  3. Spinning gas clouds: III. Solutions of minimal energy with precession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffet, B.

    2003-05-01

    We consider the model of rotating and expanding gas cloud originally proposed by Ovsiannikov (1956 Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 111 47) and Dyson (1968 J. Math. Mech. 18 91). Under the restricting assumptions of an adiabatic index gamma = 5/3 and of vorticity-free motion, this has been shown (Gaffet 2001 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 34 2097) to be a Liouville integrable Hamiltonian system. In the present work, we consider the precessing solutions where the cloud does not retain a fixed rotation axis. Choosing for definiteness a particular set of constants of motion (which corresponds to a minimum of the energy), we show that a separation of variables occurs, and that the equations of motion are reducible to the form of a Riccati equation, whose integration merely involves an elliptic integral.

  4. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reach, William T.; Pound, Marc W.; Wilner, David J.; Lee, Youngung

    1995-01-01

    The nearby molecular clouds MBM 7, 12, 30, 32, 40, 41, and 55 were surveyed for tracers of dense gas, including the (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational lines of CS and the (1-0) lines of HCO(+) and HCN. MBM 7 and MBM 12 contain dense cores, while the other clouds contain little or no traces of dense gas. Comparison of the emission from dense gas tracers to that of (13)CO reveals that the former are more compact in angular size as well as line width. An extensive CS(2-1) survey of part of MBM 12 reveals that the emission is characterized by clumps on approximately 3 min scales as well as extended emission. Observations of the CS(1-0) and (3-2) lines using telescopes with matched beam sizes reveal that the volume density must be at least approximately 10(exp 4.5)/cc within the (3-2) emitting regions, which are approximately 0.03 pc in radius. Electron excitation of the CS rotational levels is ruled out (in the cores) by comparing the (3-2)/(1-0) line ratios with models including H2 and electron collisions. The volume density in the cores is substantially larger than in the portions of the cloud traced by CO emission. The density increases into the cores as r(exp -2), suggesting dynamical collapse. The masses of the cores are close to the virial mass, suggesting they are dynamically bound. The cores in MBM 7 and MBM 12 are thus likely to form stars; they are the nearest sites of star formation.

  5. Evolution of binary seeds in collapsing protostellar gas clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satsuka, Tatsuya; Tsuribe, Toru; Tanaka, Suguru; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2017-02-01

    We perform 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of gas accretion on to the seeds of binary stars to investigate their short-term evolution. Taking into account the dynamically evolving envelope with non-uniform distribution of gas density and angular momentum of accreting flow, our initial condition includes a seed binary and a surrounding gas envelope, modelling the phase of core collapse of gas cloud when the fragmentation has already occurred. We run multiple simulations with different values of initial mass ratio q0 (the ratio of secondary over primary mass) and gas temperature. For our simulation setup, we find a critical value of qc = 0.25 which distinguishes the later evolution of mass ratio q as a function of time. If q0 ≳ qc, the secondary seed grows faster and q increases monotonically towards unity. If q0 ≲ qc, on the other hand, the primary seed grows faster and q is lower than q0 at the end of the simulation. Based on our numerical results, we analytically calculate the long-term evolution of the seed binary including the growth of binary by gas accretion. We find that the seed binary with q0 ≳ qc evolves towards an equal-mass binary star and that with q0 ≲ qc evolves to a binary with an extreme value of q. Binary separation is a monotonically increasing function of time for any q0, suggesting that the binary growth by accretion does not lead to the formation of close binaries.

  6. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reach, W.R.; Pound, M.W.; Wilner, D.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Lee, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have surveyed high-latitude molecular clouds (MBM 12, 7, 55, 40) in spectral lines that are believed to be dense-gas' tracers due to the high H[sub 2] volume density required for collisional excitation. An extensive CS (2-1) line map of MBM 12 revealed emission that is not confined to clumps. Less than 20% of the integrated line emission from the cloud originates in clearly identified clumps with size between 0.2 pc and 0.02 pc in the integrated line map. The bulk of the emission originates from a relatively smooth horseshoe' structure about 0.1 pc wide and 1 pc long. The CS (2-1) map correlates with the published Bell Labs [sup 13] CO map, with significant [sup 13] CO emission even where the CS emission is undetectable. Within the central core, the C[sup 18]O(1-0) and CS(2-1) lines are positively correlated with significant scatter. There is some indication of higher CS/[sup 13]CO in the cores than the horseshoe'. The observed correlations suggest that both the diffuse CS and [sup 13]CO originate from either numerous, unresolved clumps, or the diffuse parts of the cloud. High-spatial-resolution observations of HCO[sup +] from MBM 12 obtained with the BIMA Hat Creek array demonstrated that the main core emission is primarily on spatial scales greater than 0.004 pc. It appears that the authors have resolved most of the spatial structure of the dense-gas' tracers and have found that the emission is primarily diffuse. To understand the excitation mechanism of the CS rotational levels, a multitransitional study of the 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 lines is being performed. The CS excitation may be governed by electron collisions in regions with H[sub 2] column densities an order of magnitude lower than the critical density' of [approx gt] 2 [times] 10[sup 4] cm[sup -3]. If electron collisions are populating the CS levels, then the CS and [sup 13]CO lines can both be produced in the outer parts of the cloud, explaining their positive correlation

  7. The Galactic Center Molecular Cloud Survey. II. A Lack of Dense Gas & Cloud Evolution along Galactic Center Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Jens; Zhang, Qizhou; Menten, Karl M; Goldsmith, Paul F; Lu, Xing; Guzmán, Andrés E; Schmiedeke, Anika

    2016-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of the density structure of clouds found in a complete sample covering all major molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ; inner $\\sim{}200~\\rm{}pc$) of the Milky Way. This is made possible by using data from the Galactic Center Molecular Cloud Survey (GCMS), the first study resolving all major molecular clouds in the CMZ at interferometer angular resolution. We find that many CMZ molecular clouds have unusually shallow density gradients compared to regions elsewhere in the Milky Way. This is possibly a consequence of weak gravitational binding of the clouds. The resulting relative absence of dense gas on spatial scales $\\sim{}0.1~\\rm{}pc$ is probably one of the reasons why star formation (SF) in dense gas of the CMZ is suppressed by a factor $\\sim{}10$, compared to solar neighborhood clouds. Another factor suppressing star formation are the high SF density thresholds that likely result from the observed gas kinematics. Further, it is possible but not certain t...

  8. Dissipative Collapse of a Spherical Cluster of Gas Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Indulekha, K; Ramadurai, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the dissipative collapse of a spherical cluster of gas clouds with an isotropic velocity distribution. The time scale for collapse to one tenth radius is studied as a function of the collision time in the system. The scalar virial equation is used to investigate the evolution of the size of the cluster. This is supplemented with an evolution equation for the random kinetic energy. The above system is numerically solved and the results analyzed. For small values of the collision time we find that the time scale for collapse is proportional to the collision time as expected. However for large values of the dissipation the collapse time shows a nonlinear dependence on the collision time.

  9. A Cloud Microphysics Model for the Gas Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palotai, Csaba J.; Le Beau, Raymond P.; Shankar, Ramanakumar; Flom, Abigail; Lashley, Jacob; McCabe, Tyler

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have significantly increased the quality and the number of observed meteorological features on the jovian planets, revealing banded cloud structures and discrete features. Our current understanding of the formation and decay of those clouds also defines the conceptual modes about the underlying atmospheric dynamics. The full interpretation of the new observational data set and the related theories requires modeling these features in a general circulation model (GCM). Here, we present details of our bulk cloud microphysics model that was designed to simulate clouds in the Explicit Planetary Hybrid-Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) GCM for the jovian planets. The cloud module includes hydrological cycles for each condensable species that consist of interactive vapor, cloud and precipitation phases and it also accounts for latent heating and cooling throughout the transfer processes (Palotai and Dowling, 2008. Icarus, 194, 303–326). Previously, the self-organizing clouds in our simulations successfully reproduced the vertical and horizontal ammonia cloud structure in the vicinity of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA (Palotai et al. 2014, Icarus, 232, 141–156). In our recent work, we extended this model to include water clouds on Jupiter and Saturn, ammonia clouds on Saturn, and methane clouds on Uranus and Neptune. Details of our cloud parameterization scheme, our initial results and their comparison with observations will be shown. The latest version of EPIC model is available as open source software from NASA's PDS Atmospheres Node.

  10. Dynamics of gas and particulate clouds: parametric analysis of cloud motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark E.; Larsen, Jeremy C.; Cornelsen, Scott S.; Call, Seth T.; Stokes, Scott T.; Earl, Curtis L.; Hayes, Travis M.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes a project on automating the interpretation of cloud images recorded during several types of atmospheric observations: (1) dust clouds generated by controlled explosions, (2) chemical releases of infrared-active gases, and (3) lidar measurements of cloud altitude winds. This program began with a basic cloud tracking system for lidar comparisons, which has since been upgraded. We describe automated methods for tracking clouds of relatively constant shape, segmenting time-dependent clouds and plumes from scenic backgrounds, characterizing cloud and plume shapes, and measuring the speed and direction of cloud motion. Dust clouds were created by fireworks, releases of pressurized aerosols and by propane-driven blast tubes. Chemical clouds of organic vapors were created by evaporation or with pressurized balloon releases. Cloud imagery for particle releases was recorded primarily with a pair of visible video cameras. The chemical clouds were imaged with a high framing rate infrared camera in the 2.5 - 3.5 micron region. Current project goals include an end-to-end system for cloud warnings, wind measurement, and dispersion predictions in real time.

  11. (Talk) The Survival Of Gas Clouds In The Circumgalactic Medium Of Milky Way-Like Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillotta, Lucia

    2017-06-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that low-redshift galaxies are surrounded by extended halos of multiphase gas, the so-called 'circumgalactic medium' with a significant component of cold and ionized gas (T < 10^5 K). Through high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations, we studied the physical phenomena that drive the interaction and mixing between the different gas phases and, in particular, which conditions allow the survival of clouds of cold gas in the hot and low-density galactic coronae. Our simulations include radiative cooling, thermal conduction and photoionizing heating. The main result is that the survival time of the clouds strongly depends on their mass: clouds with mass larger than 5x10^4 solar masses lose cold gas during their trajectory but at very low rates. They can survive the journey through the galactic corona for several hundreds of Myr, potentially providing a significant amount of cold gas accretion in star-forming galaxies.

  12. Disk Evolution, Element Abundances and Cloud Properties of Young Gas Giant Planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helling, Christiane; Woitke, Peter; Rimmer, Paul B.; Kamp, Inga; Thi, Wing-Fai; Meijerink, Rowin

    We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form, in particular discussing the

  13. Disk Evolution, Element Abundances and Cloud Properties of Young Gas Giant Planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helling, Christiane; Woitke, Peter; Rimmer, Paul B.; Kamp, Inga; Thi, Wing-Fai; Meijerink, Rowin

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form, in particular discussing the ef

  14. Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Nathan

    1979-01-01

    Lie group theory, developed by M. Sophus Lie in the 19th century, ranks among the more important developments in modern mathematics. Lie algebras comprise a significant part of Lie group theory and are being actively studied today. This book, by Professor Nathan Jacobson of Yale, is the definitive treatment of the subject and can be used as a textbook for graduate courses.Chapter I introduces basic concepts that are necessary for an understanding of structure theory, while the following three chapters present the theory itself: solvable and nilpotent Lie algebras, Carlan's criterion and its

  15. Transient and steady inertially tethered clouds of gas in a vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnham, Tony L.; Muntz, E. P.

    1989-01-01

    The generation, formation, and dissipation of a transient cloud of gas produced by a multiorifice ring jet are experimentally studied, and the results are compared to a long-term steady-state flow. The transient case is related to the steady-state case by comparison of their respective number density distributions in the flowfield. The shapes of the clouds are also observed and compared to the shape of the theoretical collisionless cloud. The results indicate that the steady-state cloud is concentrated into a smaller volume than the transient cloud, which tends to spread out farther radially as well as upstream. These differences seem to indicate that a surprisingly long time is required to attain steady flow, which may be due to a long-term buildup of collision products.

  16. A general model for Io's neutral gas clouds. I - Mathematical description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, W. H.; Combi, M. R.

    1988-01-01

    A general mathematical formalism for calculating the physical properties of any of Io's neutral gas clouds (Na, K, O, S, SO2) is presented. The dynamical effects of both the gravitational fields of Io and Jupiter and solar radiation pressure are included, in addition to the many complex space- and time-dependent interactions that occur between the neutral clouds and the plasma torus. The importance of this new model in studying both the plasma conditions prevalent in the inner planetary magnetosphere and the nature of Io's local atmosphere is discussed. A numerical method for evaluating the physical properties of the neutral clouds using the new model is described.

  17. Lie Superalgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Papi, Paolo; Advances in Lie Superalgebras

    2014-01-01

    The volume is the outcome of the conference "Lie superalgebras," which was held at the Istituto Nazionale di Alta Matematica, in 2012. The conference gathered many specialists in the subject, and the talks held provided comprehensive insights into the newest trends in research on Lie superalgebras (and related topics like vertex algebras, representation theory and supergeometry). The book contains contributions of many leading esperts in the field and provides a complete account of the newest trends in research on Lie Superalgebras.

  18. The evolution of large scale dense gas clouds at Jack Rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Pablo; Spicer, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Typically ammonia and chlorine are stored or transported as pressurized liquefied gas. There have been many accidents involving storage tanks and also accidents during transport. There is a need for accurate evaluation of the hazards associated with accidental releases of ammonia and chlorine which typically result in denser than air clouds which are toxic. The dense gas cloud slumps under the action of gravity into a thin layer with stable density gradients which suppress ambient atmospheric turbulence, and so complicating the physics of mixing. We present similarity analyses of one and two ton experimental releases of ammonia and chlorine at Jack Rabbit. Similarity analysis discriminates inertia-buoyancy and viscous-buoyancy regimes. Sequences of visualizations are used to determine propagation speeds of dense clouds. There is good agreement between observed speeds and the predictions of similarity analysis of the propagation of radial, dense gas clouds. Finally, comparison of one ton with two ton releases for both ammonia and chlorine lead to insights on scaling which are likely to be useful in the design of even larger scale experiments on dense gas clouds arising from similar configurations.

  19. The survival of gas clouds in the circumgalactic medium of Milky Way-like galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillotta, L.; Fraternali, F.; Werk, J. K.; Prochaska, J. X.; Marinacci, F.

    2017-09-01

    Observational evidence shows that low-redshift galaxies are surrounded by extended haloes of multiphase gas, the so-called circumgalactic medium (CGM). To study the survival of relatively cool gas (T < 105 K) in the CGM, we performed a set of hydrodynamical simulations of cold (T = 104 K) neutral gas clouds travelling through a hot (T = 2 × 106 K) and low-density (n = 10-4 cm-3) coronal medium, typical of Milky Way-like galaxies at large galactocentric distances (∼50-150 kpc). We explored the effects of different initial values of relative velocity and radius of the clouds. Our simulations were performed on a two-dimensional grid with constant mesh size (2 pc), and they include radiative cooling, photoionization heating and thermal conduction. We found that for large clouds (radii larger than 250 pc), the cool gas survives for very long time (larger than 250 Myr): despite that they are partially destroyed and fragmented into smaller cloudlets during their trajectory, the total mass of cool gas decreases at very low rates. We found that thermal conduction plays a significant role: its effect is to hinder formation of hydrodynamical instabilities at the cloud-corona interface, keeping the cloud compact and therefore more difficult to destroy. The distribution of column densities extracted from our simulations is compatible with those observed for low-temperature ions (e.g. Si ii and Si iii) and for high-temperature ions (O vi) once we take into account that O vi covers much more extended regions than the cool gas and, therefore, it is more likely to be detected along a generic line of sight.

  20. Disk Evolution, Element Abundances and Cloud Properties of Young Gas Giant Planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Helling

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form, in particular discussing the effects of unusual, non-solar carbon and oxygen abundances. Large deviations between the abundances of the host star and its gas giants seem likely to occur if the planet formation follows the core-accretion scenario. These deviations stem from the separate evolution of gas and dust in the disk, where the dust forms the planet cores, followed by the final run-away accretion of the left-over gas. This gas will contain only traces of elements like C, N and O, because those elements have frozen out as ices. PRODIMO protoplanetary disk models are used to predict the chemical evolution of gas and ice in the midplane. We find that cosmic rays play a crucial role in slowly un-blocking the CO, where the liberated oxygen forms water, which then freezes out quickly. Therefore, the C/O ratio in the gas phase is found to gradually increase with time, in a region bracketed by the water and CO ice-lines. In this regions, C/O is found to approach unity after about 5 Myrs, scaling with the cosmic ray ionization rate assumed. We then explore how the atmospheric chemistry and cloud properties in young gas giants are affected when the non-solar C/O ratios predicted by the disk models are assumed. The DRIFT cloud formation model is applied to study the formation of atmospheric clouds under the influence of varying premordial element abundances and its feedback onto the local gas. We demonstrate that element depletion by cloud formation plays a crucial role in converting an oxygen-rich atmosphere gas into carbon-rich gas when non-solar, premordial element abundances are considered as suggested by disk models.

  1. Disk evolution, element abundances and cloud properties of young gas giant planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Christiane; Woitke, Peter; Rimmer, Paul B; Kamp, Inga; Thi, Wing-Fai; Meijerink, Rowin

    2014-04-14

    We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form, in particular discussing the effects of unusual, non-solar carbon and oxygen abundances. Large deviations between the abundances of the host star and its gas giants seem likely to occur if the planet formation follows the core-accretion scenario. These deviations stem from the separate evolution of gas and dust in the disk, where the dust forms the planet cores, followed by the final run-away accretion of the left-over gas. This gas will contain only traces of elements like C, N and O, because those elements have frozen out as ices. PRODIMO protoplanetary disk models are used to predict the chemical evolution of gas and ice in the midplane. We find that cosmic rays play a crucial role in slowly un-blocking the CO, where the liberated oxygen forms water, which then freezes out quickly. Therefore, the C/O ratio in the gas phase is found to gradually increase with time, in a region bracketed by the water and CO ice-lines. In this regions, C/O is found to approach unity after about 5 Myrs, scaling with the cosmic ray ionization rate assumed. We then explore how the atmospheric chemistry and cloud properties in young gas giants are affected when the non-solar C/O ratios predicted by the disk models are assumed. The DRIFT cloud formation model is applied to study the formation of atmospheric clouds under the influence of varying premordial element abundances and its feedback onto the local gas. We demonstrate that element depletion by cloud formation plays a crucial role in converting an oxygen-rich atmosphere gas into carbon-rich gas when non-solar, premordial element abundances are considered as suggested by disk models.

  2. The Relationship between the Dust and Gas-Phase CO across the California Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, S.; Lada, C. J.; Lada, E. A.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Bieging, J. H.; Lombardi, M.; Forbrich, J.; Alves, J. F.

    2015-05-01

    We present results of an extinction-CO line survey of the southeastern part of the California molecular cloud (CMC). Deep, wide-field, near-infrared images were used to construct a sensitive, relatively high resolution (˜0.5 arcmin) (NICEST) extinction map of the region. The same region was also surveyed in the 12CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1), and C18O(2-1) emission lines at the same angular resolution. These data were used to investigate the relation between the molecular gas, traced by CO emission lines, and the dust column density, traced by extinction, on spatial scales of 0.04 pc across the cloud. We found strong spatial variations in the abundances of 13CO and C18O that were correlated with variations in gas temperature, consistent with temperature-dependent CO depletion/desorption on dust grains. The 13CO-to-C18O abundance ratio was found to increase with decreasing extinction, suggesting selective photodissociation of C18O by the ambient UV radiation field. The effect is particularly pronounced in the vicinity of an embedded cluster where the UV radiation appears to have penetrated deeply (i.e., {{A}V} ≲ 15 mag) into the cloud. We derived the cloud-averaged X-factor to be = 2.53 × 1020 c{{m}-2}{{≤ft( K km {{s}-1} \\right)}-1}, a value somewhat higher than the Milky Way average. On sub-parsec scales we find there is no single empirical value of the 12CO X-factor that can characterize the molecular gas in cold (Tk ≲ 15 K) cloud regions, with XCO ∝ AV0.74 for {{A}V} ≳ 3 mag. However, in regions containing relatively hot (Tex ≳ 25 K) molecular gas we find a clear correlation between W(12CO) and {{A}V} over a large (3 ≲ {{A}V} ≲ 25 mag) range of extinction. This results in a constant XCO = 1.5 × 1020 c{{m}-2} {{≤ft( K km {{s}-1} \\right)}-1} for the hot gas, a lower value than either the average for the CMC or the Milky Way. Overall we find an (inverse) correlation between XCO and Tex in the cloud with XCO ∝ Tex -0.7. This correlation suggests that

  3. The cloud of gas falling toward the central black hole in the milky way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miralda-Escudé J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The cloud of gas that will pass within 200AU of the central black hole of our Galaxy in 2013 may be generated by a disk around an old, low-mass star that was created in a tidal encounter with one of the stellar black holes that are expected to accumulate in the central region of the stellar cusp.

  4. Collapse of primordial gas clouds and the formation of quasar black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Abraham; Rasio, Frederic A.

    1994-01-01

    The formation of quasar black holes during the hydrodynamic collapse of protogalactic gas clouds is discussed. The dissipational collapse and long-term dynamical evolution of these systems is analyzed using three-dimensional numerical simulations. The calculations focus on the final collapse stages of the inner baryonic component and therefore ignore the presence of dark matter. Two types of initial conditions are considered: uniformly rotating spherical clouds, and iirotational ellipsoidal clouds. In both cases the clouds are initially cold, homogeneous, and not far from rotational support (T/(absolute value of W) approximately equals 0.1). Although the details of the dynamical evolution depend sensitively on the initial conditions, the qualitative features of the final configurations do not. Most of the gas is found to fragment into small dense clumps, that eventually make up a spheroidal component resembling a galactic bulge. About 5% of the initial mass remains in the form of a smooth disk of gas supported by rotation in the gravitational potential potential well of the outer spheroid. If a central seed black hole of mass approximately greater than 10(exp 6) solar mass forms, it can grow by steady accretion from the disk and reach a typical quasar black hole mass approximately 10(exp 8) solar mass in less than 5 x 10(exp 8) yr. In the absence of a sufficiently massive seed, dynamical instabilities in a strongly self-gravitating inner region of the disk will inhibit steady accretion of gas and may prevent the immediate formation of quasar.

  5. Collapse of primordial gas clouds and the formation of quasar black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Abraham; Rasio, Frederic A.

    1994-01-01

    The formation of quasar black holes during the hydrodynamic collapse of protogalactic gas clouds is discussed. The dissipational collapse and long-term dynamical evolution of these systems is analyzed using three-dimensional numerical simulations. The calculations focus on the final collapse stages of the inner baryonic component and therefore ignore the presence of dark matter. Two types of initial conditions are considered: uniformly rotating spherical clouds, and iirotational ellipsoidal clouds. In both cases the clouds are initially cold, homogeneous, and not far from rotational support (T/(absolute value of W) approximately equals 0.1). Although the details of the dynamical evolution depend sensitively on the initial conditions, the qualitative features of the final configurations do not. Most of the gas is found to fragment into small dense clumps, that eventually make up a spheroidal component resembling a galactic bulge. About 5% of the initial mass remains in the form of a smooth disk of gas supported by rotation in the gravitational potential potential well of the outer spheroid. If a central seed black hole of mass approximately greater than 10(exp 6) solar mass forms, it can grow by steady accretion from the disk and reach a typical quasar black hole mass approximately 10(exp 8) solar mass in less than 5 x 10(exp 8) yr. In the absence of a sufficiently massive seed, dynamical instabilities in a strongly self-gravitating inner region of the disk will inhibit steady accretion of gas and may prevent the immediate formation of quasar.

  6. A Massive Dense Gas Cloud close to the Nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, Ray S

    2016-01-01

    Using the ALMA archival data of both CO(6--5) line and 689 GHz continuum emission towards the archetypical Seyfert galaxy, NGC 1068, we identified a distinct continuum peak separated by 14 pc from the nuclear radio component S1 in projection. The continuum flux gives a gas mass of ~2x10^5 Msun and bolometric luminosity of ~10^8 Lsun, leading to a star formation rate of ~0.1 Msun/yr. Subsequent analysis on the line data suggest that the gas has a size of ~10 pc, yielding to mean H2 number density of ~10^5 cm^{-3}. We therefore refer to the gas as "massive dense gas cloud": the gas density is high enough to form a "proto starcluster" whose stellar mass of ~10^4 Msun. We found that the gas stands a unique position between galactic and extraglactic clouds in the diagrams of start formation rate (SFR) vs. gas mass proposed by Lada et al. and surface density of gas vs. SFR density by Krumholz and McKee. All the gaseous and star-formation properties may be understood in terms of the turbulence-regulated star formati...

  7. C18O Observations of the Dark Molecular Cloud L134 and Gas Depletion onto Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Jie Mao; Xiao-Xia Sun

    2005-01-01

    We map the dark molecular cloud core of L134 in the C18O (J =1 -0) emission line using the PMO 13.7m telescope, and present a contour map of integrated intensity of C18O (J = 1 - 0) emission. The C18O cloud is inside the distribution of extinction AB, the visual extinction of blue light, as well as inside the 13CO cloud in the L134 region. The depletion factors in this C18O cloud are generally greater than unity, which means there is gas depletion onto dust. Since only a minimum AB = 9.7 mag is available, and our observations measure both undepleted and depleted regions along the line of sight, the depletion factors could very likely be larger in the central core than the calculated value. So we conclude that depletion does occur in the bulk of the C18O cloud through a comparison between the C18O and blue extinction maps in the L134 region. There is no direct evidence as yet for star formation in L134, and so cores on the verge of collapse will not be visible in CO and other gas molecules.

  8. Atomic Hydrogen Gas in Dark-Matter Minihalos and the Compact High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, A; Wolfire, M G

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the coupled hydrostatic and ionization structures of pressure-supported gas clouds that are confined by gravitationally dominant dark-matter (DM) mini-halos and by an external bounding pressure provided by a hot medium. We focus on clouds that are photoionized and heated by the present-day background metagalactic field and determine the conditions for the formation of warm (WNM), and multi-phased (CNM/WNM) neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) cores in the DM-dominated clouds. We consider LCDM dark-matter halos, and we compute models for a wide range of halo masses, total cloud gas masses, and external bounding pressures. We present models for the pressure-supported HI structures observed in the Local Group dwarf galaxies Leo A and Sag DIG. We then construct minihalo models for the multi-phased (and low-metallicity) compact high-velocity HI clouds (CHVCs). If the CHVCs are drawn from the same family of halos that successfully reproduce the dwarf galaxy observations, then the CHVCs must be "circumgalactic ...

  9. Stability of Gas Clouds in Galactic Nuclei: An Extended Virial Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xian; Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Cuadra, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Cold gas entering the central 1-102 pc of a galaxy fragments and condenses into clouds. The stability of the clouds determines whether they will be turned into stars or can be delivered to the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) to turn on an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The conventional criteria to assess the stability of these clouds, such as the Jeans criterion and Roche (or tidal) limit, are insufficient here, because they assume the dominance of self-gravity in binding a cloud, and neglect external agents, such as pressure and tidal forces, which are common in galactic nuclei. We formulate a new scheme for judging this stability. We first revisit the conventional Virial theorem, taking into account an external pressure, to identify the correct range of masses that lead to stable clouds. We then extend the theorem to further include an external tidal field, which is equally crucial for the stability in the region of our interest—in dense star clusters, around SMBHs. We apply our extended Virial theorem to find new solutions to controversial problems, namely, the stability of the gas clumps in AGN tori, the circum-nuclear disk in the Galactic Center, and the central molecular zone of the Milky Way. The masses we derive for these structures are orders of magnitude smaller than the commonly used Virial masses (equivalent to the Jeans mass). Moreover, we prove that these clumps are stable, contrary to what one would naively deduce from the Roche (tidal) limit.

  10. STABILITY OF GAS CLOUDS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI: AN EXTENDED VIRIAL THEOREM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xian; Cuadra, Jorge [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 782-0436 Santiago (Chile); Amaro-Seoane, Pau, E-mail: xchen@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: jcuadra@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: Pau.Amaro-Seoane@aei.mpg.de [Max Planck Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2016-03-10

    Cold gas entering the central 1–10{sup 2} pc of a galaxy fragments and condenses into clouds. The stability of the clouds determines whether they will be turned into stars or can be delivered to the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) to turn on an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The conventional criteria to assess the stability of these clouds, such as the Jeans criterion and Roche (or tidal) limit, are insufficient here, because they assume the dominance of self-gravity in binding a cloud, and neglect external agents, such as pressure and tidal forces, which are common in galactic nuclei. We formulate a new scheme for judging this stability. We first revisit the conventional Virial theorem, taking into account an external pressure, to identify the correct range of masses that lead to stable clouds. We then extend the theorem to further include an external tidal field, which is equally crucial for the stability in the region of our interest—in dense star clusters, around SMBHs. We apply our extended Virial theorem to find new solutions to controversial problems, namely, the stability of the gas clumps in AGN tori, the circum-nuclear disk in the Galactic Center, and the central molecular zone of the Milky Way. The masses we derive for these structures are orders of magnitude smaller than the commonly used Virial masses (equivalent to the Jeans mass). Moreover, we prove that these clumps are stable, contrary to what one would naively deduce from the Roche (tidal) limit.

  11. Observations of the gas cloud G2 in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Gillessen, Stefan; Fritz, Tobias K; Eisenhauer, Frank; Pfuhl, Oliver; Ott, Thomas; Burkert, Andreas; Schartmann, Marc; Ballone, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, we discovered a compact gas cloud ("G2") with roughly three Earth masses that is falling on a near-radial orbit toward the massive black hole in the Galactic Center. The orbit is well constrained and pericenter passage is predicted for early 2014. Our data beautifully show that G2 gets tidally sheared apart due to the massive black hole's force. During the next months, we expect that in addition to the tidal effects, hydrodynamics get important, when G2 collides with the hot ambient gas around Sgr A*. Simulations show that ultimately, the cloud's material might fall into the massive black hole. Predictions for the accretion rate and luminosity evolution, however, are very difficult due to the many unknowns. Nevertheless, this might be a unique opportunity in the next years to observe how gas feeds a massive black hole in a galactic nucleus.

  12. Observations of the gas cloud G2 in the Galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillessen, S.; Genzel, R.; Fritz, T. K.; Eisenhauer, F.; Pfuhl, O.; Ott, T.; Burkert, A.; Schartmann, M.; Ballone, A.

    2014-05-01

    In 2011, we discovered a compact gas cloud ("G2") with roughly three Earth masses that is falling on a near-radial orbit toward the massive black hole in the Galactic center. The orbit is well constrained and pericenter passage is predicted for early 2014. Our data beautifully show that G2 gets tidally sheared apart due to the massive black hole's force. During the next months, we expect that in addition to the tidal effects, hydrodynamics get important, when G2 collides with the hot ambient gas around Sgr A*. Simulations show that ultimately, the cloud's material might fall into the massive black hole. Predictions for the accretion rate and luminosity evolution, however, are very difficult due to the many unknowns. Nevertheless, this might be a unique opportunity in the next years to observe how gas feeds a massive black hole in a galactic nucleus.

  13. The Galactic IMF: origin in the combined mass distribution functions of dust grains and gas clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Casuso, E

    2011-01-01

    We present here a theoretical model to account for the stellar IMF as a result of the composite behaviour of the gas and dust distribution functions. Each of these has previously been modelled and the models tested against observations. The model presented here implies a relation between the characteristic size of the dust grains and the characteristic final mass of the stars formed within the clouds containing the grains, folded with the relation between the mass of a gas cloud and the characteristic mass of the stars formed within it. The physical effects of dust grain size are due to equilibrium relations between the efficiency of grains in cooling the clouds, which is a falling function of grain size, and the efficiency of grains in catalyzing the production of molecular hydrogen, which is a rising function of grain size. We show that folding in the effects of grain distribution can yield a reasonable quantitative account of the IMF, while gas cloud mass function alone cannot do so.

  14. The survival of gas clouds in the Circumgalactic Medium of Milky-Way-like galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Armillotta, L; Prochaska, J X; Fraternali, F; Marinacci, F

    2016-01-01

    Observational evidence shows that low-redshift galaxies are surrounded by extended haloes of multiphase gas, the so-called 'circumgalactic medium' (CGM). To study the survival of relatively cool gas (T < 10^5 K) in the CGM, we performed a set of hydrodynamical simulations of cool (T = 10^4 K) neutral gas clouds travelling through a hot (T = 2x10^6 K) and low-density (n = 10^-4 cm^-3) coronal medium, typical of Milky Way-like galaxies at large galactocentric distances (~ 50-150 kpc). We explored the effects of different values of relative velocity and radius of the clouds. Our simulations include radiative cooling, photoionization heating and thermal conduction. The main result is that large clouds (radii larger than 250 pc) may survive for very long time (at least 250 Myr): their mass decreases during their trajectory but at very low rates. We found that thermal conduction plays a significant role: its effect is to prevent formation of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the cloud-corona interface, keeping t...

  15. The dynamics and stability of radiatively driven gas clouds. I - Plane-parallel slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    A combination of numerical and analytical techniques has been used to investigate the dynamics and stability of optically thin plane-parallel radiatively driven slabs of gas confined by the thermal gas pressure of a high-temperature low-density medium. Scaling laws allow the individual model 'clouds' to be characterized by a single free parameter, chi, a normalized column density which measures the strength of the acceleration due to radiation pressure relative to that due to thermal gas pressure. It is found that these clouds are stable and coherently accelerated only when chi is small. In this regime a simple slab model is constructed which accurately reproduces the more complex gasdynamic results. The low-chi clouds are marginally able to reach the high velocities seen in the atmospheres of quasi-stellar objects, but only if their motion is subsonic with respect to the external confining medium. This implies either that the medium is extremely hot and tenuous or that it is moving outward with the clouds.

  16. Constraining cloud parameters using high density gas tracers in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kazandjian, M V; Meijerink, R; Israel, F P; Coppola, C M; Rosenberg, M J F; Spaans, M

    2016-01-01

    Far-infrared molecular emission is an important tool used to understand the excitation mechanisms of the gas in the inter-stellar medium of star-forming galaxies. In the present work, we model the emission from rotational transitions with critical densities n >~ 10^4 cm-3. We include 4-3 ~ 30 in order to obtain significant emission from n > 10^4 cm-3 gas. Such Mach numbers are expected in star-forming galaxies, LIRGS, and ULIRGS. By fitting line ratios of HCN(1-0), HNC(1-0), and HCO+(1-0) for a sample of LIRGS and ULIRGS using mechanically heated PDRs, we constrain the Mach number of these galaxies to 29 < M < 77.

  17. The Dust-to-Gas Ratio in the Small Magellanic Cloud Tail

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, K D; Müller, E; Misselt, K A; Bolatto, A; Bernard, J -P; Reach, W; Engelbracht, C W; Babler, B; Bracker, S; Block, M; Clayton, G C; Hora, J; Indebetouw, R; Israel, F P; Li, A; Madden, S; Meade, M; Meixner, M; Sewilo, M; Shiao, B; Smith, L J; van Loon, J Th; Whitney, B A

    2008-01-01

    The Tail region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was imaged using the MIPS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the SAGE-SMC Spitzer Legacy. Diffuse infrared emission from dust was detected in all the MIPS bands. The Tail gas-to-dust ratio was measured to be 1200 +/- 350 using the MIPS observations combined with existing IRAS and HI observations. This gas-to-dust ratio is higher than the expected 500-800 from the known Tail metallicity indicating possible destruction of dust grains. Two cluster regions in the Tail were resolved into multiple sources in the MIPS observations and local gas-to-dust ratios were measured to be ~440 and ~250 suggests dust formation and/or significant amounts of ionized gas in these regions. These results support the interpretation that the SMC Tail is a tidal tail recently stripped from the SMC that includes gas, dust, and young stars.

  18. On the quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling self-gravitating gas clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerson, B.; Megged, E. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Racah Institute of Physics; Tajima, T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Two model problems are considered, illustrating the dynamics of quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling, optically thin self-gravitating gas clouds. In the first problem, spherically symmetric flows in an unmagnetized plasma are considered. For a power-law dependence of the radiative loss function on the temperature, a one-parameter family of self-similar solutions is found. The authors concentrate on a constant-mass cloud, one of the cases, when the self-similarity indices are uniquely selected. In this case, the self-similar flow problem can be formally reduced to the classical Lane-Emden equation and therefore solved analytically. The cloud is shown to undergo radiative condensation, if the gas specific heat ratio {gamma} > 4/3. The condensation proceeds either gradually, or in the form of (quasihydrostatic) collapse. For {gamma} < 4/3, the cloud is shown to expand. The second problem addresses a magnetized plasma slab that undergoes quasihydrostatic radiative cooling and condensation. The problem is solved analytically, employing the Lagrangian mass coordinate.

  19. Stability of Gas Clouds in Galactic Nuclei: An Extended Virial Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xian; Cuadra, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Cold gas entering the central $1$ to $10^2$ pc of a galaxy fragments and condenses into clouds. The stability of the clouds determines whether they will be turned into stars or can be delivered to the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) to turn on an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The conventional criteria to assess the stability of these clouds, such as the Jeans criterion and Roche (or tidal) limit, are insufficient here, because they assume the dominance of self-gravity in binding a cloud, and neglect external agents, such as pressure and tidal forces, which are common in galactic nuclei. We formulate a new scheme for judging this stability. We first revisit the conventional Virial theorem, taking into account an external pressure, to identify the correct range of masses that lead to stable clouds. We then extend the theorem to include an external tidal field, crucial for the stability in the region of interest -- in dense star clusters, around SMBHs. We apply our extended Virial theorem to find the cor...

  20. Dynamical cooling of galactic discs by molecular cloud collisions - origin of giant clumps in gas-rich galaxy discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Xing

    2017-10-01

    Different from Milky Way-like galaxies, discs of gas-rich galaxies are clumpy. It is believed that the clumps form because of gravitational instability. However, a necessary condition for gravitational instability to develop is that the disc must dissipate its kinetic energy effectively, this energy dissipation (also called cooling) is not well understood. We propose that collisions (coagulation) between molecular clouds dissipate the kinetic energy of the discs, which leads to a dynamical cooling. The effectiveness of this dynamical cooling is quantified by the dissipation parameter D, which is the ratio between the free-fall time t_ff≈ 1/ √{G ρ _{disc}} and the cooling time determined by the cloud collision process tcool. This ratio is related to the ratio between the mean surface density of the disc Σdisc and the mean surface density of molecular clouds in the disc Σcloud. When D cloud), cloud collision cooling is inefficient, and fragmentation is suppressed. When D > 1/3 (which roughly corresponds to Σdisc > 1/3Σcloud), cloud-cloud collisions lead to a rapid cooling through which clumps form. On smaller scales, cloud-cloud collisions can drive molecular cloud turbulence. This dynamical cooling process can be taken into account in numerical simulations as a sub-grid model to simulate the global evolution of disc galaxies.

  1. Studying the molecular gas towards the R Coronae Australis dark cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Paron, S; Ortega, M E; Cunningham, M; Jones, P A; Rubio, M

    2016-01-01

    The R Coronae Australis dark cloud is one of the closest star-forming regions to the Sun. The cloud is known to be very active in star formation, harboring many Herbig-Haro objects (HHs) and Molecular Hydrogen emission-line Objects (MHOs). In this work we present results from molecular observations (a $5.5^{'}\\times5.5^{'}$ map of $^{12}$CO J$=3-2$ and HCO$^{+}$ J$=4-3$, and a single spectrum of N$_{2}$H$^{+}$ J$=4-3$) obtained with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) towards the R CrA dark cloud with an angular and spectral resolution of 22$^{"}$ and 0.11 km s$^{-1}$, respectively. From the $^{12}$CO J$=3-2$ line we found kinematical spectral features strongly suggesting the presence of outflows towards a region populated by several HHs and MHOs. Moreover, most of these objects lie within an HCO$^{+}$ maximum, suggesting that its emission arises from an increasement of its abundance due to the chemistry triggered by the outflow activity. Additionally, we are presenting the first reported de...

  2. Acoustic 2D full waveform inversion to solve gas cloud challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srichand Prajapati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The existing conventional inversion algorithm does not provide satisfactory results due to the complexity of propagated wavefield though the gas cloud. Acoustic full waveform inversion has been developed and applied to a realistic synthetic offshore shallow gas cloud feature with Student-t approach, with and without simultaneous sources encoding. As a modeling operator, we implemented the grid based finite-difference method in frequency domain using second order elastic wave equation. Jacobin operator and its adjoint provide a necessary platform for solving full waveform inversion problem in a reduced Hessian matrix. We invert gas cloud model in 5 frequency band selected from 1 to 12 Hz, each band contains 3 frequencies. The inversion results are highly sensitive to the misfit. The model allows better convergence and recovery of amplitude losses. This approach gives better resolution then the existing least-squares approach. In this paper, we implement the full waveform inversion for low frequency model with minimum number of iteration providing a better resolution of inversion results.

  3. Molecular cloud formation as seen in synthetic Hi and molecular gas observations

    CERN Document Server

    Heiner, Jonathan S; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We present synthetic Hi and CO observations of a simulation of decaying turbulence in the thermally bistable neutral medium. We first present the simulation, with clouds initially consisting of clustered clumps. Self-gravity causes these clump clusters to form more homogeneous dense clouds. We apply a simple radiative transfer algorithm, and defining every cell with > 1 as molecular. We then produce maps of Hi, CO-free molecular gas, and CO, and investigate the following aspects: i) The spatial distribution of the warm, cold, and molecular gas, finding the well-known layered structure, with molecular gas surrounded by cold Hi, surrounded by warm Hi. ii) The velocity of the various components, with atomic gas generally flowing towards the molecular gas, and that this motion is reflected in the frequently observed bimodal shape of the Hi profiles. This conclusion is tentative, because we do not include feedback. iii) The production of Hi self-absorption (HISA) profiles, and the correlation of HISA with molecul...

  4. HIPASS Detection of an Intergalactic Gas Cloud in the NGC 2442 Group

    CERN Document Server

    Ryder, S D; Staveley-Smith, L; Kilborn, V A; Malin, D; Banks, G; Barnes, D; Bhatal, R; De Blok, W J G; Boyce, P; Disney, M J; Drinkwater, M J; Ekers, R D; Freeman, Kenneth C; Gibson, B; Henning, P; Jerjen, H; Knezek, P M; Marquarding, M; Minchin, R F; Mould, J; Oosterloo, T A; Price, R; Putman, M E; Sadler, E M; Stewart, I; Stootman, F; Webster, R; Wright, A

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery, from the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS), of a gas cloud associated with the asymmetric spiral galaxy NGC 2442. This object, designated HIPASS J0731-69, contains ~10^9 M_sun of HI, or nearly one-third as much atomic gas as NGC 2442 itself. No optical counterpart to any part of HIPASS J0731-69 has yet been identified, consistent with the gas being diffuse, and with its stream-like kinematics. If the gas in HIPASS J0731-69 was once part of NGC 2442, then it was most likely a fairly recent tidal encounter with a moderately massive companion which tore it loose, although the possibility of ram-pressure stripping cannot be ruled out. This discovery highlights the potential of the HIPASS data for yielding new clues to the nature of some of the best-known galaxies in the local universe.

  5. The State of the Gas and the Relation Between Gas and Star Formation at Low Metallicity: the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Bolatto, Alberto D; Jameson, Katherine; Ostriker, Eve; Gordon, Karl; Lawton, Brandon; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Israel, Frank P; Madden, Suzanne C; Hony, Sacha; Sandstrom, Karin M; Bot, Caroline; Rubio, Monica; Winkler, P Frank; Roman-Duval, Julia; van Loon, Jacco Th; Oliveira, Joana M; Indebetouw, Remy

    2011-01-01

    We compare atomic gas, molecular gas, and the recent star formation rate (SFR) inferred from H-alpha in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). By using infrared dust emission and local dust-to-gas ratios, we construct a map of molecular gas that is independent of CO emission. This allows us to disentangle conversion factor effects from the impact of metallicity on the formation and star formation efficiency of molecular gas. On scales of 200 pc to 1 kpc we find a characteristic molecular gas depletion time of ~1.6 Gyr, similar to that observed in the molecule-rich parts of large spiral galaxies on similar spatial scales. This depletion time shortens on much larger scales to ~0.6 Gyr because of the presence of a diffuse H-alpha component, and lengthens on much smaller scales to ~7.5 Gyr because the H-alpha and H2 distributions differ in detail. We estimate the systematic uncertainties in our measurement to be a factor of 2-3. We suggest that the impact of metallicity on the physics of star formation in molecular ga...

  6. C+/H2 gas in star-forming clouds and galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordon, Raanan; Sternberg, Amiel

    2016-11-01

    We present analytic theory for the total column density of singly ionized carbon (C+) in the optically thick photon dominated regions (PDRs) of far-UV irradiated (star-forming) molecular clouds. We derive a simple formula for the C+ column as a function of the cloud (hydrogen) density, the far-UV field intensity, and metallicity, encompassing the wide range of galaxy conditions. When assuming the typical relation between UV and density in the cold neutral medium, the C+ column becomes a function of the metallicity alone. We verify our analysis with detailed numerical PDR models. For optically thick gas, most of the C+ column is mixed with hydrogen that is primarily molecular (H2), and this `C+/H2' gas layer accounts for almost all of the `CO-dark' molecular gas in PDRs. The C+/H2 column density is limited by dust shielding and is inversely proportional to the metallicity down to ˜0.1 solar. At lower metallicities, H2 line blocking dominates and the C+/H2 column saturates. Applying our theory to CO surveys in low-redshift spirals, we estimate the fraction of C+/H2 gas out of the total molecular gas to be typically ˜0.4. At redshifts 1 < z < 3 in massive disc galaxies the C+/H2 gas represents a very small fraction of the total molecular gas (≲ 0.16). This small fraction at high redshifts is due to the high gas surface densities when compared to local galaxies.

  7. 无约束气云弱点火爆炸压力实验研究%EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON EXPLOSION PRESSURES OF UNRESTRICTED GAS CLOUD EXPLOSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕明树; 王淑兰; 丁信伟; 罗正鸿

    2001-01-01

    The strength of flammable gas cloud explosion has been experimentally researched by means of acetylene-air clouds which were ignited by electric sparks.The ignition device which provides ignition energy of about 100mJ was made according to international standard ISO 6184 and American Standard NFPA68. The explosion pressure was picked up by pressure transducer with a dynamic responding time of 0.001 s and recorded by computer. By regressing the experimental data,the relationship of gas cloud explosion pressure to the initial radius of gas cloud and the distance to the center of gas cloud can be obtained. That is p=Ar20/r where A is a constant depending on flammable gas cloud.The damage of unrestricted gas cloud to building structure is discussed based on the strength of houses.

  8. Disk evolution, element abundances and cloud properties of young gas giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Ch; Rimmer, P B; Kamp, I; Thi, W -F; Meijerink, R

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form. Large deviations between the abundances of the host star and its gas giants seem likely to occur if the planet formation follows the core-accretion scenario. These deviations stem from the separate evolution of gas and dust in the disk, where the dust forms the planet cores, followed by the final run-away accretion of the left-over gas. ProDiMo protoplanetary disk models are used to predict the chemical evolution of gas and ice in the midplane. We find that cosmic rays play a crucial role in slowly un-blocking the CO, where the liberated oxygen forms water, which then freezes out quickly. Therefore, the C/O ratio in the gas phase is found to gradually increase with time, in a region bracketed by the water and CO ice-lines. In this regions, C/O i...

  9. A detailed investigation of proposed gas-phase syntheses of ammonia in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Eric; Defrees, D. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1987-01-01

    The initial reactions of the Herbst and Klemperer (1973) and the Dalgarno (1974) schemes (I and II, respectively) for the gas-phase synthesis of ammonia in dense interstellar clouds were investigated. The rate of the slightly endothermic reaction between N(+) and H2 to yield NH(+) and H (scheme I) under interstellar conditions was reinvestigated under thermal and nonthermal conditions based on laboratory data. It was found that the relative importance of this reaction in synthesizing ammonia is determined by how the laboratory data at low temperature are interpreted. On the other hand, the exothermic reaction between N and H3(+) to form NH2(+) + H (scheme II) was calculated to possess significant activation energy and, therefore, to have a negligible rate coefficient under interstellar conditions. Consequently, this reaction cannot take place appreciably in interstellar clouds.

  10. The circumnuclear disk and ionized gas filaments as remnants of tidally disrupted clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, R H

    1998-01-01

    Sticky particle calculations indicate that a coherent structure, a dispersion ring, forms when a cloud on a low angular momentum orbit passes close to the dynamical center of an isothermal sphere containing a central point mass. The cloud is tidally stretched and differentially wrapped, and dissipation in shocks organizes the gas into a precessing off-set elliptical ring which can persist for many rotation periods. The morphology and kinematics of the circumnuclear disk (CND) between 2 and 5 pc and the Northern arm in the inner 1 pc are well-represented by such structures. In the case of the Northern Arm, strong shocks which arise during the formation of the dispersion ring can lead to star formation even in the near tidal field of a massive black hole.

  11. Gas cloud G2 can illuminate the black hole population near the galactic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, Imre; Haiman, Zoltán; Kocsis, Bence; Márka, Szabolcs

    2013-05-31

    Galactic nuclei are expected to be densely populated with stellar- and intermediate-mass black holes. Exploring this population will have important consequences for the observation prospects of gravitational waves as well as understanding galactic evolution. The gas cloud G2 currently approaching Sgr A* provides an unprecedented opportunity to probe the black hole and neutron star population of the Galactic nucleus. We examine the possibility of a G2-cloud-black-hole encounter and its detectability with current x-ray satellites, such as Chandra and NuSTAR. We find that multiple encounters are likely to occur close to the pericenter, which may be detectable upon favorable circumstances. This opportunity provides an additional important science case for leading x-ray observatories to closely follow G2 on its way to the nucleus.

  12. Molecular gas and stars in the translucent cloud MBM 18 (LDN 1569)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Magnani, L.

    2012-11-01

    Context. We investigate star formation in translucent, high-latitude clouds. Aims: Our aim is to understand the star-formation history and rate in the solar neighbourhood. Methods: We used spectroscopic observations of newly found candidate Hα emission-line stars to establish their pre-main-sequence nature. The environment was studied through molecular line observations of the cloud (MBM 18/LDN 1569) in which the stars are presumably embedded. Results: Ten candidate Hα emission-line stars were found in an objective grism survey of a ~1 square degree region in MBM 18, of which seven have been observed spectroscopically in this study. Four of these have weak (| W(Hα)| ≲ 5 Å) Hα emission, and six out of seven have spectral types M1-M4 V. One star is of type F7-G1 V, and has Hα in absorption. The spectra of three of the M-stars may show an absorption line of LiI, although none of these is an unambiguous detection. The M-stars lie at distances between ~60 pc and 250 pc, while most distance determinations of MBM 18 found in the literature agree on 120-150 pc. For the six M-stars a good fit is obtained with pre-main-sequence isochrones indicating ages between 7.5 and 15 Myr. The mass of the molecular material, derived from the integrated 12CO(1-0) emission, is ~160 M⊙ (for a distance of 120 pc). This is much smaller than the virial mass (~103 M⊙), and the cloud is not gravitationally bound. Using a clump-finding routine, we identify 12 clumps from the CO-data, with masses between 2.2 and 22 M⊙. All clumps have a virial mass at least six times higher than their CO-mass, and thus none are in gravitational equilibrium. A similar situation is found from higher-resolution CO-observations of the northern part of the cloud. Conclusions: Considering the relative weakness or absence of the Hα emission, the absence of other emission lines, and the lack of clear LiI absorption, the targets are not T Tauri stars. With ages between 7.5 and 15 Myr they are old enough to

  13. Effect of Non-Condensable Gas on Cavity Dynamics and Sheet to Cloud Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makiharju, Simo; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Partial cavitation occurs in numerous industrial and naval applications. Cavities on lifting surfaces, in cryogenic rocket motors or in fuel injectors can damage equipment and in general be detrimental to the system performance, especially as partial cavities can undergo auto-oscillation causing large pressure pulsations, unsteady loading of machinery and generate significant noise. In the current experiments incipient, intermittent cloud shedding and fully shedding cavities forming in the separated flow region downstream of a wedge were investigated. The Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter was of the order of one million. Gas was injected directly into the cavitation region downstream of the wedge's apex or into the recirculating region such that with the same amount of injected gas less ended up in the shear layer. The cavity dynamics were studied with and without gas injection. The hypothesis to be tested were that i) relatively miniscule amounts of gas introduced into the shear layer at the cavity interface can reduce vapor production and ii) gas introduced into the separated region can dampen the auto oscillations. The authors also examined whether the presence of gas can switch the shedding mechanism from one dominated by condensation shock to one dominantly by re-entrant jet. The work was supported by ONR Grant Number N00014-11-1-0449.

  14. The HI Chronicles of LITTLE THINGS BCDs: VII Zw 403’s External Gas Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Trisha L.; Simpson, Caroline E.; Elmegreen, Bruce; Johnson, Megan C.; Pokhrel, Nau Raj

    2017-01-01

    Blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies are characterized by their concentrated bursts of star formation. Yet, for many BCDs, it is unclear what has triggered this activity. VII Zw 403 is a well-known BCD that is relatively isolated from other galaxies. Using the high angular and velocity resolution Very Large Array (VLA) atomic hydrogen (HI) data from the LITTLE THINGS1 survey, we study the detailed kinematics and morphology of VII Zw 403’s HI gas. High sensitivity HI Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations were also used to search the surrounding area for companion galaxies and extended HI emission, but they did not result in detections of either. The VLA data show a kinematically and morphologically disturbed HI disk. From the VLA HI data cubes, we have separated out most of the emission from what is likely an external gas cloud that is in the line of sight of the HI disk. This external gas cloud appears to be accreting onto the disk and could trigger a future burst of star formation. 1Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey; https://science.nrao.edu/science/surveys/ littlethings

  15. Dust, Gas, and Star Formation in the MBM 18--19 High-Latitude Cloud Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristen A.; Reed, Cyrus M.

    Projected on the plane of the sky, the MBM 19 molecular cloud extends from the MBM 18 high-latitude cloud toward the Taurus star-forming regions. We present a new CO(J = 1--0) map of MBM 19 that shows clumpy emission with line intensities above 3 K in some regions despite low, relatively smooth 100 micron emission and modest visual extinction. This map complements data that show extremely high polarization efficiency of dust aligned along the bridge axis and low values of the ratio of total-to-selective extinction throughout the complex. In addition, several ongoing searches for spectral signatures of young stars have found evidence for star formation associated with MBM 18--19. We discuss variation in the molecular gas fraction and dust-to-gas ratio estimates, as well as the implications all these data have for understanding star formation in the region. Results of this study and others like it will provide insight into dust and gas of the translucent interstellar medium and star formation at high galactic latitude. This research was supported by the American Astronomical Society's Small Research Grant Program.

  16. Interesting Scientific Questions Regarding Interactions in the Gas-aerosol-cloud System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    2002-01-01

    The growth of human population and their use of land, food and energy resources affect the Earth's atmosphere, biosphere and oceans in a complex manner. Many important questions in earth sciences today deal with issues regarding the impact of human activities on our immediate and future environment, ranging in scope from local (i.e. air pollution) to global (i.e. global warming) scale problems. Because the mass of the Earth's atmosphere is negligible compare to that found in the oceans and the biosphere, the atmosphere can respond quickly to natural and/or manmade perturbations. For example, seasonal 'ozone hole' formation in the Antarctic is a result of manmade CFC emissions in just the last 40 years. Also, the observed rise in global temperatures (known as global warming) is linked to a rapid increase in carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas concentrations (emitted primarily by combustion processes) over the last century. The Earth's atmosphere is composed of a mixture of gases, aerosol and cloud particles. Natural and anthropogenic emissions of gases and aerosols affect the composition of the Earth's atmosphere. Changes in the chemical and physical makeup of the atmosphere can influence how the Earth will interact with the incoming solar radiation and the outgoing infrared radiation and vise versa. While, some perturbations are short-lived, others are long-lived and can affect the Earth's global climate and chemistry in many decades to come, In order to be able to separate the natural effects from anthropogenic ones, it is essential that we understand the basic physics and chemistry of interactions in the gas-aerosol-cloud system in the Earth's atmosphere. The important physics and chemistry that takes place in the coupled gas-aerosol-cloud system as it relates to aircraft observations are discussed.

  17. Collision of an Arched Plasma-Filled Flux Rope with a Target Cloud of Initially Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwaitayakornkul, Pakorn; Bellan, Paul M.

    2015-11-01

    The Caltech solar loop experiment apparatus had been used to create an arched plasma-filled flux rope that expands to collide with a pre-injected initially-neutral gas. We investigated such a situation in two regimes: (i) plasma made by heavy gas impacting a much lighter neutral gas cloud and (ii) a light-gas plasma impacting much heavier neutral gas. The neutral gas became ionized immediately upon impact. In regime (i), multiple shock layers were formed in the target cloud; these magnetized collisionless shocks are relevant to solar physics as such shocks develop ahead of Coronal Mass Ejections and occur in Co-rotating Interaction Regions. In regime (ii), plasma expansion was inhibited. In both cases, fast camera images, magnetic probe measurements, and spectroscopy data will be reported. The analysis of plasma and shock expansion, as well as associated density and temperature changes, will be presented.

  18. Estimation of vulnerable zones due to accidental release of toxic materials resulting in dense gas clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M P; Mohan, M; Panwar, T S; Chopra, H V

    1991-09-01

    Heavy gas dispersion models have been developed at IIT (hereinafter referred as IIT heavy gas models I and II) with a view to estimate vulnerable zones due to accidental (both instantaneous and continuous, respectively) release of dense toxic material in the atmosphere. The results obtained from IIT heavy gas models have been compared with those obtained from the DEGADIS model [Dense Gas Dispersion Model, developed by Havens and Spicer (1985) for the U.S. Coast Guard] as well as with the observed data collected during the Burro Series, Maplin Sands, and Thorney Island field trials. Both of these models include relevant features of dense gas dispersion, viz., gravity slumping, air entrainment, cloud heating, and transition to the passive phase, etc. The DEGADIS model has been considered for comparing the performance of IIT heavy gas models in this study because it incorporates most of the physical processes of dense gas dispersion in an elaborate manner, and has also been satisfactorily tested against field observations. The predictions from IIT heavy gas models indicate a fairly similar trend to the observed values from Thorney Island, Burro Series, and Maplin experiments with a tendency toward overprediction. There is a good agreement between the prediction of IIT Heavy Gas models I and II with those from DEGADIS, except for the simulations of IIT heavy gas model-I pertaining to very large release quantities under highly stable atmospheric conditions. In summary, the performance of IIT heavy gas models have been found to be reasonably good both with respect to the limited field data available and various simulations (selected on the basis of relevant storages in the industries and prevalent meteorological conditions performed with DEGADIS). However, there is a scope of improvement in the IIT heavy gas models (viz., better formulation for entrainment, modification of coefficients, transition criteria, etc.). Further, isotons (nomograms) have been prepared by using

  19. HD and H2 formation in low-metallicity dusty gas clouds at high reshift

    CERN Document Server

    Cazaux, S

    2009-01-01

    Context: The HD and H2 molecules play important roles in the cooling of primordial and very metal-poor gas at high redshift. Aims: Grain surface and gas phase formation of HD and H2 is investigated to assess the importance of trace amounts of dust, 10^{-5}-10^{-3} Zo, in the production of HD and H2. Methods: We consider carbonaceous and silicate grains and include both physisorption and chemisorption, tunneling, and realistic grain surface barriers. We find, for a collapsing gas cloud environment with coupled chemical and thermal balance, that dust abundances as small as 10^{-5} solar lead to a strong boost in the H2 formation rate due to surface reactions. As a result of this enhancement in H2, HD is formed more efficiently in the gas phase through the D+ +H2 reaction. Direct formation of HD on dust grains cannot compete well with this gas phase process for dust temperatures below 150 K. We also derive up-to-date analytic fitting formulae for the grain surface formation of H2 and HD, including the different ...

  20. Cold and warm atomic gas around the Perseus molecular cloud I: Basic Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Stanimirovic, Snezana; Lee, Min-Young; Heiles, Carl; Miller, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) Using the Arecibo Observatory we have obtained neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption and emission spectral pairs in the direction of 26 background radio continuum sources in the vicinity of the Perseus molecular cloud. Strong absorption lines were detected in all cases allowing us to estimate spin temperature (T_s) and optical depth for 107 individual Gaussian components along these lines of sight. Basic properties of individual HI clouds (spin temperature, optical depth, and the column density of the cold and warm neutral medium, CNM and WNM) in and around Perseus are very similar to those found for random interstellar lines of sight sampled by the Millennium HI survey. This suggests that the neutral gas found in and around molecular clouds is not atypical. However, lines of sight in the vicinity of Perseus have on average a higher total HI column density and the CNM fraction, suggesting an enhanced amount of cold HI relative to an average interstellar field. Our estimated optical depth and spin temper...

  1. Molecular and Atomic Gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud - I. Conditions for CO Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, T; Fukui, Y; Kawamura, A; Mizuno, N; Ott, J; Müller, E; Pineda, J L; Welty, D E; Kim, S; Mizuno, Y; Murai, M; Onishi, T

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the conditions for detection of CO(1-0) emission in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), using the recently completed second NANTEN CO survey. In particular, we investigate correlations between CO integrated intensity and HI integrated intensity, peak brightness temperature, and line width at a resolution of 2.6' (~40 pc). We find that significant HI column density and peak brightness temperature are necessary but not sufficient conditions for CO detection, with many regions of strong HI emission not associated with molecular clouds. The large scatter in CO intensities for a given HI intensity persists even when averaging on scales of >200 pc, indicating that the scatter is not solely due to local conversion of HI into H_2 near GMCs. We focus on two possibilities to account for this scatter: either there exist spatial variations in the I(CO) to N(H_2) conversion factor, or a significant fraction of the atomic gas is not involved in molecular cloud formation. A weak tendency for CO emission to be suppr...

  2. The Stefan outflow in a multicomponent vapor-gas atmosphere around a droplet and its role for cloud expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchma, A E; Martyukova, D S

    2016-01-01

    A new comprehensive analysis of Stefan's flow caused by a free growing droplet in vapor-gas atmosphere with several condensing components is presented. This analysis, based on the nonstationary heat and material balance and diffusion transport equations, shows the appearance of the Stefan inflow in the vicinity of the growing droplet and the outflow at large distances from the droplet as a consequence of nonisothermal condensation. For an ensemble of droplets in the atmospheric cloud, this flow provides an increase of the total volume of the cloud, which can be treated as cloud thermal expansion and leads to floating the cloud as a whole due to buoyancy. We have formulated the self-similar solutions of the nonstationary diffusion and heat conduction equations for a growing multicomponent droplet and have derived analytical expressions for the nonstationary velocity profile of Stefan's flow and the expansion volume of the vapor-gas mixture around the growing droplet. To illustrate the approach, we computed the...

  3. The Relationship Between the Dust and Gas-Phase CO Across the California Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, S; Lada, E A; Román-Zúñiga, C; Bieging, J H; Lombardi, M; Forbrich, J; Alves, J F

    2015-01-01

    A deep, wide-field, near-infrared imaging survey was used to construct an extinction map of the southeastern part of the California Molecular Cloud (CMC) with $\\sim$ 0.5 arc min resolution. The same region was also surveyed in the $^{12}$CO(2-1), $^{13}$CO(2-1), C$^{18}$O(2-1) emission lines at the same angular resolution. Strong spatial variations in the abundances of $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O were found to be correlated with variations in gas temperature, consistent with temperature dependent CO depletion/desorption on dust grains. The $^{13}$CO to C$^{18}$O abundance ratio was found to increase with decreasing extinction, suggesting selective photodissociation of C$^{18}$O by the ambient UV radiation field. The cloud averaged X-factor is found to be $$ $=$ 2.53 $\\times$ 10$^{20}$ ${\\rm cm}^{-2}~({\\rm K~km~s}^{-1})^{-1}$, somewhat higher than the Milky Way average. On sub-parsec scales we find no single empirical value of the X-factor that can characterize the molecular gas in cold (T$_{\\rm k}$ $\\lesssim$ 15 ...

  4. Temperature structures in Galactic Center clouds - Direct evidence for gas heating via turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Immer, K; Pillai, T; Ginsburg, A; Menten, K M

    2016-01-01

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) at the center of our Galaxy is the best template to study star formation processes under extreme conditions, similar to those in high-redshift galaxies. We observed on-the-fly maps of para-H$_{2}$CO transitions at 218 GHz and 291 GHz towards seven Galactic Center clouds. From the temperature-sensitive integrated intensity line ratios of H$_{2}$CO(3$_{2,1}-$2$_{2,0}$)/H$_{2}$CO(3$_{0,3}-$2$_{0,2}$) and H$_{2}$CO(4$_{2,2}-$3$_{2,1}$)/H$_{2}$CO(4$_{0,4}-$3$_{0,3}$) in combination with radiative transfer models, we produce gas temperature maps of our targets. These transitions are sensitive to gas with densities of $\\sim$10$^{5}$ cm$^{-3}$ and temperatures 40 K) than their dust temperatures ($\\sim$25 K). Our targets have a complex velocity structure that requires a careful disentanglement of the different components. We produce temperature maps for each of the velocity components and show that the temperatures of the components differ, revealing temperature gradients in the clouds...

  5. Lie groups and Lie algebras for physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The book is intended for graduate students of theoretical physics (with a background in quantum mechanics) as well as researchers interested in applications of Lie group theory and Lie algebras in physics. The emphasis is on the inter-relations of representation theories of Lie groups and the corresponding Lie algebras.

  6. The Fundamentally Different Dynamics of Dust and Gas in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2015-01-01

    We study the behavior of large dust grains in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs). In primarily neutral regions, dust grains move as aerodynamic particles, not necessarily with the gas. We therefore directly simulate, for the first time, the behavior of aerodynamic grains in highly supersonic, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence typical of MCs. We show that, under these conditions, grains with sizes a>0.01 micron exhibit dramatic (exceeding factor ~1000) fluctuations in the local dust-to-gas ratio (implying large small-scale variations in abundances, dust cooling rates, and dynamics). The dust can form highly filamentary structures (which would be observed in both dust emission and extinction), which can be much thinner than the characteristic width of gas filaments. Sometimes, the dust and gas filaments are not even in the same location. The 'clumping factor' of the dust (critical for dust evolution) can reach ~100, for grains in the ideal size range. The dust clustering is maximized around scales ~0.2pc*(a/micron)*...

  7. Climate Response to Warm Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Comparisons With Direct Aerosol and Long-Lived Greenhouse Gas Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Ming, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We employ the NOAA/ GFDL global atmospheric model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean to investigate the mechanisms and quantitative aspects underlying the radiative perturbations and climate response arising due to cloud-aerosol interactions in low-lying clouds. The aerosol species considered include sulfate, sea-salt and carbonaceous species, whose space-time distributions are determined offline by the MOZART 2 chemistry- transport model based on emissions data. The model's prognostic cloud scheme of liquid water and amount is expanded to include cloud droplet concentration in a way that importantly allows them to be computed using the same large-scale and convective updraft velocity field. The equilibrium response of the model's global climate system to the change in aerosols from pre- industrial to present-day is evaluated, in terms of the forcing applied and the role of the large- and cloud-scale feedback mechanisms. The cloud characteristics simulated are compared against observations, while the model's response is compared with that obtained from using a diagnostic aerosol-cloud relationship to highlight the significance of specific cloud microphysical processes. The spatial distributions of the thermal and hydrologic responses are also compared with those resulting from simulations performed for the pre-industrial to present-day direct aerosol effect. The temperature responses in the low and high latitudes, including changes in the large-scale precipitation pattern, are contrasted with those due to the well-mixed greenhouse gases. The forcing-response relationship is examined for the radiative perturbations investigated, with surface radiative forcing included in these considerations. We finally investigate the concept of linear additivity of the responses in various climate variables for the set of radiative perturbations considered above, extending from the global- and zonal-mean to continental scales.

  8. Aviation response to a widely dispersed volcanic ash and gas cloud from the August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Schneider, David J.; Wallace, Kristi L.; Hall, Tony; Bensimon, Dov R.; Salinas, Leonard J.

    2010-01-01

    The extensive volcanic cloud from Kasatochi's 2008 eruption caused widespread disruptions to aviation operations along Pacific oceanic, Canadian, and U.S. air routes. Based on aviation hazard warnings issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, the Federal Aviation Administration, and Meteorological Service of Canada, air carriers largely avoided the volcanic cloud over a 5 day period by route modifications and flight cancellations. Comparison of time coincident GOES thermal infrared (TIR) data for ash detection with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) ultraviolet data for SO2 detection shows congruent areas of ash and gas in the volcanic cloud in the 2 days following onset of ash production. After about 2.5 days, the area of SO2 detected by OMI was more extensive than the area of ash indicated by TIR data, indicating significant ash depletion by fall out had occurred. Pilot reports of visible haze at cruise altitudes over Canada and the northern United States suggested that SO2 gas had converted to sulfate aerosols. Uncertain about the hazard potential of the aging cloud, airlines coped by flying over, under, or around the observed haze layer. Samples from a nondamaging aircraft encounter with Kasatochi's nearly 3 day old cloud contained volcanic silicate particles, confirming that some fine ash is present in predominantly gas clouds. The aircraft's exposure to ash was insufficient to cause engine damage; however, slightly damaging encounters with volcanic clouds from eruptions of Reventador in 2002 and Hekla in 2000 indicate the possibility of lingering hazards associated with old and/or diffuse volcanic clouds.

  9. Using gas clouds to probe the accretion flow around SgrA*: G2's delayed pericenter passage

    CERN Document Server

    Madigan, Ann-Marie; O'Leary, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of the putative gas clouds G1 and G2 recently discovered in the Galactic center. Following earlier studies suggesting that these two clouds are part of a larger gas streamer, we combine their orbits into a single trajectory. Since the gas clouds experience a drag force from background gas, this trajectory is not exactly Keplerian. By assuming the G1 and G2 clouds trace this trajectory, we fit for the drag force they experience and thus extract information about the accretion flow at a distance of thousands of Schwarzschild radii from the black hole. This range of radii is important for theories of black hole accretion, but is currently unconstrained by observations. In this paper we extend our previous work by accounting for radial forces due to possible inflow or outflow of the background gas. Such radial forces drive precession in the orbital plane, allowing a slightly better fit to the G1 and G2 data. This precession delays the pericenter passage of G2 by 4-5 months relativ...

  10. Redistribution of trace gases by convective clouds - mixed-phase processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of gas transport to the free and upper troposphere in convective clouds is investigated in an axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with detailed microphysics. In particular, we examine the sensitivity of gas transport to the treatment of gas uptake by different ice hydrometeors. Two parameters are used to describe this uptake. The gas retention coefficient defines the fraction of dissolved gas that is retained in an ice particle upon freezing, which includes also the riming process. We also define a gas burial efficiency defining the amount of gas entrapped in ice crystals growing by vapour diffusion. Model calculations are performed for continental and maritime clouds using a complete range of gas solubilities, retention coefficients and burial efficiencies. The results show that the magnitude of the gas retention coefficient is much more important for gas transport in maritime clouds than in continental clouds. The cause of this difference lies in the different microphysical processes dominating the formation and evolution of hydrometeors in the two cloud types. For highly soluble gases, the amount of gas transported to the free troposphere in maritime clouds falls approximately linearly by a factor of 12 as the retention coefficient is varied between 0 and 1. Gas transport is relatively insensitive to the magnitude of the gas burial efficiency. However, the burial efficiency strongly controls the concentration of trace gases inside anvil ice crystals, which subsequently form cirrus clouds.

  11. Redistribution of trace gases by convective clouds – mixed-phase processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yin

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of gas transport to the free and upper troposphere in convective clouds is investigated in an axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with detailed microphysics. In particular, we examine the sensitivity of gas transport to the treatment of gas uptake by different ice hydrometeors. Two parameters are used to describe this uptake. The gas retention coefficient defines the fraction of dissolved gas that is retained in an ice particle upon freezing, which includes also the riming process. We also define a gas burial efficiency defining the amount of gas entrapped in ice crystals growing by vapour diffusion. Model calculations are performed for continental and maritime clouds using a complete range of gas solubilities, retention coefficients and burial efficiencies. The results show that the magnitude of the gas retention coefficient is much more important for gas transport in maritime clouds than in continental clouds. The cause of this difference lies in the different microphysical processes dominating the formation and evolution of hydrometeors in the two cloud types. For highly soluble gases, the amount of gas transported to the free troposphere in maritime clouds falls approximately linearly by a factor of 12 as the retention coefficient is varied between 0 and 1. Gas transport is relatively insensitive to the magnitude of the gas burial efficiency. However, the burial efficiency strongly controls the concentration of trace gases inside anvil ice crystals, which subsequently form cirrus clouds.

  12. Gas Clouds in Whirlpool Galaxy Yield Important Clues Supporting Theory on Spiral Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Astronomers studying gas clouds in the famous Whirlpool Galaxy have found important clues supporting a theory that seeks to explain how the spectacular spiral arms of galaxies can persist for billions of years. The astronomers applied techniques used to study similar gas clouds in our own Milky Way to those in the spiral arms of a neighbor galaxy for the first time, and their results bolster a theory first proposed in 1964. M51 The spiral galaxy M51: Left, as seen with the Hubble Space Telescope; Right, radio image showing location of Carbon Monoxide gas. CREDIT: STScI, OVRO, IRAM (Click on image for larger version) Image Files Optical and Radio (CO) Views (above image) HST Optical Image with CO Contours Overlaid Radio/Optical Composite Image of M51 VLA/Effelsberg Radio Image of M51, With Panel Showing Magnetic Field Lines The Whirlpool Galaxy, about 31 million light-years distant, is a beautiful spiral in the constellation Canes Venatici. Also known as M51, it is seen nearly face-on from Earth and is familiar to amateur astronomers and has been featured in countless posters, books and magazine articles. "This galaxy made a great target for our study of spiral arms and how star formation works along them," said Eva Schinnerer, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. "It was ideal for us because it's one of the closest face-on spirals in the sky," she added. Schinnerer worked with Axel Weiss of the Institute for Millimeter Radio Astronomy (IRAM) in Spain, Susanne Aalto of the Onsala Space Observatory in Sweden, and Nick Scoville of Caltech. The astronomers presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Denver, Colorado. The scientists analyzed radio emission from Carbon Monoxide (CO) molecules in giant gas clouds along M51's spiral arms. Using telescopes at Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory and the 30-meter radio telescope of IRAM, they were able to determine the temperatures and amounts of turbulence within the

  13. Gas Kinematics on GMC scales in M51 with PAWS: cloud stabilization through dynamical pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Meidt, Sharon E; Garcia-Burillo, Santiago; Hughes, Annie; Colombo, Dario; Pety, Jerome; Dobbs, Clare L; Schuster, Karl F; Kramer, Carsten; Leroy, Adam K; Dumas, Gaelle; Thompson, Todd A

    2013-01-01

    We use the high spatial and spectral resolution of the PAWS CO(1-0) survey of the inner 9 kpc of the iconic spiral galaxy M51 to examine the effect of gas streaming motions on the star-forming properties of individual GMCs. We compare our view of gas flows in M51 -- which arise due to departures from axi-symmetry in the gravitational potential (i.e. the nuclear bar and spiral arms) -- with the global pattern of star formation as traced by Halpha and 24\\mu m emission. We find that the dynamical environment of GMCs strongly affects their ability to form stars, in the sense that GMCs situated in regions with large streaming motions can be stabilized, while similarly massive GMCs in regions without streaming go on to efficiently form stars. We argue that this is the result of reduced surface pressure felt by clouds embedded in an ambient medium undergoing large streaming motions, which prevents collapse. Indeed, the variation in gas depletion time expected based on the observed streaming motions throughout the di...

  14. Small hydrocarbon molecules in cloud-forming Brown Dwarf and giant gas planet atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Bilger, Camille; Helling, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    We study the abundances of complex carbon-bearing molecules in the oxygen-rich dust- forming atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs and giant gas planets. The inner atmospheric re- gions that form the inner boundary for thermochemical gas-phase models are investigated. Results from Drift-phoenix atmosphere simulations, which include the feedback of phase- non-equilibrium dust cloud formation on the atmospheric structure and the gas-phase abun- dances, are utilised. The resulting element depletion leads to a shift in the carbon-to-oxygen ratio such that several hydrocarbon molecules and cyanopolycyanopolyynene molecules can be present. An increase in surface gravity and/or a decrease in metallicity support the increase in the partial pressures of these species. CO, CO2, CH4, and HCN contain the largest fraction of carbon. In the upper atmosphere of low-metallicity objects, more carbon is contained in C4H than in CO, and also CH3 and C2H2 play an increasingly important role as carbon-sink. We determine chemical relaxation...

  15. Redistributing hot gas around galaxies: do cool clouds signal a solution to the overcooling problem?

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, Tobias; Maller, Ariyeh H; Fang, Taotao; Wadsley, James

    2008-01-01

    We present a pair of high-resolution smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations that explore the evolution and cooling behavior of hot gas around Milky-Way size galaxies. The simulations contain the same total baryonic mass and are identical other than their initial gas density distributions. The first is initialised with a low entropy hot gas halo that traces the cuspy profile of the dark matter, and the second is initialised with a high-entropy hot halo with a cored density profile as might be expected in models with pre-heating feedback. Galaxy formation proceeds in dramatically different fashion depending on the initial setup. While the low-entropy halo cools rapidly, primarily from the central region, the high-entropy halo is quasi-stable for ~4 Gyr and eventually cools via the fragmentation and infall of clouds from ~100 kpc distances. The low-entropy halo's X-ray surface brightness is ~100 times brighter than current limits and the resultant disc galaxy contains more than half of the system's ba...

  16. Weak Lie symmetry and extended Lie algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goenner, Hubert [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, University of Goettingen, D-37077 Gottingen (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The concept of weak Lie motion (weak Lie symmetry) is introduced. Applications given exhibit a reduction of the usual symmetry, e.g., in the case of the rotation group. In this context, a particular generalization of Lie algebras is found ('extended Lie algebras') which turns out to be an involutive distribution or a simple example for a tangent Lie algebroid. Riemannian and Lorentz metrics can be introduced on such an algebroid through an extended Cartan-Killing form. Transformation groups from non-relativistic mechanics and quantum mechanics lead to such tangent Lie algebroids and to Lorentz geometries constructed on them (1-dimensional gravitational fields).

  17. The Spitzer Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud: FIR Emission and Cold Gas in the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, A; Stanimirovic, S; Mizuno, N; Israel, F; Bot, C; Leroy, Adam; Bolatto, Alberto; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Mizuno, Norikazu; Israel, Frank; Bot, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    We present new far infrared maps of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 24, 70, and 160 microns obtained as part of the Spitzer Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (S3MC,Bolatto et al. 2006). These maps cover most of the active star formation in the SMC Bar and the more quiescent Wing. We combine our maps with literature data to derive the dust surface density across the SMC. We find a total dust mass of Mdust = 3 10^5 Msun, implying a dust-to-hydrogen ratio over the region studied of log D/H = -2.86, or 1-to-700, which includes H_2. Assuming the dust to trace the total gas column, we derive H_2 surface densities across the SMC. We find a total H_2 mass M_H2 = 3.2 10^7 Msun in a distribution similar to that of the CO, but more extended. We compare profiles of CO and H_2 around six molecular peaks and find that on average H_2 is more extended than CO by a factor of \\sim 1.3. The implied CO-to-H_2 conversion factor over the whole SMC is XCO = 13 +/- 1 10^21 cm^-2 (K km/s)^-1. Over the volume occupied by CO we ...

  18. Interstellar Cloud Formation through Aggregation of Cold Blobs in a Two-Phase Gas Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaya, Hideyuki

    1997-05-01

    We propose a new formation scenario for interstellar clouds through the aggregation of dense cold blobs (phase II [PII]), which drift in a diffuse warm medium (phase I [PI]). We examine how important it is that there exist numerous PII blobs when the properties of such a two-phase flow are studied. First, we solve a one-dimensional shock-tube problem and find that the shock wave in the mixture is considerably damped because of the drag force between the two phases. This is because the PII blobs are left behind the shock front, since their inertia is larger than that of PI, thus suppressing large spatial variations of PI gas via the drag force. The PII blobs thus play the role of anchors. Therefore, mass aggregation by shocks may be ineffective in a two-phase medium. However, the PII blobs can still aggregate through a kind of fluid dynamical instability. We next suppose that the PI gas is accelerated upward by shocks against downward gravity, while the PII blobs are at rest because of balance between the drag force due to PI and gravity. If we put a positive perturbation in the number density of PII blobs, the upward PI flow above the perturbation is decelerated by the enhanced drag force, and the velocity difference between PI and PII is thereby reduced. Then the PII blobs above the perturbation are accelerated downward, since the gravity on PII now dominates the reduced drag force. As a result, the blobs will fall onto this perturbed region, and this region becomes denser and denser. This is the mechanism of the instability. Therefore, we expect efficient cloud formation by this instability in spiral arms, even when galactic shocks are extremely damped.

  19. 3-LIE BIALGEBRAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白瑞蒲; 程宇; 李佳倩; 孟伟

    2014-01-01

    3-Lie algebras have close relationships with many important fields in mathemat-ics and mathematical physics. This article concerns 3-Lie algebras. The concepts of 3-Lie coalgebras and 3-Lie bialgebras are given. The structures of such categories of algebras and the relationships with 3-Lie algebras are studied. And the classification of 4-dimensional 3-Lie coalgebras and 3-dimensional 3-Lie bialgebras over an algebraically closed field of char-acteristic zero are provided.

  20. Modelling the reversible uptake of chemical species in the gas phase by ice particles formed in a convective cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Longo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a preliminary study preparing the introduction of reversible trace gas uptake by ice particles into a 3-D cloud resolving model. For this a 3-D simulation of a tropical deep convection cloud was run with the BRAMS cloud resolving model using a two-moment bulk microphysical parameterization. Trajectories encountering the convective clouds were computed from these simulation outputs along which the variations of the pristine ice, snow and aggregate mixing ratios and size distributions were extracted. The reversible uptake of 11 trace gases by ice was examined assuming applicability of Langmuir isotherms using recently evaluated (IUPAC laboratory data. The results show that ice uptake is only significant for HNO3, HCl, CH3COOH and HCOOH. For H2O2, using new results for the partition coefficient results in significant partitioning to the ice phase for this trace gas also. It was also shown that the uptake is largely dependent on the temperature for some species. The adsorption saturation at the ice surface for large gas concentrations is generally not a limiting factor except for HNO3 and HCl for gas concentration greater than 1 ppbv. For HNO3, results were also obtained using a trapping theory, resulting in a similar order of magnitude of uptake, although the two approaches are based on different assumptions. The results were compared to those obtained using a BRAMS cloud simulation based on a single-moment microphysical scheme instead of the two moment scheme. We found similar results with a slightly more important uptake when using the single-moment scheme which is related to slightly higher ice mixing ratios in this simulation. The way to introduce these results in the 3-D cloud model is discussed.

  1. Modelling the reversible uptake of chemical species in the gas phase by ice particles formed in a convective cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marécal

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a preliminary study preparing the introduction of reversible trace gas uptake by ice particles into a 3-D cloud resolving model. For this a 3-D simulation of a tropical deep convection cloud was run with the BRAMS cloud resolving model using a two-moment bulk microphysical parameterization. Trajectories within the convective clouds were computed from these simulation outputs along which the variations of the pristine ice, snow and aggregate mixing ratios and concentrations were extracted. The reversible uptake of 11 trace gases by ice was examined assuming applicability of Langmuir isotherms using recently evaluated (IUPAC laboratory data. The results show that ice uptake is only significant for HNO3, HCl, CH3COOH and HCOOH. For H2O2, using new results for the partition coefficient results in significant partitioning to the ice phase for this trace gas also. It was also shown that the uptake is largely dependent on the temperature for some species. The adsorption saturation at the ice surface for large gas mixing ratios is generally not a limiting factor except for HNO3 and HCl for gas mixing ratio greater than 1 ppbv. For HNO3, results were also obtained using a trapping theory, resulting in a similar order of magnitude of uptake, although the two approaches are based on different assumptions. The results were compared to those obtained using a BRAMS cloud simulation based on a single-moment microphysical scheme instead of the two moment scheme. We found similar results with a slightly more important uptake when using the single-moment scheme which is related to slightly higher ice mixing ratios in this simulation. The way to introduce these results in the 3-D cloud model is discussed.

  2. FRESCO+: an improved O2 A-band cloud retrieval algorithm for tropospheric trace gas retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. van Roozendael

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The FRESCO (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A-band algorithm has been used to retrieve cloud information from measurements of the O2 A-band around 760 nm by GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2. The cloud parameters retrieved by FRESCO are the effective cloud fraction and cloud pressure, which are used for cloud correction in the retrieval of trace gases like O3 and NO2. To improve the cloud pressure retrieval for partly cloudy scenes, single Rayleigh scattering has been included in an improved version of the algorithm, called FRESCO+. We compared FRESCO+ and FRESCO effective cloud fractions and cloud pressures using simulated spectra and one month of GOME measured spectra. As expected, FRESCO+ gives more reliable cloud pressures over partly cloudy pixels. Simulations and comparisons with ground-based radar/lidar measurements of clouds show that the FRESCO+ cloud pressure is about the optical midlevel of the cloud. Globally averaged, the FRESCO+ cloud pressure is about 50 hPa higher than the FRESCO cloud pressure, while the FRESCO+ effective cloud fraction is about 0.01 larger. The effect of FRESCO+ cloud parameters on O3 and NO2 vertical column density (VCD retrievals is studied using SCIAMACHY data and ground-based DOAS measurements. We find that the FRESCO+ algorithm has a significant effect on tropospheric NO2 retrievals but a minor effect on total O3 retrievals. The retrieved SCIAMACHY tropospheric NO2 VCDs using FRESCO+ cloud parameters (v1.1 are lower than the tropospheric NO2VCDs which used FRESCO cloud parameters (v1.04, in particular over heavily polluted areas with low clouds. The difference between SCIAMACHY tropospheric NO2 VCDs v1.1 and ground-based MAXDOAS measurements performed in Cabauw, The Netherlands, during the DANDELIONS campaign is about −2.12×1014molec cm−2.

  3. A protoplanetary system formation modeling into a dust-gas protoplanetary cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervina, H.

    2009-04-01

    This work investigates a protoplanetary system forming with usage of computational modeling based on modern program packages. Pictures of fields for pressure and velocity into a gravitating and rotating gas-dust cloud (around of a protostar) are obtained. The work shows that evolution of rotating gas-dust cloud forms planetary embryos in the centrally symmetric gravitational field. This work also develops an analysis of hydrodynamic flows into a rotating protoplanetary cloud [1] with usage of nonlinear dynamics methods based on the matrix decomposition in the state-space [2] and the fractal-topological methods [3]. The computer simulation of hydrodynamic flows is carried out by means of program package STAR-CD [4]. The system of differential equations in partial derivatives containing the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations in cylindrical coordinates is investigated. Using a representation of velocity field as a sum of basic flow velocity (satisfying the Navier-Stokes equation) and disturbance of velocity the equation system relative to components of velocity disturbance is obtained. The system of partial differential equations (modeling the hydrodynamic processes in the vortex flow) is reduced to the system of ordinary differential equations (describing an attractor) based on the Galerkin's method. Taking into account the continuity equation the form of components of velocity disturbance is chosen. This work shows the similar attractor of this system has been obtained in [5]. Then the fractal-topological characteristics of this attractor are investigated using matrix decomposition methods [2], [3]. The obtained results of analysis are in accord with the computational simulation. References: [1] Schlichting H. Grenzschicht-Theorie. Verlag G Braun, Karlsruhe, 1970. [2] Krot A.M. Matrix decompositions of vector functions and shift operators on the trajectories of a nonlinear dynamical system. Nonlinear Phenomena in Complex Systems, vol. 4, no.2, pp. 106-115, 2001

  4. The space density of primordial gas clouds near galaxies and groups and their relation to galactic high-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA; Briggs, FH

    2000-01-01

    The Arecibo H I Strip Survey probed the halos of similar to 300 cataloged galaxies and the environments of similar to 14 groups with sensitivity to neutral hydrogen masses greater than or equal to 10(7) M-circle dot. The survey detected no objects with properties resembling the high-velocity clouds

  5. Infalling clouds on to supermassive black hole binaries - I. Formation of discs, accretion and gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicovic, F. G.; Cuadra, J.; Sesana, A.; Stasyszyn, F.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Tanaka, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that most - if not all - galaxies harbour a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at their nucleus; hence binaries of these massive objects are an inevitable product of the hierarchical evolution of structures in the Universe, and represent an important but thus-far elusive phase of galaxy evolution. Gas accretion via a circumbinary disc is thought to be important for the dynamical evolution of SMBH binaries, as well as in producing luminous emission that can be used to infer their properties. One plausible source of the gaseous fuel is clumps of gas formed due to turbulence and gravitational instabilities in the interstellar medium, that later fall towards and interact with the binary. In this context, we model numerically the evolution of turbulent clouds in near-radial infall on to equal-mass SMBH binaries, using a modified version of the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) code GADGET-3. We present a total of 12 simulations that explore different possible pericentre distances and relative inclinations, and show that the formation of circumbinary discs and discs around each SMBH (`mini-discs') depend on those parameters. We also study the dynamics of the formed discs, and the variability of the feeding rate on to the SMBHs in the different configurations.

  6. Expanding gas clouds of ellipsoidal shape - the solutions of minimal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffet, B.

    1999-07-01

    Ovsiannikov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 111 (1965)] and Dyson [J. Math. Mech. 18 (1968) 91] have proposed a model of an ellipsoidal gas cloud adiabatically expanding into a vacuum, and have shown that the equations of fluid motion are thereby reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations, of order 18 in the most general case. Gaffet [J. Fluid Mech. 325 (1996) 113] has shown that their integration reduces to quadratures (if the gas is monatomic and there is no rotating motion of the ellipsoid’s principal axes), as a result of the existence of two integrals of the motion, m and I2. In the present work we establish the minimum value m0( I2) of m, compatible with the existence of physically meaningful solutions. We succeed in performing the separation of variables, and obtain the unexpected result that, when the energy integral m takes its minimum value m0( I2), the general solution of the equations of motion is described by elliptic functions.

  7. The relation between gas and dust in the Taurus Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Pineda, Jorge L; Chapman, Nicholas; Snell, Ronald L; Li, Di; Cambresy, Laurent; Brunt, Chris

    2010-01-01

    (abridged) We report a study of the relation between dust and gas over a 100deg^2 area in the Taurus molecular cloud. We compare the H2 column density derived from dust extinction with the CO column density derived from the 12CO and 13CO J= 1-0 lines. We derive the visual extinction from reddening determined from 2MASS data. The comparison is done at an angular size of 200", corresponding to 0.14pc at a distance of 140pc. We find that the relation between visual extinction Av and N(CO) is linear between Av~3 and 10 mag in the region associated with the B213--L1495 filament. In other regions the linear relation is flattened for Av > 4 mag. We find that the presence of temperature gradients in the molecular gas affects the determination of N(CO) by ~30--70% with the largest difference occurring at large column densities. Adding a correction for this effect and accounting for the observed relation between the column density of CO and CO2 ices and Av, we find a linear relationship between the column of carbon mon...

  8. WHEN IMPORTERS TURN TO EXPORTING OIL AND GAS — THE SHALE GAS HYPE AND CERTAIN GEOPOLITICAL CHANGES LIE AHEAD IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kneissl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Middle East, the world’s only major source of low-cost oil, will remain at the core of the long-term prospects of the world oil market. The IEA went too far referring to the “shale hydrocarbon revolution born in the USA”. For the time being, the global energy landscape has not been turned upside down. It is China’s soaring energy consumption rather than the US’ rising production that will fundamentally shift the world energy order. Some analysts claim that the Sino-Russian relationship will truly shift global energy boundaries: pipelines are turning east. Global oil prices may fall if and when significant volumes of additional Iranian oil return to the market. A new petroleum frontier in the Eastern Mediterranean complicates the manifold conflicts, but opens up new chances for cooperation. There are huge opportunities created by the discovery of gas in the Eastern Mediterranean — not least for countries that are short of both money and energy. Developing these opportunities will require cooperation, and could be both a lucrative and politically rewarding confidence-building measure. 

  9. Planck intermediate results. XXVIII. Interstellar gas and dust in the Chamaeleon clouds as seen by Fermi LAT and Planck

    CERN Document Server

    Planck,; Ade, P A R; Aghanim, N; Aniano, G; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Casandjian, J M; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Desert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Digel, S W; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Dore, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Ensslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Fukui, Y; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerlow, E; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Gorski, K M; Gregorio, A; Grenier, I A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versille, S; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihanen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vornle, M; Lopez-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macias-Perez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Norgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Strong, A W; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Tibaldo, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    Shortened abstract: Observations of the nearby Chamaeleon clouds in gamma rays with the Fermi Large Area Telescope and in thermal dust emission with Planck and IRAS have been used with the HI and CO radio data to (i) map the gas column densities in the different phases and at the dark neutral medium (DNM) transition between the HI-bright and CO-bright media; (ii) constrain the CO-to-$H_2$ conversion factor, $X_{CO}$; (iii) probe the dust properties per gas nucleon in each gas phase and spatially across the clouds. We have separated clouds in velocity in HI and CO emission and modelled the 0.4-100 GeV intensity, the dust optical depth at 353 GHz, the thermal radiance of the large grains, and an estimate of the dust extinction empirically corrected for the starlight intensity, $A_{VQ}$. The gamma-ray emissivity spectra confirm that the GeV-TeV cosmic rays uniformly permeate all gas phases up to the CO cores. The dust and cosmic rays reveal large amounts of DNM gas, with comparable spatial distributions and twic...

  10. Solvable quadratic Lie algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Linsheng

    2006-01-01

    A Lie algebra endowed with a nondegenerate, symmetric, invariant bilinear form is called a quadratic Lie algebra. In this paper, the author investigates the structure of solvable quadratic Lie algebras, in particular, the solvable quadratic Lie algebras whose Cartan subalgebras consist of semi-simple elements, the author presents a procedure to construct a class of quadratic Lie algebras from the point of view of cohomology and shows that all solvable quadratic Lie algebras can be obtained in this way.

  11. The Relationship Between Molecular Gas, HI, and Star Formation in the Low-Mass, Low-Metallicity Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, Katherine E; Leroy, Adam K; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl; Hughes, Annie; Israel, Frank P; Rubio, Monica; Indebetouw, Remy; Madden, Suzanne C; Bot, Caroline; Hony, Sacha; Cormier, Diane; Pellegrini, Eric W; Galametz, Maud; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    The Magellanic Clouds provide the only laboratory to study the effect of metallicity and galaxy mass on molecular gas and star formation at high (~20 pc) resolution. We use the dust emission from HERITAGE Herschel data to map the molecular gas in the Magellanic Clouds, avoiding the known biases of CO emission as a tracer of H2. Using our dust-based molecular gas estimates, we find molecular gas depletion times of ~0.4 Gyr in the LMC and ~0.6 SMC at 1 kpc scales. These depletion times fall within the range found for normal disk galaxies, but are shorter than the average value, which could be due to recent bursts in star formation. We find no evidence for a strong intrinsic dependence of the molecular gas depletion time on metallicity. We study the relationship between gas and star formation rate across a range in size scales from 20 pc to ~1 kpc, including how the scatter in molecular gas depletion time changes with size scale, and discuss the physical mechanisms driving the relationships. We compare the metal...

  12. Anchoring Magnetic Field in Turbulent Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hua-bai; Goodman, Alyssa; Hildebrand, Roger; Novak, Giles

    2009-01-01

    One of the key problems in star formation research is to determine the role of magnetic fields. Starting from the atomic inter-cloud medium (ICM) which has density nH ~ 1 per cubic cm, gas must accumulate from a volume several hundred pc across in order to form a typical molecular cloud. Star formation usually occurs in cloud cores, which have linear sizes below 1 pc and densities nH2 > 10^5 per cubic cm. With current technologies, it is hard to probe magnetic fields at scales lying between the accumulation length and the size of cloud cores, a range corresponds to many levels of turbulent eddy cascade, and many orders of magnitude of density amplification. For field directions detected from the two extremes, however, we show here that a significant correlation is found. Comparing this result with molecular cloud simulations, only the sub-Alfvenic cases result in field orientations consistent with our observations.

  13. Collision Experiment of an Arched Plasma-Filled Flux Rope and a Target Cloud of Initially Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwaitayakornkul, Pakorn; Bellan, Paul; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2016-10-01

    Shocks occur in the co-rotating interaction regions just beyond the solar corona, in the corona during CME events, and when the solar wind impacts Earth's magnetosphere. The Caltech solar loop experiment investigates shock physics by creating an arched plasma-filled flux rope that expands to collide with a pre-injected, initially-neutral gas. We focus the investigation on the situation of a heavy-gas plasma (Argon) impacting a much lighter neutral gas cloud (Hydrogen). The neutral gas target cloud ionizes immediately upon being impacted and plasma-induced shock waves propagate in the target cloud away from the impact region. Analysis of data from magnetic probes, Langmuir probes, a fast camera, and spectroscopic measurements will be presented. The measurements suggest that a thin, compressed, ionized layer of hydrogen is formed just downstream of the Argon plasma loop and that thin, supersonic shocks form further downstream and propagate obliquely away from the plasma loop. Numerical simulation of an ideal MHD plasma is underway to enable comparison of the measurements with the predictions of MHD theory.

  14. Stochastic Lie group integrators

    CERN Document Server

    Malham, Simon J A

    2007-01-01

    We present Lie group integrators for nonlinear stochastic differential equations with non-commutative vector fields whose solution evolves on a smooth finite dimensional manifold. Given a Lie group action that generates transport along the manifold, we pull back the stochastic flow on the manifold to the Lie group via the action, and subsequently pull back the flow to the corresponding Lie algebra via the exponential map. We construct an approximation to the stochastic flow in the Lie algebra via closed operations and then push back to the Lie group and then to the manifold, thus ensuring our approximation lies in the manifold. We call such schemes stochastic Munthe-Kaas methods after their deterministic counterparts. We also present stochastic Lie group integration schemes based on Castell--Gaines methods. These involve using an underlying ordinary differential integrator to approximate the flow generated by a truncated stochastic exponential Lie series. They become stochastic Lie group integrator schemes if...

  15. No asymmetric outflows from Sagittarius A* during the pericenter passage of the gas cloud G2

    CERN Document Server

    Park, J -H; Krichbaum, T P; Kim, J -Y; Kino, M; Bertarini, A; Bremer, M; de Vicente, P

    2015-01-01

    The gas cloud G2 falling toward Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, is supposed to provide valuable information on the physics of accretion flows and the environment of the black hole. We observed Sgr A* with four European stations of the Global Millimeter Very Long Baseline Interferometry Array (GMVA) at 86 GHz on 1 October 2013 when parts of G2 had already passed the pericenter. We searched for possible transient asymmetric structure -- such as jets or winds from hot accretion flows -- around Sgr A* caused by accretion of material from G2. The interferometric closure phases remained zero within errors during the observation time. We thus conclude that Sgr A* did not show significant asymmetric (in the observer frame) outflows in late 2013. Using simulations, we constrain the size of the outflows that we could have missed to ~2.5 mas along the major axis, ~0.4 mas along the minor axis of the beam, corresponding to approximately 232 and 35 Schwarzschild radii, ...

  16. Vertical Distribution of Galactic Disc Stars and Gas Constrained by a Molecular Cloud Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Jog, C J; Jog, Chanda J.; Narayan, Chaitra A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical effects of a molecular cloud complex with a mass of about 10**7 M_sun and a size of a few 100 pc on the vertical distribution of stars and atomic hydrogen gas in a spiral galactic disc. Such massive complexes have now been observed in a number of spiral galaxies. The extended mass distribution in a complex, with an average mass density 6 times higher than the Oort limit, is shown to dominate the local gravitational field. This results in a significant redistribution of the surrounding disc components towards the mid-plane, with a resulting decrease in their vertical scaleheights. A surprising result is the large radial distance of about 500 pc from the complex centre over which the complex influences the disc. The complex has a comparable effect on the vertical distribution of HI in the galactic disc. This `pinching' or constraining effect should be detectable in the nearby spiral galaxies. Thus the gravitational field of a complex results in local corrugations of the stellar and ...

  17. MUSE searches for galaxies near very metal-poor gas clouds at z~3: new constraints for cold accretion models

    CERN Document Server

    Fumagalli, Michele; Dekel, Avishai; Morris, Simon L; O'Meara, John M; Prochaska, J Xavier; Theuns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We report on the search for galaxies in the proximity of two very metal-poor gas clouds at z~3 towards the quasar Q0956+122. With a 5-hour MUSE integration in a ~500x500 kpc^2 region centred at the quasar position, we achieve a >80% complete spectroscopic survey of continuum-detected galaxies with m3e41 erg/s. We do not identify galaxies at the redshift of a z~3.2 Lyman limit system (LLS) with log Z/Zsun = -3.35 +/- 0.05, placing this gas cloud in the intergalactic medium or circumgalactic medium of a galaxy below our sensitivity limits. Conversely, we detect five Ly{\\alpha} emitters at the redshift of a pristine z~3.1 LLS with log Z/Zsun < -3.8, while ~0.4 sources were expected given the z~3 Ly{\\alpha} luminosity function. Both this high detection rate and the fact that at least three emitters appear aligned in projection with the LLS suggest that this pristine cloud is tracing a gas filament that is feeding one or multiple galaxies. Our observations uncover two different environments for metal-poor LLSs,...

  18. Retrieval algorithm of quantitative analysis of passive Fourier transform infrared (FTRD) remote sensing measurements of chemical gas cloud from measuring the transmissivity by passive remote Fourier transform infrared

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhi-Ming; Liu Wen-qing; Gao Ming-Guang; Tong Jing-Jing; Zhang Wian-Shu; Xu Liang; Wei Xiuai

    2008-01-01

    Passive Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) remote sensing measurement of chemical gas cloud is a vital technology.It takes an important part in many fields for the detection of released gases.The principle of concentration measurement is based on the Beer-Lambert law.Unlike the active measurement,for the passive remote sensing,in most cases,the difference between the temperature of the gas cloud and the brightness temperature of the background is usually a few kelvins.The gas cloud emission is almost equal to the background emission,thereby the emission of the gas cloud cannot be ignored.The concentration retrieval algorithm is quite different from the active measurement.In this paper,the concentration retrieval algorithm for the passive FTIR remote measurement of gas cloud is presented in detail,which involves radiative transfer model,radiometric calibration,absorption coefficient calculation,et al.The background spectrum has a broad feature,which is a slowly varying function of frequency.In this paper,the background spectrum is fitted with a polynomial by using the Levenberg-Marquardt method which is a kind of nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm.No background spectra are required.Thus,this method allows mobile,real-time and fast measurements of gas clouds.

  19. The circumnuclear disk and ionized gas filaments as remnants of tidally disrupted clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, RH; Falcke, H; Cotera, A; Duschl, WJ; Melia, F; Rieke, MJ

    1999-01-01

    Sticky particle calculations indicate that a coherent structure, a dispersion ring, forms when a cloud on a low angular momentum orbit passes close to the dynamical center of a potential containing a point mass. The cloud is tidally stretched and differentially wrapped, and dissipation in shocks org

  20. The circumnuclear disk and ionized gas filaments as remnants of tidally disrupted clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, R. H.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract: Sticky particle calculations indicate that a coherent structure, a dispersion ring, forms when a cloud on a low angular momentum orbit passes close to the dynamical center of an isothermal sphere containing a central point mass. The cloud is tidally stretched and differentially wrapped, an

  1. Impact of office productivity cloud computing on energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Daniel R; Tang, Yinshan

    2013-05-07

    Cloud computing is usually regarded as being energy efficient and thus emitting less greenhouse gases (GHG) than traditional forms of computing. When the energy consumption of Microsoft's cloud computing Office 365 (O365) and traditional Office 2010 (O2010) software suites were tested and modeled, some cloud services were found to consume more energy than the traditional form. The developed model in this research took into consideration the energy consumption at the three main stages of data transmission; data center, network, and end user device. Comparable products from each suite were selected and activities were defined for each product to represent a different computing type. Microsoft provided highly confidential data for the data center stage, while the networking and user device stages were measured directly. A new measurement and software apportionment approach was defined and utilized allowing the power consumption of cloud services to be directly measured for the user device stage. Results indicated that cloud computing is more energy efficient for Excel and Outlook which consumed less energy and emitted less GHG than the standalone counterpart. The power consumption of the cloud based Outlook (8%) and Excel (17%) was lower than their traditional counterparts. However, the power consumption of the cloud version of Word was 17% higher than its traditional equivalent. A third mixed access method was also measured for Word which emitted 5% more GHG than the traditional version. It is evident that cloud computing may not provide a unified way forward to reduce energy consumption and GHG. Direct conversion from the standalone package into the cloud provision platform can now consider energy and GHG emissions at the software development and cloud service design stage using the methods described in this research.

  2. Lying with Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Monmonier, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Darrell Huff’s How to Lie with Statistics was the inspiration for How to Lie with Maps, in which the author showed that geometric distortion and graphic generalization of data are unavoidable elements of cartographic representation. New examples of how ill-conceived or deliberately contrived statistical maps can greatly distort geographic reality demonstrate that lying with maps is a special case of lying with statistics. Issues addressed include the effects of map scale on geometry and featu...

  3. A gas cloud on its way towards the super-massive black hole in the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Gillessen, S; Fritz, T K; Quataert, E; Alig, C; Burkert, A; Cuadra, J; Eisenhauer, F; Pfuhl, O; Dodds-Eden, K; Gammie, C F; Ott, T

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of stellar orbits provide compelling evidence that the compact radio source Sagittarius A* at the Galactic Centre is a black hole four million times the mass of the Sun. With the exception of modest X-ray and infrared flares, Sgr A* is surprisingly faint, suggesting that the accretion rate and radiation efficiency near the event horizon are currently very low. Here we report the presence of a dense gas cloud approximately three times the mass of Earth that is falling into the accretion zone of Sgr A*. Our observations tightly constrain the cloud's orbit to be highly eccentric, with an innermost radius of approach of only ~3,100 times the event horizon that will be reached in 2013. Over the past three years the cloud has begun to disrupt, probably mainly through tidal shearing arising from the black hole's gravitational force. The cloud's dynamic evolution and radiation in the next few years will probe the properties of the accretion flow and the feeding processes of the super-massive black hole. ...

  4. Parenting by Lying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Gail D.; Luu, Diem H.; Lee, Kang

    2009-01-01

    The present set of studies identifies the phenomenon of "parenting by lying", in which parents lie to their children as a means of influencing their emotional states and behaviour. In Study 1, undergraduates (n = 127) reported that their parents had lied to them while maintaining a concurrent emphasis on the importance of honesty. In Study 2 (n =…

  5. Seeding the Galactic Centre gas stream: gravitational instabilities set the initial conditions for the formation of protocluster clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Henshaw, J D; Kruijssen, J M D

    2016-01-01

    Star formation within the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) may be intimately linked to the orbital dynamics of the gas. Recent models suggest that star formation within the dust ridge molecular clouds (from G0.253+0.016 to Sgr B2) follows an evolutionary time sequence, triggered by tidal compression during their preceding pericentre passage. Given that these clouds are the most likely precursors to a generation of massive stars and extreme star clusters, this scenario would have profound implications for constraining the time-evolution of star formation. In this Letter, we search for the initial conditions of the protocluster clouds, focusing on the kinematics of gas situated upstream from pericentre. We observe a highly-regular corrugated velocity field in $\\{l,\\,v_{\\rm LSR}\\}$ space, with amplitude and wavelength $A=3.7\\,\\pm\\,0.1$ kms$^{-1}$ and $\\lambda_{\\rm vel, i}=22.5\\,\\pm\\,0.1$ pc, respectively. The extremes in velocity correlate with a series of massive ($\\sim10^{4}$M$_{\\odot}$) and compact ($R_{\\rm eq}\\s...

  6. Dust and Gas in the Magellanic Clouds from the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project. II. Gas-to-Dust Ratio Variations across ISM Phases

    CERN Document Server

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Meixner, Margaret; Bot, Caroline; Bolatto, Alberto D; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony; Babler, Brian; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Clayton, Geoffrey; Fukui, Yasuo; Galametz, Maud; Galliano, Frederic; Glover, Simon C O; Hony, Sacha; Israel, Frank; Jameson, Katherine; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Lee, Min-Young; Li, Aigen; Madden, Suzanne C; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward; Okumura, K; Onishi, Toshikazu; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Reach, William; Remy-Ruyer, A; Robitaille, Thomas; Rubio, Monica; Sauvage, Marc; Seale, Jonathan; Sewilo, Marta; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Zhukovska, Svitlana

    2014-01-01

    The spatial variations of the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) provide constraints on the chemical evolution and lifecycle of dust in galaxies. We examine the relation between dust and gas at 10-50 pc resolution in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on Herschel far-infrared (FIR), H I 21 cm, CO, and Halpha observations. In the diffuse atomic ISM, we derive the gas-to-dust ratio as the slope of the dust-gas relation and find gas-to-dust ratios of 380+250-130 in the LMC, and 1200+1600-420 in the SMC, not including helium. The atomic-to-molecular transition is located at dust surface densities of 0.05 Mo pc-2 in the LMC and 0.03 Mo pc-2 in the SMC, corresponding to AV ~ 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. We investigate the range of CO-to-H2 conversion factor to best account for all the molecular gas in the beam of the observations, and find upper limits on XCO to be 6x1020 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s in the LMC (Z=0.5Zo) at 15 pc resolution, and 4x 1021 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s in the SMC (Z=0.2Zo) at 45 pc resolution. In the ...

  7. Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Interaction of Winds within a Collapsing Turbulent Gas Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Arreaga-García

    2015-01-01

    a velocity according to a turbulent spectrum built in a Fourier space of 643 grid elements. The level of turbulence and the temperature of the cloud are both adjusted so that a gravitational collapse of the cloud is initially induced. All the winds are activated in a very early stage of evolution of the cloud. We consider only two kinds of winds, namely, one with spherical symmetry and the second one of a bipolar collimated jet. In order to assess the dynamical change in the cloud due to interactions with the winds, we show isovelocity and isodensity plots for all our simulations. We also report on the accretion centers detected at the last simulation time available for each model.

  8. Particulate matter and trace-gas changes at Beltsville, MD, and influences on cloud condensation nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, David

    This dissertation seeks to further our understanding of how rainfall processes are affected by the 3 complex interactions among trace gases, aerosols, and clouds in semi-urban areas. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  9. Photostability of gas- and solid-phase biomolecules within dense molecular clouds due to soft X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Pilling, S; Nascimento, E M do; Marinho, R R T; Boechat-Roberty, H M; de Coutinho, L H; de Souza, G G B; de Castilho, R B; Cavasso-Filho, R L; Lago, A F; de Brito, A N

    2010-01-01

    An experimental photochemistry study involving gas- and solid-phase amino acids (glycine, DL-valine, DL-proline) and nucleobases (adenine and uracil) under soft X-rays was performed. The aim was to test the molecular stabilities of essential biomolecules against ionizing photon fields inside dense molecular clouds and protostellar disks analogs. In these environments, the main energy sources are the cosmic rays and soft X-rays. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing 150 eV photons. In-situ sample analysis was performed by Time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, for gas- and solid- phase analysis, respectively. The half-life of solid phase amino acids, assumed to be present at grain mantles, is at least 3E5 years and 3E8 years inside dense molecular clouds and protoplanetary disks, respectively. We estimate that for gas-phase compounds these values increase one order of magnitude since the dissociation cr...

  10. Effects of Security and Privacy Concerns on using of Cloud Services in Energy Industry, an Oil and Gas Company: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Poorebrahimi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The topic of ‘‘the cloud’’ has attracted significant attention throughout the past few years. It allows resource sharing that includes software, platform and infrastructure by means of virtualization. Cloud Adoption in Oil & Gas companies have approached cloud with caution, but they are increasingly deploying cloud services. Energy companies have carefully weighed whether they should opt for a public cloud versus a private one, and which applications are fit for deployment via the cloud. For the most part, the industry has opted to use cloud for generic purposes. Generic business functions like payroll process and procurement are being run through the cloud, along with customer relationship management, likely through software-as-a-service offerings that have become well-known. Security is as much of an issue in the cloud as it is anywhere else. Different people share different point of view on cloud computing. Some believe it is unsafe to use cloud. Cloud vendors go out of their way to ensure security. This paper aims to understand the effects of security and privacy concerns on educational use of cloud services. This proposed a research model based on Ajzen’s (1991 Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB. Following the TPB, the research developed a model, which posits that staff attitudes predicted by security and privacy perceptions and behavioral intentions are predicted by attitudes towards using cloud services. The Model was assess the based on the data collected by means of survey questionnaires. Results supported the proposed model, validating the predictive power of the TPB.

  11. DUST AND GAS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS FROM THE HERITAGE HERSCHEL KEY PROJECT. II. GAS-TO-DUST RATIO VARIATIONS ACROSS INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM PHASES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bot, Caroline [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bolatto, Alberto; Jameson, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Lab for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Hughes, Annie; Hony, Sacha [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wong, Tony [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Clayton, Geoffrey C. [Louisiana State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Galametz, Maud [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Galliano, Frederic; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Lee, Min-Young [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Glover, Simon [Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Israel, Frank [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Li, Aigen, E-mail: duval@stsci.edu [314 Physics Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); and others

    2014-12-20

    The spatial variations of the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) provide constraints on the chemical evolution and lifecycle of dust in galaxies. We examine the relation between dust and gas at 10-50 pc resolution in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on Herschel far-infrared (FIR), H I 21 cm, CO, and Hα observations. In the diffuse atomic interstellar medium (ISM), we derive the GDR as the slope of the dust-gas relation and find GDRs of 380{sub −130}{sup +250} ± 3 in the LMC, and 1200{sub −420}{sup +1600} ± 120 in the SMC, not including helium. The atomic-to-molecular transition is located at dust surface densities of 0.05 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} in the LMC and 0.03 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} in the SMC, corresponding to A {sub V} ∼ 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. We investigate the range of CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor to best account for all the molecular gas in the beam of the observations, and find upper limits on X {sub CO} to be 6 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} K{sup –1} km{sup –1} s in the LMC (Z = 0.5 Z {sub ☉}) at 15 pc resolution, and 4 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} K{sup –1} km{sup –1} s in the SMC (Z = 0.2 Z {sub ☉}) at 45 pc resolution. In the LMC, the slope of the dust-gas relation in the dense ISM is lower than in the diffuse ISM by a factor ∼2, even after accounting for the effects of CO-dark H{sub 2} in the translucent envelopes of molecular clouds. Coagulation of dust grains and the subsequent dust emissivity increase in molecular clouds, and/or accretion of gas-phase metals onto dust grains, and the subsequent dust abundance (dust-to-gas ratio) increase in molecular clouds could explain the observations. In the SMC, variations in the dust-gas slope caused by coagulation or accretion are degenerate with the effects of CO-dark H{sub 2}. Within the expected 5-20 times Galactic X {sub CO} range, the dust-gas slope can be either constant or decrease by a factor of several across ISM phases. Further modeling

  12. Aerosol and Trace Gas Processing by Clouds During the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X.; Berg, L.; Berkowitz, C.; Alexander, L.; Lee, Y.; Ogren, J.; Andrews, B.

    2008-12-01

    Clouds play an active role in the processing and cycling of atmospheric constituents. Gases and particles can partition to cloud droplets by absorption and condensation as well as activation and pact scavenging. The Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) aimed at characterizing freshly emitted aerosols above, within and below fields of cumulus humilis (or fair-weather cumulus) in the vicinity of Oklahoma City. The experiment took place in June 2007. Evolution of aerosol and cloud properties downwind of the Oklahoma City is of particular interest in this project. These observations of a mid-size and mid-latitude city can be used in the development and evaluation of regional-scale and global climate model cumulus parameterizations that describes the transport and transformations of these aerosols by fair-weather cumulus. The Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was one of the main platforms used in CHAPS. It carried a suite of instruments to measure properties of interstitial aerosols behind an isokinetic inlet and a set of duplicate instruments to determine properties of activated particles behind a counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI). The sampling line to the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer was switched between the isokinetic inlet and the CVI to allow characterization of interstitial particles out of clouds in contrast to particles activated in clouds. Trace gases including ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also measured as were key meteorological state parameters including liquid water content, cloud drop size, and dew point temperature were measured. This presentation will focus on results related to the transformation and transport of aerosols and trace gases observed in fair-weather cumulus and compare these results with concurrent observations made outside these clouds. Our interest will focus on the differences in particle size and composition under varying conditions. The role of

  13. Additive Lie ($\\xi$-Lie) Derivations and Generalized Lie ($\\xi$-Lie) Derivations on Prime Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Xiaofei

    2010-01-01

    The additive (generalized) $\\xi$-Lie derivations on prime algebras are characterized. It is shown, under some suitable assumption, that an additive map $L$ is an additive (generalized) Lie derivation if and only if it is the sum of an additive (generalized) derivation and an additive map from the algebra into its center vanishing all commutators; is an additive (generalized) $\\xi$-Lie derivation with $\\xi\

  14. CH as a Molecular Gas Tracer and C-shock Tracer Across a Molecular Cloud Boundary in Taurus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Duo; Li, Di

    2016-12-01

    We present new observations of all three ground-state transitions of the methylidyne (CH) radical and all four ground-state transitions of the hydroxyl (OH) radical toward a sharp boundary region of the Taurus molecular cloud. These data were analyzed in conjunction with existing CO and dust images. The derived CH abundance is consistent with previous observations of translucent clouds (0.8 ≤ A v ≤ 2.1 mag). The X(CH)-factor is nearly a constant (1.0 ± 0.06) × 1022 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s in this extinction range, with less dispersion than that of the more widely used molecular tracers CO and OH. CH turns out be a better tracer of total column density in such an intermediate extinction range than CO or OH. Compared with previous observations, CH is overabundant below 1 mag extinction. Such an overabundance of CH is consistent with the presence of a C-shock. CH has two kinematic components, one of which shifts from 5.3 to 6 km s-1, while the other stays at 6.8 km s-1 when moving from outside toward inside of the cloud. These velocity behaviors exactly match previous OH observation. The shifting of the two kinematic components indicates colliding streams or gas flow at the boundary region, which could be the cause of the C-shock.

  15. The SAGE-Spec Spitzer Legacy program: The life-cycle of dust and gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Kemper, F; Antoniou, V; Bernard, J -P; Blum, R D; Boyer, M L; Chan, J; Chen, C -H R; Cohen, M; Dijkstra, C; Engelbracht, C; Galametz, M; Galliano, F; Gielen, C; Gordon, Karl D; Gorjian, V; Harris, J; Hony, S; Hora, J L; Indebetouw, R; Jones, O; Kawamura, A; Lagadec, E; Lawton, B; Leisenring, J M; Madden, S C; Marengo, M; Matsuura, M; McDonald, I; McGuire, C; Meixner, M; Mulia, A J; O'Halloran, B; Oliveira, J M; Paladini, R; Paradis, D; Reach, W T; Rubin, D; Sandstrom, K; Sargent, B A; Sewilo, M; Shiao, B; Sloan, G C; Speck, A K; Srinivasan, S; Szczerba, R; Tielens, A G G M; van Aarle, E; Van Dyk, S D; van Loon, J Th; Van Winckel, H; Vijh, Uma P; Volk, K; Whitney, B A; Wilkins, A N; Zijlstra, A A

    2010-01-01

    The SAGE-Spec Spitzer Legacy program is a spectroscopic follow-up to the SAGE-LMC photometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present an overview of SAGE-Spec and some of its first results. The SAGE-Spec program aims to study the life cycle of gas and dust in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and to provide information essential to the classification of the point sources observed in the earlier SAGE-LMC photometric survey. We acquired 224.6 hours of observations using the InfraRed Spectrograph and the SED mode of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. The SAGE-Spec data, along with archival Spitzer spectroscopy of objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud, are reduced and delivered to the community. We discuss the observing strategy, the specific data reduction pipelines applied and the dissemination of data products to the scientific community. Initial science results include the first detection of an extragalactic "21 um" feature towards an evolved star and...

  16. Gamma rays from atomic and molecular gas in the large complex of clouds in Orion and Monoceros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Hermsen, W.; Lebrun, F.; Maddalena, R. J.; Strong, A. W.; Thaddeus, P.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison of COS-B gamma-ray observations of the large complex of interstellar clouds in Orion and Monoceros with the Columbia CO and Berkeley H I surveys of this region reveals a good correlation between gamma-ray emission and total gas distribution. The observed gamma-ray emission is explainable in terms of interactions of cosmic rays that are uniformly distributed in this region with the interstellar gas. The correlation is used as the basis of a calibration of the ratio between H2 column density and the integrated CO line intensity; the value of (2.6 + or - 1.2) X 10 to the 20th mol/sq cm K km s thereby obtained is consistent with the value derived from a similar analysis for the inner galaxy.

  17. The Small Magellanic Cloud Investigation of Dust and Gas Evolution (SMIDGE): The Dust Extinction Curve from Red Clump Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchulova Merica-Jones, Petia; Sandstrom, Karin M.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Gordon, Karl; Roman-Duval, Julia; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2017-10-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of red clump stars taken as part of the Small Magellanic Cloud Investigation of Dust and Gas Evolution (SMIDGE) program to measure the average dust extinction curve in a ∼200 pc × 100 pc region in the southwest bar of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The rich information provided by our eight-band ultraviolet through near-infrared photometry allows us to model the color–magnitude diagram of the red clump accounting for the extinction curve shape, a log-normal distribution of A V , and the depth of the stellar distribution along the line of sight. We measure an extinction curve with {R}475 ={A}475/({A}475{--}{A}814)=2.65+/- 0.11. This measurement is significantly larger than the equivalent values of published Milky Way (MW) R V = 3.1 ({R}475=1.83) and SMC Bar R V = 2.74 ({R}475=1.86) extinction curves. Similar extinction curve offsets in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been interpreted as the effect of large dust grains. We demonstrate that the line-of-sight depth of the SMC (and LMC) introduces an apparent “gray” contribution to the extinction curve inferred from the morphology of the red clump. We show that no gray dust component is needed to explain extinction curve measurements when FWHM depth of 10 ± 2 kpc in the stellar distribution of the SMC (5 ± 1 kpc for the LMC) is considered, which agrees with recent studies of Magellanic Cloud stellar structure. The results of our work demonstrate the power of broadband HST imaging for simultaneously constraining dust and galactic structure outside the MW.

  18. WATER ABSORPTION IN GALACTIC TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS: CONDITIONS AND HISTORY OF THE GAS DERIVED FROM HERSCHEL /HIFI PRISMAS OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flagey, N.; Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lis, D. C.; Monje, R.; Phillips, T. G. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gerin, M.; De Luca, M.; Godard, B. [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, UPMC and UCP (France); Neufeld, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins Univ. 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sonnentrucker, P. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Goicoechea, J. R., E-mail: nflagey@jpl.nasa.gov [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-01

    is below 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}. We derive the water ortho-to-para ratio for each absorption feature along the line of sight and find that most of the clouds show ratios consistent with the value of 3 expected in thermodynamic equilibrium in the high-temperature limit. However, two clouds with large column densities exhibit a ratio that is significantly below 3. This may argue that the history of water molecules includes a cold phase, either when the molecules were formed on cold grains in the well-shielded, low-temperature regions of the clouds, or when they later become at least partially thermalized with the cold gas ({approx}25 K) in those regions; evidently, they have not yet fully thermalized with the warmer ({approx}50 K) translucent portions of the clouds.

  19. The ease of lying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuere, B.; Spruyt, A.; Meijer, E.H.; Otgaar, H.

    2011-01-01

    Brain imaging studies suggest that truth telling constitutes the default of the human brain and that lying involves intentional suppression of the predominant truth response. By manipulating the truth proportion in the Sheffield lie test, we investigated whether the dominance of the truth response i

  20. The ease of lying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuere, B.; Spruyt, A.; Meijer, E.H.; Otgaar, H.

    2011-01-01

    Brain imaging studies suggest that truth telling constitutes the default of the human brain and that lying involves intentional suppression of the predominant truth response. By manipulating the truth proportion in the Sheffield lie test, we investigated whether the dominance of the truth response

  1. Whoppers and White Lies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermillion, Marti

    1985-01-01

    Lying is a symptom of a much broader problem. Primary motivations are need for acceptance, fear of punishment, and desire for attention. Children learn about honesty through observation, both directly and indirectly. Admitting mistakes, especially to children, is invaluable and can help break the lying syndrome. (MT)

  2. Medicine, lies and deceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, P

    2001-04-01

    This article offers a qualified defence of the view that there is a moral difference between telling lies to one's patients, and deceiving them without lying. However, I take issue with certain arguments offered by Jennifer Jackson in support of the same conclusion. In particular, I challenge her claim that to deny that there is such a moral difference makes sense only within a utilitarian framework, and I cast doubt on the aptness of some of her examples of non-lying deception. But I argue that lies have a greater tendency to damage trust than does non-lying deception, and suggest that since many doctors do believe there is a moral boundary between the two types of deception, encouraging them to violate that boundary may have adverse general effects on their moral sensibilities.

  3. Evasive Lying in Strategic Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Khalmetski, Kiryl; Rockenbach, Bettina; Werner, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In a sender-receiver game we investigate if sanctions for lying induce more truth-telling. Senders may not only choose between truth-telling and (explicit) lying, but may also engage in evasive lying by credibly pretending not to know. Sanctions promote truth-telling if senders cannot engage in evasive lying. If evasive lying is possible, explicit lying is largely substituted by evasive lying, in line with the notion that evasive lying is perceived as sufficiently less psychologically costly.

  4. The nearby interstellar medium toward α Leo. UV observations and modeling of a warm cloud within hot gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gry, Cecile; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2017-02-01

    Aims: Our aim is to characterize the conditions in the nearest interstellar cloud. Methods: We analyze interstellar absorption features in the full UV spectrum of the nearby (d = 24 pc) B8 IVn star α Leo (Regulus). Observations were obtained with STIS at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio by the HST ASTRAL Treasury program. We derive column densities for many key atomic species and interpret their partial ionizations. Results: The gas in front of α Leo exhibits two absorption components. The main one is kinematically identified as the local interstellar cloud (LIC) that surrounds the Sun. The second component is shifted by +5.6 km s-1 relative to the main component, in agreement with results for other lines of sight in this region of the sky, and shares its ionization and physical conditions. The excitation of the C II fine-structure levels and the ratio of Mg I to Mg II reveal a temperature T = 6500 (+750, -600) K and electron density n(e) = 0.11 (+0.025, -0.03) cm-3. Our investigation of the ionization balance yields the ion fractions for 10 different atoms and indicates that about 1/3 of the hydrogen atoms are ionized. Metals are significantly depleted onto grains, with sulfur showing [S/H] -0.27. N(H I) = 1.9 (+0.9, -0.6) × 1018 cm-3, which indicates that this partly neutral gas occupies only 2 to 8 parsecs (about 13%) of the space toward the star, with the remaining volume being filled with a hot gas that emits soft X-rays. We do not detect any absorption features from the highly ionized species that could be produced in an interface between the warm medium and the surrounding hot gas, possibly because of non-equilibrium conditions or a particular magnetic field orientation that reduces thermal conduction. Finally, the radial velocity of the LIC agrees with that of the Local Leo Cold Cloud, indicating that they may be physically related.

  5. The Gas-to-Dust Relation in the Dark Cloud L1523 - Observational Evidence for CO Gas Depletion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Correlation between gas and dust column density has been studied for the dark globule L1523. The 13CO(J= 1→0) emission is used for tracing the gas, and the IR emissions, for tracing the dust constituent. In order to match the beam resolution between the images, a beam de-convolution algorithm based on the Maximum Correlation Method (MCM) was applied on the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data. The morphology of 13CO column density map shows a close correlation to that of 100μm dust optical depth. The distribution of the optical depth at 100 μm follows that of gas column density more closely than does the flux map at either 60 or 100μm. The ratio of the 13CO column density to the 100μm optical depth shows a decreasing trend with increasing dust optical depth in the central part, indicating possible molecular gas condensation onto dust particles. The excessive decrease in the CO column density in the envelope may most probably be due to the photo-dissociation of CO molecules.

  6. LOCALIZED STARBURSTS IN DWARF GALAXIES PRODUCED BY THE IMPACT OF LOW-METALLICITY COSMIC GAS CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Filho, M. E. [Instituto Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Elmegreen, B. G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Granada (Spain); Amorín, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Ascasibar, Y. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Papaderos, P., E-mail: jos@iac.es [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2015-09-10

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter halos. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here, we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias optical spectra of 10 XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60% solar, on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6% solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possible if the metal-poor gas fell onto the disk recently. We analyze several possibilities for the origin of the metal-poor gas, favoring the metal-poor gas infall predicted by numerical models. If this interpretation is correct, XMPs trace the cosmic web gas in their surroundings, making them probes to examine its properties.

  7. On lying and deceiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhurst, D

    1992-06-01

    This article challenges Jennifer Jackson's recent defence of doctors' rights to deceive patients. Jackson maintains there is a general moral difference between lying and intentional deception: while doctors have a prima facie duty not to lie, there is no such obligation to avoid deception. This paper argues 1) that an examination of cases shows that lying and deception are often morally equivalent, and 2) that Jackson's position is premised on a species of moral functionalism that misconstrues the nature of moral obligation. Against Jackson, it is argued that both lying and intentional deception are wrong where they infringe a patient's right to autonomy or his/her right to be treated with dignity. These rights represent 'deontological constraints' on action, defining what we must not do whatever the functional value of the consequences. Medical ethics must recognise such constraints if it is to contribute to the moral integrity of medical practice.

  8. Lie algebras and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This course-based primer provides an introduction to Lie algebras and some of their applications to the spectroscopy of molecules, atoms, nuclei and hadrons. In the first part, it concisely presents the basic concepts of Lie algebras, their representations and their invariants. The second part includes a description of how Lie algebras are used in practice in the treatment of bosonic and fermionic systems. Physical applications considered include rotations and vibrations of molecules (vibron model), collective modes in nuclei (interacting boson model), the atomic shell model, the nuclear shell model, and the quark model of hadrons. One of the key concepts in the application of Lie algebraic methods in physics, that of spectrum generating algebras and their associated dynamic symmetries, is also discussed. The book highlights a number of examples that help to illustrate the abstract algebraic definitions and includes a summary of many formulas of practical interest, such as the eigenvalues of Casimir operators...

  9. Additive Lie (ζ-Lie) Derivations and Generalized Lie (ζ-Lie)Derivations on Prime Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Fei QI; Jin Chuan HOU

    2013-01-01

    The additive (generalized) ζ-Lie derivations on prime algebras are characterized.It is shown,under some suitable assumptions,that an additive map L is an additive generalized Lie derivation if and only if it is the sum of an additive generalized derivation and an additive map from the algebra into its center vanishing all commutators; is an additive (generalized) ζ-Lie derivation with ζ ≠ 1 if and only if it is an additive (generalized) derivation satisfying L(ζA) =ζL(A) for all A.These results are then used to characterize additive (generalized) ζ-Lie derivations on several operator algebras such as Banach space standard operator algebras and von Neumman algebras.

  10. Lying, honor, and contradiction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael Gilsenan

    2016-01-01

    .... +Superscript 1 -Superscript With a particular concentration on the manifold practices of what will be called "lying," I shall try to show the way in which individuals in a Lebanese village negotiate...

  11. Radiative and mechanical feedback into the molecular gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud. I. N159W

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Min-Young; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Gusdorf, Antoine; Godard, Benjamin; Wu, Ronin; Galametz, Maud; Cormier, Diane; Petit, Franck Le; Roueff, Evelyne; Bron, Emeric; Carlson, Lynn; Chevance, Melanie; Fukui, Yasuo; Galliano, Frederic; Hony, Sacha; Hughes, Annie; Indebetouw, Remy; Israel, Franck; Kawamura, Akiko; Bourlot, Jacques Le; Lesaffre, Pierre; Meixner, Margaret; Muller, Erik; Nayak, Omnarayani; Onishi, Toshikazu; Roman-Duval, Julia; Sewilo, Marta

    2016-01-01

    We present Herschel SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observations of N159W, an active star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In our observations, a number of far-infrared cooling lines including CO(4-3) to CO(12-11), [CI] 609 and 370 micron, and [NII] 205 micron are clearly detected. With an aim of investigating the physical conditions and excitation processes of molecular gas, we first construct CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) on 10 pc scales by combining the FTS CO transitions with ground-based low-J CO data and analyze the observed CO SLEDs using non-LTE radiative transfer models. We find that the CO-traced molecular gas in N159W is warm (kinetic temperature of 153-754 K) and moderately dense (H2 number density of (1.1-4.5)e3 cm-3). To assess the impact of the energetic processes in the interstellar medium on the physical conditions of the CO-emitting gas, we then compare the observed CO line intensities with the models of photodissociation regions (PDRs) and shock...

  12. Molecular and Atomic Gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud II. Three-dimensional Correlation between CO and HI

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Y; Wong, T; Murai, M; Iritani, H; Mizuno, N; Mizuno, Y; Onishi, T; Hughes, A; Ott, J; Müller, E; Staveley-Smith, L; Kim, S

    2009-01-01

    We compare the CO J =(1-0) and HI emission in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) in three dimensions, i.e. including a velocity axis in addition to the two spatial axes, with the aim of elucidating the physical connection between giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and their surrounding HI gas. The CO J =1-0 dataset is from the second NANTEN CO survey and the HI dataset is from the merged Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and Parkes Telescope surveys. The major findings of our analysis are: 1) GMCs are associated with an envelope of HI emission, 2) in GMCs [average CO intensity] is proportional to [average HI intensity]^[1.1+-0.1] and 3) the HI intensity tends to increase with the star formation activity within GMCs, from Type I to Type III. An analysis of the HI envelopes associated with GMCs shows that their average linewidth is 14 km s-1 and the mean density in the envelope is 10 cm-3. We argue that the HI envelopes are gravitationally bound by GMCs. These findings are consistent with a continual increase i...

  13. Age, size, and position of H ii regions in the Galaxy. Expansion of ionized gas in turbulent molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Tremblin, P; Didelon, P; Raga, A C; Minier, V; Ntormousi, E; Pettitt, A; Pinto, C; Samal, M; Schneider, N; Zavagno, A

    2014-01-01

    This work aims at improving the current understanding of the interaction between H ii regions and turbulent molecular clouds. We propose a new method to determine the age of a large sample of OB associations by investigating the development of their associated H ii regions in the surrounding turbulent medium. Using analytical solutions, one-dimensional (1D), and three-dimensional (3D) simulations, we constrained the expansion of the ionized bubble depending on the turbulent level of the parent molecular cloud. A grid of 1D simulations was then computed in order to build isochrone curves for H ii regions in a pressure-size diagram. This grid of models allowed to date large sample of OB associations and was used on the H ii Region Discovery Survey (HRDS). Analytical solutions and numerical simulations showed that the expansion of H ii regions is slowed down by the turbulence up to the point where the pressure of the ionized gas is in a quasi-equilibrium with the turbulent ram pressure. Based on this result, we ...

  14. Localized starbursts in dwarf galaxies produced by impact of low metallicity cosmic gas clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Munoz-Tunon, C; Elmegreen, D M; Perez-Montero, E; Amorin, R; Filho, M E; Ascasibar, Y; Papaderos, P; Vilchez, J M

    2015-01-01

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter haloes. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local Universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) optical spectra of ten XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60 % solar on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6 % solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possib...

  15. Molecular gas and stars in the translucent cloud MBM 18 (LDN 1569)

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, J; Magnani, L

    2012-01-01

    Seven of ten candidate H-alpha emission-line stars found in an objective grism survey of a 1 square degree region in MBM 18, were observed spectroscopically. Four of these have weak H-alpha emission, and 6 out of 7 have spectral types M1-M4V. One star is of type F7-G1V, and has H-alpha in absorption. The spectra of three of the M-stars may show an absorption line of LiI, although none of these is an unambiguous detection. For the six M-stars a good fit is obtained with pre-main-sequence isochrones indicating ages between 7.5 and 15Myr. The molecular cloud mass, derived from the integrated 12CO(1-0) emission, is 160Mo (for a distance of 120pc), much smaller than the virial mass (10^3Mo), and the cloud is not gravitationally bound. Nor are the individual clumps we identified through a clump-finding routine. Considering the relative weakness or absence of the H-alpha emission, the absence of other emission lines, and the lack of clear LiI absorption, the targets are not T Tauri stars. With ages between 7.5 and 1...

  16. Development of the ARISTOTLE webware for cloud-based rarefied gas flow modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschenes, Timothy R.; Grot, Jonathan; Cline, Jason A.

    2016-11-01

    Rarefied gas dynamics are important for a wide variety of applications. An improvement in the ability of general users to predict these gas flows will enable optimization of current, and discovery of future processes. Despite this potential, most rarefied simulation software is designed by and for experts in the community. This has resulted in low adoption of the methods outside of the immediate RGD community. This paper outlines an ongoing effort to create a rarefied gas dynamics simulation tool that can be used by a general audience. The tool leverages a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) library that is available to the entire community and a web-based simulation process that will enable all users to take advantage of high performance computing capabilities. First, the DSMC library and simulation architecture are described. Then the DSMC library is used to predict a number of representative transient gas flows that are applicable to the rarefied gas dynamics community. The paper closes with a summary and future direction.

  17. Lying in neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seron, X

    2014-10-01

    The issue of lying occurs in neuropsychology especially when examinations are conducted in a forensic context. When a subject intentionally either presents non-existent deficits or exaggerates their severity to obtain financial or material compensation, this behaviour is termed malingering. Malingering is discussed in the general framework of lying in psychology, and the different procedures used by neuropsychologists to evidence a lack of collaboration at examination are briefly presented and discussed. When a lack of collaboration is observed, specific emphasis is placed on the difficulty in unambiguously establishing that this results from the patient's voluntary decision.

  18. 3D adaptive mesh refinement simulations of the gas cloud G2 born within the disks of young stars in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Schartmann, M; Burkert, A; Gillessen, S; Genzel, R; Pfuhl, O; Eisenhauer, F; Plewa, P M; Ott, T; George, E M; Habibi, M

    2015-01-01

    The dusty, ionized gas cloud G2 is currently passing the massive black hole in the Galactic Center at a distance of roughly 2400 Schwarzschild radii. We explore the possibility of a starting point of the cloud within the disks of young stars. We make use of the large amount of new observations in order to put constraints on G2's origin. Interpreting the observations as a diffuse cloud of gas, we employ three-dimensional hydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations with the PLUTO code and do a detailed comparison with observational data. The simulations presented in this work update our previously obtained results in multiple ways: (1) high resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical AMR simulations are used, (2) the cloud follows the updated orbit based on the Brackett-$\\gamma$ data, (3) a detailed comparison to the observed high-quality position-velocity diagrams and the evolution of the total Brackett-$\\gamma$ luminosity is done. We concentrate on two unsolved problems of the diffuse cloud scen...

  19. Detection of a turbulent gas component associated with a starless core with subthermal turbulence in the Orion A cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Ohashi, Satoshi; Sanhueza, Patricio; Luong, Quang Nguyn; Hirota, Tomoya; Choi, Minho; Mizuno, Norikazu

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of a wing component in NH$_3$ emission toward the starless core TUKH122 with subthermal turbulence in the Orion A cloud. This NH$_3$ core is suggested to be on the verge of star formation because the turbulence inside the NH$_3$ core is almost completely dissipated, and also because it is surrounded by CCS, which resembles the prestellar core L1544 in Taurus showing infall motions. Observations were carried out with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope at 0.05 km s$^{-1}$ velocity resolution. We find that the NH$_3$ line profile consists of two components. The quiescent main component has a small linewidth of 0.3 km s$^{-1}$ dominated by thermal motions, and the red-shifted wing component has a large linewidth of 1.36 km s$^{-1}$ representing turbulent motions. These components show kinetic temperatures of 11 K and $<$ 30 K, respectively. Furthermore, there is a clear velocity offset between the NH$_3$ quiescent gas ($VLSR=3.7$ km s$^{-1}$) and the turbulent gas ($VLSR=4.4$ km s$^{-1}$). The...

  20. Infalling clouds onto super-massive black hole binaries - I. Formation of discs, accretion and gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goicovic, F G; Sesana, A; Stasyszyn, F; Amaro-Seoane, P; Tanaka, T L

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that most -if not all- galaxies harbour a super-massive black hole (SMBH) at their nucleus, hence binaries of these massive objects are an inevitable product of the hierarchical evolution of structures in the universe, and represent an important but thus-far elusive phase of galaxy evolution. Gas accretion via a circumbinary disc is thought to be important for the dynamical evolution of SMBH binaries, as well as in producing luminous emission that can be used to infer their properties. One plausible source of the gaseous fuel is clumps of gas formed due to turbulence and gravitational instabilities in the interstellar medium, that later fall toward and interact with the binary. In this context, we model numerically the evolution of turbulent clouds in near-radial infall onto equal-mass SMBH binaries, using a modified version of the SPH code GADGET-3. We present a total of 12 simulations that explore different possible pericentre distances and relative inclinations, and show that t...

  1. Evolution of OH and CO-dark Molecular Gas Fraction Across a Molecular Cloud Boundary In Taurus

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Duo; Yue, Nannan; Goldsmith, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of 12CO J=1-0, 13CO J=1-0, HI, and all four ground-state transitions of the hydroxyl (OH) radical toward a sharp boundary region of the Taurus molecular cloud. Based on a PDR model that reproduces CO and [CI] emission from the same region, we modeled the three OH transitions, 1612, 1665, 1667 MHz successfully through escape probability non-LTE radiative transfer model calculations. We could not reproduce the 1720 MHz observations, due to un-modeled pumping mechanisms, of which the most likely candidate is a C-shock. The abundance of OH and CO-dark molecular gas (DMG) are well constrained. The OH abundance [OH]/[H2] decreases from 8*10-7 to 1*10-7 as Av increases from 0.4 to 2.7 mag, following an empirical law [OH]/[H2]= 1.5 * 10^{-7} + 9.0 * 10^{-7} * exp(-Av/0.81), which is higher than PDR model predictions for low extinction regions by a factor of 80. The overabundance of OH at extinctions at or below 1 mag is likely the result of a C-shock. The dark gas fraction (DGF, defined as fra...

  2. The dense gas mass fraction in the W51 cloud and its protoclusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, Adam; Battersby, Cara; Youngblood, Allison; Darling, Jeremy; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Hector; Santos, Mayra E Lebrón

    2014-01-01

    We present new 2 cm and 6 cm maps of H2CO, radio recombination lines, and the radio continuum in the W51 star forming complex acquired with Arecibo and the Green Bank Telescope at ~50" resolution. We use H2CO absorption to determine the relative line-of-sight positions of molecular and ionized gas. We measure gas densities using the H2CO densitometer, including continuous measurements of the dense gas mass fraction (DGMF) over the range 10^4 cm^-3 ~70% above n>10^4 cm^-3, while it is low, f 10^4 cm-3 is weakly correlated with low and moderate mass star formation, but does not strongly correlate with high-mass star formation. (3) The nondetection of H2CO emission implies that the emission detected in other galaxies, e.g. Arp 220, comes from high-density gas that is not directly affiliated with already-formed massive stars. Either the non-star-forming ISM of these galaxies is very dense, implying the star formation density threshold is higher, or H ii regions have their emission suppressed.

  3. UCLCHEM: A Gas-grain Chemical Code for Clouds, Cores, and C-Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdship, J.; Viti, S.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Makrymallis, A.; Priestley, F.

    2017-07-01

    We present a publicly available, open source version of the time-dependent, gas-grain chemical code UCLCHEM. UCLCHEM propagates the abundances of chemical species through a large network of chemical reactions in a variety of physical conditions. The model is described in detail, along with its applications. As an example of possible uses, UCLCHEM is used to explore the effect of protostellar collapse on commonly observed molecules, and study the behavior of molecules in C-type shocks. We find the collapse of a simple Bonnor-Ebert sphere successfully reproduces most of the behavior of CO, CS, and NH3 from cores observed by Tafalla et al. (2004), but cannot predict the behavior of N2H+. In the C-shock application, we find that molecules can be categorized such that they become useful observational tracers of shocks and their physical properties. Although many molecules are enhanced in shocked gas, we identify two groups of molecules in particular. A small number of molecules are enhanced by the sputtering of the ices as the shock propagates, and then remain high in abundance throughout the shock. A second, larger set is also enhanced by sputtering, but then destroyed as the gas temperature rises. Through these applications, the general applicability of UCLCHEM is demonstrated.

  4. Water Deuteration and Ortho-to-Para Nuclear Spin Ratio of H2 in Molecular Clouds Formed via Accumulation of HI Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, K; Hincelin, U; Hassel, G E; Bergin, E A; Vasyunin, A I; Herbst, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the water deuteration ratio and ortho-to-para nuclear spin ratio of H2 (OPR(H2)) during the formation and early evolution of a molecular cloud, following the scenario that accretion flows sweep and accumulate HI gas to form molecular clouds. We follow the physical evolution of post-shock materials using a one-dimensional shock model, with post-processing gas-ice chemistry simulations. This approach allows us to study the evolution of the OPR(H2) and water deuteration ratio without an arbitrary assumption concerning the initial molecular abundances, including the initial OPR(H2). When the conversion of hydrogen into H2 is almost complete, the OPR(H2) is already much smaller than the statistical value of three due to the spin conversion in the gas phase. As the gas accumulates, the OPR(H2) decreases in a non-equilibrium manner. We find that water ice can be deuterium-poor at the end of its main formation stage in the cloud, compared to water vapor observed in the vicinity of low-mass protostars w...

  5. On the Logic of Lying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. van Ditmarsch (Hans); D.J.N. van Eijck (Jan); F.A.G. Sietsma (Floor); Y. Wang (Yanjing); D.J.N. van Eijck (Jan); R. Verbrugge

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractWe look at lying as an act of communication, where (i) the proposition that is communicated is not true, (ii) the utterer of the lie knows (or believes) that what she communicates is not true, and (iii) the utterer of the lie intends the lie to be taken as truth. Rather than dwell on

  6. The impact of flue gas cleaning technologies in coal-fired power plants on the CCN distribution and cloud properties in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, M.; Vogel, B.; Junkermann, W.; Brachert, L.; Schaber, K.

    2013-05-01

    Gas-cleaning technologies used in modern coal-fired power plants cause an unintended nucleation of H2SO4 aerosol droplets during the cleaning process. As a result, high concentrations of ultra-fine aerosol droplets are emitted into the atmosphere. In this study, the impact of these emissions on the atmospheric aerosol distribution, on the cloud condensation nuclei number concentration, and consequently on cloud properties is investigated. Therefore, a sophisticated modeling framework is used combining regional simulations of the atmospheric aerosol distribution and its impact on cloud properties with detailed process simulations of the nucleation during the cleaning process inside the power plant. Furthermore, the simulated aerosol size distributions downwind of the coal-fired power plants are compared with airborne aerosol measurements performed inside the plumes.

  7. Lie algebraic noncommutative gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Mukherjee, Pradip; Samanta, Saurav

    2007-06-01

    We exploit the Seiberg-Witten map technique to formulate the theory of gravity defined on a Lie algebraic noncommutative space-time. Detailed expressions of the Seiberg-Witten maps for the gauge parameters, gauge potentials, and the field strengths have been worked out. Our results demonstrate that notwithstanding the introduction of more general noncommutative structure there is no first order correction, exactly as happens for a canonical (i.e. constant) noncommutativity.

  8. The JCMT dense gas survey in dense molecular clouds: an HCO+/HCN comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Smith, Samantha; Richer, John; Buckle, Jane; Salji, Carl; Hatchell, Jennifer; Drabek, Emily

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a large-scale survey of the very dense molecular gas in Perseus, Orion A and B, Serpens and Ophiuchus using HCO+ and HCN (J = 4 - 3) transitions. We have used this emission to trace the structure and kinematics of gas at the extremely high densities found in pre- and protostellar cores; as well as tracing outflows powered by these early star-forming cores. We present a comparison of the HCO+/HCN data, highlighting regions where there is a marked discrepancy in the spectra of the two emission lines. This is particularly noticeable in some of the more powerful outflows driven by Class 0 sources, where the HCN is greatly enhanced in the linewings in comparison with HCO+. We also use the HCO+ to positively identify protostellar outflows and their driving sources. We present a statistical analysis of the outflow properties that we derive from this tracer. We show that our results are comparable to those obtained from similar outflow analyses using 12CO.

  9. Introduction to quantum Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Delius, G W

    1996-01-01

    Quantum Lie algebras are generalizations of Lie algebras whose structure constants are power series in h. They are derived from the quantized enveloping algebras \\uqg. The quantum Lie bracket satisfies a generalization of antisymmetry. Representations of quantum Lie algebras are defined in terms of a generalized commutator. In this paper the recent general results about quantum Lie algebras are introduced with the help of the explicit example of (sl_2)_h.

  10. Lie groups, lie algebras, and representations an elementary introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This textbook treats Lie groups, Lie algebras and their representations in an elementary but fully rigorous fashion requiring minimal prerequisites. In particular, the theory of matrix Lie groups and their Lie algebras is developed using only linear algebra, and more motivation and intuition for proofs is provided than in most classic texts on the subject. In addition to its accessible treatment of the basic theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras, the book is also noteworthy for including: a treatment of the Baker–Campbell–Hausdorff formula and its use in place of the Frobenius theorem to establish deeper results about the relationship between Lie groups and Lie algebras motivation for the machinery of roots, weights and the Weyl group via a concrete and detailed exposition of the representation theory of sl(3;C) an unconventional definition of semisimplicity that allows for a rapid development of the structure theory of semisimple Lie algebras a self-contained construction of the representations of compac...

  11. Laboratory Studies of Stabilities of Heterocyclic Aromatic Molecules: Suggested Gas Phase Ion-Molecule Routes to Production in Interstellar Gas Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nigel G.; Fondren, L. Dalila; McLain, Jason L.; Jackson, Doug M.

    2006-01-01

    Several ring compounds have been detected in interstellar gas clouds, ISC, including the aromatic, benzene. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs, have been implicated as carriers of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and unidentified infrared (UIR) bands. Heterocyclic aromatic rings of intermediate size containing nitrogen, possibly PreLife molecules, were included in early searches but were not detected and a recent search for Pyrimidine was unsuccessful. Our laboratory investigations of routes to such molecules could establish their existence in ISC and suggest conditions under which their concentrations would be maximized thus aiding the searches. The stability of such ring compounds (C5H5N, C4H4N2, C5H11N and C4H8O2) has been tested in the laboratory using charge transfer excitation in ion-molecule reactions. The fragmentation paths, including production of C4H4(+), C3H3N(+) and HCN, suggest reverse routes to the parent molecules, which are presently under laboratory investigation as production sources.

  12. Kinematic Structure of Molecular Gas around High-mass YSO, Papillon Nebula, in N159 East in the Large Magellanic Cloud: A New Perspective with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigo, Kazuya; Onishi, Toshikazu; Nayak, Omnarayani; Meixner, Margaret; Tokuda, Kazuki; Harada, Ryohei; Morioka, Yuuki; Sewiło, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Torii, Kazufumi; Kawamura, Akiko; Ohama, Akio; Hattori, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Madden, Suzanne; Galametz, Maud; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Mizuno, Norikazu; Fukui, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    We present the ALMA Band 3 and Band 6 results of 12CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1), H30α recombination line, free–free emission around 98 GHz, and the dust thermal emission around 230 GHz toward the N159 East Giant Molecular Cloud (N159E) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). LMC is the nearest active high-mass star-forming face-on galaxy at a distance of 50 kpc and is the best target for studing high-mass star formation. ALMA observations show that N159E is the complex of filamentary clouds with the width and length of ∼1 pc and several parsecs. The total molecular mass is 0.92 × 105 M⊙ from the 13CO(2-1) intensity. N159E harbors the well-known Papillon Nebula, a compact high-excitation H ii region. We found that a YSO associated with the Papillon Nebula has the mass of 35 M⊙ and is located at the intersection of three filamentary clouds. It indicates that the formation of the high-mass YSO was induced by the collision of filamentary clouds. Fukui et al. reported a similar kinematic structure toward two YSOs in the N159 West region, which are the other YSOs that have the mass of ≳35 M⊙. This suggests that the collision of filamentary clouds is a primary mechanism of high-mass star formation. We found a small molecular hole around the YSO in Papillon Nebula with a sub-parsec scale. It is filled by free–free and H30α emission. The temperature of the molecular gas around the hole reaches ∼80 K. It indicates that this YSO has just started the distruction of parental molecular cloud.

  13. Cloud formation by combined instabilities in galactic gas layers - Evidence for a Q threshold in the fragmentation of shearing wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    1991-09-01

    The growth of shearing wavelets in thick galactic gas disks is studied, including the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability perpendicular to the plane, various degrees of thermal instability, and the gravitational instability. Growth rates are calculated numerically for a wide range of parameter values, giving an effective dispersion relation and mass distribution function, and an approximate dispersion relation is derived analytically for the epoch of peak growth. An extensive coverage of parameter space illustrates the relative insensitivity of the gaseous shear instability to the axisymmetric stability parameter Q. The fragmentation of shearing wavelets by self-gravitational collapse parallel to the wave crest is also considered. Such fragmentation is sensitive to Q, requiring Q equal to or less than 1-2 for the growth of parallel perturbations to overcome shear inside the wavelet. Fragmentation instabilities may provide the link between shear instabilities and the formation of individual clouds. They are much more sensitive to Q than shear instabilities, and may regulate star formation so that Q approximately equals 1.

  14. Cloud point extraction and gas chromatography with direct microvial insert thermal desorption for the determination of haloanisoles in alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2016-11-01

    A sensitive analytical procedure for the determination of four haloanisoles (2,4,6 trichloroanisole, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole, 2,3,4,6-tetrachloroanisole and pentachloroanisole) related with cork taint defects in wines, in different types of alcoholic beverages has been developed. The analytes were extracted from the matrix samples by cloud point extraction (CPE) using Triton X-114 heated to 75°C, and the surfactant rich phase was separated by centrifugation. By means of direct microvial insert thermal desorption, 20µL of the CPE obtained extract was submitted to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The parameters affecting the CPE and microvial insert thermal desorption were optimized. Quantification was carried by matrix-matched calibration using an internal standard. Detection limits ranged between 12.9 and 20.8ngL(-1), depending on the compound, for beer and wine samples, whereas for whiskies values in the 46.3-48ngL(-1) range were obtained, since these samples were diluted for analysis. Recoveries for alcoholic beverages were in the 89-111% range, depending on the analyte and the sample.

  15. The nearby interstellar medium towards alpha Leo -- UV observations and modeling of a warm cloud within hot gas

    CERN Document Server

    Gry, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    We analyze interstellar absorption features in the full UV spectrum of the nearby (d = 24 pc) B8 IVn star alpha Leo (Regulus) obtained at high resolution and high S/N by the HST ASTRAL Treasury program. We derive column densities for many key atomic species and interpret their partial ionizations. The gas in front of alpha Leo exhibits two absorption components, one of which coincides in velocity with the local interstellar cloud (LIC) that surrounds the Sun. The second, smaller, component is shifted by +5.6 km/s relative to the main component, in agreement with results for other lines of sight in this region of the sky. The excitation of the C II fine-structure levels and the ratio of Mg I to Mg II reveal a temperature T = 6500 (+750,-600)K and electron density n(e) = 0.11 (+0.025,-0.03) cm^-3. Our investigation of the ionization balance of all the available species indicates that about 1/3 of the hydrogen atoms are ionized and that metals are significantly depleted onto grains. We infer that N(H I) = 1.9 (+...

  16. Lie algebraic Noncommutative Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, R; Samanta, S; Banerjee, Rabin; Mukherjee, Pradip; Samanta, Saurav

    2007-01-01

    The minimal (unimodular) formulation of noncommutative general relativity, based on gauging the Poincare group, is extended to a general Lie algebra valued noncommutative structure. We exploit the Seiberg -- Witten map technique to formulate the theory as a perturbative Lagrangian theory. Detailed expressions of the Seiberg -- Witten maps for the gauge parameters, gauge potentials and the field strengths have been worked out. Our results demonstrate that notwithstanding the introduction of more general noncommutative structure there is no first order correction, exactly as happens for a canonical (i.e. constant) noncommutativity.

  17. Lied Transplant Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

  18. Data flood : using processes such as data quality management and cloud computing, oil and gas producers harness the growing quantities of digital information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, P.

    2009-07-15

    One of the greatest challenges facing companies today is information growth. The oil and gas sector is one of the most data-intensive businesses in the world. Seismic data alone is growing at more than 30 per cent per year. In addition, the ability to efficiently handle the increase in data can be compromised as reservoir models grow bigger with the use of more sophisticated algorithms. The oil and gas industry is also faced with the challenge of protecting the integrity of information while making it available to all who need it. Better information management is essential to identifying risks, expanding markets, managing costs and improving integration across the global enterprise. This article described how Schlumberger has implemented an ongoing process that improves data quality and keeps the data quality from degrading over time. The company has developed a solution called Data Quality Management (DQM) to better control and manage the huge flow of data. A set of DQM training classes have been developed along with a DQM Handbook. This article also addressed the issue of cloud computing which will continue to gain prominence as oil and gas companies try to handle high volumes of data more effectively. Cloud computing refers to accessing resources and services needed to perform functions with dynamically changing needs. A cloud service has 3 characteristics that differentiate it from traditional hosting, notably it is sold on demand; it is elastic; and the service is fully managed by the provider. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Police lie detection accuracy: the effect of lie scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Maureen; Frank, Mark G; Hurley, Carolyn M; Tiwana, Jaspreet

    2009-12-01

    Although most people are not better than chance in detecting deception, some groups of police professionals have demonstrated significant lie detection accuracy. One reason for this difference may be that the types of lies police are asked to judge in scientific experiments often do not represent the types of lies they see in their profession. Across 23 studies, involving 31 different police groups in eight countries, police officers tested with lie detection scenarios using high stakes lies (i.e., the lie was personally involving and/or resulted in substantial rewards or punishments for the liar) were significantly more accurate than law enforcement officials tested with low stakes lies. Face validity and construct validity of various lie scenarios are differentiated.

  20. Dense Gas and Star Formation Characteristics of Cloud Cores Associated with Water Masers

    CERN Document Server

    Plume, R; Evans, N J; Martín-Pintado, J; Gómez-González, J; Plume, Rene; II, Neal J. Evans

    1996-01-01

    We have observed 150 regions of massive star formation, selected originally by the presence of a water maser, in the J = 5-4, 3-2, and 2-1 transitions of CS, and 49 regions in the same transitions of C$^{34}$S. Over 90% of the 150 regions were detected in the J = 2-1 and 3-2 transitions of CS and 75% were detected in the J=5-4 transition. We have combined the data with the J = 7-6 data from our original survey (Plume et al. 1992) to determine the density by analyzing the excitation of the rotational levels. Using Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) models, we have determined densities and column densities for 71 of these regions. The gas densities are very high (the mean log of the density is 5.9), but much less than the critical density of the J=7-6 line. Small maps of 25 of the sources in the J = 5-4 line yield a mean diameter of 1.0 pc. The mean virial mass is 3800 solar masses. The mean ratio of bolometric luminosity to virial mass (L/M) is 190, about 50 times higher than estimates using CO emission, suggesting...

  1. Mass estimates for very cold (< 8 K) gas in molecular cloud cores

    CERN Document Server

    Steinacker, Juergen; Beuther, Henrik; Henning, Thomas; Bacmann, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    The mass of prestellar cores is an essential ingredient to understand the onset of star formation in the core. The low level of emission from cold dust may keep parts of it hidden from observation. We aim to determine the fraction of core mass in the temperature range < 8 K that can be expected for typical low- and high-mass star formation regions. We calculate the dust temperature within standard spherically symmetric prestellar cores for a grid of density powerlaws in the outer core regions, core masses, and variation in the external multi-component radiation field. The dust is assumed to be composed of amorphous silicate and carbon, and variations of its optical properties are discussed. As measure for the distribution of cores and clumps, we use core mass functions derived for various environments. In view of the high densities in very cold central regions, dust and gas temperatures are assumed to be equal. We find that the fraction of mass with temperatures < 8 K in typical low- and high-mass cores...

  2. [Diagnostic imaging of lying].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Piotr; Sławek, Jarosław; Sitek, Emilia; Szurowska, Edyta; Zimmermann, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Functional diagnostic imaging has been applied in neuropsychology for more than two decades. Nowadays, the functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) seems to be the most important technique. Brain imaging in lying has been performed and discussed since 2001. There are postulates to use fMRI for forensic purposes, as well as commercially, e.g. testing the loyalty of employees, especially because of the limitations of traditional polygraph in some cases. In USA fMRI is performed in truthfulness/lying assessment by at least two commercial companies. Those applications are a matter of heated debate of practitioners, lawyers and specialists of ethics. The opponents of fMRI use for forensic purposes indicate the lack of common agreement on it and the lack of wide recognition and insufficient standardisation. Therefore it cannot serve as a forensic proof, yet. However, considering the development of MRI and a high failure rate of traditional polygraphy, forensic applications of MRI seem to be highly probable in future.

  3. Telling Lies: The Irrepressible Truth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emma J.; Bott, Lewis A.; Patrick, John; Lewis, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Telling a lie takes longer than telling the truth but precisely why remains uncertain. We investigated two processes suggested to increase response times, namely the decision to lie and the construction of a lie response. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants were directed or chose whether to lie or tell the truth. A colored square was presented and participants had to name either the true color of the square or lie about it by claiming it was a different color. In both experiments we found that there was a greater difference between lying and telling the truth when participants were directed to lie compared to when they chose to lie. In Experiments 3 and 4, we compared response times when participants had only one possible lie option to a choice of two or three possible options. There was a greater lying latency effect when questions involved more than one possible lie response. Experiment 5 examined response choice mechanisms through the manipulation of lie plausibility. Overall, results demonstrate several distinct mechanisms that contribute to additional processing requirements when individuals tell a lie. PMID:23573277

  4. Group discussion improves lie detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadav Klein; Nicholas Epley

    2015-01-01

    ... identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions...

  5. A FIRST LOOK AT THE AURIGA-CALIFORNIA GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD WITH HERSCHEL AND THE CSO: CENSUS OF THE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS AND THE DENSE GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Paul M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Fallscheer, Cassandra [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Ginsburg, Adam [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Terebey, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy PS315, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Andre, Philippe; Koenyves, Vera [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James; Matthews, Brenda C. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Peterson, Dawn E., E-mail: pmh@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: Cassandra.Fallscheer@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: adam.ginsburg@colorado.edu, E-mail: sterebe@calstatela.edu, E-mail: pandre@cea.fr, E-mail: vera.konyves@cea.fr, E-mail: tbourke@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: James.DiFrancesco@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: Brenda.Matthews@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: dpeterson@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    We have mapped the Auriga/California molecular cloud with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE cameras and the Bolocam 1.1 mm camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory with the eventual goal of quantifying the star formation and cloud structure in this giant molecular cloud (GMC) that is comparable in size and mass to the Orion GMC, but which appears to be forming far fewer stars. We have tabulated 60 compact 70/160 {mu}m sources that are likely pre-main-sequence objects and correlated those with Spitzer and WISE mid-IR sources. At 1.1 mm, we find 18 cold, compact sources and discuss their properties. The most important result from this part of our study is that we find a modest number of additional compact young objects beyond those identified at shorter wavelengths with Spitzer. We also describe the dust column density and temperature structure derived from our photometric maps. The column density peaks at a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (N {sub H2}) and is distributed in a clear filamentary structure along which nearly all of the pre-main-sequence objects are found. We compare the young stellar object surface density to the gas column density and find a strong nonlinear correlation between them. The dust temperature in the densest parts of the filaments drops to {approx}10 K from values {approx}14-15 K in the low-density parts of the cloud. We also derive the cumulative mass fraction and probability density function of material in the cloud, which we compare with similar data on other star-forming clouds.

  6. Lying because we care: Compassion increases prosocial lying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupoli, Matthew J; Jampol, Lily; Oveis, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Prosocial lies, or lies intended to benefit others, are ubiquitous behaviors that have important social and economic consequences. Though emotions play a central role in many forms of prosocial behavior, no work has investigated how emotions influence behavior when one has the opportunity to tell a prosocial lie-a situation that presents a conflict between two prosocial ethics: lying to prevent harm to another, and honesty, which might also provide benefits to the target of the lie. Here, we examine whether the emotion of compassion influences prosocial lying, and find that compassion causally increases and positively predicts prosocial lying. In Studies 1 and 2, participants evaluated a poorly written essay and provided feedback to the essay writer. Experimentally induced compassion felt toward the essay writer (Study 1) and individual differences in trait compassion (Study 2) were positively associated with inflated feedback to the essay writer. In both of these studies, the relationship between compassion and prosocial lying was partially mediated by an enhanced importance placed on preventing emotional harm. In Study 3, we found moderation such that experimentally induced compassion increased lies that resulted in financial gains for a charity, but not lies that produced financial gains for the self. This research illuminates the emotional underpinnings of the common yet morally complex behavior of prosocial lying, and builds on work highlighting the potentially harmful effects of compassion-an emotion typically seen as socially beneficial. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. On the Logic of Lying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. van Ditmarsch (Hans); D.J.N. van Eijck (Jan); F.A.G. Sietsma (Floor)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe model lying as a communicative act changing the beliefs of the agents in a multi-agent system. With Augustine, we see lying as an utterance believed to be false by the speaker and uttered with the intent to deceive the addressee. The deceit is successful if the lie is believed

  8. Lying relies on the truth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debey, E.; De Houwer, J.; Verschuere, B.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive models of deception focus on the conflict-inducing nature of the truth activation during lying. Here we tested the counterintuitive hypothesis that the truth can also serve a functional role in the act of lying. More specifically, we examined whether the construction of a lie can involve a

  9. Lying relies on the truth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debey, E.; De Houwer, J.; Verschuere, B.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive models of deception focus on the conflict-inducing nature of the truth activation during lying. Here we tested the counterintuitive hypothesis that the truth can also serve a functional role in the act of lying. More specifically, we examined whether the construction of a lie can involve a

  10. Pre-Lie Deformation Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dotsenko, V.; Shadrin, S.; Vallette, B.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop the deformation theory controlled by pre-Lie algebras; the main tool is a new integration theory for preLie algebras. The main field of application lies in homotopy algebra structures over a Koszul operad; in this case, we provide a homotopical description of the associated

  11. Water relations and gas exchange of fan bryophytes and their adaptations to microhabitats in an Asian subtropical montane cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liang; Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Chen, Xi; Li, Su; Lu, Hua-Zheng; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Tan, Zheng-Hong; Liu, Wen-Yao; Shi, Xian-Meng

    2015-07-01

    Fan life forms are bryophytes with shoots rising from vertical substratum that branch repeatedly in the horizontal plane to form flattened photosynthetic surfaces, which are well suited for intercepting water from moving air. However, detailed water relations, gas exchange characteristics of fan bryophytes and their adaptations to particular microhabitats remain poorly understood. In this study, we measured and analyzed microclimatic data, as well as water release curves, pressure-volume relationships and photosynthetic water and light response curves for three common fan bryophytes in an Asian subtropical montane cloud forest (SMCF). Results demonstrate high relative humidity but low light levels and temperatures in the understory, and a strong effect of fog on water availability for bryophytes in the SMCF. The facts that fan bryophytes in dry air lose most of their free water within 1 h, and a strong dependence of net photosynthesis rates on water content, imply that the transition from a hydrated, photosynthetically active state to a dry, inactive state is rapid. In addition, fan bryophytes developed relatively high cell wall elasticity and the osmoregulatory capacity to tolerate desiccation. These fan bryophytes had low light saturation and compensation point of photosynthesis, indicating shade tolerance. It is likely that fan bryophytes can flourish on tree trunks in the SMCF because of substantial annual precipitation, average relative humidity, and frequent and persistent fog, which can provide continual water sources for them to intercept. Nevertheless, the low water retention capacity and strong dependence of net photosynthesis on water content of fan bryophytes indicate a high risk of unbalanced carbon budget if the frequency and severity of drought increase in the future as predicted.

  12. Quantization on nilpotent Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a consistent development of the Kohn-Nirenberg type global quantization theory in the setting of graded nilpotent Lie groups in terms of their representations. It contains a detailed exposition of related background topics on homogeneous Lie groups, nilpotent Lie groups, and the analysis of Rockland operators on graded Lie groups together with their associated Sobolev spaces. For the specific example of the Heisenberg group the theory is illustrated in detail. In addition, the book features a brief account of the corresponding quantization theory in the setting of compact Lie groups. The monograph is the winner of the 2014 Ferran Sunyer i Balaguer Prize.

  13. Change of Magnetic Field$-$Gas Alignment at Gravity-Driven Alfv\\'enic Transition in Molecular Clouds: Implications for Dust Polarization Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Che-Yu; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse striations in molecular clouds are preferentially aligned with local magnetic fields whereas dense filaments tend to be perpendicular to them. When and why this transition occurs remain uncertain. To explore the physics behind this transition, we compute the histogram of relative orientation (HRO) between the density gradient and the magnetic field in 3D MHD simulations of prestellar core formation in shock-compressed regions within GMCs. We find that, in the magnetically-dominated (sub-Alfv\\'enic) post-shock region, the gas structure is preferentially aligned with the local magnetic field. For overdense sub-regions with super-Alfv\\'enic gas, their elongation becomes preferentially perpendicular to the local magnetic field instead. The transition occurs when self-gravitating gas gains enough kinetic energy from the gravitational acceleration to overcome the magnetic support against the cross-field contraction, which results in a power-law increase of the field strength with density. Similar results ca...

  14. The mode of gas accretion onto star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Marinacci, F; Fraternali, F; Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Londrillo, P

    2010-01-01

    It is argued that galaxies like ours sustain their star formation by transferring gas from an extensive corona to the star-forming disc. The transfer is effected by the galactic fountain -- cool clouds that are shot up from the plane to kiloparsec heights above the plane. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability strips gas from these clouds. If the pressure and the the metallicity of the corona are high enough, the stripped gas causes a similar mass of coronal gas to condense in the cloud's wake. Hydrodynamical simulations of cloud-corona interaction are presented. These confirm the existence of a critical ablation rate above which the corona is condensed, and imply that for the likely parameters of the Galactic corona this rate lies near the actual ablation rate of clouds. In external galaxies trails of HI behind individual clouds will not be detectable, although the integrated emission from all such trails should be significant. Parts of the trails of the clouds that make up the Galaxy's fountain should be observab...

  15. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 619 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 727 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 890 nmImages from NASA's Cassini spacecraft using three different filters reveal cloud structures and movements at different depths in the atmosphere around Jupiter's south pole.Cassini's cameras come equipped with filters that sample three wavelengths where methane gas absorbs light. These are in the red at 619 nanometer (nm) wavelength and in the near-infrared at 727 nm and 890 nm. Absorption in the 619 nm filter is weak. It is stronger in the 727 nm band and very strong in the 890 nm band where 90 percent of the light is absorbed by methane gas. Light in the weakest band can penetrate the deepest into Jupiter's atmosphere. It is sensitive to the amount of cloud and haze down to the pressure of the water cloud, which lies at a depth where pressure is about 6 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level on the Earth). Light in the strongest methane band is absorbed at high altitude and is sensitive only to the ammonia cloud level and higher (pressures less than about one-half of Earth's atmospheric pressure) and the middle methane band is sensitive to the ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide cloud layers as deep as two times Earth's atmospheric pressure.The images shown here demonstrate the power of these filters in studies of cloud stratigraphy. The images cover latitudes from about 15 degrees north at the top down to the southern polar region at the bottom. The left and middle images are ratios, the image in the methane filter divided by the image at a nearby wavelength outside the methane band. Using ratios emphasizes where contrast is due to methane absorption and not to other factors, such as the absorptive properties of the cloud particles, which influence contrast at all wavelengths.The most prominent feature seen in all three filters is the polar stratospheric haze that makes Jupiter bright near the pole

  16. Lie Subalgebras in a Certain Operator Lie Algebra with Involution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Li SUN; Xue Feng MA

    2011-01-01

    We show in a certain Lie'-algebra,the connections between the Lie subalgebra G+:=G+G*+[G,G*],generated by a Lie subalgebra G,and the properties of G.This allows us to investigate some useful information about the structure of such two Lie subalgebras.Some results on the relations between the two Lie subalgebras are obtained.As an application,we get the following conclusion:Let A (∪) B(X)be a space of self-adjoint operators and L:=A ⊕ iA the corresponding complex Lie*-algebra.G+=G+G*+[G,G*]and G are two LM-decomposable Lie subalgebras of,L with the decomposition G+=R(G+)+S,G=RG+SG,and RG (∪) R(C+).Then G+ is ideally finite iff RG+:=RG+RG*+[RG,RG*]is a quasisolvable Lie subalgebra,SG+:=SG+SG*+[SG,SG*]is an ideally finite semisimple Lie subalgebra,and [RG,SG]=[RG*,SG]={0}.

  17. PRELIMINARY DISCUSS ON EXPLOSION SUPPRESSION TECHNIQUE OF FLAMMABLE GAS CLOUD%可燃气云抑爆技术初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪剑辉; 刘飞; 薛一江

    2011-01-01

    Tests indicate that the combustion reaction process of explosion can be refrained by spraying explosion suppression materials in the process of explosion triggered or initial explosion phrase of flammable gas cloud, then explosion reaction can be interrupted or explosion intensity will be weakened strongly. Inorganic powders, inactive gas, and water mist are excellent materials on explosion suppression, which are worthy of being used widely. The mechanisms on explosion suppression of flammable gas cloud were discussed, and the most important problems for subsequent study were pointed out, which provide the reference for the application of explosion suppression technology.%试验表明,在可燃气云爆炸引发过程或爆炸初始阶段,通过喷洒抑爆材料可抑制爆炸燃烧反应进程,继而中断爆炸反应或显著削弱爆炸强度.无机粉末、惰气和水雾是性价比较高的抑爆材料,具有大面积推广的价值.探讨了可燃气云的抑爆机理,并指出可燃气云抑爆技术后续研究中亟待解决的问题,为可燃气云抑爆技术的实际应用提供了技术参考.

  18. The HI Chronicles of LITTLE THINGS BCDs. III. Gas Clouds in and around Mrk 178, VII Zw 403, and NGC 3738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Trisha; Simpson, Caroline E.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Johnson, Megan; Pokhrel, Nau Raj

    2017-03-01

    In most blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies, it remains unclear what triggers their bursts of star formation. We study the H i of three relatively isolated BCDs, Mrk 178, VII Zw 403, and NGC 3738, in detail to look for signatures of star formation triggers, such as gas cloud consumption, dwarf–dwarf mergers, and interactions with companions. High angular and velocity resolution atomic hydrogen (H i) data from the Very Large Array (VLA) dwarf galaxy H i survey, Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey (LITTLE THINGS), allow us to study the detailed kinematics and morphologies of the BCDs in H i. We also present high-sensitivity H i maps from the NRAO Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of each BCD to search their surrounding regions for extended tenuous emission or companions. The GBT data do not show any distinct galaxies obviously interacting with the BCDs. The VLA data indicate several possible star formation triggers in these BCDs. Mrk 178 likely has a gas cloud impacting the southeast end of its disk or it is experiencing ram pressure stripping. VII Zw 403 has a large gas cloud in its foreground or background that shows evidence of accreting onto the disk. NGC 3738 has several possible explanations for its stellar morphology and H i morphology and kinematics: an advanced merger, strong stellar feedback, or ram pressure stripping. Although apparently isolated, the H i data of all three BCDs indicate that they may be interacting with their environments, which could be triggering their bursts of star formation.

  19. Lie groups and automorphic forms

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Lizhen; Xu, H W; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2006-01-01

    Lie groups are fundamental objects in mathematics. They occur naturally in differential geometry, algebraic geometry, representation theory, number theory, and other areas. Closely related are arithmetic subgroups, locally symmetric spaces and the spectral theory of automorphic forms. This book consists of five chapters which give comprehensive introductions to Lie groups, Lie algebras, arithmetic groups and reduction theories, cohomology of arithmetic groups, and the Petersson and Kuznetsov trace formulas.

  20. Bosonization and Lie Group Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ha, Yuan K

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a concise quantum operator formula for bosonization in which the Lie group structure appears in a natural way. The connection between fermions and bosons is found to be exactly the connection between Lie group elements and the group parameters. Bosonization is an extraordinary way of expressing the equation of motion of a complex fermion field in terms of a real scalar boson in two dimensions. All the properties of the fermion field theory are known to be preserved under this remarkable transformation with substantial simplification and elucidation of the original theory, much like Lie groups can be studied by their Lie algebras.

  1. Lying relies on the truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debey, Evelyne; De Houwer, Jan; Verschuere, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive models of deception focus on the conflict-inducing nature of the truth activation during lying. Here we tested the counterintuitive hypothesis that the truth can also serve a functional role in the act of lying. More specifically, we examined whether the construction of a lie can involve a two-step process, where the first step entails activating the truth, based upon which a lie response can be formulated in a second step. To investigate this hypothesis, we tried to capture the covert truth activation in a reaction-time based deception paradigm. Together with each question, we presented either the truth or lie response as distractors. If lying depends on the covert activation of the truth, deceptive responses would thus be facilitated by truth distractors relative to lie distractors. Our results indeed revealed such a "covert congruency" effect, both in errors and reaction times (Experiment 1). Moreover, stimulating participants to use the distractor information by increasing the proportion of truth distractor trials enlarged the "covert congruency" effects, and as such confirmed that the effects operate at a covert response level (Experiment 2). Our findings lend support to the idea that lying relies on a first step of truth telling, and call for a shift in theoretical thinking that highlights both the functional and interfering properties of the truth activation in the lying process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential geometry on Lie groups

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Resumo: Neste trabalho estudamos os aspectos geométricos dos grupos de Lie do ponto de vista da geometria Riemanniana, geometria Hermitiana e geometria Kähler, através das estruturas geométricas invariantes associadas. Exploramos resultados relacionados às curvaturas da variedade Riemanniana subjacente a um grupo de Lie através do estudo de sua álgebra de Lie correspondente. No contexto da geometria Hermitiana e geometria Kähler, para um caso concreto de grupo de Lie complexo, investigaram su...

  3. Affective Priming Caused by Lying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Sato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Typically, arousal increases when telling a lie, as indicated in psychophysiological studies about lie detection. But the emotional valence induced by lying is unknown, though intuition indicates that it may be negative. Indeed, the Electrodermal Activity (EDA, used in such studies, only shows arousal changes during an emotional response. In this study, we examined the emotional valence induced by lying using two tasks. First, in the deceptive task, participants answered “no” to every question regarding the nature of displayed playing cards. Therefore, they told a lie about specific cards. During the task, their EDA was recorded. Secondly, in the figure estimation task, they assessed pictures by “like” or “dislike” after looking at playing cards visibly or subliminally as prime stimuli. We expected them to tend to estimate figures by “dislike” when cards relevant to deception were previously shown. This would mean that an affective priming effect due to telling a lie happened. Actually, this effect was found only when prime stimuli were displayed visibly. This result suggests that lying per se induces negative emotions even without motivation or punishment due to lying. Furthermore, we found that such effect was more blatant in participants whose EDA changes were salient while lying.

  4. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  5. Theatres of the lie: 'crazy' deception and lying as drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongen, Els van

    2002-08-01

    In this article, the author argues that lying is drama, theatre, which brings about transition, reflection, reversal and involvement of the participants in the drama. By means of ethnographic data of a psychiatric ward, the author shows that lying of mental patients is not pathological, but a ritual of affliction. By using Turner's theory about rituals and performance and Goffman's theory about presentation of the self it will be showed that lying serves the redefinition of reciprocity and solidarity. With the help of Bakhtin's work on Rabelais, the author discusses the nature of the drama of the lie. It is concluded that a perspective on lying as theatre may be of use outside psychiatric wards and will occur in imbalanced power relationships.

  6. Model atmospheres for massive gas giants with thick clouds: Application to the HR 8799 planets and predictions for future detections

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Currie, Thayne

    2011-01-01

    We have generated an extensive new suite of massive giant planet atmosphere models and used it to obtain fits to photometric data for the planets HR 8799b, c, and d. We consider a wide range of cloudy and cloud-free models. The cloudy models incorporate different geometrical and optical thicknesses, modal particle sizes, and metallicities. For each planet and set of cloud parameters, we explore grids in gravity and effective temperature, with which we determine constraints on the planet's mass and age. Our new models yield statistically significant fits to the data, and conclusively confirm that the HR 8799 planets have much thicker clouds than those required to explain data for typical L and T dwarfs. Both models with 1) physically thick forsterite clouds and a 60-micron modal particle size and 2) clouds made of 1 micron-sized pure iron droplets and 1% supersaturation fit the data. The range of best-estimated masses for HR 8799b, HR 8799c, and HR 8799d conservatively span 2-12 M_J, 7-13 M_J, and 3-11 M_J, re...

  7. Airship measurements of aerosol size distributions, cloud droplet spectra, and trace gas concentrations in the marine boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frick, G.M.; Hoppel, W.A. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The use of an airship as a platform to conduct atmospheric chemistry, aerosol, and cloud microphysical research is described, and results from demonstration flights made off the Oregon coast are presented. The slow speed of the airship makes it an ideal platform to do high-spatial resolution profiling both vertically and horizontally, and to measure large aerosol and cloud droplet distributions without the difficulties caused by high-speed aircraft sampling. A unique set of data obtained during the demonstration flights show the effect that processing marine boundary layer aerosol through stratus clouds has on the aerosol size distribution. Evidence of new particle formation (nucleation of particles) was also observed on about half the days on which flights were made. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. 开敞空间工业气云爆炸研究进展%Analyses on industrial flammable gas cloud explosions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕明树; 王树兰; 丁信伟

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results are introduced on unconfined gas explosions and the theoretical methods such as TNT equivalence model,multi_energy model,self_similar solution and computational fluid dynamics method are analyzed.The importance of restricts and obstacles to flammable gas cloud is demonstrated.The advantages and disadvantages of every method in the applications are evaluated.%评述了开敞空间气云爆炸的研究进展情况,阐明了约束条件和障碍物对气云爆炸威力的作用。分析了通过理论研究提出的TNT当量法、多能模型法、自相似法和数值模拟法,评价了它们在实际应用中的优越性和局限性。

  9. Deciding isomorphism of Lie algebras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, W.A. de

    2001-01-01

    When doing calculations with Lie algebras one of the main problems is to decide whether two given Lie algebras are isomorphic. A partial solution to this problem is obtained by calculating structural invariants. There is also a direct method available which involves the computation of Grobner bases.

  10. The low lying glueball spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam Szczepaniak; Eric Swanson

    2003-12-18

    The complete low-lying positive charge conjugation glueball spectrum is obtained from QCD. The formalism relies on the construction of an efficient quasiparticle gluon basis for Hamiltonian QCD in Coulomb gauge. The resulting rapidly convergent Fock space expansion is exploited to derive quenched low-lying glueball masses with no free parameters which are in remarkable agreement with lattice gauge theory.

  11. Lie Symmetries of Ishimori Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xu-Xia

    2013-01-01

    The Ishimori equation is one of the most important (2+1)-dimensional integrable models,which is an integrable generalization of (1+1)-dimensional classical continuous Heisenberg ferromagnetic spin equations.Based on importance of Lie symmetries in analysis of differential equations,in this paper,we derive Lie symmetries for the Ishimori equation by Hirota's direct method.

  12. Cloud Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The second half of the 20th century has been characterized by an explosive development in information technology (Maney, Hamm, & O'Brien, 2011). Processing power, storage capacity and network bandwidth have increased exponentially, resulting in new possibilities and shifting IT paradigms. In step...... with technological changes, the paradigmatic pendulum has swung between increased centralization on one side and a focus on distributed computing that pushes IT power out to end users on the other. With the introduction of outsourcing and cloud computing, centralization in large data centers is again dominating...... the IT scene. In line with the views presented by Nicolas Carr in 2003 (Carr, 2003), it is a popular assumption that cloud computing will be the next utility (like water, electricity and gas) (Buyya, Yeo, Venugopal, Broberg, & Brandic, 2009). However, this assumption disregards the fact that most IT production...

  13. Lying despite telling the truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegmann, Alex; Samland, Jana; Waldmann, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    According to the standard definition of lying an utterance counts as a lie if the agent believes the statement to be false. Thus, according to this view it is possible that a lie states something that happens to be true. This subjective view on lying has recently been challenged by Turri and Turri (2015) who presented empirical evidence suggesting that people only consider statements as lies that are objectively false (objective view). We argue that the presented evidence is in fact consistent with the standard subjective view if conversational pragmatics is taken into account. Three experiments are presented that directly test and support the subjective view. An additional experiment backs up our pragmatic hypothesis by using the uncontroversial case of making a promise.

  14. Group discussion improves lie detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nadav; Epley, Nicholas

    2015-06-16

    Groups of individuals can sometimes make more accurate judgments than the average individual could make alone. We tested whether this group advantage extends to lie detection, an exceptionally challenging judgment with accuracy rates rarely exceeding chance. In four experiments, we find that groups are consistently more accurate than individuals in distinguishing truths from lies, an effect that comes primarily from an increased ability to correctly identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions (a "wisdom-of-crowds" effect) or of altering response biases (such as reducing the "truth bias"). Interventions to improve lie detection typically focus on improving individual judgment, a costly and generally ineffective endeavor. Our findings suggest a cheap and simple synergistic approach of enabling group discussion before rendering a judgment.

  15. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative aging of organic aerosol particles, we illustrate how the

  16. The Role of Major Gas-rich Mergers on the Evolution of Galaxies from the Blue Cloud to the Red Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, X. Y.; Mao, Shude; Shi, Yong

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of exploring the fast evolutionary path from the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies to the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the local universe, we select a local advanced merging infrared luminous and ultraluminous galaxy (adv-merger (U)LIRGs) sample and perform careful dust extinction corrections to investigate their positions in the star formation rate-M *, u - r, and NUV - r color-mass diagrams. The sample consists of 89 (U)LIRGs at the late merger stage, obtained from cross-correlating the Infrared Astronomical Satellite Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ULIRGs samples with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 database. Our results show that 74 % +/- 5 % of adv-merger (U)LIRGs are localized above the 1σ line of the local star-forming galaxy main sequence. We also find that all adv-merger (U)LIRGs are more massive than and as blue as the blue cloud galaxies after corrections for Galactic and internal dust extinctions, with 95 % +/- 2 % and 81 % +/- 4 % of them outside the blue cloud on the u - r and NUV - r color-mass diagrams, respectively. These results, combined with the short timescale for exhausting the molecular gas reservoir in adv-merger (U)LIRGs (3× {10}7 to 3× {10}8 years), imply that the adv-merger (U)LIRGs are likely at the starting point of the fast evolutionary track previously proposed by several groups. While the number density of adv-merger (U)LIRGs is only ˜ 0.1 % of the blue cloud star-forming galaxies in the local universe, this evolutionary track may play a more important role at high redshift.

  17. The ISM in distant star-forming galaxies: Turbulent pressure, fragmentation and cloud scaling relations in a dense gas disk at z=2.3

    CERN Document Server

    Swinbank, Mark; Cox, Pierre; Krips, Melanie; Ivison, Rob; Smail, Ian; Thomson, Alasdair; Neri, Roberto; Richard, Johan; Ebeling, Harald

    2011-01-01

    We have used the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer and the Expanded Very Large Array to obtain a high resolution map of the CO(6-5) and CO(1-0) emission in the lensed, star-forming galaxy SMMJ2135-0102 at z=2.32. The kinematics of the gas are well described by a model of a rotationally-supported disk with an inclination-corrected rotation speed, v_rot = 320+/-25km/s, a ratio of rotational- to dispersion- support of v/sigma=3.5+/-0.2 and a dynamical mass of 6.0+/-0.5x10^10Mo within a radius of 2.5kpc. The disk has a Toomre parameter, Q=0.50+/-0.15, suggesting the gas will rapidly fragment into massive clumps on scales of L_J ~ 400pc. We identify star-forming regions on these scales and show that they are 10x denser than those in quiescent environments in local galaxies, and significantly offset from the local molecular cloud scaling relations (Larson's relations). The large offset compared to local molecular cloud linewidth-size scaling relations imply that supersonic turbulence should remain dominant on sca...

  18. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and select aldehydes in cloud and fog water: the role of the aqueous phase in impacting trace gas budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervens, B.; Wang, Y.; Eagar, J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A. M.; Valsaraj, K. T.; Herckes, P.

    2013-05-01

    Cloud and fog droplets efficiently scavenge and process water-soluble compounds and, thus, modify the chemical composition of the gas and particle phases. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the aqueous phase reach concentrations on the order of ~ 10 mgC L-1 which is typically on the same order of magnitude as the sum of inorganic anions. Aldehydes and carboxylic acids typically comprise a large fraction of DOC because of their high solubility. The dissolution of species in the aqueous phase can lead to (i) the removal of species from the gas phase preventing their processing by gas phase reactions (e.g., photolysis of aldehydes) and (ii) the formation of unique products that do not have any efficient gas phase sources (e.g., dicarboxylic acids). We present measurements of DOC and select aldehydes in fog water at high elevation and intercepted clouds at a biogenically-impacted location (Whistler, Canada) and in fog water in a more polluted area (Davis, CA). Concentrations of formaldehyde, glyoxal and methylglyoxal were in the micromolar range and comprised ≤ 2% each individually of the DOC. Comparison of the DOC and aldehyde concentrations to those at other locations shows good agreement and reveals highest levels for both in anthropogenically impacted regions. Based on this overview, we conclude that the fraction of organic carbon (dissolved and insoluble inclusions) in the aqueous phase of clouds or fogs, respectively, comprises 2-~ 40% of total organic carbon. Higher values are observed to be associated with aged air masses where organics are expected to be more highly oxidised and, thus, more soluble. Accordingly, the aqueous/gas partitioning ratio expressed here as an effective Henry's law constant for DOC (KH*DOC) increases by an order of magnitude from 7 × 103 M atm-1 to 7 × 104 M atm-1 during the ageing of air masses. The measurements are accompanied by photochemical box model simulations. These simulations are used to contrast two

  19. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC and select aldehydes in cloud and fog water: the role of the aqueous phase in impacting trace gas budgets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ervens

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud and fog droplets efficiently scavenge and process water-soluble compounds and, thus, modify the chemical composition of the gas and particle phases. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in the aqueous phase reach concentrations on the order of ~ 10 mgC L−1 which is typically on the same order of magnitude as the sum of inorganic anions. Aldehydes and carboxylic acids typically comprise a large fraction of DOC because of their high solubility. The dissolution of species in the aqueous phase can lead to (i the removal of species from the gas phase preventing their processing by gas phase reactions (e.g., photolysis of aldehydes and (ii the formation of unique products that do not have any efficient gas phase sources (e.g., dicarboxylic acids. We present measurements of DOC and select aldehydes in fog water at high elevation and intercepted clouds at a biogenically-impacted location (Whistler, Canada and in fog water in a more polluted area (Davis, CA. Concentrations of formaldehyde, glyoxal and methylglyoxal were in the micromolar range and comprised ≤ 2% each individually of the DOC. Comparison of the DOC and aldehyde concentrations to those at other locations shows good agreement and reveals highest levels for both in anthropogenically impacted regions. Based on this overview, we conclude that the fraction of organic carbon (dissolved and insoluble inclusions in the aqueous phase of clouds or fogs, respectively, comprises 2–~ 40% of total organic carbon. Higher values are observed to be associated with aged air masses where organics are expected to be more highly oxidised and, thus, more soluble. Accordingly, the aqueous/gas partitioning ratio expressed here as an effective Henry's law constant for DOC (KH*DOC increases by an order of magnitude from 7 × 103 M atm−1 to 7 × 104 M atm−1 during the ageing of air masses. The measurements are accompanied by photochemical box model simulations. These simulations are

  20. The Dark Molecular Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfire, Mark G; McKee, Christopher F

    2010-01-01

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H_2 mass. However, a significant H_2 mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas phase carbon resides in C or C+. Here, H_2 self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, where as CO is photodissociated. This H_2 gas is "dark" in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H_2 emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K < T < 100 K typical of this molecular component. This component has been indirectly observed through other tracers of mass such as gamma rays produced in cosmic ray collisions with the gas and far-infrared/submillimeter wavelength dust continuum radiation. In this paper we theoretically model this dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component ...

  1. Detecting true lies: police officers' ability to detect suspects' lies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Samantha; Vrij, Aldert; Bull, Ray

    2004-02-01

    Ninety-nine police officers, not identified in previous research as belonging to groups that are superior in lie detection, attempted to detect truths and lies told by suspects during their videotaped police interviews. Accuracy rates were higher than those typically found in deception research and reached levels similar to those obtained by specialized lie detectors in previous research. Accuracy was positively correlated with perceived experience in interviewing suspects and with mentioning cues to detecting deceit that relate to a suspect's story. Accuracy was negatively correlated with popular stereotypical cues such as gaze aversion and fidgeting. As in previous research, accuracy and confidence were not significantly correlated, but the level of confidence was dependent on whether officers judged actual truths or actual lies and on the method by which confidence was measured.

  2. Lying aversion and prosocial behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Biziou-van-Pol, Laura; Novaro, Arianna; Liberman, Andrés Occhipinti; Capraro, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the moral conflict between lying aversion and prosociality. What does telling a white lie signal about a person's prosocial tendencies? How does believing a possibly untruthful message signal about a listener's prosocial tendencies? To answer these questions, we conducted a 2x3 experiment. In the first stage we measured altruistic tendencies using a Dictator Game and cooperative tendencies using a Prisoner's dilemma. In the second stage, we used a sender-receiver game to measure aversion to telling a Pareto white lie (i.e., a lie that helps both the liar and the listener), aversion to telling an altruistic white lie (i.e., a lie that helps the listener at the expense of the liar), and skepticism towards believing a possibly untruthful message. We found three major results: (i) both altruism and cooperation are positively correlated with aversion to telling a Pareto white lie; (ii) neither altruism nor cooperation are significantly correlated with aversion to telling an altruistic wh...

  3. Lies, Calculations and Constructions: Beyond How to Lie with Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Best, Joel

    2005-01-01

    Darrell Huff’s How to Lie with Statistics remains the best-known, nontechnical call for critical thinking about statistics. However, drawing a distinction between statistics and lying ignores the process by which statistics are socially constructed. For instance, bad statistics often are disseminated by sincere, albeit innumerate advocates (e.g., inflated estimates for the number of anorexia deaths) or through research findings selectively highlighted to attract media coverage (e.g., a recent...

  4. Last Multipliers on Lie Algebroids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mircea Crasmareanu; Cristina-Elena Hreţcanu

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we extend the theory of last multipliers as solutions of the Liouville’s transport equation to Lie algebroids with their top exterior power as trivial line bundle (previously developed for vector fields and multivectors). We define the notion of exact section and the Liouville equation on Lie algebroids. The aim of the present work is to develop the theory of this extension from the tangent bundle algebroid to a general Lie algebroid (e.g. the set of sections with a prescribed last multiplier is still a Gerstenhaber subalgebra). We present some characterizations of this extension in terms of Witten and Marsden differentials.

  5. Gravitating fluids with Lie symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Msomi, A M; Maharaj, S D

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the underlying nonlinear partial differential equation which arises in the study of gravitating flat fluid plates of embedding class one. Our interest in this equation lies in discussing new solutions that can be found by means of Lie point symmetries. The method utilised reduces the partial differential equation to an ordinary differential equation according to the Lie symmetry admitted. We show that a class of solutions found previously can be characterised by a particular Lie generator. Several new families of solutions are found explicitly. In particular we find the relevant ordinary differential equation for all one-dimensional optimal subgroups; in several cases the ordinary differential equation can be solved in general. We are in a position to characterise particular solutions with a linear barotropic equation of state.

  6. Historical Techniques of Lie Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Vicianova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial, lying has been a part of everyday life. For this reason, it has become a subject of interest in several disciplines, including psychology. The purpose of this article is to provide a general overview of the literature and thinking to date about the evolution of lie detection techniques. The first part explores ancient methods recorded circa 1000 B.C. (e.g., God’s judgment in Europe. The second part describes technical methods based on sciences such as phrenology, polygraph and graphology. This is followed by an outline of more modern-day approaches such as FACS (Facial Action Coding System, functional MRI, and Brain Fingerprinting. Finally, after the familiarization with the historical development of techniques for lie detection, we discuss the scope for new initiatives not only in the area of designing new methods, but also for the research into lie detection itself, such as its motives and regulatory issues related to deception.

  7. 3D AMR simulations of the evolution of the diffuse gas cloud G2 in the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Schartmann, M; Burkert, A; Gillessen, S; Genzel, R; Pfuhl, O; Eisenhauer, F; Plewa, P M; Ott, T; George, E M; Habibi, M

    2016-01-01

    With the help of 3D AMR hydrodynamical simulations we aim at understanding G2's nature, recent evolution and fate in the coming years. By exploring the possible parameter space of the diffuse cloud scenario, we find that a starting point within the disc of young stars is favoured by the observations, which may hint at G2 being the result of stellar wind interactions.

  8. Water absorption in Galactic translucent clouds: conditions and history of the gas derived from Herschel/HIFI PRISMAS observations

    CERN Document Server

    Flagey, N; Lis, D C; Gerin, M; Neufeld, D; Sonnentrucker, P; De Luca, M; Godard, B; Goicoechea, J R; Monje, R; Phillips, T G

    2012-01-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of nine transitions of \\hho and \\hheo towards six high-mass star-forming regions, obtained as part of the PRISMAS Key Program. Water vapor in translucent clouds is detected in absorption along every sightline. We derive the column density of \\hho or \\hheo for the lower energy level of each transition observed. The total water column density is about a few $10^{13} \\rm{cm^{-2}}$. We find that the abundance of water relative to hydrogen nuclei is $1\\times10^{-8}$ in agreement with models for oxygen chemistry with high cosmic ray ionization rates. Relative to \\hh, the abundance of water is remarkably constant at $5\\times10^{-8}$. The abundance of water in excited levels is at most 15%, implying that the excitation temperature $T_{ex}$ in the ground state transitions is below 10 K. The column densities derived from the two ortho ground state transitions indicates that $T_{ex}\\simeq5$ K and that the density $n($\\hh$)$ in the clouds is $\\le10^4 \\rm{cm^{-3}}$. For most clouds we...

  9. Structure of Solvable Quadratic Lie Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Lin-sheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Killing form plays a key role in the theory of semisimple Lie algebras. It is natural to extend the study to Lie algebras with a nondegenerate symmetric invariant bilinear form. Such a Lie algebra is generally called a quadratic Lie algebra which occur naturally in physics[10,12,13]. Besides semisimple Lie algebras, interesting quadratic Lie algebras include the Kac-Moody algebras and the Extended Affine Lie algebras.

  10. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC and select aldehydes in cloud and fog water: the role of the aqueous phase in impacting trace gas budgets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ervens

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud and fog droplets efficiently scavenge and process water-soluble compounds and thus modify the chemical composition of the gas and particle phases. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in the aqueous phase reach concentrations on the order of ~10 mg C L−1 which is typically on the same order of magnitude as the sum of inorganic anions. Aldehydes and carboxylic acids typically comprise a large fraction of DOC because of their high solubility. The dissolution of species in the aqueous phase can lead to (i the removal of species from the gas phase preventing their processing by gas phase reactions (e.g. photolysis of aldehydes and (ii the formation of unique products that do not have any efficient gas phase sources (e.g. dicarboxylic acids.

    We present measurements of DOC and select aldehydes in fog water at high elevation and intercepted clouds in a biogenically-impacted location (Whistler, Canada and in fog water in a more polluted area (Davis, CA. Concentrations of formaldehyde, glyoxal and methylglyoxal were in the micromolar range and comprised ≤2% each individually of the DOC. Comparison of the DOC and aldehyde concentrations to those at other locations shows good agreement and reveals highest levels for both in anthropogenically impacted regions. Based on this overview, we conclude that the fraction of organic carbon (dissolved and insoluble inclusions in the aqueous phase comprises 1–~40% of total organic carbon. Higher values are observed to be associated with aged air masses where organics are expected to be more highly oxidized and thus more soluble. Accordingly, the aqueous/gas partitioning ratio expressed here as an effective Henry's law constant for DOC (KH*DOC increases by an order of magnitude from 7×103 M atm−1 to 7×104 M atm−1 during the ageing of air masses.

    The measurements are accompanied by

  11. Developing Atmospheric Retrieval Methods for Direct Imaging Spectroscopy of Gas Giants in Reflected Light. I. Methane Abundances and Basic Cloud Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, Roxana E.; Marley, Mark S.; Lewis, Nikole; Line, Michael; Traub, Wesley A.; Zahnle, Kevin

    2016-12-01

    Upcoming space-based coronagraphic instruments in the next decade will perform reflected light spectroscopy and photometry of cool directly imaged extrasolar giant planets. We are developing a new atmospheric retrieval methodology to help assess the science return and inform the instrument design for such future missions, and ultimately interpret the resulting observations. Our retrieval technique employs a geometric albedo model coupled with both a Markov chain Monte Carlo Ensemble Sampler (emcee) and a multimodal nested sampling algorithm (MultiNest) to map the posterior distribution. This combination makes the global evidence calculation more robust for any given model and highlights possible discrepancies in the likelihood maps. As a proof of concept, our current atmospheric model contains one or two cloud layers, methane as a major absorber, and a H2-He background gas. This 6-to-9 parameter model is appropriate for Jupiter-like planets and can be easily expanded in the future. In addition to deriving the marginal likelihood distribution and confidence intervals for the model parameters, we perform model selection to determine the significance of methane and cloud detection as a function of expected signal-to-noise ratio in the presence of spectral noise correlations. After internal validation, the method is applied to realistic spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and HD 99492c, a model observing target. We find that the presence or absence of clouds and methane can be determined with high confidence, while parameter uncertainties are model dependent and correlated. Such general methods will also be applicable to the interpretation of direct imaging spectra of cloudy terrestrial planets.

  12. The global gas and dust budget of the Large Magellanic Cloud: AGB stars and supernovae, and the impact on the ISM evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuura, M; Zijlstra, A A; Whitelock, P A; Cioni, M -R L; Groenewegen, M A T; Volk, K; Kemper, F; Kodama, T; Lagadec, E; Meixner, M; Sloan, G C; Srinivasan, S

    2009-01-01

    We report on an analysis of the gas and dust budget in the the interstellar medium (ISM) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Recent observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope enable us to study the mid-infrared dust excess of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the LMC. This is the first time we can quantitatively assess the gas and dust input from AGB stars over a complete galaxy, fully based on observations. The integrated mass-loss rate over all intermediate and high mass-loss rate carbon-rich AGB candidates in the LMC is 8.5x10^-3 solar mass per year, up to 2.1x10^-2 solar mass per year. This number could be increased up to 2.7x10^-2 solar mass per year, if oxygen-rich stars are included. This is overall consistent with theoretical expectations, considering the star formation rate when these low- and intermediate-mass stars where formed, and the initial mass functions. AGB stars are one of the most important gas sources in the LMC, with supernovae (SNe), which produces about 2-4x10^-2 solar mass pe...

  13. Lie bialgebras of generalized Witt type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Guang'ai; SU; Yucai

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, all Lie bialgebra structures on the Lie algebras of generalized Witt type are considered. It is proved that, for any Lie algebra W of generalized Witt type, all Lie bialgebras on W are the coboundary triangular Lie bialgebras. As a by-product, it is also proved that the first cohomology group H1(W, W (x) W) is trivial.

  14. An evaluation on Real Semisimple Lie Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ The theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras stem from that of continuous groups founded by Sophus Lie at the end of 19th century. From the beginning, the theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras has displayed great value in both theoretical researches and applications.

  15. Cohomology of Heisenberg Lie superalgebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wei; Liu, Wende

    2017-02-01

    Suppose the ground field to be algebraically closed and of characteristic different from 2 and 3. All Heisenberg Lie superalgebras consist of two super-versions of the Heisenberg Lie algebras, 𝔥2m,n and 𝔟𝔞n with m a non-negative integer and n a positive integer. The space of a "classical" Heisenberg Lie superalgebra 𝔥2m,n is the direct sum of a superspace with a non-degenerate anti-supersymmetric even bilinear form and a one-dimensional space of values of this form constituting the even center. The other super-analog of the Heisenberg Lie algebra, 𝔟𝔞n, is constructed by means of a non-degenerate anti-supersymmetric odd bilinear form with values in the one-dimensional odd center. In this paper, we study the cohomology of 𝔥2m,n and 𝔟𝔞n with coefficients in the trivial module by using the Hochschild-Serre spectral sequences relative to a suitable ideal. In the characteristic zero case, for any Heisenberg Lie superalgebra, we determine completely the Betti numbers and associative superalgebra structures for their cohomology. In the characteristic p > 3 case, we determine the associative superalgebra structure for the divided power cohomology of 𝔟𝔞n and we also make an attempt to determine the divided power cohomology of 𝔥2m,n by computing it in a low-dimensional case.

  16. Truth therapy/lie therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langs, R

    In this paper an attempt is made to conceptualize a basic dimension of various psychotherapeutic treatment modalities, especially psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy. The central variable under consideration is the extent to which each endeavors to approach the truth within both patient and therapist as it exists dynamically in terms of their spiraling unconscious communicative interaction. That treatment modality which takes into account every possible dimension of such truths is termed truth therapy. Treatment modalities that make no attempt to arrive at these truths or that deliberately or inadvertently falsify their nature are termed lie or barrier therapies. Extensive consideration is given to truth therapy and the truth system on which it is based. The basis for the need for lie therapies is explored, and lie systems, which may arise from either patient or therapist, or both, are identified. A classification of common types of lie patients and lie therapists (and their main techniques) is offered. The implications of this delineation for our understanding of the dynamic therapies are discussed, and a number of new clinical issues arising from this perspective are addressed.

  17. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system and the computational constraints, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity (Winkler et al., 2006. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative

  18. Finite dimensional quadratic Lie superalgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, Peter; Yates, Luke

    2010-01-01

    We consider a special class of Z_2-graded, polynomial algebras of degree 2, which we call quadratic Lie superalgebras. Starting from the formal definition, we discuss the generalised Jacobi relations in the context of the Koszul property, and give a proof of the PBW basis theorem. We give several concrete examples of quadratic Lie superalgebras for low dimensional cases, and discuss aspects of their structure constants for the `type I' class. Based on the factorisation of the enveloping algebra, we derive the Kac module construction for typical and atypical modules, and a related direct construction of irreducible modules due to Gould. We investigate the method for one specific case, the quadratic generalisation gl_2(n/1) of the Lie superalgebra sl(n/1). We formulate the general atypicality conditions at level 1, and present an analysis of zero-and one-step atypical modules for a certain family of Kac modules.

  19. On Split Lie Triple Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Antonio J Calderón Martín

    2009-04-01

    We begin the study of arbitrary split Lie triple systems by focussing on those with a coherent 0-root space. We show that any such triple systems with a symmetric root system is of the form $T=\\mathcal{U}+\\sum_j I_j$ with $\\mathcal{U}$ a subspace of the 0-root space $T_0$ and any $I_j$ a well described ideal of , satisfying $[I_j,T,I_k]=0$ if $j≠ k$. Under certain conditions, it is shown that is the direct sum of the family of its minimal ideals, each one being a simple split Lie triple system, and the simplicity of is characterized. The key tool in this job is the notion of connection of roots in the framework of split Lie triple systems.

  20. Search Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this ... of Top 110 zoster vaccine Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search ...

  1. Detection of hydrogen fluoride absorption in diffuse molecular clouds with Herschel/HIFI: a ubiquitous tracer of molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnentrucker, P; Phillips, T G; Gerin, M; Lis, D C; De Luca, M; Goicoechea, J R; Black, J H; Bell, T A; Boulanger, F; Cernicharo, J; Coutens, A; Dartois, E; Kazmierczak, M; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Geballe, T R; Giesen, T; Godard, B; Goldsmith, P F; Gry, C; Gupta, H; Hennebelle, P; Herbst, E; Hily-Blant, P; Joblin, C; Kolos, R; Krelowski, J; Mart\\in-Pintado, J; Menten, K M; Monje, R; Mookerjea, B; Pearson, J; Perault, M; Persson, C M; Plume, R; Salez, M; Schlemmer, S; Schmidt, M; Stutzki, J; Teyssier, D; Vastel, C; Yu, S; Caux, E; Gusten, R; Hatch, W A; Klein, T; Mehdi, I; Morris, P; Ward, J S

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the detection of absorption by interstellar hydrogen fluoride (HF) along the sight line to the submillimeter continuum sources W49N and W51. We have used Herschel's HIFI instrument in dual beam switch mode to observe the 1232.4762 GHz J = 1 - 0 HF transition in the upper sideband of the band 5a receiver. We detected foreground absorption by HF toward both sources over a wide range of velocities. Optically thin absorption components were detected on both sight lines, allowing us to measure - as opposed to obtain a lower limit on - the column density of HF for the first time. As in previous observations of HF toward the source G10.6-0.4, the derived HF column density is typically comparable to that of water vapor, even though the elemental abundance of oxygen is greater than that of fluorine by four orders of magnitude. We used the rather uncertain N(CH)-N(H2) relationship derived previously toward diffuse molecular clouds to infer the molecular hydrogen column density in the clouds exhibiting HF abs...

  2. Detection of a turbulent gas component associated with a starless core with subthermal turbulence in the Orion A cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Satoshi; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Sanhueza, Patricio; Hirota, Tomoya; Choi, Minho; Mizuno, Norikazu

    2016-07-01

    We report the detection of a wing component in NH3 emission towards the starless core TUKH122 with subthermal turbulence in the Orion A cloud. This NH3 core is suggested to be on the verge of star formation because the turbulence inside the NH3 core is almost completely dissipated, and also because it is surrounded by CCS, which resembles the prestellar core L1544 in Taurus showing infall motions. Observations were carried out with the Nobeyama 45-m telescope at 0.05 km s-1 velocity resolution. We find that the NH3 line profile consists of two components. The quiescent main component has a small linewidth of 0.3 km s-1 dominated by thermal motion, and the red-shifted wing component has a large linewidth of 1.36 km s-1 representing turbulent motion. These components show kinetic temperatures of 11 and wing components may indicate a sharp transition from the turbulent parent cloud to the quiescent dense core.

  3. Transverse ionization instability of the elongated dust cloud in the gas discharge uniform positive column under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobnin, A. V.; Usachev, A. D.; Lipaev, A. M.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.; Pustylnik, M. Yu; Thomas, H. M.; Fink, M. A.; Thoma, M. H.; Padalka, G. I.

    2016-11-01

    A new kind of dusty plasma instability was observed in the joint Russian-European “Plasma Kristall-4” space experiment on board of the International Space Station. An elongated cylindrical dust particle cloud of 0.9 cm diameter with a length of 20 cm was formed in the uniform positive column of a dc discharge operating in a polarity switching mode (dc/ps-mode). The discharge was operated in a glass tube of 3 cm inner diameter with a total length of 85 cm filled by argon at a pressure of 0.5 mbar. The dc/ps discharge was operated at 1 mA with a polarity switching frequency of 500 Hz. During the experiment, all the dust particles vibrated synchronized in the same phase in the direction perpendicular to the tube axis with a frequency of 24 Hz and peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.2 mm. The vibration was attended by discharge glow fluctuation. The nature of the cloud vibration is discussed.

  4. Risk in the Clouds?: Security Issues Facing Government Use of Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyld, David C.

    Cloud computing is poised to become one of the most important and fundamental shifts in how computing is consumed and used. Forecasts show that government will play a lead role in adopting cloud computing - for data storage, applications, and processing power, as IT executives seek to maximize their returns on limited procurement budgets in these challenging economic times. After an overview of the cloud computing concept, this article explores the security issues facing public sector use of cloud computing and looks to the risk and benefits of shifting to cloud-based models. It concludes with an analysis of the challenges that lie ahead for government use of cloud resources.

  5. Loop Virasoro Lie conformal algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Henan, E-mail: wuhenanby@163.com; Chen, Qiufan; Yue, Xiaoqing [Department of Mathematics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-01-15

    The Lie conformal algebra of loop Virasoro algebra, denoted by CW, is introduced in this paper. Explicitly, CW is a Lie conformal algebra with C[∂]-basis (L{sub i} | i∈Z) and λ-brackets [L{sub i} {sub λ} L{sub j}] = (−∂−2λ)L{sub i+j}. Then conformal derivations of CW are determined. Finally, rank one conformal modules and Z-graded free intermediate series modules over CW are classified.

  6. Isomorphism of Intransitive Linear Lie Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Martins Veloso

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We show that formal isomorphism of intransitive linear Lie equations along transversal to the orbits can be extended to neighborhoods of these transversal. In analytic cases, the word formal is dropped from theorems. Also, we associate an intransitive Lie algebra with each intransitive linear Lie equation, and from the intransitive Lie algebra we recover the linear Lie equation, unless of formal isomorphism. The intransitive Lie algebra gives the structure functions introduced by É. Cartan.

  7. Bubble Clouds in Coastal Waters and Their Role in Air-Water Gas Exchange of CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Crosswell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bubbles generated by breaking waves can drive significant gas exchange between the ocean and atmosphere, but the role of bubble-mediated gas transfer in estuaries is unknown. Here, backscatter data from 41 acoustic Doppler current profiler stations was analyzed to assess subsurface bubble distributions in nine estuaries along the U.S. East and Gulf Coast. Wind speed, wind direction, and current velocity were the dominant controls on bubble entrainment, but the relative importance of these physical drivers depended on local geomorphology. Bubble entrainment in high-current or shallow, long-fetch estuaries began at wind speeds <5 m s−1. In deep or fetch-limited estuaries, bubble entrainment was less frequent and generally began at higher wind speeds. Data observed during several storms suggests that episodic bubble-driven gas exchange may be an important component of annual CO2 fluxes in large, shallow estuaries but would be less significant in other coastal systems.

  8. The Role of Gas in the Merging of Massive Black Holes in Galactic Nuclei. I. Black Hole Merging in a Spherical Gas Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Escala, A; Coppi, P S; Mardones, D; Escala, Andres; Larson, Richard B.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Mardones, Diego

    2003-01-01

    Using high-resolution SPH numerical simulations, we investigate the effects of gas on the inspiral and merger of a massive black hole binary. This study is motivated by both observational and theoretical work that indicate the presence of large amounts of gas in the central regions of merging galaxies. N-body simulations have shown that the coalescence of a massive black hole binary eventually stalls in a stellar background. However, our simulations suggest that the massive black hole binary will finally merge if it is embedded in a gaseous background. Here we present results in which the gas is assumed to be initially spherical with a relatively smooth distribution. In the early evolution of the binary, the separation dimishes due to the gravitational drag exerted by the background gas. In the later stages, when the binary dominates the gravitational potential in its vicinity, the medium responds by forming an ellipsoidal density enhancement whose axis lags behind the binary axis, and this offset produces a ...

  9. Cartan Connections and Lie Algebroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Crampin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a study of the relationship between two constructions associated with Cartan geometries, both of which involve Lie algebroids: the Cartan algebroid, due to [Blaom A.D., Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 358 (2006, 3651–3671], and tractor calculus [Cap A., Gover A.R., Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 354 (2001, 1511–1548].

  10. Cartan Connections and Lie Algebroids

    CERN Document Server

    Crampin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a study of the relationship between two constructions associated with Cartan geometries, both of which involve Lie algebroids: the Cartan algebroid, due to [Blaom A.D., Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 358 (2006), 3651-3671], and tractor calculus [Cap A., Gover A.R., Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 354 (2001), 1511-1548].

  11. String Topology for Lie Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Hepworth, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In 1999 Chas and Sullivan showed that the homology of the free loop space of an oriented manifold admits the structure of a Batalin-Vilkovisky algebra. In this paper we give a direct description of this Batalin-Vilkovisky algebra in the case that the manifold is a compact Lie group G. Our answer ...

  12. Dense Molecular Gas in the First Galactic Quadrant: A New Distance Estimation Technique and the Molecular Cloud Clump Mass Function, Physical Properties, and Galactic Distribution from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy; Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    2015-01-01

    Large submillimeter and millimeter Galactic dust continuum surveys of the Milky Way, such as the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), Hi-GAL, ATLAS-GAL, and JCMT-JPS cumulatively have discovered 105 cores, clumps, and other structures in Galactic molecular clouds. Robust distance measurements to these structures are needed to enable the large range of quantitative astrophysics that these surveys promise, such as physical properties of clumps, the clump mass function, and the three-dimensional distribution of dense gas and star formation in the Milky Way. We have developed a technique for deriving distances to continuum-identified molecular cloud clumps employing kinematic distances and a suite of distance estimators for breaking kinematic distance ambiguities. Application to the BGPS has yielded 3,700 distance probability density functions (DPDFs) and 1,800 well-constrained distances (typical σdist ≈ 0.5 kpc). These have been used to determine sizes and masses of molecular cloud clumps, derive the clump mass function, and map the three-dimensional distribution of dense gas in the first Galactic quadrant. Among the interesting results are a mass function intermediate between molecular clouds and the stellar initial mass function and inter-arm star formation. Next, we plan to apply the technique to Hi-GAL, which covers the entire Galactic plane and whose submilllimeter maps provide for temperature and bolometric luminosity measurements of cloud structures.

  13. Large-Scale Gravitational Instability and Star Formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Chu, You-Hua; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Fukui, Yasuo

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale star formation in disk galaxies is hypothesized to be driven by global gravitational instability. The observed gas surface density is commonly used to compute the strength of gravitational instability, but according to this criterion star formation often appears to occur in gravitationally stable regions. One possible reason is that the stellar contribution to the instability has been neglected. We have examined the gravitational instability of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) considering the gas alone, and considering the combination of collisional gas and collisionless stars. We compare the gravitationally unstable regions with the on-going star formation revealed by Spitzer observations of young stellar objects. Although only 62% of the massive young stellar object candidates are in regions where the gas alone is unstable, some 85% lie in regions unstable due to the combination of gas and stars. The combined stability analysis better describes where star formation occurs. In agreement with othe...

  14. Dust and Gas in the Magellanic Clouds from the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project. I. Dust Properties and Insights into the Origin of the Submm Excess Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Karl D; Bot, Caroline; Meixner, Margaret; Babler, Brian; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bolatto, Alberto; Boyer, Martha L; Clayton, Geoffrey C; Engelbracht, Charles; Fukui, Yasuo; Galametz, Maud; Galliano, Frederic; Hony, Sacha; Hughes, Annie; Indebetouw, Remy; Israel, Frank P; Jameson, Katie; Kawamura, Akiko; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Li, Aigen; Madden, Suzanne C; Matsuura, Mikako; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward; Okumura, K; Onishi, Toshikazu; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Paradis, Deborah; Rubio, Monica; Sandstrom, Karin; Sauvage, Marc; Seale, Jonathan; Sewilo, Marta; Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Skibba, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    The dust properties in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are studied using the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project photometric data in five bands from 100 to 500 micron. Three simple models of dust emission were fit to the observations: a single temperature blackbody modified by a power- law emissivity (SMBB), a single temperature blackbody modified by a broken power-law emissivity (BEMBB), and two blackbodies with different temperatures, both modified by the same power-law emissivity (TTMBB). Using these models we investigate the origin of the submm excess; defined as the submillimeter (submm) emission above that expected from SMBB models fit to observations < 200 micron. We find that the BEMBB model produces the lowest fit residuals with pixel-averaged 500 micron submm excesses of 27% and 43% for the LMC and SMC, respectively. Adopting gas masses from previous works, the gas-to-dust ratios calculated from our the fitting results shows that the TTMBB fits require significantly more dust than are available e...

  15. Cloud processing of soluble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laj, P.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Lind, J. A.; Orsi, G.; Preiss, M.; Maser, R.; Jaeschke, W.; Seyffer, E.; Helas, G.; Acker, K.; Wieprecht, W.; Möller, D.; Arends, B. G.; Mols, J. J.; Colvile, R. N.; Gallagher, M. W.; Beswick, K. M.; Hargreaves, K. J.; Storeton-West, R. L.; Sutton, M. A.

    Experimental data from the Great Dun Fell Cloud Experiment 1993 were used to investigate interactions between soluble gases and cloud droplets. Concentrations of H 2O 2, SO 2, CH 3COOOH, HCOOH, and HCHO were monitored at different sites within and downwind of a hill cap cloud and their temporal and spatial evolution during several cloud events was investigated. Significant differences were found between in-cloud and out-of-cloud concentrations, most of which could not be explained by simple dissolution into cloud droplets. Concentration patterns were analysed in relation to the chemistry of cloud droplets and the gas/liquid equilibrium. Soluble gases do not undergo similar behaviour: CH 3COOH simply dissolves in the aqueous phase and is outgassed upon cloud dissipation; instead, SO 2 is consumed by its reaction with H 2O 2. The behaviour of HCOOH is more complex because there is evidence for in-cloud chemical production. The formation of HCOOH interferes with the odd hydrogen cycle by enhancing the liquid-phase production of H 2O 2. The H 2O 2 concentration in cloud therefore results from the balance of consumption by oxidation of SO 2 in-cloud production, and the rate by which it is supplied to the system by entrainment of new air into the clouds.

  16. High-Latitude Molecular Clouds as (Gamma)-ray Sources for GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, D F; Dame, T M; Digel, S W

    2005-01-05

    For about two decades, a population of relative small and nearby molecular clouds has been known to exist at high Galactic latitudes. Lying more than 10{sup o} from the Galactic plane, these clouds have typical distances of {approx}150 pc, angular sizes of {approx}1{sup o}, and masses of order tens of solar masses. These objects are passive sources of high-energy {gamma}-rays through cosmic ray-gas interactions. Using a new wide-angle CO survey of the northern sky, we show that typical high-latitude clouds are not bright enough in {gamma}-rays to have been detected by EGRET, but that of order 100 of them will be detectable by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST. Thus, we predict a new steady population of {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes, perhaps the most numerous after active galactic nuclei.

  17. Cloud and Star Formation in Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, Clare

    2014-01-01

    We present the results from simulations of GMC formation in spiral galaxies. First we discuss cloud formation by cloud-cloud collisions, and gravitational instabilities, arguing that the former is prevalent at lower galactic surface densities and the latter at higher. Cloud masses are also limited by stellar feedback, which can be effective before clouds reach their maximum mass. We show other properties of clouds in simulations with different levels of feedback. With a moderate level of feedback, properties such as cloud rotations and virial parameters agree with observations. Without feedback, an unrealistic population of overly bound clouds develops. Spiral arms are not found to trigger star formation, they merely gather gas into more massive GMCs. We discuss in more detail interactions of clouds in the ISM, and argue that these are more complex than early ideas of cloud-cloud collisions. Finally we show ongoing work to determine whether the Milky Way is a flocculent or grand design spiral.

  18. Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) Upgrade to Full Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry Capability for Airborne Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, S. E.; Flynn, C. J.; Johnson, R. R.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument has been developed at NASA Ames in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and NASA Goddard, supported substantially since 2009 by NASA's Radiation Science Program and Earth Science Technology Office. It combines grating spectrometers with fiber optic links to a tracking, scanning head to enable sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith viewing. 4STAR builds on the long and productive heritage of the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers (AATS-6 and -14), which have yielded more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and extensive archived data sets in many NASA Airborne Science campaigns from 1986 to the present. The baseline 4STAR instrument has provided extensive data supporting the TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013), SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys, 2013), and ARISE (Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea and Ice Experiment, 2014), field campaigns.This poster presents plans and progress for an upgrade to the 4STAR instrument to achieve full science capability, including (1) direct-beam sun tracking measurements to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (2) sky radiance measurements to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index and mode-resolved size distribution), (3) cloud properties via zenith radiance, and (4) trace gas spectrometry. Technical progress in context with the governing physics is reported on several upgrades directed at improved light collection and usage, particularly as related to spectrally and radiometrically stable propagation through the collection light path. In addition, improvements to field calibration and verification, and flight operability and reliability are addressed.

  19. Semiclassical states on Lie algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsobanjan, Artur, E-mail: artur.tsobanjan@gmail.com [King’s College, 133 North River Street, Kingston, Pennsylvania 18702 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The effective technique for analyzing representation-independent features of quantum systems based on the semiclassical approximation (developed elsewhere) has been successfully used in the context of the canonical (Weyl) algebra of the basic quantum observables. Here, we perform the important step of extending this effective technique to the quantization of a more general class of finite-dimensional Lie algebras. The case of a Lie algebra with a single central element (the Casimir element) is treated in detail by considering semiclassical states on the corresponding universal enveloping algebra. Restriction to an irreducible representation is performed by “effectively” fixing the Casimir condition, following the methods previously used for constrained quantum systems. We explicitly determine the conditions under which this restriction can be consistently performed alongside the semiclassical truncation.

  20. Symmetry via Lie algebra cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Eastwood, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Killing operator on a Riemannian manifold is a linear differential operator on vector fields whose kernel provides the infinitesimal Riemannian symmetries. The Killing operator is best understood in terms of its prolongation, which entails some simple tensor identities. These simple identities can be viewed as arising from the identification of certain Lie algebra cohomologies. The point is that this case provides a model for more complicated operators similarly concerned with symmetry.

  1. Spatial Variations of Turbulent Properties of Neutral Hydrogen Gas in the Small Magellanic Cloud Using Structure-function Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestingen-Palm, David; Stanimirović, Snežana; González-Casanova, Diego F.; Babler, Brian; Jameson, Katherine; Bolatto, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    We investigate spatial variations of turbulent properties in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) by using neutral hydrogen (H i) observations. With the goal of testing the importance of stellar feedback on H i turbulence, we define central and outer SMC regions based on the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, as well as the H i integrated intensity. We use the structure function and the velocity channel analysis to calculate the power-law index (γ) for both underlying density and velocity fields in these regions. In all cases, our results show essentially no difference in γ between the central and outer regions. This suggests that H i turbulent properties are surprisingly homogeneous across the SMC when probed at a resolution of 30 pc. Contrary to recent suggestions from numerical simulations, we do not find a significant change in γ due to stellar feedback as traced by the SFR surface density. This could be due to the stellar feedback being widespread over the whole of the SMC, but more likely due to a large-scale gravitational driving of turbulence. We show that the lack of difference between central and outer SMC regions cannot be explained by the high optical depth H I.

  2. Can Lies Be Detected Unconsciously?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eShanks

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available People are typically poor at telling apart truthful and deceptive statements. Based on the Unconscious Thought Theory, it has been suggested that poor lie detection arises from the intrinsic limitations of conscious thinking and can be improved by facilitating the contribution of unconscious thought. In support of this hypothesis, Reinhard, Greifeneder, and Scharmach (2013 observed improved lie detection among participants engaging in unconscious thought. The present study aimed to replicate this unconscious thought advantage using a similar experimental procedure but with an important improvement in a key control condition. Specifically, participants judged the truthfulness of 8 video recordings in three thinking modes: immediately after watching them or after a period of unconscious or conscious deliberation. Results from two experiments (combined N = 226 failed to reveal a significant difference in lie detection accuracy between the thinking modes, even after efforts were made to facilitate the occurrence of an unconscious thought advantage in Experiment 2. The results imply that the unconscious thought advantage in deception detection is not a robust phenomenon.

  3. Predictive Methods for Explosion Power of Irregular Flammable Gas Cloud%不规则可燃气云爆炸威力预测方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻健良; 闫兴清; 王健

    2014-01-01

    采用计算流体动力学(CFD )方法,以实际球罐区甲烷泄漏扩散形成的不规则可燃气云为研究工况,探讨了不规则气云爆炸威力的模拟方法,并对比了实际形状可燃气云、最大直径球可燃气云、重心高度球可燃气云、等体积球可燃气云以及采用 TNT 当量法计算得到的气云爆炸超压值。结果表明,TNT 当量法计算结果过于保守。等体积球、重心高度球、最大直径球与实际形状气云爆炸超压偏差分别为-13.9%、-17.2%、52.3%。采用等体积球法估算不规则可燃气云爆炸威力较为便捷,且精度较高。%The numerical method for explosion power of the irregular flammable gas cloud is discussed using the computa -tional fluid dynamics in the situation of leakage and dispersion of methane in real spherical tank .The explosion overpressures are obtained and compared among the five kinds of flammable gas clouds (FGC for short) ,including the actual geometrical FGC ,maximum diameter spherical FGC ,centre of gravity spherical FGC ,equal volume spherical FGC and the TNT equiva-lent FGC .The results indicate that the TNT equivalence method is too conservative .The errors of the equal volume spherical FGC ,the centre of gravity spherical FGC and the maximum diameter spherical FGC with the actual geometry FGC are -13 .9% ,-17 .2% and 52 .3% respectively .The predictive method of equal volume spherical FGC is simple and has a good accuracy .

  4. Particle-like structure of Lie algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    If a Lie algebra structure 𝔤 on a vector space is the sum of a family of mutually compatible Lie algebra structures 𝔤i's, we say that 𝔤 is simply assembled from the 𝔤i's. Repeating this procedure with a number of Lie algebras, themselves simply assembled from the 𝔤i's, one obtains a Lie algebra assembled in two steps from 𝔤i's, and so on. We describe the process of modular disassembling of a Lie algebra into a unimodular and a non-unimodular part. We then study two inverse questions: which Lie algebras can be assembled from a given family of Lie algebras, and from which Lie algebras can a given Lie algebra be assembled. We develop some basic assembling and disassembling techniques that constitute the elements of a new approach to the general theory of Lie algebras. The main result of our theory is that any finite-dimensional Lie algebra over an algebraically closed field of characteristic zero or over R can be assembled in a finite number of steps from two elementary constituents, which we call dyons and triadons. Up to an abelian summand, a dyon is a Lie algebra structure isomorphic to the non-abelian 2-dimensional Lie algebra, while a triadon is isomorphic to the 3-dimensional Heisenberg Lie algebra. As an example, we describe constructions of classical Lie algebras from triadons.

  5. Cloud formation in giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Christiane

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the formation of dust clouds in atmospheres of giant gas-planets. The chemical structure and the evolution of the grain size distribution in the dust cloud layer is discussed based on a consistent treatment of seed formation, growth/evaporation and gravitational settling. Future developments are shortly addressed.

  6. Filiform Lie algebras of order 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R. M.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work is to generalize a very important type of Lie algebras and superalgebras, i.e., filiform Lie (super)algebras, into the theory of Lie algebras of order F. Thus, the concept of filiform Lie algebras of order F is obtained. In particular, for F = 3 it has been proved that by using infinitesimal deformations of the associated model elementary Lie algebra it can be obtained families of filiform elementary lie algebras of order 3, analogously as that occurs into the theory of Lie algebras [M. Vergne, "Cohomologie des algèbres de Lie nilpotentes. Application à l'étude de la variété des algèbres de Lie nilpotentes," Bull. Soc. Math. France 98, 81-116 (1970)]. Also we give the dimension, using an adaptation of the {sl}(2,{C})-module Method, and a basis of such infinitesimal deformations in some generic cases.

  7. DUST AND GAS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS FROM THE HERITAGE HERSCHEL KEY PROJECT. I. DUST PROPERTIES AND INSIGHTS INTO THE ORIGIN OF THE SUBMILLIMETER EXCESS EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Karl D.; Roman-Duval, Julia; Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bot, Caroline [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [CESR, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 9 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse, Cedex 4 (France); Bolatto, Alberto; Jameson, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Lab for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Boyer, Martha L. [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Clayton, Geoffrey C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Engelbracht, Charles [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Galametz, Maud [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching-bei-Mnchen (Germany); Galliano, Frederic; Hony, Sacha; Lebouteiller, Vianney [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hughes, Annie [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, and National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Israel, Frank P. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kawamura, Akiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-20

    The dust properties in the Large and Small Magellanic clouds (LMC/SMC) are studied using the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project photometric data in five bands from 100 to 500 μm. Three simple models of dust emission were fit to the observations: a single temperature blackbody modified by a power-law emissivity (SMBB), a single temperature blackbody modified by a broken power-law emissivity (BEMBB), and two blackbodies with different temperatures, both modified by the same power-law emissivity (TTMBB). Using these models, we investigate the origin of the submillimeter excess, defined as the submillimeter emission above that expected from SMBB models fit to observations <200 μm. We find that the BEMBB model produces the lowest fit residuals with pixel-averaged 500 μm submillimeter excesses of 27% and 43% for the LMC and SMC, respectively. Adopting gas masses from previous works, the gas-to-dust ratios calculated from our fitting results show that the TTMBB fits require significantly more dust than are available even if all the metals present in the interstellar medium (ISM) were condensed into dust. This indicates that the submillimeter excess is more likely to be due to emissivity variations than a second population of colder dust. We derive integrated dust masses of (7.3 ± 1.7) × 10{sup 5} and (8.3 ± 2.1) × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} for the LMC and SMC, respectively. We find significant correlations between the submillimeter excess and other dust properties; further work is needed to determine the relative contributions of fitting noise and ISM physics to the correlations.

  8. Accounting for the effects of surface BRDF on satellite cloud and trace-gas retrievals: a new approach based on geometry-dependent Lambertian equivalent reflectivity applied to OMI algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkov, Alexander; Qin, Wenhan; Krotkov, Nickolay; Lamsal, Lok; Spurr, Robert; Haffner, David; Joiner, Joanna; Yang, Eun-Su; Marchenko, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Most satellite nadir ultraviolet and visible cloud, aerosol, and trace-gas algorithms make use of climatological surface reflectivity databases. For example, cloud and NO2 retrievals for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) use monthly gridded surface reflectivity climatologies that do not depend upon the observation geometry. In reality, reflection of incoming direct and diffuse solar light from land or ocean surfaces is sensitive to the sun-sensor geometry. This dependence is described by the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). To account for the BRDF, we propose to use a new concept of geometry-dependent Lambertian equivalent reflectivity (LER). Implementation within the existing OMI cloud and NO2 retrieval infrastructure requires changes only to the input surface reflectivity database. The geometry-dependent LER is calculated using a vector radiative transfer model with high spatial resolution BRDF information from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) over land and the Cox-Munk slope distribution over ocean with a contribution from water-leaving radiance. We compare the geometry-dependent and climatological LERs for two wavelengths, 354 and 466 nm, that are used in OMI cloud algorithms to derive cloud fractions. A detailed comparison of the cloud fractions and pressures derived with climatological and geometry-dependent LERs is carried out. Geometry-dependent LER and corresponding retrieved cloud products are then used as inputs to our OMI NO2 algorithm. We find that replacing the climatological OMI-based LERs with geometry-dependent LERs can increase NO2 vertical columns by up to 50 % in highly polluted areas; the differences include both BRDF effects and biases between the MODIS and OMI-based surface reflectance data sets. Only minor changes to NO2 columns (within 5 %) are found over unpolluted and overcast areas.

  9. Accounting for the Effects of Surface BRDF on Satellite Cloud and Trace-Gas Retrievals: A New Approach Based on Geometry-Dependent Lambertian-Equivalent Reflectivity Applied to OMI Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkov, Alexander; Qin, Wenhan; Krotkov, Nickolay; Lamsal, Lok; Spurr, Robert; Haffner, David; Joiner, Joanna; Yang, Eun-Su; Marchenko, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Most satellite nadir ultraviolet and visible cloud, aerosol, and trace-gas algorithms make use of climatological surface reflectivity databases. For example, cloud and NO2 retrievals for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) use monthly gridded surface reflectivity climatologies that do not depend upon the observation geometry. In reality, reflection of incoming direct and diffuse solar light from land or ocean surfaces is sensitive to the sun-sensor geometry. This dependence is described by the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). To account for the BRDF, we propose to use a new concept of geometry-dependent Lambertian equivalent reflectivity (LER). Implementation within the existing OMI cloud and NO2 retrieval infrastructure requires changes only to the input surface reflectivity database. The geometry-dependent LER is calculated using a vector radiative transfer model with high spatial resolution BRDF information from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) over land and the Cox-Munk slope distribution over ocean with a contribution from water-leaving radiance. We compare the geometry-dependent and climatological LERs for two wavelengths, 354 and 466 nm, that are used in OMI cloud algorithms to derive cloud fractions. A detailed comparison of the cloud fractions and pressures derived with climatological and geometry-dependent LERs is carried out. Geometry-dependent LER and corresponding retrieved cloud products are then used as inputs to our OMI NO2 algorithm. We find that replacing the climatological OMI-based LERs with geometry-dependent LERs can increase NO2 vertical columns by up to 50% in highly polluted areas; the differences include both BRDF effects and biases between the MODIS and OMI-based surface reflectance data sets. Only minor changes to NO2 columns (within 5 %) are found over unpolluted and overcast areas.

  10. Accounting for the Effects of Surface BRDF on Satellite Cloud and Trace-Gas Retrievals: A New Approach Based on Geometry-Dependent Lambertian-Equivalent Reflectivity Applied to OMI Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkov, Alexander; Qin, Wenhan; Krotkov, Nickolay; Lamsal, Lok; Spurr, Robert; Haffner, David; Joiner, Joanna; Yang, Eun-Su; Marchenko, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Most satellite nadir ultraviolet and visible cloud, aerosol, and trace-gas algorithms make use of climatological surface reflectivity databases. For example, cloud and NO2 retrievals for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) use monthly gridded surface reflectivity climatologies that do not depend upon the observation geometry. In reality, reflection of incoming direct and diffuse solar light from land or ocean surfaces is sensitive to the sun-sensor geometry. This dependence is described by the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). To account for the BRDF, we propose to use a new concept of geometry-dependent Lambertian equivalent reflectivity (LER). Implementation within the existing OMI cloud and NO2 retrieval infrastructure requires changes only to the input surface reflectivity database. The geometry-dependent LER is calculated using a vector radiative transfer model with high spatial resolution BRDF information from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) over land and the Cox-Munk slope distribution over ocean with a contribution from water-leaving radiance. We compare the geometry-dependent and climatological LERs for two wavelengths, 354 and 466 nm, that are used in OMI cloud algorithms to derive cloud fractions. A detailed comparison of the cloud fractions and pressures derived with climatological and geometry-dependent LERs is carried out. Geometry-dependent LER and corresponding retrieved cloud products are then used as inputs to our OMI NO2 algorithm. We find that replacing the climatological OMI-based LERs with geometry-dependent LERs can increase NO2 vertical columns by up to 50% in highly polluted areas; the differences include both BRDF effects and biases between the MODIS and OMI-based surface reflectance data sets. Only minor changes to NO2 columns (within 5 %) are found over unpolluted and overcast areas.

  11. Non-Standard Grain Properties, Dark Gas Reservoir, and Extended Submillimeter Excess, Probed by Herschel in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Galliano, F; Bernard, J -P; Bot, C; Madden, S C; Roman-Duval, J; Galametz, M; Li, A; Meixner, M; Engelbracht, C W; Lebouteiller, V; Misselt, K; Montiel, E; Panuzzo, P; Reach, W T; Skibba, R

    2011-01-01

    Aims: In this paper, we perform detailed modelling of the Spitzer and Herschel observations of the LMC, in order to: (i) systematically study the uncertainties and biases affecting dust mass estimates; and to (ii) explore the peculiar ISM properties of the LMC. Methods: To achieve these goals, we have modelled the spatially resolved SEDs with two alternate grain compositions, to study the impact of different submillimetre opacities on the dust mass. We have rigorously propagated the observational errors (noise and calibration) through the entire fitting process, in order to derive consistent parameter uncertainties. Results: First, we show that using the integrated SED leads to underestimating the dust mass by ~50 % compared to the value obtained with sufficient spatial resolution, for the region we studied. This might be the case, in general, for unresolved galaxies. Second, we show that Milky Way type grains produce higher gas-to-dust mass ratios than what seems possible according to the element abundances ...

  12. Transformation groups and Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Ibragimov, Nail H

    2013-01-01

    This book is based on the extensive experience of teaching for mathematics, physics and engineering students in Russia, USA, South Africa and Sweden. The author provides students and teachers with an easy to follow textbook spanning a variety of topics. The methods of local Lie groups discussed in the book provide universal and effective method for solving nonlinear differential equations analytically. Introduction to approximate transformation groups also contained in the book helps to develop skills in constructing approximate solutions for differential equations with a small parameter.

  13. Interstellar molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bally, J.

    1986-04-01

    The physical properties of the molecular phase of the interstellar medium are studied with regard to star formation and the structure of the Galaxy. Most observations of molecular clouds are made with single-dish, high-surface precision radio telescopes, with the best resolution attainable at 0.2 to 1 arcmin; the smallest structures that can be resolved are of order 10 to the 17th cm in diameter. It is now believed that: (1) most of the mass of the Galaxy is in the form of giant molecular clouds; (2) the largest clouds and those responsible for most massive star formation are concentrated in spiral arms; (3) the molecular clouds are the sites of perpetual star formation, and are significant in the chemical evolution of the Galaxy; (4) giant molecular clouds determine the evolution of the kinematic properties of galactic disk stars; (5) the total gas content is diminishing with time; and (6) most clouds have supersonic internal motions and do not form stars on a free-fall time scale. It is concluded that though progress has been made, more advanced instruments are needed to inspect the processes operating within stellar nurseries and to study the distribution of the molecular clouds in more distant galaxies. Instruments presently under construction which are designed to meet these ends are presented.

  14. FIR line profiles as probes of warm gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of the shapes, velocities, and intensities of FIR lines all help to probe the dynamics, physical associations, and excitation conditions of warm gas in molecular clouds. With this in mind, we have observed the J=9-8, 12-11,14-13, and 16-15 lines of (12)CO and the 158 micron line of C II in a number of positions in 4 selected clouds. The data were obtained with a laser heterodyne spectrometer aboard NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Line measurements at 0.6 km/s resolution allow us to resolve the profiles completely, and thereby to distinguish between UV-and shock-heating mechanisms for the high-excitation gas. For CO, the high-J linewidths lie in the range of 4-20 km/s (FWHM), similar to those observed for low-J (J less than 4) transitions in these sources. This correspondence suggests that the hotter gas (T = 200-600 K) is dynamically linked to the quiescent gas component, perhaps by association with the UV-heated peripheries of the numerous cloud clumps. Much of the C II emission is thought to emanate from these cloud peripheries, but the line profiles generally do not match those seen in CO. None of the observed sources show any evidence in high-J (12)CO emission for shock-excitation (i.e., linewidths greater than 30 km/s).

  15. 义安煤矿顶板走向高抽巷的层位选定%layer selection of extraction of high gas drainage roadways lying the strike of roof In Yi'an coal mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷庆超; 王恩营; 刘度

    2015-01-01

    为了解决义安矿工作面瓦斯涌出量大,上隅角瓦斯浓度经常超限问题,依据覆岩采动裂隙演化规律和“O”形圈理论,提出在工作面顶板布置高抽巷抽采采空区瓦斯,通过理论计算与数值模拟对采空区上覆岩层“两带”高度范围进行研究,确定裂隙带发育范围。而为了防止高抽巷被破坏,将高抽巷的设计层位选定为1.5倍采高。%In order to solve the gas emission quantity of Yi'an mine working face, the upper corner gas excess problem, on the basis of overlying fissure evolution law and "O" ring theory, proposed the layout of high level suction roadway in the working face roof to extract the gobs gas, through theoretical calculation and numerical simulation to study the ‘two zone' height of overlying strata in gobs, determined the fracture zone development scope. In order to prevent the destruction of the high level suction roadway, and selected the location of the high level suction roadway being 1.5 times for the mining height.

  16. Cloud Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthing, Hans Henrik

    Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing.......Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing....

  17. Mercury: its iron and sulfur enrichment has roots in mechanical concentration of dense particles in the inner part of rotating primordial gas-dust cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2013-09-01

    After MESSENGER explorations one could crystallize an idea of nature of this innermost planet of the Solar system. It has on the whole dull low albedo surface with small variations in compositions of Mg-rich Fe-poor large tectonic units. Only widespread small hollows and their groups with darker and brighter haloes brighten this dull landscape. The relief variations are small (maximum 10 km, but normally within 3-5 km), much less than on other rocky planets. The large iron core making the planet's density high leaves a modest place for mantle. Atmosphere is practically absent notwithstanding strong degassing, and this is due to strong cleaning by the solar wind. All mentioned peculiarities could be explained by the Mercury's position in the innermost zone. This was done even before the first orbital explorations just on a basis of the wave planetology connecting planets' properties with their orbital characteristics [ 1, 2]. Surprising many planetologists the high sulfur presence in Mercury, not justified by its position in the hot inner zone was, however, practically predicted by a new model of primordial matter differentiation in a rotating gas-dust cloud [ 3, 4]. This cloud consisting of gas and mixture of solids with various densities under rotation produces concentration of heavy particles in the inner zone. This process is well known for prospectors making heavy concentrations (schlich) with use of a spiral separator. There separation of heavies is made by descending and rotating in a spiral water-sand mixture. This model for differentiation of a planetary system was presented at LPSC [3, 4]. At that time nobody could imagine volatile sulfur in the inner hot zone. In [1] is written "It is suggested that primary accretion minerals in some meteorites and probably also in the larger bodies of the Solar system are united by nearness of their densities rather than by temperatures of their condensation out of the protoplanet gas (for example, common association of

  18. Dust cloud lightning in extraterrestrial atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Christiane; Diver, Declan; Witte, Soeren

    2012-01-01

    Lightning is present in all solar system planets which form clouds in their atmospheres. Cloud formation outside our solar system is possible in objects with much higher temperatures than on Earth or on Jupiter: Brown dwarfs and giant extrasolar gas planets form clouds made of mixed materials and a large spectrum of grain sizes. These clouds are globally neutral obeying dust-gas charge equilibrium which is, on short timescales, inconsistent with the observation of stochastic ionization events of the solar system planets. We argue that a significant volume of the clouds in brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets is susceptible to local discharge events and that the upper cloud layers are most suitable for powerful lightning-like discharge events. We discuss various sources of atmospheric ionisation, including thermal ionisation and a first estimate of ionisation by cosmic rays, and argue that we should expect thunderstorms also in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and giant gas planets which contain mineral clouds.

  19. DERIVATIONS AND EXTENSIONS OF LIE COLOR ALGEBRA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qingcheng; Zhang Yongzheng

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors obtain some results concerning derivations of fi-nitely generated Lie color algebras and discuss the relation between skew derivation space SkDer(L) and central extension H2(L, F) on some Lie color algebras. Meanwhile, they generalize the notion of double extension to quadratic Lie color algebras, a sufficient con-dition for a quadratic Lie color algebra to be a double extension and further properties are given.

  20. Economical and geopolitical aspects bond to the foreseen development of the natural gas in an open market; Aspects economiques et geopolitiques lies au developpement prevu du gaz naturel dans un marche ouvert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-15

    For the first time in 2000, the part of natural gas is equal to those of coal in the world energy accounting. The economy and the geo-policy of this developing energy is analyzed, showing an economy dominated by the transport costs, the specificity of the european sector and the opening market since 1980. The european market opening incertitudes and opportunities are detailed. In conclusion the Gaz De France role in the european energy pole and the new regulations are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  1. Infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian Lie superalgebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The natural filtration of the infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian Lie superalgebra over a field of positive characteristic is proved to be invariant under automorphisms by characterizing ad-nilpotent elements.We are thereby able to obtain an intrinsic characterization of the Hamiltonian Lie superalgebra and establish a property of the automorphisms of the Lie superalgebra.

  2. SOME RESULTS OF MODULAR LIE SUPERALGEBRAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In the present article, the authors give some properties on subinvariant subalgebras of modular Lie superalgebras and obtain the derivation tower theorem of modular Lie superalgebras, which is analogous to the automorphism tower theorem of finite groups.Moreover, they announce and prove some results of modular complete Lie superalgebras.

  3. Emergence of Lying in Very Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Angela D.; Lee, Kang

    2013-01-01

    Lying is a pervasive human behavior. Evidence to date suggests that from the age of 42 months onward, children become increasingly capable of telling lies in various social situations. However, there is limited experimental evidence regarding whether very young children will tell lies spontaneously. The present study investigated the emergence of…

  4. A Kind of Braided-Lie Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ We introduce a family of braidedLie algebras.They are Lie algebras in the unifying YetterDrinfeldLong module categoryJJMQQ where J and Q are Hopf algebras.We study their structure and the braidedLie structure of an algebra A in JJM QQ.

  5. Probability on real Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is a progressive introduction to non-commutativity in probability theory, summarizing and synthesizing recent results about classical and quantum stochastic processes on Lie algebras. In the early chapters, focus is placed on concrete examples of the links between algebraic relations and the moments of probability distributions. The subsequent chapters are more advanced and deal with Wigner densities for non-commutative couples of random variables, non-commutative stochastic processes with independent increments (quantum Lévy processes), and the quantum Malliavin calculus. This book will appeal to advanced undergraduate and graduate students interested in the relations between algebra, probability, and quantum theory. It also addresses a more advanced audience by covering other topics related to non-commutativity in stochastic calculus, Lévy processes, and the Malliavin calculus.

  6. Study of the physical processes involved in the operating mode of the micro-strips gas detector Micromegas; Analyse des phenomenes physiques lies au fonctionnement du detecteur gazeux a micropistes micromegas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barouch, G

    2001-04-01

    Micromegas is a micro-strip gaseous detector invented in 1996. It consists of two volumes of gas separated by a micro-mesh. The first volume of gas, 3 mm thick, is used to liberate ionization electrons from the incident charged particle. In the second volume, only 100 {mu}m thick, an avalanche phenomenon amplifies the electrons produced in the first volume. Strips printed on an insulating substrate collect the electrons from the avalanche. The geometrical configuration of Micromegas showed many advantages. The short anode-cathode distance combined with a high granularity provide high rate capabilities due to a fast collection of ions produced during the avalanche development. Moreover, the possibility to localize the avalanche with strips printed about every hundreds of micrometers allows to measure the position of the incident particle with a good resolution. In this work, experimental tests of Micromegas are presented along with detailed Monte Carlo simulations used to understand and optimize the detector's performances. The prototypes were tested several times at the PS accelerator at CERN. The analysis of the date showed a stable and efficient behavior of Micromegas combined with an excellent space resolution. In fact, spatial resolutions of less than 15 {mu}m were obtained. In parallel with the in-beam tests, several simulations have been developed in order to gain a better understanding of the detector's response. (author)

  7. Cloud optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    Clouds affect the climate of the Earth, and they are an important factor in the weather. Therefore, their radiative properties must be understood in great detail. This book summarizes current knowledge on cloud optical properties, for example their ability to absorb, transmit, and reflect light, which depends on the clouds' geometrical and microphysical characteristics such as sizes of droplets and crystals, their shapes, and structures. In addition, problems related to the image transfer through clouds and cloud remote sensing are addressed in this book in great detail. This book can be an im

  8. The Lognormal Probability Distribution Function of the Perseus Molecular Cloud: A Comparison of HI and Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Murray, Claire; Stanimirovic, Snezana

    2015-01-01

    The shape of the probability distribution function (PDF) of molecular clouds is an important ingredient for modern theories of star formation and turbulence. Recently, several studies have pointed out observational difficulties with constraining the low column density (i.e. Av <1) PDF using dust tracers. In order to constrain the shape and properties of the low column density probability distribution function, we investigate the PDF of multiphase atomic gas in the Perseus molecular cloud using opacity-corrected GALFA-HI data and compare the PDF shape and properties to the total gas PDF and the N(H2) PDF. We find that the shape of the PDF in the atomic medium of Perseus is well described by a lognormal distribution, and not by a power-law or bimodal distribution. The peak of the atomic gas PDF in and around Perseus lies at the HI-H2 transition column density for this cloud, past which the N(H2) PDF takes on a powerlaw form. We find that the PDF of the atomic gas is narrow and at column densities larger than...

  9. Interstellar Gas-phase Element Depletions in the Small Magellanic Cloud: A Guide to Correcting for Dust in QSO Absorption Line Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Edward B.; Wallerstein, George

    2017-04-01

    We present data on the gas-phase abundances for 9 different elements in the interstellar medium of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), based on the strengths of ultraviolet absorption features over relevant velocities in the spectra of 18 stars within the SMC. From this information and the total abundances defined by the element fractions in young stars in the SMC, we construct a general interpretation on how these elements condense into solid form onto dust grains. As a group, the elements Si, S, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn exhibit depletion sequences similar to those in the local part of our Galaxy defined by Jenkins. The elements Mg and Ti deplete less rapidly in the SMC than in the Milky Way, and Mn depletes more rapidly. We speculate that these differences might be explained by the different chemical affinities to different existing grain substrates. For instance, there is evidence that the mass fractions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the SMC are significantly lower than those in the Milky Way. We propose that the depletion sequences that we observed for the SMC may provide a better model for interpreting the element abundances in low-metallicity Damped Lyman Alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorption systems that are recorded in the spectra of distant quasars and gamma-ray burst afterglows. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and additional data obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Associations of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with program nr. 13778.

  10. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A.; Gupta, P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, P.; Sneep, M.; de Haan, J.; Polonsky, I.; Spurr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cloud Optical Centroid Pressure (OCP), also known as the effective cloud pressure, is a satellite-derived parameter that is commonly used in trace-gas retrievals to account for the effects of clouds on near-infrared through ultraviolet radiance measurements. Fast simulators are desirable to further expand the use of cloud OCP retrievals into the operational and climate communities for applications such as data assimilation and evaluation of cloud vertical structure in general circulation models. In this paper, we develop and validate fast simulators that provide estimates of the cloud OCP given a vertical profile of optical extinction. We use a pressure-weighting scheme where the weights depend upon optical parameters of clouds and/or aerosol. A cloud weighting function is easily extracted using this formulation. We then use fast simulators to compare two different satellite cloud OCP retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with estimates based on collocated cloud extinction profiles from a combination of CloudS at radar and MODIS visible radiance data. These comparisons are made over a wide range of conditions to provide a comprehensive validation of the OMI cloud OCP retrievals. We find generally good agreement between OMI cloud OCPs and those predicted by CloudSat. However, the OMI cloud OCPs from the two independent algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the estimates from CloudSat/MODIS. Differences between OMI cloud OCPs and those based on CloudSat/MODIS may result from undetected snow/ice at the surface, cloud 3-D effects, low altitude clouds missed by CloudSat, and the fact that CloudSat only observes a relatively small fraction of an OMI field-of-view.

  11. Lies and Deception: A Failed Reconciliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broncano-Berrocal, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The traditional view of lying says that lying is a matter of intending to deceive others by making statements that one believes to be false. Jennifer Lackey has recently defended the following version of the traditional view: A lies to B just in case (i) A states that p to B, (ii) A believes that...... is false and (iii) A intends to be deceptive to B in stating that p. I argue that, despite all the virtues that Lackey ascribes to her view, conditions (i), (ii) and (iii) are not sufficient for lying.......The traditional view of lying says that lying is a matter of intending to deceive others by making statements that one believes to be false. Jennifer Lackey has recently defended the following version of the traditional view: A lies to B just in case (i) A states that p to B, (ii) A believes that p...

  12. [Psychopathological study of lie motif in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Koichiro; Kato, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    The theme of a statement is called "lie motif" by the authors when schizophrenic patients say "I have lied to anybody". We tried to analyse of the psychopathological characteristics and anthropological meanings of the lie motifs in schizophrenia, which has not been thematically examined until now, based on 4 cases, and contrasting with the lie motif (Lügenmotiv) in depression taken up by A. Kraus (1989). We classified the lie motifs in schizophrenia into the following two types: a) the past directive lie motif: the patients speak about their real lie regarding it as a 'petty fault' in their distant past with self-guilty feeling, b) the present directive lie motif: the patients say repeatedly 'I have lied' (about their present speech and behavior), retreating from their previous commitments. The observed false confessions of innocent fault by the patients seem to belong to the present directed lie motif. In comparison with the lie motif in depression, it is characteristic for the lie motif in schizophrenia that the patients feel themselves to already have been caught out by others before they confess the lie. The lie motif in schizophrenia seems to come into being through the attribution process of taking the others' blame on ones' own shoulders, which has been pointed out to be common in the guilt experience in schizophrenia. The others' blame on this occasion is due to "the others' gaze" in the experience of the initial self-centralization (i.e. non delusional self-referential experience) in the early stage of schizophrenia (S. Kato 1999). The others' gaze is supposed to bring about the feeling of amorphous self-revelation which could also be regarded as the guilt feeling without content, to the patients. When the guilt feeling is bound with a past concrete fault, the patients tell the past directive lie motif. On the other hand, when the patients cannot find a past fixed content, and feel their present actions as uncertain and experience them as lies, the

  13. Learning to lie: Effects of practice on the cognitive cost of lying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram eVan Bockstaele

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive theories on deception posit that lying requires more cognitive resources than telling the truth. In line with this idea, it has been demonstrated that deceptive responses are typically associated with increased response times and higher error rates compared to truthful responses. Although the cognitive cost of lying has been assumed to be resistant to practice, it has recently been shown that people who are trained to lie can reduce this cost. In the present study (n = 42, we further explored the effects of practice on one’s ability to lie by manipulating the proportions of lie and truth-trials in a Sheffield lie test across three phases: Baseline (50% lie, 50% truth, Training (frequent-lie group: 75% lie, 25% truth; control group: 50% lie, 50% truth; and frequent-truth group: 25% lie, 75% truth, and Test (50% lie, 50% truth. The results showed that lying became easier while participants were trained to lie more often and that lying became more difficult while participants were trained to tell the truth more often. Furthermore, these effects did carry over to the test phase, but only for the specific items that were used for the training manipulation. Hence, our study confirms that relatively little practice is enough to alter the cognitive cost of lying, although this effect does not persist over time for non-practiced items.

  14. Deceivers' Responses to Challenges of Their Truthfulness: Difference between Familiar Lies and Unfamiliar Lies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Battista, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Examines whether a lie's cognitive representation affects deceivers' ability to respond to probing. Shows that behavioral changes made in response to probing varied depending on whether the lie was a familiar lie or an unfamiliar lie but that none of these behaviors were related to judges' ratings of truthfulness. (SR)

  15. The molecular cloud-H II region complexes associated with SH 90 and SH 235

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafon, G.; Baudry, A.; de La Noe, J.; Deharveng, L.

    1983-07-01

    The Sharpless regions Sh 90 and Sh 235 are characterized on the basis of monochromatic photographs (at H-alpha, N III, and O III) and H-alpha photographic interferograms made at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence and of molecular-cloud maps (at 110.201 and 89.189 GHz) made at the Observatoire de Bordeaux. Sh 90, at a distance of 2.4 kpc, is found to have an evolved-H II-region shell structure, with ionized gas flowing both away from and toward a neutral molecular cloud with a mass of about 60,000 solar mass which lies partly in front of the H II region. Sh 235, at 1.6 kpc, has two extended 100,000-300,000-solar-mass neutral clouds which partly overlap. The northern cloud, identified at -20 km/s, is related to the optical nebula; the southern cloud (at -17 km/s) contains three compact H II regions (A, B, and C) and exhibits recent star-formation processes. The 'champagne' model of H II regions proposed by Tenorio-Tagle (1979) is considered applicable to Sh 90 and to Sh 235C.

  16. Holomorph of Lie color algebras%Lie color代数的全形

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨恒云

    2007-01-01

    给出Lie color代数全形的一些性质,证明Lie color代数L的全形有分解(H)(L)=L(+)Z(H)(L)(L)的充分必要条件是它是完备Lie color代数.%To the holomorph of Lie color algebras, some properties are studied. A Lie color algebra L is complete if and only if (H)(L) = L(+)Z(H)(L) (L).

  17. Antarctic clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Lachlan-Cope, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Sensitivity studies with global climate models show that, by their influence on the radiation balance, Antarctic clouds play a major role in the climate system, both directly at high southern latitudes and indirectly globally, as the local circulation changes lead to global teleconnections. Unfortunately, observations of cloud distribution in the Antarctic are limited and often of low quality because of the practical difficulty in observing clouds in the harsh Antarctic environment. The best ...

  18. Fast simulators for satellite cloud optical centroid pressure retrievals; evaluation of OMI cloud retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joiner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cloud Optical Centroid Pressure (OCP is a satellite-derived parameter that is commonly used in trace-gas retrievals to account for the effects of clouds on near-infrared through ultraviolet radiance measurements. Fast simulators are desirable to further expand the use of cloud OCP retrievals into the operational and climate communities for applications such as data assimilation and evaluation of cloud vertical structure in general circulation models. In this paper, we develop and validate fast simulators that provide estimates of the cloud OCP given a vertical profile of optical extinction. We use a pressure-weighting scheme where the weights depend upon optical parameters of clouds and/or aerosols. A cloud weighting function is easily extracted using this formulation. We then use fast simulators to compare two different satellite cloud OCP retrievals, from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, with estimates based on collocated cloud extinction profiles from a combination of CloudSat radar and MODIS visible radiance data. These comparisons are made over a wide range of conditions to provide a comprehensive validation of the OMI cloud OCP retrievals. We find generally good agreement between OMI cloud OCPs and those predicted by CloudSat. However, the OMI cloud OCPs from the two independent algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the estimates from CloudSat/MODIS. Differences between OMI cloud OCPs and those based on CloudSat/MODIS may result from undetected snow/ice at the surface, cloud 3-D effects, cases of low clouds obscurred by ground-clutter in CloudSat observations and by opaque high clouds in CALIPSO lidar observations, and the fact that CloudSat/CALIPSO only observes a relatively small fraction of an OMI field-of-view.

  19. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Antonopoulos, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing has recently emerged as a subject of substantial industrial and academic interest, though its meaning and scope is hotly debated. For some researchers, clouds are a natural evolution towards the full commercialisation of grid systems, while others dismiss the term as a mere re-branding of existing pay-per-use technologies. From either perspective, 'cloud' is now the label of choice for accountable pay-per-use access to third party applications and computational resources on a massive scale. Clouds support patterns of less predictable resource use for applications and services a

  20. A Catalog of HI Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S; Lee, Y; Kim, Y; Jung, Y C; Dopita, M A; Elmegreen, B G; Freeman, K C; Sault, R J; Kesteven, M J; McConnell, D; Chu, Y -H

    2007-01-01

    A 21 cm neutral hydrogen interferometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) combined with the Parkes multi-beam HI single-dish survey clearly shows that the HI gas is distributed in the form of clumps or clouds. The HI clouds and clumps have been identified using a thresholding method with three three separate brightness temperature thresholds ($T_b$). Each catalog of HI cloud candidates shows a power law relationship between the sizes and the velocity dispersions of the clouds roughly following the Larson Law scaling $\\sigma_v \\propto R^{0.5}$, with steeper indices associated with dynamically hot regions. The clouds in each catalog have roughly constant virial parameters as a function mass suggesting that that the clouds are all in roughly the same dynamical state, but the values of the virial parameter are significantly larger than unity showing that turbulent motions dominate gravity in these clouds. The mass distribution of the clouds is a power law with differential indices between -1.6 and -2.0 ...

  1. Quantum Lie theory a multilinear approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kharchenko, Vladislav

    2015-01-01

    This is an introduction to the mathematics behind the phrase “quantum Lie algebra”. The numerous attempts over the last 15-20 years to define a quantum Lie algebra as an elegant algebraic object with a binary “quantum” Lie bracket have not been widely accepted. In this book, an alternative approach is developed that includes multivariable operations. Among the problems discussed are the following: a PBW-type theorem; quantum deformations of Kac--Moody algebras; generic and symmetric quantum Lie operations; the Nichols algebras; the Gurevich--Manin  Lie algebras;  and Shestakov--Umirbaev  operations for the Lie theory of nonassociative products.  Opening with an introduction for beginners and continuing as a textbook for graduate students in physics and mathematics, the book can also be used as a reference by more advanced readers. With the exception of the introductory chapter, the content of this monograph has not previously appeared in book form.

  2. Managing Clouds in Cloud Platforms

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmat, Kamal A

    2010-01-01

    Managing cloud services is a fundamental challenge in todays virtualized environments. These challenges equally face both providers and consumers of cloud services. The issue becomes even more challenging in virtualized environments that support mobile clouds. Cloud computing platforms such as Amazon EC2 provide customers with flexible, on demand resources at low cost. However, they fail to provide seamless infrastructure management and monitoring capabilities that many customers may need. For instance, Amazon EC2 doesn't fully support cloud services automated discovery and it requires a private set of authentication credentials. Salesforce.com, on the other hand, do not provide monitoring access to their underlying systems. Moreover, these systems fail to provide infrastructure monitoring of heterogenous and legacy systems that don't support agents. In this work, we explore how to build a cloud management system that combines heterogeneous management of virtual resources with comprehensive management of phys...

  3. Generalized derivations of Lie triple systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present some basic properties concerning the derivation algebra Der (T, the quasiderivation algebra QDer (T and the generalized derivation algebra GDer (T of a Lie triple system T, with the relationship Der (T ⊆ QDer (T ⊆ GDer (T ⊆ End (T. Furthermore, we completely determine those Lie triple systems T with condition QDer (T = End (T. We also show that the quasiderivations of T can be embedded as derivations in a larger Lie triple system.

  4. 3-Leibniz bialgebras (3-Lie bialgebras)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In this paper by use of cohomology complex of $3$-Leibniz algebras, the definitions of Leibniz bialgebras (and Lie bialgebras) are extended for the case of $3$-Leibniz algebras. Many theorems about Leibniz bialgebras are extended and proved for the case of $3$-Leibniz bialgebras ($3$-Lie bialgebras). Moreover a new theorem on the correspondence between $3$-Leibniz bialgebra and its associated Leibniz bialgebra is proved. $3$-Lie bialgebra as particular case of the $3$-Leibniz bialgebra is inv...

  5. Killing Forms of Isotropic Lie Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Malagon, Audrey

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method for computing the Killing form of an isotropic Lie algebra defined over an arbitrary field based on the Killing form of a subalgebra containing its anisotropic kernel. This approach allows for streamlined formulas for many Lie algebras of types E6 and E7 and yields a unified formula for all Lie algebras of inner type E6, including the anisotropic ones.

  6. ALIED: A Theory of Lie Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris N. H. Street

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We are very inaccurate lie detectors, and tend to believe what others tell us is the truth more often than we ought to. In fact, studies on lie detection typically describe our tendency to believe others as an error in judgment. Although people may look like hopeless lie detectors, the Adaptive Lie Detector theory (ALIED claims that people are actually making smart, informed judgments. This article explores the ALIED theory and what it means for those wanting to spot a liar.

  7. Computations in finite-dimensional Lie algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Cohen

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes progress made in context with the construction of a general library of Lie algebra algorithms, called ELIAS (Eindhoven Lie Algebra System, within the computer algebra package GAP. A first sketch of the package can be found in Cohen and de Graaf[1]. Since then, in a collaborative effort with G. Ivanyos, the authors have continued to develop algorithms which were implemented in ELIAS by the second author. These activities are part of a bigger project, called ACELA and financed by STW, the Dutch Technology Foundation, which aims at an interactive book on Lie algebras (cf. Cohen and Meertens [2]. This paper gives a global description of the main ways in which to present Lie algebras on a computer. We focus on the transition from a Lie algebra abstractly given by an array of structure constants to a Lie algebra presented as a subalgebra of the Lie algebra of n×n matrices. We describe an algorithm typical of the structure analysis of a finite-dimensional Lie algebra: finding a Levi subalgebra of a Lie algebra.

  8. Engel Subalgebras of n-Lie Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald W. BARNES

    2008-01-01

    Engel subalgebras of finite-dimensional n Lie algebras are shown to have similar properties to those of Lie algebras.Using these,it is shown that an n Lie algebra,all of whose maximal subalgebras are ideals,is nilpotent.A primitive 2-soluble n Lie algebra is shown to split over its minimal ideal, and all the complements to its minimal ideal are conjugate.A subalgebra is shown to be a Cartan subalgebra if and only if it is minimal Engel,provided that the field has su .ciently many elements. Cartan subalgebras are shown to have a property analogous to intravariance.

  9. Adolescent Interstellar Cloud Poised to Make Star-forming Debut

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's (NSF) 140-foot radio telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, W.Va., have discovered a highly unusual, massive interstellar cloud that appears poised to begin a burst of star formation. The cloud may be the first ever to be detected in the transition between atomic and molecular states. NRAO scientists Felix J. Lockman and Anthony H. Minter presented their findings at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Pasadena, Calif. Radio Image of G28.17+0.05 The scientists discovered the cloud, identified as G28.17+0.05, lying along the inner plane of the Milky Way Galaxy, approximately 16,300 light-years from Earth. Observations of the cloud indicate that it is near one of the Galaxy's sweeping spiral arms, which are outlined by young stars and the massive clouds that form them. Lockman and Minter speculate that as the interstellar cloud slams into the Galactic arm, the resulting shock wave may be precipitating the conversion of the neutral hydrogen atoms into heavier molecules, which could herald the onset of star formation. "These may be the first observations of a cloud that is in the transition between the neutral atomic hydrogen and molecular phases," said Lockman. "This provides astronomers a unique opportunity to study the chemistry of very young interstellar clouds, which could give us significant insights into the early stages of star formation and the structure of the Galaxy." Interstellar clouds that contain neutral atomic hydrogen, called HI (H-one) clouds, are thought of as giant, cold blobs of gas. Researchers study these objects because they offer intriguing glimpses of the composition of our Galaxy and the cosmos, and reveal much about how stars and planets are born. Hydrogen atoms in these clouds give off natural signals (at the 21-cm wavelength), which can be detected only by radio telescopes. The scientists discovered that this HI cloud was unusual in many

  10. CloudSat observations of multi layered clouds across the globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. Venkata; Kumar, Karanam Kishore

    2017-07-01

    Vertically resolved multi-layer cloud distributions over the globe using 4 years of CloudSat/CALIPSO observations during 2007-2010 are discussed. The quantitative information on the frequency of occurrence of one- to five-layered clouds across the globe is established, which are of immense importance from the global climate standpoint. After segregating the CloudSat observations into different seasons, the 4 years of mean global maps of frequency of occurrence of one to five-layered clouds are discussed in details. These global maps provide much needed quantification of vertically resolved multi-layer clouds by revealing when and where the frequency of occurrence of multi-layer clouds are maximum including the number of layers. On an average, it is observed that over the globe one-, two-, three-, four- and five-layer clouds occur 53, 20, 3.5, 0.4 and 0.04 % of the time respectively. High fraction of single layer clouds is observed over the descending limbs of Hadley cell where relatively large lower tropospheric stability is found. The regions where multi-layer clouds are more frequent are identified and discussed along with large scale circulation. Apart from quantifying the frequency of occurrence of multi-layer clouds, the latitudinal distribution of zonal mean occurrence of cloud base and top altitudes of each cloud layer is constructed for boreal winter and summer. These analyses provide the cloud base and top altitudes of one to five-layered clouds, which are important to understand the vertical structure of the multi-layered clouds. The significance of the present study lies in establishing the global distribution of vertically resolved multi-layer clouds and the role of large-scale dynamics in controlling their distribution for the first time.

  11. Cloud Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, Rama; Raths, David; Schaffhauser, Dian; Skelly, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    For many IT shops, the cloud offers an opportunity not only to improve operations but also to align themselves more closely with their schools' strategic goals. The cloud is not a plug-and-play proposition, however--it is a complex, evolving landscape that demands one's full attention. Security, privacy, contracts, and contingency planning are all…

  12. Cloud Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  13. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Mirashe, Shivaji P

    2010-01-01

    Computing as you know it is about to change, your applications and documents are going to move from the desktop into the cloud. I'm talking about cloud computing, where applications and files are hosted on a "cloud" consisting of thousands of computers and servers, all linked together and accessible via the Internet. With cloud computing, everything you do is now web based instead of being desktop based. You can access all your programs and documents from any computer that's connected to the Internet. How will cloud computing change the way you work? For one thing, you're no longer tied to a single computer. You can take your work anywhere because it's always accessible via the web. In addition, cloud computing facilitates group collaboration, as all group members can access the same programs and documents from wherever they happen to be located. Cloud computing might sound far-fetched, but chances are you're already using some cloud applications. If you're using a web-based email program, such as Gmail or Ho...

  14. The Serpens Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Eiroa, C; Casali, M M

    2008-01-01

    The Serpens cloud has received considerable attention in the last years, in particular the small region known as the Serpens cloud core where a plethora of star formation related phenomena are found. This review summarizes our current observational knowledge of the cloud, with emphasis on the core. Recent results are converging to a distance for the cloud of ~ 230 +- 20 pc, an issue which has been controversial over the years. We present the gas and dust properties of the cloud core and describe its structure and appearance at different wavelengths. The core contains a dense, very young, low mass stellar cluster with more than 300 objects in all evolutionary phases, from collapsing gaseous condensations to pre-main sequence stars. We describe the behaviour and spatial distribution of the different stellar populations (mm cores, Classes 0, I and II sources). The spatial concentration and the fraction number of Class 0/Class I/Class II sources is considerably larger in the Serpens core than in any other low mas...

  15. Screaming Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikke, Svein; Egill Kristjánsson, Jón; Nordli, Øyvind

    2017-04-01

    "Mother-of-pearl clouds" appear irregularly in the winter stratosphere at high northern latitudes, about 20-30 km above the surface of the Earth. The size range of the cloud particles is near that of visible light, which explains their extraordinary beautiful colours. We argue that the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch could well have been terrified when the sky all of a sudden turned "bloodish red" after sunset, when darkness was expected. Hence, there is a high probability that it was an event of mother-of-pearl clouds which was the background for Munch's experience in nature, and for his iconic Scream. Currently, the leading hypothesis for explaining the dramatic colours of the sky in Munch's famous painting is that the artist was captivated by colourful sunsets following the enormous Krakatoa eruption in 1883. After carefully considering the historical accounts of some of Munch's contemporaries, especially the physicist Carl Störmer, we suggest an alternative hypothesis, namely that Munch was inspired by spectacular occurrences of mother-of-pearl clouds. Such clouds, which have a wave-like structure akin to that seen in the Scream were first observed and described only a few years before the first version of this motive was released in 1892. Unlike clouds related to conventional weather systems in the troposphere, mother-of-pearl clouds appear in the stratosphere, where significantly different physical conditions prevail. This result in droplet sizes within the range of visible light, creating the spectacular colour patterns these clouds are famous for. Carl Störmer observed such clouds, and described them in minute details at the age of 16, but already with a profound interest in science. He later noted that "..these mother-of-pearl clouds was a vision of indescribable beauty!" The authors find it logical that the same vision could appear scaring in the sensible mind of a young artist unknown to such phenomena.

  16. Probabilistic consequence analysis for vapor cloud explosion of flammable gas%可燃气云爆炸事故后果的概率分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国华; 周剑峰; 张文海; 张晖; 陈清光

    2006-01-01

    Consequence analysis is very important for risk evaluation. Vapor cloud explosion (VCE) is one of the main accident types of flammable gas. Because of the limitation of people's knowledge about accident consequence, influence of natural environment, and complex process of the development of an accident, some parameters of the VCE models can not be precisely defined, so that different input values can make great difference in the final results. A probabilistic consequence analysis method based on Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS) is proposed to help analyze the influence of an accident. How to evaluate the fatality radius when its probability is given is also analyzed, a regression estimate method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed to solve this problem. The consequence severity can be reflected by the extent of damage (fatality radius, FR) and its related probability. Input arguments which have stochastic characteristic and their probability distributions are analyzed, and the application of the probabilistic consequence analysis method for VCE of LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) is illustrated.%对事故后果进行分析,是安全评价的重要内容.可燃气体泄漏后发生蒸气云爆炸是一种重要的事故类型,由于人们对事故后果认识的局限、环境的影响、以及事故发展过程的复杂性,VCE后果分析中许多参数未能准确定义,部份输入参数取值具有随机性,不同取值使最终的分析结果相差很大.本文提出了一种事故后果的概率分析方法,通过事故的后果(死亡半径)及其发生的概率来反映后果严重程度,并基于蒙特卡罗模拟方法来计算事故后果的发生概率.本文对给定发生概率时如何确定死亡半径也进行了分析,采用基于支持向量机(SVM)的非线性回归估计方法对死亡半径进行估计.分析了VCE后果分析模型中的随机性参数及其取值,结合具体的应用实例,说明了该方法在LPG储罐蒸气云爆炸后果分析中的应用.

  17. Discovery of lake-effect clouds on Titan

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M. E.; Schaller, E. L.; Roe, H. G.; Chen, C.; Roberts, J.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    Images from instruments on Cassini as well as from telescopes on the ground reveal the presence of sporadic small-scale cloud activity in the cold late-winter north polar of Saturn's large moon Titan. These clouds lie underneath the previously discovered uniform polar cloud attributed to a quiescent ethane cloud at ~40 km and appear confined to the same latitudes as those of the largest known hydrocarbon lakes at the north pole of Titan. The physical properties of these clouds suggest that th...

  18. Horizontally oriented plates in clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Bréon, François-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Horizontally oriented plates in clouds generate a sharp specular reflectance signal in the glint direction, often referred to as "subsun". This signal (amplitude and width) may be used to analyze the relative area fraction of oriented plates in the cloud top layer and their characteristic tilt angle to the horizontal. We make use of spaceborne measurements from the POLDER instrument to provide a statistical analysis of these parameters. More than half of the clouds show a detectable maximum reflectance in the glint direction, although this maximum may be rather faint. The typical effective fraction (area weighted) of oriented plates in clouds lies between 10-3 and 10-2. For those oriented plates, the characteristic tilt angle is less than 1 degree in most cases. These low fractions imply that the impact of oriented plates on the cloud albedo is insignificant. The largest proportion of clouds with horizontally oriented plates is found in the range 500-700 hPa, in agreement with typical in situ observation of p...

  19. The structure of complex Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Dong Hoon

    2001-01-01

    Complex Lie groups have often been used as auxiliaries in the study of real Lie groups in areas such as differential geometry and representation theory. To date, however, no book has fully explored and developed their structural aspects.The Structure of Complex Lie Groups addresses this need. Self-contained, it begins with general concepts introduced via an almost complex structure on a real Lie group. It then moves to the theory of representative functions of Lie groups- used as a primary tool in subsequent chapters-and discusses the extension problem of representations that is essential for studying the structure of complex Lie groups. This is followed by a discourse on complex analytic groups that carry the structure of affine algebraic groups compatible with their analytic group structure. The author then uses the results of his earlier discussions to determine the observability of subgroups of complex Lie groups.The differences between complex algebraic groups and complex Lie groups are sometimes subtle ...

  20. Classification and identification of Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Snobl, Libor

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to serve as a tool for researchers and practitioners who apply Lie algebras and Lie groups to solve problems arising in science and engineering. The authors address the problem of expressing a Lie algebra obtained in some arbitrary basis in a more suitable basis in which all essential features of the Lie algebra are directly visible. This includes algorithms accomplishing decomposition into a direct sum, identification of the radical and the Levi decomposition, and the computation of the nilradical and of the Casimir invariants. Examples are given for each algorithm. For low-dimensional Lie algebras this makes it possible to identify the given Lie algebra completely. The authors provide a representative list of all Lie algebras of dimension less or equal to 6 together with their important properties, including their Casimir invariants. The list is ordered in a way to make identification easy, using only basis independent properties of the Lie algebras. They also describe certain cl...

  1. Testosterone Administration Reduces Lying in Men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wibral, M.; Dohmen, T.J.; Klingmüller, Dietrich; Weber, Bernd; Falk, Armin

    2012-01-01

    Lying is a pervasive phenomenon with important social and economic implications. However, despite substantial interest in the prevalence and determinants of lying, little is known about its biological foundations. Here we study a potential hormonal influence, focusing on the steroid hormone

  2. Lie Group Techniques for Neural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-03

    Lie group techniques for Neural Learning Edinburgh June 2004 Elena Celledoni SINTEF Applied Mathematics, IMF-NTNU Lie group techniques for Neural...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) SINTEF Applied Mathematics, IMF-NTNU 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND

  3. The Killing Forms of Lie Triple Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi Xue; GAO Rui

    2009-01-01

    For Lie triple systems in the characteristic zero setting, we obtain by means of the Killing forms two criterions for semisimplicity and for solvability respectively, and then investigate the relationship among the Killing forms of a real Lie triple system To, the complexification T of To, and the realification of T.

  4. Matrix Lie Algebras and Integrable Couplings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-Feng; GUO Fu-Kui

    2006-01-01

    Three kinds of higher-dimensional Lie algebras are given which can be used to directly construct integrable couplings of the soliton integrable systems. The relations between the Lie algebras are discussed. Finally, the integrable couplings and the Hamiltonian structure of Giachetti-Johnson hierarchy and a new integrable system are obtained, respectively.

  5. Induced Modules of Restricted Lie Superalgebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文德

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we first prove the PBW theorem for reduced universal enveloping algebras of restricted Lie superalgebras. Then the notion of an induced module is introduced and the dimension formula of induced modules is established.Finally, using the results above, we obtain a property of induced modules pertaining to automorphisms of Lie superalgebras and isomorphisms of modules.

  6. On Nambu-Lie 3-algebra representations

    CERN Document Server

    Sochichiu, Corneliu

    2008-01-01

    We propose a recipe to construct matrix representations of Nambu--Lie 3-algebras in terms of irreducible representations of underlying Lie algebra. The case of Euclidean four-dimensional 3-algebra is considered in details. We find that representations of this 3-algebra are not possible in terms of only Hermitian matrices in spite of its Euclidean nature.

  7. Computations in finite-dimensional Lie algebras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, A.M.; Graaf, W.A. de; Rónyai, L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes progress made in context with the construction of a general library of Lie algebra algorithms, called ELIAS (Eindhoven Lie Algebra System), within the computer algebra package GAP. A first sketch of the packagecan be found in Cohen and de Graaf[1]. Since then, in a collaborative

  8. Kinematic Structure of Molecular Gas around High-mass Star YSO, Papillon Nebula, in N159 East in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Saigo, Kazuya; Nayak, Omnarayani; Meixner, Margaret; Tokuda, Kazuki; Harada, Ryohei; Morioka, Yuuki; Sewilo, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Torii, Kazufumi; Kawamura, Akiko; Ohama, Akio; Hattori, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Madden, Suzanne; Galametz, Maud; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Chen, C -H Rosie; Mizuno, Norikazu; Fukui, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    We present the ALMA Band 3 and Band 6 results of 12CO(2-1), 13$CO(2-1), H30alpha recombination line, free-free emission around 98 GHz, and the dust thermal emission around 230 GHz toward the N159 East Giant Molecular Cloud (N159E) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). LMC is the nearest active high-mass star forming face-on galaxy at a distance of 50 kpc and is the best target for studing high-mass star formation. ALMA observations show that N159E is the complex of filamentary clouds with the width and length of ~1 pc and 5 pc - 10 pc, respectively. The total molecular mass is 0.92 x 10^5 Msun from the 13CO(2-1) intensity. N159E harbors the well-known Papillon Nebula, a compact high-excitation HII region. We found that a YSO associated with the Papillon Nebula has the mass of 35 Msun and is located at the intersection of three filamentary clouds. It indicates that the formation of the high-mass YSO was induced by the collision of filamentary clouds. Fukui et al. 2015 reported a similar kinematic structure towa...

  9. Lie symmetries and 2D Material Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Belhaj, Adil

    2014-01-01

    Inspired from Lie symmetry classification, we establish a correspondence between rank two Lie symmetries and 2D material physics. The material unit cell is accordingly interpreted as the geometry of a root system. The hexagonal cells, appearing in graphene like models, are analyzed in some details and are found to be associated with A_2 and G_2 Lie symmetries. This approach can be applied to Lie supersymmetries associated with fermionic degrees of freedom. It has been suggested that these extended symmetries can offer a new way to deal with doping material geometries. Motivated by Lie symmetry applications in high energy physics, we speculate on a possible connection with (p,q) brane networks used in the string theory compactification on singular Calabi-Yau manifolds.

  10. Securing Cloud from Cloud Drain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niva Das

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, in the world of communication, connected systems is growing at a rapid pace. To accommodate this growth the need for computational power and storage is also increasing at a similar rate. Companies are investing a large amount of resources in buying, maintaining and ensuring availability of the system to their customers. To mitigate these issues, cloud computing is playing a major role [1]. The underlying concept of cloud computing dates back to the ‘50s but the term entering into widespread usage can be traced to 2006 when Amazon.com announced the Elastic Compute Cloud. In this paper, we will discuss about cloud security approaches. We have used the term “CloudDrain” to define data leakage in case of security compromise.

  11. Characteristics of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Lie Scale and of Extreme Lie Scorers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Results of statistical analyses suggest that high lie-scorers respond honestly, and that the Lie Scale for the Eysenck Personality Inventory may reflect a personality dimension of interest rather than an extraneous and undesirable factor to be eliminated. (Author)

  12. M2 to D2 and vice versa by 3-Lie and Lie bialgebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aali-Javanangrouh, M.; Rezaei-Aghdam, A. [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Using the concept of a 3-Lie bialgebra, which has recently been defined in arXiv:1604.04475, we construct a Bagger-Lambert-Gustavson (BLG) model for the M2-brane on a Manin triple of a special 3-Lie bialgebra. Then by using the correspondence and the relation between those 3-Lie bialgebra with Lie bialgebra, we reduce this model to an N = (4,4) WZW model (D2-brane), such that its algebraic structure is a Lie bialgebra with one 2-cocycle. In this manner by using the correspondence of the 3-Lie bialgebra and Lie bialgebra (for this special 3-Lie algebra) one can construct the M2-brane from a D2-brane and vice versa. (orig.)

  13. A-扩张Lie Rinehart代数%On the A-extended Lie Rinehart Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈酌; 祁玉海

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give a brief introduction to the category of Lie Rinehart algebras and introduces the concept of smooth manifolds associated with a unitary,commutative, associative algebra A. It especially shows that the A-extended algebra as well as the action algebra can be realized as the space of A-left invariant vector fields on a Lie group, analogous to the well known relationship of Lie algebras and Lie groups.

  14. The Prevalence of Lying in America: Three Studies of Self-Reported Lies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serota, Kim B.; Levine, Timothy R.; Boster, Franklin J.

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the frequency and the distribution of reported lying in the adult population. A national survey asked 1,000 U.S. adults to report the number of lies told in a 24-hour period. Sixty percent of subjects report telling no lies at all, and almost half of all lies are told by only 5% of subjects; thus, prevalence varies widely and…

  15. Homology of Lie algebra of supersymmetries and of super Poincare Lie algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Movshev, M.V. [Department of Mathematics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3651 (United States); Schwarz, A., E-mail: schwarz@math.ucdavis.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Xu, Renjun [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2012-01-11

    We study the homology and cohomology groups of super Lie algebras of supersymmetries and of super Poincare Lie algebras in various dimensions. We give complete answers for (non-extended) supersymmetry in all dimensions {<=}11. For dimensions D=10,11 we describe also the cohomology of reduction of supersymmetry Lie algebra to lower dimensions. Our methods can be applied to extended supersymmetry Lie algebras.

  16. Cloud migration

    CERN Document Server

    Höllwarth, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    This book is designed for managers and entrepreneurs, who are considering improving the economics and flexibility of their IT solutions and infrastructures. The book is also for readers who wish to learn more about the Cloud, but do not want to become specialists.This book discusses the technical, legal, fiscal, economic, organisational and environmental aspects of Cloud services. If you are looking for practical advice on vendor selection and certification, as well as real world Cloud project case studies, this is the book to consult.It is the result of a highly cooper

  17. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Baun, Christian; Nimis, Jens; Tai, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is a buzz-word in today's information technology (IT) that nobody can escape. But what is really behind it? There are many interpretations of this term, but no standardized or even uniform definition. Instead, as a result of the multi-faceted viewpoints and the diverse interests expressed by the various stakeholders, cloud computing is perceived as a rather fuzzy concept. With this book, the authors deliver an overview of cloud computing architecture, services, and applications. Their aim is to bring readers up to date on this technology and thus to provide a common basis for d

  18. Sequential derivatization of polar organic compounds in cloud water using O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride, N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, and gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagona, Jessica A; Dukett, James E; Hawley, Harmonie A; Mazurek, Monica A

    2014-10-03

    Cloud water samples from Whiteface Mountain, NY were used to develop a combined sampling and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GCMS) protocol for evaluating the complex mixture of highly polar organic compounds (HPOC) present in this atmospheric medium. Specific HPOC of interest were mono- and di keto-acids which are thought to originate from photochemical reactions of volatile unsaturated hydrocarbons from biogenic and manmade emissions and be a major fraction of atmospheric carbon. To measure HPOC mixtures and the individual keto-acids in cloud water, samples first must be derivatized for clean elution and measurement, and second, have low overall background of the target species as validated by GCMS analysis of field and laboratory blanks. Here, we discuss a dual derivatization method with PFBHA and BSTFA which targets only organic compounds that contain functional groups reacting with both reagents. The method also reduced potential contamination by minimizing the amount of sample processing from the field through the GCMS analysis steps. Once derivatized only gas chromatographic separation and selected ion monitoring (SIM) are needed to identify and quantify the polar organic compounds of interest. Concentrations of the detected total keto-acids in individual cloud water samples ranged from 27.8 to 329.3ngmL(-1) (ppb). Method detection limits for the individual HPOC ranged from 0.17 to 4.99ngmL(-1) and the quantification limits for the compounds ranged from 0.57 to 16.64ngmL(-1). The keto-acids were compared to the total organic carbon (TOC) results for the cloud water samples with concentrations of 0.607-3.350mgL(-1) (ppm). GCMS analysis of all samples and blanks indicated good control of the entire collection and analysis steps. Selected ion monitoring by GCMS of target keto-acids was essential for screening the complex organic carbon mixtures present at low ppb levels in cloud water. It was critical for ensuring high levels of quality assurance and

  19. Construction Model of Cloud Center for Oil-Gas Exploration in Big-Data Era%大数据时代勘探云建设模式探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林茂; 塔依尔∙伊布拉音; 许涛; 宋雪峰; 姜元刚

    2015-01-01

    According to big data definition, the data processing of exploration of oil and gas is obviously a big data application mode. Computing center is designed to meet data processing needs of the company as the main exploration platform of oil and gas exploration cloud. Under the primise of ensuring the sharing computing power and Collaborative work,exploration cloud focus on support of data storage, data management and data applications. Compared with the general public cloud, the Construction of private exploration cloud has its unique mode. The author company combined with own company characteristics and current big data application needs to construct large data private cloud, and it achieved certain results. The support for the main business is obviously effect.%按照大数据定义,油气勘探数据处理工作显然是一种大数据应用模式,而作为油气勘探核心工作平台的勘探云计算中心,其建设目的首先是为了满足企业内部业务数据处理工作需求,在确保计算力分享和协同工作的基础上,勘探云更注重数据存储、数据管理以及数据应用业务的支持,对照一般公用云建设模式,勘探私有云建设具备其独特的建设模式。笔者企业结合自身特点,对照当前大数据应用需求开展勘探私有云建设工作,取得了一定的效果,对企业主营业务的支持效果明显。

  20. A Class of Solvable Lie Algebras and Their Hom-Lie Algebra Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-chao; LI Dong-ya; JIN Quan-qin

    2014-01-01

    The finite-dimensional indecomposable solvable Lie algebras s with Q2n+1 as their nilradical are studied and classified, it turns out that the dimension of s is dim Q2n+1+1. Then the Hom-Lie algebra structures on solvable Lie algebras s are calculated.

  1. Cloud Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark Talmage

    2004-05-01

    Cloud formation is crucial to the heritage of modern physics, and there is a rich literature on this important topic. In 1927, Charles T.R. Wilson was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for applications of the cloud chamber.2 Wilson was inspired to study cloud formation after working at a meteorological observatory on top of the highest mountain in Scotland, Ben Nevis, and testified near the end of his life, "The whole of my scientific work undoubtedly developed from the experiments I was led to make by what I saw during my fortnight on Ben Nevis in September 1894."3 To form clouds, Wilson used the sudden expansion of humid air.4 Any structure the cloud may have is spoiled by turbulence in the sudden expansion, but in 1912 Wilson got ion tracks to show up by using strobe photography of the chamber immediately upon expansion.5 In the interim, Millikan's study in 1909 of the formation of cloud droplets around individual ions was the first in which the electron charge was isolated. This study led to his famous oil drop experiment.6 To Millikan, as to Wilson, meteorology and physics were professionally indistinct. With his meteorological physics expertise, in WWI Millikan commanded perhaps the first meteorological observation and forecasting team essential to military operation in history.7 But even during peacetime meteorology is so much of a concern to everyone that a regular news segment is dedicated to it. Weather is the universal conversation topic, and life on land could not exist as we know it without clouds. One wonders then, why cloud formation is never covered in physics texts.

  2. Introduction to the theory of Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Godement, Roger

    2017-01-01

    This textbook covers the general theory of Lie groups. By first considering the case of linear groups (following von Neumann's method) before proceeding to the general case, the reader is naturally introduced to Lie theory. Written by a master of the subject and influential member of the Bourbaki group, the French edition of this textbook has been used by several generations of students. This translation preserves the distinctive style and lively exposition of the original. Requiring only basics of topology and algebra, this book offers an engaging introduction to Lie groups for graduate students and a valuable resource for researchers.

  3. Quasi-big\\`ebres de Lie et cohomologie d'alg\\`ebre de Lie

    CERN Document Server

    Bangoura, Momo

    2010-01-01

    Lie quasi-bialgebras are natural generalisations of Lie bialgebras introduced by Drinfeld. To any Lie quasi-bialgebra structure of finite-dimensional (G, \\mu, \\gamma ,\\phi ?), correspond one Lie algebra structure on D = G\\oplus G*, called the double of the given Lie quasi-bialgebra. We show that there exist on \\Lambda G, the exterior algebra of G, a D-module structure and we establish an isomorphism of D-modules between \\Lambda D and End(\\Lambda G), D acting on \\Lambda D by the adjoint action.

  4. Induced Lie Algebras of a Six-Dimensional Matrix Lie Algebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-Feng; LIU Jing

    2008-01-01

    By using a six-dimensional matrix Lie algebra [Y.F. Zhang and Y. Wang, Phys. Lett. A 360 (2006) 92], three induced Lie algebras are constructed. One of them is obtained by extending Lie bracket, the others are higher-dimensional complex Lie algebras constructed by using linear transformations. The equivalent Lie algebras of the later two with multi-component forms are obtained as well. As their applications, we derive an integrable coupling and quasi-Hamiltonian structure of the modified TC hierarchy of soliton equations.

  5. Dynamic mineral clouds on HD 189733b I. 3D RHD with kinetic, non-equilibrium cloud formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, G; Helling, Ch; Bognar, K; Woitke, P

    2016-01-01

    3D modelling of cloud formation in atmospheres of extrasolar planets coupled to the atmospheric radiative, hydrodynamic and thermo-chemical properties has long been an open challenge. We present a 3D radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) atmosphere model of HD 189733b fully coupled to a kinetic, microphysical mineral cloud formation model. We include the feedback effects of cloud advection and settling, gas phase element advection and depletion/replenishment and include the radiative effects of cloud and gas opacity. The 3D Navier-Stokes equations are solved consistently with a two-stream radiative transfer scheme coupled with the cloud moment conservation equations. We model the cloud particles as a mix of mineral materials which change in size and composition as they travel through atmospheric thermo-chemical environments. The local cloud properties such as number density, grain size and material composition are time-dependently calculated. Gas phase element depletion as a result of cloud formation are calculated an...

  6. Molecular cloud evolution and star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of the relationship between molecular clouds and young stars is reviewed. The determination of physical parameters from molecular line observations is summarized, and evidence for fragmentation of molecular clouds is discussed. Hierarchical fragmentation is reviewed, minimum fragment scales are derived, and the stability against fragmentation of both spherically and anisotropically collapsing clouds is discussed. Observational evidence for high-velocity flows in clouds is summarized, and the effects of winds from pre-main sequence stars on molecular gas are discussed. The triggering of cloud collapse by enhanced pressure is addressed, as is the formation of dense shells by spherical outflows and their subsequent breakup. A model for low-mass star formation is presented, and constraints on star formation from the initial mass function are examined. The properties of giant molecular clouds and massive star formation are described. The implications of magnetic fields for cloud evolution and star formation are addressed.

  7. The Distance to the Draco Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Gladders, M D; Burns, C R; Attard, A; Casey, M P; Hamilton, D; Mallén-Ornelas, G; Karr, J L; Poirier, S M; Sawicki, M; Barrientos, L F; Mochnacki, S W; Gladders, Michael D.; Burns, Christopher R.; Hamilton, Devon; Mallén-Ornelas, Gabriela; Poirier, Sara M.; Sawicki, Marcin; Mochnacki, Stefan W.

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of the nature of intermediate and high velocity gas in the Milky Way is hampered by a paucity of distance estimates to individual clouds. A project has been started at the David Dunlap Observatory to address this lack of distance measures by observing early-type stars along the line of sight towards these clouds and searching for sodium doublet absorption at the clouds' systemic velocities. Distances to foreground stars (no absorption) and background stars (with absorption) are estimated from spectroscopic parallax, and thus the distance to the bracketed cloud is estimated. In this Letter, we present the first result from this ongoing project, a measurement of the distance to the Draco Cloud, which is the most studied of the intermediate velocity clouds. The result presented here is the first distance bracket which tightly constrains the position of the Draco Cloud. We briefly describe our target selection and observing methodology, and then demonstrate absorption at the velocity of the Drac...

  8. Distribution and characteristics of Infrared Dark Clouds using genetic forward modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, D J; Jones, A P

    2009-01-01

    Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) are dark clouds seen in silhouette in mid-infrared surveys. They are thought to be the birthplace of massive stars, yet remarkably little information exists on the properties of the population as a whole (e.g. mass spectrum, spatial distribution). Genetic forward modelling is used along with the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the Besancon Galactic model to deduce the three dimensional distribution of interstellar extinction towards previously identified IRDC candidates. This derived dust distribution can then be used to determine the distance and mass of IRDCs, independently of kinematic models of the Milky Way. Along a line of sight that crosses an IRDC, the extinction is seen to rise sharply at the distance of the cloud. Assuming a dust to gas ratio, the total mass of the cloud can be estimated. The method has been successfully applied to 1259 IRDCs, including over 1000 for which no distance or mass estimate currently exists. The IRDCs are seen to lie preferentially along the spi...

  9. The Frattini Subalgebra of Restricted Lie Superalgebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Yun CHEN; Dao Ji MENG; Yong Zheng ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, we study the Frattini subalgebra of a restricted Lie superalgebra (L, [p]). We show first that if L = A1 (⊙) A2 (⊙) … (⊙) An, then φp (L) = φp (A1) + φp (A2) +… +φp (An),where each Ai is a p-ideal of L. We then obtain two results: F(L) = φ(L) = J(L) = L(1) if and only if L is nilpotent; Fp(L) and F(L) are nilpotent ideals of L if L is solvable. In addition, necessary and sufficient conditions are found for φp-free restricted Lie superalgebras. Finally, we discuss the relationships of E-p-restricted Lie superalgebras and E-restricted Lie superalgebras.

  10. Linearization from Complex Lie Point Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex Lie point transformations are used to linearize a class of systems of second order ordinary differential equations (ODEs which have Lie algebras of maximum dimension d, with d≤4. We identify such a class by employing complex structure on the manifold that defines the geometry of differential equations. Furthermore we provide a geometrical construction of the procedure adopted that provides an analogue in R3 of the linearizability criteria in R2.

  11. Lie Superalgebras arising from bosonic representation

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, Naihuan

    2012-01-01

    A 2-toroidal Lie superalgebra is constructed using bosonic fields and a ghost field. The superalgebra contains $osp(1|2n)^{(1)}$ as a distinguished subalgebra and behaves similarly to the toroidal Lie superalgebra of type $B(0, n)$. Furthermore this algebra is a central extension of the algebra $osp(1|2n)\\otimes \\mathbb C[s, s^{-1}, t,t^{-1}]$.

  12. Noncommutative geometry with graded differential Lie algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulkenhaar, Raimar

    1997-06-01

    Starting with a Hilbert space endowed with a representation of a unitary Lie algebra and an action of a generalized Dirac operator, we develop a mathematical concept towards gauge field theories. This concept shares common features with the Connes-Lott prescription of noncommutative geometry, differs from that, however, by the implementation of unitary Lie algebras instead of associative * -algebras. The general scheme is presented in detail and is applied to functions ⊗ matrices.

  13. Post-Lie algebras and factorization theorems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Fard, Kurusch; Mencattini, Igor; Munthe-Kaas, Hans

    2017-09-01

    In this note we further explore the properties of universal enveloping algebras associated to a post-Lie algebra. Emphasizing the role of the Magnus expansion, we analyze the properties of group like-elements belonging to (suitable completions of) those Hopf algebras. Of particular interest is the case of post-Lie algebras defined in terms of solutions of modified classical Yang-Baxter equations. In this setting we will study factorization properties of the aforementioned group-like elements.

  14. Constructing semisimple subalgebras of semisimple Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    de Graaf, Willem A

    2010-01-01

    Algorithms are described that help with obtaining a classification of the semisimple subalgebras of a given semisimple Lie algebra, up to linear equivalence. The algorithms have been used to obtain classifications of the semisimple subalgebras of the simple Lie algebras of ranks <= 8. These have been made available as a database inside the SLA package of GAP4. The subalgebras in this database are explicitly given, as well as the inclusion relations among them.

  15. Lie Admissible Non-Associative Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Mohammad Ahmadi; Ki-Bong Nam; Jonathan Pakinathan

    2005-01-01

    A non-associative ring which contains a well-known associative ring or Lie ring is interesting. In this paper, a method to construct a Lie admissible non-associative ring is given; a class of simple non-associative algebras is obtained; all the derivations of the non-associative simple N0,0,1 algebra defined in this paper are determined; and finally, a solid algebra is defined.

  16. Central extension of graded Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Welte, Angelika

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we describe the universal central extension of two important classes of so-called root-graded Lie algebras defined over a commutative associative unital ring $k.$ Root-graded Lie algebras are Lie algebras which are graded by the root lattice of a locally finite root system and contain enough $\\mathfrak{sl}_2$-triples to separate the homogeneous spaces of the grading. Examples include the infinite rank analogs of the simple finite-dimensional complex Lie algebras. \\\\ In the thesis we show that in general the universal central extension of a root-graded Lie algebra $L$ is not root-graded anymore, but that we can measure quite easily how far it is away from being so, using the notion of degenerate sums, introduced by van der Kallen. We then concentrate on root-graded Lie algebras which are graded by the root systems of type $A$ with rank at least 2 and of type $C$. For them one can use the theory of Jordan algebras.

  17. The Lognormal Probability Distribution Function of the Perseus Molecular Cloud: A Comparison of HI and Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lee, Min-Young; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snezana

    2015-10-01

    The shape of the probability distribution function (PDF) of molecular clouds is an important ingredient for modern theories of star formation and turbulence. Recently, several studies have pointed out observational difficulties with constraining the low column density (i.e., {A}V\\lt 1) PDF using dust tracers. In order to constrain the shape and properties of the low column density PDF, we investigate the PDF of multiphase atomic gas in the Perseus molecular cloud using opacity-corrected GALFA-HI data and compare the PDF shape and properties to the total gas PDF and the N(H2) PDF. We find that the shape of the PDF in the atomic medium of Perseus is well described by a lognormal distribution and not by a power-law or bimodal distribution. The peak of the atomic gas PDF in and around Perseus lies at the HI-H2 transition column density for this cloud, past which the N(H2) PDF takes on a power-law form. We find that the PDF of the atomic gas is narrow, and at column densities larger than the HI-H2 transition, the HI rapidly depletes, suggesting that the HI PDF may be used to find the HI-H2 transition column density. We also calculate the sonic Mach number of the atomic gas by using HI absorption line data, which yield a median value of Ms = 4.0 for the CNM, while the HI emission PDF, which traces both the WNM and CNM, has a width more consistent with transonic turbulence.

  18. The role of major gas-rich mergers on the evolution of galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Rui; Xia, X Y; Mao, Shude; Shi, Yong

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of exploring the fast evolutionary path from the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies to the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the local universe, we select a local advanced merging infrared luminous and ultraluminous galaxy (adv-merger (U)LIRGs) sample and perform careful dust extinction corrections to investigate their positions in the SFR-$M_{\\ast}$, u-r and NUV-r color-mass diagrams. The sample consists of 89 (U)LIRGs at the late merger stage, obtained from cross-correlating the IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ULIRGs samples with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 database. Our results show that $74\\%\\pm 5\\%$ of adv-merger (U)LIRGs are localized above the $1\\, \\sigma$ line of the local star-forming galaxy main sequence. We also find that all adv-merger (U)LIRGs are more massive than and as blue as the blue cloud galaxies after corrections of Galactic and internal dust extinctions, with $95\\%\\pm 2\\%$ and $81\\%\\pm 4\\%$ of them outside the blue cloud on the u-r and NUV-r colo...

  19. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    users in very different ways and for various purposes. The book provides many stimulating examples of resource-sharing applications. Enabling technologies for mobile clouds are also discussed, highlighting the key role of network coding. Mobile clouds have the potential to enhance communications...... of resource sharing takes a wider and deeper meaning, creating the foundations for a global real-time multidimensional resource pool, the underlying infrastructure for shareconomy. Above all, this is an inspiring book for anyone who is concerned about the future of wireless and mobile communications networks...... and their relationship with Social networks. Key Features: Provides fundamental ideas and promising concepts for exploiting opportunistic cooperation and cognition in wireless and mobile networks Gives clear definitions of mobile clouds from different perspectives Associates mobile and wireless networks with social...

  20. A twisted generalization of Lie-Yamaguti algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Gaparayi, Donatien

    2010-01-01

    A twisted generalization of Lie-Yamaguti algebras, called Hom-Lie-Yamaguti algebras, is defined. Hom-Lie-Yamaguti algebras generalize Hom-Lie triple systems (and susequently ternary Hom-Nambu algebras) and Hom-Lie algebras in the same way as Lie-Yamaguti algebras generalize Lie triple systems and Lie algebras. It is shown that the category of Hom-Lie-Yamaguti algebras is closed under twisting by self-morphisms. Constructions of Hom-Lie-Yamaguti algebras from classical Lie-Yamaguti algebras and Malcev algebras are given. It is observed that, when the ternary operation of a Hom-Lie-Yamaguti algebra expresses through its binary one in a specific way, then such a Hom-Lie-Yamaguti algebra is a Hom-Malcev algebra.

  1. Detecting true lies:police officers' ability to detect suspects' lies

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Samantha; Vrij, Aldert; Bull, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-nine police officers, not identified in previous research as belonging to groups which are superior in lie detection, attempted to detect truths and lies told by suspects during their videotaped police interviews. Accuracy rates were higher than typically found in deception research and reached levels similar to those obtained by specialized lie detectors in previous research. Accuracy was positively correlated with perceived experience in interviewing suspects and with mentioning cues...

  2. Lie n-algebras of BPS charges

    CERN Document Server

    Sati, Hisham

    2015-01-01

    We uncover higher algebraic structures on Noether currents and BPS charges. It is known that equivalence classes of conserved currents form a Lie algebra. We show that at least for target space symmetries of higher parameterized WZW-type sigma-models this naturally lifts to a Lie (p+1)-algebra structure on the Noether currents themselves. Applied to the Green-Schwarz-type action functionals for super p-brane sigma-models this yields super Lie (p+1)-algebra refinements of the traditional BPS brane charge extensions of supersymmetry algebras. We discuss this in the generality of higher differential geometry, where it applies also to branes with (higher) gauge fields on their worldvolume. Applied to the M5-brane sigma-model we recover and properly globalize the M-theory super Lie algebra extension of 11-dimensional superisometries by 2-brane and 5-brane charges. Passing beyond the infinitesimal Lie theory we find cohomological corrections to these charges in higher analogy to the familiar corrections for D-brane...

  3. Cloud radiative properties and aerosol - cloud interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviana Vladutescu, Daniela; Gross, Barry; Li, Clement; Han, Zaw

    2015-04-01

    The presented research discusses different techniques for improvement of cloud properties measurements and analysis. The need for these measurements and analysis arises from the high errors noticed in existing methods that are currently used in retrieving cloud properties and implicitly cloud radiative forcing. The properties investigated are cloud fraction (cf) and cloud optical thickness (COT) measured with a suite of collocated remote sensing instruments. The novel approach makes use of a ground based "poor man's camera" to detect cloud and sky radiation in red, green, and blue with a high spatial resolution of 30 mm at 1km. The surface-based high resolution photography provides a new and interesting view of clouds. As the cloud fraction cannot be uniquely defined or measured, it depends on threshold and resolution. However as resolution decreases, cloud fraction tends to increase if the threshold is below the mean, and vice versa. Additionally cloud fractal dimension also depends on threshold. Therefore these findings raise concerns over the ability to characterize clouds by cloud fraction or fractal dimension. Our analysis indicate that Principal Component analysis may lead to a robust means of quantifying cloud contribution to radiance. The cloud images are analyzed in conjunction with a collocated CIMEL sky radiometer, Microwave Radiometer and LIDAR to determine homogeneity and heterogeneity. Additionally, MFRSR measurements are used to determine the cloud radiative properties as a validation tool to the results obtained from the other instruments and methods. The cloud properties to be further studied are aerosol- cloud interaction, cloud particle radii, and vertical homogeneity.

  4. Numerical simulations of a shock interacting with multiple magnetized clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alūzas, R.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Hartquist, T. W.

    2014-10-01

    We present 2D adiabatic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a shock interacting with groups of two or three cylindrical clouds. We study how the presence of a nearby cloud influences the dynamics of this interaction, and explore the resulting differences and similarities in the evolution of each cloud. The understanding gained from this small-scale study will help to interpret the behaviour of systems with many 10s or 100s of clouds. We observe a wide variety of behaviour in the interactions studied, which is dependent on the initial positions of the clouds and the orientation and strength of the magnetic field. We find (i) some clouds are stretched along their field lines, whereas others are confined by their field lines; (ii) upstream clouds may accelerate past downstream clouds (though magnetic tension can prevent this); (iii) clouds may also change their relative positions transverse to the direction of shock propagation as they `slingshot' past each other; (iv) downstream clouds may be offered some protection from the oncoming flow as a result of being in the lee of an upstream cloud; (v) the cycle of cloud compression and re-expansion is generally weaker when there are nearby neighbouring clouds; (vi) the plasma β in cloud material can vary rapidly as clouds collide with one another, but low values of β are always transitory. This work is relevant to studies of multiphase regions, where fast, low-density gas interacts with dense clouds, such as in circumstellar bubbles, supernova remnants, superbubbles and galactic winds.

  5. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    examples of mobile clouds applications, based on both existing commercial initiatives as well as proof-of-concept test-beds. Visions and prospects are also discussed, paving the way for further development. As mobile networks and social networks become more and more reliant on each other, the concept...

  6. Soft Clouding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten; Markussen, Thomas; Wetton, Barnabas;

    2012-01-01

    Soft Clouding is a blended concept, which describes the aim of a collaborative and transdisciplinary project. The concept is a metaphor implying a blend of cognitive, embodied interaction and semantic web. Furthermore, it is a metaphor describing our attempt of curating a new semantics of sound...

  7. Tropospheric Ozone Profile Information Derived From "Cloud Slicing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemke, Jerald R.; Chandra, S.; Bhartia, P. K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This study introduces a new approach to obtain ozone vertical profile information given coincident satellite measurements of both cloud-top pressure and above-cloud column ozone. This method is denoted "cloud slicing". In this study information of cloud-top pressure is derived from Geostationary Orbital Earth Satellite (GOES) infrared data, while above-cloud column ozone is obtained from the Earth Probe total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instrument. Several case examples are presented showing the feasibility of this technique as well as providing new geophysical results. Because the TOMS instrument measures backscattered UV radiation, it does detect ozone lying below dense water vapor clouds. This opaque property of TOMS can be used directly in conjunction with co-located cloud-top pressure data to derive ozone profile information in the troposphere. The cloud slicing method is an extension of the "Convective Cloud Differential" (CCD) method. In the CCD method, tropospheric column ozone (i.e., the total vertical column of ozone lying in the troposphere) is computed by taking total column ozone with low reflectivity (R less than 0.2) and subtracting from this a nearby measurement of above-cloud column ozone amount under conditions of high reflectivity (R greater than 0.9). (High reflectivity away from snow/ice conditions coincides with strong convection and tropopause-level clouds). The key element in determining tropospheric ozone profile information from the cloud slicing method is to have simultaneous and co-located measurements of both above-cloud column ozone and cloud-top pressure.

  8. Modelling [CI] emission from turbulent molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, Simon C O; Micic, Milica; Molina, Faviola

    2014-01-01

    We use detailed numerical simulations of the coupled chemical, thermal and dynamical evolution of the gas in a turbulent molecular cloud to study the usefulness of the [CI] 609 micron and 370 micron fine structure emission lines as tracers of cloud structure. Emission from these lines is observed throughout molecular clouds, and yet the question of what we can learn from them about the physics of the clouds remains largely unexplored. We show that the fact that [CI] emission is widespread within molecular clouds is a simple consequence of the fact that the clouds are dominated by turbulent motions. Turbulence creates large density inhomogeneities, allowing radiation to penetrate deeply into the clouds. As a result, [CI] emitting gas is found throughout the cloud, rather than being concentrated at the edges. We examine how well we can use [CI] emission to trace the structure of the cloud, and show that the integrated intensity of the 609 micron line traces column density accurately over a wide range of visual ...

  9. Riemannian manifolds as Lie-Rinehart algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessers, Victor; van der Veken, Joeri

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we show how Lie-Rinehart algebras can be applied to unify and generalize the elementary theory of Riemannian geometry. We will first review some necessary theory on a.o. modules, bilinear forms and derivations. We will then translate some classical theory on Riemannian geometry to the setting of Rinehart spaces, a special kind of Lie-Rinehart algebras. Some generalized versions of classical results will be obtained, such as the existence of a unique Levi-Civita connection, inducing a Levi-Civita connection on a submanifold, and the construction of spaces with constant sectional curvature.

  10. Split-octonion Lie 3-algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Jardino, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    We extend the concept of a generalized Lie 3-algebra, known to octonions $\\mathbb{O}$, to split-octonions $\\mathbb{SO}$. In order to do that, we introduce a notational device that unifies the two elements product of both of the algebras. We have also proved that $\\mathbb{SO}$ is a Malcev algebra and have recalculated known relations for the structure constants in terms of the introduced structure tensor. An application of the split Lie $3-$algebra to a Bagger and Lambert gauge theory is also discussed.

  11. Integrability of Lie Systems Through Riccati Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariñena, José F.; de Lucas, Javier

    Integrability conditions for Lie systems are related to reduction or transformation processes. We here analyse a geometric method to construct integrability conditions for Riccati equations following these approaches. This approach provides us with a unified geometrical viewpoint that allows us to analyse some previous works on the topic and explain new properties. Moreover, this new approach can be straightforwardly generalised to describe integrability conditions for any Lie system. Finally, we show the usefulness of our treatment in order to study the problem of the linearisability of Riccati equations.

  12. Integrability of Lie systems through Riccati equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cariñena, José F

    2010-01-01

    Integrability conditions for Lie systems are related to reduction or transformation processes. We here analyse a geometric method to construct integrability conditions for Riccati equations following these approaches. This approach provides us with a unified geometrical viewpoint that allows us to analyse some previous works on the topic and explain new properties. Moreover, this new approach can be straightforwardly generalised to describe integrability conditions for any Lie system. Finally, we show the usefulness of our treatment in order to study the problem of the linearisability of Riccati equations.

  13. Quiver Gauge theories from Lie Superalgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Belhaj, A

    2012-01-01

    We discuss quiver gauge models with matter fields based on Dynkin diagrams of Lie superalgebra structures. We focus on A(1,0) case and we find first that it can be related to intersecting complex cycles with genus $g$. Using toric geometry, A(1,0) quivers are analyzed in some details and it is shown that A(1,0) can be used to incorporate fundamental fields to a product of two unitary factor groups. We expect that this approach can be applied to other kinds of Lie superalgebras;

  14. Spiders for rank 2 Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Kuperberg, G

    1996-01-01

    A spider is an axiomatization of the representation theory of a group, quantum group, Lie algebra, or other group or group-like object. We define certain combinatorial spiders by generators and relations that are isomorphic to the representation theories of the three rank two simple Lie algebras, namely A2, B2, and G2. They generalize the widely-used Temperley-Lieb spider for A1. Among other things, they yield bases for invariant spaces which are probably related to Lusztig's canonical bases, and they are useful for computing quantities such as generalized 6j-symbols and quantum link invariants.

  15. Lie algebra contractions and separation of variables

    CERN Document Server

    Vinternits, P; Pogosyan, G S; Sissakian, A N

    2001-01-01

    The concept of analytical Lie group contractions is introduced to relate the separation of variables in space of constant nonzero curvature to separation in Euclidean or pseudo-Euclidean spaces. The contraction parameter is introduced explicitly into the basis of the Lie algebra, the Laplace-Beltrami operator, the complete set of commuting operators, the coordinates themselves and into the solutions. This enables to obtain asymptotic formulae connecting special functions related to the groups O(n) and O(n,1) to those related to Euclidean and pseudo-Euclidean groups

  16. Lie Point Symmetries of Differential-Difference Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Wei; TANG Xiao-Yan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the classical Lie group approach is extended to find some Lie point symmetries of differentialdifference equations. It reveals that the obtained Lie point symmetries can constitute a Kac-Moody-Virasoro algebra.

  17. Generalized double extension and descriptions of qadratic Lie superalgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Bajo, I; Bordemann, M

    2007-01-01

    A Lie superalgebra endowed with a supersymmetric, even, non-degenerate, invariant bilinear form is called a quadratic Lie superalgebra. In this paper we give inductive descriptions of quadratic Lie superalgebras in terms of generalized double extensions.

  18. SAGE-Spectroscopy: The life-cycle of dust and gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Data delivery document v3.0

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Paul M; Gordon, Karl D; Shiao, B; Kemper, F; Indebetouw, R

    2011-01-01

    The SAGE-Spectroscopy Spitzer legacy program (SAGE-Spec; PI: F. Kemper, PID: 40159; Kemper et al. 2010) is the IRS spectroscopic follow-up to the successful SAGE-LMC legacy program (Meixner et al. 2006; PI: M. Meixner, PID: 20203) that mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with all bands of the IRAC and MIPS instruments on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. This technical document gives details of the data-reduction procedure and the various data products that are publicly available through IRSA: http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/data/SPITZER/SAGE/

  19. The Lie Algebras in which Every Subspace s Its Subalgebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU MING-ZHONG

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Lie algebras in which every subspace is its subalgebra (denoted by HB Lie algebras). We get that a nonabelian Lie algebra is an HB Lie algebra if and only if it is isomorphic to g+Cidg, where g is an abelian Lie algebra. Moreover we show that the derivation algebra and the holomorph of a nonabelian HB Lie algebra are complete.

  20. Lie, truth, lie: the role of task switching in a deception context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debey, Evelyne; Liefooghe, Baptist; De Houwer, Jan; Verschuere, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    A cornerstone of the task switching literature is the finding that task performance is typically slower and more error-prone when the task switches than when it repeats. So far, deception research has largely ignored that such cognitive switch costs should also emerge when switching between truth telling and lying, and may affect the cognitive cost of lying as reflected in higher prefrontal brain activity and slower and less accurate responding compared to truth telling. To get a grasp on the relative size of the switch costs associated with lying and truth telling, the current study had participants perform a reaction time-based deception task, in which they alternated between lying and telling the truth to yes/no questions that were related to activities performed in the lab (Experiment 1) or neutral autobiographical facts (Experiment 2). In both experiments, the error and reaction time switch costs were found to be equally large for switching from truth telling to lying and from lying to truth telling. This symmetry in switch costs can be explained from the hypothesis that lying requires a first step of truth telling, and demonstrates that task switching does not contribute to the cognitive cost of lying when the repetition/switch ratio is balanced. Theoretical and methodological implications are considered.

  1. Lying in Business : Insights from Hannah Arendt’s ‘Lying in Politics’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenkhoorn, P.; Graafland, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The famous political philosopher Hannah Arendt develops several arguments why truthfulness cannot be counted among the political virtues. This article shows that similar arguments apply to lying in business. Based on Hannah Arendt’s theory, we distinguish five reasons why lying is a structural tempt

  2. Teaching the Truth about Lies to Psychology Students: The Speed Lying Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Matthew R.; Richardson, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    To teach the importance of deception in everyday social life, an in-class activity called the "Speed Lying Task" was given in an introductory social psychology class. In class, two major research findings were replicated: Individuals detected deception at levels no better than expected by chance and lie detection confidence was unrelated…

  3. Lying in Business : Insights from Hannah Arendt’s ‘Lying in Politics’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenkhoorn, P.; Graafland, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The famous political philosopher Hannah Arendt develops several arguments why truthfulness cannot be counted among the political virtues. This article shows that similar arguments apply to lying in business. Based on Hannah Arendt’s theory, we distinguish five reasons why lying is a structural tempt

  4. Lying in Business : Insights from Hannah Arendt’s ‘Lying in Politics’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenkhoorn, P.; Graafland, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The famous political philosopher Hannah Arendt develops several arguments why truthfulness cannot be counted among the political virtues. This article shows that similar arguments apply to lying in business. Based on Hannah Arendt’s theory, we distinguish five reasons why lying is a structural

  5. Teaching the Truth about Lies to Psychology Students: The Speed Lying Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Matthew R.; Richardson, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    To teach the importance of deception in everyday social life, an in-class activity called the "Speed Lying Task" was given in an introductory social psychology class. In class, two major research findings were replicated: Individuals detected deception at levels no better than expected by chance and lie detection confidence was unrelated…

  6. Why Do Lie-Catchers Fail? A Lens Model Meta-Analysis of Human Lie Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Maria; Bond, Charles F., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research has shown that people are poor at detecting lies. Two explanations for this finding have been proposed. First, it has been suggested that lie detection is inaccurate because people rely on invalid cues when judging deception. Second, it has been suggested that lack of valid cues to deception limits accuracy. A series of 4…

  7. The SAGE-Spec Spitzer Legacy program: the life-cycle of dust and gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Point source classification - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, O. C.; Woods, P. M.; Kemper, F.; Kraemer, K. E.; Sloan, G. C.; Srinivasan, S.; Oliveira, J. M.; van Loon, J. Th.; Boyer, M. L.; Sargent, B. A.; McDonald, I.; Meixner, M.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Ruffle, P. M. E.; Lagadec, E.; Pauly, T.; Sewiło, M.; Clayton, G. C.; Volk, K.

    2017-09-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the {\\em Spitzer Space Telescope} observed nearly 800 point sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), taking over 1,000 spectra. 197 of these targets were observed as part of the Sage-Spec Spitzer Legacy program; the remainder are from a variety of different calibration, guaranteed time and open time projects. We classify these point sources into types according to their infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership, and variability information, using a decision-tree classification method. We then refine the classification using supplementary information from the astrophysical literature. We find that our IRS sample is comprised substantially of YSO and H\\,{\\sc ii} regions, post-Main Sequence low-mass stars: (post-)AGB stars and planetary nebulae and massive stars including several rare evolutionary types. Two supernova remnants, a nova and several background galaxies were also observed. We use these classifications to improve our understanding of the stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud, study the composition and characteristics of dust species in a variety of LMC objects, and to verify the photometric classification methods used by mid-IR surveys. We discover that some widely-used catalogues of objects contain considerable contamination and others are missing sources in our sample.

  8. Supersonic Cloud Collision-II

    CERN Document Server

    Anathpindika, S

    2009-01-01

    In this, second paper of the sequel of two papers, we present five SPH simulations of fast head-on cloud collisions and study the evolution of the ram pressure confined gas slab. Anathpindika (2008) (hereafter paper I) considered highly supersonic cloud collisions and examined the effect of bending and shearing instabilities on the shocked gas slab. The post-collision shock here, as in paper I, is also modelled by a simple barotropic equation of state (EOS). However, a much stiffer EOS is used to model the shock resulting from a low velocity cloud collision. We explore the parameter space by varying the pre-collision velocity and the impact parameter. We observe that pressure confined gas slabs become Jeans unstable if the sound crossing time, $t_{cr}$, is much larger than the freefall time, $t_{ff}$, of putative clumps condensing out of them. Self gravitating clumps may spawn multiple/larger $N$-body star clusters. We also suggest that warmer gas slabs are unlikely to fragment and may end up as diffuse gas c...

  9. Hiding an Inconvenient Truth : Lies and Vagueness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serra Garcia, M.; van Damme, E.E.C.; Potters, J.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    When truth conflicts with e¢ ciency, can verbal communication destroy efficiency? Or are lies or vagueness used to hide inconvenient truths? We consider a sequential 2-player public good game in which the leader has private information about the value of the public good. This value can be low, high,

  10. Are 'Lying Compositions' Detrimental To Student Growth?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ A greater number of primary school students are inventing stories and telling lies when they are supposed to be writing about personal experiences. The Chengdu Business Daily said, of 40 pupils in a grade-four class, 30 wrote about how they struggled with human traffickers or thieves, and 26 pupils admitted they made the stories up.

  11. Lie Algebra of Noncommutative Inhomogeneous Hopf Algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Lagraa, M

    1997-01-01

    We construct the vector space dual to the space of right-invariant differential forms construct from a first order differential calculus on inhomogeneous quantum group. We show that this vector space is equipped with a structure of a Hopf algebra which closes on a noncommutative Lie algebra satisfying a Jacobi identity.

  12. SAYD modules over Lie-Hopf algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Rangipour, B

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a general van Est type isomorphism is established. The isomorphism is between the Lie algebra cohomology of a bicrossed sum Lie algebra and the Hopf cyclic cohomology of its Hopf algebra. We first prove a one to one correspondence between stable-anti-Yetter-Drinfeld (SAYD) modules over the total Lie algebra and SAYD modules over the associated Hopf algebra. In contrast to the non-general case done in our previous work, here the van Est isomorphism is found at the first level of a natural spectral sequence, rather than at the level of complexes. It is proved that the Connes-Moscovici Hopf algebras do not admit any finite dimensional SAYD modules except the unique one-dimensional one found by Connes- Moscovici in 1998. This is done by extending our techniques to work with the infinite dimensional Lie algebra of formal vector fields. At the end, the one to one correspondence is applied to construct a highly nontrivial four dimensional SAYD module over the Schwarzian Hopf algebra. We then illustrate...

  13. Happiness lies somewhere in your brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅寒

    2007-01-01

    <正> When I was a kid,I defined happinessas being able to afford anything that was de-sired and thus I came up with the conclusionthat happiness lies in the possession of mon-ey.Time turned me tall and smart,also,able

  14. Lie algebras and linear differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockett, R. W.; Rahimi, A.

    1972-01-01

    Certain symmetry properties possessed by the solutions of linear differential equations are examined. For this purpose, some basic ideas from the theory of finite dimensional linear systems are used together with the work of Wei and Norman on the use of Lie algebraic methods in differential equation theory.

  15. On Split Lie Triple Systems II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Antonio J Calderón Martín; M Forero Piulestán

    2010-04-01

    In [4] it is studied that the structure of split Lie triple systems with a coherent 0-root space, that is, satisfying $[T_0,T_0,T]=0$ and $[T_0,T_,T_0]≠ 0$ for any nonzero root and where $T_0$ denotes the 0-root space and $T_$ the -root space, by showing that any of such triple systems with a symmetric root system is of the form $T=\\mathcal{U}+\\sum_j I_j$ with $\\mathcal{U}$ a subspace of the 0-root space $T_0$ and any $I_j$ a well described ideal of , satisfying $[I_j,T,I_k]=0$ if $j≠ k$. It is also shown in [4] that under certain conditions, a split Lie triple system with a coherent 0-root space is the direct sum of the family of its minimal ideals, each one being a simple split Lie triple system, and the simplicity of is characterized. In the present paper we extend these results to arbitrary split Lie triple systems with no restrictions on their 0-root spaces.

  16. SAYD Modules over Lie-Hopf Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangipour, Bahram; Sütlü, Serkan

    2012-11-01

    In this paper a general van Est type isomorphism is proved. The isomorphism is between the Lie algebra cohomology of a bicrossed sum Lie algebra and the Hopf cyclic cohomology of its Hopf algebra. We first prove a one to one correspondence between stable-anti-Yetter-Drinfeld (SAYD) modules over the total Lie algebra and those modules over the associated Hopf algebra. In contrast to the non-general case done in our previous work, here the van Est isomorphism is proved at the first level of a natural spectral sequence, rather than at the level of complexes. It is proved that the Connes-Moscovici Hopf algebras do not admit any finite dimensional SAYD modules except the unique one-dimensional one found by Connes-Moscovici in 1998. This is done by extending our techniques to work with the infinite dimensional Lie algebra of formal vector fields. At the end, the one to one correspondence is applied to construct a highly nontrivial four dimensional SAYD module over the Schwarzian Hopf algebra. We then illustrate the whole theory on this example. Finally explicit representative cocycles of the cohomology classes for this example are calculated.

  17. OH+ in Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Porras, A J; Welty, D E; Ritchey, A M

    2013-01-01

    Near ultraviolet observations of OH+ and OH in diffuse molecular clouds reveal a preference for different environments. The dominant absorption feature in OH+ arises from a main component seen in CH+ (that with the highest CH+/CH column density ratio), while OH follows CN absorption. This distinction provides new constraints on OH chemistry in these clouds. Since CH+ detections favor low-density gas with small fractions of molecular hydrogen, this must be true for OH+ as well, confirming OH+ and H2O+ observations with the Herschel Space Telescope. Our observed correspondence indicates that the cosmic ray ionization rate derived from these measurements pertains to mainly atomic gas. The association of OH absorption with gas rich in CN is attributed to the need for high enough density and molecular fraction before detectable amounts are seen. Thus, while OH+ leads to OH production, chemical arguments suggest that their abundances are controlled by different sets of conditions and that they coexist with differen...

  18. Cloud management and security

    CERN Document Server

    Abbadi, Imad M

    2014-01-01

    Written by an expert with over 15 years' experience in the field, this book establishes the foundations of Cloud computing, building an in-depth and diverse understanding of the technologies behind Cloud computing. In this book, the author begins with an introduction to Cloud computing, presenting fundamental concepts such as analyzing Cloud definitions, Cloud evolution, Cloud services, Cloud deployment types and highlighting the main challenges. Following on from the introduction, the book is divided into three parts: Cloud management, Cloud security, and practical examples. Part one presents the main components constituting the Cloud and federated Cloud infrastructure(e.g., interactions and deployment), discusses management platforms (resources and services), identifies and analyzes the main properties of the Cloud infrastructure, and presents Cloud automated management services: virtual and application resource management services. Part two analyzes the problem of establishing trustworthy Cloud, discuss...

  19. Giant Molecular Cloud Formation in Disk Galaxies: Characterizing Simulated versus Observed Cloud Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Samantha M.; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Wadsley, James

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a study of simulated giant molecular clouds (GMCs) formed in a Milky Way-type galactic disk with a flat rotation curve. This simulation, which does not include star formation or feedback, produces clouds with masses ranging between 104 M ⊙ and 107 M ⊙. We compare our simulated cloud population to two observational surveys: the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey and the BIMA All-Disk Survey of M33. An analysis of the global cloud properties as well as a comparison of Larson's scaling relations is carried out. We find that simulated cloud properties agree well with the observed cloud properties, with the closest agreement occurring between the clouds at comparable resolution in M33. Our clouds are highly filamentary—a property that derives both from their formation due to gravitational instability in the sheared galactic environment, as well as to cloud-cloud gravitational encounters. We also find that the rate at which potentially star-forming gas accumulates within dense regions—wherein n thresh >= 104 cm-3—is 3% per 10 Myr, in clouds of roughly 106 M ⊙. This suggests that star formation rates in observed clouds are related to the rates at which gas can be accumulated into dense subregions within GMCs via filamentary flows. The most internally well-resolved clouds are chosen for listing in a catalog of simulated GMCs—the first of its kind. The cataloged clouds are available as an extracted data set from the global simulation.

  20. GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES: CHARACTERIZING SIMULATED VERSUS OBSERVED CLOUD CATALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benincasa, Samantha M.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Tasker, Elizabeth J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2013-10-10

    We present the results of a study of simulated giant molecular clouds (GMCs) formed in a Milky Way-type galactic disk with a flat rotation curve. This simulation, which does not include star formation or feedback, produces clouds with masses ranging between 10{sup 4} M{sub ☉} and 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}. We compare our simulated cloud population to two observational surveys: the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey and the BIMA All-Disk Survey of M33. An analysis of the global cloud properties as well as a comparison of Larson's scaling relations is carried out. We find that simulated cloud properties agree well with the observed cloud properties, with the closest agreement occurring between the clouds at comparable resolution in M33. Our clouds are highly filamentary—a property that derives both from their formation due to gravitational instability in the sheared galactic environment, as well as to cloud-cloud gravitational encounters. We also find that the rate at which potentially star-forming gas accumulates within dense regions—wherein n{sub thresh} ≥ 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}—is 3% per 10 Myr, in clouds of roughly 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉}. This suggests that star formation rates in observed clouds are related to the rates at which gas can be accumulated into dense subregions within GMCs via filamentary flows. The most internally well-resolved clouds are chosen for listing in a catalog of simulated GMCs—the first of its kind. The cataloged clouds are available as an extracted data set from the global simulation.

  1. Hot Molecular Gas in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Herrnstein, R M G; Herrnstein, Robeson McGary; Ho, Paul T.P.

    2002-01-01

    Using the new 23 GHz receivers at the Very Large Array (VLA), we have detected NH3(6,6) emission (nu=25.056025 GHz) from hot (>150 K) molecular clouds in the central 10 pc of the Galaxy. This is the first successful detection of NH3(6,6) with the VLA. The brightest emission comes from a region interior to the ``circumnuclear disk'' (CND), less than 1.5 pc in projected distance from Sgr A*. This region does not show molecular emission from lower energy transitions such as NH3(1,1) and (2,2), HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0). Line ratios of NH3(6,6) and (3,3) emission as well as NH3(6,6) line widths have peak values within 1.5 pc of Sgr A*, indicating that the gas is physically close to the nucleus. NH3(6,6) is also detected towards many features outside the CND observed in NH3(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3). These features tend to lie along ridges of gas associated with Sgr A East or the massive ``molecular ridge'' that connects the ``20 km/s'' and ``50 km/s'' giant molecular clouds (GMCs).

  2. 74 MHz Nonthermal Emission from Molecular Clouds: Evidence for a Cosmic Ray Dominated Region at the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Wardle, M.; Lis, D.; Viti, S.; Brogan, C.; Chambers, E.; Pound, M.; Rickert, M.

    2013-10-01

    We present 74 MHz radio continuum observations of the Galactic center region. These measurements show nonthermal radio emission arising from molecular clouds that is unaffected by free-free absorption along the line of sight. We focus on one cloud, G0.13-0.13, representative of the population of molecular clouds that are spatially correlated with steep spectrum (α327MHz74MHz = 1.3 ± 0.3) nonthermal emission from the Galactic center region. This cloud lies adjacent to the nonthermal radio filaments of the Arc near l - 0.2° and is a strong source of 74 MHz continuum, SiO (2-1), and Fe I Kα 6.4 keV line emission. This three-way correlation provides the most compelling evidence yet that relativistic electrons, here traced by 74 MHz emission, are physically associated with the G0.13-0.13 molecular cloud and that low-energy cosmic ray electrons are responsible for the Fe I Kα line emission. The high cosmic ray ionization rate -10-13 s-1 H-1 is responsible for heating the molecular gas to high temperatures and allows the disturbed gas to maintain a high-velocity dispersion. Large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling of multitransition SiO observations of this cloud implies H2 densities -104-5 cm-3 and high temperatures. The lower limit to the temperature of G0.13-0.13 is -100 K, whereas the upper limit is as high as 1000 K. Lastly, we used a time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas to investigate for molecular line diagnostics of cosmic ray heating. When the cloud reaches chemical equilibrium, the abundance ratios of HCN/HNC and N2H+/HCO+ are consistent with measured values. In addition, significant abundance of SiO is predicted in the cosmic ray dominated region of the Galactic center. We discuss different possibilities to account for the origin of widespread SiO emission detected from Galactic center molecular clouds.

  3. Cleaning Massive Sonar Point Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars Allan; Larsen, Kasper Green; Mølhave, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of automatically cleaning massive sonar data point clouds, that is, the problem of automatically removing noisy points that for example appear as a result of scans of (shoals of) fish, multiple reflections, scanner self-reflections, refraction in gas bubbles, and so on. We...... describe a new algorithm that avoids the problems of previous local-neighbourhood based algorithms. Our algorithm is theoretically I/O-efficient, that is, it is capable of efficiently processing massive sonar point clouds that do not fit in internal memory but must reside on disk. The algorithm is also...

  4. Cosmic rays and molecular clouds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the cosmic-ray penetration into molecular clouds and with the related gamma--ray emission. High energy cosmic rays interact with the dense gas and produce neutral pions which in turn decay into two gamma rays. This makes molecular clouds potential sources of gamma rays, especially if they are located in the vicinity of a powerful accelerator that injects cosmic rays in the interstellar medium. The amplitude and duration in time of the cosmic--ray overdensity around a giv...

  5. The SAGE-Spec Spitzer Legacy program: The life-cycle of dust and gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Point source classification I

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Paul M; Kemper, F; van Loon, J Th; Sargent, B A; Matsuura, M; Szczerba, R; Volk, K; Zijlstra, A A; Sloan, G C; Lagadec, E; McDonald, I; Jones, O; Gorjian, V; Kraemer, K E; Gielen, C; Meixner, M; Blum, R D; Sewi\\lo, M; Riebel, D; Shiao, B; Chen, C -H R; Boyer, M L; Indebetouw, R; Antoniou, V; Bernard, J -P; Cohen, M; Dijkstra, C; Galametz, M; Galliano, F; Gordon, Karl D; Harris, J; Hony, S; Hora, J L; Kawamura, A; Lawton, B; Leisenring, J M; Madden, S; Marengo, M; McGuire, C; Mulia, A J; O'Halloran, B; Olsen, K; Paladini, R; Paradis, D; Reach, W T; Rubin, D; Sandstrom, K; Soszyński, I; Speck, A K; Srinivasan, S; Tielens, A G G M; van Aarle, E; Van Dyk, S D; Van Winckel, H; Vijh, Uma P; Whitney, B; Wilkins, A N

    2010-01-01

    We present the classification of 197 point sources observed with the Infrared Spectrograph in the SAGE-Spec Legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We introduce a decision-tree method of object classification based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership, and variability information, which is used to classify the SAGE-Spec sample of point sources. The decision tree has a broad application to mid-infrared spectroscopic surveys, where supporting photometry and variability information are available. We use these classifications to make deductions about the stellar populations of the Large Magellanic Cloud and the success of photometric classification methods. We find 90 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 29 young stellar objects, 23 post-AGB objects, 19 red supergiants, eight stellar photospheres, seven background galaxies, seven planetary nebulae, two HII regions and 12 other objects, seven of which remain unclassified.

  6. Speeding Clouds May Reveal Invisible Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    Several small, speeding clouds have been discovered at the center of our galaxy. A new study suggests that these unusual objects may reveal the lurking presence of inactive black holes.Peculiar Cloudsa) Velocity-integrated intensity map showing the location of the two high-velocity compact clouds, HCN0.0090.044 and HCN0.0850.094, in the context of larger molecular clouds. b) and c) Latitude-velocity and longitude-velocity maps for HCN0.0090.044 and HCN0.0850.094, respectively. d) and e) spectra for the two compacts clouds, respectively. Click for a closer look. [Takekawa et al. 2017]Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole marking the center of our galaxy, is surrounded by a region roughly 650 light-years across known as the Central Molecular Zone. This area at the heart of our galaxy is filled with large amounts of warm, dense molecular gas that has a complex distribution and turbulent kinematics.Several peculiar gas clouds have been discovered within the Central Molecular Zone within the past two decades. These clouds, dubbed high-velocity compact clouds, are characterized by their compact sizes and extremely broad velocity widths.What created this mysterious population of energetic clouds? The recent discovery of two new high-velocity compact clouds, reported on in a paper led by Shunya Takekawa (Keio University, Japan), may help us to answer this question.Two More to the CountUsing the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in Hawaii, Takekawa and collaborators detected the small clouds near the circumnuclear disk at the centermost part of our galaxy. These two clouds have velocity spreads of -80 to -20 km/s and -80 to 0 km/s and compact sizes of just over 1 light-year. The clouds similar appearances and physical properties suggest that they may both have been formed by the same process.Takekawa and collaborators explore and discard several possible origins for these clouds, such as outflows from massive protostars (no massive, luminous stars have been detected affiliated

  7. Cloud Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 1 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 258.8 East (101.2 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara

  8. Reviewing Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Lopez, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    The star formation process involves a wide range of spatial scales, densities and temperatures. Herschel observations of the cold and low density molecular gas extending tens of parsecs, that constitutes the bulk of the molecular clouds of the Milky Way, have shown a network of dense structures in the shape of filaments. These filaments supposedly condense into higher density clumps to form individual stars or stellar clusters. The study of the kinematics of the filaments through single-dish observations suggests the presence of gas flows along the filaments, oscillatory motions due to gravity infall, and the existence of substructure inside filaments that may be threaded by twisted fibers. A few molecular clouds have been mapped with interferometric resolutions bringing more insight into the filament structure. Compression due to large-scale supersonic flows is the preferred mechanism to explain filament formation although the exact nature of the filaments, their origin and evolution are still not well understood. Determining the turbulence drivers behind the origin of the filaments, the relative importance of turbulence, gravity and magnetic fields on regulating the filament structure and evolution, and providing detailed insight on the substructure inside the filaments are among the current open questions in this research area.

  9. Distribution and Characteristics of Infrared Dark Clouds Using Genetic Forward Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, D. J.; Joncas, G.; Jones, A. P.

    2009-11-01

    Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) are dark clouds seen in silhouette in mid-infrared surveys. They are thought to be the birthplace of massive stars, yet remarkably little information exists on the properties of the population as a whole (e.g., mass spectrum, spatial distribution). Genetic forward modeling is used along with the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the Besançon Galactic model to deduce the three-dimensional distribution of interstellar extinction toward previously identified IRDC candidates. This derived dust distribution can then be used to determine the distance and mass of IRDCs, independently of kinematic models of the Milky Way. Along a line of sight that crosses an IRDC, the extinction is seen to rise sharply at the distance of the cloud. Assuming a dust-to-gas ratio, the total mass of the cloud can be estimated. The method has been successfully applied to 1259 IRDCs, including over 1000 for which no distance or mass estimate currently exists. The IRDCs are seen to lie preferentially along the spiral arms and in the molecular ring of the Milky Way, reinforcing the idea that they are the birthplace of massive stars. Also, their mass spectrum is seen to follow a power law with an index of -1.75 ± 0.06, steeper than giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the inner Galaxy but comparable to clumps in GMCs. This slope suggests that the IRDCs detected using the present method are not gravitationally bound, but are rather the result of density fluctuations induced by turbulence.

  10. Dimension of the $c$-nilpotent multiplier of Lie algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MEHDI ARASKHAN; MOHAMMAD REZA RISMANCHIAN

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive some inequalities for dimension of the $c$-nilpotent multiplier of finite dimensional Lie algebras and their factor Lie algebras. We further obtain an inequality between dimensions of $c$-nilpotent multiplier of Lie algebra $L$ and tensor product of a central ideal by its abelianized factor Lie algebra

  11. Legitimate lies : The relationship between omission, commission, and cheating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pittarello, Andrea; Rubaltelli, Enrico; Motro, Daphna

    2016-01-01

    Across four experiments, we show that when people can serve their self-interest, they are more likely to refrain from reporting the truth ( lie of omission) than actively lie ( lie of commission). We developed a novel online "Heads or Tails" task in which participants can lie to win a monetary prize

  12. Whittaker categories and strongly typical Whittaker modules for Lie superalgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Bagci, Irfan; Wiesner, Emilie

    2012-01-01

    Following analogous constructions for Lie algebras, we define Whittaker modules and Whittaker categories for finite-dimensional simple Lie superalgebras. Results include a decomposition of Whittaker categories for a Lie superalgebra according to the action of an appropriate sub-superalgebra; and, for basic classical Lie superalgebras of type I, a description of the strongly typical simple Whittaker modules.

  13. A Local Characterization of Lie Homomorphisms of Nest Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Miao-xia; ZHANG Jian-hua

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, linear maps preserving Lie products at zero points on nest algebras are studied. It is proved that every linear map preserving Lie products at zero points on any finite nest algebra is a Lie homomorphism. As an application, the form of a linear bijection preserving Lie products at zero points between two finite nest algebras is obtained.

  14. Discovery of lake-effect clouds on Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, M E; Roe, H G; CHen, C; Roberts, J; Brown, R H; Baines, K H; Clark, R N

    2008-01-01

    Images from instruments on Cassini as well as from telescopes on the ground reveal the presence of sporadic small-scale cloud activity in the cold late-winter north polar of Saturn's large moon Titan. These clouds lie underneath the previously discovered uniform polar cloud attributed to a quiescent ethane cloud at ~40 km and appear confined to the same latitudes as those of the largest known hydrocarbon lakes at the north pole of Titan. The physical properties of these clouds suggest that they are due to methane convection and condensation. Such convection has not been predicted for the cold winter pole, but can be caused by a process in many ways analogous to terrestrial lake-effect clouds. The lakes on Titan are a key connection between the surface and the meteorological cycle.

  15. Cirrus cloud seeding has potential to cool climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storelvmo, T.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Muri, H.; Pfeffer, M.; Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.

    2013-01-01

    Cirrus clouds, thin ice clouds in the upper troposphere, have a net warming effect on Earth's climate. Consequently, a reduction in cirrus cloud amount or optical thickness would cool the climate. Recent research indicates that by seeding cirrus clouds with particles that promote ice nucleation, their lifetimes and coverage could be reduced. We have tested this hypothesis in a global climate model with a state-of-the-art representation of cirrus clouds and find that cirrus cloud seeding has the potential to cancel the entire warming caused by human activity from pre-industrial times to present day. However, the desired effect is only obtained for seeding particle concentrations that lie within an optimal range. With lower than optimal particle concentrations, a seeding exercise would have no effect. Moreover, a higher than optimal concentration results in an over-seeding that could have the deleterious effect of prolonging cirrus lifetime and contributing to global warming.

  16. Discovery of lake-effect clouds on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M.E.; Schaller, E.L.; Roe, H.G.; Chen, C.; Roberts, J.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Images from instruments on Cassini as well as from telescopes on the ground reveal the presence of sporadic small-scale cloud activity in the cold late-winter north polar region of Saturn's large moon Titan. These clouds lie underneath the previously discovered uniform polar cloud attributed to a quiescent ethane cloud at ???40 km and appear confined to the same latitudes as those of the largest known hydrocarbon lakes at the north pole of Titan. The physical properties of these clouds suggest that they are due to methane convection and condensation. Such convection could be caused by a process in some ways analogous to terrestrial lake-effect clouds. The lakes on Titan could be a key connection between the surface and the meteorological cycle. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Lie symmetries for equations in conformal geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Hansraj, S; Msomi, A M; Govinder, K S

    2005-01-01

    We seek exact solutions to the Einstein field equations which arise when two spacetime geometries are conformally related. Whilst this is a simple method to generate new solutions to the field equations, very few such examples have been found in practice. We use the method of Lie analysis of differential equations to obtain new group invariant solutions to conformally related Petrov type D spacetimes. Four cases arise depending on the nature of the Lie symmetry generator. In three cases we are in a position to solve the master field equation in terms of elementary functions. In the fourth case special solutions in terms of Bessel functions are obtained. These solutions contain known models as special cases.

  18. Geodesic models generated by Lie symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Abebe, G Z; Govinder, K S

    2014-01-01

    We study the junction condition relating the pressure to the heat flux at the boundary of a shearing and expanding spherically symmetric radiating star when the fluid particles are travelling in geodesic motion. The Lie symmetry generators that leave the junction condition invariant are identified and the optimal system is generated. We use each element of the optimal system to transform the partial differential equation to an ordinary differential equation. New exact solutions, which are group invariant under the action of Lie point infinitesimal symmetries, are found. We obtain families of traveling wave solutions and self-similar solutions, amongst others. The gravitational potentials are given in terms of elementary functions, and the line elements can be given explicitly in all cases. We show that the Friedmann dust model is regained as a special case, and we can connect our results to earlier investigations.

  19. Analytic factorization of Lie group representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimperlein, Heiko; Krötz, Bernhard; Lienau, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    For every moderate growth representation (p,E)(p,E) of a real Lie group G on a Fréchet space, we prove a factorization theorem of Dixmier–Malliavin type for the space of analytic vectors E¿E¿. There exists a natural algebra of superexponentially decreasing analytic functions A(G)A(G), such that E......¿=¿(A(G))E¿E¿=¿(A(G))E¿. As a corollary we obtain that E¿E¿ coincides with the space of analytic vectors for the Laplace–Beltrami operator on G.......For every moderate growth representation (p,E)(p,E) of a real Lie group G on a Fréchet space, we prove a factorization theorem of Dixmier–Malliavin type for the space of analytic vectors E¿E¿. There exists a natural algebra of superexponentially decreasing analytic functions A(G)A(G), such that E...

  20. Harmonic analysis on exponential solvable Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first one that brings together recent results on the harmonic analysis of exponential solvable Lie groups. There still are many interesting open problems, and the book contributes to the future progress of this research field. As well, various related topics are presented to motivate young researchers. The orbit method invented by Kirillov is applied to study basic problems in the analysis on exponential solvable Lie groups. This method tells us that the unitary dual of these groups is realized as the space of their coadjoint orbits. This fact is established using the Mackey theory for induced representations, and that mechanism is explained first. One of the fundamental problems in the representation theory is the irreducible decomposition of induced or restricted representations. Therefore, these decompositions are studied in detail before proceeding to various related problems: the multiplicity formula, Plancherel formulas, intertwining operators, Frobenius reciprocity, and associated alge...

  1. Constructions of Lie algebras and their modules

    CERN Document Server

    Seligman, George B

    1988-01-01

    This book deals with central simple Lie algebras over arbitrary fields of characteristic zero. It aims to give constructions of the algebras and their finite-dimensional modules in terms that are rational with respect to the given ground field. All isotropic algebras with non-reduced relative root systems are treated, along with classical anisotropic algebras. The latter are treated by what seems to be a novel device, namely by studying certain modules for isotropic classical algebras in which they are embedded. In this development, symmetric powers of central simple associative algebras, along with generalized even Clifford algebras of involutorial algebras, play central roles. Considerable attention is given to exceptional algebras. The pace is that of a rather expansive research monograph. The reader who has at hand a standard introductory text on Lie algebras, such as Jacobson or Humphreys, should be in a position to understand the results. More technical matters arise in some of the detailed arguments. T...

  2. ON THE PRIMARY DECOMPOSITION THEOREM OF MODULAR LIE SUPERALGEBRAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN LIANGYUN; MENG DAOJI

    2005-01-01

    This gives some identities of associative Lie superalgebras and some properties of modular Lie superalgebras. Furthermore, the primry decomposition theorem of modular Lie superalgebras is shown. It is well known that the primary decomposition theorem of modular Lie algebras has played an important role in the classification of the finite-dimensional simple modular Lie algebras (see [5, 6]). Analogously, the primary decomposition theorem of modular Lie superalgebras may play an important role in the open classification of the finite dimensional simple modular Lie superalgebras.

  3. Abstract Lie groups and locally compact topological groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Lech

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a notion of abstract Lie group by means of the mapping which plays the role of the evolution operator. We show some basic properties of such groups very similar to the fundamentals of the infinite dimensional Lie theory. Next we give remarkable examples of abstract Lie groups which are not necessarily usual Lie groups. In particular, by making use of Yamabe theorem we prove that any locally compact topological group admits the structure of abstract Lie group and that the Lie algebra and the exponential mapping of it coincide with those determined by the Lie group structure.

  4. k-symplectic formalism on Lie algebroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Leon, M; De Diego, D Martin [Instituto de Ciencias Matematicas (CSIC-UAM-UC3M-UCM) C/Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Salgado, M; Vilarino, S [Departamento de XeometrIa e TopoloxIa, Facultade de Matematicas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782-Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: mdeleon@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: d.martin@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: modesto.salgado@usc.es, E-mail: silvia.vilarino@usc.es

    2009-09-25

    In this paper we introduce a geometric description of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian classical field theories on Lie algebroids in the framework of k-symplectic geometry. We discuss the relation between the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian descriptions through a convenient notion of Legendre transformation. The theory is a natural generalization of the standard one; in addition, other interesting examples are studied, in particular, systems with symmetry and Poisson-sigma models.

  5. How to Lie with Bad Data

    OpenAIRE

    De Veaux, Richard D.; Hand, David J.

    2005-01-01

    As Huff’s landmark book made clear, lying with statistics can be accomplished in many ways. Distorting graphics, manipulating data or using biased samples are just a few of the tried and true methods. Failing to use the correct statistical procedure or failing to check the conditions for when the selected method is appropriate can distort results as well, whether the motives of the analyst are honorable or not. Even when the statistical procedure and motives are correct, bad data can produce ...

  6. Lies, Incentives and Self-confidence

    OpenAIRE

    Maggian, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    The present thesis is composed by three chapters, each of them making contributions to three distinct topics in behavioral Economics. The chapters can thus be read independently from each other. The first chapter concerns an experimental analysis which aim is to examine the development of social preferences with respect to age and how they are related with lying behavior of children. The second chapter investigates the role of reciprocity in exacerbating inefficient and opportunistic behavior...

  7. Spherical functions on affine Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Etingof, P; Kirillov, A A; Pavel Etingof; Igor Frenkel; Alexander Kirillov Jr

    1994-01-01

    We show that the space of holomorphic functions of a fixed degree on an affine Lie group which take values in a finite-dimensional representation of this group and are equivariant with respect to (twisted) conjugacy coin- cides with the space of conformal blocks of the Wess-Zumino-Witten conformal field theory on an elliptic curve with punctures, or, equivalently,with the space of states of the Chern-Simons topological field theory in genus 1. This provides a group-theoretic realization of the Segal modular functor for elliptic curves. We also show that the the radial part of the second order Laplace operator on an affine Lie group acting in the space of equivariant functions coincides with the operator defining the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov connection on conformal blocks on elliptic curves, and its eigenfunctions coincide with the correlation functions of conformal blocks. At the critical value of the degree (minus the dual Coxeter number of the underlying simple Lie algebra) there exist higher order Laplace op...

  8. On the massive star-forming capacity of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Jose; Shore, Steven N.; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    1994-01-01

    Assuming that photoionization is the self-limiting process for continued star formation, we estimate the maximum number of massive (OB) stars that can form within a molecular cloud. The most efficient cloud destruction mechanism in the early stages of H II region evolution is the evaporation of the cloud by stars located near the cloud boundary. The maximum number of OB stars is of order 1 per 10(exp 4) solar mass of average molecular gas, or 10 per 10(exp 4) solar mass of dense molecular gas. The resulting star-forming efficiencies within cloud complexes range from 2% to 16% depending on both the location of the stars in the cloud and the details of the initial mass function, with an overall value of about 5% for average molecular gas.

  9. The Interstellar Cloud Surrounding the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.

    Ultraviolet spectral data of nearby stars indicate that the cloud surrounding the solar system has an average neutral density n(HI)~0.1 cm-3, temperature ~6800 K, and turbulence ~1.7 km/s. Comparisons between the anomalous cosmic ray data and ultraviolet data suggest that the electron density is in the range n(e-)~0.22 to 0.44 cm-3. This cloud is flowing past the Sun from a position centered in the Norma-Lupis region. The cloud properties are consistent with interstellar gas which originated as material evaporated from the surfaces of embedded clouds in the Scorpius-Centaurus Association, and which was then displaced towards the Sun by a supernova event about 4 Myrs ago. The Sun and surrounding cloud velocities are nearly perpendicular in space, and this cloud is sweeping past the Sun. The morphology of this cloud can be reconstructed by assuming that the cloud moves in a direction parallel to the surface normal. With this assumption, the Sun entered the surrounding cloud 2000 to 8000 years ago, and is now about 0.05 to 0.16 pc from the cloud surface. Prior to its recent entry into the surrounding cloud complex, the Sun was embedded in a region of space with average density lower than 0.0002 cm-3. If a denser cloud velocity component seen towards alpha Cen A,B is real, it will encounter the solar system within 50,000 yr. The nearby magnetic field seen upwind has a spatial orientation that is parallel to the cloud surface. The nearby star Sirius is viewed through the wake of the solar system, but this direction also samples the hypothetical cloud interface. Comparisons of anomalous cosmic ray and interstellar absorption line data suggest that trace elements in the surrounding cloud are in ionization equilibrium. Data towards nearby white dwarfs indicate partial helium ionization, N(N(HI)(/N(HeI)>~13.7, which is consistent with pickup ion data within the solar system if less than 40% hydrogen ionization occurs in the heliopause region. However, the white dwarfs may

  10. COMPLETE LIE ALGEBRAS WITH l-STEP NILPOTENT RADICALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高永存; 孟道冀

    2002-01-01

    The authors first give a necessary and sufficient condition for some solvable Lie algebras with l-step nilpotent radicals to be complete, and then construct a new class of infinite dimensional complete Lie algebras by using the modules of simple Lie algebras. The quotient algebras of this new constructed Lie algebras are non-solvable complete Lie algebras with l-step nilpotent radicals.

  11. Lie algebras with given properties of subalgebras and elements

    CERN Document Server

    Zusmanovich, Pasha

    2011-01-01

    Results about the following classes of finite-dimensional Lie algebras over a field of characteristic zero are presented: anisotropic (i.e., Lie algebras for which each adjoint operator is semisimple), regular (i.e., Lie algebras in which each nonzero element is regular in the sense of Bourbaki), minimal nonabelian (i.e., nonabelian Lie algebras all whose proper subalgebras are abelian), and algebras of depth 2 (i.e., Lie algebras all whose proper subalgebras are abelian or minimal nonabelian).

  12. Classification of filiform Lie algebras of order 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Rosa María

    2016-12-01

    Lie algebras of order 3 constitute a generalization of Lie algebras and superalgebras. Throughout this paper the classification problem of filiform Lie algebras of order 3 is considered and therefore this work is a continuation papers seen in the literature. We approach this classification by extending Vergne's result for filiform Lie algebras and by considering algebras of order 3 of high nilindex. We find the expression of the law to which any elementary filiform Lie algebra of order 3 is isomorphic.

  13. Martian Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 28 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. This image was acquired during early spring near the North Pole. The linear 'ripples' are transparent water-ice clouds. This linear form is typical for polar clouds. The black regions on the margins of this image are areas of saturation caused by the build up of scattered light from the bright polar material during the long image exposure. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.1, Longitude 147.9 East (212.1 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  14. Lie color 代数的商代数%Algebras of quotients of Lie color algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴凤; 周建华

    2004-01-01

    介绍了Lie color 代数的一些性质,如素性、半素性、非退化性等.给出了Lie color 代数的商代数以及弱商代数的概念,并把Lie color 代数的素性和半素性推广到它的商代数上.利用没有非零零化子的理想对Lie color 代数的商代数进行刻画,证明了:若L是Lie color 代数Q的子代数,则Q是L的商代数当且仅当Q理想吸收于L.通过具体构造证明了每一个半素Lie color 代数都有极大商代数,并给出这个极大商代数的等价刻画.

  15. Stellar Birth in a Dark Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    February 2000. It provides a deep look into a star-forming region, where stars are in the process of being born from dense clouds of dust and gas. It is particularly interesting to compare the appearance of the area in this infrared view (SOFI) with that obtained earlier at visible wavelengths (WFI), cf. ESO PR Photos 21a-b/99. As they look quite different, such a comparison is greatly facilitated by referring to the positions of the same brighter objects in the two photos. In visible light, the Eastern edge of the cloud appears as a bright rim; the same edge is present, although less prominent to the left in the infrared image. This is where the outer surface of the cloud is eroded and later completely dissolved by the strong ultraviolet light of a nearby cluster of stars, that lies beyond the edge of the infrared image. Dust obscuration The bright nebula IRAS 16362-4845 at the center of the infrared picture is much more prominent here (see PR Photo 30b/00 ) than in the visible one. This is because it is deeply embedded in the cloud and its visible light is heavily obscured by the dust particles. This effect is much smaller at longer (infrared) wavelengths, so the SOFI image provides a more detailed view of IRAS 16362-4845 . It is exactly this greater transparency of interstellar dust clouds in the infrared spectral region that is one of the main reasons why studies of very young stars are best carried out at infrared wavelengths. Such stars are often still surrounded by the remnants of their parental gas and dust clouds. The colours of the stars Dust not only dims the light of objects located behind the cloud, but also "reddens" it. This is because shorter-wavelength (e.g., blue) light is scattered out of the line-of-sight more efficiently than is longer-wavelength (e.g., red) light. This effect is clearly seen in the SOFI image, where stars located within the cloud area on the average appear much redder than those that are outside. There are a few exceptions, however

  16. The Arc Cloud Complex. A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    Altmetr setin conour (thck ines ar evey 003 igog istbrm (ti06e)aeeerF h utfon sdntdbcold~~ frn5ybl 35 imagery because the MCS cloud shield covered all...1982 Altmetr setin conour (thck ines ar evey 003 i7Hg Oistem (thi lie)aeeey4 h utfotsaedntdb cold5 fron symols 67 Fig. 42. Surface Oe (K) overlaid

  17. Data Sharing Using Cloud Information Accountability Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Chavali

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cloud Information Accountability (CIA framework, based on the notion of information accountability. Unlike privacy protection technologies, information accountability focuses on keeping the data usage transparent and traceable. Our proposed CIA framework provides end-to end accountability in a highly distributed fashion. One of them an innovative feature of the CIA framework lies in its ability of maintaining lightweight and powerful accountability that combines aspects of access control, usage control and authentication, and security issues. Index Terms:

  18. DISCOVERY OF THE METHOXY RADICAL, CH{sub 3}O, TOWARD B1: DUST GRAIN AND GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY IN COLD DARK CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernicharo, J.; Jimenez-Escobar, A.; Munoz Caro, G. M. [Department of Astrophysics, CAB, INTA-CSIC, Crta Torrejon, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Marcelino, N. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Roueff, E. [Luth, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8102, Place J. Janssen F-92190 Meudon (France); Gerin, M., E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8112 and Ecole Normale Superieure, 61 avenue de l' observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2012-11-10

    We report on the discovery of the methoxy radical (CH{sub 3}O) toward the cold and dense core B1-b based on the observation, with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope, of several lines at 3 and 2 mm wavelengths. Besides this new molecular species we also report on the detection of many lines arising from methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}SH), formic acid (HCOOH), propynal (HCCCHO), acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), dimethyl ether (CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}), methyl formate (CH{sub 3}OCOH), and the formyl radical (HCO). The column density of all these species is {approx_equal}10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, corresponding to abundances of {approx_equal}10{sup -11}. The similarity in abundances for all these species strongly suggest that they are formed on the surface of dust grains and ejected to the gas phase through non-thermal desorption processes, most likely cosmic rays or secondary photons. Nevertheless, laboratory experiments indicate that the CH{sub 3}O isomer released to the gas phase is CH{sub 2}OH rather than the methoxy one. Possible gas-phase formation routes to CH{sub 3}O from OH and methanol are discussed.

  19. Discovery of the Methoxy Radical, CH3O, toward B1: Dust Grain and Gas-phase Chemistry in Cold Dark Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernicharo, J.; Marcelino, N.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the discovery of the methoxy radical (CH3O) toward the cold and dense core B1-b based on the observation, with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope, of several lines at 3 and 2 mm wavelengths. Besides this new molecular species we also report on the detection of many lines arising from methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), formic acid (HCOOH), propynal (HCCCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), methyl formate (CH3OCOH), and the formyl radical (HCO). The column density of all these species is sime1012 cm-2, corresponding to abundances of sime10-11. The similarity in abundances for all these species strongly suggest that they are formed on the surface of dust grains and ejected to the gas phase through non-thermal desorption processes, most likely cosmic rays or secondary photons. Nevertheless, laboratory experiments indicate that the CH3O isomer released to the gas phase is CH2OH rather than the methoxy one. Possible gas-phase formation routes to CH3O from OH and methanol are discussed. This work was based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  20. Planck intermediate results XXVIII. Interstellar gas and dust in the Chamaeleon clouds as seen by Fermi LAT and Planck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aniano, G.

    2015-01-01

    densities, NH, in the different gas phases, in particular at the dark neutral medium (DNM) transition between the H I-bright and CO-bright media; (ii) constrain the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, XCO; and (iii) probe the dust properties per gas nucleon in each phase and map their spatial variations across...... or equal to 0.9 and its mass often exceeds the one-third of the molecular mass expected by theory. The corrected A(VQ) extinction largely provides the best fit to the total gas traced by the γ rays. Nevertheless, we find evidence for a marked rise in AVQ/NH with increasing NH and molecular fraction......, and with decreasing dust temperature. The rise in τ353/NH is even steeper. We observe variations of lesser amplitude and orderliness for the specific power of the grains, except for a coherent decline by half in the CO cores. This combined information suggests grain evolution. We provide average values for the dust...

  1. Cloud Computing (4)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ 8 Case Study Cloud computing is still a new phenomenon. Although many IT giants are developing their own cloud computing infrastructures,platforms, software, and services, few have really succeeded in becoming cloud computing providers.

  2. Blue skies for CLOUD

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Through the recently approved CLOUD experiment, CERN will soon be contributing to climate research. Tests are being performed on the first prototype of CLOUD, an experiment designed to assess cosmic radiation influence on cloud formation.

  3. Cloud and Star Formation in Disk Galaxy Models with Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Shetty, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    We include feedback in global hydrodynamic simulations in order to study the star formation properties, and gas structure and dynamics, in models of galactic disks. We extend previous models by implementing feedback in gravitationally bound clouds: momentum is injected at a rate proportional to the star formation rate. This mechanical energy disperses cloud gas back into the surrounding ISM, truncating star formation in a given cloud, and raising the overall level of ambient turbulence. Propagating star formation can however occur as expanding shells collide, enhancing the density and triggering new cloud and star formation. By controlling the momentum injection per massive star and the specific star formation rate in dense gas, we find that the negative effects of high turbulence outweigh the positive ones, and in net feedback reduces the fraction of dense gas and thus the overall star formation rate. The properties of the large clouds that form are not, however, very sensitive to feedback, with cutoff masse...

  4. Molecular Cloud Evolution III. Accretion vs. stellar feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Gomez, Gilberto C; Watson, Alan

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigate the effect of feedback from the ionizing radiation heating from massive stars on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and their star formation efficiency (SFE). We find that the star-forming regions within the GMCs are invariably formed by gravitational contraction. After an initial period of contraction, the collapsing clouds begin forming stars, whose feedback evaporates part of the clouds' mass, opposing the continuing accretion from the infalling gas. The competition of accretion against dense gas consumption by star formation (SF) and evaporation by the feedback, regulates the clouds' mass and energy balance, as well as their SFE. We find that, in the presence of feedback, the clouds attain levels of the SFE that are consistent at all times with observational determinations for regions of comparable SF rates (SFRs). However, we observe that the dense gas mass is larger in general in the presence of feedback, while the total (dense gas + stars) is nearly insensitive to...

  5. Classification of four-dimensional real Lie bialgebras of symplectic type and their Poisson-Lie groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Fardad, J.; Rezaei-Aghdam, A.; Haghighatdoost, Gh.

    2017-01-01

    We classify all four-dimensional real Lie bialgebras of symplectic type and obtain the classical r-matrices for these Lie bialgebras and Poisson structures on all the associated four-dimensional Poisson-Lie groups. We obtain some new integrable models where a Poisson-Lie group plays the role of the phase space and its dual Lie group plays the role of the symmetry group of the system.

  6. Fingerprints in the clouds: identifying expected cloud responses to external forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, K.; Zelinka, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in cloud properties in response to external forcing affect the radiation budget of the Earth, which in turn affects the equilibrium climate response. Reconciling modeled and observed cloud trends is therefore crucial in understanding climate sensitivity and the response to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gas concentrations. While cloud responses differ greatly across models, errors in the locations of large-scale features can obscure even those physical processes that are robust across multiple models. We propose a method to track changes in cloud height, amount, and vertical profile across multiple models, and show that certain characteristics of the response are present in most models. This allows us to calculate a multidimensional fingerprint representing the characteristic cloud response to external forcing. We show how this fingerprint changes when various relevant forcing terms are included or excluded, and differentiate between models with high and low climate sensitivities. This represents an important first step toward detection and attribution of cloud trends.

  7. Radiation feedback in dusty clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ishiki, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the impact of photoionization and radiation pressure on a dusty star-forming cloud by one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, which include absorption and re-emission of photons by dust. We find that even in a moderately dusty cloud with the infrared optical depth of 0.15, radiation pressure has strong impact on driving an outflow, while the effect of radiation pressure is negligible in a dustless cloud. The radiation pressure on dust creates an HII region whose density is much lower than that in a dustless cloud where an outflow is driven by thermal pressure of ionized gas. Due to the radiation pressure, a shocked shell expands with high velocity, > 100 km s^-1. Absorption of re-emitted photons by dust plays a significant role in driving an outflow when the infrared optical depth becomes unity and it increases the importance of radiation pressure. The column density of clouds decreases with very short timescale owing to the shell expansion. Because of the decline of the infra...

  8. Cloud-Top Entrainment in Stratocumulus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Cloud entrainment, the mixing between cloudy and clear air at the boundary of clouds, constitutes one paradigm for the relevance of small scales in the Earth system: By regulating cloud lifetimes, meter- and submeter-scale processes at cloud boundaries can influence planetary-scale properties. Understanding cloud entrainment is difficult given the complexity and diversity of the associated phenomena, which include turbulence entrainment within a stratified medium, convective instabilities driven by radiative and evaporative cooling, shear instabilities, and cloud microphysics. Obtaining accurate data at the required small scales is also challenging, for both simulations and measurements. During the past few decades, however, high-resolution simulations and measurements have greatly advanced our understanding of the main mechanisms controlling cloud entrainment. This article reviews some of these advances, focusing on stratocumulus clouds, and indicates remaining challenges.

  9. Upgrade of the NASA 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) to its Full Science Capability of Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry in Airborne Science Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy R.; Russell, P.; Dunagan, S.; Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Flynn, C.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this task in the AITT (Airborne Instrument Technology Transition) Program are to (1) upgrade the NASA 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument to its full science capability of measuring (a) direct-beam sun transmission to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (b) sky radiance vs scattering angle to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index spectra, shape, and mode-resolved size distribution), (c) zenith radiance for cloud properties, and (d) hyperspectral signals for trace gas retrievals, and (2) demonstrate its suitability for deployment in challenging NASA airborne multiinstrument campaigns. 4STAR combines airborne sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith pointing with diffraction spectroscopy to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air pollution, radiant energy budgets (hence climate), and remote measurements of Earth's surfaces. Direct beam hyperspectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements are intended to tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. 4STAR test flights, as well as science flights in the 2012-13 TCAP (Two-Column Aerosol Project) and 2013 SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) have demonstrated that the following are essential for 4STAR to achieve its full science potential: (1) Calibration stability for both direct-beam irradiance and sky radiance, (2) Improved light collection and usage, and (3) Improved flight operability and reliability. A particular challenge

  10. Radiation feedback in dusty clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiki, Shohei; Okamoto, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the impact of photoionization and radiation pressure on a dusty star-forming cloud using one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, which include absorption and re-emission of photons by dust. We find that, in a cloud of mass 105 M⊙ and radius 17 pc, the effect of radiation pressure is negligible when star formation efficiency is 2 per cent. The importance of radiation pressure increases with increasing star formation efficiency or an increasing dust-to-gas mass ratio. The net effect of radiation feedback, however, becomes smaller with the increasing dust-to-gas mass ratio, since the absorption of ultraviolet photons by dust grains suppresses photoionization and hence photoheating.

  11. Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVore, P. T. S.; Jiang, Y.; Lynch, M.;

    2015-01-01

    Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths.......Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths....

  12. Comparison of cloud models for Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Ch; Allard, F; Dehn, M; Hauschildt, P; Homeier, D; Lodders, K; Marley, M; Rietmeijer, F; Tsuji, T; Woitke, P

    2007-01-01

    A test case comparison is presented for different dust cloud model approaches applied in brown dwarfs and giant gas planets. We aim to achieve more transparency in evaluating the uncertainty inherent to theoretical modelling. We show in how far model results for characteristic dust quantities vary due to different assumptions. We also demonstrate differences in the spectral energy distributions resulting from our individual cloud modelling in 1D substellar atmosphere simulations

  13. Almost-Riemannian Geometry on Lie Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ayala, Victor; Jouan, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A simple Almost-Riemmanian Structure on a Lie group G is defined by a linear vector field and dim(G)-1 left-invariant ones. We state results about the singular locus, the abnormal extremals and the desingularization of such ARS's, and these results are illustrated by examples on the 2D affine and the Heisenberg groups.These ARS's are extended in two ways to homogeneous spaces, and a necessary and sufficient condition for an ARS on a manifold to be equivalent to a general ARS on a homogeneous ...

  14. The graded Lie algebra of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Reiterer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We construct a graded Lie algebra in which a solution to the vacuum Einstein equations is any element of degree 1 whose bracket with itself is zero. Each solution generates a cochain complex, whose first cohomology is linearized gravity about that solution. We gauge-fix to get a smaller cochain complex with the same cohomologies (deformation retraction). The new complex is much smaller, it consists of the solution spaces of linear homogeneous wave equations (symmetric hyperbolic equations). The algorithm that produces these gauges and wave equations is both for linearized gravity and the full Einstein equations. The gauge groupoid is the groupoid of rank 2 complex vector bundles.

  15. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    1900-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  16. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  17. Identifying true satellites of the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Sales, Laura V; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Frenk, Carlos S

    2016-01-01

    The hierarchical nature of LCDM suggests that the Magellanic Clouds must have been surrounded by a number of satellites before their infall into the Milky Way. Many of those satellites should still be in close proximity to the Clouds, but some could have dispersed ahead/behind the Clouds along their Galactic orbit. Either way, prior association with the Clouds results in strong restrictions on the present-day positions and velocities of candidate Magellanic satellites: they must lie close to the nearly-polar orbital plane of the Magellanic stream, and their distances and radial velocities must follow the latitude dependence expected for a tidal stream with the Clouds at pericenter. We use a cosmological numerical simulation of the disruption of a massive subhalo in a Milky Way-sized LCDM halo to test whether any of the 20 dwarfs recently-discovered in the DES, SMASH, Pan-STARRS, and ATLAS surveys are truly associated with the Clouds. Of the 6 systems with kinematic data, only Hydra II and Hor 1 have distances...

  18. View angle dependence of cloud optical thicknesses retrieved by MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    This study examines whether cloud inhomogeneity influences the view angle dependence of MODIS cloud optical thickness (tau) retrieval results. The degree of cloud inhomogeneity is characterized through the local gradient in 11 microns brightness temperature. The analysis of liquid phase clouds in a one year long global dataset of Collection 4 MODIS data reveals that while optical thickness retrievals give remarkably consistent results for all view directions if clouds are homogeneous, they give much higher tau-values for oblique views than for overhead views if clouds are inhomogeneous and the sun is fairly oblique. For solar zenith angles larger than 55deg, the mean optical thickness retrieved for the most inhomogeneous third of cloudy pixels is more than 30% higher for oblique views than for overhead views. After considering a variety of possible scenarios, the paper concludes that the most likely reason for the increase lies in three-dimensional radiative interactions that are not considered in current, one-dimensional retrieval algorithms. Namely, the radiative effect of cloud sides viewed at oblique angles seems to contribute most to the enhanced tau-values. The results presented here will help understand cloud retrieval uncertainties related to cloud inhomogeneity. They complement the uncertainty estimates that will start accompanying MODIS cloud products in Collection 5 and may eventually help correct for the observed view angle dependent biases.

  19. OH+ in Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, A. J.; Federman, S. R.; Welty, D. E.; Ritchey, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Near ultraviolet observations of OH+ and OH in diffuse molecular clouds reveal a preference for different environments. The dominant absorption feature in OH+ arises from a main component seen in CH+ (that with the highest CH+/CH column density ratio), while OH follows CN absorption. This distinction provides new constraints on OH chemistry in these clouds. Since CH+ detections favor low-density gas with small fractions of molecular hydrogen, this must be true for OH+ as well, confirming OH+ and H2O+ observations with the Herschel Space Telescope. Our observed correspondence indicates that the cosmic ray ionization rate derived from these measurements pertains to mainly atomic gas. The association of OH absorption with gas rich in CN is attributed to the need for a high enough density and molecular fraction before detectable amounts are seen. Thus, while OH+ leads to OH production, chemical arguments suggest that their abundances are controlled by different sets of conditions and that they coexist with different sets of observed species. Of particular note is that non-thermal chemistry appears to play a limited role in the synthesis of OH in diffuse molecular clouds.

  20. Fermionic realisations of simple Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    de Azcárraga, J A

    2000-01-01

    We study the representation ${\\cal D}$ of a simple compact Lie algebra $\\g$ of rank l constructed with the aid of the hermitian Dirac matrices of a (${\\rm dim} \\g$)-dimensional euclidean space. The irreducible representations of $\\g$ contained in ${\\cal D}$ are found by providing a general construction on suitable fermionic Fock spaces. We give full details not only for the simplest odd and even cases, namely su(2) and su(3), but also for the next (${dim} \\g$)-even case of su(5). Our results are far reaching: they apply to any $\\g$-invariant quantum mechanical system containing ${\\rm dim} \\g$ fermions. Another reason for undertaking this study is to examine the role of the $\\g$-invariant fermionic operators that naturally arise. These are given in terms of products of an odd number of gamma matrices, and include, besides a cubic operator, (l-1) fermionic scalars of higher order. The latter are constructed from the Lie algebra cohomology cocycles, and must be considered to be of theoretical significance simila...

  1. On the Feasibility of a Network Coded Mobile Storage Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sipos, Marton A.; Fitzek, Frank; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    Conventional cloud storage services offer relatively good reliability and performance in a cost-effective manner. However, they are typically structured in a centralized and highly controlled fashion. In more dynamic storage scenarios, these centralized approaches are unfeasible and developing...... decentralized storage approaches becomes critical. The novelty of this paper is the introduction of the highly dynamic distributed mobile cloud, which uses free resources on user devices to move storage to the edges of the network. At the core of our approach, lies the use of random linear network coding...... to simulate the processes governing user behavior to show feasibility of mobile storage clouds in real scenarios....

  2. Molecular cloud evolution - V. Cloud destruction by stellar feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín, Pedro; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Gómez, Gilberto C.

    2013-10-01

    We present a numerical study of the evolution of molecular clouds, from their formation by converging flows in the warm interstellar medium, to their destruction by the ionizing feedback of the massive stars they form. We improve with respect to our previous simulations by including a different stellar-particle formation algorithm, which allows them to have masses corresponding to single stars rather than to small clusters, and with a mass distribution following a near-Salpeter stellar initial mass function. We also employ a simplified radiative-transfer algorithm that allows the stellar particles to feedback on the medium at a rate that depends on their mass and the local density. Our results are as follows: (a) contrary to the results from our previous study, where all stellar particles injected energy at a rate corresponding to a star of ˜10 M⊙, the dense gas is now completely evacuated from 10 pc regions around the stars within 10-20 Myr, suggesting that this feat is accomplished essentially by the most massive stars. (b) At the scale of the whole numerical simulations, the dense gas mass is reduced by up to an order of magnitude, although star formation (SF) never shuts off completely, indicating that the feedback terminates SF locally, but new SF events continue to occur elsewhere in the clouds. (c) The SF efficiency (SFE) is maintained globally at the ˜10 per cent level, although locally, the cloud with largest degree of focusing of its accretion flow reaches SFE ˜30 per cent. (d) The virial parameter of the clouds approaches unity before the stellar feedback begins to dominate the dynamics, becoming much larger once feedback dominates, suggesting that clouds become unbound as a consequence of the stellar feedback, rather than unboundness being the cause of a low SFE. (e) The erosion of the filaments that feed the star-forming clumps produces chains of isolated dense blobs reminiscent of those observed in the vicinity of the dark globule B68.

  3. The formation of molecular clouds in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, C L

    2006-01-01

    We present Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of molecular cloud formation in spiral galaxies. These simulations model the response of a non-self-gravitating gaseous disk to a galactic potential. The formation of molecular gas occurs when cold ($T \\le 100$ K) gas is compressed during the passage of a spiral arm. The spiral arms display considerable structure and the molecular gas accumulates into dense clouds. We identify the formation of these structures as due to the dynamics of clumpy shocks, which perturb the orbits of particles passing through the spiral arm. In addition, the spiral shocks induce a large velocity dispersion in the spiral arms, comparable with the magnitude of the velocity dispersion observed in molecular clouds. The molecular clouds are largely confined to the spiral arms, since most molecular gas is photodissociated to atomic hydrogen upon leaving the arms. However a low photodissociation rate increases the amount of interarm molecular gas, and the possibility of molecula...

  4. What can simulated molecular clouds tell us about real molecular clouds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Cabral, A.; Dobbs, C. L.

    2016-06-01

    We study the properties of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of a portion of a spiral galaxy, modelled at high resolution, with robust representations of the physics of the interstellar medium. We examine the global molecular gas content of clouds, and investigate the effect of using CO or H2 densities to define the GMCs. We find that CO can reliably trace the high-density H2 gas, but misses less dense H2 clouds. We also investigate the effect of using 3D CO densities versus CO emission with an observer's perspective, and find that CO-emission clouds trace well the peaks of the actual GMCs in 3D, but can miss the lower density molecular gas between density peaks which is often CO-dark. Thus, the CO emission typically traces smaller clouds within larger GMC complexes. We also investigate the effect of the galactic environment (in particular the presence of spiral arms), on the distribution of GMC properties, and we find that the mean properties are similar between arm and inter-arm clouds, but the tails of some distributions are indicative of intrinsic differences in the environment. We find highly filamentary clouds (similar to the giant molecular filaments of our Galaxy) exclusively in the inter-arm region, formed by galactic shear. We also find that the most massive GMC complexes are located in the arm, and that as a consequence of more frequent cloud interactions/mergers in the arm, arm clouds are more sub-structured and have higher velocity dispersions than inter-arm clouds.

  5. Uncertainty Principles on Two Step Nilpotent Lie Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Ray

    2001-08-01

    We extend an uncertainty principle due to Cowling and Price to two step nilpotent Lie groups, which generalizes a classical theorem of Hardy. We also prove an analogue of Heisenberg inequality on two step nilpotent Lie groups.

  6. Pants on fire: the electrophysiological signature of telling a lie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Roland; Foerster, Anna; Kunde, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Even though electroencephalography has played a prominent role for lie detection via personally relevant information, the electrophysiological signature of active lying is still elusive. We addressed this signature with two experiments in which participants helped a virtual police officer to locate a knife. Crucially, before this response, they announced whether they would lie or tell the truth about the knife's location. This design allowed us to study the signature of lie-telling in the absence of rare and personally significant oddball stimuli that are typically used for lie detection via electrophysiological markers, especially the P300 component. Our results indicate that active lying attenuated P300 amplitudes as well as N200 amplitudes for such non-oddball stimuli. These results support accounts that stress the high cognitive demand of lie-telling, including the need to suppress the truthful response and to generate a lie.

  7. Cloud Computing (1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Editor's Desk: Cloud computing is a topic of intense interest in the Internet field. Major IT giants have launched their own cloud computing products. This four-part lecture series will discuss cloud computing technology in the following aspects: The first part provides a brief description of the origin and characteristics of cloud computing from the users view of point; the other parts introduce typical applications of cloud computing, technically analyze the specific content within the cloud, its components, architecture and computational paradigm, compare cloud computing to other distributed computing technologies, and discuss its successful cases, commercial models, related technical and economic issues, and development trends.

  8. Cloud Computing (2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Editor's Desk: Cloud computing is a topic of intense interest in the Internet field. Major IT giants have launched their own cloud computing products. This four-part lecture series discusses cloud computing technology in the following aspects: The first part provided a brief description of the origin and characteristics of cloud computing from the users view of point; the other parts introduce typical applications of cloud computing, technically analyze the specific content within the cloud, its components, architecture and computational paradigm, compare cloud computing to other distributed computing technologies, and discuss its successful cases, commercial models, related technical and economic issues, and development trends.

  9. Cloud storage for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Linda; Loughlin, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    Understand cloud computing and save your organization time and money! Cloud computing is taking IT by storm, but what is it and what are the benefits to your organization? Hitachi Data Systems' Cloud Storage For Dummies provides all the answers, With this book, you discover a clear explanation of cloud storage, and tips for how to choose the right type of cloud storage for your organization's needs. You also find out how cloud storage can free up valuable IT resources, saving time and money. Cloud Storage For Dummies presents useful information on setting up a

  10. Robots and sensor clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Shakshuki, Elhadi

    2016-01-01

    This book comprises four chapters that address some of the latest research in clouds robotics and sensor clouds. The first part of the book includes two chapters on cloud robotics. The first chapter introduces a novel resource allocation framework for cloud robotics and proposes a Stackelberg game model and the corresponding task oriented pricing mechanism for resource allocation. In the second chapter, the authors apply Cloud Computing for building a Cloud-Based 3D Point Cloud extractor for stereo images. Their objective is to have a dynamically scalable and applicable to near real-time scenarios.  .

  11. Twisted Hamiltonian Lie Algebras and Their Multiplicity-Free Representations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling CHEN

    2011-01-01

    We construct a class of new Lie algebras by generalizing the one-variable Lie algebras generated by the quadratic conformal algebras (or corresponding Hamiltonian operators) associated with Poisson algebras and a quasi-derivation found by Xu. These algebras can be viewed as certain twists of Xu's generalized Hamiltonian Lie algebras. The simplicity of these algebras is completely determined. Moreover, we construct a family of multiplicity-free representations of these Lie algebras and prove their irreducibility.

  12. The influence of dense gas rings on the dynamics of a stellar disk in the Galactic center

    CERN Document Server

    Trani, Alessandro Alberto; Bressan, Alessandro; Pelupessy, Federico Inti; van Elteren, Arjen; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic center hosts several hundred early-type stars, about 20% of which lie in the so-called clockwise disk, while the remaining 80% do not belong to any disks. The circumnuclear ring (CNR), a ring of molecular gas that orbits the supermassive black hole (SMBH) with a radius of 1.5 pc, has been claimed to induce precession and Kozai-Lidov oscillations onto the orbits of stars in the innermost parsec. We investigate the perturbations exerted by a gas ring on a nearly-Keplerian stellar disk orbiting a SMBH by means of combined direct N-body and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. We simulate the formation of gas rings through the infall and disruption of a molecular gas cloud, adopting different inclinations between the infalling gas cloud and the stellar disk. We find that a CNR-like ring is not efficient in affecting the stellar disk on a timescale of 3 Myr. In contrast, a gas ring in the innermost 0.5 pc induces precession of the longitude of the ascending node Omega, significantly affecting ...

  13. Identifying true satellites of the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Laura V.; Navarro, Julio F.; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2017-02-01

    The hierarchical nature of ΛCDM suggests that the Magellanic Clouds must have been surrounded by a number of satellites before their infall into the Milky Way halo. Many of those satellites should still be in close proximity to the Clouds, but some could have dispersed ahead/behind the Clouds along their Galactic orbit. Either way, prior association with the Clouds constrains the present-day positions and velocities of candidate Magellanic satellites: they must lie close to the nearly polar orbital plane of the Magellanic Stream, and their distances and radial velocities must follow the latitude dependence expected for a tidal stream with the Clouds near pericentre. We use a cosmological numerical simulation of the disruption of a massive sub-halo in a Milky Way-sized ΛCDM halo to test whether any of the 20 dwarfs recently discovered in the Dark Energy Survey, the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History, Pan-STARRS, and ATLAS surveys are truly associated with the Clouds. Of the six systems with kinematic data, only Hor 1 has distance and radial velocities consistent with a Magellanic origin. Of the remaining dwarfs, six (Hor 2, Eri 3, Ret 3, Tuc 4, Tuc 5, and Phx 2) have positions and distances consistent with a Magellanic origin, but kinematic data are needed to substantiate that possibility. Conclusive evidence for association would require proper motions to constrain the orbital angular momentum direction, which, for true Magellanic satellites, must be similar to that of the Clouds. We use this result to predict radial velocities and proper motions for all new dwarfs, assuming that they were Magellanic satellites. Our results are relatively insensitive to the assumption of first or second pericentre for the Clouds.

  14. The CLOUD experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiment as shown by Jasper Kirkby (spokesperson). Kirkby shows a sketch to illustrate the possible link between galactic cosmic rays and cloud formations. The CLOUD experiment uses beams from the PS accelerator at CERN to simulate the effect of cosmic rays on cloud formations in the Earth's atmosphere. It is thought that cosmic ray intensity is linked to the amount of low cloud cover due to the formation of aerosols, which induce condensation.

  15. Cloud Computing (3)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Editor's Desk: In the preceding two parts of this series, several aspects of cloud computing-including definition, classification, characteristics, typical applications, and service levels-were discussed. This part continues with a discussion of Cloud Computing Oopen Architecture and Market-Oriented Cloud. A comparison is made between cloud computing and other distributed computing technologies, and Google's cloud platform is analyzed to determine how distributed computing is implemented in its particular model.

  16. Cloud Robotics Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busra Koken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud robotics is a rapidly evolving field that allows robots to offload computation-intensive and storage-intensive jobs into the cloud. Robots are limited in terms of computational capacity, memory and storage. Cloud provides unlimited computation power, memory, storage and especially collaboration opportunity. Cloud-enabled robots are divided into two categories as standalone and networked robots. This article surveys cloud robotic platforms, standalone and networked robotic works such as grasping, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM and monitoring.

  17. Convective dust clouds in a complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mitic, S; Ivlev, A V; Hoefner, H; Thoma, M H; Zhdanov, S; Morfill, G E

    2008-01-01

    The plasma is generated in a low frequency glow discharge within an elongated glass tube oriented vertically. The dust particles added to the plasma are confined above the heater and form counter-rotating clouds close to the tube centre. The shape of the clouds and the velocity field of the conveying dust particles are determined. The forces acting on the particles are calculated. It is shown that convection of the dust is affected by the convective gas motion which is triggered, in turn, by thermal creep of the gas along the inhomogeneously heated walls of the tube.

  18. A new model for quasar absorption clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G. (Academy of Sciences of USSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. of Applied Mathematics); Muecket, J.P.; Mueller, V. (Academy of Sciences of GDR, Potsdam (German Democratic Republic). Central Inst. for Astrophysics)

    1990-09-15

    A local model for intervening absorption clouds in quasar spectra is discussed. At the boundary of cold clouds in the hot intergalactic gas a non-linear temperature profile results from electron heat conductivity and radiative energy losses both depending on ionization rates. This transition region causes the excitation of a wide range of ionization levels in the heavy elements of the gas. The predicted column densities along the line-of-sight are comparable with data from identified metal absorption systems at high redshifts. (author).

  19. Lie symmetries and differential galois groups of linear equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, W.R.; Put, M. van der

    2002-01-01

    For a linear ordinary differential equation the Lie algebra of its infinitesimal Lie symmetries is compared with its differential Galois group. For this purpose an algebraic formulation of Lie symmetries is developed. It turns out that there is no direct relation between the two above objects. In co

  20. 33 CFR 401.92 - Wintering and lying-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wintering and lying-up. 401.92... OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations General § 401.92 Wintering and lying-up. No vessel shall winter within the Seaway or lie-up within the Seaway during the navigation...

  1. Lie Pseudogroups à la Cartan from a Modern Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudilevich, O.

    2016-01-01

    In 1904-05, the mathematician Élie Cartan published two pioneer papers in which he introduced a structure theory for Lie pseudogroups. Lie pseudogroups are mathematical objects that appear in both differential geometry and in the theory of differential equations as local symmetries of geometric stru

  2. Graded Lie Algebra Generating of Parastatistical Algebraic Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Si-Cong; YANG Wei-Min; LI Ping

    2001-01-01

    A new kind of graded Lie algebra (We call it Z2,2 graded Lie algebra) is introduced as a framework for formulating parasupersymmetric theories. By choosing suitable Bose subspace of the Z2,2 graded Lie algebra and using relevant generalized Jacobi identities, we generate the whole algebraic structure of parastatistics.

  3. Extremal projectors for contragredient Lie (super)symmetries (short review)

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstoy, V N

    2010-01-01

    A brief review of the extremal projectors for contragredient Lie (super)symmetries (finite-dimensional simple Lie algebras, basic classical Lie superalgebras, infinite-dimensional affine Kac-Moody algebras and superalgebras, as well as their quantum $q$-analogs) is given. Some bibliographic comments on the applications of extremal projectors are presented.

  4. Focal sampling of cow lying behaviour for automated welfare assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattachini, G.; Riva, E.; Bisaglia, C.; Pompe, J.C.A.M.; Provolo, G.

    2013-01-01

    the objective of the current study was to determine the number of focal animals required to represent the daily lying behaviour of a herd of lactating dairy cows. the study was carried out at 3 commercial dairy farms. the lying time (h/d) and number of lying bouts (n/d) of 15 ± 3 focal dairy cows,

  5. Universal representations of Lie algebras by coderivations

    OpenAIRE

    Petracci, Emanuela

    2003-01-01

    A class of representations of a Lie superalgebra (over a commutative superring) in its symmetric algebra is studied. As an application we get a direct and natural proof of a strong form of the Poincare'-Birkhoff-Witt theorem, extending this theorem to a class of nilpotent Lie superalgebras. Other applications are presented. Our results are new already for Lie algebras.

  6. Lie symmetry algebra of one-dimensional nonconservative dynamical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Cui-Mei; Wu Run-Heng; Fu Jing-Li

    2007-01-01

    Lie symmetry algebra of linear nonconservative dynamical systems is studied in this paper. By using 1-1 mapping,the Lie point and Lie contact symmetry algebras are obtained from two independent solutions of the one-dimensional linear equations of motion.

  7. Central Extension for the Triangular Derivation Lie Algebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunming LI; Ping XU

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study a class of subalgebras of the Lie algebra of vector fields on n-dimensional torus,which are called the Triangular derivation Lie algebra.We give the structure and the central extension of Triangular derivation Lie algebra.

  8. Construction of Difference Equations Using Lie Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    The theory of prolongations of the generators of groups of point transformations to the grid point values of dependent variables and grid spacings is developed and applied to the construction of group invariant numerical algorithms. The concepts of invariant difference operators and generalized discrete sources are introduced for the discretization of systems of inhomogeneous differential equations and shown to produce exact difference equations. Invariant numerical flux functions are constructed from the general solutions of first order partial differential equations that come out of the evaluation of the Lie derivatives of conservation forms of difference schemes. It is demonstrated that invariant numerical flux functions with invariant flux or slope limiters can be determined to yield high resolution difference schemes. The introduction of an invariant flux or slope limiter can be done so as not to break the symmetry properties of a numerical flux-function.

  9. [Counter-acception or abort and lie].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruani, G

    1979-09-01

    In this very short but fiery and violent paper against abortion the author states that most women seeking abortion are actually lying to themselves, pretending they want something which, in reality, they do not want, i.e. an abortion. The laws regulating abortion in most countries are such that a woman is practically forbidden to make an independent decision, despite, or because of the number of counseling sessions and of meetings with doctors that she must go through. Radio, television, newspapers and magazines, friends and relatives, all contribute to make of abortion a run-of-the-mill operation, while it should be seen as scandal, and as the total negation of any maternal instinct.

  10. Lie algebraic noncommuting structures from reparametrisation symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Gangopadhyay, S

    2007-01-01

    We extend our earlier work of revealing both space-space and space-time noncommuting structures in various models in particle mechanics exhibiting reparametrisation symmetry. We show explicitly (in contrast to the earlier results in our paper \\cite{sg}) that for some special choices of the reparametrisation parameter $\\epsilon$, one can obtain space-space noncommuting structures which are Lie-algebraic in form even in the case of the relativistic free particle. The connection of these structures with the existing models in the literature is also briefly discussed. Further, there exists some values of $\\epsilon$ for which the noncommutativity in the space-space sector can be made to vanish. As a matter of internal consistency of our approach, we also study the angular momentum algebra in details.

  11. On Quantum Lie Nilpotency of Order 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kireeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the free algebras of varieties of associative algebras modulo identities of quantum Lie nilpotency of order 1 and 2. Let q be an invertible element of the ground field K (or of its extension. The element[x,y]q = xy-qyxof the free associative algebra is called a quantum commutator. We consider the algebras modulo identities                                                           [x,y]q = 0                                             (1and                                                      [[x,y]q ,z]q = 0.                                       (2It is natural to consider the aforementioned algebras as the quantum analogs of commutative algebras and algebras of Lie nilpotency of order 2. The free algebras of the varieties of associative algebras modulo the identity of Lie nilpotency of order 2, that is the identity[[x,y] ,z] =0,where [x,y]=xy-yx is a Lie commutator, are of great interest in the theory of algebras with polynomial identities, since it was proved by A.V.Grishin for algebras over fields of characteristic 2, and V.V.Shchigolev for algebras over fields of characteristic p>2, that these algebras contain non-finitely generated T-spaces.We prove in the paper that the algebras modulo identities (1 and (2 are nilpotent in the usual sense and calculate precisely the nilpotency order of these algebras. More precisely, we prove that the free algebra of the variety of associative algebras modulo identity (1 is nilpotent of order 2 if q ≠ ± 1, and nilpotent of order 3 if q = - 1 and the characteristic of K is not equal to 2. It is also proved that the free algebra of the variety of associative algebras modulo identity (2 is nilpotent of order 3 if q3 ≠ 1, q ≠ ± 1, nilpotent of order 4 if q3 = 1, q ≠ 1, and nilpotent of

  12. Detecting Children's Lies: Are Parents Accurate Judges of Their Own Children's Lies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Victoria; Renaud, Sarah-Jane; Conway, Lauryn

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated whether parents are accurate judges of their own children's lie-telling behavior. Participants included 250 mother-child dyads. Children were between three and 11 years of age. A temptation resistance paradigm was used to elicit a minor transgressive behavior from the children involving peeking at a forbidden toy and…

  13. Detecting Children's Lies: Are Parents Accurate Judges of Their Own Children's Lies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Victoria; Renaud, Sarah-Jane; Conway, Lauryn

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated whether parents are accurate judges of their own children's lie-telling behavior. Participants included 250 mother-child dyads. Children were between three and 11 years of age. A temptation resistance paradigm was used to elicit a minor transgressive behavior from the children involving peeking at a forbidden toy and…

  14. Gas in Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Reynolds, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) can be thought of as the galactic atmosphere which fills the space between stars. When clouds within the ISM collapse, stars are born. When the stars die, they return their matter to the surrounding gas. Therefore the ISM plays a vital role in galactic evolution. The medium includes starlight, gas, dust, planets, comets, asteroids, fast moving charged particles (cosmic rays) and magnetic fields. The gas can be further divided into hot, warm and cold components, e...

  15. Temperature Evolution of Molecular Clouds in the Central Molecular Zone

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Nico; Walter, Fabian; Kruijssen, J M Diederik; Beuther, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    We infer the absolute time dependence of kinematic gas temperature along a proposed orbit of molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of the Galactic Center (GC). Ammonia gas temperature maps are one of the results of the "Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center" (SWAG, PI: J. Ott); the dynamical model of molecular clouds in the CMZ was taken from Kruijssen et al. (2015). We find that gas temperatures increase as a function of time in both regimes before and after the cloud passes pericenter on its orbit in the GC potential. This is consistent with the recent proposal that pericenter passage triggers gravitational collapse. Other investigated quantities (line width, column density, opacity) show no strong sign of time dependence but are likely dominated by cloud-to-cloud variations.

  16. Tidally-disrupted Molecular Clouds falling to the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuboi, Masato; Uehara, Kenta; Miyawaki, Ryosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We found a molecular cloud connecting from the outer region to the "Galactic Center Mini-spiral (GCMS)" which is a bundle of the ionized gas streams adjacent to Sgr A*. The molecular cloud has a filamentary appearance which is prominent in the CS J=2-1 emission line and is continuously connected with the GCMS. The velocity of the molecular cloud is also continuously connected with that of the ionized gas in the GCMS observed in the H42alpha recombination line. The morphological and kinematic relations suggest that the molecular cloud is falling from the outer region to the vicinity of Sgr A*, being disrupted by the tidal shear of Sgr A* and ionized by UV emission from the Central Cluster. We also found the SiO J=2-1 emission in the boundary area between the filamentary molecular cloud and the GCMS. There seems to exist shocked gas in the boundary area.

  17. Cloud condensation nuclei as a modulator of ice processes in Arctic mixed-phase clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lance

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose that cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations are important for modulating ice formation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds, through modification of the droplet size distribution. Aircraft observations from the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC study in northern Alaska in April 2008 allow for identification and characterization of both aerosol and trace gas pollutants, which are then compared with cloud microphysical properties. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the concentration of precipitating ice particles (>400 μm is correlated with the concentration of large droplets (>30 μm. We are further able to link the observed microphysical conditions to aerosol pollution, originating mainly from long range transport of biomass burning emissions. The case studies demonstrate that polluted mixed-phase clouds have narrower droplet size distributions and contain 1–2 orders of magnitude fewer precipitating ice particles than clean clouds at the same temperature. This suggests an aerosol indirect effect leading to greater cloud lifetime, greater cloud emissivity, and reduced precipitation. This result is opposite to the glaciation indirect effect, whereby polluted clouds are expected to precipitate more readily due to an increase in the concentration of particles acting as IN.

  18. Cloud condensation nuclei as a modulator of ice processes in Arctic mixed-phase clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, S.; Shupe, M. D.; Feingold, G.; Brock, C. A.; Cozic, J.; Holloway, J. S.; Moore, R. H.; Nenes, A.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Brioude, J.; Cooper, O. R.; Stohl, A.; Burkhart, J. F.

    2011-08-01

    We propose that cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations are important for modulating ice formation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds, through modification of the droplet size distribution. Aircraft observations from the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC) study in northern Alaska in April 2008 allow for identification and characterization of both aerosol and trace gas pollutants, which are then compared with cloud microphysical properties. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the concentration of precipitating ice particles (>400 μm) is correlated with the concentration of large droplets (>30 μm). We are further able to link the observed microphysical conditions to aerosol pollution, originating mainly from long range transport of biomass burning emissions. The case studies demonstrate that polluted mixed-phase clouds have narrower droplet size distributions and contain 1-2 orders of magnitude fewer precipitating ice particles than clean clouds at the same temperature. This suggests an aerosol indirect effect leading to greater cloud lifetime, greater cloud emissivity, and reduced precipitation. This result is opposite to the glaciation indirect effect, whereby polluted clouds are expected to precipitate more readily due to an increase in the concentration of particles acting as ice nuclei.

  19. Cloud condensation nuclei as a modulator of ice processes in Arctic mixed-phase clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lance

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose that cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations are important for modulating ice formation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds, through modification of the droplet size distribution. Aircraft observations from the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC study in northern Alaska in April 2008 allow for identification and characterization of both aerosol and trace gas pollutants, which are then compared with cloud microphysical properties. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the concentration of precipitating ice particles (>400 μm is correlated with the concentration of large droplets (>30 μm. We are further able to link the observed microphysical conditions to aerosol pollution, originating mainly from long range transport of biomass burning emissions. The case studies demonstrate that polluted mixed-phase clouds have narrower droplet size distributions and contain 1–2 orders of magnitude fewer precipitating ice particles than clean clouds at the same temperature. This suggests an aerosol indirect effect leading to greater cloud lifetime, greater cloud emissivity, and reduced precipitation. This result is opposite to the glaciation indirect effect, whereby polluted clouds are expected to precipitate more readily due to an increase in the concentration of particles acting as ice nuclei.

  20. X-rays associated with the jet-cloud interacting radio galaxy 3C 277.3 (Coma A): implications for energy deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Worrall, D M; Young, A J

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery with Chandra of X-ray-emitting gas associated with the jet-cloud interaction in the radio galaxy 3C 277.3 (Coma A), a source that falls in the most important power range for radio-mode feedback in the Universe. This hot gas, heated by the jet, dominates the mass of the cloud which is responsible for an extreme projected deflection of the kpc-scale radio jet. Highly absorbed X-ray emission from the nucleus of 3C 277.3 confirms that the jet lies close to the plane of the sky and so has a large intrinsic deflection. We detect group gas on the scale of the radio lobes, and see X-ray cavities coincident with the brightest radio emission, with the lobes embraced by X-ray enhancements that we argue are the result of shocks. The anti-correlation between the locations of X-ray arms and H$\\alpha$-emitting filaments that are believed to have originated from a merger with one or more gas-rich galaxies suggests that shocks advancing around the lobe are inhibited by the dense colder material. Synchr...