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Sample records for lwr core materials

  1. Molten LWR core material interactions with water and with concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlgren, D.A.; Buxton, L.D.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.B.; Nelson, L.S.; Powers, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors are designed and operated to minimize the possibility of fuel melting. Nevertheless, in order to assess the risks associated with reactor operation, a realistic assessment is required for postulated accident sequences in which melting occurs. To investigate the experimental basis of the fuel melt accident analyses, a comprehensive review was performed at Sandia Laboratories. The results of that study indicated several phenomenological areas where additional experimental data should be gathered to verify common assumptions made in risk studies. In particular, vapor explosions and molten core material/concrete interactions were identified for further study. Results of these studies are presented

  2. Behaviour of LWR core materials under accident conditions. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    At the invitation of the Government of the Russian Federation, following a proposal of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology, the IAEA convened a Technical Committee Meeting on Behaviour of LWR Core Materials Under Accident Conditions from 9 to 13 October 1995 in Dimitrovgrad to analyze and evaluate the behaviour of LWR core materials under accident conditions with special emphasis on severe accidents. In-vessel severe accidents phenomena were considered in detail, but specialized thermal hydraulic aspects as well as ex-vessel phenomena were outside the scope of the meeting. Forty participants representing eight countries attended the meeting. Twenty-three papers were presented and discussed during five sessions. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. In-core materials testing under LWR conditions in the Halden reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.J.; Hauso, E.; Hoegberg, N.W.; Karlsen, T.M.; McGrath, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Halden boiling water reactor (HBWR) has been in operation since 1958. It is a test reactor with a maximum power of 18 MW and is cooled and moderated by boiling heavy water, with a normal operating temperature of 230 C and a pressure of 34 bar. In the past 15 years increasing emphasis has been placed on materials testing, both of in-core structural materials and fuel claddings. These tests require representative light water reactor (LWR) conditions, which are achieved by housing the test rigs in pressure flasks that are positioned in fuel channels in the reactor and connected to dedicated water loops, in which boiling water reactor (BWR) or pressurised water reactor (PWR) conditions are simulated. Understanding of the in-core behaviour of fuel or reactor materials can be greatly improved by on-line measurements during power operation. The Halden Project has performed in-pile measurements for a period of over 35 years, beginning with fuel temperature measurements using thermocouples and use of differential transformers for measurement of fuel pellet or cladding dimensional changes and internal rod pressure. Experience gained over this period has been applied to on-line instrumentation for use in materials tests. This paper gives details of the systems used at Halden for materials testing under LWR conditions. The techniques used to provide on-line data are described and illustrative results are presented. (authors)

  4. In-core materials testing under LWR conditions in the Halden reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, P.J.; Hauso, E.; Hoegberg, N.W.; Karlsen, T.M.; McGrath, M.A. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    The Halden boiling water reactor (HBWR) has been in operation since 1958. It is a test reactor with a maximum power of 18 MW and is cooled and moderated by boiling heavy water, with a normal operating temperature of 230 C and a pressure of 34 bar. In the past 15 years increasing emphasis has been placed on materials testing, both of in-core structural materials and fuel claddings. These tests require representative light water reactor (LWR) conditions, which are achieved by housing the test rigs in pressure flasks that are positioned in fuel channels in the reactor and connected to dedicated water loops, in which boiling water reactor (BWR) or pressurised water reactor (PWR) conditions are simulated. Understanding of the in-core behaviour of fuel or reactor materials can be greatly improved by on-line measurements during power operation. The Halden Project has performed in-pile measurements for a period of over 35 years, beginning with fuel temperature measurements using thermocouples and use of differential transformers for measurement of fuel pellet or cladding dimensional changes and internal rod pressure. Experience gained over this period has been applied to on-line instrumentation for use in materials tests. This paper gives details of the systems used at Halden for materials testing under LWR conditions. The techniques used to provide on-line data are described and illustrative results are presented. (authors)

  5. Estimation of irradiation-induced material damage measure of FCM fuel in LWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Chungchan; Park, Sang-Yoon; Cho, Jin-Young; Chang, Jonghwa; Lee, Won Jae

    2014-01-01

    An irradiation-induced material damage measure on tri-isotropic (TRISO) multi-coating layers of fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel to replace conventional uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel for existing light water reactors (LWRs) has been estimated using a displacement per atom (DPA) cross section for a FCM fuel performance analysis. The DPA cross sections in 47 and 190 energy groups for both silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite are generated based on the molecular dynamics simulation by SRIM/TRIM. For the selected FCM fuel assembly design with FeCrAl cladding, a core depletion analysis was carried out using the DeCART2D/MASTER code system with the prepared DPA cross sections to evaluate the irradiation effect in the Korean OPR-1000. The DPA of the SiC and IPyC coating layers is estimated by comparing the discharge burnup obtained from the MASTER calculation with the burnup-dependent DPA for each coating layer calculated using DeCART2D. The results show that low uranium loading and hardened neutron spectrum compared to that of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) result in high discharge burnup and high fast neutron fluence. In conclusion, it can be seen that the irradiation-induced material damage measure is noticeably increased under LWR operating conditions compared to HTGRs. (author)

  6. LWR-core behaviour project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paratte, J.M.

    1982-07-01

    The LWR-Core behaviour project concerns the mathematical simulation of a light water reactor in normal operation (emergency situations excluded). Computational tools are assembled, i.e. programs and libraries of data. These computational tools can likewise be used in nuclear power applications, industry and control applications. The project is divided into three parts: the development and application of calculation methods for quantisation determination of LWR physics; investigation of the behaviour of nuclear fuels under radiation with special attention to higher burnup; simulation of the operating transients of nuclear power stations. (A.N.K.)

  7. Down-selection of candidate alloys for further testing of advanced replacement materials for LWR core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Applied Physics Program; Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Life extension of the existing nuclear reactors imposes irradiation of high fluences to structural materials, resulting in significant challenges to the traditional reactor materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Advanced alloys with superior radiation resistance will increase safety margins, design flexibility, and economics for not only the life extension of the existing fleet but also new builds with advanced reactor designs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teamed up with Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program to initiate the Advanced Radiation Resistant Materials (ARRM) program, aiming to identify and develop advanced alloys with superior degradation resistance in light water reactor (LWR)-relevant environments by 2024.

  8. Results of LWR core transient benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnemann, H.; Bauer, H.; Galati, A.; Martinelli, R.

    1993-10-01

    LWR core transient (LWRCT) benchmarks, based on well defined problems with a complete set of input data, are used to assess the discrepancies between three-dimensional space-time kinetics codes in transient calculations. The PWR problem chosen is the ejection of a control assembly from an initially critical core at hot zero power or at full power, each for three different geometrical configurations. The set of problems offers a variety of reactivity excursions which efficiently test the coupled neutronic/thermal - hydraulic models of the codes. The 63 sets of submitted solutions are analyzed by comparison with a nodal reference solution defined by using a finer spatial and temporal resolution than in standard calculations. The BWR problems considered are reactivity excursions caused by cold water injection and pressurization events. In the present paper, only the cold water injection event is discussed and evaluated in some detail. Lacking a reference solution the evaluation of the 8 sets of BWR contributions relies on a synthetic comparative discussion. The results of this first phase of LWRCT benchmark calculations are quite satisfactory, though there remain some unresolved issues. It is therefore concluded that even more challenging problems can be successfully tackled in a suggested second test phase. (authors). 46 figs., 21 tabs., 3 refs

  9. Modular approach to LWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urli, N.; Pevec, D.; Coffou, E.; Petrovic, B.

    1980-01-01

    The most important methods in the LWR in-core fuel management are reviewed. A modular approach and optimization by use of infinite multiplication factor and power form-factor are favoured. A computer program for rotation of fuel assemblies at reloads has been developed which improves further fuel economy and reliability of nuclear power plants. The program has been tested on the PWR core and showed to decrease the power form-factors and flatten the radial power distribution. (author)

  10. Degradation of austenitic stainless steel (SS) light water ractor (LWR) core internals due to neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Appajosula S., E-mail: Appajosula.Rao@nrc.gov

    2014-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are extensively being used in the fabrication of light water reactor (LWR) core internal components. It is because these steels have relatively high ductility, fracture toughness and moderate strength. However, the LWR internal components exposure to neutron irradiation over an extended period of plant operation degrades the materials mechanical properties such as the fracture toughness. This paper summarizes some of the results of the existing open literature data on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of 316 CW steels that have been published by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), industry, academia, and other research agencies.

  11. Core design of super LWR with double tube water rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhui; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Supercritical light water cooled and moderated reactor with double tube water rods is developed. • Double-row fuel rod assembly and out-in fuel loading pattern are applied. • Separation plates in peripheral assemblies increase average outlet temperature. • Neutronic and thermal design criteria are satisfied during the cycle. - Abstract: Double tube water rods are employed in core design of super LWR to simplify the upper core structure and refueling procedure. The light water moderator flows up in the inner tube from the bottom of the core, then, changes the flow direction at the top of the core into the outer tube and flows out at the bottom of the core. It eliminates the moderator guide/distribution tubes into the single tube water rods from the top dome of the reactor pressure vessel of the previous super LWR design. Two rows of fuel rods are filled between the water rods in the fuel assembly. Out-in refueling pattern is adopted to flatten radial power distribution. The peripheral fuel assemblies of the core are divided into four flow zones by separation plates for increasing the average core outlet temperature. Three enrichment zones are used for axial power flattening. The equilibrium core is analyzed based on neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled model. The results show that, by applying the separation plates in peripheral fuel assemblies and low gadolinia enrichment, the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) is limited to 653 °C with the average outlet temperature of 500 °C. The inherent safety is satisfied by the negative void reactivity effects and sufficient shutdown margin

  12. Materials choices for the advanced LWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, J.P.N.; Shoemaker, C.E.; McIlree, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Current light water reactor (LWR) steam generators have been affected by a variety of corrosion and mechanical damage degradation mechanisms. Included are wear caused by tube vibration, intergranular corrosion, pitting, and thinning or wastage of the steam generator tubing and accelerated corrosion of carbon steel supports (denting). The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Steam Generator Owners Groups (I, II) have sponsored laboratory and field studies to provide ameliorative actions for the majority of the damage forms experienced to date. Some of the current corrosion mechanisms are aggravated or caused by unique materials choices or materials interactions. New materials have been proposed and at least partially qualified for use in replacement model steam generators, including an advanced LWR design. In so far as possible, the materials choices for the advanced LWR steam generator avoid the corrosion pitfalls seemingly inherent in the current designs. The EPRI Steam Generator Project staff has recommended materials and design choices for a new steam generator. Based on these recommendations we believe that the advanced LWR steam generators will be much less affected by corrosion and mechanical damage mechanisms than are now experienced

  13. Water chemistry and materials degradation in LWR'S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, H.; Toerroenen, K.; Aaltonen, P.

    1994-01-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in corrosion, in erosion corrosion and in activity transport in NPPs; it impacts upon the operational safety of LWRs in two main ways: integrity of pressure boundary materials and activity transport and out-of-core radiation fields. A good control of water chemistry can significantly reduce these problems and improve plant safety, but economic pressures are leading to more rigorous operating conditions: fuel burnups are to be increased, higher efficiencies are to be achieved by running at higher temperatures and plant lifetimes are to be extended. Typical water chemistry specifications used in PWR and BWR plants are presented and the chemistry optimization is discussed. The complex interplay of metallurgical, mechanical and environmental factors in environmental sensitive cracking is shown, with details on studies for carbon steels, stainless steels and nickel base alloys. 20 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Stylized whole-core benchmark of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hon, Ryan; Kooreman, Gabriel; Rahnema, Farzad; Petrovic, Bojan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A stylized benchmark specification of the I2S-LWR core. • A library of cross sections were generated in both 8 and 47 groups. • Monte Carlo solutions generated for the 8 group library using MCNP5. • Cross sections and pin fission densities provided in journal’s repository. - Abstract: The Integral, Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I 2 S-LWR) is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept under development by a multi-institutional team led by Georgia Tech. The core is similar in size to small 2-loop PWRs while having the power level of current large reactors (∼1000 MWe) but using uranium silicide fuel and advanced stainless steel cladding. A stylized benchmark specification of the I 2 S-LWR core has been developed in order to test whole-core neutronics codes and methods. For simplification the core was split into 57 distinct material regions for cross section generation. Cross sections were generated using the lattice physics code HELIOS version 1.10 in both 8 and 47 groups. Monte Carlo solutions, including eigenvalue and pin fission densities, were generated for the 8 group library using MCNP5. Due to space limitations in this paper, the full cross section library and normalized pin fission density results are provided in the journal’s electronic repository.

  15. Environmentally assisted cracking in LWR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Park, J.H.; Shack, W.J.; Zhang, J.; Brust, F.W.; Dong, P.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen level on fatigue life of austenitic stainless steels is discussed and the results of a detailed study of the effect of the environment on the growth of cracks during fatigue initiation are presented. Initial test results are given for specimens irradiated in the Halden reactor. Impurities introduced by shielded metal arc welding that may affect susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking are described. Results of calculations of residual stresses in core shroud weldments are summarized. Crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys under cyclic loading with R ratios from 0.2--0.95 in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 C are summarized

  16. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289 degree C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 degree C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections

  17. A simplified geometrical model for transient corium propagation in core for LWR with heavy reflector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saas Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the simulation of the Severe Accidents (SA in Light Water Reactors (LWR, we are interested on the in-core corium pool propagation transient in order to evaluate the corium relocation in the vessel lower head. The goal is to characterize the corium and debris flows from the core to accurately evaluate the corium pool propagation transient in the lower head and so the associated risk of vessel failure. In the case of LWR with heavy reflector, to evaluate the corium relocation into the lower head, we have to study the risk associated with focusing effect and the possibility to stabilize laterally the corium in core with a flooded down-comer. It is necessary to characterize the core degradation and the stratification of the corium pool that is formed in core. We assume that the core degradation until the corium pool formation and the corium pool propagation could be modeled separately. In this document, we present a simplified geometrical model (0D model for the in-core corium propagation transient. A degraded core with a formed corium pool is used as an initial state. This state can be obtained from a simulation computed with an integral code. This model does not use a grid for the core as integral codes do. Geometrical shapes and 0D models are associated with the corium pool and the other components of the degraded core (debris, heavy reflector, core plate…. During the transient, these shapes evolve taking into account the thermal and stratification behavior of the corium pool and the melting of the core surrounding components. Some results corresponding to the corium pool propagation in core transients obtained with this model on a LWR with a heavy reflector are given and compared to grid approach of the integral codes MAAP4.

  18. Fracture toughness evaluation of select advanced replacement alloys for LWR core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Xiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Life extension of the existing nuclear reactors imposes irradiation of high fluences to structural materials, resulting in significant challenges to the traditional reactor materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Advanced alloys with superior radiation resistance will increase safety margins, design flexibility, and economics for not only the life extension of the existing fleet but also new builds with advanced reactor designs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teamed up with Department of Energy (DOE) to initiate the Advanced Radiation Resistant Materials (ARRM) program, aiming to develop and test degradation resistant alloys from current commercial alloy specifications by 2021 to a new advanced alloy with superior degradation resistance in light water reactor (LWR)-relevant environments by 2024. Fracture toughness is one of the key engineering properties required for core internal materials. Together with other properties, which are being examined such as high-temperature steam oxidation resistance, radiation hardening, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking resistance, the alloys will be down-selected for neutron irradiation study and comprehensive post-irradiation examinations. According to the candidate alloys selected under the ARRM program, ductile fracture toughness of eight alloys was evaluated at room temperature and the LWR-relevant temperatures. The tested alloys include two ferritic alloys (Grade 92 and an oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy 14YWT), two austenitic stainless steels (316L and 310), four Ni-base superalloys (718A, 725, 690, and X750). Alloy 316L and X750 are included as reference alloys for low- and high-strength alloys, respectively. Compact tension specimens in 0.25T and 0.2T were machined from the alloys in the T-L and R-L orientations according to the product forms of the alloys. This report summarizes the final results of the specimens tested and analyzed per ASTM Standard E1820. Unlike the

  19. Validation of the Nuclear Design Method for MOX Fuel Loaded LWR Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, E.; Inoue, Y.; Mori, M.; Ushio, T.

    2001-01-01

    The actual batch loading of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in light water reactors (LWRs) is now ready to start in Japan. One of the efforts that have been devoted to realizing this batch loading has been validation of the nuclear design methods calculating the MOX-fuel-loaded LWR core characteristics. This paper summarizes the validation work for the applicability of the CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 in-core fuel management code system to MOX-fuel-loaded LWR cores. This code system is widely used by a number of electric power companies for the core management of their commercial LWRs. The validation work was performed for both boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Each validation consists of two parts: analyses of critical experiments and core tracking calculations of operating plants. For the critical experiments, we have chosen a series of experiments known as the VENUS International Program (VIP), which was performed at the SCK/CEN MOL laboratory in Belgium. VIP consists of both BWR and PWR fuel assembly configurations. As for the core tracking calculations, the operating data of MOX-fuel-loaded BWR and PWR cores in Europe have been utilized

  20. Release of fission and activation products during LWR core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Matschoss, V.; Wild, H.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments are described by which activity release fractions and aerosol characteristics were investigated for various core melting conditions. Samples of corium and fissium were heated by induction to temperatures of 2800 0 C under air, argon and steam. Release values are presented for Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Se, Zr, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, J, Cs and U. The deposition behaviour of the released products was found to depend strongly on the volatility and on the gas flow rate. Preliminary results of additional measurements indicate that the size distribution of the aerosol particles is trimodal. (author)

  1. Systematic technology evaluation program for SiC/SiC composite-based accident-tolerant LWR fuel cladding and core structures: Revision 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Fuels and core structures in current light water reactors (LWR’s) are vulnerable to catastrophic failure in severe accidents as unfortunately evidenced by the March 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. This vulnerability is attributed primarily to the rapid oxidation kinetics of zirconium alloys in a water vapor environment at very high temperatures. Zr alloys are the primary material in LWR cores except for the fuel itself. Therefore, alternative materials with reduced oxidation kinetics as compared to zirconium alloys are sought to enable enhanced accident-tolerant fuels and cores.

  2. Application of an enhanced cross-section interpolation model for highly poisoned LWR core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, J.M.; Cathalau, S.; Hudelot, J.P.; Barran, F.; Bellanger, V.; Magnaud, C.; Moreau, F.

    2011-01-01

    Burnable poisons are extensively used by Light Water Reactor designers in order to preserve the fuel reactivity potential and increase the cycle length (without increasing the uranium enrichment). In the industrial two-steps (assembly 2D transport-core 3D diffusion) calculation schemes these heterogeneities yield to strong flux and cross-sections perturbations that have to be taken into account in the final 3D burn-up calculations. This paper presents the application of an enhanced cross-section interpolation model (implemented in the French CRONOS2 code) to LWR (highly poisoned) depleted core calculations. The principle is to use the absorbers (or actinide) concentrations as the new interpolation parameters instead of the standard local burnup/fluence parameters. It is shown by comparing the standard (burnup/fluence) and new (concentration) interpolation models and using the lattice transport code APOLLO2 as a numerical reference that reactivity and local reaction rate prediction of a 2x2 LWR assembly configuration (slab geometry) is significantly improved with the concentration interpolation model. Gains on reactivity and local power predictions (resp. more than 1000 pcm and 20 % discrepancy reduction compared to the reference APOLLO2 scheme) are obtained by using this model. In particular, when epithermal absorbers are inserted close to thermal poison the 'shadowing' ('screening') spectral effects occurring during control operations are much more correctly modeled by concentration parameters. Through this outstanding example it is highlighted that attention has to be paid to the choice of cross-section interpolation parameters (burnup 'indicator') in core calculations with few energy groups and variable geometries all along the irradiation cycle. Actually, this new model could be advantageously applied to steady-state and transient LWR heterogeneous core computational analysis dealing with strong spectral-history variations under

  3. Safety-related investigations on power distribution in MOX fuel elements in LWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, E.; Langenbuch, S.

    1991-01-01

    For the concept of thermal recycling various fuel assembly designs have been developped during the last years. An overview is given describing the present status of MOX-fuel assembly design for PWR and BWR. The local power distribution within the MOX-fuel assembly and influences between neighbouring MOX- and Uranium fuel assemblies have been analyzed by own calculations. These investigations are limited to specific aspects of the spatial power distribution, which are related to the use of MOX-fuel assemblies within the reactor core of LWR. (orig.) [de

  4. A simplified geometrical model for transient corium propagation in core for LWR with heavy reflector - 15271

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, L.; Le Tellier, R.; Bajard, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this document, we present a simplified geometrical model (0D model) for both the in-core corium propagation transient and the characterization of the mode of corium transfer from the core to the vessel. A degraded core with a formed corium pool is used as an initial state. This initial state can be obtained from a simulation computed with an integral code. This model does not use a grid for the core as integral codes do. Geometrical shapes and 0D models are associated with the corium pool and the other components of the degraded core (debris, heavy reflector, core plate...). During the transient, these shapes evolve taking into account the thermal and stratification behavior of the corium pool and the melting of the core surrounding components. Some results corresponding to the corium pool propagation in core transients obtained with this model on a LWR with a heavy reflector are given and compared to grid approach of the integral codes MAAP4

  5. Study on material attractiveness aspect of spent nuclear fuel of LWR and FBR cycles based on isotopic plutonium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki; Novitrian,; Waris, Abdul; Suud, Zaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper analyzes the plutonium production of recycling nuclear fuel option. • To evaluate material attractiveness based on intrinsic feature of material barrier. • Evaluation based on isotopic plutonium composition of spent fuel LWR and FBR. • Even mass number of plutonium gives a significant contribution to material barrier, in particular Pu-238 and Pu-240. • Doping MA in FBR blanket is effective to increase material barrier from weapon grade plutonium to more than MOX fuel grade. - Abstract: Recycling minor actinide (MA) as well as used uranium and plutonium can be considered to reduce nuclear waste production as well as to increase the intrinsic aspect of nuclear nonproliferation as doping material. Plutonium production as a significant aspect of recycling nuclear fuel option, gives some advantages and challenges, such as fissile material utilization of plutonium as well as production of some even mass number plutonium. The study intends to evaluate the material attractiveness based on the intrinsic feature of material barrier such as plutonium composition, decay heat and spontaneous fission neutron components from spent fuel (SF) light water reactor (LWR) and fast breeder reactor (FBR) cycles. A significant contribution has been shown by decay heat (DH) and spontaneous fission neutron (SFN) of even mass number of plutonium isotopes to the total DH and SFN of plutonium element, in particular from isotopic plutonium Pu-238 and Pu-240 contributions. Longer decay cooling time and higher burnup are effective to increase the material barrier (DH and SFN) level from reactor grade plutonium level to MOX grade plutonium level. Material barrier of plutonium element from spent fuel (SF) FBR in the core regions has similarity to the material barrier profile of SF LWR which can be categorized as MOX fuel grade plutonium. Plutonium compositions, DH and SFN components are categorized as weapon grade plutonium level for FBR blanket regions with no

  6. Analysis of LWR Full MOX Core Physics Experiments with Major Nuclear Data Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Toru [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) studied high moderation full MOX cores as a part of advanced LWR core concept studies from 1994 to 2003 supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. In order to obtain the major physics characteristics of such advanced MOX cores, NUPEC carried out core physics experimental programs called MISTRAL and BASALA from 1996 to 2002 in the EOLE critical facility of the Cadarache Center in collaboration with CEA. NUPEC also obtained a part of experimental data of the EPICURE program that CEA had conducted for 30 % Pu recycling in French PWRs. Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization(JNES) established in 2003 as an incorporated administrative agency took over the NUPEC's projects for nuclear regulation and has been implementing FUBILA program that is for high burn up BWR full MOX cores. This paper presents an outline of the programs and a summary of the analysis results of the criticality of those experimental cores with major nuclear data libraries.

  7. Estimation of the core-wide fuel rod damage during a LWR LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.; Sairanen, R.; Stengaard, J.-O.

    1975-01-01

    The number of fuel rods puncturing during a LWR LOCA must be estimated as a part of the plant radioactivity release analysis. Due to the great number of fuel rods in the core and the great number of contributing parameters, many of them associated with wide uncertainty and/or truly random variability limits, probabilistic methods are well applicable. A succession of computer models developed for this purpose is described together with applications to WWER-440 PWR. Deterministic models are shown to be seriously inadequate and even misleading under certain circumstances. A simple analytical probabilistic model appears to be suitable for many applications. Monte Carlo techniques allow the development of such sophisticated models that errors in the input data presently available probably become dominant in the residual uncertainty of the corewide fuel rod puncture analysis. (author)

  8. Coupled Tort-TD/CTF Capability for high-fidelity LWR core calculations - 321

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christienne, M.; Avramova, M.; Perin, Y.; Seubert, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the developed coupling scheme between TORT-TD and CTF. TORT-TD is a time-dependent 3D discrete ordinates neutron transport code. TORT-TD is utilized for high-fidelity reactor core neutronics calculations while CTF is providing the thermal-hydraulics feedback information. CTF is an improved version of the advanced thermal-hydraulic sub-channel code COBRA-TF, which is widely used for best-estimate evaluations of LWR safety margins. CTF is a transient code based on a separated flow representation of the two-phase flow. The coupled code TORT-TD/CTF allows 3D pin-by-pin analyses of transients in few energy groups and anisotropic scattering by solving the time-dependent transport equation using the unconditionally stable implicit method. Steady-state and transient test cases, based on the OECD/NRC PWR MOX/UO 2 Core Transient Benchmark, have been calculated. The steady state cases are based on a quarter core model while the transient test case models a control rod ejection transient in a small PWR mini-core fuel assembly arrangement. The obtained results with TORT-TD/CTF are verified by a code-to-code comparison with the previously developed NEM/CTF and TORT-TD/ATHLET coupled code systems. The performed comparative analysis indicates the applicability and high-fidelity potential of the TORT-TD/CTF coupling. (authors)

  9. A trend analysis methodology for enhanced validation of 3-D LWR core simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieselquist, William; Ferroukhi, Hakim; Bernatowicz, Kinga

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an approach that is being developed and implemented at PSI to enhance the Verification and Validation (V and V) procedure of 3-D static core simulations for the Swiss LWR reactors. The principle is to study in greater details the deviations between calculations and measurements and to assess on that basis if distinct trends of the accuracy can be observed. The presence of such trends could then be a useful indicator of eventual limitations/weaknesses in the applied lattice/core analysis methodology and could thereby serve as guidance for method/model enhancements. Such a trend analysis is illustrated here for a Swiss PWR core model using as basis, the state-of-the-art industrial CASMO/SIMULATE codes. The accuracy of the core-follow models to reproduce the periodic in-core neutron flux measurements is studied for a total of 21 operating cycles. The error is analyzed with respect to different physics parameters with a ranking of the individual assemblies/nodes contribution to the total RMS error and trends are analyzed by performing partial correlation analysis. The highest errors appear at the core axial peripheries (top/bottom nodes) where a mean C/E-1 error of 10% is observed for the top nodes and -5% for the bottom nodes and the maximum C/E-1 error reaches almost 20%. Partial correlation analysis shows significant correlation of error to distance from core mid-plane and only less significant correlations to other variables. Overall, it appears that the primary areas that could benefit from further method/modeling improvements are: axial reflectors, MOX treatment and control rod cusping. (author)

  10. Fast reactor core design studies to cope with TRU fuel composition changes in the LWR-to-FBR transition period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Maruyama, Shuhei; Ohki, Shigeo; Mizuno, Tomoyasu

    2009-01-01

    As part of the Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT Project), sodium-cooled fast reactor core design efforts have been made to cope with the TRU fuel composition changes expected during LWR-to-FBR transition period, in which a various kind of TRU fuel compositions are available depending on the characteristics of the LWR spent fuels and a way of recycling them. A 750 MWe mixed-oxide fuel core is firstly defined as a FaCT medium-size reference core and its neutronics characteristics are determined. The core is a high internal conversion type and has an average burnup of 150 GWD/T. The reference TRU fuel composition is assumed to come from the FBR equilibrium state. Compared to the LWR-to-FBR transition period, the TRU fuels in the FBR equilibrium period are multi-recycled through fast reactors and have a different composition. An available TRU fuel composition is determined by fast reactor spent fuel multi-recycling scenarios. Then the FaCT core corresponding to the TRU fuel with different compositions is set according to the TRU fuel composition changes in LWR-to-FBR transition period, and the key core neutronics characteristics are assessed. It is shown that among the core neutronics characteristics, the burnup reactivity and the safety parameters such as sodium void reactivity and Doppler coefficient are significantly influenced by the TRU fuel composition changes. As a result, a general characteristic in the FaCT core design to cope with TRU fuel composition changes is grasped and the design envelopes are identified in terms of the burnup reactivity and the safety parameters. (author)

  11. Advanced in-situ characterisation of corrosion properties of LWR fuel cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arilahti, E.; Bojinov, M.; Beverskog, B.

    1999-01-01

    The trend towards higher fuel burnups imposes a demand for better corrosion and hydriding resistance of cladding materials. Development of new and improved cladding materials is a long process. There is a lack of fast and reliable in-situ techniques to investigate zirconium alloys in simulated or in-core LWR coolant conditions. This paper describes a Thin Layer Electrode (TLE) arrangement suitable for in-situ characterization of oxide films formed on fuel cladding materials. This arrangement enables us to carry out: Versatile Thin Layer Electrochemical measurements, including: (i) Thin Layer Electrochemical impedance Spectroscopic (TLEIS) measurements to characterize the oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of metals and the properties of their oxide films in aqueous environments. These measurements can also be performed in low conductivity electrolytes. (ii) Thin-Layer Wall-Jet (TLWJ) measurements, which give the possibility to detect soluble reaction products and to evaluate the influence of novel water chemistry additions on their release. Solid Contact measurements: (i) Contact Electric Resistance (CER) measurements to investigate the electronic properties of surface films on the basis of d.c. resistance measurements. (i) Contact Electric impedance (CEI) measurements to study the electronic properties of surface films using a.c. perturbation. All the above listed measurements can be performed using one single measurement device developed at VTT. This device can be conveniently inserted into an autoclave. Its geometry is currently being optimized in cooperation with the OECD Halden Reactor Project. In addition, the applicability of the device for in-core measurements has been investigated in a joint feasibility study performed by VTT and JRC Petten. Results of some autoclave studies of the effect of LiOH concentration on the stability of fuel cladding oxide films are presented in this paper. (author)

  12. NODAL3 Sensitivity Analysis for NEACRP 3D LWR Core Transient Benchmark (PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surian Pinem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of sensitivity analysis of the multidimension, multigroup neutron diffusion NODAL3 code for the NEACRP 3D LWR core transient benchmarks (PWR. The code input parameters covered in the sensitivity analysis are the radial and axial node sizes (the number of radial node per fuel assembly and the number of axial layers, heat conduction node size in the fuel pellet and cladding, and the maximum time step. The output parameters considered in this analysis followed the above-mentioned core transient benchmarks, that is, power peak, time of power peak, power, averaged Doppler temperature, maximum fuel centerline temperature, and coolant outlet temperature at the end of simulation (5 s. The sensitivity analysis results showed that the radial node size and maximum time step give a significant effect on the transient parameters, especially the time of power peak, for the HZP and HFP conditions. The number of ring divisions for fuel pellet and cladding gives negligible effect on the transient solutions. For productive work of the PWR transient analysis, based on the present sensitivity analysis results, we recommend NODAL3 users to use 2×2 radial nodes per assembly, 1×18 axial layers per assembly, the maximum time step of 10 ms, and 9 and 1 ring divisions for fuel pellet and cladding, respectively.

  13. FABRICATION AND MATERIAL ISSUES FOR THE APPLICATION OF SiC COMPOSITES TO LWR FUEL CLADDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEON-JU KIM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication methods and requirements of the fiber, interphase, and matrix of nuclear grade SiCf/SiC composites are briefly reviewed. A CVI-processed SiCf/SiC composite with a PyC or (PyC-SiCn interphase utilizing Hi-Nicalon Type S or Tyranno SA3 fiber is currently the best combination in terms of the irradiation performance. We also describe important material issues for the application of SiC composites to LWR fuel cladding. The kinetics of the SiC corrosion under LWR conditions needs to be clarified to confirm the possibility of a burn-up extension and the cost-benefit effect of the SiC composite cladding. In addition, the development of end-plug joining technology and fission products retention capability of the ceramic composite tube would be key challenges for the successful application of SiC composite cladding.

  14. Status of LWR primary pressure boundary structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Byun, Taek Sang; Kang, Sung Sik; Ryu, Woo Seog; Lee, Bong Sang; Kook, Il Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    The integrity of major systems, structures and components is a prerequisite to the economy and safety of an existing light water reactor and also for the next generation reactors. As few reactor structural materials are being manufactured by domestic companies, based on economic and safety reasons, a new demand to improve the quality of domestic reactor structural materials and to develop reactor structural steels has arisen. Investigations on the state-of-the-art of the materials specifications, performance and current state of structural materials development were performed as a first step to domestic reactor structural steel development and summarized the result in the present report. (Author) 10 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  15. Generalized perturbation theory for LWR depletion analysis and core design applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.; Frank, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive time-dependent perturbation theory formulation that includes macroscopic depletion, thermal-hydraulic and poison feedback effects, and a criticality reset mechanism is developed. The methodology is compatible with most current LWR design codes. This new development allows GTP/DTP methods to be used quantitatively in a variety of realistic LWR physics applications that were not possible prior to this work. A GTP-based optimization technique for incore fuel management analyses is addressed as a promising application of the new formulation

  16. A New Coupled CFD/Neutron Kinetics System for High Fidelity Simulations of LWR Core Phenomena: Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pérez Mañes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT is investigating the application of the meso- and microscale analysis for the prediction of local safety parameters for light water reactors (LWR. By applying codes like CFD (computational fluid dynamics and SP3 (simplified transport reactor dynamics it is possible to describe the underlying phenomena in a more accurate manner than by the nodal/coarse 1D thermal hydraulic coupled codes. By coupling the transport (SP3 based neutron kinetics (NK code DYN3D with NEPTUNE-CFD, within a parallel MPI-environment, the NHESDYN platform is created. The newly developed system will allow high fidelity simulations of LWR fuel assemblies and cores. In NHESDYN, a heat conduction solver, SYRTHES, is coupled to NEPTUNE-CFD. The driver module of NHESDYN controls the sequence of execution of the solvers as well as the communication between the solvers based on MPI. In this paper, the main features of NHESDYN are discussed and the proof of the concept is done by solving a single pin problem. The prediction capability of NHESDYN is demonstrated by a code-to-code comparison with the DYNSUB code. Finally, the future developments and validation efforts are highlighted.

  17. Cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The IAEA Specialists` Meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations was held at the ASTM Headquarters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 2-4, 1995. It was attended by 39 participants from 12 countries. The meeting was held in the framework of the IAEA International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and was organized and sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the meeting was to review experience in the field for ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. Presentations were aimed at achieving a better understanding of the behaviour of reactor component materials, providing guidance and recommendations to assure reliability and adequate performance, and proposing directions for further investigations. Refs, figs and tabs.

  18. Cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations was held at the ASTM Headquarters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 2-4, 1995. It was attended by 39 participants from 12 countries. The meeting was held in the framework of the IAEA International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and was organized and sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the meeting was to review experience in the field for ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. Presentations were aimed at achieving a better understanding of the behaviour of reactor component materials, providing guidance and recommendations to assure reliability and adequate performance, and proposing directions for further investigations. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Opportunities for the LWR ATF materials development program to contribute to the LBE-cooled ADS materials qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xing, E-mail: gongxingzfl@hotmail.com [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Li, Rui, E-mail: li-rui@cgnpc.com.cn [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Sun, Maozhou; Ren, Qisen [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Liu, Tong, E-mail: liutong@cgnpc.com.cn [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Short, Michael P., E-mail: hereiam@mit.edu [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Accelerator-driven systems (ADS) are a promising approach for nuclear waste disposal. Nevertheless, the principal candidate materials proposed for ADS construction, such as the ferritic/martensitic steel, T91, and austenitic stainless steels, 316L and 15-15Ti, are not fully compatible with the liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant. Under some operating conditions, liquid metal embrittlement (LME) or liquid metal corrosion (LMC) may occur in these steels when exposed to LBE. These environmentally-induced material degradation effects pose a threat to ADS reactor safety, as failure of the materials could initiate a severe accident, in which fission products are released into the coolant. Meanwhile, parallel efforts to develop accident-tolerant fuels (ATF) in light water reactors (LWRs) could provide both general materials design philosophies and specific material solutions to the ADS program. In this paper, the potential contributions of the ATF materials development program to the ADS materials qualification program are evaluated and discussed in terms of service conditions and materials performance requirements. Several specific areas where coordinated development may benefit both programs, including composite materials and selected coatings, are discussed. - Highlights: • ATF materials developed for LWRs could be candidate materials for the LBE-cooled ADS program. • Similar material design and protection philosophies are utilized in both programs. • Unique challenges of LBE-cooled ADS systems could possibly be addressed by LWR ATF materials. • More coordinated testing should be performed between the ATF and ADS programs.

  20. Perspectives on the economic risks of LWR accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Burke, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Models which can be used for the analysis of the economic risks from events which may occur during LWR operation have been developed. The models include capabilities to estimate both onsite and offsite costs of LWR events ranging from routine plant forced outages to severe core-melt accidents resulting in large releases of radioactive material to the environment. The economic consequence models have been applied in studies of the economic risks from the operation of US LWR plants. The results of the analyses provide some important perspectives regarding the economic risks of LWR accidents. The analyses indicate that economic risks, in contrast to public health risks, are dominated by the onsite costs of relatively high-frequency forced outage events. Even for severe (e.g., core-melt) accidents, expected offsite costs are less than expected onsite costs for a typical US plant

  1. XPS and EPXMA investigation and chemical speciation of aerosol samples formed in LWR core melting experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.; Jenett, H.; Kaufmann, R.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1985-09-01

    Aerosol samples consisting of fission products and elements of light water reactor structural materials were collected during simulating in a laboratory scale the heat-up phase of a core melt accident. The aerosol particles were formed in a steam atmosphere at temperatures between 1200 and 1900 0 C of the melting charge. The investigation of the samples by use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) permitted the chemical speciation of the detected aerosol constituents silver, cadmium, indium, tellurium, iodine, and cesium. A comparison of the elemental analysis results obtained from XPS with those achieved from electron probe X-ray micro analysis (EPXMA) revealed that aerosol particle surface and aerosol particle bulk are principally composed of the same elements and that these compositions vary with release temperature. In addition, quantitative differences between the composition of surface and bulk have only been observed for those aerosol samples which were collected at higher melting charge temperatures. In order to obtain direct information on chemical species below the surface selected samples were argon ion bombarded. Changes in composition and chemistry were monitored by XPS, and the results were interpreted in light of the effects, which were observed when appropriate standard samples were sputtered. (orig.) [de

  2. Evaluation of conceptual flowsheets for incorporating Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel materials in an advanced nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.T.; Burch, W.D.; Collins, E.D.; Forsberg, C.W.; Prince, B.E.; Bond, W.D.; Campbell, D.O.; Delene, J.G.; Mailen, J.C.

    1990-08-01

    A preliminary study by a group of experts at ORNL has generated and evaluated a number of aqueous and non-aqueous flowsheets for recovering transuranium actinides from LWR fuel for use as fuel in an LMR and, at the same time, for transmutation of the wastes to less hazardous materials. The need for proliferation resistance was a consideration in the flowsheets. The current state of development of the flowsheets was evaluated and recommendations for additional study were made. 3 refs., 6 figs

  3. Study of advanced LWR cores for effective use of plutonium and MOX physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Matsu-Ura, H.; Ueji, M.; Ota, H.; Kanagawa, T.; Sakurada, K.; Maruyama, H.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced technologies of full MOX cores have been studied to obtain higher Pu consumption based on the advanced light water reactors (APWRs and ABWRs). For this aim, basic core designs of high moderation lattice (H/HM ∼5) have been studied with reduced fuel diameters in fuel assemblies for APWRs and those of high moderation lattice (H/HM ∼6) with addition of extra water rods in fuel assemblies for ABWRs. The analysis of equilibrium cores shows that nuclear and thermal hydraulic parameters satisfy the design criteria and the Pu consumption rate increases about 20 %. An experimental program has been carried out to obtain the core parameters of high moderation MOX cores in the EOLE critical facility at the Cadarache Centre as a joint study of NUPEC, CEA and CEA's industrial partners. The experiments include a uranium homogeneous core, two MOX homogeneous cores of different moderation and a PWR assembly mock up core of MOX fuel with high moderation. The program was started from 1996 and will be completed in 2000. (author)

  4. Study of plutonium multi-recycle in high moderation LWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Toru; Ueji, Masao; Hibi, Koki; Aoyama, Motoo; Sakurada, Koichi

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has been studying advanced cores that are dedicated to enhance the plutonium consumption per recycling for effective use of plutonium. In this study, a fissile plutonium consumption rate is adopted as an index of the effective use of plutonium, which is defined as a ratio of consumption to loading of fissile plutonium in a core. High moderation core concepts have been studied in order to increase this index based on full MOX cores in the latest designs of LWRs in Japan that are the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR). As a part of this study, core performance in the case of plutonium multi-recycling has been surveyed with these higher moderation cores aiming further effective use of plutonium. The design and analyses for equilibrium cores show that nuclear and thermal hydraulics parameters satisfy design criteria, and a fissile plutonium consumption rate increases up to 20% for ABWRs and 30% for APWRs even in plutonium multi-recycling condition. It was confirmed that the high moderation cores are feasible from a viewpoint of nuclear and thermal hydraulics, safety and plutonium consumption in the condition of plutonium multi-recycling. (author)

  5. BNL program in support of LWR degraded-core accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two major sources of loading on dry watr reactor containments are steam generatin from core debris water thermal interactions and molten core-concrete interactions. Experiments are in progress at BNL in support of analytical model development related to aspects of the above containment loading mechanisms. The work supports development and evaluation of the CORCON (Muir, 1981) and MARCH (Wooton, 1980) computer codes. Progress in the two programs is described in this paper. 8 figures

  6. Legal, institutional, and political issues in transportation of nuclear materials at the back end of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippek, H.E.; Schuller, C.R.

    1979-03-01

    A study was conducted to identify major legal and institutional problems and issues in the transportation of spent fuel and associated processing wastes at the back end of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle. (Most of the discussion centers on the transportation of spent fuel, since this activity will involve virtually all of the legal and institutional problems likely to be encountered in moving waste materials, as well.) Actions or approaches that might be pursued to resolve the problems identified in the analysis are suggested. Two scenarios for the industrial-scale transportation of spent fuel and radioactive wastes, taken together, high-light most of the major problems and issues of a legal and institutional nature that are likely to arise: (1) utilizing the Allied General Nuclear Services (AGNS) facility at Barnwell, SC, as a temporary storage facility for spent fuel; and (2) utilizing AGNS for full-scale commercial reprocessing of spent LWR fuel

  7. Legal, institutional, and political issues in transportation of nuclear materials at the back end of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippek, H.E.; Schuller, C.R.

    1979-03-01

    A study was conducted to identify major legal and institutional problems and issues in the transportation of spent fuel and associated processing wastes at the back end of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle. (Most of the discussion centers on the transportation of spent fuel, since this activity will involve virtually all of the legal and institutional problems likely to be encountered in moving waste materials, as well.) Actions or approaches that might be pursued to resolve the problems identified in the analysis are suggested. Two scenarios for the industrial-scale transportation of spent fuel and radioactive wastes, taken together, high-light most of the major problems and issues of a legal and institutional nature that are likely to arise: (1) utilizing the Allied General Nuclear Services (AGNS) facility at Barnwell, SC, as a temporary storage facility for spent fuel; and (2) utilizing AGNS for full-scale commercial reprocessing of spent LWR fuel.

  8. New Small LWR Core Designs using Particle Burnable Poisons for Low Boron Concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Ho Seong; Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi

    2015-01-01

    The soluble boron has two major important roles in commercial PWR operations : 1) the control of the long-term reactivity to maintain criticality under normal operation, and 2) the shutdown of the reactor under accidents. However, the removal of the soluble boron gives several advantages in SMRs (Small Modular Reactor). These advantages resulted from the elimination of soluble boron include the significant simplification of nuclear power plant through the removal of pipes, pumps, and purification systems. Also, the use of soluble boron mitigates corrosion problems on the primary coolant loop. Furthermore, the soluble boron-free operation can remove an inadvertent boron dilution accident (BDA) which can lead to a significant insertion of positive reactivity. From the viewpoint of core physics, the removal of soluble boron or reduction of soluble boron concentration makes the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) more negative. From the core design studies using new fuel assemblies, it is shown that the cores have very low critical soluble boron concentrations less than 500ppm, low peaking factors within the design targets, strong negative MTCs over cycles, and large enough shutdown margins both at BOC and EOC. However, the present cores have relatively low average discharge burnups of ∼ 30MWD/kg leading to low fuel economy because the cores use lots of non-fuel burnable poison rods to achieve very low critical boron concentrations. So, in the future, we will perform the trade-off study between the fuel discharge burnup and the boron concentrations by changing fuel assembly design and the core loading pattern

  9. New Small LWR Core Designs using Particle Burnable Poisons for Low Boron Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Ho Seong; Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The soluble boron has two major important roles in commercial PWR operations : 1) the control of the long-term reactivity to maintain criticality under normal operation, and 2) the shutdown of the reactor under accidents. However, the removal of the soluble boron gives several advantages in SMRs (Small Modular Reactor). These advantages resulted from the elimination of soluble boron include the significant simplification of nuclear power plant through the removal of pipes, pumps, and purification systems. Also, the use of soluble boron mitigates corrosion problems on the primary coolant loop. Furthermore, the soluble boron-free operation can remove an inadvertent boron dilution accident (BDA) which can lead to a significant insertion of positive reactivity. From the viewpoint of core physics, the removal of soluble boron or reduction of soluble boron concentration makes the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) more negative. From the core design studies using new fuel assemblies, it is shown that the cores have very low critical soluble boron concentrations less than 500ppm, low peaking factors within the design targets, strong negative MTCs over cycles, and large enough shutdown margins both at BOC and EOC. However, the present cores have relatively low average discharge burnups of ∼ 30MWD/kg leading to low fuel economy because the cores use lots of non-fuel burnable poison rods to achieve very low critical boron concentrations. So, in the future, we will perform the trade-off study between the fuel discharge burnup and the boron concentrations by changing fuel assembly design and the core loading pattern.

  10. Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity in particular for BWR's, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR's and BWR's without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR's and BWR's were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density ? on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR's more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fueled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ∼2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the discharged hydride fuel is

  11. Materials behaviour in PWRs core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbu, A.; Massoud, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Like in any industrial facility, the materials of PWR reactors are submitted to mechanical, thermal or chemical stresses during particularly long durations of operation: 40 years, and even 60 years. Materials closer to the nuclear fuel are submitted to intense bombardment of particles (mainly neutrons) coming from the nuclear reactions inside the core. In such conditions, the damages can be numerous and various: irradiation aging, thermal aging, friction wear, generalized corrosion, stress corrosion etc.. The understanding of the materials behaviour inside the cores of reactors in operation is a major concern for the nuclear industry and its long term forecast is a necessity. This article describes the main ways of materials degradation without and under irradiation, with the means used to foresee their behaviour using physics-based models. Content: 1 - structures, components and materials: structure materials, nuclear materials; 2 - main ways of degradation without irradiation: thermal aging, stress corrosion, wear; 3 - main ways of degradation under irradiation: microscopic damaging - point defects, dimensional alterations, evolution of mechanical characteristics under irradiation, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), synergies; 4 - forecast of materials evolution under irradiation using physics-based models: primary damage - fast dynamics, primary damage annealing - slow kinetics microstructural evolution, impact of microstructural changes on the macroscopic behaviour, insight on modeling methods; 5 - materials change characterization techniques: microscopic techniques - direct defects observation, nuclear techniques using a particle beam, global measurements, mechanical characterizations; 6 - perspectives. (J.S.)

  12. LWR fuel cladding deformation in a LOCA and its interaction with the emergency core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbacher, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    The paper summarizes research results of out-of-pile burst tests, in-pile bursts tests, out-of-pile flooding tests and modeling work on fuel behavior in a LOCA performed at KfK: The dominant phenomena of the cladding deformation and failure have been clarified by experiments and can be modeled by computer codes. The burst and flooding tests performed up to now suggest that the coolability of the core under LOCA conditions can be maintained. (orig.) [de

  13. LMBFR and LWR in-core thermal-hydraulic codes: the state-of-the-art and research and development needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, E.U.; Coomes, E.P.; Rowe, D.S.; Trent, D.S.

    1981-04-01

    A review of analytical design methods used for predicting reactor core flow and temperature distributions is presented with emphasis on LMFBR's. The paper also briefly describes and contrasts the methods used for LWR's. These methods are global analysis, subchannel analysis, distributed parameter, and hybrid analysis. The evolution of the local and subchannel analysis methods is presented. Data used for code validation are also presented. Current research and development needs are identified and discussed. Areas identified for future research and development include methods and expermental data for analysis of distorted bundles and natural convection. Methods that have been developed for predicting the safety performance of LMFBR's and LWR's are not within the scope of this paper

  14. Quench cooling of superheated debris beds in containment during LWR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Chen, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Light water reactor core meltdown accident sequence studies suggest that superheated debris beds may settle on the concrete floor beneath the reactor vessel. A model for the heat transfer processes during quench of superheated debris beds cooled by an overlying pool of water has been presented in a prior paper. This paper discusses the coolability of decay-heated debris beds from the standpoint of their transient quench characteristics. It is shown that even though a debris bed configuration may be coolable from the point of view of steady-state decay heat removal, the quench behavior from an initially elevated temperature may lead to bed melting prior to quench of the debris

  15. Applications of the thermit code to 3D thermal hydraulic analysis of LWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    The THERMIT code calculates the three-dimensional transient thermal hydraulic behavior of light water reactor cores. Its two-fluid dynamics equations for two-phase flow offer improved physical modelling capability needed in the context of calculation coupled to neutron kinetics for feedback. The numerical fluid dynamics method was chosen for reliability over a wider range of transients. An improved heat transfer numerical method is presented which gives better numerical stability and accuracy. A number of example calculations are discussed which give an idea of the power and flexibility of the code

  16. LWR and HTGR coolant dynamics: the containment of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Gherson, P.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Hu, K.; Iyer, K.; Viskanta, R.; Lommers, L.

    1983-07-01

    This is the final report of a project containing three major tasks. Task I deals with the fundamental aspects of energetic fuel/coolant interactions (steam explosions) as they pertain to LWR core melt accidents. Task II deals with the applied aspects of LWR core melt accident sequences and mechanisms important to containment response, and includes consideration of energetic fuel/coolant interaction events, as well as non-explosive ones, corium material disposition and eventual coolability, and containment pressurization phenomena. Finally, Task III is concerned with HTGR loss of forced circulation accidents. This report is organized into three major parts corresponding to these three tasks respectively

  17. Current Needs for the Experimental Investigation of the CHF Phenomenon Relevant to LWR Core Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Corre, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The current achievements and needs toward the investigation, understanding and mechanistic prediction of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) event, under PWR and BWR core conditions, are addressed in this paper. It is shown that, even when using advanced 3-D CFD simulation tools, the current approach to CHF mechanistic modeling has serious limitations. This is mainly due to the lack of information regarding the relevant two-phase flow pattern(s) (in particular near the heated wall) and associated mechanisms (at the meso and micro-scale) leading to the CHF event. Areas of current experimental needs are identified in order to address these shortcomings. In addition, the use of 1-D and 3-D numerical tools to mechanistically predict the CHF is discussed. It is shown that 3-D two-phase CFD codes may not be superior to 1-D codes without proper consideration of relevant constitutive relations. (author)

  18. Quench cooling of superheated debris beds in containment during LWR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Chen, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Light water reactor core meltdown accident sequence studies suggest that superheated debris beds may settle on the concrete floor beneath the reactor vessel. A model for the heat transfer processes during quench (removal of stored energy from initial temperature to saturation temperature) of superheated debris beds cooled by an overlying pool of water has been presented in a prior paper. This paper discusses the coolability of decay-heated debris beds from the standpoint of their transient quench characteristics. It is shown that even though a debris bed configuration may be coolable from the point of view of steady-state decay heat removal, the quench behavior from an initially elevated temperature may lead to bed melting prior to quench of the debris

  19. Containment loadings due to hydrogen burning in LWR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cybulskis, P.

    1981-01-01

    The potential pressure loadings due to hydrogen burning under conditions representative of meltdown accident conditions are examined for a variety of PWR and BWR containment designs. For the PWR, the large dry, ice condenser, as well as subatmospheric containments are considered. For the BWR, MARK I, II, and III pressure suppression containments are evaluated. The key factors considered are: free volume, design pressure, extend to hydrogen generation, and the flammability of the atmosphere under a range of accident conditions. The potential for and the possible implications of hydrogen detonation are also considered. The results of these analyses show that the accumulation and rapid burning of the quantities of hydrogen that would be generated during core meltdown accidents will lead to pressures above design levels in all of the containments considered. As would be expected, containments characterized by small volumes and/or low design pressures are the most vulnerable to damage due to hydrogen burning. Large volume, high pressure designs may also be threatened but offer significantly more potential for accomodating hydrogen burns. The attainment of detonable hydrogen mixtures is made easier by smaller containment volumes. Detonable mixtures are also possible in the larger volume containments, but imply the accumulation of hydrogen for long periods of time without prior ignition. Hydrogen detonations, if they occur, would probably challenge the integrity of any of the containments considered. (orig.)

  20. Generalized pin factor methodology for LWR reload cores with discrete burnable absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, C.J.; Hideki Matsumoto; Toshikazu Ida; Lee, C.; Chao, Y.A.

    2005-01-01

    Discrete burnable absorbers are used to suppress excess reactivity as well as peak pin power in an assembly. After the burn-out of absorption material, discrete burnable absorbers are usually removed from assembly guide tubes for the next cycle. For that case, the pin factors with discrete burnable absorbers cannot be used since the assembly configuration is physically changed. The pin factors without discrete burnable absorbers also have noticeable deviation from the actual case because they do not take into account the history effect due to the residence of discrete burnable absorbers for the previous cycle. In this paper, the generalized pin factor (GPF) method is developed to accurately predict pin powers by considering the history effect. The method uses a second-order polynomial function to approximate the history effect which builds up during the residence of burnable absorber material and employs a linear approximation to simulate the decay of the history effect after discrete burnable absorbers are removed. The verification results from Westinghouse Vantage- 5H assemblies with WABAs showed that pin power errors were significantly reduced by using the GPF. (authors)

  1. Analysis methodology for RBMK-1500 core safety and investigations on corium coolability during a LWR severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasiulevicius, Audrius

    2003-01-01

    This thesis presents the work involving two broad aspects within the field of nuclear reactor analysis and safety. These are: - development of a fully independent reactor dynamics and safety analysis methodology of the RBMK-1500 core transient accidents and - experiments on the enhancement of coolability of a particulate bed or a melt pool due to heat removal through the control rod guide tubes. The first part of the thesis focuses on the development of the RBMK-1500 analysis methodology based on the CORETRAN code package. The second part investigates the issue of coolability during severe accidents in LWR type reactors: the coolability of debris bed and melt pool for in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions. The first chapter briefly presents the status of developments in both the RBMK-1500 core analysis and the corium coolability areas. The second chapter describes the generation of the RBMK-1500 neutron cross section data library with the HELIOS code. The cross section library was developed for the whole range of the reactor conditions. The results of the benchmarking with the WIMS-D4 code and validation against the RBMK Critical Facility experiments is also presented here. The HELIOS generated neutron cross section data library provides a close agreement with the WIMS-D4 code results. The validation against the data from the Critical Experiments shows that the HELIOS generated neutron cross section library provides excellent predictions for the criticality, axial and radial power distribution, control rod reactivity worths and coolant reactivity effects, etc. The reactivity effects of voiding for the system, fuel assembly and additional absorber channel are underpredicted in the calculations using the HELIOS code generated neutron cross sections. The underprediction, however, is much less than that obtained when the WIMS-D4 code generated cross sections are employed. The third chapter describes the work, performed towards the accurate prediction, assessment and

  2. Analysis methodology for RBMK-1500 core safety and investigations on corium coolability during a LWR severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasiulevicius, Audrius

    2003-07-01

    This thesis presents the work involving two broad aspects within the field of nuclear reactor analysis and safety. These are: - development of a fully independent reactor dynamics and safety analysis methodology of the RBMK-1500 core transient accidents and - experiments on the enhancement of coolability of a particulate bed or a melt pool due to heat removal through the control rod guide tubes. The first part of the thesis focuses on the development of the RBMK-1500 analysis methodology based on the CORETRAN code package. The second part investigates the issue of coolability during severe accidents in LWR type reactors: the coolability of debris bed and melt pool for in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions. The first chapter briefly presents the status of developments in both the RBMK-1500 core analysis and the corium coolability areas. The second chapter describes the generation of the RBMK-1500 neutron cross section data library with the HELIOS code. The cross section library was developed for the whole range of the reactor conditions. The results of the benchmarking with the WIMS-D4 code and validation against the RBMK Critical Facility experiments is also presented here. The HELIOS generated neutron cross section data library provides a close agreement with the WIMS-D4 code results. The validation against the data from the Critical Experiments shows that the HELIOS generated neutron cross section library provides excellent predictions for the criticality, axial and radial power distribution, control rod reactivity worths and coolant reactivity effects, etc. The reactivity effects of voiding for the system, fuel assembly and additional absorber channel are underpredicted in the calculations using the HELIOS code generated neutron cross sections. The underprediction, however, is much less than that obtained when the WIMS-D4 code generated cross sections are employed. The third chapter describes the work, performed towards the accurate prediction, assessment and

  3. Armor systems including coated core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Henry S [Idaho Falls, ID; Lillo, Thomas M [Idaho Falls, ID; McHugh, Kevin M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  4. Modeling the economic consequences of LWR accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.P.; Aldrich, D.C.; Rasmussen, N.C.

    1984-01-01

    Models to be used for analyses of economic risks from events which may occur during LWR plant operation are developed in this study. The models include capabilities to estimate both onsite and offsite costs of LWR events ranging from routine plant outages to severe core-melt accidents resulting in large releases of radioactive material to the environment. The models can be used by both the nuclear power industry and regulatory agencies in cost-benefit analyses for decisionmaking purposes. The newly developed economic consequence models are applied in an example to estimate the economic risks from operation of the Surry Unit 2 plant. The analyses indicate that economic risks from US LWR operation, in contrast to public health risks, are dominated by relatively high-frequency forced outage events. Even for severe (e.g., core-melt) accidents, expected offsite costs are less than expected onsite costs for the Surry site. The implications of these conclusions for nuclear power plant operation and regulation are discussed

  5. Analysis of triso packing fraction and fissile material to DB-MHR using LWR reprocessed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Clarysson A.M. da; Pereira, Claubia; Costa, Antonella L.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Gual, Maritza R.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor is being considered the next generation of nuclear power plants because of its characteristic to operate with reprocessed fuel. The typical fuel element consists of a hexagonal block with coolant and fuel channels. The fuel pin is manufactured into compacted ceramic-coated particles (TRISO) which are used to achieve both a high burnup and a high degree of passive safety. This work uses the MCNPX 2.6.0 to simulate the active core of Deep Burn Modular Helium Reactor (DB-MHR) employing PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) reprocessed fuel. However, before a complete study of DB-MHR fuel cycle and recharge, it is necessary to evaluate the neutronic parameters to some values of TRISO Packing Fractions (PF) and Fissile Material (FM). Each PF and FM combination would generate the best behaviour of neutronic parameters. Therefore, this study configures several PF and FM combinations considering the heterogeneity of TRISO layers and lattice. The results present the best combination of PF and FM values according with the more appropriated behaviour of the neutronic parameters during the burnup. In this way, the optimized combination can be used to future works of MHR fuel cycle and recharge. (author)

  6. Irradiation experiments on materials for core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Materials degradation due to the aging phenomena is one of the key issues for the life assessment and extension of the light water reactors (LWRs). This presentation introduces JAERI`s activities in the field of LWR material researches which utilize the research and testing reactors for irradiation experiments. The activities are including the material studies for the core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding. These materials are exposed to the neutron/gamma radiation and high temperature water environments so that it is worth reviewing their degradation phenomena as the continuum. Three topics are presented; For the core internal materials, the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels is the present major concern. At JAERI the effects of alloying elements on IASCC have been investigated through the post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in high-temperature water. The radiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels is still a significant issue for LWR safety, and at JAERI some factors affecting the embrittlement behavior such as a dose rate have been investigated. Waterside corrosion of Zircaloy fuel cladding is one of the limiting factors in fuel rod performance and an in-situ measurement of the corrosion rate in high-temperature water was performed in JMTR. To improve the reliability of experiments and to extent the applicability of experimental techniques, a mutual utilization of the technical achievements in those irradiation experiments is desired. (author)

  7. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhujie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bartels, David [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  8. ELCOS: the PSI code system for LWR core analysis. Part II: user's manual for the fuel assembly code BOXER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paratte, J.M.; Grimm, P.; Hollard, J.M.

    1996-02-01

    ELCOS is a flexible code system for the stationary simulation of light water reactor cores. It consists of the four computer codes ETOBOX, BOXER, CORCOD and SILWER. The user's manual of the second one is presented here. BOXER calculates the neutronics in cartesian geometry. The code can roughly be divided into four stages: - organisation: choice of the modules, file manipulations, reading and checking of input data, - fine group fluxes and condensation: one-dimensional calculation of fluxes and computation of the group constants of homogeneous materials and cells, - two-dimensional calculations: geometrically detailed simulation of the configuration in few energy groups, - burnup: evolution of the nuclide densities as a function of time. This manual shows all input commands which can be used while running the different modules of BOXER. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  9. Applications of nano-fluids to enhance LWR accidents management in in-vessel retention and emergency core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chupin, A.; Hu, L. W.; Buongiorno, J.

    2008-01-01

    Water-based nano-fluid, colloidal dispersions of nano-particles in water; have been shown experimentally to increase the critical heat flux and surface wettability at very low concentrations. The use of nano-fluids to enhance accidents management would allow either to increase the safe margins in case of severe accidents or to upgrade the power of an existing power plant with constant margins. Building on the initial work, computational fluid dynamics simulations of the nano-fluid injection system have been performed to evaluate the feasibility of a nano-fluid injection system for in-vessel retention application. A preliminary assessment was also conducted on the emergency core cooling system of the European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) to implement a nano-fluid injection system for improving the management of loss of coolant accidents. Several design options were compared/or their respective merits and disadvantages based on criteria including time to injection, safety impact, and materials compatibility. (authors)

  10. HFR irradiation testing of light water reactor (LWR) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markgraf, J.F.W.

    1985-01-01

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information with emphasis on LWR fuel rod testing capabilities and hot cell investigation is presented. Additionally a summary of LWR fuel irradiation programmes performed and forthcoming programmes are described. Project management information and a list of publications pertaining to LWR fuel rod test programmes is given

  11. LWR aging management using a proactive approach to control materials degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, L.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Cumblidge, S.E.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Taylor, W.B.; Hull, A.B.; Malik, S.N.

    2009-01-01

    Material issues can be the limiting factor for the operation of nuclear power plants. There is growing interest in new and improved philosophies and methodologies for plant life management (PLiM), which include the migration from reliance on periodic inservice inspection to include condition-based maintenance. A further step in the development of plant management is the move from proactive responses based on ISI to become proactive, through the investigation of the potential for implementation of a proactive management of materials degradation (PMMD) program and its potential impact on the management of LWRs. (author)

  12. Liquid metal reactor core material HT9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kuk, I. H.; Ryu, W. S. and others

    1998-03-01

    A state-of-the art is surveyed on the liquid metal reactor core materials HT9. The purpose of this report is to give an insight for choosing and developing the materials to be applied to the KAERI prototype liquid metal reactor which is planned for the year of 2010. In-core stability of cladding materials is important to the extension of fuel burnup. Austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316) has been used as core material in the early LMR due to the good mechanical properties at high temperatures, but it has been found to show a poor swelling resistance. So many efforts have been made to solve this problem that HT9 have been developed. HT9 is 12Cr-1MoVW steel. The microstructure of HT9 consisted of tempered martensite with dispersed carbide. HT9 has superior irradiation swelling resistance as other BCC metals, and good sodium compatibility. HT9 has also a good irradiation creep properties below 500 dg C, but irradiation creep properties are degraded above 500 dg C. Researches are currently in progress to modify the HT9 in order to improve the irradiation creep properties above 500 dg C. New design studies for decreasing the core temperature below 500 dg C are needed to use HT9 as a core material. On the contrary, decrease of the thermal efficiency may occur due to lower-down of the operation temperature. (author). 51 refs., 6 tabs., 19 figs

  13. The role of cladding material for performance of LWR control assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewes, P.; Roppelt, A.

    2000-01-01

    The lifetime of control assemblies in LWRs can be limited presently by mechanical failure of the absorber cladding. The major cause of failure is mechanical interaction of the absorber with the cladding due to irradiation induced dimensional changes such as absorber swelling and cladding creep, resulting in cracking of the clad. Such failures occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Experience and in-reactor tests revealed that cracking can be avoided principally by two ways: First, if strain rates and hence, stresses in the cladding are kept low (well below the yield strength), significant strains can be tolerated. This is the case for the cladding of PWR control assemblies with slowly swelling Ag-In-Cd absorber. Recent examinations of highly exposed PWR control assemblies confirmed the design correlation up to the presently used strain limit. Second, in such cases where strongly swelling absorber material like boron carbide is still preferred, materials which are resistant against irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) can be used. The influence of material composition and condition on IASCC was studied in-reactor using tubular samples of various stainless steels and Ni-base alloys stressed by swelling mandrels. In several programme steps high purity materials with special features had been identified as resistant to IASCC. Another process of cladding damage which may occur in PWRs is wear caused by friction of the control rods in the surrounding guide structure. For replacement control assemblies this problem is solved by coating of the cladding. There exists meanwhile excellent experience of up to 18 operation cycles with coated claddings. (author)

  14. In-vessel core degradation in LWR severe accidents: a state of the art report to CSNI january 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This state of the art report on in-vessel core degradation has been produced at the request of CSNI Principal Working Group 2. The objective of the report is to present to CSNI member countries the status of research and related information on in-vessel degraded core behaviour in both Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Information on experiments, codes and comparisons of calculations with experiments up to january 1991 is summarised and reviewed. Integrated codes, which are wider in scope than just in-vessel degradation are covered as well as specialist, degraded core codes. Implications for PWR and BWR plant calculations are considered. Conclusions and recommendations for research, plant calculations and further CSNI activity in this area are the subject of the final chapter. A major conclusion of the report is that early phase core degradation is relatively well understood. However, codes need further development to bring them up to date with the experimental database, particularly to include low temperature liquefaction processes. These processes significantly affect early phase core degradation and their neglect could affect assessments of accident management actions (including recriticality in BWR severe accidents)

  15. Adsorption and revaporisation studies on iodine oxide aerosols deposited on containment surface materials in LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.R.StJ.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Lamminmaeki, S.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    During a hypothetical severe nuclear accident, the radiation field will be very high in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a result gaseous radiolysis products will be formed. Elemental iodine can react in the gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (iodine oxide). Within the AIAS (Adsorption of Iodine oxide Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of iodine oxide (IOx) aerosols with common containment surface materials were investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS, as well as Pt and Pd surfaces from hydrogen recombiners. Non-radioactive and {sup 131}I labelled iodine oxide aerosols were produced with the EXSI CONT facility from elemental iodine and ozone at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The iodine oxide deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the kind of iodine oxide formed and if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials occurs. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited iodine oxide aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 having a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The revaporisated {sup 131}I species from the surfaces were chemically tested for elemental iodine formation. The parameter dominating the degradation of the produced iodine oxide aerosols was humidity. Cu and Zn surfaces were found to react with iodine from the iodine oxide aerosols to form iodides, while no metal iodides were detected for Al and SS samples. Most of the iodine oxide aerosols are assumed to

  16. Adsorption and revaporisation studies on iodine oxide aerosols deposited on containment surface materials in LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.R.StJ.; Ekberg, C.; Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Lamminmaeki, S.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2012-12-01

    During a hypothetical severe nuclear accident, the radiation field will be very high in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a result gaseous radiolysis products will be formed. Elemental iodine can react in the gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (iodine oxide). Within the AIAS (Adsorption of Iodine oxide Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of iodine oxide (IOx) aerosols with common containment surface materials were investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS, as well as Pt and Pd surfaces from hydrogen recombiners. Non-radioactive and 131 I labelled iodine oxide aerosols were produced with the EXSI CONT facility from elemental iodine and ozone at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The iodine oxide deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the kind of iodine oxide formed and if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials occurs. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited iodine oxide aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 having a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The revaporisated 131 I species from the surfaces were chemically tested for elemental iodine formation. The parameter dominating the degradation of the produced iodine oxide aerosols was humidity. Cu and Zn surfaces were found to react with iodine from the iodine oxide aerosols to form iodides, while no metal iodides were detected for Al and SS samples. Most of the iodine oxide aerosols are assumed to be

  17. TRU composition changes and their influence on FBR core characteristics in the LWR-to-FBR transition period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shuhei; Ohki, Shigeo; Mizuno, Tomoyasu

    2009-01-01

    In the conceptual core and fuel design studies in Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT Project) in Japan, much interest has been taken in the fuel nuclide compositions for a transition period from light water reactor to fast breeder reactor (FBR). In this paper, the range of transuranic (TRU) nuclide composition to be provided to FBR is evaluated with extended recycling scenario calculations. The influence of TRU composition changes on FBR core characteristics are also discussed with explanations of major contributing factors. (author)

  18. Summary of NRC LWR safety research programs on fuel behavior, metallurgy/materials and operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.

    1979-09-01

    The NRC light-water reactor safety-research program is part of the NRC regulatory program for ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants. This paper summarizes the results of NRC-sponsored research into fuel behavior, metallurgy and materials, and operational safety. The fuel behavior research program provides a detailed understanding of the response of nuclear fuel assemblies to postulated off-normal or accident conditions. Fuel behavior research includes studies of basic fuel rod properties, in-reactor tests, computer code development, fission product release and fuel meltdown. The metallurgy and materials research program provides independent confirmation of the safe design of reactor vessels and piping. This program includes studies on fracture mechanics, irradiation embrittlement, stress corrosion, crack growth, and nondestructive examination. The operational safety research provides direct assistance to NRC officials concerned with the operational and operational-safety aspects of nuclear power plants. The topics currently being addressed include qualification testing evaluation, fire protection, human factors, and noise diagnostics

  19. Thermal conductivity degradation analyses of LWR MOX fuel by the quasi-two phase material model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaka, Yuji; Kurematsu, Shigeru; Kitagawa, Takaaki; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    The temperature measurements of mixed oxide (MOX) and UO 2 fuels during irradiation suggested that the thermal conductivity degradation rate of the MOX fuel with burnup should be slower than that of the UO 2 fuel. In order to explain the difference of the degradation rates, the quasi-two phase material model is proposed to assess the thermal conductivity degradation of the MIMAS MOX fuel, which takes into account the Pu agglomerate distributions in the MOX fuel matrix as fabricated. As a result, the quasi-two phase model calculation shows the gradual increase of the difference with burnup and may expect more than 10% higher thermal conductivity values around 75 GWd/t. While these results are not fully suitable for thermal conductivity degradation models implemented by some industrial fuel manufacturers, they are consistent with the results from the irradiation tests and indicate that the inhomogeneity of Pu content in the MOX fuel can be one of the major reasons for the moderation of the thermal conductivity degradation of the MOX fuel. (author)

  20. Geometric radiation exchange factors for axial radiative transfer in an LWR core filled with absorbing-emitting gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.H.; Cho, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A reactor core filled with an emitting-absorbing mixture (like steam, hydrogen gas and fission gases) is considered. Analysis is provided to evaluate axial radiative heat exchange of a rod bundle with a nonuniform axial temperature distribution. The necessary radiation exchange shape factors (geometric mean absorptance, emittance and transmittance) between segments of the complex rod bundle arrangement are presented. They are applicable to arbitrary sizes of segments, well suited for numerical computations

  1. Reaction- and melting behaviour of LWR-core components UO2, Zircaloy and steel during the meltdown period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1976-07-01

    The reaction behaviour of the UO 2 , Zircaloy-4 and austenitic steel core components was investigated as a function of temperature (till melting temperatures) under inert and oxidizing conditions. Component concentrations varied between that of Corium-A (65 wt.% UO 2 , 18% Zry, 17% steel) and that of Corium-E (35 wt.% UO 2 , 10% Zry, 55% steel). In addition, Zircaloy and stainless steel were used with different degrees of oxidation. The paper describes systematically the phases that arise during heating and melting. The integral composition of the melts and the qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of the phases present in solidified corium are given. In some cases melting points have been determined. The reaction and melting behaviour of the corium specimens strongly depends on the concentration and on the degree of oxidation of the core components. First liquid phases are formed at the Zry-steel interface at about 1,350 0 C. The maximum temperatures of about 2,500 0 C for the complete melting of the corium-specimens are well below the UO 2 melting point. Depending on the steel content and/or degree of oxidation of Zry and steel, a homogeneous metallic or oxide melt or two immiscible melts - one oxide and the other metallic - are obtained. During the melting experiments performed under inert gas conditions the chemical composition of the molten specimens generally change by evaporation losses of single elements, especially of uranium, zirconium and oxygen. The total weight losses go up to 30%; under oxidizing conditions they are substantially smaller due to the occurrence of different phases. In air or water vapor, the occurrence of the phases and the melting behaviour of the core components are strongly influenced by the oxidation rate and the oxygen supply to the surface of the melt. In the case of the hypothetical core melting accident, a heterogeneous melt (oxide and metallic) is probable after the meltdown period. (orig./RW) [de

  2. Material Performance of Fully-Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel under Selected LWR Design Basis Scenarios: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, B.; Sen, R.S.; Pope, M.A.; Ougouag, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The extension to LWRs of the use of Deep-Burn coated particle fuel envisaged for HTRs has been investigated. TRISO coated fuel particles are used in Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel within a SiC matrix rather than the graphite of HTRs. TRISO particles are well characterized for uranium-fueled HTRs. However, operating conditions of LWRs are different from those of HTRs (temperature, neutron energy spectrum, fast fluence levels, power density). Furthermore, the time scales of transient core behavior during accidents are usually much shorter and thus more severe in LWRs. The PASTA code was updated for analysis of stresses in coated particle FCM fuel. The code extensions enable the automatic use of neutronic data (burnup, fast fluence as a function of irradiation time) obtained using the DRAGON neutronics code. An input option for automatic evaluation of temperature rise during anticipated transients was also added. A new thermal model for FCM was incorporated into the code; so-were updated correlations (for pyrocarbon coating layers) suitable to estimating dimensional changes at the high fluence levels attained in LWR DB fuel. Analyses of the FCM fuel using the updated PASTA code under nominal and accident conditions show: (1) Stress levels in SiC-coatings are low for low fission gas release (FGR) fractions of several percent, as based on data of fission gas diffusion in UO 2 kernels. However, the high burnup level of LWR-DB fuel implies that the FGR fraction is more likely to be in the range of 50-100%, similar to Inert Matrix Fuels (IMFs). For this range the predicted stresses and failure fractions of the SiC coating are high for the reference particle design (500 (micro)mm kernel diameter, 100 (micro)mm buffer, 35 (micro)mm IPyC, 35 (micro)mm SiC, 40 (micro)mm OPyC). A conservative case, assuming 100% FGR, 900K fuel temperature and 705 MWd/kg (77% FIMA) fuel burnup, results in a 8.0 x 10 -2 failure probability. For a 'best-estimate' FGR fraction of 50

  3. Constitution and reaction behavior of LWR materials at core melting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holleck, H.; Skokan, A.; Janzer, H.; Schlickeise, G.; Riemueller, K.; Stroemann, H.; Nold, E.; Schaefer, A.

    1979-01-01

    Crucible melting experiments were performed with mixtures of preoxidized corium and basaltic or limestone concrete in order to investigate the oxidation behavior of the fission products, esp. Mo and Ru, at elevated oxygen partial pressures by H 2 O and CO 2 released from concrete. - The solidification behavior of the metallic and oxide fractions of corium (A+R) and corium (E+R) in the course of the interaction with basaltic or limestone concrete was investigated by crucible experiments. -Thermoanalytical investigations were performed with concrete of different types ranging from pure basaltic to pure limestone aggregates in order to test the possibility of reactions between CaO and SiO 2 during the heating up period. (orig./RW) [de

  4. Fuel cycle performance indices in a high-converting LWR core design with once-through thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung-Hyun; Kim, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Young-il

    2004-01-01

    A design concept of pressure-tube type light water cooled reactor (HCPLWR) core was proposed as a thermal high-conversion reactor using a thorium based once-through cycle strategy. In a previous work, fuel cycle economics and nuclear safety were confirmed. In this work, HCPLWR was evaluated in the aspects of proliferation resistance and transmutation capability. Evaluation was done as a direct comparison of indices with PWR, CANDU and Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF). Conversion ratio was measured by fissile inventory ratio and fissile gain. Proliferation resistance of plutonium composition from spent seed and blanket fuels was measured by bare critical mass, spontaneous neutron source rate, and thermal heat generation rate. For the evaluation of long-lived minor actinide transmutation was measured by a new parameter, effective fission half-life. Two-dimensional calculation for the assembly-wise unit module showed each parameter values. Even though conversion capability of HCPLWR was higher than one of RTF, it was concluded that current HCPLWR design was not favorable than RTF. Design optimization is required for the future work. (author)

  5. Critical experiment program of heterogeneous core composed for LWR fuel rods and low enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Shouichi; Nakamura, Takemi

    2003-01-01

    In order to stimulate the criticality characteristics of a dissolver in a reprocessing plant, a critical experiment program of heterogeneous cores is under going at a Static Critical Experimental Facility, STACY in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, JAERI. The experimental system is composed of 5w/o enriched PWR-type fuel rod array immersed in 6w/o enriched uranyl nitrate solution. First series of experiments are basic benchmark experiments on fundamental critical data in order to validate criticality calculation codes for 'general-form system' classified in the Japanese Criticality Safety Handbook, JCSHB. Second series of experiments are concerning the neutron absorber effects of fission products related to the burn-up credit Level-2. For demonstrating the reactivity effects of fission products, reactivity effects of natural elements such as Sm, Nd, Eu and 103 Rh, 133 Cs, solved in the nitrate solution are to be measured. The objective of third series of experiments is to validate the effect of gadolinium as a soluble neutron poison. Properties of temperature coefficients and kinetic parameters are also studied, since these parameters are important to evaluate the transient behavior of the criticality accident. (author)

  6. Power distribution investigation in the transition phase of the low moderation type MOX fueled LWR from the high conversion core to the breeding core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    The key concept of Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) is a core transition from a high conversion (HC) type to a plutonium breeding (BR) type in a same reactor system only by replacing fuel assemblies. Consequently in this transition phase, there are two types of assemblies in the same core. Due to the differences of the two assembly types, region-wise soft to hard neutron spectra appears and result in a large power peaking. Therefore, power distribution of FLWR in the HC to BR transition phase was studied by performing assembly and core calculations. For the whole core calculation, a new 14-group energy structure is developed to better represent the power distribution obtained with the fine 107-group structure than the 9-group structure in the previous evaluations. Calculations on few assemblies geometries show large local power peakings can be effectively reduced by considering plutonium enrichment distribution in an assembly. In the whole core calculation, there is a power level mismatch between HC and BR assemblies, but overall power distribution flattening is possible by optimizing fuel assemblies loading. Although the fuel loading should be decided also taking into account the void coefficient, transition from HC to BR type FLWR seems feasible without difficulty. (author)

  7. Reactor core materials research and integrated material database establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Jang, J. S.; Kim, D. W.

    2002-03-01

    Mainly two research areas were covered in this project. One is to establish the integrated database of nuclear materials, and the other is to study the behavior of reactor core materials, which are usually under the most severe condition in the operating plants. During the stage I of the project (for three years since 1999) in- and out of reactor properties of stainless steel, the major structural material for the core structures of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), were evaluated and specification of nuclear grade material was established. And the damaged core components from domestic power plants, e.g. orifice of CVCS, support pin of CRGT, etc. were investigated and the causes were revealed. To acquire more resistant materials to the nuclear environments, development of the alternative alloys was also conducted. For the integrated DB establishment, a task force team was set up including director of nuclear materials technology team, and projector leaders and relevant members from each project. The DB is now opened in public through the Internet

  8. The materials challenge for LFR core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, Giacomo; Agostini, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    LFR share the main issues of all Fast Reactors, while presenting specific issues due to the use of lead as coolant. A number of constraints impairs the design of a LFR core, possibly resulting in a viability domain not exploitable for producing electricity in an efficient (hence economic) way. In particular, the most restrictive issues to be faced pend on the cladding. The selection of proper cladding materials provides the solution for the issues impairing the resistance of the cladding against stresses and irradiation effects. On the other hand, the protection of the cladding requires surface protections like oxide scales (passivation) or adherent layers (coating). Oxide scales seem not sufficient for a stable and effective protection of the base material. The application of adherent layers seems the only promising solution for protecting the cladding against corrosion. For the short term (i.e.: ALFRED), advanced 15/15Ti with coating is the reference solution for the cladding, allowing a core design complying with all the design constraints and goals. The candidate coatings are already being tested under irradiation to proceed towards qualification. In parallel, new base materials and/or coatings are presently under investigation. For the long term (i.e.: ELFR), the availability of such advanced materials/coatings might allow the extension of the viability domain towards higher and broader ranges (temperature, dpa, etc.), extending the fields of applications of LFRs and resulting in higher performances

  9. Implication of irradiation effects on materials data for the design of near core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, W.; Breitling, H.

    1995-01-01

    For LWR's strict regulations exist for the consideration of irradiation in the design and surveillance of the reactor pressure vessel in the various codes (ASME, RCC-M, KTA) but less for near core components. For FBR's no firm rules exist either for the vessel nor the reactor internals. In this paper the German design practices for the loop type SNR-300 will be presented, and also some information from the surveillance programme of the KNK-reactor. Austenitic stainless steels have been mainly selected for the near core components. For some special applications Ni-alloys and a stabilized 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo-alloy were specified. Considerations of the irradiation effects on material properties will be made for the various temperature and fluence levels around the core. The surveillance programmes will be described. Both, the consideration of irradiation effects in the elastic and inelastic analysis and the surveillance programmes had been a part of the licensing process for SNR-300. (author). 8 figs, 4 tabs

  10. Lifetime embrittlement of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreyns, P.H..; Bourgeois, W.F.; Charpentier, P.L.; Kammenzind, B.F.; Franklin, D.G.; White, C.J.

    1994-08-01

    Over a core lifetime, the reactor materials Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium may become embrittled due to the absorption of corrosion- generated hydrogen and to neutron irradiation damage. Results are presented on the effects of fast fluence on the fracture toughness of wrought Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium; Zircaloy-4 to hafnium butt welds; and hydrogen precharged beta treated and weld metal Zircaloy-4 for fluences up to a maximum of approximately 150 x 10 24 n/M 2 (> 1 Mev). While Zircaloy-4 did not exhibit a decrement in K IC due to irradiation, hafnium and butt welds between hafnium and Zircaloy-4 are susceptible to embrittlement with irradiation. The embrittlement can be attributed to irradiation strengthening, which promotes cleavage fracture in hafnium and hafnium-Zircaloy welds, and, in part, to the lower chemical potential of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4 compared to hafnium, which causes hydrogen, over time, to drift from the hafnium end toward the Zircaloy-4 end and to precipitate at the interface between the weld and base-metal interface. Neutron radiation apparently affects the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium in different ways. Possible explanations for these differences are suggested. It was found that Zircaloy-4 is preferred over Zircaloy-2 in hafnium-to- Zircaloy butt-weld applications due to its absence of a radiation- induced reduction in K IC plus its lower hydrogen absorption characteristics compared with Zircaloy-2

  11. Adhesion of resin composite core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, K L; Powers, J M

    2001-01-01

    This study determined (1) the effect of polymerization mode of resin composite core materials and dental adhesives on the bond strength to dentin, and (2) if dental adhesives perform as well to dentin etched with phosphoric acid as to dentin etched with self-etching primer. Human third molars were sectioned 2 mm from the highest pulp horn and polished. Three core materials (Fluorocore [dual cured], Core Paste [self-cured], and Clearfil Photo Core [light cured]) and two adhesives (Prime & Bond NT Dual Cure and Clearfil SE Bond [light cured]) were bonded to dentin using two dentin etching conditions. After storage, specimens were debonded in microtension and bond strengths were calculated. Scanning electron micrographs of representative bonding interfaces were analyzed. Analysis showed differences among core materials, adhesives, and etching conditions. Among core materials, dual-cured Fluorocore had the highest bond strengths. There were incompatibilities between self-cured Core Paste and Prime & Bond NT in both etched (0 MPa) and nonetched (3.0 MPa) dentin. Among adhesives, in most cases Clearfil SE Bond had higher bond strengths than Prime & Bond NT and bond strengths were higher to self-etched than to phosphoric acid-etched dentin. Scanning electron micrographs did not show a relationship between resin tags and bond strengths. There were incompatibilities between a self-cured core material and a dual-cured adhesive. All other combinations of core materials and adhesives produced strong in vitro bond strengths both in the self-etched and phosphoric acid-etched conditions.

  12. Fatigue management considering LWR coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Heung Bae; Jin, Tae eun

    2000-01-01

    Design fatigue curve for structural material in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments has been a concern ever since the early 1970's. And, recent fatigue test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue lives of carbon steels, low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. For these reasons, fatigue of major components has been identified as a technical issue remaining to be resolved for life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. In the present paper, results of recent investigations by many organizations are reviewed to provide technical justification to support the development of utility approach regarding the management of fatigue considering LWR coolant environments for the purpose of life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. (author)

  13. ELCOS: the PSI code system for LWR core analysis. Part II: user`s manual for the fuel assembly code BOXER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paratte, J.M.; Grimm, P.; Hollard, J.M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-02-01

    ELCOS is a flexible code system for the stationary simulation of light water reactor cores. It consists of the four computer codes ETOBOX, BOXER, CORCOD and SILWER. The user`s manual of the second one is presented here. BOXER calculates the neutronics in cartesian geometry. The code can roughly be divided into four stages: - organisation: choice of the modules, file manipulations, reading and checking of input data, - fine group fluxes and condensation: one-dimensional calculation of fluxes and computation of the group constants of homogeneous materials and cells, - two-dimensional calculations: geometrically detailed simulation of the configuration in few energy groups, - burnup: evolution of the nuclide densities as a function of time. This manual shows all input commands which can be used while running the different modules of BOXER. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  14. Molten core material holding device in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobuo; Takahashi, Katsuro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of cooling to hold molten core materials in a molten core material holding device. Constitution: Plenum structures are formed into a pan-like configuration, in which liners made of metal having high melting point and relatively high heat conductivity such as tantalum, tungsten, rhenium or alloys thereof are integrally appended to hold and directly cool the molten reactor core materials. Further, a plurality of heat pipes, passing through the plenum structures, facing the cooling portion thereof to the coolants at the outer side and immersing the heating portion into the molten core materials fallen to deposit in the inner liners are disposed radially. Furthermore, heat pipes embodded in the plenum structure are disposed in the same manner below the liners. Thus, the plenum structures and the molten reactor core materials can be cooled at a high efficiency. (Seki, T.)

  15. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...... correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...... that the diameter of the core material in models is chosen in such a way that the Froude scale law holds for a characteristic pore velocity. The characteristic pore velocity is chosen as the average velocity of a most critical area in the core with respect to porous flow. Finally the method is demonstrated...

  16. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T.

    1998-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  17. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T. [Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  18. Radionuclide sorption on granitic drill core material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.; Locklund, B.

    1987-11-01

    Distribution ratios were determined for Sr-85, Cs-134 and Eu-152 on crushed granite and fissure coating/filling material from Stripa mines. Measurements were also carried out on intact fissure surfaces. The experimental data for Sr-85, Cs-134 on crushed material can be accomodated by a sorption model based on the assumption that the crushed material consists of porous spheres with outer and inner surfaces available for sorption. In the case of Eu-152 only sorption on the outer surfaces of the crushed material was observed. The absence of sorption on inner surfaces is most probably due to high depletion of the more strongly sorbed Eu-152 in the water phase and very low diffusivity of Eu-152 in the sorbed state. (orig./HP)

  19. Modeling of hot tensile and short-term creep strength for LWR piping materials under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Y.; Maruyama, Y.; Chino, E.; Shibazaki, H.; Kudo, T.; Hidaka, A.; Hashimoto, K.; Sugimoto, J.

    2000-01-01

    The analytical study on severe accident shows the possibility of the reactor coolant system (RCS) piping failure before reactor pressure vessel failure under the high primary pressure sequence at pressurized water reactors. The establishment of the high-temperature strength model of the realistic RCS piping materials is important in order to predict precisely the accident progression and to evaluate the piping behavior with small uncertainties. Based on material testing, the 0.2% proof stress and the ultimate tensile strength above 800degC were given by the equations of second degree as a function of the reciprocal absolute temperature considering the strength increase due to fine precipitates for the piping materials. The piping materials include type 316 stainless steel, type 316 stainless steel of nuclear grade, CF8M cast duplex stainless steel and STS410 carbon steel. Also the short-term creep rupture time and the minimum creep rate at high-temperature were given by the modified Norton's Law as a function of stress and temperature considering the effect of the precipitation formation and resolution on the creep strength. The present modified Norton's Law gives better results than the conventional Larson-Miller method. Correlating the creep data (the applied stress versus the minimum creep rate) with the tensile data (the 0.2% proof stress or the ultimate tensile strength versus the strain rate), it was found that the dynamic recrystallization significantly occurred at high-temperature. (author)

  20. Fracture-mechanics data deduced from thermal-shock and related experiments with LWR pressure-vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Canonico, D.A.; Iskander, S.K.; Bolt, S.E.; Holz, P.P.; Nanstad, R.K.; Stelzman, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    Pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are susceptible to certain types of hypothetical accidents that can subject the reactor pressure vessel to severe thermal shock, that is, a rapid cooling of the inner surface of the vessel wall. The thermal-shock loading, coupled with the radiation-induced reduction in the material fracture toughness, introduces the possibility of propagation of preexistent flaws and what at one time were regarded as somewhat unique fracture-oriented conditions. Several postulated reactor accidents have been analyzed to discover flaw behavior trends; seven intermediate-scale thermal-shock experiments with steel cylinders have been conducted; and corresponding materials characterization studies have been performed. Flaw behavior trends and related fracture-mechanics data deduced from these studies are discussed

  1. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, S.; Griffith, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R and D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental enhancements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and fuel/cladding interaction to allow improved fuel economy via power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an 'accident tolerant' fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. In a staged development approach, the LWRS program will engage stakeholders throughout the development process to ensure commercial viability of the investigated technologies. Applying minimum performance criteria, several of the top-ranked materials and fabrication concepts will undergo a rigorous series of mechanical, thermal and chemical characterization tests to better define their properties and operating potential in a relatively low-cost, nonnuclear test series. A reduced number of options will be recommended for test rodlet fabrication and in-pile nuclear testing under steady-state, transient and accident conditions. (author)

  2. Review of tellurium release rates from LWR fuel elements under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, R.A.; Beahm, E.C.; Wichner, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Although fission product tellurium presents a potentially significant radiohazard, its release and transport in source-term experiments is frequently overlooked because it does not possess a readily measurable, gamma emission; moreover, a recent study emphasized noble gas, iodine and cesium release from LWR fuel elements because of the large data base that exists for these materials. Some new tests show that in some cases tellurium may be held up in core material to a greater degree than previously assumed - an observation that prompts a careful reappraisal of the existing tellurium-release data and its chemical foundation

  3. Investigation of space-energy effects in the reactivity measurement by neutron noise with ex-core detectors in a reflected LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescano, V.H.; Behringer, K.

    1981-11-01

    Practical application of the zero-crossing correlation method for measuring slightly subcritical reactivities in a swimming pool reactor required the use of detector locations in the reflector zone near to the core boundary. Experimental investigations of neutron-noise cross-power spectra showed significant deviations from the point reactor model at higher frequencies (> 100 Hz). Nevertheless, the use of the point reactor model was found to be an useful approach in the analysis of the zero-crossing correlation method yielding results which agreed well with those obtained from the rod-drop method. The theoretical part of the work is concerned with a space-dependent model calculation in two-group diffusion theory to support the experimental findings. The model calculation can explain the trends observed in the neutron-noise spectra as well as the applicability of the point reactor model to the zero-crossing correlation method. To obtain better insight, the calculations have been extended to neutron-noise spectra when one or both detectors are located in the core zone. In the case of a large core and widely spaced detectors, with at least one detector in the core zone, a sink frequency appears in the spectra. This effect is well-known in coupled-core kinetics. (Auth.)

  4. A finite element thermal analysis of various dowel and core materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti Varghese

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Non-metallic dowel and core materials such as fibre reinforced composite dowels (FRC generate greater stress than metallic dowel and core materials. This emphasized the preferable use of the metallic dowel and core materials in the oral environment.

  5. Core Design Concept and Core Structural Material Development for a Prototype SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jinwook

    2013-01-01

    Core design Concept: – Initial core is Uranium metal fueled core, then it will evolve into TRU core; – Tight pressure drop constraint lowers power density; – Trade-off studies with relaxed pressure drop constraint (~0.4MPa) are on-going; – Major feature will be finalized this year. • KAERI is developing advanced cladding for high burnup fuel in Ptototype SFR: – Advanced cladding materials are now developing, which shows superior high temperature mechanical property to the conventional material; – Processing technologies related to tube making process are now developed to enhance high temperature mechanical propertyl – Preliminary HT9 cladding tube was manufactured and out-of pile mechanical properties were evaluated. Advanced cladding tube is now being developed and being prepared for irradiation test

  6. Prediction of fission product and aerosol behaviour during a postulated severe accident in a LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentay, S.; Aeby, F.; Raguin, M.; Passalacqua, R.

    1990-02-01

    Lack of appropriate energy removal causes fuel elements in a reactor core to overheat and may eventually cause core to degrade. Fission products will be emitted from a degraded reactor core. Aerosols are generated when the vapours of various fuel and structural materials reach a cold environment and nucleate. In addition to the fission products release and aerosol generation taking place in the reactor vessel, some more fission products release and aerosol generation will occur when the molten core debris leaves the pressure vessel bottom head and comes in contact with the pedestal concrete floor. Fission products, if they are released to environment from the containment boundary, exert a great danger to public health. A source term is defined as the quantity, timing, and characteristics of the release of radionuclide material to the environment following a postulated severe accident. At PSI a considerable effort hase been spent in investigating and establishing a source term assessment methodology in order to predict the source term for a given Light Water Reactor (LWR) accident scenario. This report introduces the computer programs and the methods associated with the release of the fission products, generation of the aerosols and behaviour of the aerosols in LWR compartments used for a source term assessment analysis at PSI. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 28 refs

  7. Fatigue Characterization of Fire Resistant Syntactic Foam Core Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Mynul

    Eco-Core is a fire resistant material for sandwich structural application; it was developed at NC A&T State University. The Eco-Core is made of very small amount of phenolic resin and large volume of flyash by a syntactic process. The process development, static mechanical and fracture, fire and toxicity safety and water absorption properties and the design of sandwich structural panels with Eco-Core material was established and published in the literature. One of the important properties that is needed for application in transportation vehicles is the fatigue performance under different stress states. Fatigue data are not available even for general syntactic foams. The objective of this research is to investigate the fatigue performance of Eco-Core under three types of stress states, namely, cyclic compression, shear and flexure, then document failure modes, and develop empherical equations for predicting fatigue life of Eco-Core under three stress states. Compression-Compression fatigue was performed directly on Eco-Core cylindrical specimen, whereas shear and flexure fatigue tests were performed using sandwich beam made of E glass-Vinyl Ester face sheet and Eco-Core material. Compression-compression fatigue test study was conducted at two values of stress ratios (R=10 and 5), for the maximum compression stress (sigmamin) range of 60% to 90% of compression strength (sigmac = 19.6 +/- 0.25 MPa) for R=10 and 95% to 80% of compression strength for R=5. The failure modes were characterized by the material compliance change: On-set (2% compliance change), propagation (5%) and ultimate failure (7%). The number of load cycles correspond to each of these three damages were characterized as on-set, propagation and total lives. A similar approach was used in shear and flexure fatigue tests with stress ratio of R=0.1. The fatigue stress-number of load cycles data followed the standard power law equation for all three stress states. The constant of the equation were

  8. Applications of simulation experiments in LMFBR core materials technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    The development of charged particle bombardment experiments to simulate neutron irradiation induced swelling in austenitic alloys is briefly described. The applications of these techniques in LMFBR core materials technology are discussed. It is shown that use of the techniques to study the behavior of cold-worked Type-316 was instrumental in demonstrating at an early date the need for advanced materials. The simulation techniques then were used to identify alloying elements which can markedly decrease swelling and thus a focused reactor irradiation program is now in place to allow the future use of a lower swelling alloy for LMFBR core components

  9. Spectrophotometric Evaluation of Polyetheretherketone (PEEK as a Core Material and a Comparison with Gold Standard Core Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogna Stawarczyk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the colorimetric properties of different veneering materials on core materials. Standardized specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 1.5 mm reflecting four core (polyetheretherketone (PEEK, zirconia (ZrO2, cobalt–chromium–molybdenum alloy (CoCrMo, and titanium oxide (TiO2; thickness: 1.5 mm and veneering materials (VITA Mark II, IPS e.max CAD, LAVA Ultimate and VITA Enamic, all in shade A3; thickness: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 mm, respectively were fabricated. Specimens were superimposed to assemblies, and the color was determined with a spectrophotometer (CieLab-System or a chair-side color measurement device (VITA EasyShade, respectively. Data were analyzed using three-, two-, and one-way ANOVA, a Chi2-test, and a Wilson approach (p < 0.05. The measurements with EasyShade showed A2 for VITA Mark II, A3.5 for VITA Enamic, B2 for LAVA Ultimate, and B3 for IPS e.max CAD. LabE-values showed significant differences between the tested veneering materials (p < 0.001. CieLab-System and VITA EasyShade parameters of the different assemblies showed a significant impact of core (p < 0.001, veneering material (p < 0.001, and thickness of the veneering material (p < 0.001. PEEK as core material showed comparable outcomes as compared to ZrO2 and CoCrMo, with respect to CieLab-System parameters for each veneering material. The relative frequency of the measured VITA EasyShade parameters regarding PEEK cores also showed comparable results as compared to the gold standard CoCrMo, regardless of the veneering material used.

  10. 'CANDLE' burnup regime after LWR regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nagata, Akito

    2008-01-01

    CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) burnup strategy can derive many merits. From safety point of view, the change of excess reactivity along burnup is theoretically zero, and the core characteristics, such as power feedback coefficients and power peaking factor, are not changed along burnup. Application of this burnup strategy to neutron rich fast reactors makes excellent performances. Only natural or depleted uranium is required for the replacing fuels. About 40% of natural or depleted uranium undergoes fission without the conventional reprocessing and enrichment. If the LWR produced energy of X Joules, the CANDLE reactor can produce about 50X Joules from the depleted uranium left at the enrichment facility for the LWR fuel. If we can say LWRs have produced energy sufficient for full 20 years, we can produce the energy for 1000 years by using the CANDLE reactors with depleted uranium. We need not mine any uranium ore, and do not need reprocessing facility. The burnup of spent fuel becomes 10 times. Therefore, the spent fuel amount per produced energy is also reduced to one-tenth. The details of the scenario of CANDLE burnup regime after LWR regime will be presented at the symposium. (author)

  11. Nanostructured core-shell electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long-bo; Yuan, Xing-zhong; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Hou; Zeng, Guang-ming

    2016-11-01

    Core-shell nanostructure represents a unique system for applications in electrochemical energy storage devices. Owing to the unique characteristics featuring high power delivery and long-term cycling stability, electrochemical capacitors (ECs) have emerged as one of the most attractive electrochemical storage systems since they can complement or even replace batteries in the energy storage field, especially when high power delivery or uptake is needed. This review aims to summarize recent progress on core-shell nanostructures for advanced supercapacitor applications in view of their hierarchical architecture which not only create the desired hierarchical porous channels, but also possess higher electrical conductivity and better structural mechanical stability. The core-shell nanostructures include carbon/carbon, carbon/metal oxide, carbon/conducting polymer, metal oxide/metal oxide, metal oxide/conducting polymer, conducting polymer/conducting polymer, and even more complex ternary core-shell nanoparticles. The preparation strategies, electrochemical performances, and structural stabilities of core-shell materials for ECs are summarized. The relationship between core-shell nanostructure and electrochemical performance is discussed in detail. In addition, the challenges and new trends in core-shell nanomaterials development have also been proposed.

  12. Results of the LIRES Round Robin test on high temperature reference electrodes for LWR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, R.W. [SCK.CEN, Nuclear Research Centre Belgium, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Nagy, G. [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia KFKI Atomenergia Kutatointezet, AEKI, Konkoly Thege ut 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Feron, D. [CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Navas, M. [CIEMAT, Edificio 30, Dpto. Fision Nuclear, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid, (Spain); Bogaerts, W. [KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 31, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Karnik, D. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Dorsch, T. [Framatone ANP, Inc., Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Molander, A. [Studsvik AB SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden); Maekelae, K. [Materials and Structural Integrity, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Kemistintie 3, P.O. Box 1704, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    A European sponsored research project has been started on 1 October 2000 to develop high temperature reference electrodes that can be used for in-core electrochemical measurements in Light Water Reactors (LWR's). This LIRES-project (Development of Light Water Reactor Reference Electrodes) consists of 9 partners (SCK-CEN, AEKI, CEA, CIEMAT, KU Leuven, NRI Rez, Framatone ANP, Studsvik Nuclear and VTT) and will last for four years. The main objective of this LIRES project is to develop a reference electrode, which is robust enough to be used inside a LWR. Emphasize is put on the radiation hardness of both the mechanical design of the electrode as the proper functioning of the electrode. A four steps development trajectory is foreseen: (1) To set a testing standard for a Round Robin, (2) To develop different reference electrodes, (3) To perform a Round Robin test of these reference electrodes followed by selection of the best reference electrode(s), (4) To perform irradiation tests under appropriate LWR conditions in a Material Test Reactor (MTR). Four different high temperature reference electrodes have been developed and are being tested in a Round Robin test. These electrodes are: A Ceramic Membrane Electrode (CME), a Rhodium electrode, an external Ag/AgCl electrode and a Palladium electrode. The presentation will focus on the results obtained with the Round Robin test. (authors)

  13. Radiation quality factor of spherical antennas with material cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Vejle; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a description of the radiation quality factor and resonances of spherical antennas with material cores. Conditions for cavity and radiating resonances are given, and a theoretical description of the radiation quality factor, as well as simple expressions describing the relative...

  14. Use of stainless steel as structural materials in reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodoro, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are used as structural materials in reactor cores, due to their good mechanical properties at working temperatures and high generalized corrosion resistance in aqueous medium. The objective of this paper is to compare several 300 series austenitic stainless steels related to mechanical properties, localized corrosion resistance (SCC and intergranular) and content of delta ferrite. (author)

  15. Electrical properties of spherical dipole antennas with lossy material cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Vejle; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2012-01-01

    A spherical magnetic dipole antenna with a linear, isotropic, homogenous, passive, and lossy material core is modeled analytically, and closed form expressions are given for the internally stored magnetic and electric energies, the radiation efficiency, and radiation quality factor. This model...... and all the provided expressions are exact and valid for arbitrary core sizes, permeability, permittivity, electric and magnetic loss tangents. Arbitrary dispersion models for both permeability and permittivity can be applied. In addition, we present an investigation for an antenna of fixed electrical...

  16. The recent advances on carrier materials for microencapsulating lipophilic cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIN Minfeng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipophilic ingredients,such as polyunsaturated fatty acids,play an important role in industrialized foods to fortify the nutrients.However,these materials are normally sensitive to oxygen,light or heat to be oxidized,and hard to flow and mix within the bulk food due to the hydrophobic nature.Microencapsulation of lipophilic materials could effectively extend their shelf lives,mask unsatisfied flavors,change their physicochemical properties,and enhance the mixing capacities.This work reviewed the different carrier materials applied in microencapsulating the lipophilic ingredients,and discussed their characteristics and effects on encapsulation efficiencies and release profiles of lipophilic cores.

  17. [Comparative investigation of compressive resistance of glass-cermet cements used as a core material in post-core systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, E; Cetiner, S; Koçak, F

    1989-09-01

    In post-core applications, addition to the cast designs restorations that are performed on fabrication posts with restorative materials are being used. To improve the physical properties of glass-ionomer cements that are popular today, glass-cermet cements have been introduced and those materials have been proposed to be an alternative restorative material in post-core applications. In this study, the compressive resistance of Ketac-Silver as a core material was investigated comparatively with amalgam and composite resins.

  18. Light Water Reactor (LWR) safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a historical review of the developments in the safely of LWR power plants is presented. The paper reviews the developments prior to the TMI-2 accident, i.e. the concept of the defense in depth, the design basis, the large LOCA technical controversies and the LWR safety research programs. The TMI-2 accident, which became a turning point in the history of the development of nuclear power is described briefly. The Chernobyl accident, which terrified the world and almost completely curtailed the development of nuclear power is also described briefly. The great international effort of research in the LWR design-base and severe accidents, which was, respectively, conducted prior to and following the TMI-2 and Chernobyl accidents is described next. We conclude that with the knowledge gained and the improvements in plant organisation/management and in the training of the staff at the presently-installed nuclear power stations, the LWR plants have achieved very high standards of safety and performance. The Generation 3 + LWR power plants, next to be installed, may claim to have reached the goal of assuring the safety of the public to a very large extent. This review is based on the historical developments in LWR safety that occurred primarily in USA. however, they are valid for the rest of the Western World. This review can not do justice to the many many fine contributions that have been made over the last fifty years to the cause of LWR safety. We apologize if we have not mentioned them. We also apologize for not providing references to many of the fine investigations, which have contributed towards LWR safety earning the conclusions that we describe just above

  19. The influence of core materials and mix on the performance of a 100 kVA three phase transformer core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, David E-mail: dave.snell@cogent-power.com; Coombs, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Various grades of grain-oriented electrical steel, and the effect of mixing domain refined and non-domain refined materials in the same three phase transformer core have been assessed using a developed computer-based test system. Ball unit domain refined material and non-domain refined material can be successfully mixed in the same core, without degrading performance.

  20. Survey of melt interactions with core retention material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the interactions of up to 220 kg stainless steel melts at 1973 0 K with the candidate core retention materials borax, firebrick, high alumina cement, and magnesia is described. Data collected for the interactions include rates of material erosion, aerosol generation, gas evolution, and upward heat flux. Borax acts as an ablative solid that rapidly quenches the melt. Firebrick is ablated by the steel melt at a rate of 8.2 x 10 -6 m/s. High alumina cement is found to be an attractive melt retention material especially if it can be used in the unhydrated form. Magnesia is also found to be an attractive material though it can be eroded by the molten oxides of steel

  1. Evaluation of downmotion time interval molten materials to core catcher during core disruptive accidents postulated in LMFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronov, S.A.; Kiryushin, A.I.; Kuzavkov, N.G.; Vlasichev, G.N.

    1994-01-01

    Hypothetical core disruptive accidents are postulated to clear potential of a reactor plant to withstand extreme conditions and to generate measures for management and mitigation of accidents consequence. In Russian advanced reactors there is a core catcher below the diagrid to prevent vessel bottom melting and to localize fuel debris. In this paper the calculation technique and estimation of relocation time of molten fuel and materials are presented in the case of core disruptive accidents postulated for LMFR reactor. To evaluate minimum interval of fuel relocation time the calculations for different initial data are provided. Large mass of materials between the core and the catcher in LMFR reactor hinders molten materials relocation toward the vessel bottom. That condition increases the time interval of reaching core catcher by molten fuel. Computations performed allowed to evaluate the minimum molten materials relocation time from the core to the core catcher. This time interval is in a range of 3.5-5.5 hours. (author)

  2. Opalescence of all-ceramic core and veneer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon-Sang; Yu, Bin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-06-01

    The enamel of natural teeth is opalescent, where there is light scattering of the shorter wavelengths of the visible spectrum, giving a tooth a bluish appearance in the reflected color and an orange/brown appearance in the transmitted color. The objective of this study was to determine the opalescence of all-ceramic core, veneer and layered specimens with a color measuring spectrophotometer. Colors of core (A2-corresponding shade), veneer (A2- and A3-corresponding shades) and layered (A2- and A3-layered) ceramics for all-ceramic restorations in clinically relevant thicknesses were measured in the reflectance and transmittance modes. The opalescence parameter (OP), which was calculated as the difference in blue-yellow coordinate (Deltab(*)) and red-green coordinate (Deltaa(*)), and the differences in blue-yellow coordinate (Deltab(*)) and in color (DeltaE(ab)(*)) between the reflected and transmitted colors were calculated. One-way ANOVA was performed for the OP values of the core, veneer and layered specimens by the kind of materials. Regression analysis was performed between the OP and Deltab(*), and the OP and DeltaE(ab)(*) values. The range of the OP value was 1.6-6.1, 2.0-7.1, 1.3-5.0 and 1.6-4.2 for the core, veneer, A2- and A3-layered specimens, respectively, all of which were significantly influenced by the kind of materials (pOpalescence varied by kind of ceramics. The OP values of ceramics were lower than those of tooth enamel. All-ceramic materials that can simulate the opalescence of natural teeth should be developed.

  3. New sacrificial material for ex-vessel core catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komlev, Andrei A., E-mail: komlev@kth.se [Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (KTH), AlbaNova University Centre, Nuclear Power Safety Division, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-106 91, Stockholm (Sweden); Almjashev, Vyacheslav I., E-mail: vac@mail.ru [A.P. Aleksandrov Research Institute of Technology, NITI, DSAR, Sosnovy Bor, 188540 (Russian Federation); Bechta, Sevostian V., E-mail: bechta@safety.sci.kth.se [Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (KTH), AlbaNova University Centre, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-106 91, Stockholm (Sweden); Khabensky, Vladimir B., E-mail: vladimirkhabensky@gmail.com [A.P. Aleksandrov Research Institute of Technology, NITI, DSAR, Sosnovy Bor, 188540 (Russian Federation); Granovsky, Vladimir S., E-mail: gran@niti.ru [A.P. Aleksandrov Research Institute of Technology, NITI, DSAR, Sosnovy Bor, 188540 (Russian Federation); Gusarov, Victor V., E-mail: victor.v.gusarov@gmail.com [Ioffe Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya Str., St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A new functional (sacrificial) material has been developed in the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SrO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–CaO system based on strontium hexaferrite ceramic in concrete matrix. The method of producing SM has been advanced technologically; this technological effectiveness allows the SM to be used in ex-vessel core catchers with corium spreading as well as in crucible-type core catchers. Critical properties regarding the efficiency of SM in ex-vessel core catchers, such as porosity, pycnometric density, apparent density, solidus and liquidus temperatures, and water content have been measured. Suitable fractions of SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} and high alumina cement (HAC) were found in the SM based on thermodynamic analysis of the SM/corium interaction. The use of sacrificial steel as an additional heat adsorption component in the core catcher allowed us to increase the mass fraction range of SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} in the SM from 0.3−0.5 to 0.3–0.85. The activation temperature of the SM/corium interaction has been shown to correspond to the liquidus temperature of the local composition at the SM/corium interface. The calculated value of this temperature was 1716 °C. Analysis of phase transformations in the SrO–Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} system revealed advantages of the SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}–based sacrificial material compared with the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-contained material owing to the time proximity of SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} decomposition and corium interaction activation. - Highlights: • A sacrificial material (SM) was developed for ex-vessel core catcher. • Suitable proportions in the SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}·CaO–Fe system were determined. • Hydrogen release limitation was shown for ex-vessel corium retention with the SM. • Calculated temperature of the active initiation of corium/SM interaction is 1716 °C. • Functional properties of the SM were measured.

  4. Technical Meeting on Liquid Metal Reactor Concepts: Core Design and Structural Materials. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the TM on “Liquid metal reactor concept: core design and structural materials” was to present and discuss innovative liquid metal fast reactor (LMFR) core designs with special focus on the choice, development, testing and qualification of advanced reactor core structural materials. Main results arising from national and international R&D programmes and projects in the field were reviewed, and new activities to be carried out under the IAEA aegis were identified on the basis of the analysis of current research and technology gaps

  5. Penetration of molten core materials into basaltic and limestone concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    In conjunction with the small-scale, melt-concrete interaction tests being conducted at Sandia Laboratories, an acoustic technique has been used to monitor the penetration of molten core materials into basaltic and limestone concrete. Real time plots of the position of the melt/concrete interface have been obtained, and they illustrate that the initial penetration rate of the melt may be of the order of 80 mm/min. Phenomena deduced by the technique include a non-wetted melt/concrete interface

  6. Static analysis of material testing reactor cores:critical core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, A. A.; Khan, R. F. H.; Ahmad, N.

    1999-01-01

    A methodology has been described to study the effect of number of fuel plates per fuel element on critical cores of Material Testing Reactors (MTR). When the number of fuel plates are varied in a fuel element by keeping the fuel loading per fuel element constant, the fuel density in the fuel plates varies. Due to this variation, the water channel width needs to be recalculated. For a given number of fuel plates, water channel width was determined by optimizing k i nfinity using a transport theory lattice code WIMS-D/4. The dimensions of fuel element and control fuel element were determined using this optimized water channel width. For the calculated dimensions, the critical cores were determined for the given number of fuel plates per fuel element by using three dimensional diffusion theory code CITATION. The optimization of water channel width gives rise to a channel width of 2.1 mm when the number of fuel plates is 23 with 290 g ''2''3''5U fuel loading which is the same as in the case of Pakistan Reactor-1 (PARR-1). Although the decrease in number of fuel element results in an increase in optimal water channel width but the thickness of standard fuel element (SFE) and control fuel element (CFE) decreases and it gives rise to compact critical and equilibrium cores. The criticality studies of PARR-1 are in good agreement with the predictions

  7. Chemical interactions of reactor core materials up to very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.; Hagen, S.; Schanz, G.; Skokan, A.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes which chemical interactions may occur in a LWR fuel rod bundle containing (Ag, In, Cd) absorber rods or (Al 2 O 3 /B 4 C) burnable poison rods with increasing temperature up to the complete melting of the components and the formed reaction products. The kinetics of the most important chemical interactions has been investigated and the results are described. In most cases the reaction products have lower melting points or ranges than the original components. This results in a relocation of liquefied components often far below their melting points. There exist three distinct temperature regimes in which liquid phases can form in the core in differently large quantities. These temperature regimes are described in detail. The phase relations in the important ternary (U, Zr, O) system have been extensively studied. The effect of steel constituents on the phase relations is given in addition. All the considerations are focused on PWR conditions only. (orig.) [de

  8. Neutron Fluence, Dosimetry and Damage Response Determination in In-Core/Ex-Core Components of the VENUS CEN/SCK LWR Using 3-D Monte Carlo Simulations: NEA's VENUS-3 Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlado, J. Manuel; Marian, Jaime; Sanz, Jesus Garcia

    2000-01-01

    Validating state-of-the-art methods used to predict fluence exposure to reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) has become an important issue in identifying the sources of uncertainty in the estimated RPV fluence for pressurized water reactors. This is a very important aspect in evaluating irradiation damage leading to the hardening and embrittlement of such structural components. One of the major benchmark experiments carried out to test three-dimensional methodologies is the VENUS-3 Benchmark Experiment in which three-dimensional Monte Carlo and S n codes have proved more efficient than synthesis methods. At the Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (DENIM) at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, a detailed full three-dimensional model of the Venus Critical Facility has been developed making use of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP4B. The problem geometry and source modeling are described, and results, including calculated versus experimental (C/E) ratios as well as additional studies, are presented. Evidence was found that the great majority of C/E values fell within the 10% tolerance and most within 5%. Tolerance limits are discussed on the basis of evaluated data library and fission spectra sensitivity, where a value ranging between 10 to 15% should be accepted. Also, a calculation of the atomic displacement rate has been carried out in various locations throughout the reactor, finding that values of 0.0001 displacements per atom in external components such as the core barrel are representative of this type of reactor during a 30-yr time span

  9. Materials interaction tests to identify base and coating materials for an enhanced in-vessel core catcher design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Condie, K.G.; Swank, W.D. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls ID (United States); Cheung, F.B. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park PA (United States); Suh, K.Y. [Seoul National University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Severe Accident Research Project, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    An enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated, it must ensure In-Vessel Retention of core materials that may relocate under severe accident conditions in advanced reactors. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary): a base material, which has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; an insulating oxide coating material on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to prevent any potential oxidation of the base material during the lifetime of the reactor. Initial evaluations suggest that a thermally-sprayed oxide material is the most promising candidate insulator coating for a core catcher. Tests suggest that 2 coatings can provide adequate protection to a stainless steel core catcher: -) a 500 {mu}m thick zirconium dioxide coating over a 100-200 {mu}m Inconel 718 bond coating, and -) a 500 {mu}m thick magnesium zirconate coating.

  10. The influence of core material on transient thermal impedances in transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Górecki, K; Górski, K

    2016-01-01

    In the paper the results of measurements of thermal parameters of impulse-transformers containing cores made of different ferromagnetic materials are presented. Investigations were performed with the use of methods worked out in Gdynia Maritime University. The obtained results of measurements prove that the material of the core does not influence transient thermal impedance of the winding, whereas this parameter visibly changes with the change of spatial orientation of the transformer. In turn, the material of the core decides about transient thermal impedance of the core. Additionally, the influence of the core material on temperature distribution on the surface of the transformer was analysed. (paper)

  11. Comparison of the fractional power motor with cores made of various magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmyrek, Zbigniew; Lefik, Marcin; Cavagnino, Andrea; Ferraris, Luca

    2017-12-01

    The optimization of the motor cores, coupled with new core shapes as well as powering the motor at high frequency are the primary reasons for the use of new materials. The utilization of new materials, like SMC (soft magnetic composite), reduce the core loss and/or provide quasi-isotropic core's properties in any magnetization direction. Moreover, the use of SMC materials allows for avoiding degradation of the material portions, resulting from punching process, thereby preventing the deterioration of operating parameters of the motor. The authors examine the impact of technological parameters on the properties of a new type of SMC material and analyze the possibility of its use as the core of the fractional power motor. The result of the work is an indication of the shape of the rotor core made of a new SMC material to achieve operational parameters similar to those that have a motor with a core made of laminations.

  12. Feasibility study on the development of advanced LWR fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Youn Ho; Sohn, D. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Song, K. W.; Song, K. N.; Chun, T. H.; Bang, J. G.; Bae, K. K.; Kim, D. H. and others.

    1997-07-01

    Worldwide R and D trends related to core technology of LWR fuels and status of patents have been surveyed for the feasibility study. In addition, various fuel cycle schemes have been studied to establish the target performance parameters. For the development of cladding material, establishment of long-term research plan for alloy development and optimization of melting process and manufacturing technology were conducted. A work which could characterize the effect of sintering additives on the microstructure of UO 2 pellet has been experimentally undertaken, and major sintering variables and their ranges have been found in the sintering process of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 burnable absorber pellet. The analysis of state of the art technology related to flow mixing device for spacer grid and debris filtering device for bottom nozzle and the investigation of the physical phenomena related to CHF enhancement and the establishment of the data base for thermal-hydraulic performance tests has been done in this study. In addition, survey on the documents of the up-to-date PWR fuel assemblies developed by foreign vendors have been carried out to understand their R and D trends and establish the direction of R and D for these structural components. And, to set the performance target of the new fuel, to be developed, fuel burnup and economy under the extended fuel cycle length scheme were estimated. A preliminary study on the failure mechanism of CANDU fuel, key technology and advanced coating has been performed. (author). 190 refs., 31 tabs., 129 figs

  13. Technical Meeting on Liquid Metal Reactor Concepts: Core Design and Structural Materials. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the Technical Meeting is to present and discuss innovative liquid metal fast reactor (LMFR) core designs with special focus on the choice, development, testing and qualification of advanced reactor core structural materials

  14. AFCI : Co-extraction impacts on LWR and fast reactor fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiwo, T. A.; Szakalay, F. J.; Kim, T. K.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the impact of the co-extraction COEXTM process on reactor performance has been performed. The proliferation implication of the process was also evaluated using the critical mass, radioactivity, decay heat and neutron and gamma source rates and gamma doses as indicators. The use of LWR-spent-uranium-based MOX fuel results in a higher initial plutonium content requirement in an LWR MOX core than if natural uranium based MOX fuel is used (by about 1%); the plutonium for both cases is derived from the spent LWR spent fuel. More transuranics are consequently discharged in the spent fuel of the MOX core. The presence of U-236 in the initial fuel was also found to result in higher content of Np-237 in the spent MOX fuel and less consumption of Pu-238 and Am-241 in the MOX core. The higher quantities of Np-237 (factor of 5), Pu-238 (20%) and Am-241 (14%) decrease the effective repository utilization, relative to the use of natural uranium in the PWR MOX core. Additionally, the minor actinides continue to accumulate in the fuel cycle, even if the U-Pu co-extraction products are continuously recycled in the PWR cores, and thus a solution is required for the minor actinides. The utilization of plutonium derived from LWR spent fuel versus weapons-grade plutonium for the startup core of a 1,000 MWT advanced burner fast reactor (ABR) increases the TRU content by about 4%. Differences are negligible for the equilibrium recycle core. The impact of using reactor spent uranium instead of depleted uranium was found to be relatively smaller in the fast reactor (TRU content difference less than 0.4%). The critical masses of the co-extraction products were found to be higher than that of weapons-grade plutonium and the decay heat and radiation sources of the materials (products) were also found to be generally higher than that of weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) in the transuranics content range of 0.1 to 1.0 in the heavy-metal. The magnitude of the

  15. Characteristics Data Base: Programmer's guide to the LWR Quantities Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.E.; Moore, R.S.

    1990-08-01

    The LWR Quantities Data Base is a menu-driven PC data base developed as part of OCRWM's waste, technical data base on the characteristics of potential repository wastes, which also includes non-LWR spent fuel, high-level and other materials. This programmer's guide completes the documentation for the LWR Quantities Data Base, the user's guide having been published previously. The PC data base itself may be requested from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using the order form provided in Volume 1 of publication DOE/RW-0184

  16. Flexible fuel cycle system for the transition from LWR to FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Junichi; Hoshino, Kuniyoshi; Sasahira, Akira; Inoue, Tadashi; Minato, Kazuo; Sato, Seichi

    2009-01-01

    Japan will deploy commercial fast breeder reactor (FBR) from around 2050 under the suitable conditions for the replacement of light water reactor (LWR) with FBR. The transition scenario from LWR to FBR is investigated in detail and the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) system has been proposed as a optimum transition system. The FFCI removes ∼95% uranium from LWR spent fuel (SF) in LWR reprocessing and residual material named Recycle Material (RM), which is ∼1/10 volume of original SF and contains ∼50% U, ∼10% Pu and ∼40% other nuclides, is treated in FBR reprocessing to recover Pu and U. If the FBR deployment speed becomes lower, the RM will be stored until the higher speed again. The FFCI has some merits compared with ordinary system that consists of full reprocessing facilities for both LWR and FBR SF during the transition period. The economy is better for FFCI due to the smaller LWR reprocessing facility (no Pu/U recovery and fabrication). The FFCI can supply high Pu concentration RM, which has high proliferation resistance and flexibly respond to FBR introduction rate changes. Volume minimization of LWR SF is possible for FFCI by its conversion to RM. Several features of FFCI were quantitatively evaluated such as Pu mass balance, reprocessing capacities, LWR SF amounts, RM amounts, and proliferation resistance to compare the effectiveness of the FFCI system with other systems. The calculated Pu balance revealed that the FFCI could supply enough but no excess Pu to FBR. These evaluations demonstrated the applicability of FFCI system to the transition period from LWR to FBR cycles. (author)

  17. ERDA LWR plant technology program: role of government/industry in improving LWR performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Information is presented under the following chapter headings: executive summary; LWR plant outages; LWR plant construction delays and cancellations; programs addressing plant outages, construction delays, and cancellations; need for additional programs to remedy continuing problems; criteria for government role in LWR commercialization; and the proposed government program

  18. Comparison of the fractional power motor with cores made of various magnetic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gmyrek Zbigniew

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of the motor cores, coupled with new core shapes as well as powering the motor at high frequency are the primary reasons for the use of new materials. The utilization of new materials, like SMC (soft magnetic composite, reduce the core loss and/or provide quasi-isotropic core’s properties in any magnetization direction. Moreover, the use of SMC materials allows for avoiding degradation of the material portions, resulting from punching process, thereby preventing the deterioration of operating parameters of the motor. The authors examine the impact of technological parameters on the properties of a new type of SMC material and analyze the possibility of its use as the core of the fractional power motor. The result of the work is an indication of the shape of the rotor core made of a new SMC material to achieve operational parameters similar to those that have a motor with a core made of laminations.

  19. LWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kiyoshi.

    1993-01-01

    A water injection tank in an emergency reactor core cooling system is disposed at a position above a reactor pressure vessel. A liquid phase portion of the water injection tank and an inlet plenum portion in the reactor pressure vessel are connected by a water injection pipe. A gas phase portion of the water injection tank and an upper portion in the reactor pressure vessel are connected by a gas ventilation pipe. Hydraulic operation valves are disposed in the midway of the water injection pipe and the gas ventilation pipe respectively. A pressure conduit is disposed for connecting a discharge port of a main recycling pump and the hydraulic operation valve. In a case where primary coolants are not sent to the main recycling pump by lowering of a liquid level due to loss of coolants or in a case where the main recycling pump is stopped by electric power stoppage or occurrence of troubles, the discharge pressure of the main recycling pump is lowered. Then, the hydraulic operation valve is opened to release the flow channel, then, boric acid water in the water injection tank is sent into the reactor by a falling head, to lead the reactor to a scram state. (I.N.)

  20. MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) cores fuel management. Application of a low enrichment reactor for the equilibrium and transitory core calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relloso, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes a methodology to define the equilibrium core and a MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) type reactor's fuel management upon multiple boundary conditions, such as: end cycle and permitted maximum reactivities, burn-up extraction and maximun number of movements by rechange. The methodology proposed allows to determine the best options through conceptual relations, prior to a detailed calculation with the core code, reducing the test number with these codes and minimizing in this way CPU cost. The way to better systematized search of transient cores from the first one to the equilibrium one is presented. (Author) [es

  1. Core and Valence Structures in K beta X-ray Emission Spectra of Chromium Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Deluigi, Maria; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Lopez-Diaz, Gaston; Tirao, German; Stutz, Guillermo; Riveros de la Vega, Jose

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the core and valence transitions in chromium in a series of materials with a number of different ligands and including the oxidation states: Cr-II, Cr-III, Cr-IV, and Cr-VI. To study the core-to-core transitions we employ the CTM4XAS program and investigate the shapes, widths,

  2. Qualification of ARROTTA code for LWR accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, P.-H.; Peng, K.Y.; Lin, W.-C.; Wu, J.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the qualification efforts performed by TPC and INER for the 3-D spatial kinetics code ARROTTA for LWR core transient analysis. TPC and INER started a joint 5 year project in 1989 to establish independent capabilities to perform reload design and transient analysis utilizing state-of-the-art computer programs. As part of the effort, the ARROTTA code was chosen to perform multi-dimensional kinetics calculations such as rod ejection for PWR and rod drop for BWR. To qualify ARROTTA for analysis of FSAR licensing basis core transients, ARROTTA has been benchmarked for the static core analysis against plant measured data and SIMULATE-3 predictions, and for the kinetic analysis against available benchmark problems. The static calculations compared include critical boron concentration, core power distribution, and control rod worth. The results indicated that ARROTTA predictions match very well with plant measured data and SIMULATE-3 predictions. The kinetic benchmark problems validated include NEACRP rod ejection problem, 3-D LMW LWR rod withdrawal/insertion problem, and 3-D LRA BWR transient benchmark problem. The results indicate that ARROTTA's accuracy and stability are excellent as compared to other space-time kinetics codes. It is therefore concluded that ARROTTA provides accurate predictions for multi-dimensional core transient for LWRs. (author)

  3. Mixing core material into the envelopes of red grants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deupree, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion is presented of calculations of four core helium flashes in red giant stars. The starting point for these calculations is a point source explosion on the polar axis of a two-dimensional finite difference grid. The amount of residue of the core helium flash mixed into and above the hydrogen shell is calculated at four temperatures for the elements carbon, oxygen, neon, magnesium, silicon, and sulfur. 7 refs., 1 tab

  4. Recycling U and Pu in LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hualing.

    1986-01-01

    This article, from viewpoints of technical feasibility, safety evaluation and socioeconomic benefit-risk analysis, introduces and comments on history and status of recycling U and Pu in LWR, dealing with reactor, reprocessing, conversion and fuel element fabrication et al. Author has analysed LWR fuel cycle strategies in China and made a proposal

  5. LWR physics in SKODA Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbytovsky, A.; Lehmann, M.; Vyskocil, V.; Vacek, J.; Krysl, V.

    1980-01-01

    Computation of nuclear power reactors of the WWER-1000 type is described as are computer programs used by Skoda Works for the solution of neutron problems. The programs are analyzed for applicability in the unified program system of the CMEA countries which will be used in the preparation of safety reports, the evaluation of safety hazards, the design of fuel charges, economical studies etc. A detailed description is also presented of multigroup transport calculations and of the preparation of input data for macrocalculations of the heterogeneous lattices of LWR's. (author)

  6. A volatile-rich Earth's core inferred from melting temperature of core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Nakajima, Y.; Auzende, A. L.; Boulard, E.; Clark, A. N.; Lord, O. T.; Cervera, S.; Siebert, J.; Garbarino, G.; Svitlyk, V.; Mezouar, M.

    2016-12-01

    Planetary cores are mainly constituted of iron and nickel, alloyed with lighter elements (Si, O, C, S or H). Understanding how these elements affect the physical and chemical properties of solid and liquid iron provides stringent constraints on the composition of the Earth's core. In particular, melting curves of iron alloys are key parameter to establish the temperature profile in the Earth's core, and to asses the potential occurrence of partial melting at the Core-Mantle Boundary. Core formation models based on metal-silicate equilibration suggest that Si and O are the major light element components1-4, while the abundance of other elements such as S, C and H is constrained by arguments based on their volatility during planetary accretion5,6. Each compositional model implies a specific thermal state for the core, due to the different effect that light elements have on the melting behaviour of Fe. We recently measured melting temperatures in Fe-C and Fe-O systems at high pressures, which complete the data sets available both for pure Fe7 and other binary alloys8. Compositional models with an O- and Si-rich outer core are suggested to be compatible with seismological constraints on density and sound velocity9. However, their crystallization temperatures of 3650-4050 K at the CMB pressure of 136 GPa are very close to, if not higher than the melting temperature of the silicate mantle and yet mantle melting above the CMB is not a ubiquitous feature. This observation requires significant amounts of volatile elements (S, C or H) in the outer core to further reduce the crystallisation temperature of the core alloy below that of the lower mantle. References 1. Wood, B. J., et al Nature 441, 825-833 (2006). 2. Siebert, J., et al Science 339, 1194-7 (2013). 3. Corgne, A., et al Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 288, 108-114 (2009). 4. Fischer, R. a. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 167, 177-194 (2015). 5. Dreibus, G. & Palme, H. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 1125-1130 (1995). 6. Mc

  7. The separation and distribution of some Luna 24 core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillinger, C.T.; Fabian, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Three soil samples from different horizons of a core recovered from the Moon's surface by the Soviet Space mission Luna 24 have been separated according to size, visual appearance, density and magnetic properties. Appropriate samples have been distributed to a number of British laboratories for detailed investigations. (author)

  8. Review and comparison of WWER and LWR Codes and Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, D.; Tashkinov, A.; Brynda, J.; Davies, L.M.; Cueto-Felgeueroso, C.; Detroux, P.; Bieniussa, K.; Guinovart, J.

    2003-01-01

    The results of work on a collaborative project on comparison of Codes and Standards used for safety related components of the WWER and LWR type reactors is presented. This work was performed on behalf of the European Commission, Working Group Codes and Standards and considers areas such as rules, criteria and provisions, failure mechanisms , derivation and understanding behind the fatigue curves, piping, materials and aging, manufacturing and ISI. WWERs are essentially designed and constructed using the Russian PNAE Code together with special provisions in a few countries (e.g. Czech Republic) from national standards. The LWR Codes have a strong dependence on the ASME Code. Also within Western Europe other codes are used including RCC-M, KTA and British Standards. A comparison of procedures used in all these codes and standards have been made to investigate the potential for equivalencies between the codes and any grounds for future cooperation between eastern and western experts in this field. (author)

  9. Water chemistry and behavior of materials in PWRs and BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, P; Hanninen, H [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in corrosion and in activity transport in NPP`s. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in corrosion does not exist, controlling of the water chemistry has achieved good results in recent years. Water chemistry impacts upon the operational safety of LWR`s in two main ways: integrity of pressure boundary materials and, activity transport and out-of-core radiation fields. This paper will describe application of water chemistry control in operating reactors to prevent corrosion. Some problems experienced in LWR`s will be reviewed for the design of the nuclear heating reactors (NHR). (author). 18 refs, 10 figs, 5 tabs.

  10. Water chemistry and behavior of materials in PWRs and BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.; Hanninen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in corrosion and in activity transport in NPP's. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in corrosion does not exist, controlling of the water chemistry has achieved good results in recent years. Water chemistry impacts upon the operational safety of LWR's in two main ways: integrity of pressure boundary materials and, activity transport and out-of-core radiation fields. This paper will describe application of water chemistry control in operating reactors to prevent corrosion. Some problems experienced in LWR's will be reviewed for the design of the nuclear heating reactors (NHR). (author). 18 refs, 10 figs, 5 tabs

  11. Development of information management system on LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. D.; Lee, S. H.; Song, D. Y.; Jeon, I.; Park, S. J.; Seo, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    LWRs in Korea should manage all the information of spent fuel to implement the obligations under Korea-IAEA safeguards agreement and to perform the nuclear material accountancy work at the facility level. The information management system on LWR spent fuel was developed to manage all movement records from receipt to shipment of LWR fuels, and to get the necessary information such as nuclear fuel inventory lists and status, maps of fresh fuel storage, reactor and spent fuel pool, receipt and shipment records and so on. This information management system has a function to setup the system environments to cover the various kinds of storage types for all LWRs ; reactor, spent fuel pool and fresh fuel storage. The movements of nuclear fuel between the storages can be easily done by double click of the mouse to the destination. It also has a several error checking routines for maintaining the correct accounting data. Using this information management system of LWR spent fuel, facility operators can perform efficiently and effectively the safeguards related works including nuclear material accountancy at each facility

  12. Preliminary Study for Radioactivity Evaluation of MSR compared with LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geun Hyeong; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    LWR uses fuel as {sup 235}U and fissile material as solid (enriched uranium). Those cannot control its component artificially and hard to change fuel frequently. Therefore this fuel remains as much as possible. That makes risk of high radiation leakage because of long neutron irradiation time. On the other hand, MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) uses fuel as thorium-uranium; fissile {sup 233}U when {sup 232}Th absorbs one neutron, and fissile material as liquid (molten salt). It has plenty of benefits respect to radioactive safety. It leads nuclear fuel dump when accident happens, diminishes basic fission substances' radiation and even the cost (Th exist 3∼4 times more on the earth compared with natural uranium). Source term is much lower than conventional LWR in order to processing time. Radiation exposure from volatile fission products in severe accidents is thought to be negligible due to the continuous removal mechanism. The generation of high level radioactive wastes from MSR is estimated to be much smaller than that of conventional LWR because of its less converting probability of thorium to minor actinides. It was thought the fundamental approach to MSR would make it possible to realize the safety of reactor when considering the severe accidents affecting on nuclear power plants due to natural disaster.

  13. Preliminary Study for Radioactivity Evaluation of MSR compared with LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Geun Hyeong; Kim, Hee Reyoung

    2014-01-01

    LWR uses fuel as 235 U and fissile material as solid (enriched uranium). Those cannot control its component artificially and hard to change fuel frequently. Therefore this fuel remains as much as possible. That makes risk of high radiation leakage because of long neutron irradiation time. On the other hand, MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) uses fuel as thorium-uranium; fissile 233 U when 232 Th absorbs one neutron, and fissile material as liquid (molten salt). It has plenty of benefits respect to radioactive safety. It leads nuclear fuel dump when accident happens, diminishes basic fission substances' radiation and even the cost (Th exist 3∼4 times more on the earth compared with natural uranium). Source term is much lower than conventional LWR in order to processing time. Radiation exposure from volatile fission products in severe accidents is thought to be negligible due to the continuous removal mechanism. The generation of high level radioactive wastes from MSR is estimated to be much smaller than that of conventional LWR because of its less converting probability of thorium to minor actinides. It was thought the fundamental approach to MSR would make it possible to realize the safety of reactor when considering the severe accidents affecting on nuclear power plants due to natural disaster

  14. Development of information management system on LWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. D.; Lee, S. H.; Song, D. Y.; Jeon, I.; Park, S. J.; Seo, D. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    LWRs in Korea should manage all the information of spent fuel to implement the obligations under Korea-IAEA safeguards agreement and to perform the nuclear material accountancy work at the facility level. The information management system on LWR spent fuel was developed to manage all movement records from receipt to shipment of LWR fuels, and to get the necessary information such as nuclear fuel inventory lists and status, maps of fresh fuel storage, reactor and spent fuel pool, receipt and shipment records and so on. This information management system has a function to setup the system environments to cover the various kinds of storage types for all LWRs ; reactor, spent fuel pool and fresh fuel storage. The movements of nuclear fuel between the storages can be easily done by double click of the mouse to the destination. It also has a several error checking routines for maintaining the correct accounting data. Using this information management system of LWR spent fuel, facility operators can perform efficiently and effectively the safeguards related works including nuclear material accountancy at each facility.

  15. Reactor Structure Materials: Corrosion of Reactor Core Internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on the corrosion of reactor core internals are: (1) to gain mechanistic insight into the Irradition Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) phenomenon by studying the influence of separate parameters in well controlled experiments; (2) to develop and validate a predictive capability on IASCC by model description and (3) to define and validate countermeasures and monitoring techniques for application in reactors. Progress and achievements in 1999 are described

  16. Core degradation and fission product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Hagen, S.J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments on core degradation and melt progression in severe LWR accidents have provided reasonable understanding of the principal processes involved in the early phase of melt progression that extends through core degradation and metallic material melting and relocation. A general but not a quantitative understanding of late phase melt progression that involves ceramic material melting and relocation has also been obtained, primarily from the TMI-2 core examination. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge on core degradation and melt progression obtained from these integral experiments and of the principal remaining significant uncertainties. A summary is also given of the principal results on in-vessel fission product release obtained from these experiments. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Feasibility assessment of the once-through thorium fuel cycle for the PTVM LWR concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E.; Galperin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The PTVM LWR is an innovation reactor concept operating in a “breed & burn” mode. • An advanced once-through thorium fuel cycle for the PTVM LWR concept is proposed. • The PTVM LWR concept makes use of a seed-blanket geometry. • A novel fuel management scheme based on two separate fuel flow routes is analyzed. • The analysis indicates a potential for utilizing the fuel in an efficient manner. - Abstract: This paper investigates the feasibility of a once-through thorium fuel cycle for the novel reactor-design concept named the pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control (PTVM LWR). The PTVM LWR operates in a “breed & burn” mode, which makes it an attractive system for utilizing thorium fuel in a once-through mode. The “breed & burn” mode can emphasize the in situ generation as well as incineration of 233 U, which are the basic foundations of the once-through thorium fuel cycle. The PTVM LWR concept makes use of a seed–blanket geometry, whereby the core is divided into separated regions of thorium-based fuel channel assemblies (blanket) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel channel assemblies (seed). A novel fuel in-core management scheme based on two separate fuel flow routes (i.e., seed route and blanket route) is proposed and analyzed. Neutronic performance analysis indicates that the proposed novel fuel in-core management scheme has the potential to utilize both LEU- and thorium-based fuel in an efficient manner. The once-through thorium cycle, presented and discussed in this paper, provide interesting research leads and can serve as a bridge between current LEU-based fuel cycles and a thorium fuel cycle based on recycling of 233 U

  18. Feasibility study on the development of advanced LWR fuel technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Youn Ho; Sohn, D. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Song, K. W.; Song, K. N.; Chun, T. H.; Bang, J. G.; Bae, K. K.; Kim, D. H. and others

    1997-07-01

    Worldwide R and D trends related to core technology of LWR fuels and status of patents have been surveyed for the feasibility study. In addition, various fuel cycle schemes have been studied to establish the target performance parameters. For the development of cladding material, establishment of long-term research plan for alloy development and optimization of melting process and manufacturing technology were conducted. A work which could characterize the effect of sintering additives on the microstructure of UO{sub 2} pellet has been experimentally undertaken, and major sintering variables and their ranges have been found in the sintering process of UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable absorber pellet. The analysis of state of the art technology related to flow mixing device for spacer grid and debris filtering device for bottom nozzle and the investigation of the physical phenomena related to CHF enhancement and the establishment of the data base for thermal-hydraulic performance tests has been done in this study. In addition, survey on the documents of the up-to-date PWR fuel assemblies developed by foreign vendors have been carried out to understand their R and D trends and establish the direction of R and D for these structural components. And, to set the performance target of the new fuel, to be developed, fuel burnup and economy under the extended fuel cycle length scheme were estimated. A preliminary study on the failure mechanism of CANDU fuel, key technology and advanced coating has been performed. (author). 190 refs., 31 tabs., 129 figs.

  19. Materials problems related to the core catcher of sodium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzmann, O.

    1975-05-01

    There are in principal two possible solutions for the external core catcher as far as materials are concerned. 1) A barrier consisting of a material with a high melting point, 2) a tray of comparatively low melting material with a high solubility for the fuel. In case of the first concept one has to look for materials whose melting temperatures are above the temperature of the molten core. Based on metallurgical reasons it seems very likely that the molten core does not exceed a temperature in the range between 2,500 and 2,800 0 C. Due to the compatibility situation with the molten core only a few high melting oxides will be suitable as liner materials for a core catcher. In the second case basalt or concrete, if free of water and lime, are suitable materials. Graphite is a high melting material, however, due to its behaviour with the molten core it should be listed under the second group. By the reaction of graphite with the core materials the melt can be kept liquid down to temperatures of around 1,100 0 C. The evolution of CO by this reaction should be supportable. It is an endothermal reaction. Experiments on the behaviour of core catcher materials have shown that sodium is capable of penetrating into sintered bodies of UO 2 with densities of 90% TD at temperatures higher than 200 0 C. This may lead to the desintegration of these bodies. The exposure to moist air has not done much harm to UO 2 pellets of densities from 80 to 90% TD. Even after one year of exposure, swelling or desintegration could not be observed. Sodium is also capable of penetrating into bodies of synthetic carbon and graphite. Only well graphitized material will not be destroyed. (orig.) [de

  20. Comparison of scale/triton and helios burnup calculations for high burnup LWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittelbach, S.; Mispagel, T.; Phlippen, P.W. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The presented analyses provide information about the suitability of the lattice burnup code HELIOS and the recently developed code SCALE/TRITON for the prediction of isotopic compositions of high burnup LWR fuel. The accurate prediction of the isotopic inventory of high burnt spent fuel is a prerequisite for safety analyses in and outside of the reactor core, safe loading of spent fuel into storage casks, design of next generation spent fuel casks and for any consideration of burnup credit. Depletion analyses are performed with both burnup codes for PWR and BWR fuel samples which were irradiated far beyond 50 GWd/t within the LWR-PROTEUS Phase II project. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of core structural materials and surveillance programme of research reactors. Report of the consultants meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    A series of presentations on the assessment of core structural components and materials at their facilities were given by the experts. The different issues related to degradation mechanisms were discussed. The outputs include a more thorough understanding of the specific challenges related to Research Reactors (RRs) as well as proposals for activities which could assist RR organizations in their efforts to address the issues involved. The experts recommend that research reactor operators consider implementation of surveillance programs for materials of core structural components, as part of ageing management program (TECDOC-792 and DS-412). It is recognised by experts that adequate archived structural material data is not available for many RRs. Access to this data and extension of existing material databases could help many operating organisations extend the operation of their RRs. The experts agreed that an IAEA Technical Meeting (TM) on Assessment of Core Structural Materials should be organised in December 2009 (IAEA HQ Vienna). The proposed objectives of the TM are: (i) exchange of detailed technical information on the assessment and ageing management of core structural materials, (ii) identification of materials of interest for further investigation, (iii) proposal for a new IAEA CRP on Assessment of Core Structural Materials, and (iv) identification of RRs prepared to participate in proposed CRP. Based on the response to a questionnaire prepared for the 2008 meeting of the Technical Working Group for Research Reactors, the number of engineering capital projects related to core structural components is proportionally lower than those related to,for example, I and C or electrical power systems. This implies that many operating research reactors will be operating longer using their original core structural components and justifies the assessment and evaluation programmes and activities proposed in this report. (author)

  2. Relating the structural strength of concrete sewer pipes and material properties retrieved from core samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanic, N.; Langeveld, J.G.; Salet, Theo; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2016-01-01

    Drill core samples are taken in practice for an analysis of the material characteristics of concrete pipes in order to improve the quality of the decision-making on rehabilitation actions. Earlier research has demonstrated that core sampling is associated with a significant uncertainty. In this

  3. Outline of Swedish activities on LWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M [Studsvik Nuclear, Nykoeping (Sweden); Roennberg, G [OKG AB (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    The presentation outlines the Swedish activities on LWR fuel and considers the following issues: electricity production; performance of operating nuclear power plants; nuclear fuel cycle and waste management; research and development in nuclear field. 4 refs, 4 tabs.

  4. Energy profit ratio on LWR by uranium recycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu; Uno, Takeki; Matsushima, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Energy profit ratio is defined as the ratio of output energy/input system total energy. In case of electric power generation, input energy is a total for fuel such as uranium mining and enrichment, fuel transportation, build nuclear power plant, M and O and for disposal waste and decommission of reactor vessel. Output energy is the total electricity on LWR during the plant life. EPR on both PWR and BWR is high value using gas centrifuge enrichment compared other type of electric power generation such as a thermal power, a hydraulic power, a wind power and a photovoltaic power. How is the EPR on LWR by MOX? We need understanding the energy of reprocessing spent fuel, MOX fuel fabrication, low level waste disposal and high level radioactive glass disposal. As we show the material balance for two cases, the first is the case of long term storage and reprocessing before FBR, the second is the MOX fuel cycle on LWR plant. The MOX fuel recycle is better EPR value rather than the case of long term storage and reprocessing before FBR (LTSRBF). At the gaseous diffusion enrichment case, MOX fuel recycle has 15 to 18% higher EPR value than LTSRBF. At the gas centrifuge enrichment case the MOX fuel recycle has 17 to 18 higher EPR value than LTSRBF. MOX fuel recycle decreases the uranium mining and refine mass, enrichment separative work and the spent fuel interim storage. It tells us the MOX fuel recycle is good way from view of EPR. (author)

  5. The Relative Impact of Aligning Tier 2 Intervention Materials with Classroom Core Reading Materials in Grades K-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foorman, Barbara R.; Herrera, Sarah; Dombek, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial in 55 low-performing schools across Florida compared 2 early literacy interventions--1 using stand-alone materials and 1 using materials embedded in the existing core reading/language arts program. A total of 3,447 students who were below the 30th percentile in vocabulary and reading-related skills participated in…

  6. Icare/Cathare coupling: three-dimensional thermal hydraulics of severe LWR accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillard, V.; Fichot, F. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Recherches en Securite, DRS, 92 (France); Boudier, P.; Parent, M. [CEA Grenoble, Dir. des Reacteurs Nucleaires, DRN, 38 (France); Roser, R. [Communication et Systemes Systemes d' Information, CS SI, 38 - Fontaine (France)

    2001-07-01

    In the phenomenology of severe LWR accidents considered in safety studies, the accidental sequences can be divided into three phases: the initial phase, where no severe damage of fuel or control rods and structures occurs; the early core degradation phase, where limited material melting and relocation takes place; and the late core degradation phase during which substantial material relocation happens, molten pools and debris beds can form and corium may fall into the lower plenum and, in case of vessel failure, come into the containment. The CATHARE2 code is a system code which has been developed by CEA for IPSN, EDF and FRAMATOME to describe the thermal-hydraulics behavior of a whole PWR circuit during the first of these three phases, with a core degradation model limited to clad rupture. The ICARE2 code, developed by IPSN, allows the complete description of early and late core degradation phases, with a thermal-hydraulics model limited to the vessel, initial and boundary conditions being provided by a system code. The aim of this paper is to present the main features of the new version of the coupling, ICARE/CATHARE V2. First, the general characteristics of ICARE2 V3mod1 and CATHARE2 V1.5 standard codes, dealing with physical models and numerical aspects, are described. Second, the technical features of the coupling between the two codes are detailed. At last, some results of ICARE/CATHARE V2 calculations are presented which demonstrate the ability of the code to simulate a severe accident in a PWR and notably to describe multi-dimensional effects occurring in the core during the LOCA and degradation phases. (authors)

  7. Criticality impacts on LWR fuel storage efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napolitano, D.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation discusses the criticality impacts throughout storage of fuel onsite including new fuel storage, spent fuel storage, consolidation, and dry storage. The general principles for criticality safety are also be discussed. There is first an introduction which explains today's situation for criticality safety concerns. This is followed by a discussion of criticality safety Regulatory Guides, safety limits and fundamental principles. Design objectives for criticality safety in the 1990's include higher burnups, longer cycles, and higher enrichments which impact the criticality safety design. Criticality safety for new fuel storage, spent fuel storage, fuel consolidation, and dry storage are followed by conclusions. Today's situation is one in which the US does not reprocess, and does not have an operating MRS facility or repository. High density fuel storage rack designs of the 1980s, are filling up. Dry cask storage systems for spent fuel storage are being utilized. Enrichments continue to increase PWR fuel assemblies with enrichments of 4.5 to 5.0 weight percent U-235 and BWR fuel assemblies with enrichments of 3.25 to 3.5 weight percent U-235 are common. Criticality concerns affect the capacity and the economics of light water reactor (LWR) fuel storage arrays by dictating the spacing of fuel assemblies in a storage system, or the use of poisons or exotic materials in the storage system design

  8. A study for small-medium LWR development of JAPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Toshihiko; Hida, Takahiko; Hoshi, Takashi; Kawahara, Hiroto; Tominaga, Kenji; Asano, Hiromitsu

    2011-01-01

    LWR (Light Water Reactor) power stations have accumulated many experiences of design, construction and operation. In addition, large-sized reactors have an advantage of economy of scale and 1,000 MWe LWR has therefore become the mainstream reactor in Japan. Meanwhile, introduction of the medium and small-sized LWRs (SMRs) has also been under review in Japan in order to respond to stagnant growth in electricity demand and electricity market liberalization or for investment risk mitigation; however, it has not been realized due to the economic disadvantage of scale. Therefore, JAPC has been developing the concept of SMR (300 MWe - 600 MWe) which is competitive to the large-sized LWR cooperating with Japanese plant makers (Hitachi, Toshiba Corporation and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries), assessing the possibility of realization of SMRs as one of the electric power sources in the future. As the result of the JAPC's study, we developed SMR concepts whose cost and safety are almost equal to large-sized LWR and confirmed technical feasibility of the concept in order to start developing basic design. In this paper, the outline of the SMR concepts and the current development status are presented. Concepts have been developed for two types of SMRs (i.e. BWR and PWR). As for the BWR type, reactor system is simplified by adopting natural circulation core method and CRD falling under gravity in order to downsize the reactor containments. As for the PWR type, the risk of LOCA occurrence is eliminated by unifying the primary system (e.g. incorporating steam generator into reactor). Furthermore, the primary system is simplified by adopting natural circulation core method in operation and containment vessel also become compact for the PWR. As for JAPC's further development of SMRs, key elements of SMR concepts are studied. In addition, the environment surrounding the SMRs has changed in recent years and the one with capacity exceeding 300-600 MWe class or small-sized reactor with

  9. Status of core material development for fast reactor in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, S.; Shibahara, I.; Nagai, S.

    1994-01-01

    In the last two decades, extensive efforts have been devoted to the development of mixed-oxide fuel for LMFBR in Japan. For the fuel of the prototype reactor MONJU, drastic improvement in creep rupture strength and swelling resistance were attained by modification within the compositional specification of the standard Type 316 stainless steel (PNC316). For the fuel of future large-scale reactors, extensive research and development program are under way to realize the long life fuel. The candidate material for demonstration reactor is advanced austenitic stainless steel (PNC1520) which intended to modify the composition beyond the Type 316 stainless steel specification. In order to further improve the swelling resistance, the austenitic stainless steel with higher nickel content (High Ni alloy) and ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) are developed. In a prospective cladding material for the long life fuel, the development of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is focused to establish the alloying design and fabrication process toward as high as 250dpa. (author)

  10. Experimental study of the mechanical behaviour of pin reinforced foam core sandwich materials under shear load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimassi, M A; Brauner, C; Herrmann, A S

    2016-01-01

    Sandwich structures with a lightweight closed cell hard foam core have the potential to be used in primary structures of commercial aircrafts. Compared to honeycomb core sandwich, the closed cell foam core sandwich overcomes the issue of moisture take up and makes the manufacturing of low priced and highly integrated structures possible. However, lightweight foam core sandwich materials are prone to failure by localised external loads like low velocity impacts. Invisible cracks could grow in the foam core and threaten the integrity of the structure. In order to enhance the out-of-plane properties of foam core sandwich structures and to improve the damage tolerance (DT) dry fibre bundles are inserted in the foam core. The pins are infused with resin and co-cured with the dry fabric face sheets in an out-of-autoclave process. This study presents the results obtained from shear tests following DIN 53294-standard, on flat sandwich panels. All panels were manufactured with pin-reinforcement manufactured with the Tied Foam Core Technology (TFC) developed by Airbus. The effects of pin material (CFRP and GFRP) and pin volume fraction on the shear properties of the sandwich structure and the crack propagation were investigated and compared to a not pinned reference. It has been concluded that the pin volume fraction has a remarkable effect on the shear properties and damage tolerance of the observed structure. Increasing the pin volume fraction makes the effect of crack redirection more obvious and conserves the integrity of the structure after crack occurrence. (paper)

  11. EUV lithography for 22nm half pitch and beyond: exploring resolution, LWR, and sensitivity tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putna, E. Steve; Younkin, Todd R.; Leeson, Michael; Caudillo, Roman; Bacuita, Terence; Shah, Uday; Chandhok, Manish

    2011-04-01

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) denotes Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography as a leading technology option for realizing the 22nm half pitch node and beyond. According to recent assessments made at the 2010 EUVL Symposium, the readiness of EUV materials remains one of the top risk items for EUV adoption. The main development issue regarding EUV resists has been how to simultaneously achieve high resolution, high sensitivity, and low line width roughness (LWR). This paper describes our strategy, the current status of EUV materials, and the integrated post-development LWR reduction efforts made at Intel Corporation. Data collected utilizing Intel's Micro- Exposure Tool (MET) is presented in order to examine the feasibility of establishing a resist process that simultaneously exhibits <=22nm half-pitch (HP) L/S resolution at <=11.3mJ/cm2 with <=3nm LWR.

  12. Comparative study of mechanical properties of direct core build-up materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The strength greatly influences the selection of core material because core must withstand forces due to mastication and para-function for many years. This study was conducted to evaluate certain mechanical properties of commonly used materials for direct core build-up, including visible light cured composite, polyacid modified composite, resin modified glass ionomer, high copper amalgam, and silver cermet cement. Materials and Methods: All the materials were manipulated according to the manufacturer′s recommendations and standard test specimens were prepared. A universal testing machine at different cross-head speed was used to determine all the four mechanical properties. Mean compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, flexural strength, and elastic modulus with standard deviations were calculated. Multiple comparisons of the materials were also done. Results: Considerable differences in compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength were observed. Visible light cured composite showed relatively high compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength compared with the other tested materials. Amalgam showed the highest value for elastic modulus. Silver cermet showed less value for all the properties except for elastic modulus. Conclusions: Strength is one of the most important criteria for selection of a core material. Stronger materials better resist deformation and fracture provide more equitable stress distribution, greater stability, and greater probability of clinical success.

  13. Environmental development plan. LWR commercial waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies the planning and managerial requirements and schedules needed to evaluate and assess the environmental, health and safety (EH and S) aspects of the Commercial Waste Management Program (CWM). Environment is defined in its broadest sense to include environmental, health (occupational and public), safety, socioeconomic, legal and institutional aspects. This plan addresses certain present and potential Federal responsibilities for the storage, treatment, transfer and disposal of radioactive waste materials produced by the nuclear power industry. The handling and disposal of LWR spent fuel and processed high-level waste (in the event reprocessing occurs) are included in this plan. Defense waste management activities, which are addressed in detail in a separate EDP, are considered only to the extent that such activities are common to the commercial waste management program. This EDP addresses three principal elements associated with the disposal of radioactive waste materials from the commercial nuclear power industry, namely Terminal Isolation Research and Development, Spent Fuel Storage and Waste Treatment Technology. The major specific concerns and requirements addressed are assurance that (1) radioactivity will be contained during waste transport, interim storage or while the waste is considered as retrievable from a repository facility, (2) the interim storage facilities will adequately isolate the radioactive material from the biosphere, (3) the terminal isolation facility will isolate the wastes from the biosphere over a time period allowing the radioactivity to decay to innocuous levels, (4) the terminal isolation mode for the waste will abbreviate the need for surveillance and institutional control by future generations, and (5) the public will accept the basic waste management strategy and geographical sites when needed

  14. FMDP reactor alternative summary report: Volume 4, Evolutionary LWR alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] have become surplus to national defense needs both in the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. The purpose of this report is to provide schedule, cost, and technical information that will be used to support the Record of Process (ROD). Following the screening process, DOE/MD via its national laboratories initiated a more detailed analysis activity to further evaluate each of the ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived the screening process. Three ''Alternative Teams,'' chartered by DOE and comprised of technical experts from across the DOE national laboratory complex, conducted these analyses. One team was chartered for each of the major disposition classes (borehole, immobilization, and reactors). During the last year and a half, the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) Reactor Alternative Team (RxAT) has conducted extensive analyses of the cost, schedule, technical maturity, S ampersand S, and other characteristics of reactor-based plutonium disposition. The results of the RxAT's analyses of the existing LWR, CANDU, and partially complete LWR alternatives are documented in Volumes 1-3 of this report. This document (Volume 4) summarizes the results of these analyses for the ELWR-based plutonium disposition option

  15. FMDP reactor alternative summary report: Volume 4, Evolutionary LWR alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] have become surplus to national defense needs both in the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. The purpose of this report is to provide schedule, cost, and technical information that will be used to support the Record of Process (ROD). Following the screening process, DOE/MD via its national laboratories initiated a more detailed analysis activity to further evaluate each of the ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived the screening process. Three ``Alternative Teams,`` chartered by DOE and comprised of technical experts from across the DOE national laboratory complex, conducted these analyses. One team was chartered for each of the major disposition classes (borehole, immobilization, and reactors). During the last year and a half, the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) Reactor Alternative Team (RxAT) has conducted extensive analyses of the cost, schedule, technical maturity, S&S, and other characteristics of reactor-based plutonium disposition. The results of the RxAT`s analyses of the existing LWR, CANDU, and partially complete LWR alternatives are documented in Volumes 1-3 of this report. This document (Volume 4) summarizes the results of these analyses for the ELWR-based plutonium disposition option.

  16. Irradiation-accelerated corrosion of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, David; Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie

    2012-09-01

    The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, but also applies to most all other GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion presents a unique and extremely challenging environment for materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is essentially absent. Irradiation can affect corrosion or oxidation in at least three different ways. Radiation interaction with water results in the decomposition of water into radicals and oxidizing species that will increase the electrochemical corrosion potential and lead to greater corrosion rates. Irradiation of the solid surface can produce excited states that can alter corrosion, such as in the case of photo-induced corrosion. Lastly, displacement damage in the solid will result in a high flux of defects to the solid-solution interface that can alter and perhaps, accelerate interface reactions. While there exists reasonable understanding of how corrosion is affected by irradiation of the aqueous environment, there is little understanding of how irradiation affects corrosion through its impact on the solid, whether metal or oxide. The reason is largely due to the difficulty of conducting experiments that can measure this effect separately. We have undertaken a project specifically to separate the several effects of irradiation on the mechanisms of corrosion. We seek to answer the question: How does radiation damage to the solution-oxide couple affect the oxidation process differently from radiation damage to either component alone? The approach taken in this work is to closely compare corrosion accelerated by (1) proton irradiation, (2) electron irradiation, and (3) chemical corrosion potential effects alone, under typical PWR operating conditions at 300 deg. C. Both 316 stainless steel and zirconium are to be studied. The proton

  17. Core-Shell Structured Electro- and Magneto-Responsive Materials: Fabrication and Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Jin Choi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Core-shell structured electrorheological (ER and magnetorheological (MR particles have attracted increasing interest owing to their outstanding field-responsive properties, including morphology, chemical and dispersion stability, and rheological characteristics of shear stress and yield stress. This study covers recent progress in the preparation of core-shell structured materials as well as their critical characteristics and advantages. Broad emphasises from the synthetic strategy of various core-shell particles to their feature behaviours in the magnetic and electric fields have been elaborated.

  18. Conceptual development of a complete LWR reload design methodology based on generalized perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach for the physics design and analysis of LWR reload cores is developed and demonstrated through several practical applications. The new design philosophy uses first- and second-order response derivatives to predict the important reactor performance characteristics (power peaking, reactivity coefficients, etc.) for any number of possible material configurations (assembly shuffling and burnable poison loadings). The response derivatives are computed using generalized perturbation theory (GPT) techniques. This report describes in detail an idealized GPT-based design system. The idealized system would contain individual modules to generate the required first-order and higher-order sensitivity data. It would also contain at least two major application codes; one for core design optimization and the other for evaluation of several safety parameters of interest in off-normal situations. This ideal system would be fully automated, user-friendly, and quite flexible in its ability to provide a variety of design and analysis capabilities. Information gained form these three studies gives a good foundation for the development of a complete integrated design package

  19. Analysis of alternative light water reactor (LWR) fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Boegel, A.J.; Jenquin, U.P.; Kottwitz, D.A.; Lewallen, M.A.; Merrill, E.T.; Nolan, A.M.

    1979-12-01

    Nine alternative LWR fuel cycles are analyzed in terms of the isotopic content of the fuel material, the relative amounts of primary and recycled material, the uranium and thorium requirements, the fuel cycle costs and the fraction of energy which must be generated at secured sites. The fuel materials include low-enriched uranium (LEU), plutonium-uranium (MOX), highly-enriched uranium-thorium (HEU-Th), denatured uranium-thorium (DU-Th) and plutonium-thorium (Pu-Th). The analysis is based on tracing the material requirements of a generic pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a 30-year period at constant annual energy output. During this time period all the created fissile material is recycled unless its reactivity worth is less than 0.2% uranium enrichment plant tails

  20. Review of literature on the TMI accident and correlation to the LWR Safety Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.J.

    1980-05-01

    This report is the result of approximately two man-months of effort devoted to assimilating and comprehending significant publicly available material related to Three Mile Island Unit 2 and events during and subsequent to the accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Those events were then correlated with the Preliminary LWR Safety Technology Program Plan (Preliminary Program Plan) prepared for the US Department of Energy by Sandia National Lab. This report is being submitted simultaneously with the SAI report entitled Preliminary Prioritization of Tasks in the Draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan.

  1. Review of literature on the TMI accident and correlation to the LWR Safety Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.J.

    1980-05-01

    This report is the result of approximately two man-months of effort devoted to assimilating and comprehending significant publicly available material related to Three Mile Island Unit 2 and events during and subsequent to the accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Those events were then correlated with the Preliminary LWR Safety Technology Program Plan (Preliminary Program Plan) prepared for the US Department of Energy by Sandia National Lab. This report is being submitted simultaneously with the SAI report entitled Preliminary Prioritization of Tasks in the Draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan

  2. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    OpenAIRE

    PANITIWAT, Prapaporn; SALIMEE, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2...

  3. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 3 - partially complete LWR alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, S.R.; Fisher, S.E.; Bevard, B.B.

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 3 of a four volume report summarizes the results of these analyses for the partially complete LWR (PCLWR) reactor based plutonium disposition alternative

  4. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 3 - partially complete LWR alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, S.R.; Fisher, S.E.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 3 of a four volume report summarizes the results of these analyses for the partially complete LWR (PCLWR) reactor based plutonium disposition alternative.

  5. Influence of different post core materials on the color of Empress 2 full ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Wang, Xin-zhi; Feng, Hai-lan

    2006-10-20

    For esthetic consideration, dentin color post core materials were normally used for all-ceramic crown restorations. However, in some cases, clinicians have to consider combining a full ceramic crown with a metal post core. Therefore, this experiment was conducted to test the esthetical possibility of applying cast metal post core in a full ceramic crown restoration. The color of full ceramic crowns on gold and Nickel-Chrome post cores was compared with the color of the same crowns on tooth colored post cores. Different try-in pastes were used to imitate the influence of a composite cementation on the color of different restorative combinations. The majority of patients could not detect any color difference less than DeltaE 1.8 between the two ceramic samples. So, DeltaE 1.8 was taken as the objective evaluative criterion for the evaluation of color matching and patients' satisfaction. When the Empress 2 crown was combined with the gold alloy post core, the color of the resulting material was similar to that of a glass fiber reinforced resin post core (DeltaE = 0.3). The gold alloy post core and the try-in paste did not show a perceptible color change in the full ceramic crowns, which indicated that the color of the crowns might not be susceptible to change between lab and clinic as well as during the process of composite cementation. Without an opaque covering the Ni-Cr post core would cause an unacceptable color effect on the crown (DeltaE = 2.0), but with opaque covering, the color effect became more clinically satisfactory (DeltaE = 1.8). It may be possible to apply a gold alloy post core in the Empress 2 full ceramic crown restoration when necessary. If a non-extractible Ni-Cr post core exists in the root canal, it might be possible to restore the tooth with an Empress 2 crown after covering the labial surface of the core with one layer of opaque resin cement.

  6. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part I: core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    All-ceramic restorations have been advocated for superior esthetics. Various materials have been used to improve ceramic core strength, but it is unclear whether they affect the opacity of all-ceramic systems. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic system core materials at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Disc specimens 13 mm in diameter and 0.49 +/- 0.01 mm in thickness were fabricated from the following materials (n = 5 per group): IPS Empress dentin, IPS Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina core, In-Ceram Spinell core, In-Ceram Zirconia core, and Procera AllCeram core. Empress and Empress 2 dentin specimens also were fabricated and tested at a thickness of 0.77 +/- 0.02 mm (the manufacturer's recommended core thickness is 0.8 mm). A high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) served as the control, and Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin was used as a standard. Sample reflectance (ratio of the intensity of reflected light to that of the incident light) was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white (Yw) backing to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (P In-Ceram Spinell > Empress, Procera, Empress 2 > In-Ceram Alumina > In-Ceram Zirconia, 52 SF alloy.

  7. Behavior of LWR fuel elements under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Bocek, M.; Erbacher, F.; Fiege, A.; Fischer, M.; Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Holleck, H.; Karb, E.; Leistikow, S.; Melang, S.; Ondracek, G.; Thuemmler, F.; Wiehr, K.

    1977-01-01

    In the frame of the German reactor safety research program, the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe is carrying out a comprehensive program on the behavior of LWR fuel elements under a variety of power cooling mismatch conditions in particular during loss-of-coolant accidents. The major objectives are to establish a detailed quantitative understanding of fuel rod failures mechanisms and their thresholds, to evaluate the safety margins of power reactor cores under accident conditions and to investigate the feedback of fuel rod failures on the efficiency of emergency core cooling systems. This detailed quantitative understanding is achieved through extensive basic and integral experiments and is incorporated in a fuel behavior code. On the basis of these results the design of power reactor fuel elements and of safety devices can be further improved. The results of investigations on the inelastic deformation (ballooning) behavior of Zircaloy 4 cladding at LOCA temperatures in oxidizing atmosphere are presented. Depending upon strain rate and temperature superplastic deformation behavior was observed. In the equation of state of Zry 4 the strain rate sensitivity index depends strongly upon strain and in the superplastic region upon sample anisotropy. Oxidation kinetics experiments with Zry-tubes at 900-1300 0 C showed that the Baker-Just correlation describes the reality quite conservative. Therefore a reduction of the amount of Zry oxidation can be assumed in the course of a LOCA. The external oxidation of Zry-cladding by steam as well as internal oxidation by the oxygen in oxide fuel and fission products (Cs, I, Te) have an influence on the strain and rupture behavior of Zry-cladding at LOCA temperatures. In out-of-pile and inpile experiments the mechanical and thermal behavior of fuel rods during the blowdown, the heatup and the reflood phases of a LOCA are investigated under representative and controlled thermohydraulic conditions. The task of the inpile experiments is

  8. Evaluation of Core Loss in Magnetic Materials Employed in Utility Grid AC Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beres, Remus Narcis; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    magnetic materials adopted in utility grid ac filters have been investigated and measured for both sinusoidal and rectangular excitation, with and without dc bias condition. The core loss information can ensure cost effective passive filter designs and may avoid trial-error design procedures of the passive......Inductive components play an important role in filtering the switching harmonics related to the pulse width modulation in voltage source converters. Particularly, the filter reactor on the converter side of the filter is subjected to rectangular excitation which may lead to significant losses...... in the core, depending on the magnetic material of choice and current ripple specifications. Additionally, shunt or series reactors that exists in LCL or trap filters and which are subjected to sinusoidal excitations have different specifications and requirements. Therefore, the core losses of different...

  9. Nanocrystalline material in toroidal cores for current transformer: analytical study and computational simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito Antonio Luciano

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on electrical and magnetic properties, such as saturation magnetization, initial permeability, and coercivity, in this work are presented some considerations about the possibilities of applications of nanocrystalline alloys in toroidal cores for current transformers. It is discussed how the magnetic characteristics of the core material affect the performance of the current transformer. From the magnetic characterization and the computational simulations, using the finite element method (FEM, it has been verified that, at the typical CT operation value of flux density, the nanocrystalline alloys properties reinforce the hypothesis that the use of these materials in measurement CT cores can reduce the ratio and phase errors and can also improve its accuracy class.

  10. Behaviour of contact layer material between cermet fuel element core and can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilin, S.S.; Permyakov, L.N.; Simakov, G.A.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    The structural state of the contact layer between the shell of the Zr1Nb alloy and cermet fuel element core containing up to 70% of uranium dioxides is experimental studied. The silumin alloy was used as contact material. The results of studies on interaction zones, formed on the Zr1Nb - silumin boundary after fuel elements manufacture and also under temperature conditions, modeling the maximum design and hypothetical accidents accompanied by the contact material melting, are presented [ru

  11. Phenomena in the interaction among a core melt and protective and sacrificial materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, W.; Koller, W.; Dyllong, N.; Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S.; Lansmann, V.; Nie, M.; Haefner, W.; Alkan, Z.; Andrae, P.; Rensing, B.

    2000-01-01

    In a postulated core meltdown accident in a light water reactor there are bound to be interactions, in the ex-vessel phase, among the core melt and the structural materials within and below the reactor cavity. In existing plants, these structural materials normally are structural concrete, while future, evolutionary reactor lines are to have sacrificial and protective materials specially designed for this hypothetical case. To add to the state of knowledge about the phenomena occurring, experiments need to be conducted under conditions as realistic as possible. Within the research programs funded by the European Union, the German Federal Ministry for Economics, and the German nuclear power plant operators, experiments on a laboratory as well as an industrial scale on these problems are being carried out in the two projects called CORESA (COrium on REfractory and SAcrificial materials) and ECOSTAR (Ex-vessel COre melt STAbilization Research). The experiments are accompanied by an extensive analytical theoretical program also serving to advance and validate computer codes on the problems under investigation. The projects, which are carried out with international European participation, are expected to allow a concept to be developed for managing postulated accident scenarios involving core meltdown for innovative nuclear power plants, and to provide findings on risk evaluation of plants now in operation so as to further develop accident management measures. (orig.) [de

  12. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified

  13. Supplemental materials for the ICDP-USGS Eyreville A, B, and C core holes, Chesapeake Bay impact structure: Core-box photographs, coring-run tables, and depth-conversion files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, C.T.; Edwards, L.E.; Malinconico, M.L.; Powars, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    During 2005-2006, the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program and the U.S. Geological Survey drilled three continuous core holes into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure to a total depth of 1766.3 m. A collection of supplemental materials that presents a record of the core recovery and measurement data for the Eyreville cores is available on CD-ROM at the end of this volume and in the GSA Data Repository. The supplemental materials on the CD-ROM include digital photographs of each core box from the three core holes, tables of the three coring-run logs, as recorded on site, and a set of depth-conversion programs. In this chapter, the contents, purposes, and basic applications of the supplemental materials are briefly described. With this information, users can quickly decide if the materials will apply to their specific research needs. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  14. Research activities at JAERI on core material behaviour under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetsuka, H.; Katanashi, S.; Ishijima, K.

    1996-01-01

    At the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), experimental studies on physical phenomena under the condition of a severe accident have been conducted. This paper presents the progress of the experimental studies on fuel and core materials behaviour such as the thermal shock fracture of fuel cladding due to quenching, the chemical interaction of core materials at high temperatures and the examination of TMI-2 debris. The mechanical behaviour of fuel rod with heavily embrittled cladding tube due to the thermal shock during delayed reflooding have been investigated at the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSSR) of JAERI. A test fuel rod was heated in steam atmosphere by both electric and nuclear heating using the NSSR, then the rod was quenched by reflooding at the test section. Melting of core component materials having relatively low melting points and their eutectic reaction with other materials significantly influence on the degradation and melt down of fuel bundles during severe accidents. Therefore basic information on the reaction of core materials is necessary to understand and analyze the progress of core melting and relocation. Chemical interactions have been widely investigated at high temperatures for various binary systems of core component materials including absorber materials such as Zircaloy/Inconel, Zircaloy/stainless steel, Zircaloy/(Ag-In-Cd), stainless steel B 4 C and Zircaloy/B 4 C. It was found that the reaction generally obeyed a parabolic rate law and the reaction rate was determined for each reaction system. Many debris samples obtained from the degraded core of TMI-2 were transported to JAERI for numerous examinations and analyses. The microstructural examination revealed that the most part of debris was ceramic and it was not homogeneous in a microscopic sense. The thermal diffusivity data was also obtained for the temperature range up to about 1800K. The data from the large scale integral experiments were also obtained through the

  15. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P materials.

  16. Convergence studies of deterministic methods for LWR explicit reflector methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canepa, S.; Hursin, M.; Ferroukhi, H.; Pautz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The standard approach in modem 3-D core simulators, employed either for steady-state or transient simulations, is to use Albedo coefficients or explicit reflectors at the core axial and radial boundaries. In the latter approach, few-group homogenized nuclear data are a priori produced with lattice transport codes using 2-D reflector models. Recently, the explicit reflector methodology of the deterministic CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system was identified to potentially constitute one of the main sources of errors for core analyses of the Swiss operating LWRs, which are all belonging to GII design. Considering that some of the new GIII designs will rely on very different reflector concepts, a review and assessment of the reflector methodology for various LWR designs appeared as relevant. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to first recall the concepts of the explicit reflector modelling approach as employed by CASMO/SIMULATE. Then, for selected reflector configurations representative of both GII and GUI designs, a benchmarking of the few-group nuclear data produced with the deterministic lattice code CASMO-4 and its successor CASMO-5, is conducted. On this basis, a convergence study with regards to geometrical requirements when using deterministic methods with 2-D homogenous models is conducted and the effect on the downstream 3-D core analysis accuracy is evaluated for a typical GII deflector design in order to assess the results against available plant measurements. (authors)

  17. Prospects for future uranium savings through LWRs with high performance cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochida, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Sasaki, M.; Matsuura, H.; Ueji, M.; Murata, T.; Kanda, K.; Oka, Y.; Kondo, S.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1986, Nuclear Power Engineering Cooperation (NUPEC) has been studying four types of LWR high performance core concepts (i.e., the uranium saving core I (USC-I), the uranium saving core II (USC-II), the high moderation core (HMC) and the low moderation core (LMC)), which aim at improvement of uranium and plutonium utilization. After the evaluation of fundamental core performance and uranium and plutonium material balance for each reactor, potential uranium savings with different reactor strategies are evaluated for the Japanese scenario with assumption of the growth of future nuclear power plant generation, annual reprocessing capacity and schedules for the introduction of high performance core. At 2030, about 3-6% savings in uranium demand are expected by USC-I or USC-II strategy, while about 14% savings by HMC strategy and about 8% by LMC strategy. (author)

  18. Effect of Fuel Structure Materials on Radiation Source Term in Reactor Core Meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Ha, Kwang Soon

    2014-01-01

    The fission product (Radiation Source) releases from the reactor core into the containment is obligatorily evaluated to guarantee the safety of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) under the hypothetical accident involving a core meltdown. The initial core inventory is used as a starting point of all radiological consequences and effects on the subsequent results of accident assessment. Hence, a proper evaluation for the inventory can be regarded as one of the most important part over the entire procedure of accident analysis. The inventory of fission products is typically evaluated on the basis of the uranium material (e.g., UO2 and USi2) loaded in nuclear fuel assembly, except for the structure materials such as the end fittings, grids, and some kinds of springs. However, the structure materials are continually activated by the neutrons generated from the nuclear fission, and some nuclides of them (e.g., 14 C and 60 Co) can significantly influence on accident assessment. During the severe core accident, the structure components can be also melted with the melting points of temperature relatively lower than uranium material. A series of the calculation were performed by using ORIGEN-S module in SCALE 6.1 package code system. The total activity in each part of structure materials was specifically analyzed from these calculations. The fission product inventory is generally evaluated based on the uranium materials of fuel only, even though the structure components of the assembly are continually activated by the neutrons generated from the nuclear fission. In this study, the activation calculation of the fuel structure materials was performed for the initial source term assessment in the accident of reactor core meltdown. As a result, the lower end fitting and the upper plenum greatly contribute to the total activity except for the cladding material. The nuclides of 56 Mn, '5 1 Cr, 55 Fe, 58 Co, 54 Mn, and 60 Co are analyzed to mainly effect on the activity. This result

  19. Results and Prospects of Development of Works on Structural Core Materials for Russian Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitina, A.A.; Ageev, V.S.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M.V.; Mitrofanova, N.M.; Tselishchev, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    The strategy of development of atomic energy in Russia in the first half of XXI century contemplates construction and putting in operation of fast reactors of new generation with different types of coolant: sodium (BN-800, BN-1200, MBIR), lead (BREST-OD-300) and lead-bismuth eutectic (SVBR-100). For assurance of the working capacity of reactors that are under construction and achievement of economically reasonable burn-up of nuclear fuel the structural core materials with necessary level of radiation resistance, heat resistance, corrosion resistance to products of fuel fission, corrosion resistance in coolant and in water must be developed and justified. For sodium cooled reactors the key challenge is creation of radiation resistant and heat resistant cladding materials, which must ensure the achievement of damage doses at least 140 dpa. The solution of this problem is provided by phased use as cladding materials of austenitic steels ChS68 and EK164 (maximum damage doses ~ 92 and ~110-115 dpa, respectively), precipitation-hardening heat resistant ferritic-martensitic steels EK181 and ChS139 (maximum damage dose ~140 dpa) and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels (maximum damage dose more than 140 dpa). For development of core materials for reactors with lead and lead-bismuth eutectic coolants the most serious challenge is corrosion resistance of materials in coolant. Therefore at present time a very wide range of works on study of corrosion resistance of candidate materials is carrying out. As the basic material for the cladding tubes is considered a ferritic-martensitic steel EP823 with high silicon content. In this report the main results of works on justification of the working capacity of materials of different classes in respect to use it in cores of operating and prospective fast reactors with different types of coolant and prospects of further development of works are presented. (author)

  20. PIE of nuclear grade SiC/SiC flexural coupons irradiated to 10 dpa at LWR temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites are being actively investigated for accident-tolerant core structures of light water reactors (LWRs). Owing to the limited number of irradiation studies previously conducted at LWR-coolant temperature, this study examined SiC/SiC composites following neutron irradiation at 230–340°C to 2.0 and 11.8 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The investigated materials are chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC/SiC composites with three different reinforcement fibers. The fiber materials were monolayer pyrolytic carbon (PyC)-coated Hi-NicalonTM Type-S (HNS), TyrannoTM SA3 (SA3), and SCS-UltraTM (SCS) SiC fibers. The irradiation resistance of these composites was investigated based on flexural behavior, dynamic Young’s modulus, swelling, and microstructures. There was no notable mechanical properties degradation of the irradiated HNS and SA3 SiC/SiC composites except for reduction of the Young’s moduli by up to 18%. The microstructural stability of these composites supported the absence of degradation. In addition, no progressive swelling from 2.0 to 11.8 dpa was confirmed for these composites. On the other hand, the SCS composite showed significant mechanical degradation associated with cracking within the fiber. This study determined that SiC/SiC composites with HNS or SA3 SiC/SiC fibers, a PyC interphase, and a CVI SiC matrix retain their properties beyond the lifetime dose for LWR fuel cladding at the relevant temperature.

  1. The Common Core State Standards and the Role of Instructional Materials: A Case Study on EdReports.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review research studies investigating the role of instructional materials in relation to the Common Core State Standards and to evaluate whether a new organisation, EdReports.org, founded to evaluate the alignment of instructional materials to the Common Core State Standards, has achieved its objectives. Content…

  2. Further work on sodium borates as sacrificial materials for a core-catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Roth, A.; Werle, H.

    1982-01-01

    Sodium borates are suitable low melting point sacrificial materials for a core-catcher of a fast reactor. Concept, design and initial development work have been described previously. Here we report on the measurements of density, volumetric thermal expansion coefficients and viscosity of borax and sodium metaborate, pure and with various percentages of dissolved UO 2 . The density of these molten salts was measured with the buoyancy method in the temperature range 850 - 1300 0 C, while the viscosity was measured in the temperature range 700 - 1250 0 C with a Haake viscosity balance. Simulation experiments with low melting point materials were performed to investigate the ratio of the downward to sideward melt velocity. The results of these experiments show that this ratio is equal to 0.34 for a solid to liquid density ratio rho = 1.66. For the real borax core-catcher rho = 4 and this would correspond to a velocity ratio of about one

  3. Standard Test Method for Water Absorption of Core Materials for Structural Sandwich Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the relative amount of water absorption by various types of structural core materials when immersed or in a high relative humidity environment. This test method is intended to apply to only structural core materials; honeycomb, foam, and balsa wood. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given may be approximate. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Influence of high dose irradiation on core structural and fuel materials in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) periodically organizes meeting to discuss and review important aspects of fast reactor technology. The fifth meeting held in Obninsk, Russian Federation, 16-19 June 1997, was devoted to the influence of high dose irradiation on the mechanical properties of reactor core structural and fuel materials. The proceedings includes the papers submitted at this meeting each with a separate abstract

  5. Thermal interactions of a molten core debris pool with surrounding structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, L. Jr.; Cheung, F.B.; Farhadieh, R.; Stein, R.P.; Gabor, J.D.; Bingle, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results on individual aspects of the overall problem of the interaction of a large mass of LMFBR core debris with concrete or other materials are reviewed. Results of recent heat transfer experiments with molten UO 2 have indicated the importance of internal thermal radiation and methods to take account of this are developed. Effects of gas release and density difference are considered. The GROWS-2 Code is used to illustrate the effects of various assumptions

  6. Development of training simulator for LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sureshbabu, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    A full-scope training simulator was developed for a light water reactor (LWR). This paper describes how the development evolved from a desktop simulator to the full-scope training simulator. It also describes the architecture and features of the simulator including the large number of failures that it simulates. The paper also explains the three-level validation tests that were used to qualify the training simulator. (author)

  7. Research reactors for power reactor fuel and materials testing - Studsvik's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1998-01-01

    Presently Studsvik's R2 test reactor is used for BWR and PWR fuel irradiations at constant power and under transient power conditions. Furthermore tests are performed with defective LWR fuel rods. Tests are also performed on different types of LWR cladding materials and structural materials including post-irradiation testing of materials irradiated at different temperatures and, in some cases, in different water chemistries and on fusion reactor materials. In the past, tests have also been performed on HTGR fuel and FBR fuel and materials under appropriate coolant, temperature and pressure conditions. Fuel tests under development include extremely fast power ramps simulating some reactivity initiated accidents and stored energy (enthalpy) measurements. Materials tests under development include different types of in-pile tests including tests in the INCA (In-Core Autoclave) facility .The present and future demands on the test reactor fuel in all these cases are discussed. (author)

  8. Materials considerations for UF6 gas-core reactor. Interim report for preliminary design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1977-04-01

    The limiting materials problem in a high-temperature UF 6 core reactor is the corrosion of the core containment vessel. The UF 6 , the lower fluorides of uranium, and the fluorine that exist at the anticipated reactor operating conditions (1000 K and about one atmosphere UF 6 ) are all corrosive. Because of this, the materials evaluation effort for this reactor design study has concentrated on the identification of a viable system for the containment vessel that meets both the materials and neutronic requirements. A study of the literature has revealed that the most promising corrosion-resistant candidates are Ni or Ni-Al alloys. One of the conclusions of this work is that the containment vessel use a nickel liner or clad since the use of Ni as a structural member is precluded by its relative blackness to thermal neutrons. Estimates of corrosion rates of Ni and Ni-Al alloys, the effects of the pressure and temperature of F 2 on the corrosion rates, calculated equilibrium gas compositions at reactor core operating conditions, suggested methods of fabrication, and recommendations for future research and development are included

  9. The influence of anisotropy on the core structure of Shockley partial dislocations within FCC materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajewski, B. A.; Hunter, A.; Luscher, D. J.; Beyerlein, I. J.

    2018-01-01

    Both theoretical and numerical models of dislocations often necessitate the assumption of elastic isotropy to retain analytical tractability in addition to reducing computational load. As dislocation based models evolve towards physically realistic material descriptions, the assumption of elastic isotropy becomes increasingly worthy of examination. We present an analytical dislocation model for calculating the full dissociated core structure of dislocations within anisotropic face centered cubic (FCC) crystals as a function of the degree of material elastic anisotropy, two misfit energy densities on the γ-surface ({γ }{{isf}}, {γ }{{usf}}) and the remaining elastic constants. Our solution is independent of any additional features of the γ-surface. Towards this pursuit, we first demonstrate that the dependence of the anisotropic elasticity tensor on the orientation of the dislocation line within the FCC crystalline lattice is small and may be reasonably neglected for typical materials. With this approximation, explicit analytic solutions for the anisotropic elasticity tensor {B} for both nominally edge and screw dislocations within an FCC crystalline lattice are devised, and employed towards defining a set of effective isotropic elastic constants which reproduce fully anisotropic results, however do not retain the bulk modulus. Conversely, Hill averaged elastic constants which both retain the bulk modulus and reasonably approximate the dislocation core structure are employed within subsequent numerical calculations. We examine a wide range of materials within this study, and the features of each partial dislocation core are sufficiently localized that application of discrete linear elasticity accurately describes the separation of each partial dislocation core. In addition, the local features (the partial dislocation core distribution) are well described by a Peierls-Nabarro dislocation model. We develop a model for the displacement profile which depends upon

  10. Technical report on LWR design decision methodology. Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Energy Incorporated (EI) was selected by Sandia Laboratories to develop and test on LWR design decision methodology. Contract Number 42-4229 provided funding for Phase I of this work. This technical report on LWR design decision methodology documents the activities performed under that contract. Phase I was a short-term effort to thoroughly review the curret LWR design decision process to assure complete understanding of current practices and to establish a well defined interface for development of initial quantitative design guidelines

  11. French R&D on Materials for the Core Components of SFRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Flem, M.; Séran, J.L.; Blat-Yrieix, M.; Garat, V.

    2013-01-01

    ASTRID demonstrator 480-700°C, 110 dpa. • Use of reference materials benefiniting from a large feed-back from the previous French SFRs (Rapsodie, Phénix, SuperPhénix) • Austenitic steels (cladding), Martensitic steels (wrapper tube), B4C (absorbers). • Improving the description of their behavior (swelling, high temperature) • Qualifying the materials regarding the specificities of ASTRID core. Future SFRs 530-750, 180 dpa. • Use of advanced materials with improved properties • ODS ferritic/martensitic steels (cladding), Other metallic solutions as V alloys (cladding), SiC/SiC composites (wrapper tube), Innovative absorbers and reflectors. • R&D to develop/fabricate suitable grades • Qualifying these materials in ASTRID

  12. Status of LWR fuel design and future usage of JENDL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takuya

    2008-01-01

    For all conventional LWR fuel design codes of LWR fuel manufactures in Japan, the cross section library are based on the ENDF/B. Recently we can see several movements for the utilization of JENDL library for the LWR fuel design. The latest version of NEUPHYS cross section library is based on the JENDL-3.2. To accelerate this movement of JENDL utilization in LWR fuel design, it is necessary to prepare a high quality JENDL document, systematic validation of JENDL and to appeal them abroad effectively. (author)

  13. Implementation of static generalized perturbation theory for LWR design applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byron, R.F.; White, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized perturbation theory (GPT) formulation is developed for application to light water reactor (LWR) design. The extensions made to standard generalized perturbation theory are the treatment of thermal-hydraulic and fission product poisoning feedbacks, and criticality reset. This formulation has been implemented into a standard LWR design code. The method is verified by comparing direct calculations with GPT calculations. Data are presented showing that feedback effects need to be considered when using GPT for LWR problems. Some specific potential applications of this theory to the field of LWR design are discussed

  14. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1978-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide state of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (DG) [de

  15. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1985-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide states of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (orig./PW)

  16. Proceedings of the 2007 LWR Fuel Performance Meeting / TopFuel 2007 'Zero by 2010'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    ANS, ENS, AESJ and KNS are jointly organizing the 2007 International LWR Fuel Performance Meeting following the successful ENS TopFuel meeting held during 22-26 October, 2006 in Salamaca, Spain. Merging three premier nuclear fuel design and performance meetings: the ANS LWR Fuel Performance Meeting, the ENS TopFuel and Asian Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting (WRFPM) created this international meeting. The meeting will be held annually on a tri-annual rotational basis in USA, Asia, and Europe. The technical scope of the meeting includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as performance experience in commercial and test reactors. The meeting excludes front end and back end fuel issues, however, it covers all front and/or back issues that impact fuel designs and performance

  17. Analytical methods to characterize heterogeneous raw material for thermal spray process: cored wire Inconel 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, T.; Bonebeau, S.; Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Pawlowski, L.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    In wire arc spraying, the raw material needs to exhibit sufficient formability and ductility in order to be processed. By using an electrically conductive, metallic sheath, it is also possible to handle non-conductive and/or brittle materials such as ceramics. In comparison to massive wire, a cored wire has a heterogeneous material distribution. Due to this fact and the complex thermodynamic processes during wire arc spraying, it is very difficult to predict the resulting chemical composition in the coating with sufficient accuracy. An Inconel 625 cored wire was used to investigate this issue. In a comparative study, the analytical results of the raw material were compared to arc sprayed coatings and droplets, which were remelted in an arc furnace under argon atmosphere. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis were used to determine the chemical composition. The phase determination was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results were related to the manufacturer specifications and evaluated in respect to differences in the chemical composition. The comparison between the feedstock powder, the remelted droplets and the thermally sprayed coatings allows to evaluate the influence of the processing methods on the resulting chemical and phase composition.

  18. Mechanical properties of chemically bonded sand core materials dipped in sol-gel coating impregnated with filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    A novel sol-gel coating impregnated with filter dust was applied on chemically bonded sand core materials by dipping. After curing, the strengths of the core materials were measured under uniaxial loading using a new strength testing machine (STM). The STM presents the loading history as a force-...... of the chemically bonded sand core materials, a combination of flexural and compression tests is suggested for improving the casting quality. © 2012 W. S. Maney & Son Ltd.......A novel sol-gel coating impregnated with filter dust was applied on chemically bonded sand core materials by dipping. After curing, the strengths of the core materials were measured under uniaxial loading using a new strength testing machine (STM). The STM presents the loading history as a force...... the strengths were increased under compression. The mode of fracture of the chemically bonded sand core materials was observed to be intergranular through the binder. The stiffness of the chemically bonded sand core materials was determined. For better understanding of the mechanical properties...

  19. Development of a data bank system for LWR integral experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Aoyagi, Hideo

    1983-01-01

    A data bank system for LWR integral experiment has been developed for the purpose of alleviating various efforts associated with the verification of computer codes. The final aim of this system is such that the imput data for the code to be verified can be easily obtained, and the results of calculation can be obtained in the form of the comparison with measurement. Geometry and material composition as well as measured data are stored in the data bank. This data bank system is composed of four sub-programs; (1) registration program, (2) information retrieval program, (3) maintenance program, and (4) figure representation program. In this report, the structure of this data bank system and how to use the system are explained. An example of the use of this system is also included. (Aoki, K.)

  20. Alternatives for managing post LWR reactor nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The two extremes in the LWR fuel cycle are discarding the spent fuel and recycling the U and Pu to the maximum extent possible. The waste volumes from the two alternatives are compared. A preliminary evaluation is made of the technology available for handling wastes from each step of the fuel cycle. The wastes considered are fuel materials, high--level wastes, other liquids, combustible and non-combustible solids, and non--high--level wastes. Evaluation of processing gaseous wastes indicates that technology is available for capture of Kr and I 2 , but further development is needed for T 2 . Technology for interim storage and geological isolation is considered adequate. An outline is given of the steps in the selection of a final storage site

  1. LWR-PV Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program review graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; Gold, R.; Gutherie, G.L.

    1979-10-01

    A primary objective of the multilaboratory program is to prepare an updated and improved set of dosimetry, damage correlation, and the associated reactor analysis ASTM standards for LWR-PV irradiation surveillance programs. Supporting this objective are a series of analytical and experimental validation and calibration studies in Benchmark Neutron Fields, reactor Test Regions, and operating power reactor Surveillance Positions. These studies will establish and certify the precision and accuracy of the measurement and predictive methods which are recommended for use in these standards. Consistent and accurate measurement and data analysis techniques and methods, therefore, will have been developed and validated along with guidelines for required neutron field calculations that are used to (1) correlate changes in material properties with the characteristics of the neutron radiation field and (2) predict pressure vessel steel toughness and embrittlement from power reactor surveillance data

  2. Development of PIE techniques for irradiated LWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Masahiro; Kizaki, Minoru; Sukegawa, Tomohide

    1999-01-01

    For the evaluation of safety and integrity of light water reactors (LWRs), various post irradiation examinations (PIEs) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and fuel claddings have been carried out in the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL). In recent years, the instrumented Charpy impact testing machine was remodeled aiming at the improvement of accuracy and reliability. By this remodeling, absorbed energy and other useful information on impact properties can be delivered from the force-displacement curve for the evaluation of neutron irradiation embrittlement behavior of LWR-RPV steels at one-time striking. In addition, two advanced PIE technologies are now under development. One is the remote machining of mechanical test pieces from actual irradiated pressure vessel steels. The other is development of low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue test technology in order to clarify the post-irradiation fatigue characteristics of structural and fuel cladding materials. (author)

  3. Quality assurance in the course of fabrication of LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, G.; Perry, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A high quality level of LWR fuel elements can only be assured by a system of Quality Assurance measures purposefully designed, balanced, and appropriately applied. This includes application of and the appropriate balance between both system and product oriented measures. A prerequisite to the establishment of these measures is a precise analysis of the various influences of the individual process steps on the quality characteristics of the starting materials, semi-finished and finished products. In addition, these characteristics require classification criteria relative to their significance. The described classification is used to establish sampling plans and to disposition non-conformances. The EXXON Nuclear Quality Assurance system which is based on these principles is described and illustrated with some examples. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N.; Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C.; Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors

  5. Measuring technique of super high temperature thermal properties of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Akira; Baba, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Hideo; Matsumoto, Tsuyoshi

    1998-01-01

    In this study, thermal properties of reactor core materials used for water cooled reactors and FBR were tried to develop a technique to measure their melt states at less than 3,000degC in order to contribute more correct evaluation of the reactor core behavior at severe accident. Then, a thermal property measuring method of high temperature melt by using floating method was investigated and its fundamental design was begun to investigate under a base of optimum judgement on the air flow floating throw-down method. And, in order to measure emissivity of melt specimen surface essential for correct temperature measurement using the throw down method, a spectroscopic emissivity measuring unit using an ellipsometer was prepared and induced. On the thermal properties measurement using the holding method, a specimen container to measure thermal diffusiveness of the high temperature melts by using laser flashing method was tried to prepare. (G.K.)

  6. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N., E-mail: neelampg@iastate.edu; Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  7. Studies on the core-support carbon material for VHTR, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto; Saito, Tamotsu; Fukuda, Yasumasa; Sasaki, Yasuichi; Hasegawa, Takashi.

    1979-11-01

    To obtain information of core-support carbon material for VHTR, thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of three domestic carbon blocks were measured. Results indicated the need for development of carbon material with lower thermal conductivity for VHTR. These two were also measured of the samples heat-treated between 1000 0 C and 3040 0 C for one hour. Thermal conductivity increased with heat-treatment above 1200 0 C and resistivity stayed constant between 1500 0 C and 2000 0 C. The results should be useful in choosing the final heat-treatment temperature in carbon material production. The changes of Lorentz number with heat treatment were classified into three heat-treatment temperature regions of below 1500 0 C, 1500 0 C - 2500 0 C, and above 2500 0 C; the results are interpreted with a graphitization model. (author)

  8. Debris and pool formation/heat transfer in FARO-LWR: experiments and analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magallon, D.; Annunziato, A.; Corradini, M.

    1999-01-01

    The FARO-LWR experiments examine the debris and pool formation from a pour of core melt materials (UO 2 /ZrO 2 and UO 2 /ZrO 2 /Zr) into a pool of water at prototypic accident conditions. The experiments give unique data on the debris bed initial conditions, morphology and heat transfer after the core melt has slump and (partly) quenched into the water of the lower head. Quantities of up to 170 kg of corium melt are poured by gravity into water of depth between 1 and 2 m through a nozzle of diameter 0.1 m at different system pressures. The debris is collected in a flat bottom catcher of diameter 0.66 m. It reaches heights up to 0.2 m depending on the melt quantity. In general, the melt reaches the bottom only partially fragmented. The debris which forms consists of a conglomerate ('cake') in contact with the collecting structure and overlaying fragments (loose debris). The mean particle size of the loose debris is in the range 3.5 - 4.8 mm. The upper surface of the debris is flat. A gap is present between the cake and the bottom plate. The paper reviews the debris formation and heat transfer to the bottom steel structure from these tests and describes the development of a model to predict the debris and pool formation process. Sensitivity analyses have been performed by the COMETA code to study the behaviour of the ratio between the cake mass and the total mass. (authors)

  9. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (p<0.05). Surface roughening of the tested FRC posts is

  10. Effect of silica fiber on the mechanical and chemical behavior of alumina-based ceramic core material

    OpenAIRE

    Weiguo Jiang; Kaiwen Li; Jiuhan Xiao; Langhong Lou

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve the chemical leachability, the alumina-based ceramic core material with the silica fiber was injected and sintered at 1100 °C/4 h, 1200 °C/4 h, 1300 °C/4 h and 1400 °C/4 h, respectively. The micrographs of ceramic core materials at sintered and leached state were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The phase composition of ceramic core material after sintering and the leaching product after leaching were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The porosity, r...

  11. LIFE vs. LWR: End of the Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; Blink, J.A.; Shaw, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    LIFE are expected to result in a more straightforward licensing process and are also expected to improve the public perception of risk from nuclear power generation, transportation of nuclear materials, and nuclear waste disposal. Waste disposal is an ongoing issue for LWRs. The conventional (once-through) LWR fuel cycle treats unburned fuel as waste, and results in the current fleet of LWRs producing about twice as much waste in their 60 years of operation as is legally permitted to be disposed of in Yucca Mountain. Advanced LWR fuel cycles would recycle the unused fuel, such that each GWe-yr of electricity generation would produce only a small waste volume compared to the conventional fuel cycle. However, the advanced LWR fuel cycle requires chemical reprocessing plants for the fuel, multiple handling of radioactive materials, and an extensive transportation network for the fuel and waste. In contrast, the LIFE engine requires only one fueling for the plant lifetime, has no chemical reprocessing, and has a single shipment of a small amount of waste per GWe-yr of electricity generation. Public perception of the nuclear option will be improved by the reduction, for LIFE engines, of the number of shipments of radioactive material per GWe-yr and the need to build multiple repositories. In addition, LIFE fuel requires neither enrichment nor reprocessing, eliminating the two most significant pathways to proliferation from commercial nuclear fuel to weapons programs

  12. Magnetite Core-Shell Nanoparticles in Nondestructive Flaw Detection of Polymeric Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetti, Mimi; Wei, Qiang; Pohl, Rainer; Casperson, Ralf; Bartusch, Matthias; Neu, Volker; Pospiech, Doris; Voit, Brigitte

    2016-10-04

    Nondestructive flaw detection in polymeric materials is important but difficult to achieve. In this research, the application of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) in nondestructive flaw detection is studied and realized, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. Superparamagnetic and highly magnetic (up to 63 emu/g) magnetite core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by grafting bromo-end-group-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (Br-PGMA) onto surface-modified Fe 3 O 4 NPs. These Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs are blended into bisphenol A diglycidylether (BADGE)-based epoxy to form homogeneously distributed magnetic epoxy nanocomposites (MENCs) after curing. The core Fe 3 O 4 of the Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs endows the MENCs with magnetic property, which is crucial for nondestructive flaw detection of the materials, while the shell PGMA promotes colloidal stability and prevents NP aggregation during curing. The eddy current testing (ET) technique is first applied to detect flaws in the MENCs. Through the brightness contrast of the ET image, surficial and subsurficial flaws in MENCs can be detected, even for MENCs with low content of Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs (1 wt %). The incorporation of Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs can be easily extended to other polymer and polymer-based composite systems and opens a new and very promising pathway toward MNP-based nondestructive flaw detection in polymeric materials.

  13. Exploratory study of molten core material/concrete interactions, July 1975--March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.; Dahlgren, D.A.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.D.

    1978-02-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between high-temperature molten materials and structural concrete is described. The experimental efforts focused on the interaction of melts of reactor core materials weighing 12 to 200 kg at temperatures 1700 to 2800 0 C with calcareous and basaltic concrete representative of that found in existing light-water nuclear reactors. Observations concerning the rate and mode of melt penetration into concrete, the nature and generation rate of gases liberated during the interaction, and heat transfer from the melt to the concrete are described. Concrete erosion is shown to be primarily a melting process with little contribution from mechanical spallation. Water and carbon dioxide thermally released from the concrete are extensively reduced to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Heat transfer from the melt to the concrete is shown to be dependent on gas generation rate and crucible geometry. Interpretation of results from the interaction experiments is supported by separate studies of the thermal decomposition of concretes, response of bulk concrete to intense heat fluxes (28 to 280 W/cm 2 ), and heat transfer from molten materials to decomposing solids. The experimental results are compared to assumptions made in previous analytic studies of core meltdown accidents in light-water nuclear reactors. A preliminary computer code, INTER, which models and extrapolates results of the experimental program is described. The code allows estimation of the effect of physical parameters on the nature of the melt/concrete interaction

  14. Validating the BISON fuel performance code to integral LWR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, R.L., E-mail: Richard.Williamson@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Gamble, K.A., E-mail: Kyle.Gamble@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Perez, D.M., E-mail: Danielle.Perez@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Novascone, S.R., E-mail: Stephen.Novascone@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Pastore, G., E-mail: Giovanni.Pastore@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Gardner, R.J., E-mail: Russell.Gardner@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Hales, J.D., E-mail: Jason.Hales@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Liu, W., E-mail: Wenfeng.Liu@anatech.com [ANATECH Corporation, 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Mai, A., E-mail: Anh.Mai@anatech.com [ANATECH Corporation, 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The BISON multidimensional fuel performance code is being validated to integral LWR experiments. • Code and solution verification are necessary prerequisites to validation. • Fuel centerline temperature comparisons through all phases of fuel life are very reasonable. • Accuracy in predicting fission gas release is consistent with state-of-the-art modeling and the involved uncertainties. • Rod diameter comparisons are not satisfactory and further investigation is underway. - Abstract: BISON is a modern finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior and has been used to analyze a variety of fuel forms in 1D spherical, 2D axisymmetric, or 3D geometries. Code validation is underway and is the subject of this study. A brief overview of BISON's computational framework, governing equations, and general material and behavioral models is provided. BISON code and solution verification procedures are described, followed by a summary of the experimental data used to date for validation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Validation comparisons focus on fuel centerline temperature, fission gas release, and rod diameter both before and following fuel-clad mechanical contact. Comparisons for 35 LWR rods are consolidated to provide an overall view of how the code is predicting physical behavior, with a few select validation cases discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrate that (1) fuel centerline temperature comparisons through all phases of fuel life are very reasonable with deviations between predictions and experimental data within ±10% for early life through high burnup fuel and only slightly out of these bounds for power ramp experiments, (2) accuracy in predicting fission gas release appears to be consistent with state-of-the-art modeling and with the involved uncertainties and (3) comparison

  15. An efficient strategy for designing ambipolar organic semiconductor material: Introducing dehydrogenated phosphorus atoms into pentacene core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Dan

    2017-09-01

    The charge transport properties of phosphapentacene (P-PEN) derivatives were systematically explored by theoretical calculation. The dehydrogenated P-PENs have reasonable frontier molecular orbital energy levels to facilitate both electron and hole injection. The reduced reorganization energies of dehydrogenated P-PENs could be intimately connected to the bonding nature of phosphorus atoms. From the idea of homology modeling, the crystal structure of TIPSE-4P-2p is constructed and fully optimized. Fascinatingly, TIPSE-4P-2p shows the intrinsic property of ambipolar transport in both hopping and band models. Thus, introducing dehydrogenated phosphorus atoms into pentacene core could be an efficient strategy for designing ambipolar material.

  16. Exfoliated BN shell-based high-frequency magnetic core-shell materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Patel, Ketan; Ren, Shenqiang

    2017-09-14

    The miniaturization of electric machines demands high frequency magnetic materials with large magnetic-flux density and low energy loss to achieve a decreased dimension of high rotational speed motors. Herein, we report a solution-processed high frequency magnetic composite (containing a nanometal FeCo core and a boron nitride (BN) shell) that simultaneously exhibits high electrical resistivity and magnetic permeability. The frequency dependent complex initial permeability and the mechanical robustness of nanocomposites are intensely dependent on the content of BN insulating phase. The results shown here suggest that insulating magnetic nanocomposites have potential for application in next-generation high-frequency electric machines with large electrical resistivity and permeability.

  17. Creep damage in zircaloy-4 at LWR temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keusseyan, R.L.; Hu, C.P.; Li, C.Y.

    1978-08-01

    The observation of creep damage in the form of grain boundary cavitation in Zircaloy-4 in the temperature range of interest to Light Water Reactor (LWR) applications is reported. The observed damage is shown to reduce the ductility of Zircaloy-4 in a tensile test at LWR temperatures

  18. Role of core support material in veneer failure of brittle layer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Ilja; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Lawn, Brian R

    2007-07-01

    A study is made of veneer failure by cracking in all-ceramic crown-like layer structures. Model trilayers consisting of a 1 mm thick external glass layer (veneer) joined to a 0.5 mm thick inner stiff and hard ceramic support layer (core) by epoxy bonding or by fusion are fabricated for testing. The resulting bilayers are then glued to a thick compliant polycarbonate slab to simulate a dentin base. The specimens are subjected to cyclic contact (occlusal) loading with spherical indenters in an aqueous environment. Video cameras are used to record the fracture evolution in the transparent glass layer in situ during testing. The dominant failure mode is cone cracking in the glass veneer by traditional outer (Hertzian) cone cracks at higher contact loads and by inner (hydraulically pumped) cone cracks at lower loads. Failure is deemed to occur when one of these cracks reaches the veneer/core interface. The advantages and disadvantages of the alumina and zirconia core materials are discussed in terms of mechanical properties-strength and toughness, as well as stiffness. Consideration is also given to the roles of interface strength and residual thermal expansion mismatch stresses in relation to the different joining methods. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Modelling mechanical properties of the multilayer composite materials with the polyamide core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaśka Krzysztof

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the wide range of application for belt conveyors, engineers look for many different combinations of mechanical properties of conveyor and transmission belts. It can be made by creating multilayer or fibre reinforced composite materials from base thermoplastic or thermosetting polymers. In order to gain high strength with proper elasticity and friction coefficient, the core of the composite conveyor belt is made of polyamide film core, which can be combined with various types of polymer fabrics, films or even rubbers. In this paper authors show the complex model of multilayer composite belt with the polyamide core, which can be used in simulation analyses. The following model was derived based on the experimental research, which consisted of tensile, compression and shearing tests. In order to achieve the most accurate model, proper simulations in ABAQUS were made and then the results were compared with empirical mechanical characteristics of a conveyor belt. The main goal of this research is to fully describe the perforation process of conveyor and transmission belts for vacuum belt conveyors. The following model will help to develop design briefs for machines used for mechanical perforation.

  20. Is it the end of history for LWR safety?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2004-01-01

    In this essay a parallel is drawn between the struggle for recognition, which is argued by Fukuyama as the 'motor' of human history and that waged by the LWR safety for the public to recognize the LWR plants as a source of safe nuclear power. The end of history for the ''human struggle for recognition'' as the capitalistic liberal democracy is equated with the ''end of history'' for the LWR safety to provide assurance to the public of termination of a severe accident it ever would occur. It is suggested that we are near ''the end of history'' of the LWR safety for the new-design LWR plants but fall short for the presently-installed plants. The essay bases these suggestions on an examination of the history of nuclear power development in U.S.A., but also considering the more recent regulatory and public acceptance developments in Europe and the rest of the World. (author)

  1. Nonlinear Thermo-mechanical Finite Element Analysis of Polymer Foam Cored Sandwich Structures including Geometrical and Material Nonlinearity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleti, Hara Naga Krishna Teja; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Taher, Siavash Talebi

    In this paper, polymer foam cored sandwich structures with fibre reinforced composite face sheets subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads will be analysed using the commercial FE code ABAQUS® incorporating both material and geometrical nonlinearity. Large displacements and rotations...

  2. Short Communication on "In-situ TEM ion irradiation investigations on U3Si2 at LWR temperatures"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinbin; Harp, Jason; Mo, Kun; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Baldo, Peter; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2017-02-01

    The radiation-induced amorphization of U3Si2 was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy using 1 MeV Kr ion irradiation. Both arc-melted and sintered U3Si2 specimens were irradiated at room temperature to confirm the similarity in their responses to radiation. The sintered specimens were then irradiated at 350 °C and 550 °C up to 7.2 × 1015 ions/cm2 to examine their amorphization behavior under light water reactor (LWR) conditions. U3Si2 remains crystalline under irradiation at LWR temperatures. Oxidation of the material was observed at high irradiation doses.

  3. Feasibility study of thermal insulation materials for core support of experimental VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, H.; Nakanishi, T.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal insulation materials for core support of the experimental VHTR, planned by JAERI, should maintain moderate compressive strength and dimensional stability as well as low thermal conductivity at the maximum service temperature of 1100 0 C for 20 years. For selecting materials, we investigate properties of some candidates, and evaluate their feasibility. Preliminary tests, heat treatment test and compressive creep tests for 1000 hours at 900 0 C and 1000 0 C were conducted. In the preliminary tests, EG-38B (carbon baked at 1350 0 C) and Fine Finnex 600 (silicon nitride) showed acceptable physical stability. In the heat treatment tests, silicon nitride showed weight loss probably caused by thermal decomposition. Compressive creep deformation of Fine Finnex 600 was negligible under stress of 100 kg/cm 2 for 1000 hours. Heat treatment at 1200 to 1300 0 C for 50 hours improved dimensional stability of carbon at 1000 0 C

  4. A new mechanism of hydrogen absorption in water-water reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, V.V.; Gann, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of fast protons, generated in water by fast neutrons of WWER-1000 reactor core, has been calculated using the code MCNPX. The main mechanism of fast proton generation in the moderator is found to be elastic scattering of fast neutrons on hydrogen nuclei. Fast protons with mean energy 1 MeV flow towards the surface of cladding material at flux density ∼ 0.1 μA/cm 2 . Proton range distribution profile in cladding material is calculated. The range of fast protons in zirconium averages 20 μm, the maximal proton range is larger than 200 μm. The rate of hydrogen deposition in 40 μm layer amounts to 5 x 10 -5 H/n/μ. A role of the suggested mechanism in process of zirconium clad hydrogenation during reactor irradiation is discussed.

  5. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part II: core and veneer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM All-ceramic core materials with various strengthening compositions have a range of translucencies. It is unknown whether translucency differs when all-ceramic materials are fabricated similarly to the clinical restoration with a veneered core material. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic materials veneered and glazed at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Core specimens (n = 5 per group) of Empress dentin, Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Spinell, In-Ceram Zirconia, and Procera AllCeram were fabricated as described in Part I of this study and veneered with their corresponding dentin porcelain to a final thickness of 1.47 +/- 0.01 mm. These specimens were compared with veneered Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin (as a standard), a clear glass disc (positive control), and a high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) veneered with Vitadur Omega dentin (negative control). Specimen reflectance was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Measurements were repeated after a glazing cycle. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white backing (Yw) to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (P<.05). Significant differences in contrast ratios were found among the ceramic systems tested when they were veneered (P<.0001) and after the glazing cycle (P<.0001). Significant changes in contrast ratios (P<.0001) also were identified when the veneered specimens were glazed. Within the limitations of this study, a range of translucency was identified in the veneered all-ceramic systems tested. Such variability may affect their ability to match natural teeth. The glazing cycle resulted

  6. Safeguarding of emergency core cooling in case of loss-of-coolant accidents with insulation material release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointner, W.; Broecker, A.

    2012-01-01

    The report on safeguarding of emergency core cooling in case of loss-of-coolant accidents with insulation material release covers the following issues: assessment of the relevant status for PWR, evaluation of the national and international (USA, Canada, France) status, actualization of recommendations, transferability from PWR to BWR. Generic studies on the core cooling capability in case of insulation material release in BWR-type reactors were evaluated.

  7. Effect of Three Different Core Materials on Masking Ability of a Zirconia Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Tabatabaian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Masking ability of a restorative material plays a role in hiding colored substructures; however, the masking ability of zirconia ceramic (ZRC has not yet been clearly understood in zirconia-based restorations. This study evaluated the effect of three different core materials on masking ability of a ZRC.Materials and Methods: Ten zirconia disc samples, 0.5mm in thickness and 10mm in diameter, were fabricated. A white (W substrate (control and three substrates of nickel-chromium alloy (NCA, non-precious gold alloy (NPGA, and ZRC were prepared. The zirconia discs were placed on the four types of substrates for spectrophotometry. The L*, a*, and b* values of the specimens were measured by a spectrophotometer and color change (ΔE values were calculated to determine color differences between the test and control groups and were then compared with the perceptual threshold. Randomized block ANOVA and Bonferroni test analyzed the data. A significance level of 0.05 was considered.Results: The mean and standard deviation values of ΔE for NCA, NPGA, and ZRC groups were 10.26±2.43, 9.45±1.74, and 6.70±1.91 units, respectively. Significant differences were found in the ΔE values between ZRC and the other two experimental groups (NCA and NPGA; P<0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively. The ΔE values for the groups were more than the predetermined perceptual threshold.Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that the tested ZRC could not well mask the examined core materials.Keywords: Color; Spectrophotometry; Visual Perception; Yttria Stabilized Tetragonal Zirconia

  8. Assessment of the Possibility of Using Reclaimed Materials for Making Cores by the Blowing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dańko R.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The cumulative results of investigations of the possibility of using the reclaimed materials after the mechanical, thermal or mechanical-thermal reclamation for making cores by means of the blowing method in the alkaline CO2 technology, are presented in the paper. Three kinds of spent sands: with furfuryl resin, bentonite and alkaline phenolic resin, obtained from the foundry, were subjected to three kinds of reclamation: mechanical, thermal and combined mechanical-thermal, applying for this aim adequate experimental devices. The obtained reclaims were assessed with regard to the degree of the matrix liberation from the determined binding material. Reclaims of moulding sands with binders of the form of resin were assessed with regard to ignition loss values and pH reaction, while reclaims of moulding sands with bentonite with regard to the residual clay content and pH value. In all cases the results of the performed sieve analyses were estimated and the average characteristic diameter dl was determined. The reclaimed matrix was applied as a full substitute of the fresh high-silica sand in typical procedures of preparing core sands used for making shaped samples for bending strength investigations, Rgu.

  9. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fatigue design curves for structural materials do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Recent test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping materials in light water reactor (LWR) environments. Fatigue tests have been conducted on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steel in air and LWR environments to evaluate the effects of various material and loading variables, e.g., steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) in water, and strain range, on fatigue lives of these steels. The results confirm the significant decrease in fatigue life in water. The environmentally assisted decrease in fatigue life depends both on strain rate and DO content in water. A decrease in strain rate from 0.4 to 0.004%/s decreases fatigue life by a factor of ∼ 8. However, unlike carbon and low-alloy steels, environmental effects are more pronounced in low-DO than in high-DO water. At ∼ 0.004%/s strain rate, reduction in fatigue life in water containing <10 ppb D is greater by a factor of ∼ 2 than in water containing ≥ 200 ppb DO. Experimental results have been compared with estimates of fatigue life based on the statistical model. The formation and growth of fatigue cracks in austenitic stainless steels in air and LWR environments are discussed

  10. The necessity of improvement for the current LWR fuel assembly homogenization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Chuntao; Huang Hao; Zhang Shaohong

    2007-01-01

    When the modern LWR core analysis method is used to do core nuclear design and in-core fuel management calculation, how to accurately obtain the fuel assembly homogenized parameters is a crucial issue. In this paper, taking the NEA C5G7-MOX benchmark problem as a severe test problem, which involves low-enriched uranium assemblies interspersed with MOX assemblies, we have re-examined the applicability of the two major assumptions of the modern equivalence theory for fuel assembly homoge- nization, i.e. the isolated assembly spatial spectrum assumption and the condensed two- group representation assumption. Numerical results have demonstrated that for LWR cores with strong spectrum interaction, both of these two assumptions are no longer applicable and the improvement for the homogenization method is necessary, the current two-group representation should be improved by the multigroup representation and the current reflective assembly boundary condition should be improved by the 'real' assembly boundary condition. This is a research project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10605016). (authors)

  11. Recycle of LWR actinides to an IFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Poa, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Large quantities of actinide elements are present in irradiated light water reactor fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission to capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high energy neutrons in metal-fueled integral fast reactors (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel may represent valuable resource for the expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, the removal of TRU elements from spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of high level waste facilities by reducing the heat load and may increase the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirement. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. Two pyrochemical processes, that is, salt transport process and blanket processing study, are discussed in this paper. Also the experimental studies are reported. (K.I.)

  12. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitiwat, Prapaporn; Salimee, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Each group was built-up with one of the four core materials following its manufacturers' instructions. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Nickel-Chromium crowns were fixed on the specimens with resin cement. The fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min at 1350 to the tooth axis until failure occurred. All core materials used in the study were subjected to test for the flexural modulus according to ISO 4049:2009. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test indicated that the fracture resistance was higher in the groups with CPC and MCF, which presented no statistically significant difference (p>0.05), but was significantly higher than in those with LCZ and TNC (paligned with the same tendency of fracture loads. Among the cores used in this study, the composite core with high filler content tended to enhance fracture thresholds of teeth restored with fiber posts more than others.

  13. Challenges in coupled thermal-hydraulics and neutronics simulations for LWR safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Kostadin; Avramova, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The simulation of nuclear power plant accident conditions requires three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the reactor core to ensure a realistic description of physical phenomena. The operational flexibility of Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants can be improved by utilizing accurate 3D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics calculations for safety margins evaluations. There are certain requirements to the coupling of thermal-hydraulic system codes and neutron-kinetics codes that ought to be considered. The objective of these requirements is to provide accurate solutions in a reasonable amount of CPU time in coupled simulations of detailed operational transient and accident scenarios. These requirements are met by the development and implementation of six basic components of the coupling methodologies: ways of coupling (internal or external coupling); coupling approach (integration algorithm or parallel processing); spatial mesh overlays; coupled time-step algorithms; coupling numerics (explicit, semi-implicit and implicit schemes); and coupled convergence schemes. These principles of the coupled simulations are discussed in details along with the scientific issues associated with the development of appropriate neutron cross-section libraries for coupled code transient modeling. The current trends in LWR nuclear power generation and regulation as well as the design of next generation LWR reactor concepts along with the continuing computer technology progress stimulate further development of these coupled code systems. These efforts have been focused towards extending the analysis capabilities as well as refining the scale and level of detail of the coupling. This article analyses the coupled phenomena and modeling challenges on both global (assembly-wise) and local (pin-wise) levels. The issues related to the consistent qualification of coupled code systems as well as their application to different types of LWR transients are presented. Finally, the advances in numerical

  14. Overview of LWR severe accident research activities at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miassoedov, Alexei; Albrecht, Giancarlo; Foit, Jerzy-Jan; Jordan, Thomas; Steinbrück, Martin; Stuckert, Juri; Tromm, Walter

    2012-01-01

    The research activities in the light water reactor (LWR) severe accidents domain at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are concentrated on the in- and ex-vessel core melt behavior. The overall objective is to investigate the core melt scenarios from the beginning of core degradation to melt formation and relocation in the vessel, possible melt dispersion to the reactor cavity and to the containment, corium concrete interaction and corium coolability in the reactor cavity, and hydrogen behaviour in reactor systems. The results of the experiments contribute to a better understanding of the core melt sequences and thus improve safety of existing and, in the long-term, of future reactors by severe accident mitigation measures and by safety installations where required. This overview paper describes the experimental facilities used at KIT for severe accident research and gives an overview of the main directions and objectives of the R&D work. (author)

  15. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Biodentine, Resin Modified GIC and Hybrid Composite Resin as a Core Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, Dayalan; Shoba, Krishnamma; Aman, Shibu; Bharkavi, Srinivasan Kumar Indu; Nimmi, Vijayan; Abhilash, Radhakrishnan

    2017-09-01

    The restoration of a severely damaged tooth usually needs a post and core as a part of treatment procedure to provide a corono - radicular stabilization. Biodentine is a class of dental material which possess high mechanical properties with excellent biocompatibility and bioactive behaviour. The sealing ability coupled with optimum physical properties could make Biodentine an excellent option as a core material. The aim of the study was to determine the fracture resistance of Biodentine as a core material in comparison with resin modified glass ionomer and composite resin. Freshly extracted 30 human permanent maxillary central incisors were selected. After endodontic treatment followed by post space preparation and luting of Glass fibre post (Reforpost, Angelus), the samples were divided in to three groups based on the type of core material. The core build-up used in Group I was Biodentine (Septodont, France), Group II was Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (GC, Japan) and Group III was Hybrid Composite Resin (TeEconom plus, Ivoclar vivadent). The specimens were subjected to fracture toughness using Universal testing machine (1474, Zwick/Roell, Germany) and results were compared using One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's Post hoc test. The results showed that there was significant difference between groups in terms of fracture load. Also, composite resin exhibited highest mean fracture load (1039.9 N), whereas teeth restored with Biodentine demonstrated the lowest mean fracture load (176.66 N). Resin modified glass ionomer exhibited intermediate fracture load (612.07 N). The primary mode of failure in Group I and Group II was favourable (100%) while unfavourable fracture was seen in Group III (30%). Biodentine, does not satisfy the requirements to be used as an ideal core material. The uses of RMGIC's as a core build-up material should be limited to non-stress bearing areas. Composite resin is still the best core build-up material owing to its high fracture

  16. Evaluation of materials for retention of sodium and core debris in reactor systems. Annual progress report, September 1977-December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, D.G.; Zehms, E.H.; McClelland, J.D.; Meyer, R.A.; van Paassen, H.L.L.

    1978-12-01

    This report considers some of the consequences of a hypothetical core disruptive accident in a nuclear reactor. The interactions expected between molten core debris, liquid sodium, and materials that might be employed in an ex-vessel sacrificial-bed or in the reactor building are discussed. Experimental work performed for NRC by Sandia Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory on the interactions between liquid sodium and basalt concrete is reviewed. Studies of molten steel interactions with concrete at Sandia Laboratories and molten UO 2 interactions with concrete at The Aerospace Corporation are also discussed. The potential of MgO for use in core containment is discussed and refractory materials other than MgO are reviewed. Finally, results from earlier experiments with molten core debris and various materials performed at The Aerospace Corporation are presented

  17. Dependences of optical properties of spherical two-layered nanoparticles on parameters of gold core and material shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovalov, V.K.; Astafyeva, L.G.; Zharov, V.P.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of nonlinear dependences of optical properties of spherical two-layered gold core and some material shell nanoparticles (NPs) placed in water on parameters of core and shell was carried out on the basis of the extended Mie theory. Efficiency cross-sections of absorption, scattering and extinction of radiation with wavelength 532 nm by core–shell NPs in the ranges of core radii r 00 =5–40 nm and of relative NP radii r 1 /r 00 =1–8 were calculated (r 1 —radius of two-layered nanoparticle). Shell materials were used with optical indexes in the ranges of refraction n 1 =0.2–1.5 and absorption k 1 =0–3.5 for the presentation of optical properties of wide classes of shell materials (including dielectrics, metals, polymers, vapor shell around gold core). Results show nonlinear dependences of optical properties of two-layered NPs on optical indexes of shell material, core r 00 and relative NP r 1 /r 00 radii. Regions with sharp decrease and increase of absorption, scattering and extinction efficiency cross-sections with changing of core and shell parameters were investigated. These dependences should be taken into account for applications of two-layered NPs in laser nanomedicine and optical diagnostics of tissues. The results can be used for experimental investigation of shell formation on NP core and optical determination of geometrical parameters of core and shell of two-layered NPs. -- Highlights: • Absorption, scattering and extinction of two-layered nanoparticles are studied. • Shell materials change in wide regions of materials (metals, dielectrics, vapor). • Effect of sharp decrease and increase of optical characteristics is established. • Explanation of sharp decreasing and increasing optical characteristics is presented

  18. Workshop on initiation of stress corrosion cracking under LWR conditions: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Cubicciotti, D.; Licina, G.J.

    1988-05-01

    A workshop titled ''Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking under LWR Conditions'' was held in Palo Alto, California on November 13, 1986, hosted by the Electric Power Research Institute. Participants were experts on the topic from nuclear steam supply and component manufacturers, public and private research laboratories, and university environments. Presentations included discussions on the definition of crack initiation, the effects of environmental and electrochemical variables on cracking susceptibility, and detection methods for the determination of crack initiation events and measurement of critical environmental and stress parameters. Examination of the questions related to crack initiation and its relative importance to the overall question of cracking of LWR materials from these perspectives provided inputs to EPRI project managers on the future direction of research efforts designed to prevent and control cracking. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately

  19. Standard problem exercise to validate criticality codes for spent LWR fuel transport container calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitesides, G.H.; Stephens, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    During the past two years, a Working Group established by the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA) has been developing a set of criticality benchmark problems which could be used to help establish the validity of criticality safety computer programs and their associated nuclear data for calculation of ksub(eff) for spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel transport containers. The basic goal of this effort was to identify a set of actual critical experiments which would contain the various material and geometric properties present in spent LWR transport contrainers. These data, when used by the various computational methods, are intended to demonstrate the ability of each method to accurately reproduce the experimentally measured ksub(eff) for the parameters under consideration

  20. EUV lithography for 30nm half pitch and beyond: exploring resolution, sensitivity, and LWR tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putna, E. Steve; Younkin, Todd R.; Chandhok, Manish; Frasure, Kent

    2009-03-01

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) denotes Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography as a leading technology option for realizing the 32nm half-pitch node and beyond. Readiness of EUV materials is currently one high risk area according to assessments made at the 2008 EUVL Symposium. The main development issue regarding EUV resist has been how to simultaneously achieve high sensitivity, high resolution, and low line width roughness (LWR). This paper describes the strategy and current status of EUV resist development at Intel Corporation. Data is presented utilizing Intel's Micro-Exposure Tool (MET) examining the feasibility of establishing a resist process that simultaneously exhibits <=30nm half-pitch (HP) L/S resolution at <=10mJ/cm2 with <=4nm LWR.

  1. Nonlinear analysis of LWR components: areas of investigation/benefits/recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S. J. [ed.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify specific topics of investigation into design procedures, design concepts, methods of analysis, testing practices, and standards which are characterized by nonlinear behavior (both geometric and material) and which are considered to offer some economic and/or technical benefits to the LWR industry (excluding piping). In this study these topics were collected, compiled, and subjectively evaluated as to their potential benefit. The topics considered to have the greatest benefit/impact potential are discussed. The topics listed are based upon the experience of ODAI and also based upon a sampling of over 100 engineers/scientists in the LWR industry. The topics of investigation were found to fall basically into three areas: component, code interpretation, and load/failure mechanism. The topics are arbitrarily reorganized into six areas of investigation: Fracture, Fatigue, Vibration/Dynamic/Seismic, Plasticity, Component/Computational Considerations, and Code Interpretation.

  2. Nonlinear analysis of LWR components: areas of investigation/benefits/recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.J.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify specific topics of investigation into design procedures, design concepts, methods of analysis, testing practices, and standards which are characterized by nonlinear behavior (both geometric and material) and which are considered to offer some economic and/or technical benefits to the LWR industry (excluding piping). In this study these topics were collected, compiled, and subjectively evaluated as to their potential benefit. The topics considered to have the greatest benefit/impact potential are discussed. The topics listed are based upon the experience of ODAI and also based upon a sampling of over 100 engineers/scientists in the LWR industry. The topics of investigation were found to fall basically into three areas: component, code interpretation, and load/failure mechanism. The topics are arbitrarily reorganized into six areas of investigation: Fracture, Fatigue, Vibration/Dynamic/Seismic, Plasticity, Component/Computational Considerations, and Code Interpretation

  3. TMI-2 core examination plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.E.; MacDonald, P.E.; Hobbins, R.R.; Ploggr, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Three Mile Island (TMI-2) core examination is divided into four stages: (1) before removing the head; (2) before removing the plenum; (3) during defueling; and (4) offsite examinations. Core examinations recommended during the first three stages are primarily devoted to documenting the post-accident condition of the core. The detailed analysis of core damage structures will be performed during offsite examinations at government and commercial hot cell facilities. The primary objectives of these examinations are to enhance the understanding of the degraded core accident sequence, to develop the technical bases for reactor regulations, and to improve LWR design and operation

  4. Qualification of the neutronic evolution of LWR fuels in MELUSINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretz, D.; Garcin, J.; Ducros, G.; Vanhumbeeck, D.; Chaucheprat, P.

    1984-09-01

    MELUSINE, a swimming pool type reactor, in Grenoble, for research and technological irradiations is well fitted to the neutronic evolution qualification of the LWR fuel. Thus, with an adjustment of the lattice pitch, representative neutron spectrum locations are available. The re-leading management and the regulation mode flexibility of MELUSINE lead to reproductible neutronic parameters configurations without restricting the reactor to this purpose only. Under these conditions, simple calculations can be carried out for interpretation, without taking into account the whole core. An instrumentation by Self Power Neutron Detectors (collectrons) gives on-line information on the fluxes at the periphery of the device. When required by the neutronicians, experimental pins can be unloaded during the irradiation process and scanned on a gammametry bench immersed in the reactor-pool itself, before their isotopic composition analysis. Thus, within the framework of neutronic evolution qualification, are studied fuel pins for advanced assemblies for the light water reactors or their derivatives, with large advantages over irradiations in power reactors [fr

  5. Validation of KENOREST with LWR-PROTEUS phase II samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M.; Kilger, R.; Pautz, A.; Zwermann, W. [GRS, Garching (Germany); Grimm, P.; Vasiliev, A.; Ferroukhi, H. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-11-01

    In order to broaden the validation basis of the reactivity and nuclide inventory code KENOREST two samples of the LWR-PROTEUS phase II program have been calculated and compared to the experimental results. In general most nuclides are reproduced very well and agree within about ten percent with the experiment. Some already known problems, the overprediction of metallic fission products and the underprediction of the higher curium isotopes, have been confirmed. One of the largest uncertainties in the calculation was the burnup of the samples due to differences between a core simulation of the fuel vendor and the burnup determined from the measured values of the burnup indicator Nd-148. Two different models taking into account the environment for a peripheral fuel rod have been studied. The more detailed model included the three direct neighbor fuel assemblies depleted along with the fuel rod of interest. The influence on the results has been found to be very small. Compared to the uncertainties from the burnup, this effect can be considered negligible. The reason for the low influence was basically that the spectrum did not get considerably harder with increasing burnup beyond about 20GWd/tHM. Since the sample reached burnups far beyond that value, an effect could not be seen. In the near future an update of the used libraries is planned and it will be very interesting to study the effect on the results, especially for Curium. (orig.)

  6. Discussion of OECD LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.; Avramova, M.; Royer, E.; Gillford, J.

    2013-01-01

    The demand for best estimate calculations in nuclear reactor design and safety evaluations has increased in recent years. Uncertainty quantification has been highlighted as part of the best estimate calculations. The modelling aspects of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are to be further developed and validated on scientific grounds in support of their performance and application to multi-physics reactor simulations. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) / Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has endorsed the creation of an Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (EGUAM). Within the framework of activities of EGUAM/NSC the OECD/NEA initiated the Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling for Design, Operation, and Safety Analysis of Light Water Reactor (OECD LWR UAM benchmark). The general objective of the benchmark is to propagate the predictive uncertainties of code results through complex coupled multi-physics and multi-scale simulations. The benchmark is divided into three phases with Phase I highlighting the uncertainty propagation in stand-alone neutronics calculations, while Phase II and III are focused on uncertainty analysis of reactor core and system respectively. This paper discusses the progress made in Phase I calculations, the Specifications for Phase II and the incoming challenges in defining Phase 3 exercises. The challenges of applying uncertainty quantification to complex code systems, in particular the time-dependent coupled physics models are the large computational burden and the utilization of non-linear models (expected due to the physics coupling). (authors)

  7. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wananuruksawong, R.; Jinawath, S.; Padipatvuthikul, P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si3N4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si3N4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si3N4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si3N4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (tube furnace between 1000-1200°C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100°C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98×10-6 °C-1, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  8. The CERN antiproton target: hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of...

  9. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T; Padipatvuthikul, P

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si 3 N 4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si 3 N 4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si 3 N 4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si 3 N 4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder ( 2 O 3 - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si 3 N 4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10 -6 deg. C -1 , rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  10. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Torregrosa Martin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26  GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa’s. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  11. LWR Spent Fuel Management for the Smooth Deployment of FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, T.; Yamashita, J.; Hoshino, K.; Sasahira, A.; Inoue, T.; Minato, K.; Sato, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) and FBR fuel cycle are indispensable to prevent the global warming and to secure the long-term energy supply. Commercial FBR expects to be deployed from around 2050 until around 2110 in Japan by the replacement of light water reactors (LWR) after their 60 years life. The FBR deployment needs Pu (MOX) from the LWR-spent fuel (SF) reprocessing. As Japan can posses little excess Pu, its balance control is necessary between LWR-SF management (reprocessing) and FBR deployment. The fuel cycle systems were investigated for the smooth FBR deployment and the effectiveness of proposed flexible system was clarified in this work. (author)

  12. Heat Storage Performance of the Prefabricated Hollow Core Concrete Deck Element with Integrated Microencapsulated Phase Change Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the numerically calculated dynamic heat storage capacity of the prefabricated hollow core concrete deck element with and without microencapsulated phase change material (PCM). The reference deck is the ordinary deck made of standard concrete material and that is broadly used...

  13. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prapaporn PANITIWAT

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC, MultiCore Flow (MCF, and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ, and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC. Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2.0. Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=10. Each group was built-up with one of the four core materials following its manufacturers’ instructions. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Nickel-Chromium crowns were fixed on the specimens with resin cement. The fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min at 1350 to the tooth axis until failure occurred. All core materials used in the study were subjected to test for the flexural modulus according to ISO 4049:2009. Results One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test indicated that the fracture resistance was higher in the groups with CPC and MCF, which presented no statistically significant difference (p>0.05, but was significantly higher than in those with LCZ and TNC (p<0.05. In terms of the flexural modulus, the ranking from the highest values of the materials was aligned with the same tendency of fracture loads. Conclusion Among the cores used in this study, the composite core with high filler content tended to enhance fracture thresholds of teeth restored with fiber posts more than others.

  14. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy

  15. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. ► Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. ► A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. ► Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. ► Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of

  16. Evaluating the loss of a LWR spent fuel or plutonium shipping package into the sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaberlin, S.W.; Baker, D.A.

    1976-06-01

    As the nations of the world turn to nuclear power for an energy source, commerce in nuclear fuel cycle materials will increase. Some of this commerce will be transported by sea. Such shipments give rise to the possibility of loss of these materials into the sea. This paper discusses the postulated accidental loss of two materials, light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and plutonium, at sea. The losses considered are that of a single shipping package which is either undamaged or damaged by fire prior to the loss. The containment failure of the package in the sea,

  17. Safety research for LWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The current R and D activities are to be seen in connection with the LWR risk assessment studies. Two trends are emerging, of which the one concentrates more on BWR-specific problems, and the other on the efficiency or safety-related assessment of accident management activities. This annual report of 1988 reviews the progress of work done by the institutes and departments of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, (KfK), or on behalf of KfK by external institutions, in the field of safety research. The papers of this report present the state of work at the end of the year 1988. They are written in German, with an abstract in English. (orig./HP) [de

  18. LWR nuclear power plant component failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.H.

    1980-10-01

    An analysis of the most significant light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant component failures, from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank, shows that for both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) plants the component category most responsible for reactor shutdowns is valves. Next in importance for PWR shutdowns is steam generators followed by seals of all kinds. For BWR plants, seals, and pipes and pipe fittings are the second and third most important component failure categories which lead to reactor shutdown. The data are for records extending from early 1972 through September 1978. A list of the most significant component categories and a breakdown of the number of component citations for both PWR and BWR reactor types are presented

  19. Expert system for estimating LWR plutonium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandquist, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    An Artificial Intelligence-Expert System called APES (Analysis of Proliferation by Expert System) has been developed and tested to permit a non proliferation expert to evaluate the capability and capacity of a specified LWR reactor and PUREX reprocessing system for producing and separating plutonium even when system information may be limited and uncertain. APES employs an expert system coded in LISP and based upon an HP-RL (Hewlett Packard-Representational Language) Expert System Shell. The user I/O interface communicates with a blackboard and the knowledge base which contains the quantitative models required to describe the reactor, selected fission product production and radioactive decay processes, Purex reprocessing and ancillary knowledge

  20. Problems associated with domestic LWR technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watamori, Tikara

    1975-01-01

    To cope with the future energy problem in Japan, the enhancement of her own technology is continuing in the nuclear power field. Developments in the past, current state, and problems for the future are described regarding LWR power plants. The technology introduced from overseas countries cannot be used as it is. The domestic technology thus consists of the conversion of nuclear power technology so as to meet Japan's own condition and the domestic manufacture of machinery. In the former category, there are the aspects of aseismatic design, waste disposal, software, etc. In the latter, there are the productions of reactor vessels, steam generators, large valves, piping, etc. As the problems for the future, there are reliability and safety and the associated standardization. (Mori, K.)

  1. Numerical simulation of the insulation material transport to a PWR core under loss of coolant accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höhne, Thomas; Grahn, Alexander; Kliem, Sören; Rohde, Ulrich; Weiss, Frank-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detailed results of a numerical simulation of the insulation material transport to a PWR core are shown. ► The spacer grid is modeled as a strainer which completely retains the insulation material carried by coolant. ► The CFD calculations showed that the fibers at the upper spacer grid plane are not uniformly distributed. ► Furthermore the pressure loss does not exceed a critical limit. ► The PWR core coolablity can be guaranteed all the time during the transient. -- Abstract: In 1992, strainers on the suction side of the ECCS pumps in Barsebäck NPP Unit 2 became partially clogged with mineral wool because after a safety valve opened the steam impinged on thermally insulated equipment and released mineral wool. This event pointed out that strainer clogging is an issue in the course of a loss-of-coolant accident. Modifications of the insulation material, the strainer area and mesh size were carried out in most of the German NPPs. Moreover, back flushing procedures to remove the mineral wool from the strainers and differential pressure measurements were implemented to assure the performance of emergency core cooling during the containment sump recirculation mode. Nevertheless, it cannot be completely ruled out, that a limited amount of small fractions of the insulation material is transported into the RPV. During a postulated cold leg LOCA with hot leg ECC injection, the fibers enter the upper plenum and can accumulate at the fuel element spacer grids, preferably at the uppermost grid level. This effect might affect the ECC flow into the core and could result in degradation of core cooling. It was the aim of the numerical simulations presented to study where and how many mineral wool fibers are deposited at the upper spacer grid. The 3D, time dependent, multi-phase flow problem was modeled applying the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The CFD calculation does not yet include steam production in the core and also does not include re-suspension of the

  2. Interfacial characterization of ceramic core materials with veneering porcelain for all-ceramic bi-layered restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagmatarchis, Alexander; Tripodakis, Aris-Petros; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, George

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the elemental distribution at the interface between all-ceramic core and veneering porcelain materials. Three groups of all-ceramic cores were selected: A) Glass-ceramics (Cergo, IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, e-max Press, Finesse); B) Glass-infiltrated ceramics (Celay Alumina, Celay Zirconia) and C) Densely sintered ceramics (Cercon, Procera Alumina, ZirCAD, Noritake Zirconia). The cores were combined with compatible veneering porcelains and three flat square test specimens were produced for each system. The core-veneer interfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. The glass-ceramic systems showed interfacial zones reach in Si and O, with the presence of K, Ca, Al in core and Ca, Ce, Na, Mg or Al in veneer material, depending on the system tested. IPS Empress and IPS Empress 2 demonstrated distinct transitional phases at the core-veneer interface. In the glassinfiltrated systems, intermixing of core (Ce, La) with veneer (Na, Si) elements occurred, whereas an abrupt drop of the core-veneer elemental concentration was documented at the interfaces of all densely sintered ceramics. The results of the study provided no evidence of elemental interdiffusion at the core-veneer interfaces in densely sintered ceramics, which implies lack of primary chemical bonding. For the glass-containing systems (glassceramics and glass-infiltrated ceramics) interdiffusion of the glass-phase seems to play a critical role in establishing a primary bonding condition between ceramic core and veneering porcelain.

  3. Effect of curing mode on the hardness of dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Galvão Arrais

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the Knoop Hardness (KHN values of two dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials and one resin cement exposed to different curing conditions. Two dual-cured core build-up composite resins (LuxaCore®-Dual, DMG; and FluoroCore®2, Dentsply Caulk, and one dual-cured resin cement (Rely X ARC, 3M ESPE were used in the present study. The composite materials were placed into a cylindrical matrix (2 mm in height and 3 mm in diameter, and the specimens thus produced were either light-activated for 40 s (Optilux 501, Demetron Kerr or were allowed to self-cure for 10 min in the dark (n = 5. All specimens were then stored in humidity at 37°C for 24 h in the dark and were subjected to KHN analysis. The results were submitted to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test at a pre-set alpha of 5%. All the light-activated groups exhibited higher KHN values than the self-cured ones (p = 0.00001, regardless of product. Among the self-cured groups, both composite resin core build-up materials showed higher KHN values than the dual-cured resin cement (p = 0.00001. LuxaCore®-Dual exhibited higher KHN values than FluoroCore®2 (p = 0.00001 when they were allowed to self-cure, while no significant differences in KHN values were observed among the light-activated products. The results suggest that dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials may be more reliable than dual-cured resin cements when curing light is not available.

  4. Statistical analysis on hollow and core-shell structured vanadium oxide microspheres as cathode materials for Lithium ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Liang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this data, the statistical analyses of vanadium oxide microspheres cathode materials are presented for the research article entitled “Statistical analyses on hollow and core-shell structured vanadium oxides microspheres as cathode materials for Lithium ion batteries” (Liang et al., 2017 [1]. This article shows the statistical analyses on N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm and morphology vanadium oxide microspheres as cathode materials for LIBs. Keywords: Adsorption-desorption isotherm, Pore size distribution, SEM images, TEM images

  5. Chemical and physical analysis of core materials for advanced high temperature reactors with process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1985-08-01

    Various chemical and physical methods for the analysis of structural materials have been developed in the research programmes for advanced high temperature reactors. These methods are discussed using as examples the structural materials of the reactor core - the fuel elements consisting of coated particles in a graphite matrix and the structural graphite. Emphasis is given to the methods of chemical analysis. The composition of fuel kernels is investigated using chemical analysis methods to determine the heavy metals content (uranium, plutonium, thorium and metallic impurity elements) and the amount of non-metallic constituents. The properties of the pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings of fuel elements are investigated using specially developed physiochemical methods. Regarding the irradiation behaviour of coated particles and fuel elements, methods have been developed for examining specimens in hot cells following exposures under reactor operating conditions, to supplement the measurements of in-reactor performance. For the structural graphite, the determination of impurities is important because certain impurities may cause pitting corrosion during irradiation. The localized analysis of very low impurity concentrations is carried out using spectrochemical d.c. arc excitation, local laser and inductively coupled plasma methods. (orig.)

  6. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: net recovery and transport intensity indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulation of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Hofman, Gerard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Gamble, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation; Mei, Zhi-Gang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-08-29

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well understood. In this report, rate theory model was developed based on existing experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations so as to predict the fission gas behavior in U3Si2 at LWR conditions. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 can be divided into three temperature regimes. During steady-state operation, the majority of the fission gas stays in intragranular bubbles, whereas the dominance of intergranular bubbles and fission gas release only occurs beyond 1000 K. The steady-state rate theory model was also used as reference to establish a gaseous swelling correlation of U3Si2 for the BISON code. Meanwhile, the overpressurized bubble model was also developed so that the fission gas behavior at LOCA can be simulated. LOCA simulation showed that intragranular bubbles are still dominant after a 70 second LOCA, resulting in a controllable gaseous swelling. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is benign according to the rate theory prediction at both steady-state and LOCA conditions, which provides important references to the qualification of U3Si2 as a LWR fuel material with excellent fuel performance and enhanced accident tolerance.

  8. Status of the CONTAIN computer code for LWR containment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Murata, K.K.; Rexroth, P.E.; Clauser, M.J.; Senglaub, M.E.; Sciacca, F.W.; Trebilcock, W.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of the CONTAIN code for LWR safety analysis is reviewed. Three example calculations are discussed as illustrations of the code's capabilities: (1) a demonstration of the spray model in a realistic PWR problem, and a comparison with CONTEMPT results; (2) a comparison of CONTAIN results for a major aerosol experiment against experimental results and predictions of the HAARM aerosol code; and (3) an LWR sample problem, involving a TMLB' sequence for the Zion reactor containment

  9. Status of the CONTAIN computer code for LWR containment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Murata, K.K.; Rexroth, P.E.; Clauser, M.J.; Senglaub, M.E.; Sciacca, F.W.; Trebilcock, W.

    1982-01-01

    The current status of the CONTAIN code for LWR safety analysis is reviewed. Three example calculations are discussed as illustrations of the code's capabilities: (1) a demonstration of the spray model in a realistic PWR problem, and a comparison with CONTEMPT results; (2) a comparison of CONTAIN results for a major aerosol experiment against experimental results and predictions of the HAARM aerosol code; and (3) an LWR sample problem, involving a TMLB' sequence for the Zion reactor containment

  10. The development of learning materials based on core model to improve students’ learning outcomes in topic of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avianti, R.; Suyatno; Sugiarto, B.

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to create an appropriate learning material based on CORE (Connecting, Organizing, Reflecting, Extending) model to improve students’ learning achievement in Chemical Bonding Topic. This study used 4-D models as research design and one group pretest-posttest as design of the material treatment. The subject of the study was teaching materials based on CORE model, conducted on 30 students of Science class grade 10. The collecting data process involved some techniques such as validation, observation, test, and questionnaire. The findings were that: (1) all the contents were valid, (2) the practicality and the effectiveness of all the contents were good. The conclusion of this research was that the CORE model is appropriate to improve students’ learning outcomes for studying Chemical Bonding.

  11. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T [Research Unit of Advanced Ceramic, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Padipatvuthikul, P, E-mail: raayaa_chula@hotmail.com [Faculty of Dentistry, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2011-10-29

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (<150 micrometer, Pyrex) with 5 wt% of zirconia powder (3 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10{sup -6} deg. C{sup -1}, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  12. Heat and fission product transport in molten core material pool with crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, J.I.; Suh, K.Y.; Kang, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Heat transfer and fluid flow in a molten pool are influenced by internal volumetric heat generated from the radioactive decay of fission product species retained in the reactor vessel during a severe accident. The pool superheat is determined based on the overall energy balance that equates the heat production rate to the heat loss rate. Decay heat of fission products in the pool is estimated by product of the mass concentration and energy conversion factor of each fission product. Twenty-nine elements are chosen and classified by their chemical properties to calculate heat generation rate in the pool. The mass concentration of a fission product is obtained from released fraction and the tabular output of the ORIGEN 2 code. The initial core and pool inventories at each time can also be estimated using ORIGEN 2. The released fraction of each fission product is calculated based on the bubble dynamics and mass transport. Numerical analysis is performed for heat and fission product transport in a molten core material pool during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The pool is assumed to be a partially filled hemisphere, whose change in geometry is neglected during the numerical calculation. Calculated results indicate that the peak temperature in the molten pool is significantly lowered, since a substantial amount of the volatile fission products is released from the molten pool during progression of the accident. The results may directly be applied to the existing severe accident analysis codes to more mechanistically determine the thermal load to the reactor vessel lower head during the in-vessel retention

  13. Report on material and fabrication tests of the KUHFR core vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Kozuka, T.; Achiwa, N.; Mitani, S.; Kawano, S.; Araki, Y.; Shibata, T.

    1983-01-01

    For the material of the cylindrical reactor core vessel of the Kyoto University High Flux Reactor (KUHFR), A6061 alloy is selected because the aged state of the alloy is known to show the highest resistance against void swelling due to high-dose irradiation. The fabrication possibility of the large-scale tubes is also tested because the sizes (40 cmdiameter and 43 cmdiameter x 960 cm with a thickness of 10 mm for the inner- and outer-tubes, respectively) are just over the largest limit of the conventional factory fabrication. The results are summarized as follows. (1) From an ingot of A6061 alloy a raw inner-tube is hot-extruded by the 3,000 ton press machine. The shape of the extruded tubes is effectively corrected by stretch forming and other special methods. (2) The real scale tubes are heat-treated under the various conditions (T1, T4 and T6) and their size changes are measured just after the every heat-treatment. (3) The hydropressure for a pipe prepared by welding from an aged-tube shows a fairly uniform strain distribution and the breaking initiation at the reasonable pressure in the welded part. (4) Each of the welded specimens prepared using three kinds of welding rods shows sufficient strength in both of bending and tensile test for the JIS standard. Their microstructures correspond to the result of the mechanical tests for each welded specimen. The confidence for the fabrication possibility of the real core vessel has been given through the present tests. (author)

  14. Permeability analysis of Asbuton material used as core layers of water resistance in the body of dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, H.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Thaha, A.; Djamaluddin, R.

    2017-11-01

    In order to increase consumption of the local materials and national products, large reserves of Asbuton material about 662.960 million tons in the Buton Islands became an alternative as a waterproof core layer in the body of dam. The Asbuton material was used in this research is Lawele Granular Asphalt (LGA). This study was an experimental study conducted in the laboratory by conducting density testing (content weight) and permeability on Asbuton material. Testing of the Asbuton material used Falling Head method to find out the permeability value of Asbuton material. The data of test result to be analyzed are the relation between compaction energy and density value also relation between density value and permeability value of Asbuton material. The result shows that increases the number of blow apply to the Asbuton material at each layer will increase the density of the Asbuton material. The density value of Asbuton material that satisfies the requirements for use as an impermeable core layer in the dam body is 1.53 grams/cm3. The increase the density value (the weight of the contents) of the Asbuton material will reduce its permeability value of the Asbuton material.

  15. Proceedings of the specialists meeting on experience with thermal fatigue in LWR piping caused by mixing and stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This specialists meeting on experience with thermal fatigue in LWR piping caused by mixing and stratification, was held in June 1998 in Paris. It included five sessions. Session 1: operating experience (7 papers): Historical perspective; EDF experience with local thermohydraulic phenomena in PWRs: impacts and strategies; Thermal fatigue in safety injection lines of French PWRs: technical problems, regulatory requirements, concerns about other areas; US NRC Regulatory perspective on unanticipated thermal fatigue in LWR piping; Failure to the Residual Heat Removal system suction line pipe in Genkai unit 1 caused by thermal stratification cycling; Emergency Core Cooling System pipe crack incident at Tihange unit 1; Two leakages induced by thermal stratification at the Loviisa power plant). Session 2: thermal hydraulic phenomena (5 papers): Thermal stratification in small pipes with respect to fatigue effects and so called 'Banana effect'; Thermal stratification in the surge line of the Korean next generation reactor; Thermal stratification in horizontal pipes investigated in UPTF-TRAM and HDR facilities; Research on thermal stratification in un-isolable piping of reactor pressure boundary; Thermal mixing phenomena in piping systems: 3D numerical simulation and design considerations. Session 3: response of material and structure (5 papers): Fatigue induced by thermal stratification, Results of tests and calculations of the COUFAST model; Laboratory simulation of thermal fatigue cracking as a basis for verifying life models; Thermo-mechanical analysis methods for the conception and the follow up of components submitted to thermal stratification transients; Piping analysis methods of a PWR surge line for stratified flow; The thermal stratification effect on surge lines, The VVER estimation. Session 4: monitoring aspects (4 papers): Determination of the thermal loadings affecting the auxiliary lines of the reactor coolant system in French PWR plants; Expected and

  16. Phoenix type concepts for transmutation of LWR waste minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, M.

    1994-01-01

    A number of variations on the original Phoenix theme were studied. The basic rationale of the Phoenix incinerator is making oxide fuel of the LWR waste minor actinides, loading it in an FFTF-like subcritical core, then bombarding the core with the high current beam accelerated protons to generate considerable energy through spallation and fission reactions. As originally assessed, if the machine is fed with 1600 MeV protons in a 102 mA current, then 8 core modules are driven to transmute the yearly minor actinides waste of 75 1000 MW LWRs into Pu 238 and fission products; in a 2 years cycle the energy extracted is 100000 MW d/T. This performance cannot be substantiated in a rigorous analysis. A calculational consistent methodology, based on a combined execution of the Hermes, NCNP, and Korigen codes, shows, nonetheless that changes in the original Phoenix parameters can upgrade its performance.The original Phoenix contains 26 tons minor actinides in 8 core modules; 1.15 m 3 module is shaped for 40% neutron leakage; with a beam of 102 mA the 8 modules are driven to 100000 MW/T in 10.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinide waste of 15 LWRs; the operation must be assisted by grid electricity. If the 1.15 m 3 module is shaped to allow only 28% leakage, then a beam of 102 mA will drive the 8 modules to 100000 MW/T in 3.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 45 LWRs. Some net grid electricity will be generated. If 25 tons minor actinides are loaded into 5 modules, each 1.72 m 3 in volume and of 24% leakage, then a 97 mA beam will drive the module to 100000 MW/T in 2.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 70 LWRs. A considerable amount of net grid electricity will be generated. If the lattice is made of metal fuel, and 26 tons minor actinides are loaded into 32 small modules, 0.17 m 3 each, then a 102 mA beam will drive the modules to 100000 MW/T in 2 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 72 LWRs. A considerable

  17. EURLIB-LWR-45/16 and - 15/5. Two board group libraries for LWR-shielding problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrnberger, V

    1982-04-01

    Specifications of the broad group cross section libraries EURLIB-LWR-45/16 and -15/5 are given. They are based on EURLIB-III data and produced for LWR shielding problems. The elements considered are H, C{sub 12}, O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zr, U{sub 235}, U{sub 238}. The cross section libraries are available upon request from EIR, RSIC, NEA-CPL and IAEA-NDS. (author) Refs, figs, tabs

  18. Fabrication of Fe3O4@CuO core-shell from MOF based materials and its antibacterial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajabi, S.K.; Sohrabnezhad, Sh.; Ghafourian, S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Fe 3 O 4 @CuO nanocomposite with a core/shell structure was successfully synthesized via direct calcinations of magnetic Fe 3 O 4 @HKUST-1 in air atmosphere. The morphology, structure, magnetic and porous properties of the as-synthesized nano composites were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and vibration sample magnetometer (VSM). The results showed that the nanocomposite material included a Fe 3 O 4 core and a CuO shell. The Fe 3 O 4 @CuO core-shell can be separated easily from the medium by a small magnet. The antibacterial activity of Fe 3 O 4 -CuO core-shell was investigated against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A new mechanism was proposed for inactivation of bacteria over the prepared sample. It was demonstrated that the core-shell exhibit recyclable antibacterial activity, acting as an ideal long-acting antibacterial agent. - Graphical abstract: Fe 3 O 4 @CuO core-shell release of copper ions. These Cu 2+ ions were responsible for the exhibited antibacterial activity. - Highlights: • The Fe 3 O 4 @CuO core-shell was prepared by MOF method. • This is the first study of antibacterial activity of core-shell consist of CuO and Fe 3 O 4 . • The core-shell can be reused effectively. • Core-shell was separated from the reaction solution by external magnetic field.

  19. On the Diffusion Coefficient of Two-step Method for LWR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deokjung; Choi, Sooyoung; Smith, Kord S.

    2015-01-01

    The few-group constants including diffusion coefficients are generated from the assembly calculation results. Once the assembly calculation is done, the cross sections (XSs) are spatially homogenized, and a critical spectrum calculation is performed in order to take into account the neutron leakages of the lattice. The diffusion coefficient is also generated through the critical spectrum calculation. Three different methods of the critical spectrum calculation such as B1 method, P1 method, and fundamental mode (FM) calculation method are considered in this paper. The diffusion coefficients can also be affected by transport approximations for the transport XS calculation which is used in the assembly transport lattice calculation in order to account for the anisotropic scattering effects. The outflow transport approximation and the inflow transport approximation are investigated in this paper. The accuracy of the few group data especially the diffusion coefficients has been studied to optimize the combination of the transport correction methods and the critical spectrum calculation methods using the UNIST lattice physics code STREAM. The combination of the inflow transport approximation and the FM method is shown to provide the highest accuracy in the LWR core calculations. The methodologies to calculate the diffusion coefficients have been reviewed, and the performances of them have been investigated with a LWR core problem. The combination of the inflow transport approximation and the fundamental mode critical spectrum calculation shows the smallest errors in terms of assembly power distribution

  20. Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous LWR MOX fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, D.; Barker, M.

    2013-11-01

    It is generally observed that the thermal conductivity of LWR MOX fuel is lower than that of pure UO2. For MOX, the degradation is usually only interpreted as an effect of the substitution of U atoms by Pu. This hypothesis is however in contradiction with the observations of Duriez and Philiponneau showing that the thermal conductivity of MOX is independent of the Pu content in the ranges 3-15 and 15-30 wt.% PuO2 respectively. Attributing this degradation to Pu only implies that stoichiometric heterogeneous MOX can be obtained, while we show that any heterogeneity in the plutonium distribution in the sample introduces a variation in the local stoichiometry which in turn has a strong impact on the thermal conductivity. A model quantifying this effect is obtained and a new set of experimental results for homogeneous and heterogeneous MOX fuels is presented and used to validate the proposed model. In irradiated fuels, this effect is predicted to disappear early during irradiation. The 3, 6 and 10 wt.% Pu samples have a similar thermal conductivity. Comparison of the results for this homogeneous microstructure with MIMAS (heterogeneous) fuel of the same composition showed no difference for the Pu contents of 3, 5.9, 6, 7.87 and 10 wt.%. A small increase of the thermal conductivity was obtained for 15 wt.% Pu. This increase is of about 6% when compared to the average of the values obtained for 3, 6 and 10 wt.% Pu. For comparison purposes, Duriez also measured the thermal conductivity of FBR MOX with 21.4 wt.% Pu with O/M = 1.982 and a density close to 95% TD and found a value in good agreement with the estimation obtained using the formula of Philipponneau [8] for FBR MOX, and significantly lower than his results corresponding to the range 3-15 wt.% Pu. This difference in thermal conductivity is of about 20%, i.e. higher than the measurement uncertainties.Thus, a significant difference was observed between FBR and PWR MOX fuels, but was not explained. This difference

  1. On the use of moderating material to enhance the feedback coefficients in SFR cores with high minor actinide content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.; Weiss, F. P.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fine distributed moderating material to enhance the feedback effects and to reduce the sodium void effecting sodium cooled fast reactor cores is described. The influence of the moderating material on the neutron spectrum, the power distribution, and the burnup distribution is shown. The consequences of the use of fine distributed moderating material into fuel assemblies with fuel configurations foreseen for minor actinide transmutation is analyzed and the transmutation efficiency is compared. The degradation of the feedback effects due to the insertion of minor actinides and the compensation by the use of moderating materials is discussed. (authors)

  2. On the use of moderating material to enhance the feedback coefficients in SFR cores with high minor actinide content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merk, B. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung, Postfach 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Weiss, F. P. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit GRS MbH Forschungszentrum, Boltzmannstr. 14, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The use of fine distributed moderating material to enhance the feedback effects and to reduce the sodium void effecting sodium cooled fast reactor cores is described. The influence of the moderating material on the neutron spectrum, the power distribution, and the burnup distribution is shown. The consequences of the use of fine distributed moderating material into fuel assemblies with fuel configurations foreseen for minor actinide transmutation is analyzed and the transmutation efficiency is compared. The degradation of the feedback effects due to the insertion of minor actinides and the compensation by the use of moderating materials is discussed. (authors)

  3. About the use of approximations, which ensure materials mass balance conservation by spatial meshes, in Sn full core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshchenko, A.M.; Russkov, A.A.; Gurevich, M.I.; Olejnik, D.S.

    2008-01-01

    One analyzes a possibility to make use of the geometry approximations conserving the materials mass local balance in every mesh via adding of mixtures in the meshes containing several feed materials to perform the kinetic calculation of the reactor core neutron fields. To set the 3D-geometry of the reactor core one makes use of the combinatorial geometry methods implemented in the MCI Program to solve the diffusivity equations by the Monte Carlo method, to convert the combinatorial prescribing of the geometry into the mesh representation - the ray tracing method. According to the calculations of the WWER-1000 reactor core and the simulations of the spent fuel storage facility, the described procedure compares favorably with the conventional geometry approximations [ru

  4. Development of the evaluation methodology for the material relocation behavior in the core disruptive accident of sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, Yoshiharu; Kamiyama, Kenji; Tagami, Hirotaka; Matsuba, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Tohru; Isozaki, Mikio; Yamano, Hidemasa; Morita, Koji; Guo, Liancheng; Zhang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The in-vessel retention (IVR) of core disruptive accident (CDA) is of prime importance in enhancing safety characteristics of sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). In the CDA of SFRs, molten core material relocates to the lower plenum of reactor vessel and may impose significant thermal load on the structures, resulting in the melt through of the reactor vessel. In order to enable the assessment of this relocation process and prove that IVR of core material is the most probable consequence of the CDA in SFRs, a research program to develop the evaluation methodology for the material relocation behavior in the CDA of SFRs has been conducted. This program consists of three developmental studies, namely the development of the analysis method of molten material discharge from the core region, the development of evaluation methodology of molten material penetration into sodium pool, and the development of the simulation tool of debris bed behavior. The analysis method of molten material discharge was developed based on the computer code SIMMER-III since this code is designed to simulate the multi-phase, multi-component fluid dynamics with phase changes involved in the discharge process. Several experiments simulating the molten material discharge through duct using simulant materials were utilized as the basis of validation study of the physical models in this code. It was shown that SIMMER-III with improved physical models could simulate the molten material discharge behavior including the momentum exchange with duct wall and thermal interaction with coolant. In order to develop evaluation methodology of molten material penetration into sodium pool, a series of experiments simulating jet penetration behavior into sodium pool in SFR thermal condition were performed. These experiments revealed that the molten jet was fragmented in significantly shorter penetration length than the prediction by existing correlation for light water reactor conditions, due to the direct

  5. Utility requirements for advanced LWR passive plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yedidia, J.M.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    LWR Passive Plants are becoming an increasingly attractive and prominent option for future electric generating capacity for U.S. utilities. Conceptual designs for ALWR Passive Plants are currently being developed by U.S. suppliers. EPRI-sponsored work beginning in 1985 developed preliminary conceptual designs for a passive BWR and PWR. DOE-sponsored work from 1986 to the present in conjunction with further EPRI-sponsored studies has continued this development to the point of mature conceptual designs. The success to date in developing the ALWR Passive Plant concepts has substantially increased utility interest. The EPRI ALWR Program has responded by augmenting its initial scope to develop a Utility Requirements Document for ALWR Passive Plants. These requirements will be largely based on the ALWR Utility Requirements Document for Evolutionary Plants, but with significant changes in areas related to the passive safety functions and system configurations. This work was begun in late 1988, and the thirteen-chapter Passive Plant Utility Requirements Document will be completed in 1990. This paper discusses the progress to date in developing the Passive Plant requirements, reviews the top-level requirements, and discusses key issues related to adaptation of the utility requirements to passive safety functions and system configurations. (orig.)

  6. Economic analyses of LWR fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, F.R.

    1977-05-01

    An economic comparison was made of three options for handling irradiated light-water reactor (LWR) fuel. These options are reprocessing of spent reactor fuel and subsequent recycle of both uranium and plutonium, reprocessing and recycle of uranium only, and direct terminal storage of spent fuel not reprocessed. The comparison was based on a peak-installed nuclear capacity of 507 GWe by CY 2000 and retirement of reactors after 30 years of service. Results of the study indicate that: Through the year 2000, recycle of uranium and plutonium in LWRs saves about $12 billion (FY 1977 dollars) compared with the throwaway cycle, but this amounts to only about 1.3% of the total cost of generating electricity by nuclear power. If deferred costs are included for fuel that has been discharged from reactors but not reprocessed, the economic advantage increases to $17.7 billion. Recycle of uranium only (storage of plutonium) is approximately $7 billion more expensive than the throwaway fuel cycle and is, therefore, not considered an economically viable option. The throwaway fuel cycle ultimately requires >40% more uranium resources (U 3 O 8 ) than does reprocessing spent fuel where both uranium and plutonium are recycled

  7. NUPEC proves reliability of LWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    It is very important in assuring the safety of nuclear reactors to confirm the reliability of fuel assemblies. The test program of the Nuclear Power Engineering Center on the reliability of fuel assemblies has verified the high performance and reliability of Japanese LWR fuels, and confirmed the propriety of their design and fabrication. This claim is based on the data obtained from the fuel assemblies irradiated in commercial reactors. The NUPEC program includes irradiation test which has been conducted for 11 years since fiscal 1976, and the maximum thermal loading test using the out of pile test facilities simulating a real reactor which has been continued since fiscal 1978. The irradiation test on BWR fuel assemblies in No.3 reactor in Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., and on PWR fuel assemblies in No.3 reactor in Mihama Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., and the maximum thermal loading test on BWR and PWR fuel assemblies are reported. The series of postirradiation examination of the fuel assemblies used for commercial reactors was conducted for the first time in Japan, and the highly systematic data on 27 items were obtained. (Kako, I.)

  8. LWR primary coolant pipe rupture test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitoshi, Shyoji

    1978-01-01

    The rupture test rig for primary coolant pipes is constructed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to verify the reliability of the primary coolant pipes for both PWRs and BWRs. The planned test items consisted of reaction force test, restraint test, whip test, jet test and continuous release test. A pressure vessel of about 4 m 3 volume, a circulating pump, a pressurizer, a heater, an air cooler and the related instrumentation and control system are included in this test rig. The coolant test condition is 160 kg/cm 2 g, 325 deg C for PWR test, and 70 kg/cm 2 g, saturated water and steam for BWR test, 100 ton of test load for the ruptured pipe bore of 8B Schedule 160, and 20 lit/min. discharge during 20 h for continuous release of coolant. The maximum pit internal pressure was estimated for various pipe diameters and time under the PWR and BWR conditions. The spark rupturing device was adopted for the rupture mechanics in this test rig. The computer PANAFACOM U-300 is used for the data processing. This test rig is expected to operate in 1978 effectively for the improvement of reliability of LWR primary coolant pipes. (Nakai, Y.)

  9. LWR safety research in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seipel, H.G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper gives a review of the German LWR safety research programme. It describes how the programme was initiated and informs on its goals, development andpractical realization, and indicates how it is bound up with international collaboration. The contribution so far made by the programme to an enhancement of the understanding of major safety problems and to the improvement of safety technology is demonstrated by means of a few selected examples. Experiments relating to loss-of--coolant accidents have deepened our understanding of the heat transfer in the reactor core during blowdown as well as during the flooding phase. Investigations of the dynamic effects going on in dry full pressure containments and pressure suppression systems, following a loss-of--coolant accident, have indicated that existing computer models cannot satisfactorily predict all relevant physical phenomena. Yet, the experimental results obtained constitute a sufficient basis for safe containment design. Research work on core meltdown accidents has identified the particular importance of the type of concrete used for the containment structures and its foundation. If basaltic concrete is used, a substantial fission product release to the environment is extremely unlikely even in the case of a core meltdown accident. At least, it would take place much later than was previously assumed. Resrach on the safety of pressurized components has been concentrated on the problem of cracks in the heat-affected zone of welds. New methods were developed for the detection and analysis of the acceptability of microcrack fields. Additional investigations of specimens and components to increase the understanding of the long-term behaviour of components with microcracks are envisaged in the frame of a new major project on ''component safety''. Considerable progress has been made in the development of methods for automatic remote-control volumetric testing of reactor pressure vessels using ultrasonic techniques

  10. Material dimensionality effects on the nanoindentation behavior of Al/a-Si core-shell nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Robert A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Center for Advanced Surface Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Goss, Josue A. [Center for Advanced Surface Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Zou, Min, E-mail: mzou@uark.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Center for Advanced Surface Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Nanoindentation behavior of Al/a-Si core-shell nanostructures were studied. • 3D core confinement enables significant deformation recovery beyond elastic limit. • As the confinement is reduced, the deformation recovery is reduced or suppressed. • Atomistic simulations suggest core confinement affects dislocation dynamics. • 3D confinement has the highest percentage of dislocation removal after unloading. - Abstract: The nanoindentation behavior of hemispherical Al/a-Si core-shell nanostructures (CSNs), horizontally-aligned Al/a-Si core-shell nanorods (CSRs) with various lengths, and an Al/a-Si layered thin film has been studied to understand the effects of geometrical confinement of the Al core on the CSN deformation behavior. When loaded beyond the elastic limit, the CSNs have an unconventional load-displacement behavior with no residual displacement after unloading, resulting in no net shape change after indentation. This behavior is enabled by dislocation activities within the confined Al core, as indicated by discontinuous indentation signatures (load-drops and load-jumps) observed in the load-displacement data. When the geometrical confinement of the core is slightly reduced, as in the case of CSRs with the shortest rod length, the discontinuous indentation signatures and deformation resistance are heavily reduced. Further decreases in core confinement result in conventional nanoindentation behavior, regardless of geometry. Supporting molecular dynamics simulations show that dislocations nucleated in the core of a CSN are more effectively removed during unloading compared to CSRs, which supports the hypothesis that the unique deformation resistance of Al/a-Si CSNs are enabled by 3-dimensional confinement of the Al core.

  11. Material dimensionality effects on the nanoindentation behavior of Al/a-Si core-shell nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Robert A.; Goss, Josue A.; Zou, Min

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanoindentation behavior of Al/a-Si core-shell nanostructures were studied. • 3D core confinement enables significant deformation recovery beyond elastic limit. • As the confinement is reduced, the deformation recovery is reduced or suppressed. • Atomistic simulations suggest core confinement affects dislocation dynamics. • 3D confinement has the highest percentage of dislocation removal after unloading. - Abstract: The nanoindentation behavior of hemispherical Al/a-Si core-shell nanostructures (CSNs), horizontally-aligned Al/a-Si core-shell nanorods (CSRs) with various lengths, and an Al/a-Si layered thin film has been studied to understand the effects of geometrical confinement of the Al core on the CSN deformation behavior. When loaded beyond the elastic limit, the CSNs have an unconventional load-displacement behavior with no residual displacement after unloading, resulting in no net shape change after indentation. This behavior is enabled by dislocation activities within the confined Al core, as indicated by discontinuous indentation signatures (load-drops and load-jumps) observed in the load-displacement data. When the geometrical confinement of the core is slightly reduced, as in the case of CSRs with the shortest rod length, the discontinuous indentation signatures and deformation resistance are heavily reduced. Further decreases in core confinement result in conventional nanoindentation behavior, regardless of geometry. Supporting molecular dynamics simulations show that dislocations nucleated in the core of a CSN are more effectively removed during unloading compared to CSRs, which supports the hypothesis that the unique deformation resistance of Al/a-Si CSNs are enabled by 3-dimensional confinement of the Al core.

  12. Material properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for core materials of FBR. Tensile properties of sodium exposed and nickel diffused materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shoichi; Yoshida, Eiichi

    2002-12-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is candidate for a long-life core materials of future FBR, because of good swelling resistance and high creep strength. In this study, tensile tests were carried out the long-term extrapolation of sodium environmental effects on the mechanical properties of ODS steels. The tested heats of materials are M93, M11 and F95. The specimens were pre-exposed to sodium for 1,000 and 3,000 hours under non-stress conditions. The pre-exposure to sodium was conducted using a sodium test loop constituted by austenitic steels. For the conditions of sodium exposure test, the sodium temperature was 650 and 700degC, the oxygen concentration in sodium was about 1 ppm and sodium flow rate on the surface of specimen was less than 1x10 -4 m/seconds (nearly static). Further the specimen with the nickel diffused was prepared, which is simulate to nickel diffusing through sodium from the surface of structural stainless steels. The main results obtained were as follows; (1) The tensile strength and the fracture elongation after sodium exposure (maximum 3,000 hours) were same as that of as-received materials. If was considered that the sodium environmental effect is negligible under the condition of this study. (2) Tensile properties of nickel diffused specimens were slightly lower than that of the as-received specimens, but it remains equal to that of thermal aging specimens. (3) The change in microstructure such as a degraded layer was observed on the surface of nickel diffused specimen. In the region of the degraded layer, phase transformations from the α-phase to the γ-phase were recognized. But, the microscopic oxide particles were observed same as that of α-phase base metal. (author)

  13. Crust behavior and erosion rate prediction of EPR sacrificial material impinged by core melt jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gen; Liu, Ming, E-mail: ming.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Jinshi; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A numerical code was developed to analyze melt jet-concrete interaction in the frame of MPS method. • Crust and ablated concrete layer at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface periodically developed and collapsed. • Concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. • Concrete erosion by Fe-Zr melt jet was significantly faster than that by UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt jet. - Abstract: Sacrificial material is a special ferro-siliceous concrete, designed in the ex-vessel core melt stabilization system of European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR). Given a localized break of RPV lower head, the melt directly impinges onto the dry concrete in form of compact jet. The concrete erosion behavior influences the failure of melt plug, and further affects melt spreading. In this study, a numerical code was developed in the frame of Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method, to analyze the crust behavior and erosion rate of sacrificial concrete, impinged by prototypic melt jet. In validation of numerical modeling, the time-dependent erosion depth and erosion configuration matched well with the experimental data. Sensitivity study of sacrificial concrete erosion indicates that the crust and ablated concrete layer presented at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface, whereas no crust could be found in the interaction of Fe-Zr melt with concrete. The crust went through stabilization-fracture-reformation periodic process, accompanied with accumulating and collapsing of molten concrete layer. The concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. It increased as the concrete surface layer was heated to melting, and dropped down when the cold concrete was revealed. The erosion progression was fast in the conditions of small jet diameter and large concrete inclination angle, and it was significantly faster in the erosion by metallic melt jet than by oxidic melt jet.

  14. Standard practice for radiologic examination of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials used in aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice is intended to be used as a supplement to Practices E 1742, E 1255, and E 2033. 1.2 This practice describes procedures for radiologic examination of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials made entirely or in part from fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites. Radiologic examination is: a) radiographic (RT) with film, b) Computed Radiography (CR) with Imaging Plate, c) Digital Radiology (DR) with Digital Detector Array’s (DDA), and d) Radioscopic (RTR) Real Time Radiology with a detection system such as an Image Intensifier. The composite materials under consideration typically contain continuous high modulus fibers (> 20 GPa), such as those listed in 1.4. 1.3 This practice describes established radiological examination methods that are currently used by industry that have demonstrated utility in quality assurance of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials during product process design and optimization, process control, after manufacture inspection, in service exami...

  15. Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves in Slab Waveguide Structure Consisting of Chiral Nihility Claddings and Negative-Index Material Core Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Alaa N. Abu; Taya, Sofyan A.; Elwasife, Khitam Y.

    2018-06-01

    The dispersion equation of an asymmetric three-layer slab waveguide, in which all layers are chiral materials is presented. Then, the dispersion equation of a symmetric slab waveguide, in which the claddings are chiral materials and the core layer is negative index material, is derived. Normalized cut-off frequencies, field profile, and energies flow of right-handed and left-handed circularly polarized modes are derived and plotted. We consider both odd and even guided modes. Numerical results of guided low-order modes are provided. Some novel features, such as abnormal dispersion curves, are found.

  16. Residual life assessment of major LWR components: NPAR approach and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Weidenhamer, G.H.; Vora, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear plant aging research (NPAR) program is systematically addressing the technical issues associated with understanding and managing aging of major LWR components. Twenty-one major components have been identified and prioritized according to their relevance to plant safety. Qualitative aging assessment has identified pertinent design features, materials, stressors, environments, aging mechanisms. and failure modes for each of the components. Emerging inspection, surveillance, and monitoring methods to characterize aging damage and mitigation methods to reduce the damage are currently being assessed. The results of all these assessments are used to develop life-assessment procedures for the components and are included in appropriate documents supporting the regulatory requirements for license renewal. (author)

  17. Study on preparation and microwave absorption property of the core-nanoshell composite materials doped with La.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liqiu; Che, Ruxin; Jiang, Yijun; Yu, Bing

    2013-12-01

    Microwave absorbing material plays a great role in electromagnetic pollution controlling, electromagnetic interference shielding and stealth technology, etc. The core-nanoshell composite materials doped with La were prepared by a solid-state reaction method, which is applied to the electromagnetic wave absorption. The core is magnetic fly-ash hollow cenosphere, and the shell is the nanosized ferrite doped with La. The thermal decomposition process of the sample was investigated by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis. The morphology and components of the composite materials were investigated by the X-ray diffraction analysis, the microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The results of vibrating sample magnetometer analysis indicated that the exchange-coupling interaction happens between ferrite of magnetic fly-ash hollow cenosphere and nanosized ferrite coating, which caused outstanding magnetic properties. The microwave absorbing property of the sample was measured by reflectivity far field radar cross section of radar microwave absorbing material with vector network analyzer. The results indicated that the exchange-coupling interaction enhanced magnetic loss of composite materials. Therefore, in the frequency of 5 GHz, the reflection coefficient can achieve -24 dB. It is better than single material and is consistent with requirements of the microwave absorbing material at the low-frequency absorption. Copyright © 2013 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proceedings of the international conference on irradiation behaviour of metallic materials for fast reactor core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Dupouy, J.M.

    Radiation effects on metals or alloys used in fast reactor core components are examined in the papers presented at this conference, the accent being put on swelling and irradiation creep of steels and nickel alloys

  19. Engineered zircaloy cladding modifications for improved accident tolerance of LWR fuel: US DOE NEUP Integrated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Brent

    2013-01-01

    An integrated research project (IRP) to fabricate and evaluate modified zircaloy LWR cladding under normal BWR/PWR operation and off-normal events has been funded by the US DOE. The IRP involves three US academic institutions, a US national laboratory, an intermediate stock industrial cladding supplier, and an international academic institution. A combination of computational and experimental protocols will be employed to design and test modified zircaloy cladding with respect to corrosion and accelerated oxide growth, the former associated with normal operation, the latter associated with steam exposure during loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and low-pressure core re-floods. Efforts will be made to go beyond design-base accident (DBA) scenarios (cladding temperature equal to or less than 1204 deg. C) during the experimental phase of modified zircaloy performance characterisation. The project anticipates the use of the facilities at ORNL to achieve steam exposure beyond DBA scenarios. In addition, irradiation of down-selected modified cladding candidates in the ATR may be performed. Cladding performance evaluation will be incorporated into a reactor system modelling effort of fuel performance, neutronics, and thermal hydraulics, thereby providing a holistic approach to accident-tolerant nuclear fuel. The proposed IRP brings together personnel, facilities, and capabilities across a wide range of technical areas relevant to the study of modified nuclear fuel and LWR performance during normal operation and off-normal scenarios. Two pathways towards accident-tolerant LWR fuel are envisioned, both based on the modification of existing zircaloy cladding. The first is the modification of the cladding surface by the application of a coating layer designed to shift the M + O→MO reaction away from oxide growth during steam exposure at elevated temperatures. This pathway is referred to as the 'surface coating' solution. The second is the modification of the bulk

  20. Design consideration on severe accident for future LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, A.

    1998-01-01

    Utilities' Severe Accident Management strategies, selected based on Individual Plant Examination, are in the process of implementation for each operating plant. Activities for the next generation LWR design are going on by Utilities, NSSS vendors and Research Institutes. The proposed new designs vary from evolutionary design to revolutionary design such as the supercritical LWR. Discussion on the consideration of Severe Accident in the design of next generation LWR is being held to establish the industry's self-regulatory document on containment design and its performance, which ABWR-IER (Improved Evolutionary Reactor) on the part of BWR and Evolutionary APWR and New PWR21 on the part of PWR are expected to comply. Conceptual design study for ABWR-IER will illustrate an example of design approach for the prevention and mitigation of Severe Accident and its impact on capital cost

  1. Photoelastic stress analysis of different prefabricated post-and-core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asvanund, Pattapon; Morgano, Steven M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate stress developed by a combination of a stainless steel post or a fiber-reinforced resin post with a silver amalgam core or a composite resin core. Two-dimensional photoelastic models were used to simulate root dentin. Posts (ParaPost XT and ParaPost-FiberWhite) were cemented with a luting agent (RelyX Unicem). Silver amalgam cores and composite resin cores were fabricated on the posts. Complete crowns were fabricated and cemented on the cores. Each model was analyzed with 2 force magnitudes and in 2 directions. Fringe orders were recorded and compared using ANOVA (p=0.05) and the Scheffe's test. With vertical force, no stress differences occurred among the 4 groups (p=0.159). With a 30-degree force, there was stress differences among the 4 groups (p<0.001). The combination of a fiber-reinforced post and composite resin core could potentially reduce stresses within the radicular dentin when angled loads are applied.

  2. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lori Braase

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), in collaboration with the nuclear industry, has been conducting research and development (R&D) activities on advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels for the last few years. The emphasis for these activities was on improving the fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization and increased power density for power upgrades, as well as collaborating with industry on fuel reliability. After the events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. In the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Conference Report 112-75, the U.S. Congress directed DOE-NE to: • Give “priority to developing enhanced fuels and cladding for light water reactors to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools.” • Give “special technical emphasis and funding priority…to activities aimed at the development and near-term qualification of meltdown-resistant, accident-tolerant nuclear fuels that would enhance the safety of present and future generations of light water reactors.” • Report “to the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, on its plan for development of meltdown-resistant fuels leading to reactor testing and utilization by 2020.” Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The overall draft strategy for development and demonstration is comprised of three phases: Feasibility Assessment and Down-selection; Development and Qualification; and

  3. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control the reactivity during a postulated core meltdown accident in generation IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plevacova, Kamila

    2010-01-01

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B 4 C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic points of view. Concerning B 4 C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B 4 C - UO 2 system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B 4 C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu 2 O 3 or HfO 2 as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO 2 , first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 - UO 2 system, the Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 - UO 2 mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author)

  4. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control reactivity during a postulated core melt down accident in Generation IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plevacova, K.

    2010-01-01

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B 4 C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic point of view. Concerning B 4 C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B 4 C - UO 2 system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, a volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B 4 C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu 2 O 3 or HfO 2 as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO 2 , first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 - UO 2 system, the Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 - UO 2 mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author) [fr

  5. Material correlations and models for the irradiation behavior of fissile and fertile material in SNR-300, Mark-II and KNK II, third core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenneker; Steinmetz; Toebbe

    1986-07-01

    The report contains the material correlations and models used in the fuel pin design code IAMBUS for the irradiation behavior of PuO 2 -UO 2 fissile materials and UO 2 fertile materials of the SNR-300 Mark-II reload and the KNK II third core. They are applicable for pellet densities of more than 90 % of the theoretical density. The presented models of the fuel behavior and the applied material correlations have been derived either from single experiments or from the comparison of theoretically predicted integral fuel behavior with the results of fuel pin irradiation experiments. The material correlations have been examined and extended in the frame of the collaborations INTERATOM/KWU and INTERATOM/KfK. French and British results were included, when available from the European fast reactor knowledge exchange [de

  6. Analysis of an out-of-pile experiment for materials redistribution under core disruptive accident condition of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuo; Ninokata, Hisashi; Shimizu, Akinao

    1995-01-01

    Calculation of one of the SIMBATH experiments was performed using the SIMMER-II code. The experiments were intended to simulate the fuel pin disintegration, the molten materials relocation and following materials redistribution that could occur during core disruptive accidents assumed in fast breeder reactors. The calculation by SIMMER-II showed that the incorporated step-wise fuel pin disintegration model and the modified particle jamming model were capable of reproducing the course of materials relocation within the identified ranges of the parameters which governed the blockages formation, i.e. the characteristic radius of solid particles jamming and/or sieving out in the flow and the effective particle viscosity. In particular the final materials redistribution calculated by SIMMER-II very well reproduced the experiment. This fact made it possible to interpret theoretically the mechanisms of flow blockages formation and related materials redistribution. (author)

  7. Hybridization of MOFs and COFs: A New Strategy for Construction of MOF@COF Core-Shell Hybrid Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yongwu; Zhao, Meiting; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Zhicheng; Huang, Ying; Dai, Fangna; Lai, Zhuangchai; Cui, Xiaoya; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhang, Hua

    2018-01-01

    The exploration of new porous hybrid materials is of great importance because of their unique properties and promising applications in separation of materials, catalysis, etc. Herein, for the first time, by integration of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), a new type of MOF@COF core-shell hybrid material, i.e., NH 2 -MIL-68@TPA-COF, with high crystallinity and hierarchical pore structure, is synthesized. As a proof-of-concept application, the obtained NH 2 -MIL-68@TPA-COF hybrid material is used as an effective visible-light-driven photocatalyst for the degradation of rhodamine B. The synthetic strategy in this study opens up a new avenue for the construction of other MOF-COF hybrid materials, which could have various promising applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The need for LWR metrology standardization: the imec roughness protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, Gian Francesco; Sutani, Takumichi; Rutigliani, Vito; van Roey, Frieda; Moussa, Alain; Charley, Anne-Laure; Mack, Chris; Naulleau, Patrick; Constantoudis, Vassilios; Ikota, Masami; Ishimoto, Toru; Koshihara, Shunsuke

    2018-03-01

    As semiconductor technology keeps moving forward, undeterred by the many challenges ahead, one specific deliverable is capturing the attention of many experts in the field: Line Width Roughness (LWR) specifications are expected to be less than 2nm in the near term, and to drop below 1nm in just a few years. This is a daunting challenge and engineers throughout the industry are trying to meet these targets using every means at their disposal. However, although current efforts are surely admirable, we believe they are not enough. The fact is that a specification has a meaning only if there is an agreed methodology to verify if the criterion is met or not. Such a standardization is critical in any field of science and technology and the question that we need to ask ourselves today is whether we have a standardized LWR metrology or not. In other words, if a single reference sample were provided, would everyone measuring it get reasonably comparable results? We came to realize that this is not the case and that the observed spread in the results throughout the industry is quite large. In our opinion, this makes the comparison of LWR data among institutions, or to a specification, very difficult. In this paper, we report the spread of measured LWR data across the semiconductor industry. We investigate the impact of image acquisition, measurement algorithm, and frequency analysis parameters on LWR metrology. We review critically some of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) metrology guidelines (such as measurement box length larger than 2μm and the need to correct for SEM noise). We compare the SEM roughness results to AFM measurements. Finally, we propose a standardized LWR measurement protocol - the imec Roughness Protocol (iRP) - intended to ensure that every time LWR measurements are compared (from various sources or to specifications), the comparison is sensible and sound. We deeply believe that the industry is at a point where it is

  9. The minimum attention plant inherent safety through LWR simplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turk, R.S.; Matzie, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Minimum Attention Plant (MAP) is a unique small LWR that achieves greater inherent safety, improved operability, and reduced costs through design simplification. The MAP is a self-pressurized, indirect-cycle light water reactor with full natural circulation primary coolant flow and multiple once-through steam generators located within the reactor vessel. A fundamental tenent of the MAP design is its complete reliance on existing LWR technology. This reliance on conventional technology provides an extensive experience base which gives confidence in judging the safety and performance aspects of the design

  10. Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuel Technology for LWR Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Bell, Gary L.; Kiggans, Jim; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for the specific LWR application has been provided. Basic fuel properties and characteristics that aim to improve operational reliability, enlarge performance envelope, and enhance safety margins under design-basis accident scenarios are summarized. Fabrication of M3 rodlets with various coated fuel particles over a temperature range of 800-1300 C is discussed. Results from preliminary irradiation testing of LWR M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles are also reported.

  11. Fabrication of Fe3O4@CuO core-shell from MOF based materials and its antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, S. K.; Sohrabnezhad, Sh.; Ghafourian, S.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic Fe3O4@CuO nanocomposite with a core/shell structure was successfully synthesized via direct calcinations of magnetic Fe3O4@HKUST-1 in air atmosphere. The morphology, structure, magnetic and porous properties of the as-synthesized nano composites were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and vibration sample magnetometer (VSM). The results showed that the nanocomposite material included a Fe3O4 core and a CuO shell. The Fe3O4@CuO core-shell can be separated easily from the medium by a small magnet. The antibacterial activity of Fe3O4-CuO core-shell was investigated against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A new mechanism was proposed for inactivation of bacteria over the prepared sample. It was demonstrated that the core-shell exhibit recyclable antibacterial activity, acting as an ideal long-acting antibacterial agent.

  12. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented

  13. New Developments in Actinides Burning with Symbiotic LWR-HTR-GCFR Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomboni, Eleonora

    2008-01-01

    The long-term radiotoxicity of the final waste is currently the main drawback of nuclear power production. Particularly, isotopes of Neptunium and Plutonium along with some long-lived fission products are dangerous for more than 100000 years. 96% of spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel consists of actinides, hence it is able to produce a lot of energy by fission if recycled. Goals of Generation IV Initiative are reduction of long-term radiotoxicity of waste to be stored in geological repositories, a better exploitation of nuclear fuel resources and proliferation resistance. Actually, all these issues are intrinsically connected with each other. It is quite clear that these goals can be achieved only by combining different concepts of Gen. IV nuclear cores in a 'symbiotic' way. Light-Water Reactor - (Very) High Temperature Reactor ((V)HTR) - Fast Reactor (FR) symbiotic cycles have good capabilities from the viewpoints mentioned above. Particularly, HTR fuelled by Plutonium oxide is able to reach an ultra-high burn-up and to burn Neptunium and Plutonium effectively. In contrast, not negligible amounts of Americium and Curium build up in this core, although the total mass of Heavy Metals (HM) is reduced. Americium and Curium are characterised by an high radiological hazard as well. Nevertheless, at least Plutonium from HTR (rich in non-fissile nuclides) and, if appropriate, Americium can be used as fuel for Fast Reactors. If necessary, dedicated assemblies for Minor Actinides (MA) burning can be inserted in Fast Reactors cores. This presentation focuses on combining HTR and Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) concepts, fuelled by spent LWR fuel and depleted uranium if need be, to obtain a net reduction of total mass and radiotoxicity of final waste. The intrinsic proliferation resistance of this cycle is highlighted as well. Additionally, some hints about possible Curium management strategies are supplied. Besides, a preliminary assessment of different chemical forms of

  14. Research work for improving LWR safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bork, G.

    1993-09-01

    The work performed in 1992 for the PSF project centers on various phenomena of severe fuel damage and on selected aspects of a core meltdown accident, relating to aerosol behaviour and filter engineering, and to methods of assessing and minimizing the radiological impacts of a reactor accident. The 1992 task programme of the project included research into extreme load conditions affecting the containment in a core meltdown accident: first results are given of the experiments performed. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Adaptation of adhesive post and cores to dentin after in vitro occlusal loading: evaluation of post material influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietschi, Dider; Ardu, Stefano; Rossier-Gerber, Anne; Krejci, Ivo

    2006-12-01

    Fatigue resistance of post and cores is critical to the long term behavior of restored nonvital teeth. The purpose of this in vitro trial was to evaluate the influence of the post material's physical properties on the adaptation of adhesive post and core restorations after cyclic mechanical loading. Composite post and cores were made on endodontically treated deciduous bovine teeth using 3 anisotropic posts (made of carbon, quartz, or quartz-and-carbon fibers) and 3 isotropic posts (zirconium, stainless steel, titanium). Specimens were submitted to 3 successive loading phases--250,000 cycles at 50 N, 250,000 at 75 N, and 500,000 at 100 N--at a rate of 1.5 Hz. Restoration adaptation was evaluated under SEM, before and during loading (margins) and after test completion (margins and internal interfaces). Six additional samples were fabricated for the characterization of interface micromorphology using confocal microscopy. Mechanical loading increased the proportion of marginal gaps in all groups; carbon fiber posts presented the lowest final gap proportion (7.11%) compared to other stiffer metal-ceramic or softer fiber posts (11.0% to 19.1%). For internal adaptation, proportions of debonding between dentin and core or cement varied from 21.69% (carbon post) to 47.37% (stainless steel post). Debonding at the post-cement interface occurred only with isotropic materials. Confocal microscopy observation revealed that gaps were generally associated with an incomplete hybrid layer and reduced resin tags. Regardless of their rigidity, metal and ceramic isotropic posts proved less effective than fiber posts at stabilizing the post and core structure in the absence of the ferrule effect, due to the development of more interfacial defects with either composite or dentin.

  16. Core design studies on various forms of coolants and fuel materials. 2. Studies on liquid heavy metal and gas cooled cores, small cores and evaluation of 4-type cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Sakashita, Yoshiyuki; Naganuma, Masayuki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Ikegami, Tetsuo

    2001-01-01

    Alternative concepts to sodium cooled fast reactors, such as heavy metal liquid cooled reactors and gas cooled fast reactors were studied in Phase-1 of the feasibility studies, aiming at simplification of the system, high thermal efficiency and enhancing safety. Fuel and core specifications and nuclear characteristics were surveyed to meet the targets for commercialization of fast reactor cycle. Nuclear characteristics of small fast reactor cores were also surveyed from the perspective of the possibility of multi-purpose use and dispersed power stations. The key points of the design study for each concept in Phase-2 were summarized from the aspect of the screening of the candidates for FR commercialization. (author)

  17. The accretion of solar material onto white dwarfs: No mixing with core material implies that the mass of the white dwarf is increasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumner Starrfield

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataclysmic Variables (CVs are close binary star systems with one component a white dwarf (WD and the other a larger cooler star that fills its Roche Lobe. The cooler star is losing mass through the inner Lagrangian point of the binary and some unknown fraction of this material is accreted by the WD. One consequence of the WDs accreting material, is the possibility that they are growing in mass and will eventually reach the Chandrasekhar Limit. This evolution could result in a Supernova Ia (SN Ia explosion and is designated the Single Degenerate Progenitor (SD scenario. This paper is concerned with the SD scenario for SN Ia progenitors. One problem with the single degenerate scenario is that it is generally assumed that the accreting material mixes with WD core material at some time during the accretion phase of evolution and, since the typical WD has a carbon-oxygen CO core, the mixing results in large amounts of carbon and oxygen being brought up into the accreted layers. The presence of enriched carbon causes enhanced nuclear fusion and a Classical Nova explosion. Both observations and theoretical studies of these explosions imply that more mass is ejected than is accreted. Thus, the WD in a Classical Nova system is losing mass and cannot be a SN Ia progenitor. However, the composition in the nuclear burning region is important and, in new calculations reported here, the consequences to the WD of no mixing of accreted material with core material have been investigated so that the material involved in the explosion has only a Solar composition. WDs with a large range in initial masses and mass accretion rates have been evolved. I find that once sufficient material has been accreted, nuclear burning occurs in all evolutionary sequences and continues until a thermonuclear runaway (TNR occurs and the WD either ejects a small amount of material or its radius grows to about 1012 cm and the evolution is ended. In all cases where mass ejection occurs

  18. Core II Materials for Rural Agriculture Programs. Units E-H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This curriculum guide includes teaching packets for 21 problem areas to be included in a core curriculum for 10th grade students enrolled in a rural agricultural program. Covered in the four units included in this volume are crop science (harvesting farm crops and growing small grains); soil science and conservation of natural resources…

  19. Preliminary concepts for detecting national diversion of LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnier, C.S.; Cravens, M.N.

    1978-04-01

    Preliminary concepts for detecting national diversion of LWR spent fuel during storage, handling and transportation are presented. Principal emphasis is placed on means to achieve timely detection by an international authority. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) as part of the overall Sandia Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program

  20. Safety criteria related to microheterogeneities in LWR mixed oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, A.; Mostin, N.

    1978-01-01

    The main safety aspets of PuO 2 microheterogeneities in the pellets of LWR mixed oxide fuels are reviewed. Points of interest are studied, especially the transient behaviour in accidental conditions and criteria are deduced for use in the specification and quality control of the fabricated product. (author)

  1. Nondestructive evaluation of LWR spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, D.W.

    1978-02-01

    An analysis of nondestructive testing (NDT) methods currently being used to evaluate the integrity of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel shipping casks is presented. An assessment of anticipated NDT needs related to breeder reactor cask requirements is included. Specific R and D approaches to probable NDT problem areas such as the evaluation of austenitic stainless steel weldments are outlined

  2. Contributions to LWR spent fuel storage and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers included in this document describe the aspects of spent LWR fuel storage and transport-behaviour of spent fuel during storage; use of compact storage packs; safety of storage; design of storage facilities AR and AFR; description of transport casks and transport procedures

  3. Data needs for long-term dry storage of LWR fuel. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Baldwin, D.L.; Pitman, S.G.

    1998-04-01

    The NRC approved dry storage of spent fuel in an inert environment for a period of 20 years pursuant to 10CFR72. However, at-reactor dry storage of spent LWR fuel may need to be implemented for periods of time significantly longer than the NRC's original 20-year license period, largely due to uncertainty as to the date the US DOE will begin accepting commercial spent fuel. This factor is leading utilities to plan not only for life-of-plant spent-fuel storage during reactor operation but also for the contingency of a lengthy post-shutdown storage. To meet NRC standards, dry storage must (1) maintain subcriticality, (2) prevent release of radioactive material above acceptable limits, (3) ensure that radiation rates and doses do not exceed acceptable limits, and (4) maintain retrievability of the stored radioactive material. In light of these requirements, this study evaluates the potential for storing spent LWR fuel for up to 100 years. It also identifies major uncertainties as well as the data required to eliminate them. Results show that the lower radiation fields and temperatures after 20 years of dry storage promote acceptable fuel behavior and the extension of storage for up to 100 years. Potential changes in the properties of dry storage system components, other than spent-fuel assemblies, must still be evaluated

  4. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

  5. Influence of Parameters of Core Bingham Material on Critical Behaviour of Three-Layered Annular Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlus Dorota

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the dynamic response of annular three-layered plate subjected to loads variable in time. The plate is loaded in the plane of outer layers. The plate core has the electrorheological properties expressed by the Bingham body model. The dynamic stability loss of plate with elastic core is determined by the critical state parameters, particularly by the critical stresses. Numerous numerical observations show the influence of the values of viscosity constant and critical shear stresses, being the Bingham body parameters, on the supercritical viscous fluid plate behaviour. The problem has been solved analytically and numerically using the orthogonalization method and finite difference method. The solution includes both axisymmetric and asymmetric plate dynamic modes.

  6. Performance and reliability of LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, H.; Deramaix, P.; Vandenberg, C.

    1977-01-01

    The main requirements for fuel reloads are: good reliability, minimum fuel cycle costs and flexibility of operation. Fulfilling these goals requires a background of experience. The approach to the acquisition of this experience in the particular case of BN has included over the last 15 years a proper development and cross-checking of the design methods and criteria, a continuous updating of the drawings and specifications and the qualification of adequate fabrication plants. This approach can best be outlined on the basis of the gradual implementation of the modern features of the LWR fuel. The first fuel clad with stainless steel was loaded in the BR 3 (11 MWe) in 1969 and later on (since 1974) in the SENA plant (310 MWe). Similarly, Zircaloy 4 cladding was first introduced in a reactor reload in 1969 as autoclaved cladding and later on (in 1971) the autoclaving was suppressed for the further reloads. Zircaloy 2 was loaded in DODEWAARD (51.5 MWe) in 1970. The first demonstration assembly in a PWR was a Pu-island assembly loaded in the BR 3 in 1963. It was followed by an all-Pu assembly in the same reactor in 1965 and by the loading of Pu fuels in four prototype assemblies in GARIGLIANO (160 MWe) in 1968. A full reload incorporating Pu fuel has been experienced by the supply of fuel for GARIGLIANO (BOL: 1975) and for BR 3 (BOL: 1972 and 1976). While in the early sixties the brazed design was still being utilized, the first assembly incorporating grids with springs was introduced in BR 3 in 1963. The first Inconel grids were loaded in the same reactor in 1969 and the first Zircaloy grids in 1972 (the first Zr grid has been loaded in a BWR in 1973). The experience covered successively the shrouded design (BOL: 1963), the shroudless design (BOL: 1969), a BWR assembly (BOL: 1971), a typical RCC assembly first with large diameter fuel rods (1972) and later on with small diameter fuel rods (1974). The experience on the reactivity control covered successively diluted

  7. Influence of reflector materials and core coolant on the characteristics of accelerator driven systems

    OpenAIRE

    Panza, Fabio; Osipenko, Michail; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Saracco, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we simulated the behavior of a simple ADS model, based on MOX fuel embedded in solid lead, in terms of multiplication coefficient keff, thermal power and absolute neutron spectra. In the first part of the paper, we report on the results obtained when modifying the reflector surrounding the fission core, by replacing pure lead with a layered graphite/lead structure. We found that, by appropriately choosing position and thickness of the graphite and lead layers, it is possible to ...

  8. Safety oriented LWR research. Annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The contributions describe phenomenons of severe fuel damage and aspects of core meltdown accidents. These accidents deal with aerosol behaviour and ventilation systems and the methods for assessing and reducing the radiological concequences of nuclear accidents. Other contributions describe selected questions of safety of HCLWR type reactors. (DG)

  9. Description and hydrogeologic implications of cored sedimentary material from the 1975 drilling program at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rightmire, C.T.

    1984-08-01

    Samples of sedimentary material from interbeds between basalt flows and from fractures in the flows, taken from two drill cores at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory were analyzed for (1) particle-size distribution, (2) bulk mineralogy, (3) clay mineralogy, (4) cation-exchange capacity, and (5) carbonate content. Thin sections of selected sedimentary material were made for petrographic examination. These analyses are needed for a characterization of paths and rates of movement of radionuclides transported by infiltrating water. Preliminary interpretations indicate that (1) it may be possible to distinguish the various sedimentary interbeds on the basis of their mineralogy, (2) the presence of carbonate horizons in sedimentary interbeds may be utilized to approximate the time of exposure and the climate while the surface was exposed, and (3) the type and orientation of fracture-filling material may be utilized to determine the mechanism by which fractures were filled. 9 references, 14 figures, 8 tables

  10. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with Zirconia filler containing composite core material and fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeaidi, Zaid Al

    2016-01-01

    To assess the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth with a novel Zirconia (Zr) nano-particle filler containing bulk fill resin composite. Forty-five freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were endodontically treated using conventional step back preparation and warm lateral condensation filling. Post space preparation was performed using drills compatible for fiber posts (Rely X Fiber Post) on all teeth (n=45), and posts were cemented using self etch resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Samples were equally divided into three groups (n=15) based on the type of core materials, ZirconCore (ZC) MulticCore Flow (MC) and Luxacore Dual (LC). All specimens were mounted in acrylic resin and loads were applied (Universal testing machine) at 130° to the long axis of teeth, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. The loads and the site at which the failures occurred were recorded. Data obtained was tabulated and analyzed using a statistical program. The means and standard deviations were compared using ANOVA and Multiple comparisons test. The lowest and highest failure loads were shown by groups LC (18.741±3.02) and MC (25.16±3.30) respectively. Group LC (18.741±3.02) showed significantly lower failure loads compared to groups ZC (23.02±4.21) and MC (25.16±3.30) (pcomposite cores was comparable to teeth restored with conventional Zr free bulk fill composites. Zr filled bulk fill composites are recommended for restoration of endodontically treated teeth as they show comparable fracture resistance to conventional composite materials with less catastrophic failures.

  11. Flowing and freezing of molten core materials during unprotected loss of flow accidents in sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Royl, P.

    1988-09-01

    Flowing and freezing of mobile core materials change the fissile material distribution and core-inventory under hypothetical accident conditions and determine the path to permanent shutdown of the neutronic events and the energetic potentials. The report classifies the bondary conditions for such flowing and freezing processes by going through the different situations under which these processes can occur in the scenario of the unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) accident. The classification is based on ULOF-accident simulations for a homogeneous reactor core concept of a 300 MWe LMFBR (e. g. SNR-300), but many boundary conditions are also characteristic for other core designs. A review of the relevant experiments is then made to correlate the available experimental information with these classified boundary conditions and to look at the resulting flowing and freezing processes. Boundary conditions that have been experimentally shown to be important are assigned high priorities. The data are specifically valued in relation to these boundary conditions of high priorities. The review includes the major experimental programs with published results. The discussion shows that the results from most clean condition tests for melt relocations are valuable for a better understanding of basic phenomena and analytical model development, but are not directly applicable to real accident conditions. The database for relevant boundary conditions from the ULOF scenario is limited and largely included in integral sequence tests from which quantitative information for modelling is difficult to obtain. Needs for additional investigations are identified. The suggestions are mainly restricted to investigations of the early phase of fuel removal. They are given with reference to candidate facilities and include relocations in the subassemblies and in the inter-subassembly gaps. Particular emphasis is put on the leading edge properties and possible driving forces to which more attention

  12. Survival of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors restored with different types of posts-and-core foundation restoration material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazari, Priscilla Cardoso; de Carvalho, Marco Aurélio; Del Bel Cury, Altair A; Magne, Pascal

    2018-05-01

    analysis (log-rank post hoc test at α=.05 for pairwise comparisons). None of the tested specimen withstood all 140 000 cycles. All specimens without a ferrule were affected by an initial failure phenomenon (wide gap at the lingual margin between the core foundation restoration/crown assembly and the root). NfPfP, NfPt, and NfPtB had similar survival (29649 to 30987 mean cycles until initial failure). NfPfB outperformed NfPt and NfPtB. None of the post-and-core foundation restoration materials were able to match the performance of the ferrule group FPf (72667 cycles). In all groups, 100% of failures were catastrophic. The survival of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors without a ferrule was slightly improved by the use of a fiber post with a bulk-fill composite resin core foundation restoration. However, none of the post-and-core techniques was able to compensate for the absence of a ferrule. The presence of the posts always adversely affected the failure mode. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry

  14. Core baffle for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, O.J.; Berringer, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns the design of the core of a LWR with a large number of fuel assemblies formed by fuel rods and kept in position by spacer grids. According to the invention, at the level of the spacer grids match plates are mounted with openings so the flow of coolant directed upwards will not be obstructed and a parallel bypass will be obtained in the space between the core barrel and the baffle plates. In case of an accident, this configuration reduces or avoids damage from overpressure reactions. (HP) [de

  15. Impact of wall materials and seeding gases on the pedestal and on core plasma performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wolfrum

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmas in machines with all metal plasma facing components have a lower Zeff, less radiation cooling in the scrape-off layer and divertor regions and are prone to impurity accumulation in the core. Higher gas puff and the seeding of low-Z impurities are applied to prevent impurity accumulation, to increase the frequency of edge localised modes and to cool the divertor. A lower power threshold for the transition from low-confinement mode to high confinement mode has been found in all metal wall machines when compared to carbon wall machines. The application of lithium before or during discharges can lead to ELM free H-modes. The seeding of high-Z impurities increases core radiation, reduces the power flux across the separatrix and, if applied in the right amount, does not lead to deterioration of the confinement. All these effects have in common that they can often be explained by the shape or position of the density profile. Not only the peakedness of the density profile in the core but also the position of the edge pressure gradient influences global confinement. It is shown how (i ionisation in the pedestal region due to higher reflection of deuterium from high-Z walls, (ii reduced recycling in consequence of lithium wall conditioning, (iii the fostering of edge modes with lithium dropping, (iv increased gas puff and (v the cooling of the scrape-off layer by medium-Z impurities such as nitrogen affect the edge density profile. The consequence is a shift in the pressure profile relative to the separatrix, leading to improved pedestal stability of H-mode plasmas when the direction is inwards.

  16. Long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1990-08-01

    This progress report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems during the six months from April to September 1988. Characteristics of the primary mechanism of aging embrittlement (i.e., spinodal decomposition of ferrite) and synergistic effects of alloying and impurity elements that influence the kinetics of the primary mechanism are discussed. Several secondary metallurgical processes of embrittlement, strongly dependent on the C, N, Ni, Mo, and Si content of various heats, are identified. Information on kinetics and data on impact properties are analyzed and correlated with microstructural characteristics to provide a unified method of extrapolating accelerated-aging data to reactor operating conditions. Fracture toughness data are presented for several heats of cast stainless steel aged at temperatures between 320 and 450 degrees C for times up to 10,000 h. Mechanical property data are analyzed to develop the procedure and correlations or predicting the kinetics and extent of embrittlement of reactor components from known material parameters. The method and examples of estimating the impact strength and fracture toughness of cast components during reactor service are described. The lower-bound values of impact strength and fracture toughness for cast stainless steels at LWR operating temperatures are defined. 42 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Estimation of fracture parameters in foam core materials using thermal techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Berggreen, Christian; Boyenval Langlois, C.

    2010-01-01

    is described. A mode I simulated crack in the form of a machined notch is used to establish the feasibility of the TSA approach to derive stress intensity factors for the foam material. The overall goal is to demonstrate that thermal techniques have the ability to provide deeper insight into the behaviour......The paper presents some initial work on establishing the stress state at a crack tip in PVC foam material using a non-contact infra-red technique known as thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA). A parametric study of the factors that may affect the thermoelastic response of the foam material...

  18. Current R and D status on material motion and interactions relevant to core disruptive accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Satoru [Safety Engineering Division, O-arai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, O-arai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-07-01

    In this paper, the current status of research and development activities are briefly reviewed on evaluation of material-coolant interactions and material movement and relocation relevant to the safety of liquid-metal fast reactors. Since the status of European activities are well summarized in other papers submitted to the present meeting, the activities in Japan and the United States are highlighted in this paper. The review includes: out-of-pile experiments, in-pile experiments and relevant computer code development. It is emphasized that improved understanding on material motion has contributed to establishing more realistic and rational safety evaluation methods, where various mitigation mechanisms are inherently effective. (author)

  19. Single-step generation of fluorophore-encapsulated gold nanoparticle core-shell materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardar, R; Shem, P M; Pecchia-Bekkum, C; Bjorge, N S; Shumaker-Parry, J S

    2010-01-01

    We report a simple route to produce fluorophore-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in a single step under aqueous conditions using the fluorophore 1-pyrenemethylamine (PMA). Different amounts of PMA were used and the resulting core-shell gold nanoparticles were analyzed using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Electron microscopy analysis shows nanoparticles consisting of a gold nanoparticle core which is encapsulated with a lower contrast shell. In the UV-visible spectra, we observed a significant red shift (37 nm) of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption maximum (λ max ) compared to citrate-stabilized AuNPs of a similar size. We attribute the prominent LSPR wavelength shift for PMA-AuNP conjugates to the increase in the local dielectric environment near the gold nanoparticles due to the shell formation. This simple, aqueous-based synthesis is a new approach to the production of fluorophore-encapsulated AuNPs that could be applicable in biological sensing systems and photonic device fabrication.

  20. In core instrumentation for online nuclear heating measurements of material testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynard, C.; Andre, J.; Brun, J.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Merroun, O.; Zerega, Y.; Lyoussi, A.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J-P.; Fourmentel, D.; Glayse, W.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Iracane, D.; Villard, J.-F.

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on nuclear heating. This work belongs to a new advanced research program called IN-CORE which means 'Instrumentation for Nuclear radiations and Calorimetry Online in REactor' between the LCP (University of Provence-CNRS) and the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) - Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) program. This program started in September 2009 and is dedicated to the conception and the design of an innovative mobile experimental device coupling several sensors and ray detectors for on line measurements of relevant physical parameters (photonic heating, neutronic flux ...) and for an accurate parametric mapping of experimental channels in the JHR Core. The work presented below is the first step of this program and concerns a brief state of the art related to measurement methods of nuclear heating phenomena in research reactor in general and MTR in particular. A special care is given to gamma heating measurements. A first part deals with numerical codes and models. The second one presents instrumentation divided into various kinds of sensor such as calorimeter measurements and gamma ionization chamber measurements. Their basic principles, characteristics such as metrological parameters, operating mode, disadvantages/advantages, ... are discussed. (author)

  1. Results of recent reactor-material tests on dispersal of oxide fuel from a disrupted core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; Wilson, R.J.; Vetter, D.L.; Erickson, E.G.; Dewey, G.

    1985-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations and related analyses are reported addressing the dispersal of molten oxide fuel from a disrupted core via various available pathways for the CRBR system. These investigations included the GAPFLOW tests in which pressure-driven and gravity drainage tests were performed using dispersal pathways mocking up the intersubassembly gaps, the CAMEL C6 and C7 tests in which molten fuel entered sodium-filled control assembly ducts under prototypic thermal-hydraulic conditions, and the Lower Internals Drainage (LID) tests in which molten fuel drained downward through simulated below-core structure (orifice plate stacks) as the bottom of control assembly ducts. The results of SHOTGUN tests addressing basic freezing of molten UO 2 and UO 2 /metal mixtures flowing through circular tubes are also reported. Test results have invariably shown the existance of stable UO 2 crusts on the inside surfaces of the flow paths. Appreciable removal of fuel was indicated prior to freezing-induced immobilization. Application of heat transfer models based upon the presence of stable, insulating fuel crusts tends to overpredict the removal process

  2. Spirobifluorene Core-Based Novel Hole Transporting Materials for Red Phosphorescence OLEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanaskanda Braveenth

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new hole transporting materials, named HTM 1A and HTM 1B, were designed and synthesized in significant yields using the well-known Buchwald Hartwig and Suzuki cross- coupling reactions. Both materials showed higher decomposition temperatures (over 450 °C at 5% weight reduction and HTM 1B exhibited a higher glass transition temperature of 180 °C. Red phosphorescence-based OLED devices were fabricated to analyze the device performances compared to Spiro-NPB and NPB as reference hole transporting materials. Devices consist of hole transporting material as HTM 1B showed better maximum current and power efficiencies of 16.16 cd/A and 11.17 lm/W, at the same time it revealed an improved external quantum efficiency of 13.64%. This efficiency is considerably higher than that of Spiro-NPB and NPB-based reference devices.

  3. Testing round robin on cyclic crack growth of low and medium sulfur A533-B steels in LWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, H.; Komai, K.; Nakajima, H.; Higuchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    After the facts of environmentally assisted crack growth of low alloy steel was first observed when cyclically loaded in high temperature water. The subject has been extensively studied in connection with the evaluation of the integrity of LWR pressure boundary materials. In 1977, International Cooperative Group on Cyclic Crack Growth Rate Testing Evaluation (the ICCGR group) was organized for more systematic and effective solution of the problem. Successful results have been reported on the programs of the ICCGR activity, particularly in the promotion of a couple of programs of testing round robin and the associated research. JAERI also organized a domestic group of 15 organizations as the Corrosion Fatigue Subcommittee(JCF) of the LWR Safety Research Committee to carry out the similar test program. The group has been evaluating the behavior of steels representing the range of quality for the existing Japanese LWR plants. This paper describes the present status of the Japanese domestic testing round robin and related research especially focused on the test methodology

  4. Effect of varying core thicknesses and artificial aging on the color difference of different all-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikicier, Sibel; Ayyildiz, Simel; Ozen, Julide; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2014-11-01

    Clinicians should reserve all-ceramics with high translucency for clinical applications in which high-level esthetics are required. Furthermore, it is unclear whether a correlation exists between core thickness and color change. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of different core thicknesses and artificial aging on the color stability of three all-ceramic systems. Ninety disc-shaped cores with different thicknesses (0.5 mm, 0.8 mm and 1.0 mm) were prepared from three all-ceramic systems, In-Ceram Alumina (IC), IPS e.max Press (EM) and Katana (K). The colors of the samples were measured with a spectrophotometer and the color parameters (L*, a*, b*, ΔE) were calculated according to the CIE L*a*b* (Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage) color system before and after aging. The effects of aging on color parameters were statistically significant (p artificial aging affected color stability of the all-ceramic materials tested.

  5. From harmful Microcystis blooms to multi-functional core-double-shell microsphere bio-hydrochar materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lei; Pan, Gang

    2017-11-13

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) induced by eutrophication is becoming a serious global environmental problem affecting public health and aquatic ecological sustainability. A novel strategy for the utilization of biomass from HABs was developed by converting the algae cells into hollow mesoporous bio-hydrochar microspheres via hydrothermal carbonization method. The hollow microspheres were used as microreactors and carriers for constructing CaO 2 core-mesoporous shell-CaO 2 shell microspheres (OCRMs). The CaO 2 shells could quickly increase dissolved oxygen to extremely anaerobic water in the initial 40 min until the CaO 2 shells were consumed. The mesoporous shells continued to act as regulators restricting the release of oxygen from CaO 2 cores. The oxygen-release time using OCRMs was 7 times longer than when directly using CaO 2 . More interestingly, OCRMs presented a high phosphate removal efficiency (95.6%) and prevented the pH of the solution from rising to high levels in comparison with directly adding CaO 2 due to the OH - controlled-release effect of OCRMs. The distinct core-double-shell micro/nanostructure endowed the OCRMs with triple functions for oxygen controlled-release, phosphorus removal and less impact on water pH. The study is to explore the possibility to prepare smarter bio-hydrochar materials by utilizing algal blooms.

  6. Characterization of a Porous Carbon Material Functionalized with Cobalt-Oxide/Cobalt Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.; Rasul, Shahid; Roldan-Gutierrez, Manuel A.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2016-01-01

    A nanoporous carbon (C) material, functionalized with Cobalt-Oxide/Cobalt (CoO/Co) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs), was structurally and chemically characterized with transmission electron microcopy (TEM) while its electrochemical response

  7. The effects of radiations on materials for core internals of PWRs: EDF-CEA-Framatome joint research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathan, N. de; Buisine, D.; Goltrant, O.; Dubuisson, P.; Scott, P.; Deydier, D.; Trenty, A.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on materials for the core internals of PWRs (austenitic stainless steels) are potentially a significant economic and regulatory concern for EDF. The maintenance strategy for EDF relies primarily on in-service inspection, safety analysis and characterization of materials irradiated in-service. In addition, to anticipate likely future behaviour of highly irradiated materials, EDF has initiated, in collaboration with CEA and Framatome, a large R and D programme designed to (i) evaluate the effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking sensitivity (IASCC), and (ii) identify possible replacement materials. The programme, currently in progress, involves mechanical tests (tensile, fracture toughness, irradiation creep), stress corrosion cracking tests (in flux and out of flux) and metallurgical examinations. The test materials are being irradiated in several experimental reactors in France and Russia up to PWR-related end of life doses (∼ 80 dpa) at several PWR-relevant irradiation temperatures (300-400 deg. C). The presentation will describe the objectives and early results of this ongoing R and D programme. (author)

  8. Design and preliminary analysis of in-vessel core catcher made of high-temperature ceramics material in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hong; Ma Li; Wang Junrong; Zhou Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    In order to protect the interior wall of pressure vessel from melting, as an additional way to external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC), a kind of in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) made of high-temperature ceramics material was designed. Through the high-temperature and thermal-resistance characteristic of IVCC, the distributing of heat flux was optimized. The results show that the downward average heat flux from melt in ceramic layer reduces obviously and the interior wall of pressure vessel doesn't melt, keeping its integrity perfectly. Increasing of upward heat flux from metallic layer makes the upper plenum structure's temperature ascend, but the temperature doesn't exceed its melting point. In conclusion, the results indicate the potential feasibility of IVCC made of high-temperature ceramics material. (authors)

  9. Nano-magnetic particles used in biomedicine: core and coating materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Z; Karimi, L; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications have been developed by many researchers. Separation, immunoassay, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia are enhanced by the use of suitable magnetic nanoparticles and coating materials in the form of ferrofluids. Due to their low biocompatibility and low dispersion in water solutions, nanoparticles that are used for biomedical applications require surface treatment. Various kinds of coating materials including organic materials (polymers), inorganic metals (gold, platinum) or metal oxides (aluminum oxide, cobalt oxide) have been attracted during the last few years. Based on the recent advances and the importance of nanomedicine in human life, this paper attempts to give a brief summary on the different ferrite nano-magnetic particles and coatings used in nanomedicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety aspects and operating experience of LWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Yoshioka, T.; Toyota, M.; Hinoki, M.

    1977-01-01

    To develop nuclear power generation for the future, it is necessary to put further emphasis on safety assurance and to endeavour to devise measures to improve plant availability, based on the careful analysis of causes that reduce plant availability. The paper discusses the results of studies on the following items from such viewpoints: (1) Safety and operating experience of LWR nuclear power plants in Japan: operating experience with LWRs; improvements in LWR design during the past ten years; analysis of the factors affecting plant availability; (2) Assurance of safety and measures to increase availability: measures for safety and environmental protection; measures to reduce radiation exposure of employees; appropriateness of maintenance and inspection work; measures to increase plant availability; measures to improve reliability of equipment and components; (3) Future technical problems. (author)

  11. Improving the safety of LWR power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Study to identify current, potential research issues and efforts for improving the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plants. This final report describes the work accomplished, the results obtained, the problem areas, and the recommended solutions. Specifically, for each of the issues identified in this report for improving the safety of LWR power plants, a description is provided in detail of the safety significance, the current status (including information sources, status of technical knowledge, problem solution and current activities), and the suggestions for further research and development. Further, the issues are ranked for action into high, medium, and low priority with respect to primarily (a) improved safety (e.g. potential reduction in public risk and occupational exposure), and secondly (b) reduction in safety-related costs

  12. Development of top nozzle for Korean standard LWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. K.; Kim, I. K.; Choi, K. S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. N.; Kim, H. K. [KNFC, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    Performance evaluation was executed for each component and its assembly for the deduced Top Nozzles to develop the new Top Nozzle for LWR. This new Top Nozzle is composed of the optimum components among the derived Top Nozzles that have been evaluated in the viewpoint of structural integrity, simpleness of dismantle and assembly, manufacturability etc. In this study, the developed Top Nozzle satisfied all the related design criteria. In special, it makes fuel repair time reduced by assembling and disassembling itself as one body, and improves Fuel Assembly holddown ability by revising the design parameters of its spring and the structural integrity through the betterment of its geometrical shpae of Flange and Holddown Plate as compared with the existing LWR Top Nozzles.

  13. LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program and initial test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhlestein, L.D.; Hilliard, R.K.; Bloom, G.R.; McCormack, J.D.; Rahn, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program is described. The LACE program is being performed at the Hanford Engineer Development Laboratory (operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company) and the initial tests are sponsored by EPRI. The objectives of the LACE program are: to demonstrate, at large-scale, inherent radioactive aerosol retention behavior for postulated high consequence LWR accident situations; and to provide a data base to be used for aerosol behavior . Test results from the first phase of the LACE program are presented and discussed. Three large-scale scoping tests, simulating a containment bypass accident sequence, demonstrated the extent of agglomeration and deposition of aerosols occurring in the pipe pathway and vented auxiliary building under realistic accident conditions. Parameters varied during the scoping tests were aerosol type and steam condensation

  14. Development of LWR fuel performance code FEMAXI-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe

    2006-01-01

    LWR fuel performance code: FEMAXI-6 (Finite Element Method in AXIs-symmetric system) is a representative fuel analysis code in Japan. Development history, background, design idea, features of model, and future are stated. Characteristic performance of LWR fuel and analysis code, what is model, development history of FEMAXI, use of FEMAXI code, fuel model, and a special feature of FEMAXI model is described. As examples of analysis, PCMI (Pellet-Clad Mechanical Interaction), fission gas release, gap bonding, and fission gas bubble swelling are reported. Thermal analysis and dynamic analysis system of FEMAXI-6, function block at one time step of FEMAXI-6, analytical example of PCMI in the output increase test by FEMAXI-III, analysis of fission gas release in Halden reactor by FEMAXI-V, comparison of the center temperature of fuel in Halden reactor, and analysis of change of diameter of fuel rod in high burn up BWR fuel are shown. (S.Y.)

  15. Core performance of equilibrium fast reactors for different coolant materials and fuel types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Parametric studies with several coolant and fuel materials in the equilibrium state are performed for fast reactors in which natural uranium is fed and all of the actinides are confined. Sodium, sodium-potassium, lead, lead-bismuth and helium coolant materials, and oxide, nitride and metal fuels are employed to compare the neutronic characteristics in the equilibrium state. As to the criticality performance, sodium-potassium shows the best performance among the liquid metal coolants and the metallic fuel indicates the best performance

  16. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  17. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  18. A resin composite material containing an eugenol derivative for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaroof, A; Rojo, L; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2016-02-01

    To formulate and evaluate new dual cured resin composite based on the inclusion of eugenyl methacrylate monomer (EgMA) with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin systems for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration of endodontically treated teeth. EgMA was synthesized and incorporated at 5% (BTEg5) or 10% (BTEg10) into dual-cure formulations. Curing properties, viscosity, Tg, radiopacity, static and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined and compared with Clearfil™DC Core-Plus, a commercial dual-cure, two-component composite. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey's post-hoc test. The experimental composites were successfully prepared, which exhibited excellent curing depths of 4.9, 4.7 and 4.2 mm for BTEg0, BTEg5 and BTEg10 respectively, which were significantly higher than Clearfil™DC. However, the inclusion of EgMA initially led to a lower degree of cure, which increased when measured at 24 h with values comparable to formulations without EgMA, indicating post-curing. The inclusion of EgMA also lowered the polymerization exotherm thereby reducing the potential of thermal damage to host tissue. Both thermal and viscoelastic analyses confirmed the ability of the monomer to reduce the stiffness of the composites by forming a branched network. The compressive strength of BTEg5 was significantly higher than the control whilst flexural strength increased significantly from 95.9 to 114.8 MPa (BTEg5) and 121.9 MPa (BTEg10). Radiopacity of the composites was equivalent to ∼3 mm Al allowing efficient diagnosis. The incorporation of EgMA within polymerizable formulations provides a novel approach to prepare reinforced resin composite material for intracanal post cementation and core build-up and the potential to impart antibacterial properties of eugenol to endodontic restorations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Equipment designs for the spent LWR fuel dry storage demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, R.J.; Kurasch, D.H.; Hardin, R.T.; Schmitten, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    In conjunction with the Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program (SFHPP) equipment has been designed, fabricated and successfully utilized to demonstrate the packaging and interim dry storage of spent LWR fuel. Surface and near surface storage configurations containing PWR fuel assemblies are currently on test and generating baseline data. Specific areas of hardware design focused upon include storage cell components and the support related equipment associated with encapsulation, leak testing, lag storage, and emplacement operations

  20. Safety-related LWR research. Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueper, R.

    1994-06-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre (KfK) has been part of the Nuclear Safety Research Project (PSF) since 1990. The present annual report 1993 summarizes the results on LWR safety. The research tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report correspond to the status at the end of 1993. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Baseline descriptions for LWR spent fuel storage, handling, and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, J.W.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1978-04-01

    Baseline descriptions for the storage, handling, and transportation of reactor spent fuel are provided. The storage modes described include light water reactor (LWR) pools, away-from-reactor basins, dry surface storage, reprocessing-facility interim storage pools, and deep geologic storage. Land and water transportation are also discussed. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security as part of the Sandia Laboratories Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program. 45 figs, 4 tables

  2. Baseline descriptions for LWR spent fuel storage, handling, and transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, J.W.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1978-04-01

    Baseline descriptions for the storage, handling, and transportation of reactor spent fuel are provided. The storage modes described include light water reactor (LWR) pools, away-from-reactor basins, dry surface storage, reprocessing-facility interim storage pools, and deep geologic storage. Land and water transportation are also discussed. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security as part of the Sandia Laboratories Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program. 45 figs, 4 tables.

  3. Standard casks for the transport of LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, P.

    1986-01-01

    During the past decade, TRANSNUCLEAIRE has developed, licensed and marketed a family of standard casks for the transport of spent fuel from LWR reactors to reprocessing plants and the ancillary equipments necessary for their operation and transport. A large number of these casks have been manufactured in different countries and are presently used for european and intercontinental transports. The main advantages of these casks are: large payload, moderate cost, reliability, standardisation facilitating fabrication, operation and spare part supply [fr

  4. Investigation of valve failure problems in LWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    An analysis of component failures from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank shows that for both PWR and BWR plants the component category most responsible for approximately 19.3% of light water reactor (LWR) power plant shutdowns. This investigation by Burns and Roe, Inc. shows that the greatest cause of shutdowns in LWRs due to valve failures is leakage from valve stem packing. Both BWR plants and PWR plants have stem leakage problems

  5. A classification scheme for LWR fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.S.; Williamson, D.A.; Notz, K.J.

    1988-11-01

    With over 100 light water nuclear reactors operating nationwide, representing designs by four primary vendors, and with reload fuel manufactured by these vendors and additional suppliers, a wide variety of fuel assembly types are in existence. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, both the Systems Integration Program and the Characteristics Data Base project required a classification scheme for these fuels. This scheme can be applied to other areas and is expected to be of value to many Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management programs. To develop the classification scheme, extensive information on the fuel assemblies that have been and are being manufactured by the various nuclear fuel vendors was compiled, reviewed, and evaluated. It was determined that it is possible to characterize assemblies in a systematic manner, using a combination of physical factors. A two-stage scheme was developed consisting of 79 assembly types, which are grouped into 22 assembly classes. The assembly classes are determined by the general design of the reactor cores in which the assemblies are, or were, used. The general BWR and PWR classes are divided differently but both are based on reactor core configuration. 2 refs., 15 tabs.

  6. A classification scheme for LWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.S.; Williamson, D.A.; Notz, K.J.

    1988-11-01

    With over 100 light water nuclear reactors operating nationwide, representing designs by four primary vendors, and with reload fuel manufactured by these vendors and additional suppliers, a wide variety of fuel assembly types are in existence. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, both the Systems Integration Program and the Characteristics Data Base project required a classification scheme for these fuels. This scheme can be applied to other areas and is expected to be of value to many Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management programs. To develop the classification scheme, extensive information on the fuel assemblies that have been and are being manufactured by the various nuclear fuel vendors was compiled, reviewed, and evaluated. It was determined that it is possible to characterize assemblies in a systematic manner, using a combination of physical factors. A two-stage scheme was developed consisting of 79 assembly types, which are grouped into 22 assembly classes. The assembly classes are determined by the general design of the reactor cores in which the assemblies are, or were, used. The general BWR and PWR classes are divided differently but both are based on reactor core configuration. 2 refs., 15 tabs

  7. Proceedings of the international conference on irradiation behaviour of metallic materials for fast reactor core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Dupouy, J.M.

    In this conference are presented papers dealing with swelling of metals and alloys, (and specially ferritic steels), structural evolution and stability under irradiation, modifications of mechanical properties, consequences on the behaviour of fuel elements and the optimization of materials selection, and irradiation creep [fr

  8. Easily oxidizable triarylamine materials with naphthalene and binaphthalene core: structure-properties relationship

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kerner, L.; Gmucová, K.; Kožíšek, J.; Petříček, Václav; Putala, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 44 (2016), s. 7081-7092 ISSN 0040-4020 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : triphenylamine * carbazole * regioselective amination * Sonogashira coupling * Negishi alkynylation * hole-transporting materials * OLED * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.651, year: 2016

  9. Simulated Fission Gas Behavior in Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mo, Kun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harp, Jason [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-15

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well-understood. However, existing experimental post-irradiation examination (PIE) data are limited to the research reactor conditions, which involve lower fuel temperature compared to LWR conditions. This lack of appropriate experimental data significantly affects the development of fuel performance codes that can precisely predict the microstructure evolution and property degradation at LWR conditions, and therefore evaluate the qualification of U3Si2 as an AFT for LWRs. Considering the high cost, long timescale, and restrictive access of the in-pile irradiation experiments, this study aims to utilize ion irradiation to simulate the inpile behavior of the U3Si2 fuel. Both in situ TEM ion irradiation and ex situ high-energy ATLAS ion irradiation experiments were employed to simulate different types of microstructure modifications in U3Si2. Multiple PIE techniques were used or will be used to quantitatively analyze the microstructure evolution induced by ion irradiation so as to provide valuable reference for the development of fuel performance code prior to the availability of the in-pile irradiation data.

  10. Assessment of LWR piping design loading based on plant operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, P.O.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of this study has been to: (1) identify current Light Water Reactor (LWR) piping design load parameters, (2) identify significant actual LWR piping loads from plant operating experience, (3) perform a comparison of these two sets of data and determine the significance of any differences, and (4) make an evaluation of the load representation in current LWR piping design practice, in view of plant operating experience with respect to piping behavior and response to loading

  11. PIE technology on mechanical tests for HTTR core component and structural materials developed at Research Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizaki, Minoru; Honda, Junichi; Usami, Kouji; Ouchi, Asao; Oeda, Etsuro; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2001-02-01

    The high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) with the target operation temperature of 950degC established the first criticality on November, 1998 based on a large amount of R and D results on fuel and materials. In such R and D works, the development of reactor materials are one of the key issues from the view point of reactor environments such as extremely high temperature, neutron irradiation and so on for the HTTR. The Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) had carried out much kind of post irradiation examinations (PIEs) on core component and pressure vessel materials for during more than a quarter century. And obtained data played an important role in development, characterization and licensing of those materials for the HTTR. This paper describes the PIE technology developed at RHL and typical results on mechanical tests such as elevated temperature tensile and creep rupture tests for Hasteloy-X, Incolloy 800H and so on, and Charpy impact, J IC fracture toughness, K Id fracture toughness and small punch tests for normalized and tempered 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel from historical view. In addition, an electrochemical test technique established for investigating the irradiation embrittlement mechanism on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel is also mentioned. (author)

  12. Proceedings of JSPS-CAS core university program seminar on target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Z.Z.; Norimatsu, T.

    2008-02-01

    China-Japan Bilateral Collaboration on the Study of Ultrahigh Density Plasma has been established since 2001 and its second phase is conducting from 2006. Target materials are key issue of the Study of Ultrahigh Density Plasma, and the second of target fabrication was opened at the 2005 Workshop on Ultrahigh Density Plasma Production, Application and theory for Laser Fusion at Nine Village Valley, Sichuan. It achieved great successes in high-level academic exchange and efficient presentation of state-of-the-art development in this research field. However, in order to attract greater attention and participation of more scientists in these fields, the organizing committee decided to further specify and enlarge the scale of the workshop to be China-Japan Bilateral Seminar on Target Materials 2007 in Huang Shan in southern Anhui Province of east China. The seminar had more than 20 participants from 7 universities and 3 institutes in Japan and China. They exchanged state-of-the-art development in nanomaterials, capsule fabrication and low density materials toward target of high power laser. This issue is the collection of the paper presented at the seminar. The 17 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. Perceptions of LWR risk for decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.; Asselin, S.

    1984-01-01

    The Industry Degraded Core (IDCOR) Program was designed to develop a comprehensive, technically sound position on the issues related to potential accidents in light water reactors. One of the goals is to acquire knowledge and data so that a more realistic approach to the problem is possible. Some of the IDCOR tasks develop information in a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) framework. The PRA approach is structured upon reliability characteristics for individual components, such as pumps, valves and relays, which can be used to predict the frequency of system failures. System failure combinations can then be used to predict the probability of undesirable plant response to given initiating events. The IDCOR PRA tasks provide a significant amount of information related to the response of the plant to severe accidents. This information has been derived in a logical and consistent manner and so provides a coherent and rational basis for decision-making

  14. Material Issues of Blanket Systems for Fusion Reactors - Compatibility with Cooling Water -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Yukio; Tsukada, Takashi; Jitsukawa, Shiro

    Environmental assisted cracking (EAC) is one of the material issues for the reactor core components of light water power reactors(LWRs). Much experience and knowledge have been obtained about the EAC in the LWR field. They will be useful to prevent the EAC of water-cooled blanket systems of fusion reactors. For the austenitic stainless steels and the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels, they clarifies that the EAC in a water-cooled blanket does not seem to be acritical issue. However, some uncertainties about influences on water temperatures, water chemistries and stress conditions may affect on the EAC. Considerations and further investigations elucidating the uncertainties are discussed.

  15. Stress relaxation and creep of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core support ceramic materials: a literature search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.; Tennery, V.J.

    1980-05-01

    Creep and stress relaxation in structural ceramics are important properties to the high-temperature design and safety analysis of the core support structure of the HTGR. The ability of the support structure to function for the lifetime of the reactor is directly related to the allowable creep strain and the ability of the structure to withstand thermal transients. The thermal-mechanical response of the core support pads to steady-state stresses and potential thermal transients depends on variables, including the ability of the ceramics to undergo some stress relaxation in relatively short times. Creep and stress relaxation phenomena in structural ceramics of interest were examined. Of the materials considered (fused silica, alumina, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide), alumina has been more extensively investigated in creep. Activation energies reported varied between 482 and 837 kJ/mole, and consequently, variations in the assigned mechanisms were noted. Nabarro-Herring creep is considered as the primary creep mechanism and no definite grain size dependence has been identified. Results for silicon nitride are in better agreement with reported activation energies. No creep data were found for fused silica or silicon carbide and no stress relaxation data were found for any of the candidate materials. While creep and stress relaxation are similar and it is theoretically possible to derive the value of one property when the other is known, no explicit demonstrated relationship exists between the two. For a given structural ceramic material, both properties must be experimentally determined to obtain the information necessary for use in high-temperature design and safety analyses

  16. Synthesis and properties of Pr-substituted MgZn ferrites for core materials and high frequency applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhtar, Muhammad Waqas; Irfan, Muhammad [Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Ali, Ihsan [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Akhtar, Majid Niaz [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, Muhammad Azhar [Department of Physics, Islamia University, Bahawalpur (Pakistan); Abbas, Ghazanfar [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Rana, M.U. [Center of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Ali, Akbar [Department of Basic Sciences, Riphah International University, Islamabad-44000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Mukhtar, E-mail: ahmadmr25@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-05-01

    A series of single phase spinel ferrites having chemical formula Mg{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Pr{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} (x=0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25) were prepared using the sol–gel technique after sintering at 700 °C. The thermal decomposition behavior of an as prepared powder was investigated by means of DTA/TGA analyses. The sintered powders were then characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope and vibrating sample magnetometer. X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the single phase spinel structure of prepared ferrites without the presence of any impurity phase. The value of lattice parameter (a) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x) into the spinel lattice. The grain size estimated from electron microscope images is in the range of 2.75–5.4 µm which confirms the spinel crystalline nature of the investigated samples. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) decreases whereas coercivity (H{sub c}) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x). The measured parameters suggest that these materials are favorable for high frequency applications and as core materials. - Highlights: • Pr-substituted spinel ferrites synthesized by autocombustion route have been investigated. • The average grain size was in the range of 2.75–5.4 µm estimated by SEM technique. • The (M{sub s}) decreases whereas (H{sub c}) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x). • These parameters are favorable for high frequency applications and as core materials.

  17. Synthesis and properties of Pr-substituted MgZn ferrites for core materials and high frequency applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhtar, Muhammad Waqas; Irfan, Muhammad; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Ali, Ihsan; Akhtar, Majid Niaz; Khan, Muhammad Azhar; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Rana, M.U.; Ali, Akbar; Ahmad, Mukhtar

    2015-01-01

    A series of single phase spinel ferrites having chemical formula Mg 0.5 Zn 0.5 Pr x Fe 2−x O 4 (x=0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25) were prepared using the sol–gel technique after sintering at 700 °C. The thermal decomposition behavior of an as prepared powder was investigated by means of DTA/TGA analyses. The sintered powders were then characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope and vibrating sample magnetometer. X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the single phase spinel structure of prepared ferrites without the presence of any impurity phase. The value of lattice parameter (a) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x) into the spinel lattice. The grain size estimated from electron microscope images is in the range of 2.75–5.4 µm which confirms the spinel crystalline nature of the investigated samples. The saturation magnetization (M s ) decreases whereas coercivity (H c ) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x). The measured parameters suggest that these materials are favorable for high frequency applications and as core materials. - Highlights: • Pr-substituted spinel ferrites synthesized by autocombustion route have been investigated. • The average grain size was in the range of 2.75–5.4 µm estimated by SEM technique. • The (M s ) decreases whereas (H c ) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x). • These parameters are favorable for high frequency applications and as core materials

  18. Bidirectional Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Foam Core Materials Using DIC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taher, Siavash Talebi; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; M Dulieu-Barton, Janice

    2011-01-01

    mechanical properties at room and at elevated temperatures. The MAF enables the realization of pure compression or high compression to shear bidirectional loading conditions that is not possible with conventional Arcan fixtures. The MAF is attached to a standard universal test machine equiped...... with an environmental chamber using specially designed grips that allow the specimen to rotate, and hence reduces paristic effects due to misalignment. The objective is to measure the unidirectional and bidirectional mechanical properties of PVC foam materials at elevated tempreature using digital image correlation...

  19. Analysis and synthesis of the theoretical studies performed on the control and safety of LWR's burning plutonium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basselier, J.; Renard, A.; Holzer, R.; Hnilica, K.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents the comparative investigations of parameters for plutonium fuelled power stations (PWR and BWR) under steady state and dynamic conditions for typical accidents. The recycling of about 30% of mixed oxide fuel in the large LWR cores should not induce special problems, if some cautions are taken in core design to minimize the differences with UO 2 cores taking into account a limited margin fo uncertainty. The influence on the core behaviour, during the investigated accidents, is not very important and does not induce restrictions for at least a 30% Pu fraction in the core. The operation with high plutonium amounts may be considered. From the steady state and safety point-of-views, the maximum allowable quantity into the cores should be sought for each reactor. In principle, a 100% UO 2 -PuO 2 core could be operated under certain conditions of loading pattern and shutdown margins. For what concerns the storage and handling, the studies show the following results: storage pool design with respect to criticality will not be affected by the use of UO 2 -PuO 2 fuel asemblies

  20. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu

    2002-01-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  2. In-core instrumentation and in-situ measurement in connection with fuel behaviour. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The subject of this meeting has been touched on briefly in most of the Specialist's and topical meetings related to fuel behaviour. On the basis of the conclusions and recommendations of these meetings the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) recommended the Agency to organize a dedicated Specialist's Meeting on the subject. The twenty one papers covered the instrumentation, sensors, methods and computer codes currently used in Material Test Reactor (MTR) and power reactors as well as improved instrumentation and methods. The meeting acknowledged the fast development of fuel modelling and therefore the growing need of dedicated high burnup fuel experiments carried out in MTR reactors on refabricated rods from power reactors. In order to reduce safety margins in power reactors, thus improving economics, the necessity to develop more sophisticated on-line calculations, based on improved sensors, was recognized, although this development is limited by insufficient knowledge of the mechanisms involved. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. Physical properties of molten core materials: Zr-Ni and Zr-Cr alloys measured by electrostatic levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohishi, Yuji, E-mail: ohishi@see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Kondo, Toshiki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Ishikawa, Takehiko [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); SOKEN-DAI (Graduate University for Advanced Studies) (Japan); Okada, Junpei T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan); Watanabe, Yuki [Advanced Engineering Services Co. Ltd. (Japan); Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Yamanaka, Shinsuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    It is important to understand the behaviors of molten core materials to investigate the progression of a core meltdown accident. In the early stages of bundle degradation, low-melting-temperature liquid phases are expected to form via the eutectic reaction between Zircaloy and stainless steel. The main component of Zircaloy is Zr and those of stainless steel are Fe, Ni, and Cr. Our group has previously reported physical property data such as viscosity, density, and surface tension for Zr-Fe liquid alloys using an electrostatic levitation technique. In this study, we report the viscosity, density, and surface tension of Zr-Ni and Zr-Cr liquid alloys (Zr{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} (x = 0.12 and 0.24) and Zr{sub 0.77}Cr{sub 0.23}) using the electrostatic levitation technique. - Highlights: • The physical properties of Zr-Ni and Zr-Cr liquid alloys have been measured Zr{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} (x = 0.12 and 0.24) and Zr{sub 77}Cr{sub 23}. • The measurement was conducted using the electrostatic levitation technique. • The density, viscosity, and surface tension of each liquid alloy were measured.

  4. Physical properties of molten core materials: Zr-Ni and Zr-Cr alloys measured by electrostatic levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohishi, Yuji; Kondo, Toshiki; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Okada, Junpei T.; Watanabe, Yuki; Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    It is important to understand the behaviors of molten core materials to investigate the progression of a core meltdown accident. In the early stages of bundle degradation, low-melting-temperature liquid phases are expected to form via the eutectic reaction between Zircaloy and stainless steel. The main component of Zircaloy is Zr and those of stainless steel are Fe, Ni, and Cr. Our group has previously reported physical property data such as viscosity, density, and surface tension for Zr-Fe liquid alloys using an electrostatic levitation technique. In this study, we report the viscosity, density, and surface tension of Zr-Ni and Zr-Cr liquid alloys (Zr 1-x Ni x (x = 0.12 and 0.24) and Zr 0.77 Cr 0.23 ) using the electrostatic levitation technique. - Highlights: • The physical properties of Zr-Ni and Zr-Cr liquid alloys have been measured Zr 1-x Ni x (x = 0.12 and 0.24) and Zr 77 Cr 23 . • The measurement was conducted using the electrostatic levitation technique. • The density, viscosity, and surface tension of each liquid alloy were measured.

  5. Nonlinear analysis of LWR components: areas of investigation/benefits/recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S. J. [ed.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify specific topics of investigation into design procedures, design concepts, methods of analysis, testing practices, and standards which are characterized by nonlinear behavior (both geometric and material) and which are considered to offer some economic and/or technical benefits to the LWR industry (excluding piping). In this study these topics were collected, compiled, and subjectively evaluated as to their potential benefit. The topics considered to have the greatest benefit/impact potential are discussed. The topics of investigation were found to fall basically into three areas: component, code interpretation, and load/failure mechanism. The topics are arbitrarily reorganized into six areas of investigation: Fracture, Fatigue, Vibration/Dynamic/Seismic, Plasticity, Component/Computational Considerations, and Code Interpretation.

  6. Experimental investigation of material chemical effects on emergency core cooling pump suction filter performance after loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon; Park, Byung Gi; Kim, Chang Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Integral tests of head loss through an emergency core cooling filter screen are conducted, simulating reactor building environmental conditions for 30 days after a loss of coolant accident. A test rig with five individual loops each of whose chamber is established to test chemical product formation and measure the head loss through a sample filter. The screen area at each chamber and the amounts of reactor building materials are scaled down according to specific plant condition. A series of tests have been performed to investigate the effects of calcium-silicate, reactor building spray, existence of calcium-silicate with tri-sodium phosphate (TSP), and composition of materials. The results showed that head loss across the chemical bed with even a small amount of calcium-silicate insulation instantaneously increased as soon as TSP was added to the test solution. Also, the head loss across the filter screen is strongly affected by spray duration and the head loss increase is rapid at the early stage, because of high dissolution and precipitation of aluminum and zinc. After passivation of aluminum and zinc by corrosion, the head loss increase is much slowed down and is mainly induced by materials such as calcium, silicon, and magnesium leached from NUKON TM and concrete. Furthermore, it is newly found that the spay buffer agent, tri-sodium phosphate, to form protective coating on the aluminum surface and reduce aluminum leaching is not effective for a large amount of aluminum and a long spray.

  7. Safe core management with burnable absorbers in WWERs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this TECDOC is to present state of the art information on burnable poisoned fuel during the CRP. It is based on experimental evidence and on the utilization of theoretical models and will help achieve improvements in safety and economy of LWR cores with hexagonal geometries. 149 refs, figs and tabs

  8. Mathematical modelling of powder material motion and transportation in high-temperature flow core during plasma coatings application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovich, V. I.; Giorbelidze, M. G.

    2018-03-01

    A problem of mathematical modelling of powder material motion and transportation in gas thermal flow core has been addressed. Undertaken studies indicate significant impact on dynamics of motion of sprayed particles of phenomenological law for drag coefficient and accounting momentum loss of a plasma jet upon acceleration of these particles and their diameter. It is determined that at great dispersion of spraying particles, they reach detail surface at different velocity and significant particles separation takes place at spraying spot. According to the results of mathematical modelling, requirements for admissible dispersion of diameters of particles used for spraying have been formulated. Research has also allowed reducing separation of particles at the spraying spot due to the selection of the method of powder feed to the anode channel of the plasma torch.

  9. Analysis of the thermal response of a BWR Mark-I containment shell to direct contact by molten core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, T.S.; Cleveland, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the thermal response of a BWR Mark-I containment shell in the event of an accident severe enough for molten core materials to fall into the cavity beneath the rector vessel and eventually come into direct contact with the shell. An existing ORNL three-dimensional transient heat transport computer code, HEATING-6, was used for a specific 2-D case (and variations) for which representative melt/shell boundary conditions required as input were available from other studies. In addition to the use of HEATING-6, a simplified analytical steady-state correlation was developed and given the name BWR Liner Analysis Program (BWRLAP). BWRLAP was ''benchmarked'' by comparison with HEATING-6 and was then used to make a number of parametric calculations to investigate the sensitivities of the results to the inputs. 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  10. ROP MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF ROTARY-ULTRASONIC CORE DRILLING OF BRITTLE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mera Fayez Horne

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The results from the Phoenix mission led scientists to believe it is possible that primitive life exists below the Martian surface. Therefore, drilling in Martian soil in search for organisms is the next logical step. Drilling on Mars is a major engineering challenge due to the drilling depth requirement and extreme environment condition. Mars lacks a thick atmosphere and a continuous magnetic field that shield the planet’s surface from solar radiation and solar flares. As a result, the Martian surface is sterile and if life ever existed, it must be found below the surface. NASA’s Mars Exploration Payload Advisory Group proposed that drilling should be considered as a priority investigation on Mars in an effort of finding evidence of extinct or extant life. The results from the Curiosity mission suggested drilling six meters deep in the red planet in search for life. Excavation tools deployed to Mars so far have been able to drill to a maximum depth of 6.5 cm. Thus, the drilling capabilities need to be increased by a factor of approximately 100 to achieve the goal of drilling six meters deep. This requirement puts a demand on developing new and more effective technologies to reach this goal. Previous research shows evidence of a promising drilling mechanism in rotary-ultrasonic for what it offers in terms of high surface quality, faster rate of penetration and higher material removal rate. This research addresses the need to understand the mechanics of the drill bit tip and rock interface in rotary-ultrasonic drilling performance of one drill bit at a time drilling in three types of rocks that vary in strength. A mathematical model identifying all contributing independent parameters, such as drill bit design parameters, drilling process parameters, ultrasonic wave amplitude and rocks’ material properties, that have effect on rate of penetration is developed. Analytical and experimental results under ambient condition are presented to show

  11. Development of advanced LWR fuel pellet technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kun Woo; Kang, K.W.; Kim, K. S.; Yang, J. H.; Kim, Y. M.; Kim, J. H.; Bang, J. B.; Kim, D. H.; Bae, S. O.; Jung, Y. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Kim, B. G.; Kim, S. H.

    2000-03-01

    A UO 2 pellet was designed to have a grain size of larger than 12 μm, and a new duplex design that UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 is in the core and UO 2 -Er 2 O 3 in the periphery was proposed. A master mixing method was developed to make a uniform mixture of UO 2 and additives. The open porosity of UO 2 pellet was reduced by only mixing AUC-UO 2 powder with ADU-UO 2 or milled powder. Duplex compaction tools (die and punch) were designed and fabricated, and duplex compacting procedures were developed to fabricate the duplex BA pellet. In UO 2 sintering, the relations between sintering variables (additive, sintering gas, sintering temperature) and pellet properties (density, grain size, pore size) were experimentally found. The UO 2 -U 3 O 8 powder which is inherently not sinterable to high density could be sintered well with the aid of additives. U 3 O 8 single crystals were added to UO 2 powder, and homogeneous powder mixture was pressed and sintered in a reducing atmosphere. This technology leads to a large-grained pellet of 12-20 μm. In UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 sintering, the relations between sintering variables (additives, sintering gas) and pellet properties (density, grain size) were experimentally found. The developed technology of fabricating a large-grained UO 2 pellet has been optimized in a lab scale. Pellet properties were investigated in the fields of (1) creep properties, (2) thermal properties, (3) O/M ratios and (4) unit cell lattice. (author)

  12. Development of advanced LWR fuel pellet technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kun Woo; Kang, K.W.; Kim, K. S.; Yang, J. H.; Kim, Y. M.; Kim, J. H.; Bang, J. B.; Kim, D. H.; Bae, S. O.; Jung, Y. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Kim, B. G.; Kim, S. H

    2000-03-01

    A UO{sub 2} pellet was designed to have a grain size of larger than 12 {mu}m, and a new duplex design that UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} is in the core and UO{sub 2}-Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the periphery was proposed. A master mixing method was developed to make a uniform mixture of UO{sub 2} and additives. The open porosity of UO{sub 2} pellet was reduced by only mixing AUC-UO{sub 2} powder with ADU-UO{sub 2} or milled powder. Duplex compaction tools (die and punch) were designed and fabricated, and duplex compacting procedures were developed to fabricate the duplex BA pellet. In UO{sub 2} sintering, the relations between sintering variables (additive, sintering gas, sintering temperature) and pellet properties (density, grain size, pore size) were experimentally found. The UO{sub 2}-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder which is inherently not sinterable to high density could be sintered well with the aid of additives. U{sub 3}O{sub 8} single crystals were added to UO{sub 2} powder, and homogeneous powder mixture was pressed and sintered in a reducing atmosphere. This technology leads to a large-grained pellet of 12-20 {mu}m. In UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} sintering, the relations between sintering variables (additives, sintering gas) and pellet properties (density, grain size) were experimentally found. The developed technology of fabricating a large-grained UO{sub 2} pellet has been optimized in a lab scale. Pellet properties were investigated in the fields of (1) creep properties, (2) thermal properties, (3) O/M ratios and (4) unit cell lattice. (author)

  13. Filtered atmospheric venting of LWR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, L.; Ahlstroem, P.E.; Bachofner, E.; Graeslund, C.; Johansson, K.; Nilsson, L.; Persson, Aa.; Eriksson, B.

    1981-03-01

    The FILTRA project is a cooperative Swedish programme which started in February 1980. It is aimed at investigating the possibility of reducing the risk for a large release of radioactivity, assuming a severe reactor accident. The project has been focused on filtered venting of the reactor containment. The first stage of the project has dealt with two types of severe accident sequences, namely core meltdown as a result of the complete loss of water supplies to the reactor pressure vessel and insufficient cooling of the reactor containment. Some important conclusion are the following. The applicability of computer models used to describe various phenomena in the accident sequence must be scrutinized. The details of the design of the containment are important and must be taken into consideration in a more accurate manner than in previous analyses. A pressure relief area of less than 1 m 2 appears to be adequate. The following principles should guide the technical design of filtered venting systems, namely reduction of the risk for the release of those radioactive substances which could cause long term land contamination, provision for a passive function of the vent filter system during the first 24 hours and achievement of filtering capabilities which make leakages in severe accidents comparable to the leakages of radioactive substances in less severe accidents, which do not necessarily actuate the pressure relief system. Nothing indicates that a system for filtered venting of a BWR containment would have a significant negative effect on the safety within the framework of the design basis. Efforts should be directed towards designing a filtered venting system for a BWR such as Barsebaeck. (authors)

  14. Effects of core-to-dentin thickness ratio on the biaxial flexural strength, reliability, and fracture mode of bilayered materials of zirconia core (Y-TZP) and veneer indirect composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Naichuan; Liao, Yunmao; Zhang, Hai; Yue, Li; Lu, Xiaowen; Shen, Jiefei; Wang, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Indirect composite resins (ICR) are promising alternatives as veneering materials for zirconia frameworks. The effects of core-to-dentin thickness ratio (C/Dtr) on the mechanical property of bilayered veneer ICR/yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) core disks have not been previously studied. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effects of C/Dtr on the biaxial flexural strength, reliability, and fracture mode of bilayered veneer ICR/ Y-TZP core disks. A total of 180 bilayered 0.6-mm-thick composite resin disks in core material and C/Dtr of 2:1, 1:1, and 1:2 were tested with either core material placed up or placed down for piston-on-3-ball biaxial flexural strength. The mean biaxial flexural strength, Weibull modulus, and fracture mode were measured to evaluate the variation trend of the biaxial flexural strength, reliability, and fracture mode of the bilayered disks with various C/Dtr. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the variation tendency of fracture mode with the C/Dtr or material placed down during testing (α=.05). Light microscopy was used to identify the fracture mode. The mean biaxial flexural strength and reliability improved with the increase in C/Dtr when specimens were tested with the core material either up and down, and depended on the materials that were placed down during testing. The rates of delamination, Hertzian cone cracks, subcritical radial cracks, and number of fracture fragments partially depended on the C/Dtr and the materials that were placed down during testing. The biaxial flexural strength, reliability, and fracture mode in bilayered structures of Y-TZP core and veneer ICR depend on both the C/Dtr and the material that was placed down during testing. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. LWR control assembly designs: A historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennard, M.W.; Harbottle, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Control rod designs and materials have evolved in response to performance problems in both PWRs and BWRs. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) due to absorber swelling has primarily affected BWR control rods with B 4 C absorbers, but has also occurred in PWRs with Ag-In-Cd absorbers. The primary problems for some designs of PWR control rods have been wear of the rodlets against upper internal components and swelling with tip wear and cracking. Competition amongst vendors for supplying control rod reloads has also resulted in design improvements. This paper provides an historical review of PWR and BWR control rod designs, their problems and remedies. (author)

  16. Synthesis and Performance of Highly Stable Star-Shaped Polyaniline Electrochromic Materials with Triphenylamine Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shanxin; Li, Shuaishuai; Zhang, Xiangkai; Wang, Ru; Zhang, Runlan; Wang, Xiaoqin; Wu, Bohua; Gong, Ming; Chu, Jia

    2018-02-01

    The molecular architecture of conducting polymers has a significant impact on their conjugated structure and electrochemical properties. We have investigated the influence of star-shaped structure on the electrochemical and electrochromic properties of polyaniline (PANI). Star-shaped PANI (SPANI) was prepared by copolymerization of aniline with triphenylamine (TPA) using an emulsion polymerization method. With addition of less than 4.0 mol.% TPA, the resulting SPANI exhibited good solubility in xylene with dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) as doping acid. The structure and thermal stability of the SPANI were characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, and the electrochemical behavior was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrochromic properties of SPANI were tested using an electrochemical workstation combined with an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometer. The results show that, with increasing TPA loading, the thermal stability of SPANI increased. With addition of 4.0 mol.% TPA, the weight loss of SPANI was 36.9% at 700°C, much lower than the value of 71.2% for PANI at the same temperature. The low oxidation potential and large enclosed area of the CV curves indicate that SPANI possesses higher electrochemical activity than PANI. Enhanced electrochromic properties including higher optical contrast and better electrochromic stability of SPANI were also obtained. SPANI with 1.6 mol.% TPA loading exhibited the highest optical contrast of 0.71, higher than the values of 0.58 for PANI, 0.66 for SPANI-0.4%, or 0.63 for SPANI-4.0%. Overdosing of TPA resulted in slow switching speed due to slow ion transport in short branched chains of star-shaped PANI electrochromic material. Long-term stability testing confirmed that all the SPANI-based devices exhibited better stability than the PANI-based device.

  17. OREST, LWR Burnup Simulation Using Program HAMMER and ORIGEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, Ulrich; Sieberer, Johann

    2006-01-01

    printer-output. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: NEA version is limited for 100 loops, 1000 burnup time-steps and 10 post-irradiation steps. GRS recommends the use of LWR fuels based on oxygen and on the main HAMMER isotopes 235-U, 236-U, 238-U, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 239-Pu, 240-Pu, 241-Pu, 242-Pu, 241-Am and 243-Am. Gadolinium entries should be handled with care if singular positions of Gd-rods in real assemblies are found. Other mixture entries at start of calculation should only be impurities. Cladding should be Zr, Al or stainless steel. Special options for handling other materials can be found in the user description. Activation of structure materials is not calculated. Strong heterogeneous assembly problems outside of the input data processor should be pre-calculated by using more-dimensional codes to achieve a neutron spectra equivalent HAMMER lattice (FEC-method). Coolant pressure, coolant temperatures and coolant steam contents are assumed to be constant during burnup. During each program loop neutron spectra and cross sections are assumed to be constant

  18. Preliminary model for core/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murfin, W.B.

    1977-08-01

    A preliminary model is described for computing the rate of penetration of concrete by a molten LWR core. Among the phenomena included are convective stirring of the melt by evolved gases, admixture of concrete decomposition products to the melt, chemical reactions, radiative heat loss, and variation of heat transfer coefficients with local pressure. The model is most applicable to a two-phase melt (metallic plus oxidic) having a fairly high metallic content

  19. The effect of core material, veneering porcelain, and fabrication technique on the biaxial flexural strength and weibull analysis of selected dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Ercoli, Carlo; Feng, Changyong; Morton, Dean

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of veneering porcelain (monolithic or bilayer specimens) and core fabrication technique (heat-pressed or CAD/CAM) on the biaxial flexural strength and Weibull modulus of leucite-reinforced and lithium-disilicate glass ceramics. In addition, the effect of veneering technique (heat-pressed or powder/liquid layering) for zirconia ceramics on the biaxial flexural strength and Weibull modulus was studied. Five ceramic core materials (IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max Press, IPS e.max CAD, IPS e.max ZirCAD) and three corresponding veneering porcelains (IPS Empress Esthetic Veneer, IPS e.max Ceram, IPS e.max ZirPress) were selected for this study. Each core material group contained three subgroups based on the core material thickness and the presence of corresponding veneering porcelain as follows: 1.5 mm core material only (subgroup 1.5C), 0.8 mm core material only (subgroup 0.8C), and 1.5 mm core/veneer group: 0.8 mm core with 0.7 mm corresponding veneering porcelain with a powder/liquid layering technique (subgroup 0.8C-0.7VL). The ZirCAD group had one additional 1.5 mm core/veneer subgroup with 0.7 mm heat-pressed veneering porcelain (subgroup 0.8C-0.7VP). The biaxial flexural strengths were compared for each subgroup (n = 10) according to ISO standard 6872:2008 with ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (p≤ 0.05). The reliability of strength was analyzed with the Weibull distribution. For all core materials, the 1.5 mm core/veneer subgroups (0.8C-0.7VL, 0.8C-0.7VP) had significantly lower mean biaxial flexural strengths (p Empress and e.max groups, regardless of core thickness and fabrication techniques. Comparing fabrication techniques, Empress Esthetic/CAD, e.max Press/CAD had similar biaxial flexural strength (p= 0.28 for Empress pair; p= 0.87 for e.max pair); however, e.max CAD/Press groups had significantly higher flexural strength (p Empress Esthetic/CAD groups. Monolithic core

  20. Experiment on heat transfer in simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Yukihiro; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Toda, Saburo; Kawaguchi, Takahiro.

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate heat transfer between molten core and concrete in LWR severe accidents, experiments were performed using water as the molten core, paraffin as the concrete, and air as gases from the decomposition of concrete. It was found that the heat transfer on the interface between paraffin and water were promoted strongly by the air gas. (author)

  1. Effect of long-term storage of LWR spent fuel on Pu-thermal fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Masayoshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya; Itahara, Kuniyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo; Hamada, Koji

    1998-01-01

    According to the Long-term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy (June, 1994) in Japan, the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant will be operated shortly after the year 2000, and the planning of the construction of the second commercial plant will be decided around 2010. Also, it is described that spent fuel storage has a positive meaning as an energy resource for the future utilization of Pu. Considering the balance between the increase of spent fuels and the domestic reprocessing capacity in Japan, it can be expected that the long-term storage of UO 2 spent fuels will be required. Then, we studied the effect of long-term storage of spent fuels on Pu-thermal fuel cycle. The burnup calculation were performed on the typical Japanese PWR fuel, and the burnup and criticality calculations were carried out on the Pu-thermal cores with MOX fuel. Based on the results, we evaluate the influence of extending the spent fuel storage term on the criticality safety, shielding design of the reprocessing plant and the core life time of the MOX core, etc. As the result of this work on long-term storage of LWR spent fuels, it becomes clear that there are few demerits regarding the lifetime of a MOX reactor core, and that there are many merits regarding the safety aspects of the fuel cycle facilities. Furthermore, long-term storage is meaningful as energy storage for effective utilization of Pu to be improved by technological innovation in future, and it will allow for sufficient time for the important policymaking of nuclear fuel cycle establishment in Japan. (author)

  2. Measurement and characterization of fission products released from LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, M.F.; Collins, J.L.; Lorenz, R.A.; Norwood, K.S.; Strain, R.V.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of commercial LWR fuel have been heated under simulated accident conditions to determine the extent and the chemical forms of fission product release. This project was sponsored by the USNRC under a broad program of reactor safety studies. Of the five tests discussed, the fractional releases of Kr, I, and Cs varied from approx. 2% at 1400 0 C to >50% at 2000 0 C; much smaller fractions of Ru, Ag, Sb, and Te were measured in some tests. The major chemical forms in the effluent appeared to include CsI, CsOH, Sb, Te, and Ag

  3. Conceptual design of a spent LWR fuel recycle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, B.H.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose was to design a licensable facility, to make cost-benefit analyses of alternatives, and to aid in developing licensing criteria. The Savannah River Plant was taken to be the site for the recycle complex. The spent LWR fuel will be processed through the plant at the rate of 3000 metric tons of heavy metal per year. The following aspects of the complex are discussed: operation, maintenance, co-conversion (Coprecal), waste disposal, off-gas treatment, ventilation, safeguards, accounting, equipment and fuel fabrication. Differences between the co-processing case and the separated streams case are discussed. 44 figures

  4. Issues in risk analysis of passive LWR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, R.W.; Pratt, W.T.; Amico, P.J.; Gallagher, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses issues which bear on the question of how safety is to be demonstrated for ''simplified passive'' light water reactor (LWR) designs. First, a very simplified comparison is made between certain systems in today's plants. comparable systems in evolutionary designs, and comparable systems in the simplified passives. in order to introduce the issues. This discussion is not intended to describe the designs comprehensively, but is offered only to show why certain issues seem to be important in these particular designs. Next, an important class of accident sequences is described; finally, based on this discussion, some priorities in risk analysis are presented and discussed

  5. Hamor-2: a computer code for LWR inventory calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, L.N.F.; Marzo, M.A.S.

    1985-01-01

    A method for calculating the accuracy inventory of LWR reactors is presented. This method uses the Hamor-2 computer code. Hamor-2 is obtained from the coupling of two other computer codes Hammer-Techion and Origen-2 for testing Hamor-2, its results were compared to concentration values measured from activides of two PWR reactors; Kernkraftwerk Obrighein (KWO) and H.B. Robinson (HBR). These actinides are U 235 , U 236 , U 238 , Pu 239 , Pu 241 and PU 242 . The computer code Hammor-2 shows better results than the computer code Origem-2, when both are compared with experimental results. (E.G.) [pt

  6. Measurement and characterization of fission products released from LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, M.F.; Collins, J.L.; Lorenz, R.A.; Norwood, K.S.; Strain, R.V.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of commercial LWR fuel have been heated under simulated accident conditions to determine the extent and the chemical forms of fission product release. Of the five tests discussed, the fractional releases of Kr, I, and Cs varied from proportional 2% at 1400 0 C to >50% at 2000 0 C; much smaller fractions of Ru, Ag, Sb, and Te were measured in some tests. The major chemical forms in the effluent appeared to include CsI, CsOH, Sb, Te, and Ag. (orig./HP)

  7. Nondestructive evaluation of LWR spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, D.W.

    1978-02-01

    An analysis of nondestructve testing (NDT) methods currently being used to evaluate the integrity of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel shipping casks is presented. An assessment of anticipated NDT needs related to breeder reactor cask requirements is included. Specific R and D approaches to probable NDT problem areas such as the evaluation of austenitic stainless steel weldments are outlined. A comprehensive bibliography of current NDT methods for cask evaluation in the USA, Great Britain, Japan and West Germany was compiled for this study

  8. Standard casks for the transport of LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, P.

    1985-01-01

    During the past decade, TRANSNUCLEAIRE has developed, licensed and marketed a family of standard casks for the transport of spent fuel from LWR reactors to reprocessing plants and the ancillary equipments necessary for their operation and transport. A large number of these casks have been manufacturer under TRANSNUCLEAIRE supervision in different countries and are presently used for European and intercontinental transports. The main advantages of these casks are: - large payload for considered modes of transport, - moderate cost, - reliability due to the large experience gained by TRANSNUCLEAIRE as concerns fabrication and operation problems, - standardisation facilitating fabrication, operation and spare part supply [fr

  9. Hydrogen mixing study (HMS) in LWR type containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical technique has been developed for calculating the full three-dimensional time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations with multiple speies transport. The method is a modified form of the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique to solve the governing equations for low Mach number flows where pressure waves and local variations in compression and expansion are not significant. Large density variations, due to thermal and species concentration gradients, are accounted for without the restrictions of the classical Boussinesq approximation. Calculations of the EPRI/HEDL standard problems verify the feasibility of using this finite-difference technique for analyzing hydrogen mixing within LWR containments

  10. Investigation of valve failure problems in LWR power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    An analysis of component failures from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank shows that for both PWR and BWR plants the component category most responsible for approximately 19.3% of light water reactor (LWR) power plant shutdowns. This investigation by Burns and Roe, Inc. shows that the greatest cause of shutdowns in LWRs due to valve failures is leakage from valve stem packing. Both BWR plants and PWR plants have stem leakage problems (BWRs, 21% and PWRs, 34%).

  11. Transmutation of LWR waste actinides in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    Recycle of actinides to a reactor for transmutation to fission products is being considered as a possible means of waste disposal. Actinide transmutation calculations were made for two irradiation options in a thermal (LWR) reactor. The cases considered were: all actinides recycled in regular uranium fuel assemblies, and transuranic actinides recycled in separate mixed oxide (MOX) assemblies. When all actinides were recycled in a uranium lattice, a reduction of 62% in the transuranic inventory was achieved after 10 recycles, compared to the inventory accumulated without recycle. When the transuranics from 2 regular uranium assemblies were combined with those recycled from a MOX assembly, the transuranic inventory was reduced 50% after 5 recycles

  12. Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

    1991-03-01

    A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs

  13. Pie technique of LWR fuel cladding fracture toughness test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Shinya; Usami, Koji; Nakata, Masahito; Fukuda, Takuji; Numata, Masami; Kizaki, Minoru; Nishino, Yasuharu

    2006-01-01

    Remote-handling techniques were developed by cooperative research between the Department of Hot Laboratories in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd. (NFI) for evaluating the fracture toughness on irradiated LWR fuel cladding. The developed techniques, sample machining by using the electrical discharge machine (EDM), pre-cracking by fatigue tester, sample assembling to the compact tension (CT) shaped test fixture gave a satisfied result for a fracture toughness test developed by NFL. And post-irradiation examination (PIE) using the remote-handling techniques were carried out to evaluate the fracture toughness on BWR spent fuel cladding in the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF). (author)

  14. Principles of MONJU maintenance. Characteristic of MONJU maintenance and reflection of LWR maintenance experience to FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Satoru; Nishio, Ryuichi; Uchihashi, Masaya; Kaneko, Yoshihisa; Yamashita, Hironobu; Yamaguchi, Atsunori; Aoki, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    A sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR) has unique systems and components and different degradation mechanism from light water reactor (LWR) so that need to establish maintenance technology in accordance with its features. The examination of the FBR maintenance technology is carried out in the special committee for considering the maintenance for Monju established in the Japan Society of Maintenology (JSM). As a result of the study such as extraction of Monju maintenance feature, maintenance technology benchmark between Monju and LWR components and survey of LWR maintenance experience, it is clear that principles of maintenance are same as LWR, necessity of LWR maintenance experience reflection and points to be considered in Monju maintenance. The road map to establish a FBR maintenance technology in the technical aspect became clear and it is vital to acquire operation and maintenance experience of the plant to implement this road map, and to establish a fast reactor maintenance. (author)

  15. Characterization of a Porous Carbon Material Functionalized with Cobalt-Oxide/Cobalt Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-04-18

    A nanoporous carbon (C) material, functionalized with Cobalt-Oxide/Cobalt (CoO/Co) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs), was structurally and chemically characterized with transmission electron microcopy (TEM) while its electrochemical response for Lithium ion battery (LIB) applications was evaluated as well. The results herein show that the nanoporous C material was uniformly functionalized with the CoO/Co core-shell NPs. Further the NPs were crystalline with fcc-Type lattice on the Co2+ oxide shell and hcp-Type core of metallic Co0. The electrochemical study was carried out by using galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling at a current density of 1000 mA g-1. The potential of this hybrid material for LIB applications was confirmed and it is attributed to the successful dispersion of the Co2+/ Co0 NPs in the C support.

  16. Testing of LWR fuel rods to support criticality safety analysis of transport accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, P.C. [BNFL International Transport, Spent Fuel Services (United Kingdom); Dallongeville, M. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group) (France)

    2004-07-01

    For the transport of low enriched materials, criticality safety may be demonstrated by applying pessimistic modelling assumptions that bound any realistic case. Where Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel is being transported, enrichment levels are usually too high to permit this approach and more realistic data is needed. This requires a method by which the response of LWR fuel under impact accident conditions can be approximated or bounded. In 2000, BNFL and COGEMA LOGISTICS jointly commenced the Fuel Integrity Project (FIP) whose objective was to develop such methods. COGEMA LOGISTICS were well advanced with a method for determining the impact response of unirradiated fuel, but required further test data before acceptance by the Transport Regulators. The joint project team extensively discussed the required inputs to the FIP, from which it was agreed that BNFL would organise new tests on both unirradiated and irradiated fuel samples and COGEMA LOGISTICS would take major responsibility for evaluating the test results. Tests on unirradiated fuel rod samples involved both dynamic and quasi-static loading on fuel samples. PWR fuel rods loaded with uranium pellets were dropped vertically from 9m onto a rigid target and this was repeated on BWR fuel rods, similar tests on empty fuel rods were also conducted. Quasi-static tests were conducted on 530 mm long PWR and BWR fuel specimens under axial loading. Tests on irradiated fuel samples were conducted on high burn-up fuel rods of both PWR and BWR types. These were believed original to the FIP project and involved applying bending loads to simply supported pressurised rod specimens. In one test the fuel rod was heated to nearly 500oC during loading, all specimens were subject to axial impact before testing. Considerable experience of fuel rod testing and new data was gained from this test programme.

  17. Testing of LWR fuel rods to support criticality safety analysis of transport accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, P.C.; Dallongeville, M.

    2004-01-01

    For the transport of low enriched materials, criticality safety may be demonstrated by applying pessimistic modelling assumptions that bound any realistic case. Where Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel is being transported, enrichment levels are usually too high to permit this approach and more realistic data is needed. This requires a method by which the response of LWR fuel under impact accident conditions can be approximated or bounded. In 2000, BNFL and COGEMA LOGISTICS jointly commenced the Fuel Integrity Project (FIP) whose objective was to develop such methods. COGEMA LOGISTICS were well advanced with a method for determining the impact response of unirradiated fuel, but required further test data before acceptance by the Transport Regulators. The joint project team extensively discussed the required inputs to the FIP, from which it was agreed that BNFL would organise new tests on both unirradiated and irradiated fuel samples and COGEMA LOGISTICS would take major responsibility for evaluating the test results. Tests on unirradiated fuel rod samples involved both dynamic and quasi-static loading on fuel samples. PWR fuel rods loaded with uranium pellets were dropped vertically from 9m onto a rigid target and this was repeated on BWR fuel rods, similar tests on empty fuel rods were also conducted. Quasi-static tests were conducted on 530 mm long PWR and BWR fuel specimens under axial loading. Tests on irradiated fuel samples were conducted on high burn-up fuel rods of both PWR and BWR types. These were believed original to the FIP project and involved applying bending loads to simply supported pressurised rod specimens. In one test the fuel rod was heated to nearly 500oC during loading, all specimens were subject to axial impact before testing. Considerable experience of fuel rod testing and new data was gained from this test programme

  18. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  19. International collaboration for development of accident-resistant LWR fuel. International Collaboration for Development of Accident Resistant Light Water Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowder, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Following the March 2011 multi-unit accident at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, there has been increased interest in the development of breakthrough nuclear fuel designs that can reduce or eliminate many of the outcomes of a severe accident at a light water reactor (LWR) due to loss of core cooling following an extended station blackout or other initiating event. With this interest and attention comes a unique opportunity for the nuclear industry to fundamentally change the nature and impact of severe accidents. Clearly, this is no small feat. The challenges are many and the technical barriers are high. Early estimates for moving maturing R and D concepts to the threshold of commercialisation exceed one billion USD. Given the anticipated effort and resources required, no single entity or group can succeed alone. Accordingly, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sees the need for and promise of cooperation among many stakeholders on an international scale to bring about what could be transformation in LWR fuel performance and robustness. An important initial task in any R and D programme is to define the goals and metrics for measuring success. As starting points for accident-tolerant fuel development, the extension of core coolability under loss of coolant conditions and the elimination or reduction of hydrogen generation are widely recognised R and D endpoints for deployment. Furthermore, any new LWR fuel technology will, at a minimum, need to (1) be compatible with the safe, economic operation of existing plants and (2) maintain acceptable or improve nuclear fuel performance under normal operating conditions. While the primary focus of R and D to date has been on cladding and fuel improvements, there are a number of other potential paths to improve outcomes following a severe accident at an LWR that include modifications to other fuel hardware and core internals to fully address core coolability, criticality, and hydrogen generation concerns. The US

  20. The dupic fuel cycle synergism between LWR and HWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.S.; Yang, M.S.; Park, H.S.; Lee, H.H.; Kim, K.P.; Sullivan, J.D.; Boczar, P.G.; Gadsby, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    The DUPIC fuel cycle can be developed as an alternative to the conventional spent fuel management options of direct disposal or plutonium recycle. Spent LWR fuel can be burned again in a HWR by direct refabrication into CANDU-compatible DUPIC fuel bundles. Such a linkage between LWR and HWR can result in a multitude of synergistic effects, ranging from savings of natural uranium to reductions in the amount of spent fuel to be buried in the earth, for a given amount of nuclear electricity generated. A special feature of the DUPIC fuel cycle is its compliance with the 'Spent Fuel Standard' criteria for diversion resistance, throughout the entire fuel cycle. The DUPIC cycle thus has a very high degree of proliferation resistance. The cost penalty due to this technical factor needs to be considered in balance with the overall benefits of the DUPIC fuel cycle. The DUPIC alternative may be able to make a significant contribution to reducing spent nuclear fuel burial in the geosphere, in a manner similar to the contribution of the nuclear energy alternative in reducing atmospheric pollution from fossil fuel combustion. (author)

  1. Effects of cooling time on a closed LWR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R. P.; Forsberg, C. W.; Shwageraus, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effects of cooling time prior to reprocessing spent LWR fuel has on the reactor physics characteristics of a PWR fully loaded with homogeneously mixed U-Pu or U-TRU oxide (MOX) fuel is examined. A reactor physics analysis was completed using the CASM04e code. A void reactivity feedback coefficient analysis was also completed for an infinite lattice of fresh fuel assemblies. Some useful conclusions can be made regarding the effect that cooling time prior to reprocessing spent LWR fuel has on a closed homogeneous MOX fuel cycle. The computational analysis shows that it is more neutronically efficient to reprocess cooled spent fuel into homogeneous MOX fuel rods earlier rather than later as the fissile fuel content decreases with time. Also, the number of spent fuel rods needed to fabricate one MOX fuel rod increases as cooling time increases. In the case of TRU MOX fuel, with time, there is an economic tradeoff between fuel handling difficulty and higher throughput of fuel to be reprocessed. The void coefficient analysis shows that the void coefficient becomes progressively more restrictive on fuel Pu content with increasing spent fuel cooling time before reprocessing. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of LWR fuel rod behavior under operational transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Hiramoto, K.; Maru, A.

    1984-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of fission gas flow and diffusion in the fuel-cladding gap on fuel rod thermal and mechanical behaviors in light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods under operational transient conditions, computer sub-programs which can calculate the gas flow and diffusion have been developed and integrated into the LWR fuel rod performance code BEAF. This integrated code also calculates transient temperature distribution in the fuel-pellet and cladding. The integrated code was applied to an analysis of Inter Ramp Project data, which showed that by taking into account the gas flow and diffusion effects, the calculated cladding damage indices predicted for the failed rods in the ramp test were consistent with iodine-SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) failure conditions which were obtained from out-of-reactor pressurized tube experiments with irradiated Zircaloy claddings. This consistency was not seen if the gas flow and diffusion effects were neglected. Evaluation were also made for the BWR 8x8 RJ fuel rod temperatures under power ramp conditions. (orig.)

  3. Fabrication of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuO core-shell from MOF based materials and its antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajabi, S.K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Guilan, University Campus 2, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohrabnezhad, Sh., E-mail: sohrabnezhad@guilan.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Guilan, P.O. Box 1914, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafourian, S. [Clinical Microbiology Research Center, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuO nanocomposite with a core/shell structure was successfully synthesized via direct calcinations of magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@HKUST-1 in air atmosphere. The morphology, structure, magnetic and porous properties of the as-synthesized nano composites were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and vibration sample magnetometer (VSM). The results showed that the nanocomposite material included a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core and a CuO shell. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuO core-shell can be separated easily from the medium by a small magnet. The antibacterial activity of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CuO core-shell was investigated against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A new mechanism was proposed for inactivation of bacteria over the prepared sample. It was demonstrated that the core-shell exhibit recyclable antibacterial activity, acting as an ideal long-acting antibacterial agent. - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuO core-shell release of copper ions. These Cu{sup 2+} ions were responsible for the exhibited antibacterial activity. - Highlights: • The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuO core-shell was prepared by MOF method. • This is the first study of antibacterial activity of core-shell consist of CuO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. • The core-shell can be reused effectively. • Core-shell was separated from the reaction solution by external magnetic field.

  4. The LER/LWR metrology challenge for advance process control through 3D-AFM and CD-SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurie, P.; Foucher, J.; Foucher, A.-L.

    2009-12-01

    The continuous shrinkage in dimensions of microelectronic devices has reached such level, with typical gate length in advance R&D of less than 20nm combine with the introduction of new architecture (FinFET, Double gate...) and new materials (porous interconnect material, 193 immersion resist, metal gate material, high k materials...), that new process parameters have to be well understood and well monitored to guarantee sufficient production yield in a near future. Among these parameters, there are the critical dimensions (CD) associated to the sidewall angle (SWA) values, the line edge roughness (LER) and the line width roughness (LWR). Thus, a new metrology challenge has appeared recently and consists in measuring "accurately" the fabricated patterns on wafers in addition to measure the patterns on a repeatable way. Therefore, a great effort has to be done on existing techniques like CD-SEM, Scatterometry and 3D-AFM in order to develop them following the two previous criteria: Repeatability and Accuracy. In this paper, we will compare the 3D-AFM and CD-SEM techniques as a mean to measure LER and LWR on silicon and 193 resist and point out CD-SEM impact on the material during measurement. Indeed, depending on the material type, the interaction between the electron beam and the material or between the AFM tip and the material can vary a lot and subsequently can generate measurements bias. The first results tend to show that depending on CD-SEM conditions (magnification, number of acquisition frames) the final outputs can vary on a large range and therefore show that accuracy in such measurements are really not obvious to obtain. On the basis of results obtained on various materials that present standard sidewall roughness, we will show the limit of each technique and will propose different ways to improve them in order to fulfil advance roadmap requirements for the development of the next IC generation.

  5. The use of ferritic materials in light water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of ferritic materials in LWR power plant components. The two principal types of LWR systems, the boiling water reactor (BWR) and the pressurized water reactor (PWR) are described. The evolution of the construction materials, including plates and forgings, is presented. The fabrication process for both reactors constructed with plates and forgings are described in detail. Typical mechanical properties of the reactor vessel materials are presented. Finally, one critical issue radiation embrittlement dealing with ferritic materials is discussed. This has been one of the major issues regarding the use of ferritic material in the construction of LWR pressure vessels

  6. Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuser, Brent [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Stubbins, James [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Kozlowski, Tomasz [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Uddin, Rizwan [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Trinkle, Dallas [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Downar, Thoms [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); ang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sabharwall, piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-25

    The DOE NEUP sponsored IRP on accident tolerant fuel (ATF) entitled Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel involved three academic institutions, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and ATI Materials (ATI). Detailed descriptions of the work at the University of Illinois (UIUC, prime), the University of Florida (UF), the University of Michigan (UMich), and INL are included in this document as separate sections. This summary provides a synopsis of the work performed across the IRP team. Two ATF solution pathways were initially proposed, coatings on monolithic Zr-based LWR cladding material and selfhealing modifications of Zr-based alloys. The coating pathway was extensively investigated, both experimentally and in computations. Experimental activities related to ATF coatings were centered at UIUC, UF, and UMich and involved coating development and testing, and ion irradiation. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic aspects of ATF coatings were the focus of computational work at UIUC and UMich, while materials science aspects were the focus of computational work at UF and INL. ATI provided monolithic Zircaloy 2 and 4 material and a binary Zr-Y alloy material. The selfhealing pathway was investigated with advanced computations only. Beryllium was identified as a valid self-healing additive early in this work. However, all attempts to fabricate a Zr-Be alloy failed. Several avenues of fabrication were explored. ATI ultimately declined our fabrication request over health concerns associated with Be (we note that Be was not part of the original work scope and the ATI SOW). Likewise, Ames Laboratory declined our fabrication request, citing known litigation dating to the 1980s and 1990s involving the U.S. Federal government and U.S. National Laboratory employees involving the use of Be. Materion (formerly, Brush Wellman) also declined our fabrication request, citing the difficulty in working with a highly reactive Zr and Be

  7. Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Brent; Stubbins, James; Kozlowski, Tomasz; Uddin, Rizwan; Trinkle, Dallas; Downar, Thoms; Was, Gary; Ang, Yong; Phillpot, Simon; Sabharwall, Piyush

    2017-01-01

    The DOE NEUP sponsored IRP on accident tolerant fuel (ATF) entitled Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel involved three academic institutions, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and ATI Materials (ATI). Detailed descriptions of the work at the University of Illinois (UIUC, prime), the University of Florida (UF), the University of Michigan (UMich), and INL are included in this document as separate sections. This summary provides a synopsis of the work performed across the IRP team. Two ATF solution pathways were initially proposed, coatings on monolithic Zr-based LWR cladding material and selfhealing modifications of Zr-based alloys. The coating pathway was extensively investigated, both experimentally and in computations. Experimental activities related to ATF coatings were centered at UIUC, UF, and UMich and involved coating development and testing, and ion irradiation. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic aspects of ATF coatings were the focus of computational work at UIUC and UMich, while materials science aspects were the focus of computational work at UF and INL. ATI provided monolithic Zircaloy 2 and 4 material and a binary Zr-Y alloy material. The selfhealing pathway was investigated with advanced computations only. Beryllium was identified as a valid self-healing additive early in this work. However, all attempts to fabricate a Zr-Be alloy failed. Several avenues of fabrication were explored. ATI ultimately declined our fabrication request over health concerns associated with Be (we note that Be was not part of the original work scope and the ATI SOW). Likewise, Ames Laboratory declined our fabrication request, citing known litigation dating to the 1980s and 1990s involving the U.S. Federal government and U.S. National Laboratory employees involving the use of Be. Materion (formerly, Brush Wellman) also declined our fabrication request, citing the difficulty in working with a highly reactive Zr and Be

  8. Long-term aging embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objectives of this program are to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in light water reactor (LWR) systems and to evaluate possible remedies for the embrittlement problem in existing and future plants. The scope of the investigation includes three goals: (1) develop a methodology and correlations for predicting the toughness loss suffered by cast stainless steel components during normal and extended life of LWRs, (2) validate the simulation of in-reactor degradation by accelerated aging, and (3) establish the effects of key compositional and metallurgical variables on the kinetics and extent of embrittlement. The emphasis during the current year was on developing a procedure and correlations for predicting fracture toughness J-R curves of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The present analysis has focused on developing correlations for the fracture properties in terms of material information that can be determined from the certified material test record (CMTR) and on ensuring that the correlations are adequately conservative for structurally weak materials

  9. Core-Shell Al-Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Configurations to Enhance Reaction Kinetics and Energy Performance for Nanoenergetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Qiao, Zhiqiang; Yang, Yuntao; Shen, Jinpeng; Long, Zhang; Li, Zhaoqian; Cui, Xudong; Yang, Guangcheng

    2016-01-04

    The energy performance of solid energetic materials (Al, Mg, etc.) is typically restricted by a natural passivation layer and the diffusion-limited kinetics between the oxidizer and the metal. In this work, we use polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as the fluorine carrier and the shielding layer to construct a new type of nano-Al based fuels. The PTFE shell not only prevents nano-Al layers from oxidation, but also assists in enhancing the reaction kinetics, greatly improving the stability and reactivity of fuels. An in situ chemical vapor deposition combined with the electrical explosion of wires (EEW) method is used to fabricate core-shell nanostructures. Studies show that by controlling the stoichiometric ratio of the precursors, the morphology of the PTFE shell and the energy performance can be easily tuned. The resultant composites exhibit superior energy output characters than that of their physically mixed Al/PTFE counterparts. This synthetic strategy might provide a general approach to prepare other high-energy fuels (Mg, Si). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. PBDOWN - a computer code for simulating core material discharge and thermal to mechanical energy conversion in LMFBR hypothetical accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.

    1981-01-01

    PBDOWN is a computer code that simulates the blowdown of confined boiling materials ('pools') into a colder upper coolant plenum as time dependent ejection and expansion with consideration of a few selected exchange processes. Its application is restricted to situations resulting from hypothetical loss of flow (LOF) accidents in LMFBR's, where enough voiding has occured, that in core sodium vapor pressures become negligible. PBDOWN considers one working fluid for the discharge process (either fuel or steel) and a maximum of two working fluids (either fuel and sodium or steel and sodium) for the expansion process in the upper coolant plenum. Entrainment of sodium at the accelerated bubble liquid interfaces is mechanistically calculated by a Taylor instability entrainment model. Simulation of a hemispherical expansion form together with this mechanistic entrainment model gives a new integrated calculation of the time dependent sodium mass in the bubble. The paper summarizes the basic equations and assumptions of this computer model. Sample results compare different heat transfer and Na entrainment models during steel and fuel driven discharge processes. Mechanistic sodium entrainment simulation for SNR-type reactors coupled with a realistic heat transfer model is shown to reduce the integral mechanical work potential by a factor of 1.3 to 2.0 over the isentropic energy of the discharge working fluids. (orig.)

  11. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.; Filliatre, P.; Lopez, A. Legrand; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Bréaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 1020 n/cm2. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  12. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, SPEx/LDCI, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vermeeren, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Lopez, A. Legrand [CEA, DEN, Saclay, SIREN/LECSI, F-91400 Saclay (France)

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  13. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Vermeeren, L.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-01-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10 20 n/cm 2 . A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  14. Advanced core concepts with enhanced proliferation resistance by transmutation of minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masaki

    2005-01-01

    ''Protected Plutonium Production (P 3 )'' has been proposed to establish high burn-up cores and to produce protected with high proliferation resistance due to high decay heat and large number of spontaneous fission neutron of 238 Pu by the transmutation of Minor Actinides (MAs) which is presently treated as high-level waste. The burn-up calculations have shown that the advanced fuel with UO 2 (11-13% enrichment of 235 U) by doping 237 Np to produce 238 Pu in the commercialized large LWRs burn up to 100 GWd/t with 238 Pu to Pu ratio of about 20% which means the fuel is highly protected from proliferation. It was also predicted that medium or small size LWR cores with 15-17% enrichment, liquid metal cooled cores, and gas cooled cores added by 1-2% Np could achieve 100 GWd/t burning with bearing high proliferation resistance. The 237 Np mass balance calculations have revealed that more than 20 nuclear P 3 plants of 300 MWe could be supplied with enough 237 Np from the Japanese commercial plants in equilibrium fuel cycles. From the present studies, it is confirmed that MAs are treated as burnable and fertile materials not only to extend the core life but also to improve plutonium proliferation resistance of the future nuclear energy systems instead of their geological disposal or just their burning through fission. (author)

  15. Fundamental experiment on simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Katsumura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    If a complete and prolonged failure of coolant flow were to occur in a LWR or FBR, fission product decay heat would cause the fuel to overheat. If no available action to cool the fuel were taken, it would eventually melt. Ibis could lead to slumping of the molten core material and to the failure of the reactor pressure vessel and deposition of these materials into the concrete reactor cavity. Consequently, the molten core could melt and decompose the concrete. Vigorous agitation of the molten core pool by concrete decomposition gases is expected to enhance the convective heat transfer process. Besides the decomposition gases, melting concrete (slag) generated under the molten core pool will be buoyed up, and will also affect the downward heat transfer. Though, in this way, the heat transfer process across the interface is complicated by the slag and the gases evolved from the decomposed concrete, it is very important to make its process clear for the safety evaluation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, in this study, fundamental experiments were performed using simulated materials to observe the behaviors of the hot pool, slag and gases at the interface. Moreover, from the experimental observation, a correlation without empirical constants was proposed to calculate the interface heat transfer. The heat transfer across the interface would depend on thermo-physical interactions between the pool, slag and concrete which are changed by their thermal properties and interface temperature and so on. For example, the molten concrete is miscible in molten oxidic core debris, but is immiscible in metallic core debris. If a contact temperature between the molten core pool and the concrete falls below the solidus of the pool, solidification of the pool will occur. In this study, the case of immiscible slag in the pool is treated and solidification of the pool does not occur. Thus, water, paraffin and air were selected as the simulated molten core pool, concrete, and decomposition

  16. Core Design and Deployment Strategy of Heavy Water Cooled Sustainable Thorium Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Takaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies on water cooled thorium breeder reactor based on matured pressurized water reactor (PWR plant technology concluded that reduced moderated core by arranging fuel pins in a triangular tight lattice array and using heavy water as coolant is appropriate for achieving better breeding performance and higher burn-up simultaneously [1–6]. One optimum core that produces 3.5 GW thermal energy using Th-233U oxide fuel shows a breeding ratio of 1.07 and averaged burn-up of about 80 GWd/t with long cycle length of 1300 days. The moderator to fuel volume ratio is 0.6 and required enrichment of 233U for the fresh fuel is about 7%. The coolant reactivity coefficient is negative during all cycles despite it being a large scale breeder reactor. In order to introduce this sustainable thorium reactor, three-step deployment scenario, with intermediate transition phase between current light water reactor (LWR phase and future sustainer phase, is proposed. Both in transition phase and sustainer phase, almost the same core design can be applicable only by changing fissile materials mixed with thorium from plutonium to 233U with slight modification in the fuel assembly design. Assuming total capacity of 60 GWe in current LWR phase and reprocessing capacity of 800 ton/y with further extensions to 1600 ton/y, all LWRs will be replaced by heavy water cooled thorium reactors within about one century then thorium reactors will be kept operational owing to its potential to sustain fissile fuels while reprocessing all spent fuels until exhaustion of massive thorium resource.

  17. Effects of gaseous radioactive nuclides on the design and operation of repositories for spent LWR fuel in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenks, G.H.

    1979-12-01

    Information relating to the identities and amounts of gaseous radionuclides present in spent LWR fuel and to their release from canistered spent fuel under plausible storage and disposal conditions was assembled, reviewed, and analyzed. Information was also reviewed and analyzed on several other subjects that relate to the integrity of the carbon steel canister in which the spent fuel is to be encapsulated and to the expected rates of transfer of gaseous radionuclides through crushed salt backfill within a disposal room in a reference repository in rock salt. The advantages and disadvantages were considered for several different canister-backfill materials, and recommendations were made regarding preferred materials. Other recommendations relate to encapsulation procedures and specifications and to needs for additional experimental studies. The objective of this work was to provide reference information, conclusions, and recommendations that could be used to establish design and operating conditions and procedures for a bedded salt repository for spent LWR fuel and that could also be used to help evaluate the safety of the repository. The results of this work will also generally apply to spent fuel repositories in domal salt. However, because the domal salt may have little or no brine inclusions within it, there may be little or no possibility that brine will migrate into open spaces around an emplaced canister. Addordingly, some of the concerns that result from the possible occurrence of brine migration in bedded salt may be of no importance in domal salt

  18. Material properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for core materials of FBR. Mechanical strength properties of sodium exposed and Nickel diffused materials. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shoichi; Yoshida, Eiichi

    2004-02-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel have excellent resistance to swelling and superior creep strength, they are expected to be used as a long-life cladding material in future advanced fast reactor. In this study, sodium environmental effects on the ODS steel developed by JNC were clarified through tensile test after sodium exposure for maximum 10,000hrs and creep-rupture test in sodium at elevated temperature. The exposure to sodium was conducted using a sodium test loop constituted by austenitic steels. For the conditions of sodium exposure test, the sodium temperatures were 923 K and 973 K, the oxygen concentration in sodium was below 2ppm and sodium flow rate on the surface of specimen was less than 1x10 -4 m/s. Further the specimen with the nickel diffused was prepared, which is simulate to nickel diffusing through sodium from the surface of structural stainless steels. The main results obtained were as follows; (1) The results showed excellent sodium-resistance up to a high temperature of about 973 K in stagnant sodium conditions, and its considered that the effects of sodium environment of tensile properties were negligible. In case of stagnant sodium condition, creep-rupture strength in sodium was equal to the in argon gas, and no sodium environmental effect was observed. The same is true for the creep-rupture ductility. (2) The tensile properties of nickel diffused test specimens at high temperatures simulating microstructure change were equal to that of the thermal aging process specimens. These tensile tests suggest that sodium environmental effects can be ignored. However, the effect of nickel diffusion on creep strength are not clear at present and experimental investigation are being conducted. (3) The coefficient of nickel diffusion in the ODS steel can be estimated based on the results of nickel concentration measurement. This value is larger than that of the diffusion coefficient for typical α-Fe steel at temperature below 973 K

  19. Short Communication on “In-situ TEM ion irradiation investigations on U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} at LWR temperatures”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin, E-mail: ymiao@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Harp, Jason [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID 83415 (United States); Mo, Kun [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Bhattacharya, Sumit [Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Baldo, Peter; Yacout, Abdellatif M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    The radiation-induced amorphization of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy using 1 MeV Kr ion irradiation. Both arc-melted and sintered U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} specimens were irradiated at room temperature to confirm the similarity in their responses to radiation. The sintered specimens were then irradiated at 350 °C and 550 °C up to 7.2 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} to examine their amorphization behavior under light water reactor (LWR) conditions. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} remains crystalline under irradiation at LWR temperatures. Oxidation of the material was observed at high irradiation doses.

  20. Development of the evaluation methodology for the material relocation behavior in the core disruptive accident of sodium-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, Yoshiharu; Kamiyama, Kenji; Tagami, Hirotaka; Matsuba, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Tohru; Isozaki, Mikio; Yamano, Hidemasa; Morita, Koji; Guo, LianCheng; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The in-vessel retention (IVR) of core disruptive accident (CDA) is of prime importance in enhancing safety characteristics of sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). In the CDA of SFRs, molten core material relocates to the lower plenum of reactor vessel and may impose significant thermal load on the structures, resulting in the melt-through of the reactor vessel. In order to enable the assessment of this relocation process and prove that IVR of core material is the most probable consequence of the CDA in SFRs, a research program to develop the evaluation methodology for the material relocation behavior in the CDA of SFRs has been conducted. This program consists of three developmental studies, namely the development of the analysis method of molten material discharge from the core region, the development of evaluation methodology of molten material penetration into sodium pool, and the development of the simulation tool of debris bed behavior. The analysis method of molten material discharge was developed based on the computer code SIMMER-III since this code is designed to simulate the multi-phase, multi-component fluid dynamics with phase changes involved in the discharge process. Several experiments simulating the molten material discharge through duct using simulant materials were utilized as the basis of validation study of the physical models in this code. It was shown that SIMMER-III with improved physical models could simulate the molten material discharge behavior, including the momentum exchange with duct wall and thermal interaction with coolant. In order to develop an evaluation methodology of molten material penetration into sodium pool, a series of experiments simulating jet penetration behavior into sodium pool in SFR thermal condition were performed. These experiments revealed that the molten jet was fragmented in significantly shorter penetration length than the prediction by existing correlation for light water reactor conditions, due to the direct

  1. In-situ synthetize multi-walled carbon nanotubes@MnO2 nanoflake core-shell structured materials for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Jiaoxia; Jia, Yi; Ma, Chun'an

    2012-10-01

    A new type of core-shell structured material consisting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanoflake is synthesized using an in-situ co-precipitation method. By scanning electron microscopy and transition electron microscope, it is confirmed that the core-shell nanostructure is formed by the uniform incorporation of birnessite-type MnO2 nanoflake growth round the surface of the activated-MWCNTs. That core-shell structured material electrode presents excellent electrochemical capacitance properties with the specific capacitance reaching 380 F g-1 at the current density of 5 A g-1 in 0.5 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. In addition, the electrode also exhibits good performance (the power density: 11.28 kW kg-1 at 5 A g-1) and long-term cycling stability (retaining 82.7% of its initial capacitance after 3500 cycles at 5 A g-1). It mainly attributes to MWCNTs not only providing considerable specific surface area for high mass loading of MnO2 nanoflakes to ensure effective utilization of MnO2 nanoflake, but also offering an electron pathway to improve electrical conductivity of the electrode materials. It is clearly indicated that such core-shell structured materials including MWCNTs and MnO2 nanoflake may find important applications for supercapacitors.

  2. Influence of material non-linearity on the thermo-mechanical response of polymer foam cored sandwich structures - FE modelling and preliminary experiemntal results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleti, Hara Naga Krishna Teja; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Fruehmann, Richard.K

    In this paper, the polymer foam cored sandwich structures with fibre reinforced composite face sheets will be analyzed using the commercial FE code ABAQUS/Standard® incorporating the material and geometrical non-linearity. Large deformations are allowed which attributes geometric non linearity...

  3. The Impact of Fukushima Accidents on LWR Safety and the Nuclear Power Risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    The history of the consideration of severe accidents (SA) safety begins really with WASH-1400 [1] initiated by USNRC in early 1970s. The WASH-1400 considered accidents of decreasing probability and increasing consequence.The accidents considered, occurred due to successive faults which lead to at least the melting of the core and a possible radioactivity release to the environment. The increasing consequence accidents would entail additional failures e.g., vessel failure, late containment failure, containment bypass, early containment failure etc. These additional failures would lead to larger releases of radioactivity and thus larger consequences for the public in the vicinity of the plant. WASH -1400 did not provide estimates of the costs for cleanup of the contaminated land area. Also there were no estimates of the economic costs involved in removal of the molten fuel and the decommissioning of the stricken plant. The emphasis in WASH-1400 was primarily with physical damage to the population in the vicinity of the plant and peripherally with the societal, social and economic costs of a severe accident in a large LWR plant

  4. TRU transmutation using ThO2-UO2 and fully ceramic micro-encapsulated fuels in LWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Gonghoon; Hong, Sergi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to design new LWR fuel assemblies which are able to efficiently destroy TRU (transuranics) nuclide without degradation of safety aspects by using ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel pins and FCM (Fully Ceramic Micro-encapsulated) fuel pins containing TRU fuel particles. Thorium was mixed to UO 2 in order to reduce the generation of plutonium nuclides and to save the uranium resources in the UO 2 pins. Additionally, the use of thorium contributes to the extension of the fuel cycle length. All calculations were performed by using DeCART (Deterministic Core Analysis based on Ray Tracing) code. The results show that the new concept of fuel assembly has the TRU destruction rates of ∼40% and ∼25% per 1200 EFPD (Effective Full Power Day) over the TRU FCM pins and the overall fuel assembly, respectively, without degradation of FTC and MTC

  5. I2S-LWR Activation Analysis of Heat Exchangers Using Hybrid Shielding Methodology with SCALE6.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijevic, M.; Pevec, D.; Jecmenica, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR) concept developed by Georgia Tech is a novel PWR reactor delivering electric power of 1000 MWe while implementing inherent safety features typical for Generation III+ small modular reactors. The main safety feature is based on integral primary circuit configuration, bringing together compact design of the reactor core with 121 fuel assembly (FA), control rod drive mechanism (CRDM), 8 primary heat exchangers (PHE), 4 passive decay heat removal systems (DHRS), 8 pumps, and other integral components. A high power density core based on silicide fuel is selected to achieve a high thermal power which is extracted with PHEs placed in the annual region between the barrel and the vessel. The complex and integrated design of I2S-LWR leads to activation of integral components, mainly made from stainless steel, so accurate and precise Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are needed to quantify potential dose rates to personnel during routine maintenance operation. This shielding problem is therefore very challenging one, posing a non-trivial neutron flux solution in a phase space. This paper presents the performance of the hybrid shielding methodologies CADIS/FW-CADIS implemented in the MAVRIC sequence of the SCALE6.1 code package. The main objective was to develop a detailed MC shielding model of the I2S-LWR reactor along with effective variance reduction (VR) parameters and to calculate neutron fluence rates inside PHEs. Such results are then utilized to find neutron activation rate distribution via 60Co generation inside of a stack of microchannel heat exchangers (MCHX), which will be periodically withdrawn for the maintenance. 59Co impurities are the main cause of (n,gamma) radiative gamma dose to personnel via neutron activation since 60Co has half-life of 5.27 years and is emitting high energy gamma rays (1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV). The developed MC model was successfully used to find converged fluxes inside all 8 stacks of

  6. LWR risk management by safety R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sheikh, K.A.; Damon, D.R.; Temme, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology which has been developed for selecting LWR safety RandD projects. The methodology provides ranking of the RandD projects and the RandD budget allocation which minimizes public risk. The methodology contains procedures to identify institutional, organizational, legal, and contractual factors which affect the probabilities of success and use of RandD projects so that these factors can be evaluated and possibly managed.The methodology also contains a nonlinear optimization code to provide the optimum selection of RandD projects and evaluate the sensitivity of this selection to uncertainity in the input data. Application of the methodology to a test case has shown that: 1) commonly used schemes for ranking RandD projects do not necessarily lead to the optimum selection, and 2) the optimum selection is not necessarily strongly sensitive to uncertainty in the input data

  7. Spent LWR fuel leach tests: Waste Isolation Safety Assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Y.B.

    1979-04-01

    Spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels with burnups of 54.5, 28 and 9 MWd/kgU were leach-tested in deionized water at 25 0 C. Fuel burnup has no apparent effect on the calculated leach rates based upon the behavior of 137 Cs and 239+240 Pu. A leach test of 54.5 MWd/kgU spent fuel in synthetic sea brine showed that the cesium-based leach rate is lower in sea brine than in deionized water. A rise in the leach rate was observed after approximately 600 d of cumulative leaching. During the rise, the leach rate for all the measured radionuclides become nearly equal. Evidence suggests that exposure of new surfaces to the leachant may cause the increase. As a result, experimental work to study leaching mechanisms of spent fuel has been initiated. 22 figures

  8. Evaluation of management alternatives for LWR hulls and caps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudon, L.; Mehling, O.; Cecille, L.; Thiels, G.; Kowa, S.

    1993-01-01

    Hulls and caps resulting from the reprocessing of LWR spent fuels represent one of the major sources of alpha-bearing solid waste generated during the nuclear fuel cycle. The Commission of the European Communities has undertaken considerable R and D efforts on the development of advanced treatment and conditioning methods for this type of waste. In view of the encouraging results achieved, the Commission launched a theoretical assessment study on cladding waste management. Six practical or potential schemes were identified and elaborated: direct cementation, decontamination prior to cementation, rolling before cementation, rolling followed by embedding in graphite, compaction, and melting in a cold crucible. The economic aspects of each management option were also investigated. This included the assessment of the plant (treatment, conditioning and interim storage), transport and disposal costs. Further consideration will be required to define the best management option for 'cap' wastes. Transport and disposal costs will also require further analysis from an industrial standpoint

  9. Cost optimization of long-cycle LWR operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handwerk, C.S.; Driscoll, M.J.; McMahon, M.V.; Todreas, N.E.

    1997-01-01

    The continuing emphasis on improvement of plant capacity factor, as a major means to make nuclear energy more cost competitive in the current deregulatory environment, motivates heightened interest in long intra-refueling intervals and high burnup in LWR units. This study examines the economic implications of these trends, to determine the envelope of profitable fuel management tactics. One batch management is found to be significantly more expensive than two-batch management. Parametric studies were carried out varying the most important input parameters. If ultra-high burnup can be achieved, then n = 3 or even n = 4 management may be preferable. For n = 1 or 2, economic performance declines at higher burnups, hence providing no great incentive for moving further in that direction. Values for n > 2 are also attractive because, for a given burnup target, required enrichment decreases as n increases. This study was limited to average batch burnups below 60,000 MWd/MT

  10. Irradiation effects on thermal properties of LWR hydride fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrani, Kurt, E-mail: terrani@berkeley.edu [University of California, 4155 Etcheverry Hall, M.C. 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Balooch, Mehdi [University of California, 4155 Etcheverry Hall, M.C. 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Carpenter, David; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Keiser, Dennis; Meyer, Mitchell [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Olander, Donald [University of California, 4155 Etcheverry Hall, M.C. 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Three hydride mini-fuel rods were fabricated and irradiated at the MIT nuclear reactor with a maximum burnup of 0.31% FIMA or ∼5 MWd/kgU equivalent oxide fuel burnup. Fuel rods consisted of uranium-zirconium hydride (U (30 wt%)ZrH{sub 1.6}) pellets clad inside a LWR Zircaloy-2 tubing. The gap between the fuel and the cladding was filled with lead-bismuth eutectic alloy to eliminate the gas gap and the large temperature drop across it. Each mini-fuel rod was instrumented with two thermocouples with tips that are axially located halfway through the fuel centerline and cladding surface. In-pile temperature measurements enabled calculation of thermal conductivity in this fuel as a function of temperature and burnup. In-pile thermal conductivity at the beginning of test agreed well with out-of-pile measurements on unirradiated fuel and decreased rapidly with burnup.

  11. Fracture probability evaluation of a LWR pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandemange, J.; Pellissier-Tanon, A.; Quero, J.; Carnino, A.; Dufresne, J.

    1978-01-01

    Fracture probability evaluation, of a LWR pressure vessel have been performed in the past, using statistical data from conventional plant. A more accurate evaluation has been requested in 1976 from the SCSIN to the CEA. With this object, a joint collaboration agreement has been signed between CEA, EURATOM/ISPRA and FRAMATOME. The whole program proceeding from this agreement is managed by a joint board including the three partners. The basic objective of this program is to develop a method which integrates, or makes it possible to integrate at a later stage, the greatest number of significant parameters. Also, in order to prepare the practical applications, a special effort is being made to collect the data corresponding to these parameters. Parallel basic research program have been launched in order to clarify our knowledge on some important parts of the main factors contributing to the evaluation. The results of this research will be progressively introduced into the method or will help checking its validity

  12. Dual-purpose LWR supplying heat for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waplington, G.; Fitcher, H.

    1977-01-01

    A number of desalination processes are at present in various stages of development but distillation is the only serious choice for a large-scale project. The distillation process temperature requirement is low compared with the temperature of steam normally delivered to the turbine in a power generation plant. This gives the possibility for combining the functions of electricity generation with water distillation. The brine heater of the multi-stage flash distillation plant can be supplied with steam after partial expansion through a turbine. Such an arrangement allows the use of a standard nuclear steam supply system and makes fuller use of the energy output than would either single purpose role. The LWR represents a safe, reliable and economic system, and is easily able to provide heat of a quality adequate for the desalination process. (M.S.)

  13. A study on the behavior of defected LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung; Kim, Eun Ka; Kim, Keon Sik; Suh, Hang Suck; Kim, Seung Jung; Ro, Seung Gy; Park, Chong Mook; Ji, Pyung Gook

    1992-03-01

    To investigate the storage behavior of the defective LWR spent fuel rods, the characteristic changes of fuel and cladding are to be measured and analyzed. In addition, the oxidation study in air on non-irradiated and irradiated U0 2 was performed. No changes were observed in the tested fuel rods after 30 month storage. The Cs-134, 137 released rapidly during the initial 3 months of storage, but remained in constant value after 3 month storage and the release was almost ceased after 30 month storage. The weight gain of non-irradiated U0 2 samples showed a trend of S type curves and the activation energies were 11OKJ/mol above 350 deg C. and 143KJ/mol below 350 deg C. But irradiated U0 2 showed a rapid increase at initial stage of oxidation and a decrease at later stage when compared with the results of non-irradiated U0 2 . (Author)

  14. Progress in Development of I2S-LWR Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The paper will present the progress in developing the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (12S-LWR) concept. This new concept aims to combine the competitive economics of a large nuclear power plant, with enhanced safety achieved by the integral primary circuit configuration (previously considered only for PWRs with power levels not exceeding several hundred MWc), and with enhanced accident tolerance (to address concerns after the Fukushima Dai-lchi accidents). Several new technologies are being developed to enable this concept, including novel silicide fuel and micro-channel primary heat exchangers. This project is performed by a multi-disciplinary multi-organization team led by Georgia Tech, including academia, a national laboratory, nuclear industry, and a power utility, wit expected participation of the University of Zagreb. (author)

  15. Automatic test equipment for C and I of compact LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayya, Anuradha; Marathe, P.P.; Madala, Kalyan C.

    2014-01-01

    The C and I of compact LWR consist of a wide variety of electronic modules. Testing of these modules manually was found to be very cumbersome. To ease the testing of these modules, Automatic Test Equipments (ATE) were developed jointly by BARC and ECIL. This paper describes the design of two ATEs for testing 69 types of modules. A power supply ATE was developed for 43 types of power supply modules of type AC-AC, AC-DC, DC-DC and signal conditioning modules. A VME ATE was developed to test 26 types of VME bus based and other microcontroller based non-bussed modules. These ATEs are used for the automated black box testing of modules by feeding power and control inputs and checking the outputs without operator intervention. This paper describes the important considerations in design and the major design challenges. (author)

  16. Influence of core thickness and artificial aging on the biaxial flexural strength of different all-ceramic materials: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikicier, Sibel; Ayyildiz, Simel; Ozen, Julide; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2017-05-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the flexural strength of all-ceramics with varying core thicknesses submitted to aging. In-Ceram Alumina (IC), IPS e.max Press (EM) and Katana (K) (n=40), were selected. Each group contained two core groups based on the core thickness as follows: IC/0.5, IC/0.8, EM/0.5, EM/0.8, K/0.5 and K/0.8 mm in thickness (n=20 each). Ten specimens from each group were subjected to aging and all specimens were tested for strength in a testing machine either with or without being subjected aging. The mean strength of the K were higher (873.05 MPa) than that of the IC (548.28 MPa) and EM (374.32 MPa) regardless of core thickness. Strength values increased with increasing core thickness for all IC, EM and K regardless of aging. Results of this study concluded that strength was not significantly affected by aging. Different core thicknesses affected strength of the all-ceramic materials tested (p<0.05).

  17. The results of the CCI-3 reactor material experiment investigating 2-D core-concrete interaction and debris coolability with a siliceous concrete crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Basu, S.

    2006-01-01

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis with the objectives of resolving the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. Despite years of international research, there are remaining uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. In the continuing effort to bridge this data gap, the third in a series of large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiments (CCI-3) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test involved the interaction of a 375 kg core-oxide melt within a two-dimensional siliceous concrete crucible. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predetermined ablation depth was reached, the cavity was flooded to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a summary description of the test facility and an overview of test results

  18. Influence of Nonfused Cores on the Photovoltaic Performance of Linear Triphenylamine-Based Hole-Transporting Materials for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yungen; Wang, Zhihui; Liang, Mao; Cheng, Hua; Li, Mengyuan; Liu, Liyuan; Wang, Baiyue; Wu, Jinhua; Prasad Ghimire, Raju; Wang, Xuda; Sun, Zhe; Xue, Song; Qiao, Qiquan

    2018-05-18

    The core plays a crucial role in achieving high performance of linear hole transport materials (HTMs) toward the perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Most studies focused on the development of fused heterocycles as cores for HTMs. Nevertheless, nonfused heterocycles deserve to be studied since they can be easily synthesized. In this work, we reported a series of low-cost triphenylamine HTMs (M101-M106) with different nonfused cores. Results concluded that the introduced core has a significant influence on conductivity, hole mobility, energy level, and solubility of linear HTMs. M103 and M104 with nonfused oligothiophene cores are superior to other HTMs in terms of conductivity, hole mobility, and surface morphology. PSCs based on M104 exhibited the highest power conversion efficiency of 16.50% under AM 1.5 sun, which is comparable to that of spiro-OMeTAD (16.67%) under the same conditions. Importantly, the employment of M104 is highly economical in terms of the cost of synthesis as compared to that of spiro-OMeTAD. This work demonstrated that nonfused heterocycles, such as oligothiophene, are promising cores for high performance of linear HTMs toward PSCs.

  19. Safety aspects of LWR fuel reprocessing and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.; Leichsenring, C.H.; Herrmann, G.W.; Schueller, W.; Hagenberg, W.; Stoll, W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper is focused on the safety and the control of the consequences of credible accidents in LWR fuel reprocessing plants and in mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Each of these plants serve for many power reactor (about 50.000 Mwel) thus the contribution to the overall risk of nuclear energy is correspondingly low. Because of basic functional differences between reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication plants and nuclear power reactors, the structure and safety systems of these plants are different in many respects. The most important differences that influence safety systems are: (1) Both fuel reprocessing and fabrication plants do not have the high system pressure that is associated with power reactors. (2) A considerable amount of the radioactivity of the fuel, which is in the form of short-lived radionuclides has decayed. Therefore, fuel reprocessing plants and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants are designed with multiple confinement barriers for control of radioactive materials, but do not require the high-pressure containment systems that are used in LWR plants. The consequences of accidents which may lead to the dispersion of radioactive materials such as chemical explosions, nuclear excursions, fires and failure of cooling systems are considered. A reasonable high reliability of the multiple confinement approach can be assured by design. In fuel reprocessing plants, forced cooling is necessary only in systems where fission products are accumulated. However, the control of radioactive materials can be maintained during normal operation and during the above mentioned accidents, if the dissolver off-gas and vessel off-gas treatment systems provide for effective removal of radioactive iodine, radioactive particulates, nitrogen oxides, tritium and krypton 85. In addition, the following incidents in the dissolver off-gas system itself must be controlled: failures of iodine filters, hydrogen explosion in O 2 - and NOsub(x)-reduction component, decomposition of

  20. Materials behavior in interim storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bailey, W.J.; Gilbert, E.R.; Inman, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    Interim storage has emerged as the only current spent-fuel management method in the US and is essential in all countries with nuclear reactors. Materials behavior is a key aspect in licensing interim-storage facilities for several decades of spent-fuel storage. This paper reviews materials behavior in wet storage, which is licensed for light-water reactor (LWR) fuel, and dry storage, for which a licensing position for LWR fuel is developing

  1. Effect of the shell material and confinement type on the conversion efficiency of core/shell quantum dot nanocrystal solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet

    2018-05-23

    In this study, the effects of the shell material and confinement type on the conversion efficiency of core/shell quantum dot nanocrystal (QDNC) solar cells have been investigated in detail. For this purpose, the conventional, i.e. original, detailed balance model, developed by Shockley and Queisser to calculate an upper limit for the conversion efficiency of silicon p-n junction solar cells, is modified in a simple and effective way to calculate the conversion efficiency of core/shell QDNC solar cells. Since the existing model relies on the gap energy ([Formula: see text]) of the solar cell, it does not make an estimation about the effect of QDNC materials on the efficiency of the solar cells, and gives the same efficiency values for several QDNC solar cells with the same [Formula: see text]. The proposed modification, however, estimates a conversion efficiency in relation to the material properties and also the confinement type of the QDNCs. The results of the modified model show that, in contrast to the original one, the conversion efficiencies of different QDNC solar cells, even if they have the same [Formula: see text], become different depending upon the confinement type and shell material of the core/shell QDNCs, and this is crucial in the design and fabrication of the new generation solar cells to predict the confinement type and also appropriate QDNC materials for better efficiency.

  2. Effect of the shell material and confinement type on the conversion efficiency of core/shell quantum dot nanocrystal solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the effects of the shell material and confinement type on the conversion efficiency of core/shell quantum dot nanocrystal (QDNC) solar cells have been investigated in detail. For this purpose, the conventional, i.e. original, detailed balance model, developed by Shockley and Queisser to calculate an upper limit for the conversion efficiency of silicon p–n junction solar cells, is modified in a simple and effective way to calculate the conversion efficiency of core/shell QDNC solar cells. Since the existing model relies on the gap energy () of the solar cell, it does not make an estimation about the effect of QDNC materials on the efficiency of the solar cells, and gives the same efficiency values for several QDNC solar cells with the same . The proposed modification, however, estimates a conversion efficiency in relation to the material properties and also the confinement type of the QDNCs. The results of the modified model show that, in contrast to the original one, the conversion efficiencies of different QDNC solar cells, even if they have the same , become different depending upon the confinement type and shell material of the core/shell QDNCs, and this is crucial in the design and fabrication of the new generation solar cells to predict the confinement type and also appropriate QDNC materials for better efficiency.

  3. Repairing rabbit radial defects by combining bone marrow stroma stem cells with bone scaffold material comprising a core-cladding structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Liu, G H; Wu, Q; Yu, B

    2015-10-05

    We prepared a bone scaffold material comprising a PLGA/β-TCP core and a Type I collagen cladding, and recombined it with bone marrow stroma stem cells (BMSCs) to evaluate its potential for use in bone tissue engineering by in vivo and in vitro experiments. PLGA/β-TCP without a cladding was used for comparison. The adherence rate of the BMSCs to the scaffold was determined by cell counting. Cell proliferation rate was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. The osteogenic capability was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity. The scaffold materials were recombined with the BMSCs and implanted into a large segmental rabbit radial defect model to evaluate defect repair. Osteogenesis was assessed in the scaffold materials by histological and double immunofluorescence labeling, etc. The adherence number, proliferation number, and alkaline phosphatase expression of the cells on the bone scaffold material with core-cladding structure were significantly higher than the corresponding values in the PLGA/β-TCP composite scaffold material (P structure completely degraded at the bone defect site and bone formation was completed. The rabbit large sentimental radial defect was successfully repaired. The degradation and osteogenesis rates matched well. The bone scaffold with core-cladding structure exhibited better osteogenic activity and capacity to repair a large segmental bone defect compared to the PLGA/β-TCP composite scaffold. The bone scaffold with core-cladding structure has excellent physical properties and biocompatibility. It is an ideal scaffold material for bone tissue engineering.

  4. A fracture mechanics approach for estimating fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. B.; Chopra, O. K.

    2000-01-01

    A fracture mechanics approach for elastic-plastic materials has been used to evaluate the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels. The fatigue life of such steel, defined as the number of cycles required to form an engineering-size crack, i.e., 3-mm deep, is considered to be composed of the growth of (a) microstructurally small cracks and (b) mechanically small cracks. The growth of the latter was characterized in terms of ΔJ and crack growth rate (da/dN) data in air and LWR environments; in water, the growth rates from long crack tests had to be decreased to match the rates from fatigue S-N data. The growth of microstructurally small cracks was expressed by a modified Hobson relationship in air and by a slip dissolution/oxidation model in water. The crack length for transition from a microstructurally small crack to a mechanically small crack was based on studies on small crack growth. The estimated fatigue S-N curves show good agreement with the experimental data for these steels in air and water environments. At low strain amplitudes, the predicted lives in water can be significantly lower than the experimental values

  5. Microstructure and hydrothermal corrosion behavior of NITE-SiC with various sintering additives in LWR coolant environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, Chad M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kim, Young -Jin [GE Global Research Center, Schenectady, NY (United States); Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Nano-infiltration and transient eutectic phase (NITE) sintering was developed for fabrication of nuclear grade SiC composites. We produced monolithic SiC ceramics using NITE sintering, as candidates for accident-tolerant fuels in light-water reactors (LWRs). In this work, we exposed three different NITE chemistries (yttria-alumina [YA], ceria-zirconia-alumina [CZA], and yttria-zirconia-alumina [YZA]) to autoclave conditions simulating LWR coolant loops. The YZA was most corrosion resistant, followed by CZA, with YA being worst. High-resolution elemental analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) X-ray mapping combined with multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) datamining helped explain the differences in corrosion. YA-NITE lost all Al from the corroded region and the ytttria reformed into blocky precipitates. The CZA material lost all Al from the corroded area, and the YZA – which suffered the least corrosion –retained some Al in the corroded region. Lastly, the results indicate that the YZA-NITE SiC is most resistant to hydrothermal corrosion in the LWR environment.

  6. Configuration of LWR fuel enrichment or burnup yielding maximum power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartosek, V.; Zalesky, K.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis is given of the spatial distribution of fuel burnup and enrichment in a light-water lattice of given dimensions with slightly enriched uranium, at which the maximum output is achieved. It is based on the spatial solution of neutron flux using a one-group diffusion model in which linear dependence may be expected of the fission cross section and the material buckling parameter on the fuel burnup and enrichment. Two problem constraints are considered, i.e., the neutron flux value and the specific output value. For the former the optimum core configuration remains qualitatively unchanged for any reflector thickness, for the latter the cases of a reactor with and without reflector must be distinguished. (Z.M.)

  7. A Brief Assessment of North Korea's Capacities for Building an Experimental LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Hyu; An, Jin Soo

    2011-01-01

    On November 2010, North Korea revealed the construction site of 100 MWt (thermal) experimental LWR in the early stage with a target operation date of 2012. And they claimed that their first LWR construction project is proceeding with strictly domestic talent and resources. Introduction of LWR imposes various technical challenges, even though North Korea has experiences in the construction and management of graphite-moderated and gas-cooled reactor. So, there are doubts about whether they can successfully complete the project in time without any external support. In this paper, to estimate the fate of the LWR construction, we focused on the North Korea's capability to deal with the technical challenges which differ from those of gas-graphite reactor

  8. A Brief Assessment of North Korea's Capacities for Building an Experimental LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Hyu; An, Jin Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    On November 2010, North Korea revealed the construction site of 100 MWt (thermal) experimental LWR in the early stage with a target operation date of 2012. And they claimed that their first LWR construction project is proceeding with strictly domestic talent and resources. Introduction of LWR imposes various technical challenges, even though North Korea has experiences in the construction and management of graphite-moderated and gas-cooled reactor. So, there are doubts about whether they can successfully complete the project in time without any external support. In this paper, to estimate the fate of the LWR construction, we focused on the North Korea's capability to deal with the technical challenges which differ from those of gas-graphite reactor

  9. LWR pressure vessel irradiation surveillance dosimetry. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, G L; McElroy, W N; Lippincott, E P; Gold, R

    1978-12-01

    Program objectives and progress to date by the national laboratories in LWR pressure vessel irradiation surveillance dosimetry are summarized. Participants in the program include: Rockwell International, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, National Bureau of Standards, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  10. Properties of polyurethane foam/coconut coir fiber as a core material and as a sandwich composites component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, M. A.; Abdullah, H. Z.; Idris, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    This research focuses on the fabrication and characterization of sandwich composite panels using glass fiber composite skin and polyurethane foam reinforced coconut coir fiber core. The main objectives are to characterize the physical and mechanical properties and to elucidate the effect of coconut coir fibers in polyurethane foam cores and sandwich composite panels. Coconut coir fibers were used as reinforcement in polyurethane foams in which later were applied as the core in sandwich composites ranged from 5 wt% to 20 wt%. The physical and mechanical properties found to be significant at 5 wt% coconut coir fiber in polyurethane foam cores as well as in sandwich composites. It was found that composites properties serve better in sandwich composites construction.

  11. Properties of polyurethane foam/coconut coir fiber as a core material and as a sandwich composites component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmi, M A; Abdullah, H Z; Idris, M I

    2013-01-01

    This research focuses on the fabrication and characterization of sandwich composite panels using glass fiber composite skin and polyurethane foam reinforced coconut coir fiber core. The main objectives are to characterize the physical and mechanical properties and to elucidate the effect of coconut coir fibers in polyurethane foam cores and sandwich composite panels. Coconut coir fibers were used as reinforcement in polyurethane foams in which later were applied as the core in sandwich composites ranged from 5 wt% to 20 wt%. The physical and mechanical properties found to be significant at 5 wt% coconut coir fiber in polyurethane foam cores as well as in sandwich composites. It was found that composites properties serve better in sandwich composites construction

  12. Low leaching and low LWR photoresist development for 193 nm immersion lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Nobuo; Lee, Youngjoon; Miyagawa, Takayuki; Edamatsu, Kunishige; Takemoto, Ichiki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tsuchida, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Keiko; Konishi, Shinji; Nakano, Katsushi; Tomoharu, Fujiwara

    2006-03-01

    receding contact angle become very important issue for not only defectivity but also scanner throughput. Some of our experimental results along this line of study are also included in the report. The last topic covered is LWR (Line Width Roughness) as an essential leverage for performance improvement, especially for the smaller CD that immersion lithography is aiming to define. Our recent effort to find effect and working concept to reduce LWR with low leaching materials is also described.

  13. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulations of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mei, Zhigang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hofman, Gerard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel has higher thermal conductivity and higher uranium density, making it a promising candidate for the accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs). However, previous studies on the fuel performance of U3Si2, including both experimental and computational approaches, have been focusing on the irradiation conditions in research reactors, which usually involve low operation temperatures and high fuel burnups. Thus, it is important to examine the fuel performance of U3Si2 at typical LWR conditions so as to evaluate the feasibility of replacing conventional uranium dioxide fuel with this silicide fuel material. As in-reactor irradiation experiments involve significant time and financial cost, it is appropriate to utilize modeling tools to estimate the behavior of U3Si2 in LWRs based on all those available research reactor experimental references and state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculation capabilities at the early development stage. Hence, in this report, a comprehensive investigation of the fission gas swelling behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is introduced. The modeling efforts mentioned in this report was based on the rate theory (RT) model of fission gas bubble evolution that has been successfully applied for a variety of fuel materials at devious reactor conditions. Both existing experimental data and DFT-calculated results were used for the optimization of the parameters adopted by the RT model. Meanwhile, the fuel-cladding interaction was captured by the coupling of the RT model with simplified mechanical correlations. Therefore, the swelling behavior of U3Si2 fuel and its consequent interaction with cladding in LWRs was predicted by the rate theory modeling, providing valuable information for the development of U3Si2 fuel as an accident

  14. Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1998-01-01

    This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle

  15. Metholology for the selection of LWR safety R and D projects. Phase I, status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sheikh, K.A.

    1980-03-01

    The objective of the LWR R and D Selection Methodology Program is to develop and demonstrate an R and D selection methodology appropriate for LWR safety technology. This report documents the development work from the program beginning in April, 1979 to the end of Fiscal Year 1979. The scope of work for this period included three tasks; methodology review (Task 1), measures development (Task 2), and methodology development for the first phase of application (Task 3). The accomplishments of these tasks are presented

  16. Nano-sized LiFePO4/C composite with core-shell structure as cathode material for lithium ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Min; Li, Ying; Hu, Yemin; Zhu, Mingyuan; Jin, Hongming; Li, Wenxian

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized LiFePO4/C composite with core-shell structure was fabricated via a well-designed approach as cathode material forlithium ion battery. The nano-sized LiFePO4/C composite with whole carbon shell coating layer showed an excellent electrical performance. - Abstract: Nano-sized composite with LiFePO 4 -core and carbon-shell was synthesized via a facile route followed by heat treatment at 650 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the core is well crystallized LiFePO 4 . The electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) observations show that the core-shell structured LiFePO 4 /C composite coating with whole carbon shell layer of ∼2.8 nm, possesses a specific surface area of 51 m 2 g −1 . As cathode material for lithium ion battery, the core-shell LiFePO 4 /C composite exhibits high initial capacity of 161 mAh g −1 at 0.1 C, excellent high-rate discharge capacity of 135 mAh g −1 at 5 C and perfect cycling retention of 99.6% at 100 th cycle. All these promising results should be contributed to the core-shell nanostructure which prevents collapse of the particle structure in the long-term charge and discharge cycles, as well as the large surface area of the nano-sized LiFePO 4 /C composite which enhances the electronic conductivity and shortens the distance of lithium ion diffusion

  17. Implications of plutonium utilization strategies on the transition from a LWR economy to a breeder economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.F.; Fleischman, R.M.; White, M.K.

    1977-02-01

    The plutonium interface between the LWR and LMFBR fuel cycles is examined for typical nuclear growth projections both with and without plutonium recycle in LWRs. In order to guarantee a fuel supply for projected LMFBR growth rates, significant multiple Pu recycle in LWRs will not be possible. However, about 78% of the benefit of multiple plutonium recycle between now and the turn of the century is realized by one recycle and then stockpiling spent MOX for the LMFBR. LMFBR reprocessing schecules are estimated based on accumulation of reprocessing load. These schedules are used to estimate the amount of plutonium recovered from LMFBR fuels and determine the residual LWR plutonium required to meet LMFBR demand. The stockpile of LWR produced plutonium in spent MOX is sufficient to fuel the LMFBR until commercial LMFBR reprocessing can be justified. After that time, recycle of plutonium in LWRs will be significantly limited by a continuing LMFBR demand for LWR plutonium due to the projected high LMFBR growth rate. LWR reprocessing requirements are estimated for the assumed condition that LWR plutonium recycle is not approved, but the LMFBR is still pursued as an energy option. The uncertainties presented by this condition are addressed qualitatively. However, in our judgment these uncertainties in the plutonium market would likely delay LMFBR growth to levels significantly below current projections

  18. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 6. Cost determination of the LWR waste management routes (treatment/conditioning/packaging/transport operations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiels, G.M.; Kowa, S.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the cost determination of a number of schemes for the treatment, conditioning, packaging, interim storage and transport operations of LWR wastes drawn up on the basis of Belgian, French and German practices in this particular area. In addition to the general procedure elaborated for determining, actualizing and scaling of plant and transport costs associated with the various schemes, in-depth calculations of each intermediate management stage are included in this report. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management routes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  19. Visible-light photochemical activity of heterostructured core-shell materials composed of selected ternary titanates and ferrites coated by tiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Yiling; Nuhfer, Noel T; Barmak, Katayun; Salvador, Paul A; Rohrer, Gregory S

    2013-06-12

    Heterostructured photocatalysts comprised of microcrystalline (mc-) cores and nanostructured (ns-) shells were prepared by the sol-gel method. The ability of titania-coated ATiO3 (A = Fe, Pb) and AFeO3 (A = Bi, La, Y) catalysts to degrade methylene blue in visible light (λ > 420 nm) was compared. The catalysts with the titanate cores had enhanced photocatalytic activities for methylene blue degradation compared to their components alone, whereas the catalysts with ferrite cores did not. The temperature at which the ns-titania shell is crystallized influences the photocatalytic dye degradation. mc-FeTiO3/ns-TiO2 annealed at 500 °C shows the highest reaction rate. Fe-doped TiO2, which absorbs visible light, did not show enhanced photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation. This result indicates that iron contamination is not a decisive factor in the reduced reactivity of the titania coated ferrite catalysts. The higher reactivity of materials with the titanate cores suggests that photogenerated charge carriers are more easily transported across the titanate-titanate interface than the ferrite-titanate interface and this provides guidance for materials selection in composite catalyst design.

  20. The effect of different soft segments on the formation and properties of binary core microencapsulated phase change materials with polyurea/polyurethane double shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanhong; Chu, Xiaodong; Tang, Guoyi; Yao, Youwei

    2013-02-15

    A series of polyurea/polyurethane microcapsules with butyl stearate and paraffin as binary core materials are successfully synthesized via interfacial polymerization method. The phase change temperature of these microencapsulated phase change materials (micro-PCMs) can be adjusted by regulating the composition of the binary core. SEM photographs show that these micro-PCMs have relatively spherical profiles and compact surfaces with diameter ranging from 5 to 15 μm. DSC results indicate that the binary core content in micro-PCMs is in a range of 45-60 wt%. Moreover, after being treated under 50°C for 7 days or subjected to thermal-cycling test for 500 times, the micro-PCMs keep good thermal performances and stabilities. Besides, these micro-PCMs show good thermal stability, and the degradation temperature differs from the different compositions of the binary core and molecular weight of the water-soluble monomers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.