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Sample records for lv fluid mechanics

  1. Association Between Myocardial Mechanics and Ischemic LV Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Nicholas; D'hooge, Jan; Marwick, Thomas H

    2015-12-01

    The outcomes associated with heart failure after myocardial infarction are still poor. Both global and regional left ventricular (LV) remodeling are associated with the progression of the post-infarct patient to heart failure, but although global remodeling can be accurately measured, regional LV remodeling has been more difficult to investigate. Preliminary evidence suggests that post-MI assessment of LV mechanics using stress and strain may predict global (and possibly regional) LV remodeling. A method of predicting both global and regional LV remodeling might facilitate earlier, targeted, and more extensive clinical intervention in those most likely to benefit from novel interventions such as cell therapy.

  2. Application of SPCALC for chemical and thermodynamic speciation of fluids -example for wells LV-4A, LV-11 and LV-13, Las Tres Virgenes geothermal field, BCS; Aplicacion del SPCALC en la especiacion quimica y termodinamica de fluidos: ejemplo del caso de los pozos LV-4A, LV-11 y LV-13, del campo geotermico de Las Tres Virgenes, BCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viggiano Guerra, J.C.; Sandoval Medina, F.; Flores Armenta, M.C. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)]. E-mail: fernando.sandoval@cfe.gob.mx, E-mail: magaly.flores@cfe.gob.mx; Perez, R.J. [Universidad de Calgary (Canada); Gonzalez Partida, E. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Geociencias, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    SPCALC is an excellent software application providing chemical and multi-phase speciation for geothermal fluids. Recently it was acquired by the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) through a contract with the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and the University of Calgary, Canada. Software methodology consists of calculating thermodynamic variables, such as activity (a) and fugacity (f) of chemical species, as well as the saturation indices (log Q/K) of mineral phases of the reservoir. In other words, it models the thermodynamic conditions of the reservoir (pH among other) and simulates the fluid-corrosion rate. This allows the software to foresee scaling and corrosion. In this paper, pervasive fluids in Cretaceous granitic rocks penetrated by wells LV-4A, LV-11 and LV-13 in Las Tres Virgenes geothermal field, BCS, are modeled, starting with chemical analyses. The more important ratios among activities [those which influence the fluid-rock interaction (i.e. {sup a}K{sup +}/{sup a}H{sup +}, {sup a}Ca{sup ++}/{sup a}H{sup +}, {sup a}Na{sup +}/{sup a}H{sup +}, {sup a}Mg{sup ++}/{sup a}H{sup +}) and whose results are the minerals visible under a microscope] are graphed in balance diagrams compatible with the pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions in the reservoir. Epidote (zoisite) is the mineral found in congruent equilibrium with the system. The main mineral association at those conditions (200-250 degrees Celsius and {approx}18 bar), as observed in the well cuttings, is calcite+illite-quartz{+-}epidote, which is explained by the hydrolithic reactions that form replacement calcite in the presence of CO{sub 2}, thus restricting the formation of epidote and eventually eliminating it. The process enhances the CO{sub 2} molarity in the residual fluid, even up to {sup m}CO{sub 2} 1, which means the CO{sub 2} can be diluted back into fluid and intervene again in the process of calcite formation (2HCO{sub 3}{sup -} + Ca{sup ++} = calcite + H{sub 2}O

  3. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  4. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  5. Fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kundu, Pijush K; Dowling, David R

    2011-01-01

    Fluid mechanics, the study of how fluids behave and interact under various forces and in various applied situations-whether in the liquid or gaseous state or both-is introduced and comprehensively covered in this widely adopted text. Revised and updated by Dr. David Dowling, Fluid Mechanics, 5e is suitable for both a first or second course in fluid mechanics at the graduate or advanced undergraduate level. Along with more than 100 new figures, the text has been reorganized and consolidated to provide a better flow and more cohesion of topics.Changes made to the

  6. Lectures on fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shinbrot, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Readable and user-friendly, this high-level introduction explores the derivation of the equations of fluid motion from statistical mechanics, classical theory, and a portion of the modern mathematical theory of viscous, incompressible fluids. 1973 edition.

  7. Fluid and particle mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Michell, S J

    2013-01-01

    Fluid and Particle Mechanics provides information pertinent to hydraulics or fluid mechanics. This book discusses the properties and behavior of liquids and gases in motion and at rest. Organized into nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the science of fluid mechanics that is subdivided accordingly into two main branches, namely, fluid statics and fluid dynamics. This text then examines the flowmeter devices used for the measurement of flow of liquids and gases. Other chapters consider the principle of resistance in open channel flow, which is based on improper application of th

  8. Left ventricular muscle and fluid mechanics in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucifora, Gaetano; Delgado, Victoria; Bertini, Matteo; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Van de Veire, Nico R; Ng, Arnold C T; Siebelink, Hans-Marc J; Schalij, Martin J; Holman, Eduard R; Sengupta, Partho P; Bax, Jeroen J

    2010-11-15

    Left ventricular (LV) diastolic filling is characterized by the formation of intraventricular rotational bodies of fluid (termed "vortex rings") that optimize the efficiency of LV ejection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphology and dynamics of LV diastolic vortex ring formation early after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in relation to LV diastolic function and infarct size. A total of 94 patients with a first ST-segment elevation AMI (59 ± 11 years; 78% men) were included. All patients underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention. After 48 hours, the following examinations were performed: 2-dimensional echocardiography with speckle-tracking analysis to assess the LV systolic and diastolic function, the vortex formation time (VFT, a dimensionless index for characterizing vortex formation), and the LV untwisting rate; contrast echocardiography to assess LV vortex morphology; and myocardial contrast echocardiography to identify the infarct size. Patients with a large infarct size (≥ 3 LV segments) had a significantly lower VFT (p mechanical sequence of diastolic restoration play key roles in modulating the morphology and dynamics of early diastolic vortex ring formation.

  9. Mechanics of fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Basniev, Kaplan S; Chilingar, George V 0

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of fluid flow is a fundamental engineering discipline explaining both natural phenomena and human-induced processes, and a thorough understanding of it is central to the operations of the oil and gas industry.  This book, written by some of the world's best-known and respected petroleum engineers, covers the concepts, theories, and applications of the mechanics of fluid flow for the veteran engineer working in the field and the student, alike.  It is a must-have for any engineer working in the oil and gas industry.

  10. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  11. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity v(v). The term "compressibility" as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci. 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and gases.

  12. Respiratory fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James B

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  13. Fluid mechanics fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cengel, Yunus

    2013-01-01

    Cengel and Cimbala's Fluid Mechanics Fundamentals and Applications, communicates directly with tomorrow's engineers in a simple yet precise manner. The text covers the basic principles and equations of fluid mechanics in the context of numerous and diverse real-world engineering examples. The text helps students develop an intuitive understanding of fluid mechanics by emphasizing the physics, using figures, numerous photographs and visual aids to reinforce the physics. The highly visual approach enhances the learning of Fluid mechanics by students. This text distinguishes itself from others by the way the material is presented - in a progressive order from simple to more difficult, building each chapter upon foundations laid down in previous chapters. In this way, even the traditionally challenging aspects of fluid mechanics can be learned effectively. McGraw-Hill is also proud to offer ConnectPlus powered by Maple with the third edition of Cengel/Cimbabla, Fluid Mechanics. This innovative and powerful new sy...

  14. Mechanical Behaviors and Elastic Parameters of Laminated Fabric URETEK3216LV Subjected to Uniaxial and Biaxial Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwen; Chen, Wujun; Wang, Mingyang; Ding, Yong; Zhou, Han; Zhao, Bing; Fan, Jin

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental study of the laminated fabric URETEK3216LV subjected to mono-uniaxial, uniaxial cyclic and biaxial cyclic loading was performed to expose the detailed mechanical behaviors and determine proper elastic parameters for the laminated fabrics under specific stress states. The elastic modulus-strain curves and elastic parameter response surfaces were used to reveal the mechanical behaviors, and a weighted average method of integrals was proposed to calculate the elastic parameters for different stress states. Results show that typical stress-strain curves consist of three distinct regions during loading: crimp region, nonlinear transition region and yarn extension region, which is consistent with those of the constitutive yarns. The elastic parameters and mechanical behaviors of the laminated fabric are stress-state specific, and they vary noticeably with the experimental protocols, stress ratios and stress levels. The proposed method is feasible to evaluate the elastic parameters no matter what stress states the materials are subjected to, and thus it may offer potential access to obtain accurate design and analysis of the airship structures under different loading conditions.

  15. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  16. Galilean relativistic fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ván, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Single component Galilean-relativistic (nonrelativistic) fluids are treated independently of reference frames. The basic fields are given, their balances, thermodynamic relations and the entropy production is calculated. The usual relative basic fields, the mass, momentum and energy densities, the diffusion current density, the pressure tensor and the heat flux are the time- and spacelike components of the third order mass-momentum-energy density tensor according to a velocity field. The transformation rules of the basic fields are derived and prove that the non-equilibrium thermodynamic background theory, that is the Gibbs relation, extensivity condition and the entropy production is absolute, that is independent of the reference frame and also of the fluid velocity. --- Az egykomponensu Galilei-relativisztikus (azaz nemrelativisztikus) disszipativ folyadekokat vonatkoztatasi rendszertol fuggetlenul targyaljuk. Megadjuk az alapmennyisegeket, ezek merlegeit, a termodinamikai osszefuggeseket es kiszamoljuk az ...

  17. Galilean relativistic fluid mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ván, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Single component nonrelativistic dissipative fluids are treated independently of reference frames and flow-frames. First the basic fields and their balances, then the related thermodynamic relations and the entropy production are calculated and the linear constitutive relations are given. The usual basic fields of mass, momentum, energy and their current densities, the heat flux, pressure tensor and diffusion flux are the time- and spacelike components of the third order mass-momentum-energy ...

  18. Galilean relativistic fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ván, P.

    2017-01-01

    Single-component nonrelativistic dissipative fluids are treated independently of reference frames and flow-frames. First the basic fields and their balances are derived, then the related thermodynamic relations and the entropy production are calculated and the linear constitutive relations are given. The usual basic fields of mass, momentum, energy and their current densities, the heat flux, pressure tensor and diffusion flux are the time- and spacelike components of the third-order mass-momentum-energy density-flux four-tensor. The corresponding Galilean transformation rules of the physical quantities are derived. It is proved that the non-equilibrium thermodynamic frame theory, including the thermostatic Gibbs relation and extensivity condition and also the entropy production, is independent of the reference frame and also the flow-frame of the fluid. The continuity-Fourier-Navier-Stokes equations are obtained almost in the traditional form if the flow of the fluid is fixed to the temperature. This choice of the flow-frame is the thermo-flow. A simple consequence of the theory is that the relation between the total, kinetic and internal energies is a Galilean transformation rule.

  19. Fluid Mechanics Can Be Fun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanks, Robert F.

    1979-01-01

    A humanistic approach to teaching fluid mechanics is described which minimizes lecturing, increases professor-student interaction, uses group and individual problem solving sessions, and allows for student response. (BB)

  20. Fluid Mechanics Can Be Fun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanks, Robert F.

    1979-01-01

    A humanistic approach to teaching fluid mechanics is described which minimizes lecturing, increases professor-student interaction, uses group and individual problem solving sessions, and allows for student response. (BB)

  1. PREFACE: XXI Fluid Mechanics Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyd, Janusz S.; Fornalik-Wajs, Elzbieta; Jaszczur, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This Conference Volume contains the papers presented at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) held at AGH - University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland, 15-18 June 2014, and accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Fluid Mechanics Conferences have been taking place every two years since 1974, a total of forty years. The 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) is being organized under the auspices of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee of Mechanics. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for the exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in fluid mechanics. Conference topics include, but are not limited to Aerodynamics, Atmospheric Science, Bio-Fluids, Combustion and Reacting Flows, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Flow Machinery, General Fluid Dynamics, Hydromechanics, Heat and Fluid Flow, Measurement Techniques, Micro- and Nano- Flow, Multi-Phase Flow, Non-Newtonian Fluids, Rotating and Stratified Flows, Turbulence. Within the general subjects of this conference, the Professor Janusz W. Elsner Competition for the best fluid mechanics paper presented during the Conference is organized. Authors holding a M.Sc. or a Ph.D. degree and who are not older than 35 years of age may enter the Competition. Authors with a Ph.D. degree must present individual papers; authors with a M.Sc. degree may present papers with their supervisor as coauthor, including original results of experimental, numerical or analytic research. Six state-of-the-art keynote papers were delivered by world leading experts. All contributed papers were peer reviewed. Recommendations were received from the International Scientific Committee, reviewers and the advisory board. Accordingly, of the 163 eligible extended abstracts submitted, after a review process by the International Scientific Committee, 137 papers were selected for presentation at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference, 68

  2. Advances in Environmental Fluid Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mihailovic, Dragutin T

    2010-01-01

    Environmental fluid mechanics (EFM) is the scientific study of transport, dispersion and transformation processes in natural fluid flows on our planet Earth, from the microscale to the planetary scale. This book brings together scientists and engineers working in research institutions, universities and academia, who engage in the study of theoretical, modeling, measuring and software aspects in environmental fluid mechanics. It provides a forum for the participants, and exchanges new ideas and expertise through the presentations of up-to-date and recent overall achievements in this field.

  3. Applied fluid mechanics; Mecanique des fluides appliquee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viollet, P.L.; Chabard, J.P.; Esposito, P.; Laurence, D. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees (ENPC), 75 - Paris (France)]|[Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    2002-07-01

    Computational hydraulics, computational fluid dynamics, and hydro-informatics have invaded virtually all domains of research and application in hydro-science and fluids engineering. To the extent that this invasion has led to improved understanding of complex fluid phenomena and provided a frame of reference for testing and verifying designs and operational schemes, we have all benefited from it. But to the extent that it has shifted attention away from fundamental descriptions and understanding of fluid phenomena, and toward computational and numerical issues, this invasion has left avoid in the scientific and technical literature. This void exists somewhere between student exposure to first principles of solid and fluid mechanics on the one hand, and advanced-student and researcher/practitioner exposure to computational techniques and applications on the other. This new text naturally and refreshingly steps in to fill this void, and as such is a most welcome addition to the literature and to personal and institutional libraries. The text is refreshing in its innovative and careful attention to setting the historical framework of general and specific topics. This is most notable in the first chapter, which very gracefully and efficiently leads the reader through historical developments to contemporary mathematical statements of basic fluid phenomena. Once the authors have established this foundation of fundamental principles, they tie each succeeding chapter back into the introduction with appropriate and supportive historical contexts. Although the text does not shy away from rigorous analytical descriptions of fluid phenomena, it is unique in providing this delightful historical context for each topic. The authors have also made a special effort to tie the chapters together into a unified whole, with ample references forward and back; this is indeed rare, and much appreciated, in a text of multiple authorship. The topics treated and chapter structures reflect

  4. Fluid mechanics problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Spurk, Joseph H

    1997-01-01

    his collection of over 200 detailed worked exercises adds to and complements the textbook Fluid Mechanics by the same author, and illustrates the teaching material through examples. In the exercises the fundamental concepts of Fluid Mechanics are applied to obtaining the solution of diverse concrete problems, and in doing this the student's skill in the mathematical modeling of practical problems is developed. In addition, 30 challenging questions without detailed solutions have been included, and while lecturers will find these questions suitable for examinations and tests, the student himself can use them to check his understanding of the subject.

  5. Respiratory Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James

    2005-11-01

    This brief overview of our groups activities includes liquid plug propagation in single and bifurcating tubes, a subject which pertains to surfactant delivery, liquid ventilation, pulmonary edema, and drowning. As the plug propagates, a variety of flow patterns may emerge depending on the parameters. It splits unevenly at airway bifurcations and can rupture, which reopens the airway to gas flow. Both propagation and rupture may damage the underlying airway wall cells. Another topic is surfactant dynamics and flow in a model of an oscillating alveolus. The analysis shows a nontrivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns particularly depend on the ratio of inspiration to expiration time periods and the sorption parameter. Vortices, single and multiple, may be achieved, as well as a saddle point configuration. Potential applications are pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways, and gene therapy. Finally, capillary instabilities which cause airway closure, and strategies for stabilization, will be presented. This involves the core-annular flow of a liquid-lined tube, where the core (air) is forced to oscillate axially. The stabilization mechanism is similar to that of a reversing butter knife, where the core shear wipes the growing liquid bulge, from the Rayleigh instability, back on to the tube wall during the main tidal volume stroke, but allows it to grow back as the stroke and shear turn around.

  6. Fluid Mechanics in Sommerfeld's School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Sommerfeld's affiliation with fluid mechanics started when he began his career as an assistant of the mathematician Felix Klein at Göttingen. He always regarded fluid mechanics as a particular challenge. In 1904, he published a theory of hydrodynamic lubrication. Four years later, he conceived an approach for the analysis of flow instability (the Orr-Sommerfeld approach) as an attempt to account for the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The onset of turbulence also became a major challenge for some of his pupils, in particular Ludwig Hopf and Fritz Noether. Both contributed considerably to elaborate the Orr-Sommerfeld theory. Heisenberg's doctoral work was another attempt in this quest. When Sommerfeld published his lectures on theoretical physics during World War II, he dedicated one of the six volumes to the mechanics of continuous media. With chapters on boundary layer theory and turbulence, it exceeded the scope of contemporary theoretical physics—revealing Sommerfeld's persistent appreciation of fluid mechanics. He resorted to Prandtl's Göttingen school of fluid mechanics in order to stay abreast of the rapid development of these specialties.

  7. [Improving myocardial mechanics parameters of severe burn rabbits with oral fluid resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jing; Zhang, Bing-qian; Wang, Guang; Luo, Zhong-hua; Zheng, Qing-yi; Zheng, Jian-sheng; Huang, Yue-sheng; Xiao, Rong

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the protective effect of oral fluid resuscitation on cardiac function in severe burn rabbits. One hundred and fifty rabbits were randomly divided into normal control group (NC group, n = 6, without treatment), burn group (B group, n = 42, without fluid therapy), immediate oral fluid resuscitation group (C group, n = 42), delayed oral fluid resuscitation group (D group, n = 30) and delayed and rapid oral fluid resuscitation group (E group, n = 30). The rabbits in B, C, D, E groups were subjected to 40% TBSA full-thickness burn, then were treated with fluid therapy immediately after burn (C group), at 6 hour after burn (D, E groups). The myocardial mechanics parameters including mean arterial pressure (MAP), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP), LV +/- dp/dt max were observed at 2, 6, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 post burn hour (PBH). Urine output was also examined. The level of LVSP, LV +/- dp/dt max in B roup were significantly lower than those in NC group. The level of LVSP, LV +/- dp/dt max in the C and E group were singnificantly increased during 24 hour after burn. The level of LV + dp/dt max and LV-dp/dt max in C group peaked at 8 PBH (892 +/- 116 kPa/s) and at 6PBH (724 +/- 149 kPa/s) respectively. The levels of LV +/- dp/dt max, LVSP in D group at each time point were similar to B group (P > 0.05). Both the levels of LV +/- dp/dt max in E group peaked at 8 PBH. The level of LVEDP was no obvious difference between B and other groups at each time point (P > 0.05). The changes of MAP and urine output on 24 PBH in each group were similar to above indices. Effective oral fluid therapy in severe burn rabbits during 24 hours after burn can ameliorate myocardial mechanics parameters. The amount of fluid resuscitation can be estimated according to relevant formula for delayed fluid resuscitation in burn rabbits.

  8. Selected topics of fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindsvater, Carl E.

    1958-01-01

    The fundamental equations of fluid mechanics are specific expressions of the principles of motion which are ascribed to Isaac Newton. Thus, the equations which form the framework of applied fluid mechanics or hydraulics are, in addition to the equation of continuity, the Newtonian equations of energy and momentum. These basic relationships are also the foundations of river hydraulics. The fundamental equations are developed in this report with sufficient rigor to support critical examinations of their applicability to most problems met by hydraulic engineers of the Water Resources Division of the United States Geological Survey. Physical concepts are emphasized, and mathematical procedures are the simplest consistent with the specific requirements of the derivations. In lieu of numerical examples, analogies, and alternative procedures, this treatment stresses a brief methodical exposition of the essential principles. An important objective of this report is to prepare the user to read the literature of the science. Thus, it begins With a basic vocabulary of technical symbols, terms, and concepts. Throughout, emphasis is placed on the language of modern fluid mechanics as it pertains to hydraulic engineering. The basic differential and integral equations of simple fluid motion are derived, and these equations are, in turn, used to describe the essential characteristics of hydrostatics and piezometry. The one-dimensional equations of continuity and motion are defined and are used to derive the general discharge equation. The flow net is described as a means of demonstrating significant characteristics of two-dimensional irrotational flow patterns. A typical flow net is examined in detail. The influence of fluid viscosity is described as an obstacle to the derivation of general, integral equations of motion. It is observed that the part played by viscosity is one which is usually dependent on experimental evaluation. It follows that the dimensionless ratios known as

  9. Fundamental fluid mechanics and magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hosking, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    This book is primarily intended to enable postgraduate research students to enhance their understanding and expertise in Fluid Mechanics and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), subjects no longer treated in isolation. The exercises throughout the book often serve to provide additional and quite significant knowledge or to develop selected mathematical skills, and may also fill in certain details or enhance readers’ understanding of essential concepts. A previous background or some preliminary reading in either of the two core subjects would be advantageous, and prior knowledge of multivariate calculus and differential equations is expected.

  10. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  11. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  12. Association of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony with survival benefit from revascularization: a study of gated positron emission tomography in patients with ischemic LV dysfunction and narrow QRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlJaroudi, Wael [Imaging Institute, Heart and Vascular, Cleveland, OH (United States); Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute, Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Alraies, M.C. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hachamovitch, Rory; Jaber, Wael A.; Brunken, Richard; Cerqueira, Manuel D.; Marwick, Thomas [Imaging Institute, Heart and Vascular, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-10-15

    LV mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) is a risk marker in narrow QRS cardiomyopathy, but its association with treatment outcome is not well defined. We determined the incremental prognostic value of LVMD in ischemic cardiomyopathy, and assessed its interaction with scar, myocardium in jeopardy and subsequent revascularization. Stress and rest {sup 82}Rb gated PET were performed in 486 consecutive patients (66 {+-} 11 years of age, 82 % men, LV ejection fraction 26 {+-} 6 %) with ischemic cardiomyopathy and QRS <120 ms. LVMD was determined as the standard deviation (SD) of the regional time to minimum volume on phase analysis of the gated PET scan. A propensity score was determined to adjust for nonrandomized referral after imaging to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In a Cox proportional hazards model used to determine the association between measures of LVMD and survival time, CABG was included as a time-dependent covariate and the use of an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) after imaging was modeled as a stratification factor. Over 1.9 {+-} 1.4 years, 96 patients (20 %) underwent CABG and 108 (22 %) died. LVMD was a predictor of mortality (HR 1.16. 95 % CI 1.03;1.30, per 10 increase in phase SD, p = 0.02) after adjusting for baseline covariates, prior ICD use, the use of postimaging CABG, and other imaging data. There was a significant interaction between phase SD and CABG. Nested Cox models showed that LVMD carried prognostic information incremental to clinical variables, ejection fraction and CABG. LVMD is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in ischemic cardiomyopathy, and may identify patients with a differential survival benefit from CABG versus medical therapy. (orig.)

  13. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  14. Fluid mechanics in the perivascular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Olbricht, William L

    2011-04-07

    Perivascular space (PVS) within the brain is an important pathway for interstitial fluid (ISF) and solute transport. Fluid flowing in the PVS can affect these transport processes and has significant impacts on physiology. In this paper, we carry out a theoretical analysis to investigate the fluid mechanics in the PVS. With certain assumptions and approximations, we are able to find an analytical solution to the problem. We discuss the physical meanings of the solution and particularly examine the consequences of the induced fluid flow in the context of convection-enhanced delivery (CED). We conclude that peristaltic motions of the blood vessel walls can facilitate fluid and solute transport in the PVS.

  15. Fluid Mechanics of Spinning Rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    internal energy dissipation is present. A classic case was the instability exhibited by the first American earth satellite, the Explorer I, which...measure the pressure fluctuations. Water was used as the working fluid. This is acceptable in these simulations, since compressibility is not a...nozzle are responsible for the the apparition of the instability late in the motor bum. In conclusion, it has been shown that an unsteady internal gas

  16. CIME school Topics in Mathematical Fluid Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantin, Peter; Galdi, Giovanni P; Růžička, Michael; Seregin, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This volume brings together five contributions to mathematical fluid mechanics, a classical but still very active research field which overlaps with physics and engineering. The contributions cover not only the classical Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible Newtonian fluid, but also generalized Newtonian fluids, fluids interacting with particles and with solids, and stochastic models. The questions addressed in the lectures range from the basic problems of existence of weak and more regular solutions, the local regularity theory and analysis of potential singularities, qualitative and quantitative results about the behavior in special cases, asymptotic behavior, statistical properties and ergodicity.

  17. Fluid Mechanics An Introduction to the Theory of Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Durst, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Advancements of fluid flow measuring techniques and of computational methods have led to new ways to treat laminar and turbulent flows. These methods are extensively used these days in research and engineering practise. This also requires new ways to teach the subject to students at higher educational institutions in an introductory manner. The book provides the knowledge to students in engineering and natural science needed to enter fluid mechanics applications in various fields. Analytical treatments are provided, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Introductions are also given into numerical and experimental methods applied to flows. The main benefit the reader will derive from the book is a sound introduction into all aspects of fluid mechanics covering all relevant subfields.

  18. A Course in Fluid Mechanics of Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a course focusing on fluid mechanics and physical chemistry of suspensions. Describes the main themes of the lectures and includes a list of course outlines. Possible textbooks and many journal articles are listed. (YP)

  19. A Course in Fluid Mechanics of Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a course focusing on fluid mechanics and physical chemistry of suspensions. Describes the main themes of the lectures and includes a list of course outlines. Possible textbooks and many journal articles are listed. (YP)

  20. Mechanics of couple-stress fluid coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    The formal development of a theory of viscoelastic surface fluids with bending resistance - their kinematics, dynamics, and rheology are discussed. It is relevant to the mechanics of fluid drops and jets coated by a thin layer of immiscible fluid with rather general rheology. This approach unifies the hydrodynamics of two-dimensional fluids with the mechanics of an elastic shell in the spirit of a Cosserat continuum. There are three distinct facets to the formulation of surface continuum mechanics. Outlined are the important ideas and results associated with each: the kinematics of evolving surface geometries, the conservation laws governing the mechanics of surface continua, and the rheological equations of state governing the surface stress and moment tensors.

  1. On the fluid mechanics of fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-29

    Fluid mechanics research related to fire is reviewed with focus on canonical flows, multiphysics coupling aspects, experimental and numerical techniques. Fire is a low-speed, chemically-reacting, flow in which buoyancy plans an important role. Fire research has focused on two canonical flows, the reacting boundary-layer and the reacting free plume. There is rich, multi-lateral, bi-directional, coupling among fluid mechanics and scalar transport, combustion, and radiation. There is only a limited experimental fluid-mechanics database for fire due to measurement difficulties in the harsh environment, and the focus within the fire community on thermal/chemical consequences. Increasingly, computational fluid dynamics techniques are being used to provide engineering guidance on thermal/chemical consequences and to study fire phenomenology.

  2. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  3. Conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuma, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    We present a generally covariant formulation of conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics with strain allowed to take arbitrarily large values. We give a general prescription to determine the dynamics of a relativistic viscoelastic fluid in a way consistent with the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. We then elaborately study the transient time scales at which the strain almost relaxes and becomes proportional to the gradients of velocity. We particularly show that a conformal second-order fluid with all possible parameters in the constitutive equations can be obtained without breaking the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium, if the conformal fluid is defined as the long time limit of a conformal second-order viscoelastic system. We also discuss how local thermodynamic equilibrium could be understood in the context of the fluid/gravity correspondence.

  4. Conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2012-06-01

    We present a generally covariant formulation of conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics with strain allowed to take arbitrarily large values. We give a general prescription to determine the dynamics of a relativistic viscoelastic fluid in a way consistent with the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. We then elaborately study the transient time scales at which the strain almost relaxes and becomes proportional to the gradients of velocity. We particularly show that a conformal second-order fluid with all possible parameters in the constitutive equations can be obtained without breaking the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium, if the conformal fluid is defined as the long time limit of a conformal second-order viscoelastic system. We also discuss how local thermodynamic equilibrium could be understood in the context of the fluid/gravity correspondence.

  5. Fluid Mechanics of Blood Clot Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelson, Aaron L; Neeves, Keith B

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular blood clots form in an environment in which hydrodynamic forces dominate and in which fluid-mediated transport is the primary means of moving material. The clotting system has evolved to exploit fluid dynamic mechanisms and to overcome fluid dynamic challenges to ensure that clots that preserve vascular integrity can form over the wide range of flow conditions found in the circulation. Fluid-mediated interactions between the many large deformable red blood cells and the few small rigid platelets lead to high platelet concentrations near vessel walls where platelets contribute to clotting. Receptor-ligand pairs with diverse kinetic and mechanical characteristics work synergistically to arrest rapidly flowing cells on an injured vessel. Variations in hydrodynamic stresses switch on and off the function of key clotting polymers. Protein transport to, from, and within a developing clot determines whether and how fast it grows. We review ongoing experimental and modeling research to understand these and related phenomena.

  6. Indicators of Student Engagement in Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Jean; Goodman, Katherine

    2015-11-01

    Many engineering programs require a fluids course. Standards such as ABET ensure that it is technically accurate. To keep students engaged, however, we need to ask: does this course present our discipline in its most salient and meaningful form? As part of an ongoing investigation of a technical elective called Flow Visualization, we compare student surveys from both Flow Vis and a required Fluid Mechanics course. Surveys going back to 2008-2012 found that Fluid Mechanics students in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder tended to have a negative shift in affect. That is, they were less likely to believe studying fluids was important to them as engineers and to society in general by the end of the course. More recent surveys find that this has become neutral among our students: from the beginning to the end of the course, they do not report any change in the importance of fluids. The recent survey also reveals that they are now noticing fluids in everyday life significantly more often. This expanded perception is a hallmark of the Deweyan transformative experience, a framework to evaluate the motivational and affective aspects of a course. Suggestions of why these changes have taken place are drawn from open-response survey items and student interviews. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. EC-1240294.

  7. An introduction to the mechanics of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Truesdell, C

    2000-01-01

    The authors have backgrounds which are ideally suited for writing this book. The late C. Truesdell is well known for his monumental treatises on continuum thermomechanics. K.R. Rajagopal has made many important contributions to the mechanics of continua in general, and to nonlinear fluids in particular. They have produced a compact, moderately general book which encompasses many fluid models of current interest…The book is written very clearly and contains a large number of exercises and their solutions. The level of mathematics is that commonly taught to undergraduates in mathematics departments. This is an excellent book which is highly recommended to students and researchers in fluid mechanics. —Mathematical Reviews The writing style is quintessential Truesdellania: purely mathematical, breathtaking, irrepressible, irreverent, uncompromising, taking no prisoners...The book is filled with historical nuggets…Its pure, exact mathematics will baptize, enlighten and exhilarate. —Applied Mechanics Review...

  8. Mechanics of coupled granular/fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinningland, J.; Toussaint, R.; Johnsen, O.; Flekkoy, E. G.; Maloy, K. J.

    2006-12-01

    We introduce a hybrid numerical model for coupled flow of solid grains and intersticial fluid, which renders for complex hydrodynamic interactions between mobile grains. This model treats the solid phase as discrete particles, interacting mechanically with the other particles and with the intersticial flowing fluid. The fluid is described by continuum equations rendering for its advection by the local grains, superposed to a pressure diffusion ruled by a Darcy flow with a permeability depending on the local solid fraction. This model is aimed at describing accurately such coupled flow. This model is tested for two model situations, where it is compared to experimental results: 1/ Injection of a localized overpressure in a grain/fluid filled cell lying horizontally, where gravity is unimportant. 2/ Sedimentation of heavy grains falling into an initially grain-free fluid region. The development of pattern-forming instabilities is obtained in these two situations, corresponding to granular/fluid equivalents of the two-fluids Saffman-Taylor and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Numerical and experimental results are shown to be consistent with each other.

  9. Introductory fluid mechanics for physicists and mathematicians

    CERN Document Server

    Pert, Geoffrey J

    2013-01-01

    This textbook presents essential methodology for physicists of the theory and applications of fluid mechanics within a single volume.  Building steadily through a syllabus, it will be relevant to almost all undergraduate physics degrees which include an option on hydrodynamics, or a course in which hydrodynamics figures prominently.

  10. Topological fluid mechanics of Axisymmetric Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1998-01-01

    to the authors knowledge has not been used systematically to high orders in topological fluid mechanics. We compare the general results with experimental and computational results on the Vogel-Ronneberg flow. We show that the topology changes observed when recirculating bubbles on the vortex axis are created...

  11. Isogeometric shape optimization in fluid mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørtoft, Peter; Gravesen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this work is numerical shape optimization in fluid mechanics, based on isogeometric analysis. The generic goal is to design the shape of a 2-dimensional flow domain to minimize some prescribed objective while satisfying given geometric constraints. As part of the design problem...

  12. Neural Control Mechanisms and Body Fluid Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to study the nature of afferent signals to the brain that reflect the status of body fluid balance and to investigate the central neural mechanisms that process this information for the activation of response systems which restore body fluid homeostasis. That is, in the face of loss of fluids from intracellular or extracellular fluid compartments, animals seek and ingest water and ionic solutions (particularly Na(+) solutions) to restore the intracellular and extracellular spaces. Over recent years, our laboratory has generated a substantial body of information indicating that: (1) a fall in systemic arterial pressure facilitates the ingestion of rehydrating solutions and (2) that the actions of brain amine systems (e.g., norepinephrine; serotonin) are critical for precise correction of fluid losses. Because both acute and chronic dehydration are associated with physiological stresses, such as exercise and sustained exposure to microgravity, the present research will aid in achieving a better understanding of how vital information is handled by the nervous system for maintenance of the body's fluid matrix which is critical for health and well-being.

  13. Interfacial Fluid Mechanics A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ajaev, Vladimir S

    2012-01-01

    Interfacial Fluid Mechanics: A Mathematical Modeling Approach provides an introduction to mathematical models of viscous flow used in rapidly developing fields of microfluidics and microscale heat transfer. The basic physical effects are first introduced in the context of simple configurations and their relative importance in typical microscale applications is discussed. Then,several configurations of importance to microfluidics, most notably thin films/droplets on substrates and confined bubbles, are discussed in detail.  Topics from current research on electrokinetic phenomena, liquid flow near structured solid surfaces, evaporation/condensation, and surfactant phenomena are discussed in the later chapters. This book also:  Discusses mathematical models in the context of actual applications such as electrowetting Includes unique material on fluid flow near structured surfaces and phase change phenomena Shows readers how to solve modeling problems related to microscale multiphase flows Interfacial Fluid Me...

  14. New Directions in Mathematical Fluid Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fursikov, Andrei V

    2010-01-01

    The scientific interests of Professor A.V. Kazhikhov were fundamentally devoted to Mathematical Fluid Mechanics, where he achieved outstanding results that had, and still have, a significant influence on this field. This volume, dedicated to the memory of A.V. Kazhikhov, presents the latest contributions from renowned world specialists in a number of new important directions of Mathematical Physics, mostly of Mathematical Fluid Mechanics, and, more generally, in the field of nonlinear partial differential equations. These results are mostly related to boundary value problems and to control problems for the Navier-Stokes equations, and for equations of heat convection. Other important topics include non-equilibrium processes, Poisson-Boltzmann equations, dynamics of elastic body, and related problems of function theory and nonlinear analysis.

  15. Topology optimization of fluid mechanics problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Allan

    While topology optimization for solid continuum structures have been studied for about 20 years and for the special case of trusses for many more years, topology optimization of fluid mechanics problems is more recent. Borrvall and Petersson [1] is the seminal reference for topology optimization...... with respect to minimizing the energy loss, characteristic properties of the velocity field or mixing properties. To reduce the computational complexity of the topology optimization problems the primary focus is put on the Stokes equation in 2D and in 3D. However, the the talk also contains examples with the 2......D Navier-Stokes equation as well as an example with convection dominated transport in 2D Stokes flow. Using Stokes flow limits the range of applications; nonetheless, the present work gives a proof-of-concept for the application of the method within fluid mechanics problems and it remains...

  16. Falsification of dark energy by fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for the discovery of accelerating supernovae dimness, suggesting a remarkable change in the expansion rate of the Universe from a decrease since the big bang to an increase, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanical considerations falsify both the accelerating expansion and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in current standard models of self-gravitational structure formation, which rely on cold dark matter CDM condensations and clusterings that are also falsified by fluid mechanics. Weakly collisional CDM particles do not condense but diffuse away. Photon viscosity predicts superclustervoid fragmentation early in the plasma epoch and protogalaxies at the end. At the plasma-gas transition, the plasma fragments into Earth-mass gas planets in trillion planet clumps (proto-globular-star-cluster PGCs). The hydrogen planets freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies ...

  17. Falsification of dark energy by fluid mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Carl H. Gibson

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for the discovery of accelerating supernovae dimness, suggesting a remarkable change in the expansion rate of the Universe from a decrease since the big bang to an increase, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanical considerations falsify both the accelerating expansion and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in current standard models of self-gr...

  18. Attracting Students to Fluid Mechanics with Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    We describe a new class developed at U.C. Davis titled "The Design of Coffee," which serves as a nonmathematical introduction to chemical engineering as illustrated by the process of roasting and brewing coffee. Hands-on coffee experiments demonstrate key engineering principles, including material balances, chemical kinetics, mass transfer, conservation of energy, and fluid mechanics. The experiments lead to an engineering design competition where students strive to make the best tasting coffee using the least amount of energy - a classic engineering optimization problem, but one that is both fun and tasty. "The Design of Coffee" started as a freshmen seminar in 2013, and it has exploded in popularity: it now serves 1,533 students per year, and is the largest and most popular elective course at U.C. Davis. In this talk we focus on the class pedagogy as applied to fluid mechanics, with an emphasis on how coffee serves as an engaging and exciting topic for teaching students about fluid mechanics in an approachable, hands-on manner.

  19. Protection of LV system against lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Yordanova Nedyalkova, Greta

    2010-01-01

    Lightning is a natural hazard and one of the greatest local mysteries. Scientists have not fully understood the mechanism of lightning. It is one of the most beautiful displays in nature and one of the nature's most dangerous phenomenon known to man. Overvoltage due to lightning is a very important problem of LV systems. Some lightning flashes damage buildings and a few kill or injure people and animals, either directly or indirectly, by causing fire and explosions. The need for protect...

  20. Statistical mechanical theory of fluid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yueqiang; Wu, Zhengming; Liu, Weiwei

    2014-01-01

    A general statistical mechanical theory of fluid mixtures (liquid mixtures and gas mixtures) is developed based on the statistical mechanical expression of chemical potential of components in the grand canonical ensemble, which gives some new relationships between thermodynamic quantities (equilibrium ratio Ki, separation factor α and activity coefficient γi) and ensemble average potential energy u for one molecule. The statistical mechanical expressions of separation factor α and activity coefficient γi derived in this work make the fluid phase equilibrium calculations can be performed by molecular simulation simply and efficiently, or by the statistical thermodynamic approach (based on the saturated-vapor pressure of pure substance) that does not need microscopic intermolecular pair potential functions. The physical meaning of activity coefficient γi in the liquid phase is discussed in detail from a viewpoint of molecular thermodynamics. The calculated Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) properties of argon-methane, methanol-water and n-hexane-benzene systems by this model fit well with experimental data in references, which indicates that this model is accurate and reliable in the prediction of VLE properties for small, large and strongly associating molecules; furthermore the statistical mechanical expressions of separation factor α and activity coefficient γi have good compatibility with classical thermodynamic equations and quantum mechanical COSMO-SAC approach.

  1. Joseph Boussinesq's legacy in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrigol, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    Joseph Boussinesq was the most prolific of all French contributors to nineteenth-century fluid mechanics. His scientific production included a novel theory of solitary waves, the KdV equation for finite deformations of the water surface in an open channel, a systematic study of open channel and pipe flow based on the concept of effective viscosity, pioneering derivations of boundary layers and entrance effects, new exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation under geometrically simple boundary conditions, and the 'Boussinesq approximation' for heat convection in a moving fluid under gravity. Although his extraordinary skills were quickly recognized and rewarded, other experts in the field were often unaware even of his most important results and they ended up rediscovering some of them. Boussinesq's unusual background and the resulting peculiarities of his style explain this problematic diffusion. They also account for the richness of his legacy.

  2. Effects of suture position on left ventricular fluid mechanics under mitral valve edge-to-edge repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dongxing; Jiang, Song; Wang, Ze; Hu, Yingying; He, Zhaoming

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve (MV) edge-to-edge repair (ETER) is a surgical procedure for the correction of mitral valve regurgitation by suturing the free edge of the leaflets. The leaflets are often sutured at three different positions: central, lateral and commissural portions. To study the effects of position of suture on left ventricular (LV) fluid mechanics under mitral valve ETER, a parametric model of MV-LV system during diastole was developed. The distribution and development of vortex and atrio-ventricular pressure under different suture position were investigated. Results show that the MV sutured at central and lateral in ETER creates two vortex rings around two jets, compared with single vortex ring around one jet of the MV sutured at commissure. Smaller total orifices lead to a higher pressure difference across the atrio-ventricular leaflets in diastole. The central suture generates smaller wall shear stresses than the lateral suture, while the commissural suture generated the minimum wall shear stresses in ETER.

  3. Gray's paradox: A fluid mechanical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patel, Namrata; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Gray reported that the drag power experienced by a dolphin was larger than the estimated muscle power – this is termed as Gray's paradox. We provide a fluid mechanical perspective of this paradox. The viewpoint that swimmers necessarily spend muscle energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming needs revision. For example, in undulatory swimming most of the muscle energy is directly expended to generate lateral undulations of the body, and the drag power is balanced not by the muscle power but by the thrust power. Depending on drag model utilized, the drag power may be greater than muscle power without being paradoxical. PMID:25082341

  4. Recent developments of mathematical fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Giga, Yoshikazu; Kozono, Hideo; Okamoto, Hisashi; Yamazaki, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The book addresses recent developments of the mathematical research on the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations as well as on related problems. In particular, there are covered:   1) existence, uniqueness, and the regularity of weak solutions; 2) stability of the motion in rest and the asymptotic behavior of solutions; 3) singularity and blow-up of weak and strong solutions; 4) vorticity and energy conservation; 5) motions of rotating fluids, or of fluids surrounding a rotating body; 6) free boundary problems; 7) maximal regularity theory and other abstract results for mathematical fluid mechanics.   For this quarter century, these topics have been playing a central role in both pure and applied mathematics and having a great influence to the developm ent of the functional analysis, harmonic analysis and numerical analysis whose tools make a a substantial contribution to the investigation of nonlinear partial differential equations, particularly the Navier-Stokes and the Euler equations.      There are 24...

  5. Statistical mechanics and the physics of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mario

    This volume collects the lecture notes of a course on statistical mechanics, held at Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa for third-to-fifth year students in physics and chemistry. Three main themes are covered in the book. The first part gives a compact presentation of the foundations of statistical mechanics and their connections with thermodynamics. Applications to ideal gases of material particles and of excitation quanta are followed by a brief introduction to a real classical gas and to a weakly coupled classical plasma, and by a broad overview on the three states of matter.The second part is devoted to fluctuations around equilibrium and their correlations. Coverage of liquid structure and critical phenomena is followed by a discussion of irreversible processes as exemplified by diffusive motions and by the dynamics of density and heat fluctuations. Finally, the third part is an introduction to some advanced themes: supercooling and the glassy state, non-Newtonian fluids including polymers and liquid cryst...

  6. Art & Science duality in Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2014-11-01

    The connections between Art & Science is analysed through examples of my research both in Fluid Mechanics and in Art & Science. Working as a member of the artist group Labofactory and collaborating with more than twenty different artists, I have been exploring for more than twenty-four years a path between art and science that mixes both scientific and artistic imaginations. Formulating questions in science is pure imagination and intuition that does not involve only the sensible side of the brain but the sensitive side, which is able to be non incremental, to understand faster and anticipate. Instead of showing scientific proof or technique, it is possible with Art & Science to directly attempt to share this sensitive side. I will show ten recent installations that involve vortex rings, tornado generators, music propagated in shallow layers, wave tanks used as silent soft drums, boundary layer on a rotating sphere to question climate change, plum ever evolving over a nuclear plan in an water tank, a bubbly fountain in microfluidic... Two installations on the thermohaline circulation staged in a stratified tank and on the generation of earthquake are part of the exhibit ``LOST IN FATHOMS'' with the artist Anaïs Tondeur from 17 October until 29 November 2014 at the GV Art gallery, London. These pieces are like writing poems using fluid mechanics and by doing so re-interrogating our scientific practice and the societal role of science. They symmetrize the relation with the public that involve not only ``outreach'' but ``inreach'' or sharing.

  7. Fluid mechanics of artificial heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasi, Lakshmi P; Simon, Helene A; Sucosky, Philippe; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2009-02-01

    1. Artificial heart valves have been in use for over five decades to replace diseased heart valves. Since the first heart valve replacement performed with a caged-ball valve, more than 50 valve designs have been developed, differing principally in valve geometry, number of leaflets and material. To date, all artificial heart valves are plagued with complications associated with haemolysis, coagulation for mechanical heart valves and leaflet tearing for tissue-based valve prosthesis. For mechanical heart valves, these complications are believed to be associated with non-physiological blood flow patterns. 2. In the present review, we provide a bird's-eye view of fluid mechanics for the major artificial heart valve types and highlight how the engineering approach has shaped this rapidly diversifying area of research. 3. Mechanical heart valve designs have evolved significantly, with the most recent designs providing relatively superior haemodynamics with very low aerodynamic resistance. However, high shearing of blood cells and platelets still pose significant design challenges and patients must undergo life-long anticoagulation therapy. Bioprosthetic or tissue valves do not require anticoagulants due to their distinct similarity to the native valve geometry and haemodynamics, but many of these valves fail structurally within the first 10-15 years of implantation. 4. These shortcomings have directed present and future research in three main directions in attempts to design superior artificial valves: (i) engineering living tissue heart valves; (ii) development of advanced computational tools; and (iii) blood experiments to establish the link between flow and blood damage.

  8. Isogeometric shape optimization in fluid mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørtoft, Peter; Gravesen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    , the steady-state, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, governing a laminar flow in the domain, must be solved. Based on isogeometric analysis, we use B-splines as the basis for both the design optimization and the flow analysis, thereby unifying the models for geometry and analysis, and, at the same time......The subject of this work is numerical shape optimization in fluid mechanics, based on isogeometric analysis. The generic goal is to design the shape of a 2-dimensional flow domain to minimize some prescribed objective while satisfying given geometric constraints. As part of the design problem......, facilitating a compact representation of complex geometries and smooth approximations of the flow fields. To drive the shape optimization, we use a gradient-based approach, and to avoid inappropriate parametrizations during optimization, we regularize the optimization problem by adding to the objective...

  9. Fluid mechanics of mathematics testing in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The performance of Texas high school students on mathematics exams is tightly connected to the level of poverty in the school. I will employ the coarse-graining techniques that lead from molecular motions to fluid mechanics in order to find how student scores evolve over time. I will show that the points of divergence between well-off and low-income kids are particularly clear when viewed as streamlines of a flow in the space of grade-level and score. The results can also be cast in the form of a Fokker-Planck equation, which highlights the separate roles of convection and diffusion. I will use the results the assess the plausibility of using charter schools, highly qualified teachers, and accountability systems as primary agents of school reform.

  10. Teaching Technical Competencies for Fluid Mechanics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagg, Randall

    2014-11-01

    We are developing an ``on demand'' framework for students to learn techniques used in fluid mechanics research. The site for this work is a university-grade laboratory situated next to Gateway High School in Aurora, Colorado. Undergraduate university students work with K-12 students on research and technical innovation projects. Both groups need customized training as their projects proceed. A modular approach allows particular competencies such as pump selection, construction of flow piping and channels, flow visualization, and specific flow measurement methods to be acquired through focused lessons. These lessons can be learned in either a stand-alone fashion or assembled into units for formal courses. A research example was a student project on diffusion of infectious material in micro-gravity in the event of an intestinal puncture wound. A curriculum example is a 9-week quarter of high-school instruction on instrumentation that uses small-scale water treatment systems as a case study.

  11. CEE3500 - Fluid Mechanics, Spring 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Urroz, Gilberto E.

    2006-01-01

    Explores fluid properties, hydrostatics, fluid dynamics, similitude, energy and momentum principles, closed conduit flow, open channel flow, and flow measurement. Includes laboratory exercises in flow measurement, open channel flow, pipe friction, physical modeling, and data collection.

  12. An introduction to theoretical fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Childress, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    This book gives an overview of classical topics in fluid dynamics, focusing on the kinematics and dynamics of incompressible inviscid and Newtonian viscous fluids, but also including some material on compressible flow. The topics are chosen to illustrate the mathematical methods of classical fluid dynamics. The book is intended to prepare the reader for more advanced topics of current research interest.

  13. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load.

  14. The Status of Fluid Mechanics in Bioengineering Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gerald E.; Hyman, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the status of fluid mechanics courses in bioengineering curricula. A survey of institutions offering bioengineering degrees indicates that over half do not require fluid mechanics courses. Suggests increasing number of mechanics courses to increase the quality of bioengineering students and to prepare students for graduate work and more…

  15. The Status of Fluid Mechanics in Bioengineering Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gerald E.; Hyman, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the status of fluid mechanics courses in bioengineering curricula. A survey of institutions offering bioengineering degrees indicates that over half do not require fluid mechanics courses. Suggests increasing number of mechanics courses to increase the quality of bioengineering students and to prepare students for graduate work and more…

  16. Fluid Mechanics of Cricket and Tennis Balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.

    2009-11-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in defining the flight of a ball that is struck or thrown through the air in almost all ball sports. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can often deviate from its initial straight path, resulting in a curved, or sometimes an unpredictable, flight path. It is particularly fascinating that that not all the parameters that affect the flight of a ball are always under human influence. Lateral deflection in flight, commonly known as swing, swerve or curve, is well recognized in cricket and tennis. In tennis, the lateral deflection is produced by spinning the ball about an axis perpendicular to the line of flight, which gives rise to what is commonly known as the Magnus effect. It is now well recognized that the aerodynamics of sports balls are strongly dependent on the detailed development and behavior of the boundary layer on the ball's surface. A side force, which makes a ball curve through the air, can also be generated in the absence of the Magnus effect. In one of the cricket deliveries, the ball is released with the seam angled, which trips the laminar boundary layer into a turbulent state on that side. The turbulent boundary layer separates relatively late compared to the laminar layer on the other side, thereby creating a pressure difference and hence side force. The fluid mechanics of a cricket ball become very interesting at the higher Reynolds numbers and this will be discussed in detail. Of all the round sports balls, a tennis ball has the highest drag coefficient. This will be explained in terms of the contribution of the ``fuzz" drag and how that changes with Reynolds number and ball surface wear. It is particularly fascinating that, purely through historical accidents, small disturbances on the ball surface, such as the stitching on cricket balls and the felt cover on tennis balls are all about the right size to affect boundary layer transition and development in the Reynolds numbers of interest. The fluid

  17. Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Methods for Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikatamarla, Shyam; Boesch, Fabian; Sichau, David; Karlin, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    With its roots in statistical mechanics and kinetic theory, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a paradigm-changing innovation, offering for the first time an intrinsically parallel CFD algorithm. Over the past two decades, LBM has achieved numerous results in the field of CFD and is now in a position to challenge state-of-the art CFD techniques. Our major restyling of LBM resulted in an unconditionally stable entropic LBM which restored Second Law (Boltzmann H theorem) in the LBM kinetics and thus enabled affordable direct simulations of fluid turbulence. We review here recent advances in ELBM as a practical, modeling-free tool for simulation of turbulent flows in complex geometries. We shall present recent simulations including turbulent channel flow, flow past a circular cylinder, knotted vortex tubes, and flow past a surface mounted cube. ELBM listed all admissible lattices supporting a discrete entropy function and has classified them in hierarchically increasing order of accuracy. Applications of these higher-order lattices to simulations of turbulence and thermal flows shall also be presented. This work was supported CSCS grant s437.

  18. Collective fluid mechanics of honeybee nest ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Combes, Stacey; Wood, Robert J.; Peters, Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Honeybees thermoregulate their brood in the warm summer months by collectively fanning their wings and creating air flow through the nest. During nest ventilation workers flap their wings in close proximity in which wings continuously operate in unsteady oncoming flows (i.e. the wake of neighboring worker bees) and near the ground. The fluid mechanics of this collective aerodynamic phenomena are unstudied and may play an important role in the physiology of colony life. We have performed field and laboratory observations of the nest ventilation wing kinematics and air flow generated by individuals and groups of honeybee workers. Inspired from these field observations we describe here a robotic model system to study collective flapping wing aerodynamics. We microfabricate arrays of 1.4 cm long flapping wings and observe the air flow generated by arrays of two or more fanning robotic wings. We vary phase, frequency, and separation distance among wings and find that net output flow is enhanced when wings operate at the appropriate phase-distance relationship to catch shed vortices from neighboring wings. These results suggest that by varying position within the fanning array honeybee workers may benefit from collective aerodynamic interactions during nest ventilation.

  19. Lymphatic fluid: exchange mechanisms and regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, Virginia H; Scallan, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Regulation of fluid and material movement between the vascular space of microvessels penetrating functioning organs and the cells therein has been studied extensively. Unanswered questions as to the regulatory mechanisms and routes remain. Significantly less is known about the lymphatic vascular system given the difficulties in seeing, no less isolating, these vessels lying deeper in these same tissues. It has become evident that the exchange microvasculature is not simply a passive biophysical barrier separating the vascular and interstitial compartments but a dynamic, multicellular structure subject to acute regulation and chronic adaptation to stimuli including inflammation, sepsis, diabetes, injury, hypoxia and exercise. Similarly lymphatic vessels range, in their simplest form, from lymphatic endothelium attached to the interstitial matrix, to endothelia and phasic lymphatic smooth muscle that act as Starling resistors. Recent work has demonstrated that among the microvascular lymphatic elements, the collecting lymphatics have barrier properties similar to venules, and thus participate in exchange. As with venules, vasoactive agents can alter both the permeability and contractile properties thereby setting up previously unanticipated gradients in the tissue space and providing potential targets for the pharmacological prevention and/or resolution of oedema. PMID:21521763

  20. Falsification of Dark Energy by Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2012-03-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for the discovery of accelerating super- novae dimness, suggesting a remarkable reversal in the expansion rate of the Universe from a decrease to an increase, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanics and Herschel- Planck-Spitzer-Hubble etc. space telescope observations falsify both the accelerating ex- pansion rate and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in models of self-gravitational structure formation. Large plasma photon viscosity predicts protosu- perclustervoid fragmentation early in the plasma epoch and protogalaxies at the end. At the plasma-gas transition, the gas protogalaxies fragment into Earth-mass rogue plan- ets in highly persistent, trillion-planet clumps (proto-globular-star-cluster PGCs). PGC planets freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies and merge to form their stars, giving the hydrogen triple-point (14 K) infrared emissions observed. Dark energy is a system- atic dimming error for Supernovae Ia caused by partially evaporated planets feeding hot white dwarf stars at the Chandrasekhar carbon limit. Planet atmospheres may or may not dim light from SNe-Ia events depending on the line of sight.

  1. Fluid Mechanics of Liquid-Liquid Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John Reed

    The detailed hydrodynamics of selected liquid -liquid flow systems are investigated to provide a firm foundation for the rational design of separation processes. The implementation of this objective centers on the development of a robust code to simulate liquid-liquid flows. We have applied this code to the realistic simulation of aspects of the complex fluid mechanical behavior, and developed quantitative insight into the underlying processes involved. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is combined with the Continuous Surface Force (CSF) algorithm to provide a numerically stable code capable of solving high Reynolds numbers free surface flows. One of the developments during the testing was an efficient method for solving the Young-Laplace equation describing the shape of the meniscus in a vertical cylinder for a constrained liquid volume. The steady-state region near the nozzle for the laminar flow of a Newtonian liquid jet injected vertically into another immiscible Newtonian liquid is investigated for various Reynolds numbers by solving the axisymmetric transient equations of motion and continuity. The analysis takes into account pressure, viscous, inertial, gravitational, and surface tension forces, and comparison with previous experimental measurements shows good agreement. Comparisons of the present numerical method with the numerical results of previous boundary-layer methods help establish their range of validity. A new approximate equation for the shape of the interface of the steady jet, based on an overall momentum balance, is also developed. The full transient from liquid-liquid jet startup to breakup into drops is also simulated numerically. In comparison with experiment, the results of the present numerical method show a greater sensitivity of the jet length to the Reynolds number than the best predictions of previous linear stability analyses. The formation of drops is investigated at low to high Reynolds numbers before and after jet formation. The

  2. Gelled Complex Fluids: Combining Unique Structures with Mechanical Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Gießelmann, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Gelled complex fluids are soft materials in which the microstructure of the complex fluid is combined with the mechanical stability of a gel. To obtain a gelled complex fluid one either adds a gelator to a complex fluid or replaces the solvent in a gel by a complex fluid. The most prominent example of a "natural" gelled complex fluid is the cell. There are various strategies by which one can form a gelled complex fluid; one such strategy is orthogonal self-assembly, that is, the independent but simultaneous formation of two coexisting self-assembled structures within one system. The aim of this Review is to describe the structure and potential applications of various man-made gelled complex fluids and to clarify whether or not the respective system is formed by orthogonal self-assembly.

  3. Quantitative image processing in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Lambertus; Helman, James; Ning, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The current status of digital image processing in fluid flow research is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to a comprehensive approach to the extraction of quantitative data from multivariate databases and examples of recent developments. The discussion covers numerical simulations and experiments, data processing, generation and dissemination of knowledge, traditional image processing, hybrid processing, fluid flow vector field topology, and isosurface analysis using Marching Cubes.

  4. Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmforth, N. J.; Craster, R. V.

    Non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is a vast subject that has several journals partly, or primarily, dedicated to its investigation (Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics, Rheologica Acta, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Journal of Rheology, amongst others). It is an area of active research, both for industrial fluid problems and for applications elsewhere, notably geophysically motivated issues such as the flow of lava and ice, mud slides, snow avalanches and debris flows. The main motivati on for this research activity is that, apart from some annoyingly common fluids such as air and water, virtually no fluid is actually Newtonian (that is, having a simple linear relation between stress and strain-rate characterized by a constant viscosity). Several textbooks are useful sources of information; for example, [1-3] are standard texts giving mathematical and engineering perspectives upon the subject. In these lecture notes, Ancey's chapter on rheology (Chap. 3) gives further introduction.

  5. Application of the principle of similarity fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Sengers, J. V.

    1979-01-01

    Possible applications of the principle of similarity to fluid mechanics is described and illustrated. In correlating thermophysical properties of fluids, the similarity principle transcends the traditional corresponding states principle. In fluid mechanics the similarity principle is useful in correlating flow processes that can be modeled adequately with one independent variable (i.e., one-dimensional flows). In this paper we explore the concept of transforming the conservation equations by combining similarity principles for thermophysical properties with those for fluid flow. We illustrate the usefulness of the procedure by applying such a transformation to calculate two phase critical mass flow through a nozzle.

  6. Diffuse-Interface Methods in Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. M.; McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review the development of diffuse-interface models of hydrodynamics and their application to a wide variety of interfacial phenomena. The authors discuss the issues involved in formulating diffuse-interface models for single-component and binary fluids. Recent applications and computations using these models are discussed in each case. Further, the authors address issues including sharp-interface analyses that relate these models to the classical free-boundary problem, related computational approaches to describe interfacial phenomena, and related approaches describing fully-miscible fluids.

  7. The Role of CFD in Undergraduate Fluid Mechanics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimbala, John

    2006-11-01

    Instruction of undergraduate fluid mechanics is greatly enhanced through integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) into fluid mechanics courses and labs. Specifically, students are able to visualize fluid flows with CFD and are better able to understand those flows by performing parametric studies. At Penn State, CFD has been carefully integrated into our introductory junior-level fluid mechanics course, yet displaces only about one class period. The key is to show demonstrations and assign homework that use CFD as a tool that helps students learn the basic concepts of fluid mechanics. The application of CFD (grid generation, boundary conditions, etc.), rather than numerical algorithms, is stressed. This is done through use of short, pre-defined templates for FlowLab, a student-friendly analysis and visualization package created by Fluent, Inc. The textbook by Cengel and Cimbala (McGraw-Hill 2006) contains 46 end-of-chapter homework problems that are used in conjunction with 42 FlowLab templates. Each exercise has been designed with two major learning objectives in mind: (1) enhance student understanding of a specific fluid mechanics concept, and (2) introduce the student to a specific capability and/or limitation of CFD through hands-on practice. More templates are being developed that emphasize the first objective. The flow of fluid between two concentric rotating cylinders is a good example of a problem that is solved approximately, analytically, and with CFD, and the results are compared to enhance learning.

  8. Bernoulli and Newton in Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Norman F.

    1972-01-01

    Bernoulli's theorem can be better understood with the aid of Newton's laws and the law of conservation of energy. Application of this theorem should involve only cases dealing with an interchange of velocity and pressure within a fluid under isentropic conditions. (DF)

  9. Bernoulli and Newton in Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Norman F.

    1972-01-01

    Bernoulli's theorem can be better understood with the aid of Newton's laws and the law of conservation of energy. Application of this theorem should involve only cases dealing with an interchange of velocity and pressure within a fluid under isentropic conditions. (DF)

  10. Fluid catalytic cracking : feedstocks and reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupain, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is one of the key units in a modern refinery. Traditionally, its design is primarily aimed for the production of gasoline from heavy oil fractions, but as co-products also diesel blends and valuable gasses (e.g. propene and butenes) are formed in

  11. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, John M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  12. Vectors, tensors and the basic equations of fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Aris, Rutherford

    1962-01-01

    Introductory text, geared toward advanced undergraduate and graduate students, applies mathematics of Cartesian and general tensors to physical field theories and demonstrates them in terms of the theory of fluid mechanics. 1962 edition.

  13. Mechanics of undulatory swimming in a frictional fluid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ding, Yang; Sharpe, Sarah S; Masse, Andrew; Goldman, Daniel I

    2012-01-01

    .... In this paper, we use the simulation to study the detailed mechanics of undulatory swimming in a "granular frictional fluid" and compare the predictions to our previously developed resistive force theory (RFT...

  14. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  15. Research in Applied Mathematics, Fluid Mechanics and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1998 through March 31, 1999.

  16. Zero-G fluid mechanics in animal and man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, H.

    1986-01-01

    Significant cardiovascular change occurs with spaceflight. Loss of normal hydrostatic pressure gradients (head-to-foot), present while upright on earth, results in significant headward fluid shift of vascular and interstitial fluids. The resultant fluid change also shifts the hydrostatic indifference point for the circulation. The persistent distention of neck veins and change in upper body tissue compliance initiates steps to adapt to and compensate for the sensed excess fluid. These result in a loss of intravascular volume through neuro-humoral mechanisms and the presence of a smaller heart size, leading to a state where the subject has a reduced adaptive capacity to stress, particularly to fluid shifts to the lower body as occurs when once again returning to earth. This article reviews what is known about the weightlessness-induced headward fluid shift and its effects on cardiovascular function.

  17. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-12-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  18. The Contact Angle in Inviscid Fluid Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Shankar; R Kidambi

    2005-05-01

    We show that in general, the specification of a contact angle condition at the contact line in inviscid fluid motions is incompatible with the classical field equations and boundary conditions generally applicable to them. The limited conditions under which such a specification is permissible are derived;however, these include cases where the static meniscus is not flat. In view of this situation, the status of the many `solutions’ in the literature which prescribe a contact angle in potential flows comes into question. We suggest that these solutions which attempt to incorporate a phenomenological, but incompatible, condition are in some, imprecise sense `weak-type solutions’;they satisfy or are likely to satisfy, at least in the limit, the governing equations and boundary conditions everywhere except in the neighbourhood of the contact line. We discuss the implications of the result for the analysis of inviscid flows with free surfaces.

  19. Problems in Microgravity Fluid Mechanics: G-Jitter Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsy, G. M.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final report on our NASA grant, Problems in Microgravity Fluid Mechanics NAG3-2513: 12/14/2000 - 11/30/2003, extended through 11/30/2004. This grant was made to Stanford University and then transferred to the University of California at Santa Barbara when the PI relocated there in January 2001. Our main activity has been to conduct both experimental and theoretical studies of instabilities in fluids that are relevant to the microgravity environment, i.e. those that do not involve the action of buoyancy due to a steady gravitational field. Full details of the work accomplished under this grant are given below. Our work has focused on: (i) Theoretical and computational studies of the effect of g-jitter on instabilities of convective states where the convection is driven by forces other than buoyancy (ii) Experimental studies of instabilities during displacements of miscible fluid pairs in tubes, with a focus on the degree to which these mimic those found in immiscible fluids. (iii) Theoretical and experimental studies of the effect of time dependent electrohydrodynamic forces on chaotic advection in drops immersed in a second dielectric liquid. Our objectives are to acquire insight and understanding into microgravity fluid mechanics problems that bear on either fundamental issues or applications in fluid physics. We are interested in the response of fluids to either a fluctuating acceleration environment or to forces other than gravity that cause fluid mixing and convection. We have been active in several general areas.

  20. Molecular mechanics and structure of the fluid-solid interface in simple fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gerald J.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.

    2017-09-01

    Near a fluid-solid interface, the fluid spatial density profile is highly nonuniform at the molecular scale. This nonuniformity can have profound effects on the dynamical behavior of the fluid and has been shown to play an especially important role when modeling a wide variety of nanoscale heat and momentum transfer phenomena. We use molecular-mechanics arguments and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations to develop a better understanding of the structure of the first fluid layer directly adjacent to the solid in the layering regime, as delineated by a nondimensional number that compares the effects of wall-fluid interaction to thermal energy. Using asymptotic analysis of the Nernst-Planck equation, we show that features of the fluid density profile close to the wall, such as the areal density of the first layer ΣFL (defined as the number of atoms in this layer per unit of fluid-solid interfacial area), can be expressed as polynomial functions of the fluid average density ρave. This is found to be in agreement with MD simulations, which also show that the width of the first layer hFL is a linear function of the average density and only a weak function of the temperature T . These results can be combined to show that, for system average densities corresponding to a dense fluid (ρave≥0.7 ), the ratio C ≡ΣFLρavehFL, representing a density enhancement with respect to the bulk fluid, depends only weakly on temperature and is essentially independent of density. Further MD simulations suggest that the above results, nominally valid for large systems (solid in contact with semi-infinite fluid), also describe fluid-solid interfaces under considerable nanoconfinement, provided ρave is appropriately defined.

  1. Multifield Problems in Solid and Fluid Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Helmig, Rainer; Wohlmuth, Barbara I

    2006-01-01

    Many phenomena cannot be described by concentrating on them in isolation - therefore multifield models and concepts are needed. This book summarizes the scientific results of the Collaborative Research Center on Multifield Problems in Continuum Mechanics funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) from 1995-2006.

  2. Active Learning in Fluid Mechanics: Youtube Tube Flow and Puzzling Fluids Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrenya, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Active-learning exercises appropriate for a course in undergraduate fluid mechanics are presented. The first exercise involves an experiment in gravity-driven tube flow, with small groups of students partaking in a contest to predict the experimental flow rates using the mechanical energy balance. The second exercise takes the form of an…

  3. Active Learning in Fluid Mechanics: Youtube Tube Flow and Puzzling Fluids Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrenya, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Active-learning exercises appropriate for a course in undergraduate fluid mechanics are presented. The first exercise involves an experiment in gravity-driven tube flow, with small groups of students partaking in a contest to predict the experimental flow rates using the mechanical energy balance. The second exercise takes the form of an…

  4. Some connections between fluid mechanics and the solving of industrial and environmental fluid-flow problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. C. R.

    1981-05-01

    The ways in which advances in fluid mechanics have led to improvements in engineering design are discussed, with attention to the stimulation of fluid mechanics research by industrial and environmental problems. The development of many practical uses of fluid flow without the benefit of scientific study is also emphasized. Among the topics discussed are vortices and coherent structures in turbulent flows, lubrication, jet and multiphase flows, the control and exploitation of waves, the effect of unsteady forces on structures, and dispersion phenomena. Among the practical achievements covered are the use of bluff shields to control separated flow over truck bodies and reduce aerodynamic drag, ink-jet printing, hovercraft stability, fluidized-bed combustion, the fluid/solid instabilities caused by air flow around a computer memory floppy disc, and various wind turbines.

  5. 全球化背景下核型创新网络竞争机制研究--基于改进LV-EG模型的仿真分析%Study on Competition Mechanism of Core-structure Innovation Network under the Circumstance of Globalization-A Simulation Study Based on LV-EG Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙冰; 姚洪涛

    2016-01-01

    在全球化背景下,核型创新网络在向全球创新网络演进的过程中面临多市场竞争和关键资源竞争的双重考验。首先构建全球市场环境下核型创新网络多层次竞合模型;其次,运用Lotka-Volterra模型和演化博弈模型分别剖析核心企业间的竞争关系和尾端企业间的竞合关系,并据此构建改进的LV-EG模型以分析尾端企业竞合关系对核心企业间竞争关系的作用机理;最后,运用matlab对改进的LV-EG模型进行仿真。仿真结果表明:核心企业的尾端企业报酬支付能力、创新产品生产能力、创新环境和网络结构对核型创新网络在全球范围内吸引优质企业并在全球市场环境中获取竞争优势具有重要影响。%Under the circumstance of globalization , core-structure innovation network faces dual challenge of multi-market competition and key resources competition in the process of development where the revolution of core -struc-ture innovation network is to global innovation network .Therefore , we firstly establish the model of core-structure innovation network ’ s multi-level coopetition under the global market environment .And then we expound core-firms’ competition and end-firms’ coopetition by applying and the Lotka-Volterra model and the evolutionary game model.Finally, we simulate and analyze this process by applying matlab software to the LV -EG model and come to the conclusion that core-firm’ s ability of paying to end-firms and production capacity of innovative products , the innovation environment and the network structure influence greatly on core -firms’ ability to attract end-firms from the global world and core-firms’ s competitive advantage under the global market environment .

  6. Ludwig Prandtl and the growth of fluid mechanics in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Ludwig Prandtl (1875-1953) has been called the father of modern aerodynamics. His name is associated most famously with the boundary layer concept, but also with several other topics in 20th-century fluid mechanics, particularly turbulence (Prandtl's mixing length). Among his disciples are pioneers of modern fluid mechanics like Heinrich Blasius, Theodore von Kármán, and Walter Tollmien. Furthermore, Prandtl founded the Aerodynamische Versuchsanstalt (AVA) and the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Strömungsforschung in Göttingen, nuclei for the growth of fluid mechanics in Germany. In this article I trace this development on the basis of my recent biography of Prandtl.

  7. Using an Interactive Lattice Boltzmann Solver in Fluid Mechanics Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam S. Glessmer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of the diverse range of teaching applications that can be realized using an interactive lattice Boltzmann simulation tool in fluid mechanics instruction and outreach. In an inquiry-based learning framework, examples are given of learning scenarios that address instruction on scientific results, scientific methods or the scientific process at varying levels of student activity, from consuming to applying to researching. Interactive live demonstrations on portable hardware enable new and innovative teaching concepts for fluid mechanics, also for large audiences and in the early stages of the university education. Moreover, selected examples successfully demonstrate that the integration of high-fidelity CFD methods into fluid mechanics teaching facilitates high-quality student research work within reach of the current state of the art in the respective field of research.

  8. Respiratory fluid mechanics and transport processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, J B

    2001-01-01

    The field of respiratory flow and transport has experienced significant research activity over the past several years. Important contributions to the knowledge base come from pulmonary and critical care medicine, surgery, physiology, environmental health sciences, biophysics, and engineering. Several disciplines within engineering have strong and historical ties to respiration including mechanical, chemical, civil/environmental, aerospace and, of course, biomedical engineering. This review draws from a wide variety of scientific literature that reflects the diverse constituency and audience that respiratory science has developed. The subject areas covered include nasal flow and transport, airway gas flow, alternative modes of ventilation, nonrespiratory gas transport, aerosol transport, airway stability, mucus transport, pulmonary acoustics, surfactant dynamics and delivery, and pleural liquid flow. Within each area are a number of subtopics whose exploration can provide the opportunity of both depth and breadth for the interested reader.

  9. Formulation development, optimization and study on drug release kinetics of Eudragit® L100-HPMC E15 LV mixed film-coated colon-targeted Mesalamine tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Maria John Newton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to evaluate the in vitro dissolution characteristics of pH-sensitive polymer - HPMC E 15 LV-coated tablets - in various simulated fluids (pH range 1.2, 6, 7.2. The Mesalamine tablets were fabricated by mixing the drug with microcrystalline cellulose and other ingredients. The fabricated Mesalamine tablets were coated with Eudragit L100 polymer and HPMC E 15 LV. The fluctuation in colonic pH conditions during inflammatory bowel disease and the nature of less fluid content in the colon may limit the expected drug release in the colon. Addition of HPMC E 15 LV may control this problem by hydrophilic nature and excellent film-forming characteristics like ductility and elasticity. The different batches of Mesalamine tablets (FM1-FM5 were coated with increasing concentration of Eudragit L100 and HPMC E 15 LV. The coating was given up to 8% TWG(Total weight gain of the uncoated tablet. Drug release studies were conducted in different pH conditions in the presence of rat ceaecal contents. The different buffer conditions were chosen to mimic the pH changes in the terminal part of the ileum as well as in the colon. The drug release profile was analyzed for colon-targeting performance in vitro. The release profile of the tablets indicates that the drug release was retarded in the tablet by film coating. The addition of HPMC E 15 LV ensures the channels for allowing colonic fluids to penetrate into the core and subsequent drug release at the target site. The kinetics of the drug release also evaluated the release pattern that was best fitted with Higuchian release. The results of the mechanism of release revealed that drug release was found to be a complex one with diffusion, erosion and swelling.

  10. An Introduction to Computational Fluid Mechanics by Example

    CERN Document Server

    Biringen, Sedat

    2011-01-01

    This new book builds on the original classic textbook entitled: An Introduction to Computational Fluid Mechanics by C. Y. Chow which was originally published in 1979. In the decades that have passed since this book was published the field of computational fluid dynamics has seen a number of changes in both the sophistication of the algorithms used but also advances in the computer hardware and software available. This new book incorporates the latest algorithms in the solution techniques and supports this by using numerous examples of applications to a broad range of industries from mechanical

  11. Multimedia Fluid Mechanics - Multilingual Version CD-ROM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsy, G. M.; Aref, H.; Breuer, K. S.; Hochgreb, S.; Koseff, J. R.; Munson, B. R.; Powell, K. G.; Robertson, C. R.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2004-07-01

    This CD-ROM offers an interactive tool for teaching undergraduate fluid mechanics. It features experiments that demonstrate fluid mechanical phenomena, animations of important principles and concepts, virtual laboratories in which students acquire data from the images, interactive computational exercises in which parameters can be varied, and other descriptive and illuminating material on applications. The material may be accessed randomly through a hyperlinked text, a search engine, a video library, and a glossary of terms. The new edition has been thoroughly updated and includes versions in English, Spanish and French.

  12. Shocks, singularities and oscillations in nonlinear optics and fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Santo, Daniele; Lannes, David

    2017-01-01

    The book collects the most relevant results from the INdAM Workshop "Shocks, Singularities and Oscillations in Nonlinear Optics and Fluid Mechanics" held in Rome, September 14-18, 2015. The contributions discuss recent major advances in the study of nonlinear hyperbolic systems, addressing general theoretical issues such as symmetrizability, singularities, low regularity or dispersive perturbations. It also investigates several physical phenomena where such systems are relevant, such as nonlinear optics, shock theory (stability, relaxation) and fluid mechanics (boundary layers, water waves, Euler equations, geophysical flows, etc.). It is a valuable resource for researchers in these fields. .

  13. Mechanics and mathematics of fluids of the differential type

    CERN Document Server

    Cioranescu, D; Rajagopal, K R

    2016-01-01

    This text is the first of its kind to bring together both the thermomechanics and mathematical analysis of Reiner-Rivlin fluids and fluids of grades 2 and 3 in a single book. Each part of the book can be considered as being self-contained. The first part of the book is devoted to a description of the mechanics, thermodynamics, and stability of flows of fluids of grade 2 and grade 3. The second part of the book is dedicated to the development of rigorous mathematical results concerning the equations governing the motion of a family of fluids of the differential type. Finally, the proofs of a number of useful results are collected in an appendix.

  14. Micro-mechanisms of residual oil mobilization by viscoelastic fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lijuan; Yue Xiang'an; Guo Fenqiao

    2008-01-01

    Four typical types of residual oil, residual oil trapped in dead ends, oil ganglia in pore throats,oil at pore comers and oil film adhered to pore walls, were studied. According to main pore structure characteristics and the fundamental morphological features of residual oil, four displacement models for residual oil were proposed, in which pore-scale flow behavior of viscoelastic fluid was analyzed by a numerical method and micro-mechanisms for mobilization of residual oil were discussed. Calculated results indicate that the viscoelastic effect enhances micro displacement efficiency and increases swept volume. For residual oil trapped in dead ends, the flow field of viscoelastic fluid is developed in dead ends more deeply, resulting in more contact with oil by the displacing fluid, and consequently increasing swept volume. In addition, intense viscoelastic vortex has great stress, under which residual oil becomes small oil ganglia, and finally be carried into main channels. For residual oil at pore throats, its displacement mechanisms are similar to the oil trapped in dead ends. Vortices are developed in the depths of the throats and oil ganglia become smaller. Besides, viscoelastic fluid causes higher pressure drop on oil ganglia, as a driving force, which can overcome capillary force, consequently, flow direction can be changed and the displacing fluid enter smaller throats. For oil at pore comers, viscoelastic fluid can enhance displacement efficiency as a result of greater velocity and stress near the comers. For residual oil adhered to pore wall,viscoelastic fluid can provide a greater displacing force on the interface between viscoelastic fluid and oil,thus, making it easier to exceed the minimum interfacial tension for mobilizing the oil film.

  15. Internal fluid mechanics research on supercomputers for aerospace propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brent A.; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Szuch, John R.

    1988-01-01

    The Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center is combining the key elements of computational fluid dynamics, aerothermodynamic experiments, and advanced computational technology to bring internal computational fluid mechanics (ICFM) to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion systems. The strategies used to achieve this goal are to: (1) pursue an understanding of flow physics, surface heat transfer, and combustion via analysis and fundamental experiments, (2) incorporate improved understanding of these phenomena into verified 3-D CFD codes, and (3) utilize state-of-the-art computational technology to enhance experimental and CFD research. Presented is an overview of the ICFM program in high-speed propulsion, including work in inlets, turbomachinery, and chemical reacting flows. Ongoing efforts to integrate new computer technologies, such as parallel computing and artificial intelligence, into high-speed aeropropulsion research are described.

  16. A Blended Learning Approach to Teach Fluid Mechanics in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ataur

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the teaching and learning of fluid mechanics at the University of Western Sydney (UWS), Australia, by applying a blended learning approach (BLA). In the adopted BLA, various flexible learning materials have been made available to the students such as online recorded lectures, online recorded tutorials, hand…

  17. Instructor's Guide for Fluid Mechanics: A Modular Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John S.

    This guide is designed to assist engineering teachers in developing an understanding of fluid mechanics in their students. The course is designed around a set of nine self-paced learning modules, each of which contains a discussion of the subject matter; incremental objectives; problem index, set and answers; resource materials; and a quiz with…

  18. Fluid Mechanics of Wing Adaptation for Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Wilder, M. C.; Carr, L. W.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The unsteady fluid mechanics associated with use of a dynamically deforming leading edge airfoil for achieving compressible flow separation control has been experimentally studied. Changing the leading edge curvature at rapid rates dramatically alters the flow vorticity dynamics which is responsible for the many effects observed in the flow.

  19. Leonhard Euler and his contributions to fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    The career of Leonhard Euler, one of the world's most gifted scientists, is reviewed. The paper focuses on Euler's contributions to fluid mechanics and gives a perspective of how this science was born. A bibliography is included to provide the history enthusiast with a starting point for further study.

  20. Escape response of planktonic protists to fluid mechanical signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Hans Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The escape response to fluid mechanical signals was examined in 6 protists, 4 ciliates and 2 dinoflagellates. When exposed to a siphon flow. 3 species of ciliates, Balanion comatum, Strobilidium sp., and Mesodinium pulex, responded with escape jumps. The threshold deformation rates required...

  1. Flippin' Fluid Mechanics--Comparison Using Two Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Donald R.; Majerich, David M.; Madden, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    A flipped classroom approach was implemented in an undergraduate fluid mechanics course. Students watched short, online video lectures before class, participated in active in-class problem solving sessions (in pairs), and completed individualized online quizzes weekly. In-class activities were designed to develop problem-solving skills and teach…

  2. Instructor's Guide for Fluid Mechanics: A Modular Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John S.

    This guide is designed to assist engineering teachers in developing an understanding of fluid mechanics in their students. The course is designed around a set of nine self-paced learning modules, each of which contains a discussion of the subject matter; incremental objectives; problem index, set and answers; resource materials; and a quiz with…

  3. Cardiac resynchronization therapy by multipoint pacing improves response of left ventricular mechanics and fluid dynamics: a three-dimensional and particle image velocimetry echo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Mariachiara; Migliore, Federico; Badano, Luigi; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Cavedon, Stefano; Zorzi, Alessandro; Corrado, Domenico; Iliceto, Sabino; Muraru, Denisa

    2016-12-26

    To characterize the effect of multipoint pacing (MPP) compared to biventricular pacing (BiV) on left ventricle (LV) mechanics and intraventricular fluid dynamics by three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) and echocardiographic particle imaging velocimetry (Echo-PIV). In 11 consecutive patients [8 men; median age 65 years (57-75)] receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) with a quadripolar LV lead (Quartet,St.Jude Medical,Inc.), 3DE and Echo-PIV data were collected for each pacing configuration (CRT-OFF, BiV, and MPP) at follow-up after 6 months. 3DE data included LV volumes, LV ejection fraction (LVEF), strain, and systolic dyssynchrony index (SDI). Echo-PIV was used to evaluate the directional distribution of global blood flow momentum, ranging from zero, when flow force is predominantly along the base-apex direction, up to 90° when it becomes transversal. MPP resulted in significant reduction in end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes compared with both CRT-OFF (P = 0.02; P = 0.008, respectively) and BiV (P = 0.04; P = 0.03, respectively). LVEF and cardiac output were significant superior in MPP compared with CRT-OFF, but similar between MPP and BiV. Statistical significant differences when comparing global longitudinal and circumferential strain and SDI with MPP vs. CRT-OFF were observed (P = 0.008; P = 0.008; P = 0.01, respectively). There was also a trend towards improvement in strain between BiV and MPP that did not reach statistical significance. MPP reflected into a significant reduction of the deviation of global blood flow momentum compared with both CRT-OFF and BiV (P = 0.002) indicating a systematic increase of longitudinal alignment from the base-apex orientation of the haemodynamic forces. These preliminary results suggest that MPP resulted in significant improvement of LV mechanics and fluid dynamics compared with BiV. However, larger studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis. © Crown copyright 2016.

  4. Oscillatory fluid flow influences primary cilia and microtubule mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinha, Lina C; Hoey, David A; Fernandes, Paulo R; Rodrigues, Hélder C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues, such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity.

  5. Application of computational fluid mechanics to atmospheric pollution problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility. This paper reports the results of investigations of the fluid dynamical and microphysical processes involved in the formation of advection fog on aerosols from combustion-related pollutants, as condensation nuclei. The effects of a polydisperse aerosol distribution, on the condensation/nucleation processes which cause the reduction in visibility are studied. This study demonstrates how computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer modeling can be applied to simulate the life cycle of the atmosphereic pollution problems.

  6. CISM course on stochastic methods in fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chibbaro, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Since their first introduction in natural sciences through the work of Einstein on Brownian motion in 1905 and further works, in particular by Langevin, Smoluchowski and others, stochastic processes have been used in several areas of science and technology. For example, they have been applied in chemical studies, or in fluid turbulence and for combustion and reactive flows. The articles in this book provide a general and unified framework in which stochastic processes are presented as modeling tools for various issues in engineering, physics and chemistry, with particular focus on fluid mechan

  7. Bilateral patching in retinal detachment: fluid mechanics and retinal "settling".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William J

    2011-07-20

    When a patient suffers a retinal detachment and surgery is delayed, it is known clinically that bilaterally patching the patient may allow the retina to partially reattach or "settle." Although this procedure has been performed since the 1860s, there is still debate as to how such a maneuver facilitates the reattachment of the retina. Finite element calculations using commercially available analysis software are used to elucidate the influence of reduction in eye movement caused by bilateral patching on the flow of subretinal fluid in a physical model of retinal detachment. It was found that by coupling fluid mechanics with structural mechanics, a physically consistent explanation of increased retinal detachment with eye movements can be found in the case of traction on the retinal hole. Large eye movements increase vitreous traction and detachment forces on the edge of the retinal hole, creating a subretinal vacuum and facilitating increased subretinal fluid. Alternative models, in which intraocular fluid flow is redirected into the subretinal space, are not consistent with these simulations. The results of these simulations explain the physical principles behind bilateral patching and provide insight that can be used clinically. In particular, as is known clinically, bilateral patching may facilitate a decrease in the height of a retinal detachment. The results described here provide a description of a physical mechanism underlying this technique. The findings of this study may aid in deciding whether to bilaterally patch patients and in counseling patients on pre- and postoperative care.

  8. Fluid mechanics mechanisms in the stall process of helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results from airfoils in the Mach number, Reynolds number, or reduced frequency ranges typical of helicopter rotor blades have identified the most influential flow mechanisms in the dynamic stall process. The importance of secondary shed vortices, downstream wake action, and the flow in the separated region is generally acknowledged but poorly understood. By means of surface pressure cross-correlations and flow field measurements in static stall, several new hypotheses have been generated. It is proposed that vortex shedding may be caused by acoustic disturbances propagating forward in the lower (pressure) surface boundary layer, that wake closure is a misnomer, and that the shed vortex leaves a trail of vorticity that forms a turbulent free shear layer. The known dynamic stall flow mechanisms are reviewed and the potential importance of recently proposed and hypothetical flow phenomena with respect to helicopter blade aeroelastic response are assessed.

  9. A fluid mechanical model for current-generating-feeding jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John

    2008-11-01

    Many jellyfish species, e.g. moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita, use body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. In this study, a model was developed to understand the fluid mechanics for this current-generating-feeding mode of jellyfish. The flow generated by free-swimming Aurelia aurita was measured using digital particle image velocimetry. The dynamics of prey (e.g., brine shrimp Artemia) in the flow field were described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation which takes into consideration the inertia of prey and the escape forces, which prey exert in the presence of predator. A Lagrangian analysis was used to identify the region of the flow in which prey can be captured by the jellyfish and the clearance rate was quantified. The study provides a new methodology to study biological current-generating-feeding and the transport and mixing of particles in fluid flow in general.

  10. Fluid coupling in a discrete model of cochlear mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Stephen J; Lineton, Ben; Ni, Guangjian

    2011-09-01

    A discrete model of cochlear mechanics is introduced that includes a full, three-dimensional, description of fluid coupling. This formulation allows the fluid coupling and basilar membrane dynamics to be analyzed separately and then coupled together with a simple piece of linear algebra. The fluid coupling is initially analyzed using a wavenumber formulation and is separated into one component due to one-dimensional fluid coupling and one comprising all the other contributions. Using the theory of acoustic waves in a duct, however, these two components of the pressure can also be associated with a far field, due to the plane wave, and a near field, due to the evanescent, higher order, modes. The near field components are then seen as one of a number of sources of additional longitudinal coupling in the cochlea. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the fluid chamber areas can also be taken into account, to predict both the pressure difference between the chambers and the mean pressure. This allows the calculation, for example, of the effect of a short cochlear implant on the coupled response of the cochlea.

  11. Stanley Corrsin Award Talk: Fluid Mechanics of Fungi and Slime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Michael

    2013-11-01

    There are interesting fluid mechanics problems everywhere, even in the most lowly and hidden corners of forest floors. Here I discuss some questions we have been working on in recent years involving fungi and slime. A critical issue for the ecology of fungi and slime is nutrient availability: nutrient sources are highly heterogeneous, and strategies are necessary to find food when it runs out. In the fungal phylum Ascomycota, spore dispersal is the primary mechanism for finding new food sources. The defining feature of this phylum is the ascus, a fluid filled sac from which spores are ejected, through a build up in osmotic pressure. We outline the (largely fluid mechanical) design constraints on this ejection strategy, and demonstrate how it provides strong constraints for the diverse morphologies of spores and asci found in nature. The core of the argument revisits a classical problem in elastohydrodynamic lubrication from a different perspective. A completely different strategy for finding new nutrient is found by slime molds and fungi that stretch out - as a single organism- over enormous areas (up to hectares) over forest floors. As a model problem we study the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, which forages with a large network of connected tubes on the forest floors. Localized regions in the network find nutrient sources and then pump the nutrients throughout the entire organism. We discuss fluid mechanical mechanisms for coordinating this transport, which generalize peristalsis to pumping in a heterogeneous network. We give a preliminary discussion to how physarum can detect a nutrient source and pump the nutrient throughout the organism.

  12. Efficacy of an inactivated FeLV vaccine compared to a recombinant FeLV vaccine in minimum age cats following virulent FeLV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuke, Kristin; King, Vickie; Southwick, Kendra; Stoeva, Mira I; Thomas, Anne; Winkler, M Teresa C

    2014-05-07

    The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of an inactivated feline leukemia virus (FeLV) vaccine (Versifel(®) FeLV, Zoetis.) compared to a recombinant FeLV vaccine (Purevax(®) FeLV, Merial Animal Health) in young cats, exposed under laboratory conditions to a highly virulent challenge model. The study was designed to be consistent with the general immunogenicity requirements of the European Pharmacopoeia 6.0 Monograph 01/2008:1321-Feline Leukaemia Vaccine (Inactivated) with the exception that commercial-strength vaccines were assessed. Fifty seronegative cats (8-9 weeks old) were vaccinated subcutaneously on two occasions, three weeks apart, with either placebo (treatment group T01), Versifel FeLV Vaccine (treatment group T02), or Purevax FeLV Vaccine (treatment group T03) according to the manufacturer's directions. Cats were challenged three weeks after the second vaccination with a virulent FeLV isolate (61E strain). Persistent FeLV antigenemia was determined from 3 to 15 weeks postchallenge. Bone marrow samples were tested for the presence of FeLV proviral DNA to determine FeLV latent infection. At week 15 after challenge with the virulent FeLV 61E strain, the Versifel FeLV Vaccine conferred 89.5% protection against FeLV persistent antigenemia and 94.7% protection against FeLV proviral DNA integration in bone marrow cells. In comparison, the Purevax FeLV Vaccine conferred 20% protection against FeLV persistent antigenemia and 35% protection against FeLV proviral DNA integration in bone marrow cells following challenge. The data from this study show that the Versifel FeLV Vaccine was efficacious in preventing both FeLV persistent p27 antigenemia and FeLV proviral DNA integration in bone marrow cells of cats challenged with this particular challenge model under laboratory conditions and provided better protection than Purevax FeLV in this experimental challenge model with highly virulent FeLV.

  13. Fluid mechanics as a driver of tissue-scale mechanical signaling in organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Rachel M; Morgan, Joshua T; Marcin, Elizabeth S; Gleghorn, Jason P

    2016-12-01

    Organogenesis is the process during development by which cells self-assemble into complex, multi-scale tissues. Whereas significant focus and research effort has demonstrated the importance of solid mechanics in organogenesis, less attention has been given to the fluid forces that provide mechanical cues over tissue length scales. Fluid motion and pressure is capable of creating spatial gradients of forces acting on cells, thus eliciting distinct and localized signaling patterns essential for proper organ formation. Understanding the multi-scale nature of the mechanics is critically important to decipher how mechanical signals sculpt developing organs. This review outlines various mechanisms by which tissues generate, regulate, and sense fluid forces and highlights the impact of these forces and mechanisms in case studies of normal and pathological development.

  14. Friction mechanisms and interfacial slip at fluid-solid interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Leger, L

    2003-01-01

    We present series of experiments based on near field laser velocimetry, developed to characterize the friction mechanisms at fluid-solid interfaces. For polymers, entangled polymer melts are sheared against smooth solid surfaces, covered by surface attached polymer chains of the same chemical species, having a controlled surface density. Direct measurements of the interfacial velocity and of the shear force allow identification of the molecular mechanisms of friction. Depending on the value of the inverse of the shear rate experienced by the polymer compared to the reptation time, the transition between a regime of high and a regime of low friction observed when increasing the shear rate can be related to disentanglement or to the extraction of the surface chains from the bulk polymer. Surfaces with adjusted friction properties can thus be designed by choosing chain anchored length and surface density. For simple fluids, the direct measurements of the interfacial velocity show that, contrary to the usual hypo...

  15. Effect of Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Hulka, James R.; Moser, Marlow D.; Rhys, Noah O.

    2008-01-01

    A common propellant combination used for high thrust generation is GH2/LOX. Historical GH2/LOX injection elements have been of the shear-coaxial type. Element type has a large heritage of research work to aid in element design. The swirl-coaxial element, despite its many performance benefits, has a relatively small amount of historical, LRE-oriented work to draw from. Design features of interest are grounded in the fluid mechanics of the liquid swirl process itself, are based on data from low-pressure, low mass flow rate experiments. There is a need to investigate how high ambient pressures and mass flow rates influence internal and external swirl features. The objective of this research is to determine influence of varying liquid mass flow rate and ambient chamber pressure on the intact-length fluid mechanics of a liquid swirl element.

  16. A Study on the Fluid Mechanics Performance of Aquatics Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Jian

    2015-01-01

    Based on the theoretical foundation of fluid mechanics performance, this paper carries out an analysis on mechanical characteristics of aquatic sports. First, basic features of windsurfing are studied in this paper. Performance of windsurfing changes with its parameters, requiring a lot for windsurfers. It can be known from variance analysis that the best performance of NP plate and a relatively small resistance should be the direction of sail-board design. Meanwhile, by building up a mathematical model with fuzzy comprehensive evaluation and correlation analysis, it can be also found that the fluid resistance characteristic is a key factor that influences the performance of windsurfers. Besides, this paper also takes into account external factors, including the influences of regional difference on aquatic events. Different regions with various geographical conditions have different influences on aquatic events.

  17. A cyber-physical approach to experimental fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowski, Andrew Williams

    This Thesis documents the design, implementation, and use of a novel type of experimental apparatus, termed Cyber-Physical Fluid Dynamics (CPFD). Unlike traditional fluid mechanics experiments, CPFD is a general-purpose technique that allows one to impose arbitrary forces on an object submerged in a fluid. By combining fluid mechanics with robotics, we can perform experiments that would otherwise be incredibly difficult or time-consuming. More generally, CPFD allows a high degree of automation and control of the experimental process, allowing for much more efficient use of experimental facilities. Examples of CPFD's capabilites include imposing a gravitational force in the horizontal direction (allowing a test object to "fall" sideways in a water channel), simulating nonlinear springs for a vibrating fluid-structure system, or allowing a self-propelled body to move forward under its own force. Because experimental parameters (including forces and even the mass of the test object) are defined in software, one can define entire ensembles of experiments to run autonomously. CPFD additionally integrates related systems such as water channel speed control, LDV flow speed measurements, and PIV flowfield measurements. The end result is a general-purpose experimental system that opens the door to a vast array of fluid-structure interaction problems. We begin by describing the design and implementation of CPFD, the heart of which is a high-performance force-feedback control system. Precise measurement of time-varying forces (including removing effects of the test object's inertia) is more critical here than in typical robotic force-feedback applications. CPFD is based on an integration of ideas from control theory, fluid dynamics, computer science, electrical engineering, and solid mechanics. We also describe experiments using the CPFD experimental apparatus to study vortex-induced vibration (VIV) and oscillating-airfoil propulsion. We show how CPFD can be used to simulate

  18. A UNIVERSAL VARIATIONAL FORMULATION FOR TWO DIMENSIONAL FLUID MECHANICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何吉欢

    2001-01-01

    A universal variational formulation for two dimensional fluid mechanics is obtained, which is subject to the so-called parameter-constrained equations (the relationship between parameters in two governing equations). By eliminating the constraints, the generalized variational principle (GVPs) can be readily derived from the formulation. The formulation can be applied to any conditions in case the governing equations can be converted into conservative forms. Some illustrative examples are given to testify the effectiveness and simplicity of the method.

  19. Immunosensor with Fluid Control Mechanism for Salivary Cortisol Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Matsuda, Yohei; Sasaki, Shohei; Sasaki, Makoto; Kadoma, Yoshihiro; Imai, Yoshikatsu; Niwa, Daisuke; Shetty, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate a new design for a cortisol immunosensor for the noninvasive and quantitative analysis of salivary cortisol. We propose a cortisol immunosensor with a fluid control mechanism which has both a vertical flow and a lateral flow. The detected current resulting from a competitive reaction between the sample cortisol and a glucose oxidase (GOD)-labeled cortisol conjugate was found to be inversely related to the concentration of cortisol in the sample s...

  20. A statistical mechanics approach to mixing in stratified fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venaille, A.; Gostiaux, L.; Sommeria, J.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting how much mixing occurs when a given amount of energy is injected into a Boussinesq fluid is a longstanding problem in stratified turbulence. The huge number of degrees of freedom involved in those processes renders extremely difficult a deterministic approach to the problem. Here we present a statistical mechanics approach yielding prediction for a cumulative, global mixing efficiency as a function of a global Richardson number and the background buoyancy profile.

  1. Fluid mechanics and solidification investigations in low-gravity environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Lundquist, C. A.; Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Fluid mechanics of gases and liquids and solidification processes were investigated under microgravity conditions during Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions. Electromagnetic, acoustic, and aerodynamic levitation devices, drop tubes, aircraft parabolic flight trajectories, and vertical sounding rockets were developed for low-g simulation. The Spacelab 3 mission will be carried out in a gravity gradient flight attitude; analyses of sources of vehicle dynamic accelerations with associated g-levels and angular rates will produce results for future specific experiments.

  2. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 3: Internal Fluid Mechanics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Internal fluid mechanics research at Lewis is directed toward an improved understanding of the important flow physics affecting aerospace propulsion systems, and applying this improved understanding to formulate accurate predictive codes. To this end, research is conducted involving detailed experimentation and analysis. The presentations in this session summarize ongoing work and indicated future emphasis in three major research thrusts: namely, inlets, ducts, and nozzles; turbomachinery; and chemical reacting flows.

  3. Fluid mechanics mechanisms in the stall process of airfoils for helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Phenomena that control the flow during the stall portion of a dynamic stall cycle are analyzed, and their effect on blade motion is outlined. Four mechanisms by which dynamic stall may be initiated are identified: (1) bursting of the separation bubble, (2) flow reversal in the turbulent boundary layer on the airfoil upper surface, (3) shock wave-boundary layer interaction behind the airfoil crest, and (4) acoustic wave propagation below the airfoil. The fluid mechanics that contribute to the identified flow phenomena are summarized, and the usefulness of a model that incorporates the required fluid mechanics mechanisms is discussed.

  4. Effect of HPMC - E15 LV premium polymer on release profile and compression characteristics of chitosan/ pectin colon targeted mesalamine matrix tablets and in vitro study on effect of pH impact on the drug release profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, A M J; Lakshmanan, Prabakaran

    2014-04-01

    The study was designed to investigate the in vitro dissolution profile and compression characteristics of colon targeted matrix tablets prepared with HPMC E15 LV in combination with pectin and Chitosan. The matrix tablets were subjected to two dissolution models in various simulated fluids such as pH 1.2, 6, 6.8, 7.2, 5.5. The fluctuations in colonic pH conditions during IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) and the nature of less fluid content in the colon may limit the expected drug release in the polysaccharide-based matrices when used alone. The Hydrophilic hydroxyl propyl methylcellulose ether premium polymer (HPMC E15 LV) of low viscosity grade was used in the formulation design, which made an excellent modification in physical and compression characteristics of the granules. The release studies indicated that the prepared matrices could control the drug release until the dosage form reaches the colon and the addition HPMC E15 LV showed the desirable changes in the dissolution profile by its hydrophilic nature since the colon is known for its less fluid content. The hydrophilic HPMC E15 LV allowed the colonic fluids to enter into the matrix and confirmed the drug release at the target site from a poorly water soluble polymer such as Chitosan and also from water soluble Pectin. The dramatic changes occurred in the drug release profile and physicochemical characteristics of the Pectin, Chitosan matrix tablets when a premium polymer HPMC E15 LV added in the formulation design in the optimized concentration. Various drug release mechanisms used for the examination of drug release characteristics. Drug release followed the combined mechanism of diffusion, erosion, swelling and polymer entanglement. In recent decade, IBD attracts many patents in novel treatment methods by using novel drug delivery systems.

  5. Advances in cardiovascular fluid mechanics: bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasi, Lakshmi P; Sucosky, Philippe; de Zelicourt, Diane; Sundareswaran, Kartik; Jimenez, Jorge; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents recent advances in cardiovascular fluid mechanics that define the current state of the art. These studies include complex multimodal investigations with advanced measurement and simulation techniques. We first discuss the complex flows within the total cavopulmonary connection in Fontan patients. We emphasize the quantification of energy losses by studying the importance of caval offsets as well as the differences among various Fontan surgical protocols. In our studies of the fluid mechanics of prosthetic heart valves, we reveal for the first time the full three-dimensional complexity of flow fields in the vicinity of bileaflet and trileaflet valves and the microscopic hinge flow dynamics. We also present results of these valves functioning in a patient-specific native aorta geometry. Our in vitro mitral valve studies show the complex mechanism of the native mitral valve apparatus. We demonstrate that the different components of the mitral valve have independent and synergistically complex functions that allow the valve to operate efficiently. We also show how valve mechanics change under pathological and repair conditions associated with enlarged ventricles. Finally, our ex vivo studies on the interactions between the aortic valve and its surrounding hemodynamic environment are aimed at providing insights into normal valve function and valve pathology. We describe the development of organ- and tissue-culture systems and the biological response of the tissue subjected to their respective simulated mechanical environment. The studies noted above have enhanced our understanding of the complex fluid mechanics associated with the cardiovascular system and have led to new translational technologies.

  6. Fluid mechanics of eating, swallowing and digestion - overview and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engmann, Jan; Burbidge, Adam S

    2013-02-26

    From a very simplistic viewpoint, the human digestive system can be regarded as a long tube (with dramatic variations in diameter, cross-section, wall properties, pumping mechanisms, regulating valves and in-line sensors). We single out a few fluid mechanical phenomena along the trajectory of a food bolus from the mouth to the small intestine and discuss how they influence sensorial perception, safe transport, and nutrient absorption from a bolus. The focus is on lubrication flows between the tongue and palate, the oropharyngeal stage of swallowing and effects of flow on absorption in the small intestine. Specific challenges and opportunities in this research area are highlighted.

  7. The fluid mechanics of the inner-ear disorder BPPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, Michael; Squires, Todd; Stone, Howard

    2001-11-01

    The inner ear of mammals contains fluid-filled semi-circular canals with a flexible sensory membrane (called a cupula) which detects rotational acceleration. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common disorders of this system diagnosed today, and is characterized by symptoms of dizziness and nausea brought on by sudden changes in head orientation. BPPV is believed to have a mechanical (rather than nervous) origin, in which dense particles called otoconia settle into the canals and trigger false sensations of rotational acceleration. Several qualitative mechanisms have been proposed by the medical community, which we examine from a fluid mechanical standpoint. Traditionally, the semicircular canal and the cupula are modeled as an over-damped torsional pendulum with a driving force provided by rotational acceleration. We extend this model to include the time-dependent mechanical response owing to sedimentation of the otoconia. We make qualitative and quantitative predictions associated with the proposed mechanisms, with an eye towards differentiating between them and perhaps towards more effective diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  8. Dynamical density functional theory for molecular and colloidal fluids: a microscopic approach to fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, A J

    2009-01-07

    In recent years, a number of dynamical density functional theories (DDFTs) have been developed for describing the dynamics of the one-body density of both colloidal and atomic fluids. In the colloidal case, the particles are assumed to have stochastic equations of motion and theories exist for both the case when the particle motion is overdamped and also in the regime where inertial effects are relevant. In this paper, we extend the theory and explore the connections between the microscopic DDFT and the equations of motion from continuum fluid mechanics. In particular, starting from the Kramers equation, which governs the dynamics of the phase space probability distribution function for the system, we show that one may obtain an approximate DDFT that is a generalization of the Euler equation. This DDFT is capable of describing the dynamics of the fluid density profile down to the scale of the individual particles. As with previous DDFTs, the dynamical equations require as input the Helmholtz free energy functional from equilibrium density functional theory (DFT). For an equilibrium system, the theory predicts the same fluid one-body density profile as one would obtain from DFT. Making further approximations, we show that the theory may be used to obtain the mode coupling theory that is widely used for describing the transition from a liquid to a glassy state.

  9. Topological Fluid Mechanics with Applications to Free Surfaces and Axisymmetric Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1996-01-01

    Topological fluid mechanics is the study of qualitative features of fluid patterns. We discuss applications to the flow beneath a stagnant surface film, and to patterns in axisymmetric flow.......Topological fluid mechanics is the study of qualitative features of fluid patterns. We discuss applications to the flow beneath a stagnant surface film, and to patterns in axisymmetric flow....

  10. Interpreting Students’ Perceptions in Fluid Mechanics Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena SOARES

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyse the impact of introducing a practical work in the learning process of the Fluid Transport Systems course in Chemical Engineering degree. The students, in groups of two or three elements, were free to choose the application case in order to develop the practical work proposed by the responsible teachers. The students selected a centrifugal pump to supply water to houses or buildings and designed the piping system. The practical work was evaluated through the written report. The students’ perceptions were analysed through a questionnaire. The learning outcomes were also considered in order to understand how the fluid mechanics concepts were acquired. In the teachers’ point of view the teamwork should enable the development of students’ soft skills and competencies, promoting the ability to integrate and work in teams. The students changed their learning processing and perception becoming more reflective and less accommodative, forcing them to think critically and share opinions. Regarding the Fluid Mechanics assessment, the practical work increased, in average, the final grade at least one value.

  11. Mechanical design problems associated with turbopump fluid film bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evces, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    Most high speed cryogenic turbopumps for liquid propulsion rocket engines currently use ball or roller contact bearings for rotor support. The operating speeds, loads, clearances, and environments of these pumps combine to make bearing wear a limiting factor on turbopump life. An example is the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Although the HPOTP design life is 27,000 seconds at 30,000 rpms, or approximately 50 missions, bearings must currently be replaced after 2 missions. One solution to the bearing wear problem in the HPOTP, as well as in future turbopump designs, is the utilization of fluid film bearings in lieu of continuous contact bearings. Hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, and damping seal bearings are all replacement candidates for contact bearings in rocket engine high speed turbomachinery. These three types of fluid film bearings have different operating characteristics, but they share a common set of mechanical design opportunities and difficulties. Results of research to define some of the mechanical design issues are given. Problems considered include transient strat/stop rub, non-operational rotor support, bearing wear inspection and measurement, and bearing fluid supply route. Emphasis is given to the HPOTP preburner pump (PBP) bearing, but the results are pertinent to high-speed cryogenic turbomachinery in general.

  12. Isogeometric Analysis and Shape Optimization in Fluid Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Nørtoft

    unites the power to solve complex engineering problems from finite element analysis (FEA) with the ability to effectively represent complex shapes from computer aided design (CAD). The methodology is appealing for flow modeling purposes also due to the inherent high regularity of velocity and pressure......This thesis brings together the fields of fluid mechanics, as the study of fluids and flows, isogeometric analysis, as a numerical method to solve engineering problems using computers, and shape optimization, as the art of finding "best" shapes of objects based on some notion of goodness. The flow...... is given of how isogeometric analysis is applied to flow problems. We present several new discretizations of the velocity and pressure spaces, we investigate these in terms of stability and error convergence properties, and a benchmark flow problem is analyzed. As the second contribution, we show how...

  13. Otto Laporte Award Talk - In light of Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Fluid mechanics, in its inherent non-linear beauty, has been its own laboratory, testing our perseverance and dedication to a branch of science that, despite its perceived maturity, still has many surprises to offer. For many of us, the study of fluid flow has been our path to understanding the complexity of nature. My journey has taken me through many interesting projects including the development of new visualization tools, scrutinizing the rhythms of the human heart, observing flow vortices and studying the dynamics of soap films. But this lecture is mainly devoted to a new example of my research activities where light and flow physics interweave to display another intriguing multi-physics beauty of nature.

  14. Fluid Mechanics, Drag Reduction and Advanced Configuration Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses Advanced Aircraft configurational approaches across the speed range, which are either enabled, or greatly enhanced, by clever Flow Control. Configurations considered include Channel Wings with circulation control for VTOL (but non-hovering) operation with high cruise speed, strut-braced CTOL transports with wingtip engines and extensive ('natural') laminar flow control, a midwing double fuselage CTOL approach utilizing several synergistic methods for drag-due-to-lift reduction, a supersonic strut-braced configuration with order of twice the L/D of current approaches and a very advanced, highly engine flow-path-integrated hypersonic cruise machine. This paper indicates both the promise of synergistic flow control approaches as enablers for 'Revolutions' in aircraft performance and fluid mechanic 'areas of ignorance' which impede their realization and provide 'target-rich' opportunities for Fluids Research.

  15. On the Use of Computers for Teaching Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Several approaches for improving the teaching of basic fluid mechanics using computers are presented. There are two objectives to these approaches: to increase the involvement of the student in the learning process and to present information to the student in a variety of forms. Items discussed include: the preparation of educational videos using the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations, the analysis of CFD flow solutions using workstation based post-processing graphics packages, and the development of workstation or personal computer based simulators which behave like desk top wind tunnels. Examples of these approaches are presented along with observations from working with undergraduate co-ops. Possible problems in the implementation of these approaches as well as solutions to these problems are also discussed.

  16. Fluid mechanics in crystal growth - The 1982 Freeman scholar lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrach, S.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to unify the current state of knowledge in crystal growth techniques and fluid mechanics. After identifying important fluid dynamic problems for such representative crystal growth processes as closed tube vapor transport, open reactor vapor deposition, and the Czochralski and floating zone melt growth techniques, research results obtained to date are presented. It is noted that the major effort to date has been directed to the description of the nature and extent of bulk transport under realistic conditions, where bulk flow determines the heat and solute transport which strongly influence the temperature and concentration fields in the vicinity of the growth interface. Proper treatment of near field, or interface, problems cannot be given until the far field, or global flow, involved in a given crystal growth technique has been adequately described.

  17. Modeling Chemical Mechanical Polishing with Couple Stress Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张朝辉; 雒建斌; 温诗铸

    2004-01-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a manufacturing process used to achieve high levels of global and local planarity.Currently, the slurries used in CMP usually contain nanoscale particles to accelerate the removal ratio and to optimize the planarity, whose rheological properties can no longer be accurately modeled with Newtonian fluids.The Reynolds equation, including the couple stress effects, was derived in this paper.The equation describes the mechanism to solve the CMP lubrication equation with the couple stress effects.The effects on load and moments resulting from the various parameters, such as pivot height, roll angle, and pitch angle, were subsequently simulated.The results show that the couple stress can provide higher load and angular moments.This study sheds some lights into the mechanism of the CMP process.

  18. Crust-Mantle Structures and Gold Enrichment Mechanism of Mantle Fluid System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 孙忠实; 王庆飞; 韦延光

    2003-01-01

    Gold enrichment mechanism of ore-forming fluid is the essence of gold metallization.This paper summarizes the distinguishing symbols of mantle fluid and effect of crust-mantlestructure on fluid movement. Fluid moving processes include osmosis, surge, gas-liquid alterna-tion and mutation of fluid speed. During fluid movement, gold will be enriched gradually. Final-ly, a layered circulatory system is illustrated in this paper.

  19. Laser metrology in fluid mechanics granulometry, temperature and concentration measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Boutier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In fluid mechanics, non-intrusive measurements are fundamental in order to improve knowledge of the behavior and main physical phenomena of flows in order to further validate codes.The principles and characteristics of the different techniques available in laser metrology are described in detail in this book.Velocity, temperature and concentration measurements by spectroscopic techniques based on light scattered by molecules are achieved by different techniques: laser-induced fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using lasers and parametric sources, and absorption sp

  20. The Fluid Mechanics of Cancer and Its Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros; Pivkin, Igor; Milde, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Fluid mechanics is involved in the growth, progression, metastasis, and therapy of cancer. Blood vessels transport oxygen and nutrients to cancerous tissues, provide a route for metastasizing cancer cells to distant organs, and deliver drugs to tumors. The irregular and leaky tumor vasculature is responsible for increased interstitial pressure in the tumor microenvironment, whereas multiscale flow-structure interaction processes control tumor growth, metastasis, and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. We outline these flow-mediated processes, along with related experimental and computational methods for the diagnosis, predictive modeling, and therapy of cancer.

  1. Review of coaxial flow gas core nuclear rocket fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    Almost all of the fluid mechanics research associated with the coaxial flow gas core reactor ended abruptly with the interruption of NASA's space nuclear program because of policy and budgetary considerations in 1973. An overview of program accomplishments is presented through a review of the experiments conducted and the analyses performed. Areas are indicated where additional research is required for a fuller understanding of cavity flow and of the factors which influence cold and hot flow containment. A bibliography is included with graphic material.

  2. Partitioned fluid-solid coupling for cardiovascular blood flow: left-ventricular fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krittian, Sebastian; Janoske, Uwe; Oertel, Herbert; Böhlke, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    We present a 3D code-coupling approach which has been specialized towards cardiovascular blood flow. For the first time, the prescribed geometry movement of the cardiovascular flow model KaHMo (Karlsruhe Heart Model) has been replaced by a myocardial composite model. Deformation is driven by fluid forces and myocardial response, i.e., both its contractile and constitutive behavior. Whereas the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) of the Navier-Stokes equations is discretized by finite volumes (FVM), the solid mechanical finite elasticity equations are discretized by a finite element (FEM) approach. Taking advantage of specialized numerical solution strategies for non-matching fluid and solid domain meshes, an iterative data-exchange guarantees the interface equilibrium of the underlying governing equations. The focus of this work is on left-ventricular fluid-structure interaction based on patient-specific magnetic resonance imaging datasets. Multi-physical phenomena are described by temporal visualization and characteristic FSI numbers. The results gained show flow patterns that are in good agreement with previous observations. A deeper understanding of cavity deformation, blood flow, and their vital interaction can help to improve surgical treatment and clinical therapy planning.

  3. Introducing CFD in Introductory Undergraduate Fluid Mechanics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimbala, John M.

    2005-11-01

    Many instructors want to introduce CFD into their introductory junior-level fluid mechanics course, but cannot because it requires several hours of class time at the cost of displacement of other basic material. A simple but effective method is now available that has been used successfully at Penn State since Spring 2005. It requires minimal instructor preparation time and only about one class period. Namely, immediately after solving the Navier-Stokes equation analytically for simple flows such as Couette and Poiseuille flow, CFD is introduced as a modern tool for solving the same equations numerically. The application of CFD (grid generation, boundary conditions, etc.), rather than numerical algorithms, is stressed. Homework problems are then assigned using pre-defined templates for FlowLab, a student-friendly analysis and visualization package created by Fluent, Inc. The templates and exercises are designed to support and emphasize the theory and concepts taught in class and in the textbook. For example, the new textbook by Cengel and Cimbala (McGraw-Hill 2006) contains 46 end-of-chapter homework problems that are used in conjunction with 42 FlowLab templates. Each exercise has been designed with two major learning objectives in mind: (1) enhance student understanding of a specific fluid mechanics concept, and (2) introduce the student to a specific capability and/or limitation of CFD through hands-on practice.

  4. Respiratory mechanics and fluid dynamics after lung resection surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Beretta, Egidio; Rivolta, Ilaria

    2010-08-01

    Thoracic surgery that requires resection of a portion of lung or of a whole lung profoundly alters the mechanical and fluid dynamic setting of the lung-chest wall coupling, as well as the water balance in the pleural space and in the remaining lung. The most frequent postoperative complications are of a respiratory nature, and their incidence increases the more the preoperative respiratory condition seems compromised. There is an obvious need to identify risk factors concerning mainly the respiratory function, without neglecting the importance of other comorbidities, such as coronary disease. At present, however, a satisfactory predictor of postoperative cardiopulmonary complications is lacking; postoperative morbidity and mortality have remained unchanged in the last 10 years. The aim of this review is to provide a pathophysiologic interpretation of the main respiratory complications of a respiratory nature by relying on new concepts relating to lung fluid dynamics and mechanics. New parameters are proposed to improve evaluation of respiratory function from pre- to the early postoperative period when most of the complications occur.

  5. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 2: Tabulated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re sub max, Re sub w, and A sub R, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation, and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphics).

  6. 100 volumes of 'notes on numerical fluid mechanics' 40 years of numerical fluid mechanics and aerodynamics in retrospect

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschel, Ernst Heinrich; Fujii, Kozo

    2009-01-01

    This volume contains 37 invited contributions, collected to celebrate one hundred volumes of the ""NNFM Series"". After a general introduction, overviews are given in five parts of the developments in numerical fluid mechanics and related fields. In the first part information about the series is given, its origins are discussed, as well as its environment and the German and European high-performance computer scene. In Part II the co-editors of the series give short surveys over developments in their countries. Current applications, mainly in the aerospace sector, but also in the automotive sec

  7. [Present status and trend of heart fluid mechanics research based on medical image analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jianhong; Yin, Lixue; Xie, Shenghua; Li, Wenhua; Lu, Jing; Luo, Anguo

    2014-06-01

    With introduction of current main methods for heart fluid mechanics researches, we studied the characteristics and weakness for three primary analysis methods based on magnetic resonance imaging, color Doppler ultrasound and grayscale ultrasound image, respectively. It is pointed out that particle image velocity (PIV), speckle tracking and block match have the same nature, and three algorithms all adopt block correlation. The further analysis shows that, with the development of information technology and sensor, the research for cardiac function and fluid mechanics will focus on energy transfer process of heart fluid, characteristics of Chamber wall related to blood fluid and Fluid-structure interaction in the future heart fluid mechanics fields.

  8. Serious Fun: Using Toys to Demonstrate Fluid Mechanics Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviz, Camilla M.; Shakerin, Said

    2014-01-01

    Many students have owned or seen fluids toys in which two immiscible fluids within a closed container can be tilted to generate waves. These types of inexpensive and readily available toys are fun to play with, but they are also useful for provoking student learning about fluid properties or complex fluid behavior, including drop formation and…

  9. Serious Fun: Using Toys to Demonstrate Fluid Mechanics Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviz, Camilla M.; Shakerin, Said

    2014-01-01

    Many students have owned or seen fluids toys in which two immiscible fluids within a closed container can be tilted to generate waves. These types of inexpensive and readily available toys are fun to play with, but they are also useful for provoking student learning about fluid properties or complex fluid behavior, including drop formation and…

  10. Computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics for geosystems management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Scott; Alger, Nicholas; Turner, Daniel Zack; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Carnes, Brian; Martinez, Mario J.; Notz, Patrick K.; Klise, Katherine A.; Stone, Charles Michael; Field, Richard V., Jr.; Newell, Pania; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Red-Horse, John Robert; Bishop, Joseph E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Hopkins, Polly L.; Mesh, Mikhail; Bean, James E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes research performed under the SNL LDRD entitled - Computational Mechanics for Geosystems Management to Support the Energy and Natural Resources Mission. The main accomplishment was development of a foundational SNL capability for computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics analysis of geosystems. The code was developed within the SNL Sierra software system. This report summarizes the capabilities of the simulation code and the supporting research and development conducted under this LDRD. The main goal of this project was the development of a foundational capability for coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) simulation of heterogeneous geosystems utilizing massively parallel processing. To solve these complex issues, this project integrated research in numerical mathematics and algorithms for chemically reactive multiphase systems with computer science research in adaptive coupled solution control and framework architecture. This report summarizes and demonstrates the capabilities that were developed together with the supporting research underlying the models. Key accomplishments are: (1) General capability for modeling nonisothermal, multiphase, multicomponent flow in heterogeneous porous geologic materials; (2) General capability to model multiphase reactive transport of species in heterogeneous porous media; (3) Constitutive models for describing real, general geomaterials under multiphase conditions utilizing laboratory data; (4) General capability to couple nonisothermal reactive flow with geomechanics (THMC); (5) Phase behavior thermodynamics for the CO2-H2O-NaCl system. General implementation enables modeling of other fluid mixtures. Adaptive look-up tables enable thermodynamic capability to other simulators; (6) Capability for statistical modeling of heterogeneity in geologic materials; and (7) Simulator utilizes unstructured grids on parallel processing computers.

  11. Links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics: a model for information in economics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2016-05-28

    This paper tallies the links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics, and attempts to show whether those links can aid in beginning to build a formal template which is usable in economics models where time is (a)symmetric and memory is absent or present. An objective of this paper is to contemplate whether those formalisms can allow us to model information in economics in a novel way.

  12. Statistical mechanical description of supercritical fluid extraction and retrograde condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. J.; Kwak, T. Y.; Mansoori, G. A.

    1987-07-01

    The phenomena of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and its reverse effect, which is known as retrograde condensation (RC), have found new and important applications in industrial separation of chemical compounds and recovery and processing of natural products and fossil fuels. Full-scale industrial utilization of SFE/RC processes requires knowledge about thermodynamic and transport characteristics of the asymmetric mixtures involved and the development of predictive modeling and correlation techniques for performance of the SFE/RC system under consideration. In this report, through the application of statistical mechanical techniques, the reasons for the lack of accuracy of existing predictive approaches are described and they are improved. It is demonstrated that these techniques also allow us to study the effect of mixed supercritical solvents on the solubility of heavy solutes (solids) at different compositions of the solvents, pressures, and temperatures. Fluid phase equilibrium algorithms based on the conformal solution van der Waals mixing rules and different equations of state are presented for the prediction of solubilities of heavy liquid in supercritical gases. It is shown that the Peng-Robinson equation of state based on conformal solution theory can predict solubilites of heavy liquid in supercritical gases more accurately than the van der Waals and Redlich-Kwong equations of state.

  13. Fluid Mechanics of Biological Surfaces and their Technological Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, D. W.; Bruse, M.; Hage, W.; Meyer, R.

    A survey is given on fluid-dynamic effects caused by the structure and properties of biological surfaces. It is demonstrated that the results of investigations aiming at technological applications can also provide insights into biophysical phenomena. Techniques are described both for reducing wall shear stresses and for controlling boundary-layer separation. (a) Wall shear stress reduction was investigated experimentally for various riblet surfaces including a shark skin replica. The latter consists of 800 plastic model scales with compliant anchoring. Hairy surfaces are also considered, and surfaces in which the no-slip condition is modified. Self-cleaning surfaces such as that of lotus leaves represent an interesting option to avoid fluid-dynamic deterioration by the agglomeration of dirt. An example of technological implementation is discussed for riblets in long-range commercial aircraft. (b) Separation control is also an important issue in biology. After a few brief comments on vortex generators, the mechanism of separation control by bird feathers is described in detail. Self-activated movable flaps (=artificial bird feathers) represent a high-lift system enhancing the maximum lift of airfoils by about 20%. This is achieved without perceivable deleterious effects under cruise conditions. Finally, flight experiments on an aircraft with laminar wing and movable flaps are presented.

  14. STUDY ON FLUID MECHANICS OF HYPERVELOCITY LIQUID JETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Hong-hui; Tetsu Sakakura

    2003-01-01

    The fluid mechanics in the generation of hypervelocity water jets, light oil jets and glycerin jets was studied. Framing high-speed photography and single-shot photography were used to observe the jets directly. The purposes of this study is to investigate the disintegration and atomization processes at the velocity of 2km/s-3km/s as well as the auto-ignition and self-combustion of the light oil jets. Therefore, in the jet velocity measurement in addition to the high-speed photography, the results by other methods such as the laser beams cutting method and the shock wave detection using pressure transducers were also given. In the observation of the jets events, the illumination phenomenon was found, which may be regarded as the result of the auto-ignition and combustion of the light oil jets. Finally, the Munroe jet was studied.

  15. Application of ICT supported learning in fluid mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Svidt, Kjeld

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the application of ICT, Information & Communication Technology, supported learning in the area of fluid mechanics education. Taking a starting point in a course in Ventilation Technology, including room air flow and contaminant distribution, it explains how ICT may be used...... actively in the learning environment to increase efficiency in the learning process. The paper comprises past experiences and lessons learnt as well as prospect for future development in the area. A model is presented that describes a high efficiency learning environment where ICT plays an important role....... Traditionally, education in Ventilation Technology has been a combination of teacher performance at the blackboard combined with student exercises by paper and pencils. Sometimes a visit to a building has been included to see how things look like in the real world. In order to increase learning efficiency...

  16. Fluid-Structure Interaction Mechanisms for Close-In Explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B. Wardlaw Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines fluid-structure interaction for close-in internal and external underwater explosions. The resulting flow field is impacted by the interaction between the reflected explosion shock and the explosion bubble. This shock reflects off the bubble as an expansion that reduces the pressure level between the bubble and the target, inducing cavitation and its subsequent collapse that reloads the target. Computational examples of several close-in interaction cases are presented to document the occurrence of these mechanisms. By comparing deformable and rigid body simulations, it is shown that cavitation collapse can occur solely from the shock-bubble interaction without the benefit of target deformation. Addition of a deforming target lowers the flow field pressure, facilitates cavitation and cavitation collapse, as well as reducing the impulse of the initial shock loading.

  17. Fluid mechanics relevant to flow through pretreatment of cellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault-Léger, Véronique; Lynd, Lee R

    2014-04-01

    The present study investigates fluid mechanical properties of cellulosic feedstocks relevant to flow through (FT) pretreatment for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass. The results inform identifying conditions for which FT pretreatment can be implemented in a practical context. Measurements of pressure drop across packed beds, viscous compaction and water absorption are reported for milled and not milled sugarcane bagasse, switchgrass and poplar, and important factors impacting viscous flow are deduced. Using biomass knife-milled to pass through a 2mm sieve, the observed pressure drop was highest for bagasse, intermediate for switchgrass and lowest for poplar. The highest pressure drop was associated with the presence of more fine particles, greater viscous compaction and the degree of water absorption. Using bagasse without particle size reduction, the instability of the reactor during pretreatment above 140kg/m(3) sets an upper bound on the allowable concentration for continuous stable flow.

  18. An explicit example of Hopf bifurcation in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloeden, P.; Wells, R.

    1983-01-01

    It is observed that a complete and explicit example of Hopf bifurcation appears not to be known in fluid mechanics. Such an example is presented for the rotating Benard problem with free boundary conditions on the upper and lower faces, and horizontally periodic solutions. Normal modes are found for the linearization, and the Veronis computation of the wave numbers is modified to take into account the imposed horizontal periodicity. An invariant subspace of the phase space is found in which the hypotheses of the Joseph-Sattinger theorem are verified, thus demonstrating the Hopf bifurcation. The criticality calculations are carried through to demonstrate rigorously, that the bifurcation is subcritical for certain cases, and to demonstrate numerically that it is subcritical for all the cases in the paper.

  19. An intelligent data acquisition system for fluid mechanics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, E. R.; Zilliac, G.; Fukunishi, Y.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a novel data acquisition system for use with wind-tunnel probe-based measurements, which incorporates a degree of specific fluid dynamics knowledge into a simple expert system-like control program. The concept was developed with a rudimentary expert system coupled to a probe positioning mechanism operating in a small-scale research wind tunnel. The software consisted of two basic elements, a general-purpose data acquisition system and the rulebased control element to take and analyze data and supplying decisions as to where to measure, how many data points to take, and when to stop. The system was validated in an experiment involving a vortical flow field, showing that it was possible to increase the resolution of the experiment or, alternatively, reduce the total number of data points required, to achieve parity with the results of most conventional data acquisition approaches.

  20. Introduction to the internal fluid mechanics research session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brent A.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1990-01-01

    Internal fluid mechanics research at LeRC is directed toward an improved understanding of the important flow physics affecting aerospace propulsion systems, and applying this improved understanding to formulate accurate predictive codes. To this end, research is conducted involving detailed experimentation and analysis. The following three papers summarize ongoing work and indicate future emphasis in three major research thrusts: inlets, ducts, and nozzles; turbomachinery; and chemical reacting flows. The underlying goal of the research in each of these areas is to bring internal computational fluid mechanic to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion systems. Achievement of this goal requires that carefully planned and executed experiments be conducted in order to develop and validate useful codes. It is critical that numerical code development work and experimental work be closely coupled. The insights gained are represented by mathematical models that form the basis for code development. The resultant codes are then tested by comparing them with appropriate experiments in order to ensure their validity and determine their applicable range. The ultimate user community must be a part of this process to assure relevancy of the work and to hasten its practical application. Propulsion systems are characterized by highly complex and dynamic internal flows. Many complex, 3-D flow phenomena may be present, including unsteadiness, shocks, and chemical reactions. By focusing on specific portions of a propulsion system, it is often possible to identify the dominant phenomena that must be understood and modeled for obtaining accurate predictive capability. The three major research thrusts serve as a focus leading to greater understanding of the relevant physics and to an improvement in analytic tools. This in turn will hasten continued advancements in propulsion system performance and capability.

  1. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  2. Mechanobiology and the microcirculation: cellular, nuclear and fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Kris Noel; Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Pekkan, Kerem

    2010-04-01

    Endothelial cells are stimulated by shear stress throughout the vasculature and respond with changes in gene expression and by morphological reorganization. Mechanical sensors of the cell are varied and include cell surface sensors that activate intracellular chemical signaling pathways. Here, possible mechanical sensors of the cell including reorganization of the cytoskeleton and the nucleus are discussed in relation to shear flow. A mutation in the nuclear structural protein lamin A, related to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, is reviewed specifically as the mutation results in altered nuclear structure and stiffer nuclei; animal models also suggest significantly altered vascular structure. Nuclear and cellular deformation of endothelial cells in response to shear stress provides partial understanding of possible mechanical regulation in the microcirculation. Increasing sophistication of fluid flow simulations inside the vessel is also an emerging area relevant to the microcirculation as visualization in situ is difficult. This integrated approach to study--including medicine, molecular and cell biology, biophysics and engineering--provides a unique understanding of multi-scale interactions in the microcirculation.

  3. Magnetic particle translation as a surrogate measure for synovial fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Yash Y; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena; Patel, Neal S; Biedrzycki, Adam H; Yarmola, Elena G; Dobson, Jon; Rinaldi, Carlos; Allen, Kyle D

    2017-07-26

    The mechanics of synovial fluid vary with disease progression, but are difficult to quantify quickly in a clinical setting due to small sample volumes. In this study, a novel technique to measure synovial fluid mechanics using magnetic nanoparticles is introduced. Briefly, microspheres embedded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, termed magnetic particles, are distributed through a 100μL synovial fluid sample. Then, a permanent magnet inside a protective sheath is inserted into the synovial fluid sample. Magnetic particles translate toward the permanent magnet and the percentage of magnetic particles collected by the magnet in a given time can be related to synovial fluid viscosity. To validate this relationship, magnetic particle translation was demonstrated in three phases. First, magnetic particle translation was assessed in glycerol solutions with known viscosities, demonstrating that as fluid viscosity increased, magnetic particle translation decreased. Next, the relationship between magnetic particle translation and synovial fluid viscosity was assessed using bovine synovial fluid that was progressively degenerated via ultrasonication. Here, particle collection in a given amount of time increased as fluid degenerated, demonstrating that the relationship between particle collection and fluid mechanics holds in non-Newtonian synovial fluid. Finally, magnetic particle translation was used to assess differences between healthy and OA affected joints in equine synovial fluid. Here, particle collection in a given time was higher in OA joints relative to healthy horses (pmagnetic particle translation in a clinical setting to evaluate synovial fluid mechanics in limited volumes of synovial fluid sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics and Hydrodynamics for a Granular Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Dufty, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Granular fluids consist of collections of activated mesoscopic or macroscopic particles (e.g., powders or grains) whose flows often appear similar to those of normal fluids. To explore the qualitative and quantitative description of these flows an idealized model for such fluids, a system of smooth inelastic hard spheres, is considered. The single feature distinguishing granular and normal fluids being explored in this way is the inelasticity of collisions. The dominant differences observed i...

  5. Yielding to stress: Recent developments in viscoplastic fluid mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Balmforth, Neil; Frigaard, Ian A.; Ovarlez, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The archetypal feature of a viscoplastic fluid is its yield stress: If the material is not sufficiently stressed, it behaves like a solid, but once the yield stress is exceeded, the material flows like a fluid. Such behavior characterizes materials common in industries such as petroleum and chemical processing, cosmetics, and food processing and in geophysical fluid dynamics. The most common idealization of a viscoplastic fluid is the Bingham model, which has been widely used to rationalize e...

  6. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro C Ucero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Alvaro C Ucero1,*, Sara Gonçalves2,*, Alberto Benito-Martin1, Beatriz Santamaría1, Adrian M Ramos1, Sergio Berzal1, Marta Ruiz-Ortega1, Jesus Egido1, Alberto Ortiz11Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Fundación Renal Iñigo Alvarez de Toledo, Madrid, Spain; 2Nefrologia e Transplantação Renal, Hospital de Santa Maria EPE, Lisbon, Portugal *Both authors contributed equally to the manuscriptAbstract: Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.Keywords: urinary tract obstruction, renal injury, fluid mechanics, molecular cell biology

  7. Fundamental Studies of Fluid Mechanics: Stability in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George M. Homsy

    2005-04-28

    This work has been concerned with theoretical, computational and experimental studies of a variety of flow and transport problems that are of generic interest and applicability in energy-related and energy-intensive processes. These include the following. (1) Problems associated with oil recovery: the global economy continues to be dependent on the stable and predictable supply of oil and fossil fuels. This will remain the case for the near term, as current estimates are that world production of oil will peak between 2025 and 2100, depending on assumptions regarding growth. Most of these resources reside in porous rocks and other naturally occurring media. Studies of flow-induced instabilities are relevant to the areas of secondary and enhanced oil recovery. (2) Small scale and Stokes flows: flows in microgeometries and involving interfaces and surfactants are of interest in a myriad of energy-related contexts. These include: pore-level modeling of the fundamental processes by which oil held in porous materials is mobilized and produced; heating and cooling energy cycles involving significant expenditure of energy in conditioning of human environments, heat pipes, and compact heat exchangers; and energy efficiency in large scale separation processes such as distillation and absorption-processes that underlie the chemical process industries. (3) Coating flows: these are of interest in information technologies, including the manufacture of integrated circuits and data storage and retrieval devices. It is estimated that 50-70% of the starting raw materials and intermediate devices in information technology processes must be discarded as a result of imperfections and failure to meet specifications. These in turn are often the result of the inability to control fluid-mechanical processes and flow instabilities. Our work over the grant period is primarily fundamental in nature. We are interested in establishing general principles and behaviors that relate to a variety of

  8. Introducing Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Computations with Mathematica in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binous, Housam

    2007-01-01

    We study four non-Newtonian fluid mechanics problems using Mathematica[R]. Constitutive equations describing the behavior of power-law, Bingham and Carreau models are recalled. The velocity profile is obtained for the horizontal flow of power-law fluids in pipes and annuli. For the vertical laminar film flow of a Bingham fluid we determine the…

  9. Introducing Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Computations with Mathematica in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binous, Housam

    2007-01-01

    We study four non-Newtonian fluid mechanics problems using Mathematica[R]. Constitutive equations describing the behavior of power-law, Bingham and Carreau models are recalled. The velocity profile is obtained for the horizontal flow of power-law fluids in pipes and annuli. For the vertical laminar film flow of a Bingham fluid we determine the…

  10. Statistical mechanics of homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakoviack, Vincent

    2010-12-01

    The homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems are simple models of a fluid confined in a disordered porous matrix obtained by arresting randomly chosen particles in a one-component bulk fluid or one of the two components of a binary mixture. In this paper, their configurational properties are investigated. It is shown that a peculiar complementarity exists between the mobile and immobile phases, which originates from the fact that the solid is prepared in presence of and in equilibrium with the adsorbed fluid. Simple identities follow, which connect different types of configurational averages, either relative to the fluid-matrix system or to the bulk fluid from which it is prepared. Crucial simplifications result for the computation of important structural quantities, both in computer simulations and in theoretical approaches. Finally, possible applications of the model in the field of dynamics in confinement or in strongly asymmetric mixtures are suggested.

  11. Computational estimation of fluid mechanical benefits from a fluid deflector at the distal end of artificial vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, M W; Wadbro, E; Berggren, M

    2013-02-01

    Intimal hyperplasia at the distal anastomosis is considered to be an important determinant for arterial and arteriovenous graft failure. The connection between unhealthy hemodynamics and intimal hyperplasia motivates the use of computational fluid dynamics modeling to search for improved graft design. However, studies on the fluid mechanical impact on intimal hyperplasia at the suture line intrusion have previously been scanty. In the present work, we focus on intimal hyperplasia at the suture line and illustrate potential benefits from the introduction of a fluid deflector to shield the suture line from unhealthily high wall shear stress.

  12. Inferring microbial interaction networks from metagenomic data using SgLV-EKF algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshawaqfeh, Mustafa; Serpedin, Erchin; Younes, Ahmad Bani

    2017-03-27

    Inferring the microbial interaction networks (MINs) and modeling their dynamics are critical in understanding the mechanisms of the bacterial ecosystem and designing antibiotic and/or probiotic therapies. Recently, several approaches were proposed to infer MINs using the generalized Lotka-Volterra (gLV) model. Main drawbacks of these models include the fact that these models only consider the measurement noise without taking into consideration the uncertainties in the underlying dynamics. Furthermore, inferring the MIN is characterized by the limited number of observations and nonlinearity in the regulatory mechanisms. Therefore, novel estimation techniques are needed to address these challenges. This work proposes SgLV-EKF: a stochastic gLV model that adopts the extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm to model the MIN dynamics. In particular, SgLV-EKF employs a stochastic modeling of the MIN by adding a noise term to the dynamical model to compensate for modeling uncertainties. This stochastic modeling is more realistic than the conventional gLV model which assumes that the MIN dynamics are perfectly governed by the gLV equations. After specifying the stochastic model structure, we propose the EKF to estimate the MIN. SgLV-EKF was compared with two similarity-based algorithms, one algorithm from the integral-based family and two regression-based algorithms, in terms of the achieved performance on two synthetic data-sets and two real data-sets. The first data-set models the randomness in measurement data, whereas, the second data-set incorporates uncertainties in the underlying dynamics. The real data-sets are provided by a recent study pertaining to an antibiotic-mediated Clostridium difficile infection. The experimental results demonstrate that SgLV-EKF outperforms the alternative methods in terms of robustness to measurement noise, modeling errors, and tracking the dynamics of the MIN. Performance analysis demonstrates that the proposed SgLV-EKF algorithm

  13. Immunosensor with fluid control mechanism for salivary cortisol analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Matsuda, Yohei; Sasaki, Shohei; Sasaki, Makoto; Kadoma, Yoshihiro; Imai, Yoshikatsu; Niwa, Daisuke; Shetty, Vivek

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate a new design for a cortisol immunosensor for the noninvasive and quantitative analysis of salivary cortisol. We propose a cortisol immunosensor with a fluid control mechanism which has both a vertical flow and a lateral flow. The detected current resulting from a competitive reaction between the sample cortisol and a glucose oxidase (GOD)-labeled cortisol conjugate was found to be inversely related to the concentration of cortisol in the sample solution. A calibration curve using the relative detected current showed a R(2)=0.98 and CV=14% for a range of standard cortisol solutions corresponding to the concentrations of native salivary cortisol (0.1-10 ng/ml). The measurement could be accomplished within 35 min and the cortisol immunosensor could be reused. These results show promise for realizing an on-site and easy-to-use biosensor for cortisol. Used for evaluation of human salivary cortisol levels, the cortisol immunosensor measurement corresponded closely with commercially available ELISA method (R(2)=0.92). Our results indicate the promise of the new cortisol immunosensor for noninvasive, point of care measurement of human salivary cortisol levels.

  14. A fluid-mechanical model of elastocapillary coalescence

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Kiran

    2014-03-25

    © 2014 Cambridge University Press. We present a fluid-mechanical model of the coalescence of a number of elastic objects due to surface tension. We consider an array of spring-block elements separated by thin liquid films, whose dynamics are modelled using lubrication theory. With this simplified model of elastocapillary coalescence, we present the results of numerical simulations for a large number of elements, N = O(104). A linear stability analysis shows that pairwise coalescence is always the most unstable mode of deformation. However, the numerical simulations show that the cluster sizes actually produced by coalescence from a small white-noise perturbation have a distribution that depends on the relative strength of surface tension and elasticity, as measured by an elastocapillary number K. Both the maximum cluster size and the mean cluster size scale like K-1/2 for small K. An analytical solution for the response of the system to a localized perturbation shows that such perturbations generate propagating disturbance fronts, which leave behind \\'frozen-in\\' clusters of a predictable size that also depends on K. A good quantitative comparison between the cluster-size statistics from noisy perturbations and this \\'frozen-in\\' cluster size suggests that propagating fronts may play a crucial role in the dynamics of coalescence.

  15. Dynamics of fluid and light intensity in mechanically stirred photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T

    2013-10-10

    Turbulent flows in a single-stage and a two-stage impeller-stirred photobioreactor with a simple geometric configuration were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics. The trajectories of the microorganisms entrained in the flow field were traced by the particle tracking method. By projecting these trajectories onto a radial-axial (r-z) plane with a given azimuth angle, we were able to observe four different dynamics zones: circulation, pure rotation, trap, and slow-motion. Within the pure rotation zone, turbulence can be observed near the edges of the impeller. The light intensity and the light/dark cycles subjected by the microorganisms differ significantly in these zones. These differences can be further changed by providing different incident light illuminations on the reactor surface. The dynamics zones can be altered by modifying the geometric configuration of the reactor and the impeller stirring mechanism. In combination with the utilization of different incident light illuminations, the light intensity dynamics and the light/dark cycles subjected by the microorganisms can be controlled such that an optimal photobioreactor design with a high efficiency of light utilization and a high formation rate of the biochemical products can be realized.

  16. Separation mechanisms and fluid flow in oil/water separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celius, H.K.; Knudsen, B. [IKU Petroleumsforskning A/S, Trondheim (Norway); Hafskjold, B.; Hansen, E.W. [Selskapet for Industriell og Teknisk Forskning, Trondheim (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes work aimed at physical and numerical modeling of separation rates of oil/water systems in order to establish better tools for design and operation of offshore operators. This work aims to integrate the chemical and physical phenomena behind coalescence and settling with those of fluid flow in the system, in order to develop tools for design and operational analysis of separation equipment. The work includes the development of a high pressure, bench-scale test rig to perform separation tests on live oil and water samples, and a rationale in the form of a computer code that can be used to interpret the test results and transform them to a form siutable for operational purposes. This involves a formulation of a mathematical description of the chemical and physical mechanisms behind the emulsification and separation process, and to establish a link to the hydrdynamic properties of the separator vessel. The Emucol computer program is used in the analysis. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  17. A fluid-mechanical model of elastocapillary coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Kiran; Vella, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    We present a fluid-mechanical model of the coalescence of a number of elastic objects due to surface tension. We consider an array of spring-block elements separated by thin liquid films, whose dynamics are modelled using lubrication theory. With this simplified model of elastocapillary coalescence, we present the results of numerical simulations for a large number of elements, $N=O(10^4)$. A linear stability analysis shows that pairwise coalescence is always the most unstable mode of deformation. However, the numerical simulations show that the cluster sizes actually produced by coalescence from a small white-noise perturbation have a distribution that depends on the relative strength of surface tension and elasticity, as measured by an elastocapillary number $K$. Both the maximum cluster size and the mean cluster size scale like $K^{-1/2}$ for small $K$. An analytical solution for the response of the system to a localized perturbation shows that such perturbations generate propagating disturbance fronts, wh...

  18. Cold Dark Matter Cosmology Conflicts with Fluid Mechanics and Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl H. Gibson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold dark matter (CDM cosmology based on the Jeans 1902 criterion for gravitational instability gives predictions about the early universe contrary to fluid mechanics and observations. Jeans neglected viscosity, diffusivity, and turbulence: factors that determine gravitational structure formation and contradict small structures (CDM halos forming from non-baryonic dark matter particle candidates. From hydro-gravitational-dynamics (HGD cosmology, viscous-gravitational fragmentation produced supercluster (10^46 kg, cluster, and galaxy-mass (10^42 kg clouds in the primordial plasma with the large fossil density turbulence (3 ×10 ^ -17 kg m ^ -3 of the first fragmentation at 10^12 s, and a protogalaxy linear morphology reflecting maximum stretching on vortex lines of the plasma turbulence at plasma-gas transition at 10^13 s. Gas protogalaxies fragmented into proto-globular-star-cluster mass (10 ^36 kg clumps of protoplanet gas clouds that are now frozen as earth-mass (10^ 24-25 kg Jovian planets of the baryonic dark matter, about 30,000,000 rogue planets per star. Observations contradict the prediction of CDM hierarchical clustering cosmology that massive Population III first stars at 10^16 s existed but support the HGD prediction of gentle formation of small first stars in globular-star-clusters soon after 10^13 s.

  19. Fluid Shearing for Accelerated Chemical Reactions - Fluid Mechanics in the VFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leivadarou, Evgenia; Dalziel, Stuart; G. K. Batchelor Laboratory, Department of Applied Mathematics; Theoretical Physics Team

    2016-11-01

    The Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD) is a rapidly rotating tube that can operate under continuous flow with a jet feeding liquid reactants to the tube's hemispherical base. It is a new 'green' approach to the organic synthesis with many industrial applications in cosmetics, protein folding and pharmaceutical production. The rate of reaction in the VFD is enhanced when the collision rate is increased. The aim of the project is to explain the fluid mechanics and optimize the performance of the device. One contribution to the increased yield is believed to be the high levels of shear stress. We attempt to enhance the shear stress by achieving high velocity gradients in the boundary layers. Another factor is the uncontrolled vibrations due to imperfections in the bearings and therefore it is important to assess their influence in the initial spreading. The surface area of the film should be maximized with respect to the rotation rate, geometry and orientation of the tube, flow rate, wettability and contact line dynamics. Experiments are presented for a flat disk and a curved bowl, establishing the optimum height of release, rotation rate and tube orientation. Vibrations were imposed to investigate the changes in the film formation. We discuss the implications of our results in the VFD.

  20. Fluid mechanics a concise introduction to the theory

    CERN Document Server

    Yih, Chia-Shun

    1969-01-01

    Fundamentals ; the basic equations ; general theorems for the flow of an inviscid fluid ; irrotational flows of an inviscid fluid of constant density ; waves in an incompressible ; effects of viscosity ; heat transfer and boundary layers of a gas ; hydrodynamic stability ; turbulence ; basic thermodynamics ; curvilinear coordinates.

  1. Take-Home Experiments in Undergraduate Fluid Mechanics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimbala, John

    2007-11-01

    Hands-on take-home experiments, assigned as homework, are useful as supplements to traditional in-class demonstrations and laboratories. Students borrow the equipment from the department's equipment room, and perform the experiment either at home or in the student lounge or student shop work area. Advantages include: (1) easy implementation, especially for large classes, (2) low cost and easy duplication of multiple units, (3) no loss of lecture time since the take-home experiment is self-contained with all necessary instructions, and (4) negligible increase in student or teaching assistant work load since the experiment is assigned as a homework problem in place of a traditional pen and paper problem. As an example, a pump flow take-home experiment was developed, implemented, and assessed in our introductory junior-level fluid mechanics course at Penn State. The experimental apparatus consists of a bucket, tape measure, submersible aquarium pump, tubing, measuring cup, and extension cord. We put together twenty sets at a total cost of less than 20 dollars per set. Students connect the tube to the pump outlet, submerge the pump in water, and measure the volume flow rate produced at various outflow elevations. They record and plot volume flow rate as a function of outlet elevation, and compare with predictions based on the manufacturer's pump performance curve (head versus volume flow rate) and flow losses. The homework assignment includes an online pre-test and post-test to assess the change in students' understanding of the principles of pump performance. The results of the assessment support a significant learning gain following the completion of the take-home experiment.

  2. Mechanics of undulatory swimming in a frictional fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ding

    Full Text Available The sandfish lizard (Scincus scincus swims within granular media (sand using axial body undulations to propel itself without the use of limbs. In previous work we predicted average swimming speed by developing a numerical simulation that incorporated experimentally measured biological kinematics into a multibody sandfish model. The model was coupled to an experimentally validated soft sphere discrete element method simulation of the granular medium. In this paper, we use the simulation to study the detailed mechanics of undulatory swimming in a "granular frictional fluid" and compare the predictions to our previously developed resistive force theory (RFT which models sand-swimming using empirically determined granular drag laws. The simulation reveals that the forward speed of the center of mass (CoM oscillates about its average speed in antiphase with head drag. The coupling between overall body motion and body deformation results in a non-trivial pattern in the magnitude of lateral displacement of the segments along the body. The actuator torque and segment power are maximal near the center of the body and decrease to zero toward the head and the tail. Approximately 30% of the net swimming power is dissipated in head drag. The power consumption is proportional to the frequency in the biologically relevant range, which confirms that frictional forces dominate during sand-swimming by the sandfish. Comparison of the segmental forces measured in simulation with the force on a laterally oscillating rod reveals that a granular hysteresis effect causes the overestimation of the body thrust forces in the RFT. Our models provide detailed testable predictions for biological locomotion in a granular environment.

  3. Mechanics of undulatory swimming in a frictional fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yang; Sharpe, Sarah S; Masse, Andrew; Goldman, Daniel I

    2012-01-01

    The sandfish lizard (Scincus scincus) swims within granular media (sand) using axial body undulations to propel itself without the use of limbs. In previous work we predicted average swimming speed by developing a numerical simulation that incorporated experimentally measured biological kinematics into a multibody sandfish model. The model was coupled to an experimentally validated soft sphere discrete element method simulation of the granular medium. In this paper, we use the simulation to study the detailed mechanics of undulatory swimming in a "granular frictional fluid" and compare the predictions to our previously developed resistive force theory (RFT) which models sand-swimming using empirically determined granular drag laws. The simulation reveals that the forward speed of the center of mass (CoM) oscillates about its average speed in antiphase with head drag. The coupling between overall body motion and body deformation results in a non-trivial pattern in the magnitude of lateral displacement of the segments along the body. The actuator torque and segment power are maximal near the center of the body and decrease to zero toward the head and the tail. Approximately 30% of the net swimming power is dissipated in head drag. The power consumption is proportional to the frequency in the biologically relevant range, which confirms that frictional forces dominate during sand-swimming by the sandfish. Comparison of the segmental forces measured in simulation with the force on a laterally oscillating rod reveals that a granular hysteresis effect causes the overestimation of the body thrust forces in the RFT. Our models provide detailed testable predictions for biological locomotion in a granular environment.

  4. The early years of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. Style and international impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, H. Keith

    2017-07-01

    The origins of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics, of which the first volume was published in 1956, are discussed, with reference to editorial correspondence during the early years of the Journal. This paper is based on a lecture given at the colloquium: A Century of Fluid Mechanics, 1870-1970, IMFT, Toulouse, France, 19-21 October 2016.

  5. Teaching Fluid Mechanics to the Beginning Graduate Student--An Objective-Oriented Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Henry

    A premature embarkation in specialized areas of fluid mechanics by the beginning graduate student, without having first thoroughly learned the basics, leads to learning difficulties and destroys zeal for learning. To avoid these problems, many schools in the U.S. offer beginning graduate courses in fluid mechanics (BGCFM). Because the success or…

  6. CHARACTERISTCS OF FLUID FILM IN OPTIMIZED SPIRAL GROOVE MECHANICAL SEAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the sealing performance variation resulted from the thermal deformation of the end faces, the equations to calculate the fluid film pressure distribution, the bearing force and the leakage rate are derived, for the fluid film both in parallel gap and in wedgy gap. The geometrical parameters of the sealing members are optimized by means of heat transfer analysis and complex method. The analysis results indicate that the shallow spiral grooves can generate hydrodynamic pressure while the rotating ring rotates and the bearing force of the fluid film in spiral groove end faces is much larger than that in the flat end faces. The deformation increases the bearing force of the fluid film in flat end faces, but it decreases the hydrodynamic pressure of the fluid film in spiral groove end faces. The gap dimensions which determine the characteristics of the fluid film is obtained by coupling analysis of the frictional heat and the thermal deformation in consideration of the equilibrium condition of the bearing force and the closing force. For different gap dimensions, the relationship between the closing force and the leakage rate is also investigated, based on which the leakage rate can be controlled by adjusting the closing force.

  7. Application of MV/LV Transformers with OLTC for Increasing the PV Hosting Capacity Of LV Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi Toghroljerdi, Seyedmostafa; Heckmann, Wolfram; Geibel, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    the operation of OLTC during high PV generation periods are investigated and the methods are applied to an LV feeder with an MV/LV transformer equipped by OLTC located in Felsberg, Germany. The potential interferences between OLTCs and two other overvoltage prevention methods, the demand side management (DSM...

  8. Yielding to Stress: Recent Developments in Viscoplastic Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmforth, Neil J.; Frigaard, Ian A.; Ovarlez, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The archetypal feature of a viscoplastic fluid is its yield stress: If the material is not sufficiently stressed, it behaves like a solid, but once the yield stress is exceeded, the material flows like a fluid. Such behavior characterizes materials common in industries such as petroleum and chemical processing, cosmetics, and food processing and in geophysical fluid dynamics. The most common idealization of a viscoplastic fluid is the Bingham model, which has been widely used to rationalize experimental data, even though it is a crude oversimplification of true rheological behavior. The popularity of the model is in its apparent simplicity. Despite this, the sudden transition between solid-like behavior and flow introduces significant complications into the dynamics, which, as a result, has resisted much analysis. Over recent decades, theoretical developments, both analytical and computational, have provided a better understanding of the effect of the yield stress. Simultaneously, greater insight into the material behavior of real fluids has been afforded by advances in rheometry. These developments have primed us for a better understanding of the various applications in the natural and engineering sciences.

  9. Sensing fluid viscosity and density through mechanical impedance measurement using a whisker transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new technique for fluid viscosity and density sensing through measuring the mechanical impedance of the fluid load applied on a sphere. A piezoelectric whisker transducer (WT) is proposed which acts simultaneously as both the actuator to excite the sphere tip to oscillate in the fluid and the sensor to measure the force, velocity and mechanical impedance. The relationship between mechanical impedance of the fluid load and electrical impedance of the WT is derived based on a transduction matrix model which characterizes the electro-mechanical transduction process of the WT in both directions. The mechanical impedance is further related to the fluid viscosity and density using a theoretical model. The establishment of this fluid-mechanical-electrical relationship allows the WT to extract the fluid viscosity and density conveniently and accurately just from its electrical impedance. Experimental studies are carried out to calibrate the WT and test its performance using glycerol-water mixtures. It is concluded that the WT is capable of providing results comparable to those of standard viscometers within a wide measurement range due to its low working frequency and large vibration amplitude. Its unique self-actuation-and-sensing feature makes it a suitable solution for online fluid sensing.

  10. Teaching Fluid Mechanics for Undergraduate Students in Applied Industrial Biology: from Theory to Atypical Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Absi, Rafik; Dufour, Florence; Huet, Denis; Bennacer, Rachid; Absi, Tahar

    2011-01-01

    EBI is a further education establishment which provides education in applied industrial biology at level of MSc engineering degree. Fluid mechanics at EBI was considered by students as difficult who seemed somewhat unmotivated. In order to motivate them, we applied a new play-based pedagogy. Students were asked to draw inspiration from everyday life situations to find applications of fluid mechanics and to do experiments to verify and validate some theoretical results obtained in course. In this paper, we present an innovative teaching/learning pedagogy which includes the concept of learning through play and its implications in fluid mechanics for engineering. Examples of atypical experiments in fluid mechanics made by students are presented. Based on teaching evaluation by students, it is possible to know how students feel the course. The effectiveness of this approach to motivate students is presented through an analysis of students' teaching assessment. Learning through play proved a great success in fluid...

  11. Heat Transfer Analysis for Peristaltic Mechanism in Variable Viscosity Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Hayat; F.M.Abbasi; Awatif A.Hendi

    2011-01-01

    An analysis is carried out for a peristaltic flow of a third-order fluid with heat transfer and variable viscosity when no-slip condition does not hold. Perturbation solution is discussed and a comparative study between the cases of constant and variable viscosities is presented and analyzed.%@@ An analysis is carried out for a peristaltic flow of a third-order fluid with heat transfer and variable viscosity when no-slip condition does not hold.Perturbation solution is discussed and a comparative stuity between the cases of constant and variable viscosities is presented and analyzed.

  12. The Influence of Fluid Overload on the Length of Mechanical Ventilation in Pediatric Congenital Heart Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Tatiana Z A L; O'Hearn, Katie; Reddy, Deepti; Menon, Kusum

    2015-12-01

    Fluid overload and prolonged mechanical ventilation lead to worse outcomes in critically ill children. However, the association between these variables in children following congenital heart surgery is unknown. The objectives of this study were to describe the association between fluid overload and duration of mechanical ventilation, oxygen requirement and radiologic findings of pulmonary and chest wall edema. This study is a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent congenital heart surgery between June 2010 and December 2013. Univariate and multivariate associations between maximum cumulative fluid balance and length of mechanical ventilation and OI were tested using the Spearman correlation test and multiple linear regression models, respectively. There were 85 eligible patients. Maximum cumulative fluid balance was associated with duration of mechanical ventilation (adjusted analysis beta coefficient = 0.53, CI 0.38-0.66, P Fluid overload is associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation and PICU length of stay after congenital heart surgery. Fluid overload was also associated with physiological markers of respiratory restriction. A randomized controlled trial of a restrictive versus liberal fluid replacement strategy is necessary in this patient population, but in the meantime, accumulating observational evidence suggests that cautious use of fluid in the postoperative care may be warranted.

  13. Polymeric liquids in extension: fluid mechanics or rheometry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Marin, Jose Martin Roman; Yu, Kaijia

    2010-01-01

    We use a transient 3D free surface finite element method to simulate flow of entangled polymer fluids in the dual cylinder wind-up extensional rheometer. The constitutive equations are K-BKZ integral representations of the Doi-Edwards models with and without the independent alignment approximatio...

  14. Some applications of magnetic resonance imaging in fluid mechanics: Complex flows and complex fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonn, D.; Rodts, S.; Groenink, M.; Rafaï, S.; Shahidzadeh-Bonn, N.; Coussot, P.

    2008-01-01

    The review deals with applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to study flow. We first briefly discuss the principles of flow measurement by MRI and give examples of some applications, such as multiphase flows, the MRI rheology of complex fluid flows, and blood flows in the human

  15. Mechanical and chemical behavior of intergranular fluids in nonhydrostatically stressed rocks at low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘亮明; 彭省临

    2001-01-01

    Intergranular fluids within the nonhydrostatically stressed solids are a sort of important fluids in the crust. Research on the mechanical and chemical behavior of the intergranular fluids in nonhydrostatically stressed rocks at low temperature is a key for understanding deformation and syntectonic geochemical processes in mid to shallow crust. Theoretically, it is suggested that the fluid film sandwiched between solid grains is one of the main states of intergranular fluids in the nonhydrostatically stressed solids. Their superthin thickness makes the fluid films have the mechanical and chemical behavior very different from the common fluids. Because of hydration force, double-layer repulsive force or osmotic pressure due to double-layer, the fluid films can transmit nonhydrostatic stress. The solid minerals-intergranular fluids interaction and mass transfer by intergranular fluids is stress-related, because the stress in solid minerals can enhance the free energy of solid matter on the interfaces. The thermodynamic and kinetic equations for the simple case of stress induced processes are derived.

  16. Value of dobutamine stress tissue Doppler in evaluation of LV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shaimaa Ahmed Mostafa

    2014-12-12

    Dec 12, 2014 ... Prosthetic valve disease. Complicated PCI. LVEF less .... annulus moved toward the cardiac apex due to longitudinal contraction of the LV. ..... to fibrotic tissue is too high and also, improved the integrity of cardiac myocyte cell ...

  17. Noninvasive LV pressure estimation using subharmonic emissions from microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Raichlen, Joel S; Liu, Ji-Bin; McDonald, Maureen E; Dickie, Kris; Wang, Shumin; Leung, Corina; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    To develop a new noninvasive approach to quantify left ventricular (LV) pressures using subharmonic emissions from microbubbles, an ultrasound scanner was used in pulse inversion grayscale mode; unprocessed radiofrequency data were obtained with pulsed wave Doppler from the aorta and/or LV during Sonazoid infusion. Subharmonic data (in dB) were extracted and processed. Calibration factor (mm Hg/dB) from the aortic pressure was used to estimate LV pressures. Errors ranged from 0.19 to 2.50 mm Hg when estimating pressures using the aortic calibration factor, and were higher (0.64 to 8.98 mm Hg) using a mean aortic calibration factor. Subharmonic emissions from ultrasound contrast agents have the potential to noninvasively monitor LV pressures.

  18. Fluid mechanics phenomena in microgravity; ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Anaheim, CA, Nov. 8-13, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siginer, Dennis A. (Editor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series of symposia presenting research activity in microgravity fluid mechanics. General topics addressed include two-phase flow and transport phenomena, thermo-capillary flow, and interfacial stability. Papers present mathmatical models of fluid dynamics in the microgravity environment. Applications suggested include space manufacturing and storage of liquids in low gravity.

  19. Revisiting Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Using Computer Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, D. G.

    2006-01-01

    This article illustrates how a computer algebra system, such as Maple[R], can assist in the study of theoretical fluid mechanics, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The continuity equation, the stress equations of motion, the Navier-Stokes equations, and various constitutive equations are treated, using a full, but straightforward,…

  20. Revisiting Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Using Computer Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, D. G.

    2006-01-01

    This article illustrates how a computer algebra system, such as Maple[R], can assist in the study of theoretical fluid mechanics, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The continuity equation, the stress equations of motion, the Navier-Stokes equations, and various constitutive equations are treated, using a full, but straightforward,…

  1. Fluid mechanics phenomena in microgravity; ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Anaheim, CA, Nov. 8-13, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siginer, Dennis A. (Editor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series of symposia presenting research activity in microgravity fluid mechanics. General topics addressed include two-phase flow and transport phenomena, thermo-capillary flow, and interfacial stability. Papers present mathmatical models of fluid dynamics in the microgravity environment. Applications suggested include space manufacturing and storage of liquids in low gravity.

  2. Mechanics of magnetic fluid column in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Platonov, V. B.

    2017-06-01

    Elastic-and magnetic properties of magnetic fluid confined by ponderomotive force in a tube fixed in horizontal position are considered. The system is placed in a strong magnetic field under the influence of external static and dynamic perturbations. An experimental setup has been developed. A theoretical basis of the processes of magnetic colloid elastic deformation has been proposed. The values of the static ponderomotive elasticity coefficient and the elasticity coefficient under dynamic action are experimentally determined. The calculations of the saturation magnetization for two magnetic fluid samples, carried out according to the equation containing the dynamic elasticity coefficient, are in good agreement with the experimental magnetization curve. The described method is of interest when studying magnetophoresis and aggregation of nanoparticles in magnetic colloids.

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  4. A mathematical model of post-instability in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Postinstability of fluids is eliminated in numerical models by introducing multivalued velocity fields after discarding the principle of impenetrability. Smooth functions are shown to be incapable of keeping the derivatives from going towards infinity when iterating solutions for the governing equations such as those defined by Navier-Stokes. Enlarging the class of functions is shown to be necessary to eliminate the appearance of imaginary characteristic roots in the systems of arbitrary partial differential equations, a condition which leads to physically impossible motions. The enlarging is demonstrated to be achievable by allowing several individual particles with different velocities to appear at the same point of space, and the subsequent multivaluedness of the solutions is purely a mathematical concern, rather than one of actual physical existence. Applications are provided for an inviscid fluid and for turbulence.

  5. Siquieros accidental painting technique: a fluid mechanics point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Zetina, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    This is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 65th Annual Meeting of the APS-DFD (fluid dynamics video). This video shows an analysis of the 'accidental painting' technique developed by D.A. Siqueiros, a famous Mexican muralist. We reproduced the technique that he used: pouring layers of paint of different colors on top of each other. We found that the layers mix, creating aesthetically pleasing patterns, as a result of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Due to the pigments used to give paints their color, they can have different densities. When poured on top of each other, if the top layer is denser than the lower one, the viscous gravity current undergoes unstable as it spread radially. We photograph the process and produced slowed-down video to visualize the process.

  6. Interpreting Students’ Perceptions in Fluid Mechanics Learning Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Filomena; Leão, Celina; Guedes, Anabela; Isabel PEREIRA; Morais, Cristina; Esteves, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse the impact of introducing a practical work in the learning process of the Fluid Transport Systems course in Chemical Engineering degree. The students, in groups of two or three elements, were free to choose the application case in order to develop the practical work proposed by the responsible teachers. The students selected a centrifugal pump to supply water to houses or buildings and designed the piping system. The practical work was evaluated throu...

  7. Mechanisms of Fluid-Mud Interactions Under Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    surface a corrugated appearance (Figure 12). Through careful analysis of these tests, it has been concluded that the waves are the result of a resonant...square meter per month. Analysis of X-radiographs from this field program has contributed to development of new theory relating hydrodynamics of...Shear near the base of the mobile fluid mud layer mixes coarser underlying rippled sediment with overlying finer sediment, producing laminations

  8. Fluid intelligence and neural mechanisms of conflict adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tongran; Jiannong, Shi; Xiao, Tong

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated whether adolescents with different intellectual levels have different conflict adaptation processes. Adolescents with high and average IQ abilities were enrolled, and their behavioral responses and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a modified Erik...... adaptation control processing with smaller SP amplitude-CAE values. In conclusion, the present study revealed the essential association between fluid intelligence and conflict adaptation processes....

  9. Fluid mechanics for mechanical engineering. Technology and examples; Stroemungslehre fuer den Maschinenbau. Technik und Beispiele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siekmann, H.E. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Hermann-Foettinger-Institut fuer Stroemungsmechanik

    2001-07-01

    The book complements the established fluid mechanics textbook. It discusses the same subjects but goes into more detail and contains many practical examples. It addresses students of engineering, physics and practically oriented mathematics and can be used for independent studying or for a deeper understanding of subject matter treated in university lectures. [German] Der Band stellt als Ergaenzung zum eingefuehrten Grundlagenbuch Stroemungslehre eine tiefergehende Behandlung des Vorlesungsstoffes dar. Die Einteilung der Kapitel entspricht im wesentlichen der im Band Grundlagen: Hydrostatik, Kinematik, Impulssatz, NAVIER-Stokes-Bewegungsgleichung, Potential-, Wirbel- und Grenzschichtstroemung sowie turbulente Stroemung. Das Buch schliesst mit Darstellungen ueber Rohrstroemungen, Umstroemungen von Koerpern, Aehnlichkeitsgesetzen und numerische Stroemungsberechnung. Es enthaelt zahlreiche Praxisbeispiele. Geeignet fuer Studenten der Ingenieurwissenschaften, Physiker und praxisorientierte Mathematiker zum Selbststudium sowie zur Vorlesungsbegleitung. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of regional work from ECG-gated SPECT images through solution of equations of continuity for fluids-mechanical cardiac work calculated using thin wall model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hisatoshi

    2012-03-01

    Regional contraction work (RCW) of left ventricle (LV) was evaluated from cardiac perfusion images of ECG-gated single photon emission computed tomography (ECG-SPECT). The mechanical work was computed as a product of force and displaced distance. Force was determined from Laplace's law under a rectangle pressure. Deformation of wireframe representing LV was calculated from equations of continuity for two-dimensional fluids. Experiments were performed with homemade life-sized cardiac models. Total contraction work (TCW) and stroke work (SW) were 524.0 ± 166.1 mJ/beat and 709.8 ± 169.5 mJ/beat, respectively, in normal subjects (n = 23). Moderate correlation was seen between TCW and SW (y = -43.4 + 0.779 x, r = 0.815). The regional contraction amplitude (RCA), synchronous contraction index and RCW were 35.4 ± 3.5%, 95.4 ± 3.1% and 5.58 ± 0.97 mJ cm(-2)/beat in normal subjects, whereas those in patients with decreased ejection raction (EF) ≤ 30% (n = 6) were 19.6 ± 7.7%, 64.4 ± 32.2% and 2.58 ± 0.82 mJ cm(-2)/beat (p < 0.0001, Student's t-test). There was a poor correlation between RCW and RCA (y = 1.648 ± 0.116 x, r = 0.501) in normal subjects, suggesting that it might not be suitable to use RCA as an alternative to evaluate RCW.

  11. Contact mechanics for poroelastic, fluid-filled media, with application to cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B N J

    2016-12-21

    I study a simple contact mechanics model for a poroelastic, fluid-filled solid squeezed against a rigid, randomly rough substrate. I study how the fluid is squeezed out from the interface, and how the area of contact, and the average interfacial separation, change with time. I present numerical results relevant for a human cartilage. I show that for a fluid filled poroelastic solid the probability of cavitation (and the related wear as the cavities implode), and dynamical scraping (defined below and in Hutt and Persson, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 124903 (2016)), may be suppressed by fluid flow from the poroelastic solid into the (roughness induced) interfacial gap between the solids.

  12. Contact mechanics for poroelastic, fluid-filled media, with application to cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-12-01

    I study a simple contact mechanics model for a poroelastic, fluid-filled solid squeezed against a rigid, randomly rough substrate. I study how the fluid is squeezed out from the interface, and how the area of contact, and the average interfacial separation, change with time. I present numerical results relevant for a human cartilage. I show that for a fluid filled poroelastic solid the probability of cavitation (and the related wear as the cavities implode), and dynamical scraping (defined below and in Hutt and Persson, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 124903 (2016)), may be suppressed by fluid flow from the poroelastic solid into the (roughness induced) interfacial gap between the solids.

  13. Mechanical Role of Fluids in Earthquakes and Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    Following the contributions of Hubbert and Rubey, the level of ambient pore pressure is of accepted importance for understanding the static frictional strength of faults. There are also important dynamical interactions between pore fluids and faulting. Some of those are addressed here, with examples to be chosen from the following: (1) Pore fluid presence at full saturation promotes strong localization in rapidly shearing granular materials, even in cases for which the friction coefficient increases rapidly with shearing rate [see Rice, Rudnicki and Tsai, this meeting]. (2) Thermal pressurization of earthquake faults during seismic slip may provide the primary weakening process during earthquakes in mature crustal fault zones; it provides a plausible basic explanation, based on geological and laboratory data, of the magnitudes of the fracture energies of earthquakes as inferred independently from seismological data [see web link below]. The process also seems to be active in some large landslides. (3) Pore pressure alterations are induced by rapid mode II slip on fault planes when they have bordering gouge or damage zones which are of dissimilar permeability and/or poroelastic properties. This provides a fuller, new perspective on effects of material dissimilarity across a slip surface on altering the effective normal stress and thus interacting with dynamic rupture [see Rudnicki and Rice, this meeting]. (4) Gouge dilatancy associated with slip-rate increases induces suction in the pore fluid, so as to partially stabilize faults against earthquake nucleation, and also to slow rupture propagation into shallow fault regions. An open question is that of when and if shear heating acts to aid nucleation; the effect seems negligible for nucleation under slow tectonic loading but may be important for nucleation driven by sudden steps in stress. (5) Permeability determines pore pressure gradients for given flow rates, but increases in pore pressure cause increases in

  14. MECHANISMS OF FLUID SHEAR-INDUCED INHIBITION OF POPULATION GROWTH IN A RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Net population growth of some dinoflagellates is inhibited by fluid shear at shear stresses comparable with those generated during oceanic turbulence. Decreased net growth may occur through lowered cell division, increased mortality, or both. The dominant mechanism under various ...

  15. Methodology for Developing Teaching Activities and Materials for Use in Fluid Mechanics Courses in Undergraduate Engineering Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez-Montero, P. Javier; Raush, Gustavo; Domènech, Lluis; Castilla, Robert; García-Vílchez, Mercedes; Moreno, Hipòlit; Carbó, Albert

    2015-01-01

    "Mechanics" and "Fluids" are familiar concepts for any newly-registered engineering student. However, when combined into the term "Fluid Mechanics", students are thrust into the great unknown. The present article demonstrates the process of adaptation employed by the Fluid Mechanics course in the undergraduate…

  16. Attack or attacked: The sensory and fluid mechanical constraints of copepods’ predator–prey interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    , and mechanisms for mobility of the parties involved. Here, I describe the mechanisms of sensing, escaping predators, and capturing prey in marine pelagic copepods. I demonstrate that feeding tradeoffs vary with feeding mode, and I describe simple fluid mechanical models that are used to quantify these tradeoffs...

  17. Attack or attacked: The sensory and fluid mechanical constraints of copepods’ predator–prey interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    , and mechanisms for mobility of the parties involved. Here, I describe the mechanisms of sensing, escaping predators, and capturing prey in marine pelagic copepods. I demonstrate that feeding tradeoffs vary with feeding mode, and I describe simple fluid mechanical models that are used to quantify these tradeoffs...

  18. Evolution of pore fluid pressures in a stimulated geothermal reservoir inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, T.; Deichmann, N.

    2014-12-01

    We developed an inversion method to estimate the evolution of pore fluid pressure fields from earthquake focal mechanism solutions based on the Bayesian statistical inference and Akaike's Bayesian information criterion (ABIC). This method's application to induced seismicity in the Basel enhanced geothermal system in Switzerland shows the evolution of pore fluid pressures in response to fluid injection experiments. For a few days following the initiation of the fluid injection, overpressurized fluids are concentrated around the borehole and then anisotropically propagate within the reservoir until the bleed-off time. Then, the pore fluid pressure in the vicinity of the borehole drastically decreases, and overpressurized fluids become isolated in a few major fluid pockets. The pore fluid pressure in these pockets gradually decreases with time. The pore fluid pressure in the reservoir is less than the minimum principal stress at each depth, indicating that the hydraulic fracturing did not occur during stimulation. This suggests that seismic events may play an important role to promote the development of permeable channels, particularly southeast of the borehole where the largest seismic event (ML 3.4) occurred. This is not directly related to a drastic decrease in fault strength at the hypocenter, but rather the positive feedback between permeability enhancement and poro-elastic and stress transfer loading from slipping interfaces. These processes likely contribute to this event's nucleation.

  19. Crystal Growth and Fluid Mechanics Problems in Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, Saleh A.; Baker, Gregory R.; Foster, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    Our work in directional solidification has been in the following areas: (1) Dynamics of dendrites including rigorous mathematical analysis of the resulting equations; (2) Examination of the near-structurally unstable features of the mathematically related Hele-Shaw dynamics; (3) Numerical studies of steady temperature distribution in a vertical Bridgman device; (4) Numerical study of transient effects in a vertical Bridgman device; (5) Asymptotic treatment of quasi-steady operation of a vertical Bridgman furnace for large Rayleigh numbers and small Biot number in 3D; and (6) Understanding of Mullins-Sererka transition in a Bridgman device with fluid dynamics is accounted for.

  20. Experience revising an advanced-undergraduate/beginning-graduate fluid mechanics textbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, David

    2012-11-01

    In the fall of 2009, Elsevier Inc. approached me about taking over as the lead author of the fluid mechanics textbook by P. K. Kundu and I. M. Cohen. I subsequently agreed and this presentation provides the story of the process and the approach taken to revising this fluid mechanics textbook which has been in print for approximately 15 years. The goal of the revision was to produce an excellent textbook for second courses in fluid mechanics taken by advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students while maintaining the book's appeal to instructors who used prior editions. Thus, I sought to maintain or expand the text's fluid mechanics content, while adjusting the text's tone so that this content might be more readily reached by students who may have had only one prior course in fluid mechanics, or who may not specialize in fluid mechanics but do possess appropriate mathematical skills. The entire revision process involved seven steps: (i) formulating a revision plan that was independently reviewed, (ii) agreeing to a formal contract with deadlines, (iii) revising the text, figures, and front matter, (iv) proof reading and correcting copy-edited text, (v) correcting page proofs, (vi) generating the solutions manual, and (vii) tabulating errata. Formulating and executing the

  1. Thermophysical property data - Who needs them. [similarity principle applications in fluid mechanics and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Specific examples are cited herein to illustrate the universal needs and demands for thermophysical property data. Applications of the principle of similarity in fluid mechanics and heat transfer and extensions of the principle to fluid mixtures are discussed. It becomes quite clear that no matter how eloquent theories or experiments in fluid mechanics or heat transfer are, the results of their application can be no more accurate than the thermophysical properties required to transform these theories into practice, or in the case of an experiment, to reduce the data. Present-day projects take place on such a scale that the need for international standards and mutual cooperation is evident.

  2. The mechanical response in a fluid of synthetic antiferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic microdiscs with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulkar, T.; Welbourne, E. N.; Petit, D. C. M. C.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we demonstrate the magneto-mechanic behavior in a fluid environment of perpendicularly magnetized microdiscs with antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling. When suspended in a fluid and under the influence of a simple uniaxial applied magnetic field sequence, the microdiscs mechanically rotate to access the magnetic saturation processes that are either that of the easy axis, hard axis, or in-between the two, in order to lower their energy. Further, these transitions enable the magnetic particles to form reconfigurable magnetic chains, and transduce torque from uniaxial applied fields. These microdiscs offer an attractive platform for the fabrication of fluid based micro- and nanodevices, and dynamically self assembled complex architectures. PMID:28190886

  3. The mechanical response in a fluid of synthetic antiferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic microdiscs with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulkar, T.; Welbourne, E. N.; Mansell, R.; Petit, D. C. M. C.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we demonstrate the magneto-mechanic behavior in a fluid environment of perpendicularly magnetized microdiscs with antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling. When suspended in a fluid and under the influence of a simple uniaxial applied magnetic field sequence, the microdiscs mechanically rotate to access the magnetic saturation processes that are either that of the easy axis, hard axis, or in-between the two, in order to lower their energy. Further, these transitions enable the magnetic particles to form reconfigurable magnetic chains, and transduce torque from uniaxial applied fields. These microdiscs offer an attractive platform for the fabrication of fluid based micro- and nanodevices, and dynamically self assembled complex architectures.

  4. A review of interaction mechanisms in fluid-solid flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.; Rajagopal, K.R. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Massoudi, M. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Multiphase flows have become the subject of considerable attention because of their importance in many industrial applications, such as fluidized beds, pneumatic transport of solids, coal combustion, etc. Fundamental research into the nature of pneumatic transport has made significant progress in identifying key parameters controlling the characteristics of these processes. The emphasis of this study is on a mixture composed of spherical particles of uniform size and a linearly viscous fluid. Section 1 introduces our approach and the importance of this study. In Section 2, the dynamics of a single particle as studied in classical hydrodynamics and fluid dynamics is presented. This has been a subject of study for more than 200 years. In Section 3, we review the literature for the constitutive relations as given in multiphase studies, i.e., generalization of single particle and as given in literature concerning the continuum theories of mixtures or multicomponent systems. In Section 4, a comparison between these representations and the earlier approach, i.e., forces acting on a single particle will be made. The importance of flow regimes, particle concentration, particle size and shape, rotation of the particle, effect of solid walls, etc. are discussed. 141 refs.

  5. The instanton method and its numerical implementation in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafke, Tobias; Grauer, Rainer; Schäfer, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    A precise characterization of structures occurring in turbulent fluid flows at high Reynolds numbers is one of the last open problems of classical physics. In this review we discuss recent developments related to the application of instanton methods to turbulence. Instantons are saddle point configurations of the underlying path integrals. They are equivalent to minimizers of the related Freidlin-Wentzell action and known to be able to characterize rare events in such systems. While there is an impressive body of work concerning their analytical description, this review focuses on the question on how to compute these minimizers numerically. In a short introduction we present the relevant mathematical and physical background before we discuss the stochastic Burgers equation in detail. We present algorithms to compute instantons numerically by an efficient solution of the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations. A second focus is the discussion of a recently developed numerical filtering technique that allows to extract instantons from direct numerical simulations. In the following we present modifications of the algorithms to make them efficient when applied to two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) fluid dynamical problems. We illustrate these ideas using the 2D Burgers equation and the 3D Navier-Stokes equations.

  6. A numerical investigation of the fluid mechanical sewing machine

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Audoly, Basile

    2012-01-01

    A thin thread of viscous fluid falling onto a moving belt generates a surprising variety of patterns depending on the belt speed, fall height, flow rate, and fluid properties. Here we simulate this experiment numerically using the Discrete Viscous Threads method that can predict the non-steady dynamics of thin viscous filaments, capturing the combined effects of inertia, stretching, bending and twisting. Our simulations successfully reproduce nine out of ten different patterns previously seen in the laboratory, and agree closely with the experimental phase diagram of Morris et al.\\ (2008). We propose a new classification of the patterns based on the Fourier spectra of the longitudinal and transverse motion of the point of contact of the thread with the belt. These frequencies appear to be locked in most cases to simple ratios of the frequency $\\Omega_c$ of steady coiling obtained in the limit of zero belt speed. In particular the intriguing `alternating loops' pattern is produced by combining the first five m...

  7. Experiments and Modeling of G-Jitter Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, F. W.; Ramachandran, N.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    While there is a general understanding of the acceleration environment onboard an orbiting spacecraft, past research efforts in the modeling and analysis area have still not produced a general theory that predicts the effects of multi-spectral periodic accelerations on a general class of experiments nor have they produced scaling laws that a prospective experimenter can use to assess how an experiment might be affected by this acceleration environment. Furthermore, there are no actual flight experimental data that correlates heat or mass transport with measurements of the periodic acceleration environment. The present investigation approaches this problem with carefully conducted terrestrial experiments and rigorous numerical modeling for better understanding the effect of residual gravity and gentler on experiments. The approach is to use magnetic fluids that respond to an imposed magnetic field gradient in much the same way as fluid density responds to a gravitational field. By utilizing a programmable power source in conjunction with an electromagnet, both static and dynamic body forces can be simulated in lab experiments. The paper provides an overview of the technique and includes recent results from the experiments.

  8. 7th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The proceedings volumes 1 and 2 comprise the papers that were accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 11 to 14, 1994. The prime objective of this Seventh Symposium is to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and reveal significant results to fluid mechanics. The applications of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research is emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods are also considered where they facilitate new improved fluid mechanic research. Attention is focused on laser-Doppler anemometry, particle sizing and other methods for the measurement of velocity and scalars such as particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence.

  9. 7th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The proceedings volumes 1 and 2 comprise the papers that were accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 11 to 14, 1994. The prime objective of this Seventh Symposium is to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and reveal significant results to fluid mechanics. The applications of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research is emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods are also considered where they facilitate new improved fluid mechanics research. Attention is focused on laser-Doppler anemometry, particle sizing and other methods for the measurement of velocity and scalars such as particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence.

  10. Schaum’s outline of fluid mechanics and hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Giles, Ranald V; Liu, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Tough Test Questions? Missed Lectures? Not Enough Time? Fortunately, there's Schaum's. More than 40 million students have trusted Schaum's to help them succeed in the classroom and on exams. Schaum's is the key to faster learning and higher grades in every subject. Each Outline presents all the essential course information in an easy-to-follow, topic-by-topic format. You also get hundreds of examples, solved problems, and practice exercises to test your skills. This Schaum's Outline gives you: 622 fully solved problems; extra practice on topics such as buoyancy and flotation, complex pipeline systems, fluid machinery, flow in open channels, and more; and support for all the major textbooks for fluidmechanics and hydraulics courses. Fully compatible with your classroom text, Schaum's highlights all the important facts you need to know. Use Schaum's to shorten your study time - and get your best test scores! Schaum's Outlines - Problem Solved.

  11. The instanton method and its numerical implementation in fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Grafke, Tobias; Schäfer, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    A precise characterization of structures occurring in turbulent fluid flows at high Reynolds numbers is one of the last open problems of classical physics. In this review we discuss recent developments related to the application of instanton methods to turbulence. Instantons are saddle point configurations of the underlying path integrals. They are equivalent to minimizers of the related Freidlin-Wentzell action and known to be able to characterize rare events in such systems. While there is an impressive body of work concerning their analytical description, this review focuses on the question on how to compute these minimizers numerically. In a short introduction we present the relevant mathematical and physical background before we discuss the stochastic Burgers equation in detail. We present algorithms to compute instantons numerically by an efficient solution of the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations. A second focus is the discussion of a recently developed numerical filtering technique that allows to...

  12. Personal Computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.-C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes computation.

  13. The NASA Lewis Research Center Internal Fluid Mechanics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, A. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Wasserbauer, C. A.; Andrews, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental facility specifically designed to investigate internal fluid duct flows is described. It is built in a modular fashion so that a variety of internal flow test hardware can be installed in the facility with minimal facility reconfiguration. The facility and test hardware interfaces are discussed along with design constraints of future test hardware. The plenum flow conditioning approach is also detailed. Available instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities are discussed. The incoming flow quality was documented over the current facility operating range. The incoming flow produces well behaved turbulent boundary layers with a uniform core. For the calibration duct used, the boundary layers approached 10 percent of the duct radius. Freestream turbulence levels at the various operating conditions varied from 0.64 to 0.69 percent of the average freestream velocity.

  14. Frictional heat transfer regularity of the fluid film in mechanical seals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The frictional heat transfer regularity in the mechanical seal system consisting of the rotating ring, the stationary ring, the fluid film in the end faces and the sealed medium was investigated. The primary factors affecting the frictional heat transfer regularity, such as the heat transfer coefficients from the rings to the sealed medium, the frictional heat flux, the frictional heat distribution ratio and so on, were discussed. The equations for calculating the temperature field both in the sealing members and in the fluid film were derived. The coupling analysis of the frictional heat of the fluid film and the thermal deformation of the two end faces of the rings was carried out to obtain the separation angle of the two deformed end faces in consideration of the viscosity change of the fluid film. The results indicate that the frictional heat of the fluid film heavily affects its characteristic and the sealing performance of mechanical seals. The frictional heat changes not only the shape of the gap between the end faces but also the viscosity of the fluid film, and thereupon leads to the increase of the leakage rate. The maximum temperature of the system is at the inner radius of the fluid film, and most of the frictional heat is conducted by the rotating ring. Based on the heat transfer analysis method put forward in this paper, the parameterized design of mechanical seals can be realized to determine the best geometrical parameters and to select the appropriate material of the sealing members.

  15. Fluid-structure interaction of an aortic heart valve prosthesis driven by an animated anatomic left ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-07-01

    We develop a novel large-scale kinematic model for animating the left ventricle (LV) wall and use this model to drive the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between the ensuing blood flow and a mechanical heart valve prosthesis implanted in the aortic position of an anatomic LV/aorta configuration. The kinematic model is of lumped type and employs a cell-based, FitzHugh-Nagumo framework to simulate the motion of the LV wall in response to an excitation wavefront propagating along the heart wall. The emerging large-scale LV wall motion exhibits complex contractile mechanisms that include contraction (twist) and expansion (untwist). The kinematic model is shown to yield global LV motion parameters that are well within the physiologic range throughout the cardiac cycle. The FSI between the leaflets of the mechanical heart valve and the blood flow driven by the dynamic LV wall motion and mitral inflow is simulated using the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method [1, 2] implemented in conjunction with a domain decomposition approach. The computed results show that the simulated flow patterns are in good qualitative agreement with in vivo observations. The simulations also reveal complex kinematics of the valve leaflets, thus, underscoring the need for patient-specific simulations of heart valve prosthesis and other cardiac devices.

  16. Mechanical testing of hydraulic fluids II; Mechanische Pruefung von Hydraulikfluessigkeiten II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, M.; Feldmann, D.G.; Laukart, V.

    2001-09-01

    Since May 1996 the Institute for Mechanical Engineering Design 1 of Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg is working on the topic of ''Mechanical Testing of Hydraulic fluids''. The first project lasting 2 1/2 years was completed in 1999, the results are published as the DGMK report 514. Within these project a testing principle for the ''mechanical testing'' of hydraulic fluids has been derived, a prototype of a test rig was designed and set in operation at the authors' institute. This DGMK-report 514-1 describes the results of the second project, which investigates the operating behaviour of the test-rig more in detail. Several test-runs with a total number of 11 different hydraulic fluids show the dependence of the different lubricating behaviour of the tested fluids and their friction and wear behaviour during the tests in a reproducible way. The aim of the project was to derive a testing principle including the design of a suitable test-rig for the mechanical testing of hydraulic fluids. Based on the described results it can be stated that with the developed test it is possible to test the lubricity of hydraulic fluids reproducible and in correlation to field experiences within a relatively short time, so the target was reached. (orig.)

  17. Climate dynamics and fluid mechanics: Natural variability and related uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Ghil, Michael; Simonnet, Eric; 10.1016/j.physd.2008.03.036

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this review-and-research paper is twofold: (i) to review the role played in climate dynamics by fluid-dynamical models; and (ii) to contribute to the understanding and reduction of the uncertainties in future climate-change projections. To illustrate the first point, we focus on the large-scale, wind-driven flow of the mid-latitude oceans which contribute in a crucial way to Earth's climate, and to changes therein. We study the low-frequency variability (LFV) of the wind-driven, double-gyre circulation in mid-latitude ocean basins, via the bifurcation sequence that leads from steady states through periodic solutions and on to the chaotic, irregular flows documented in the observations. This sequence involves local, pitchfork and Hopf bifurcations, as well as global, homoclinic ones. The natural climate variability induced by the LFV of the ocean circulation is but one of the causes of uncertainties in climate projections. Another major cause of such uncertainties could reside in the structural ...

  18. Mechanics of fluid flow over compliant wrinkled polymeric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raayai, Shabnam; McKinley, Gareth; Boyce, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Skin friction coefficients (based on frontal area) of sharks and dolphins are lower than birds, fish and swimming beetles. By either exploiting flow-induced changes in their flexible skin or microscale textures, dolphins and sharks can change the structure of the fluid flow around them and thus reduce viscous drag forces on their bodies. Inspired by this ability, investigators have tried using compliant walls and riblet-like textures as drag reduction methods in aircraft and marine industries and have been able to achieve reductions up to 19%. Here we investigate flow-structure interaction and wrinkling of soft polymer surfaces that can emulate shark riblets and dolphin's flexible skin. Wrinkling arises spontaneously as the result of mismatched deformation of a thin stiff coating bound to a thick soft elastic substrate. Wrinkles can be fabricated by controlling the ratio of the stiffness of the coating and substrate, the applied displacement and the thickness of the coating. In this work we will examine the evolution in the kinematic structures associated with steady viscous flow over the polymer wrinkled surfaces and in particular compare the skin friction with corresponding results for flow over non-textured and rigid surfaces.

  19. Combustion research in the Internal Fluid Mechanics Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularz, Edward J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this research is to bring computational fluid dynamics to a state of practical application for the aircraft engine industry. The approach is to have a strongly integrated computational and experimental program for all the disciplines associated with the gas turbine and other aeropropulsion systems by advancing the understanding of flow physics, heat transfer, and combustion processes. The computational and experimental research is integrated in the following way: the experiments that are performed provide an empirical data set so that physical models can be formulated to describe the processes that are occurring - for example, turbulence or chemical reaction. These experiments also form a data base for those who are doing code development by providing experimental data against which the codes can be verified and assesed. Models are generated as closure to some of the numerical codes, and they also provide physical insight for experiments. At the same time, codes which solve the complete Navier-Stokes equations can be used as a kind of numerical experiment from which far more extensive data can be obtained than ever could be obtained experimentally. This could provide physical insight into the complex processes that are taking place. These codes are also exercised against experimental data to assess the accuracy and applicability of models.

  20. Finite element procedures for coupled linear analysis of heat transfer, fluid and solid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    Coupled finite element formulations for fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and solid mechanics are derived from the conservation laws for energy, mass, and momentum. To model the physics of interactions among the participating disciplines, the linearized equations are coupled by combining domain and boundary coupling procedures. Iterative numerical solution strategy is presented to solve the equations, with the partitioning of temporal discretization implemented.

  1. The chemo-mechanical effect of cutting fluid on material removal in diamond scribing of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arkadeep; Melkote, Shreyes N.

    2017-07-01

    The mechanical integrity of silicon wafers cut by diamond wire sawing depends on the damage (e.g., micro-cracks) caused by the cutting process. The damage type and extent depends on the material removal mode, i.e., ductile or brittle. This paper investigates the effect of cutting fluid on the mode of material removal in diamond scribing of single crystal silicon, which simulates the material removal process in diamond wire sawing of silicon wafers. We conducted scribing experiments with a diamond tipped indenter in the absence (dry) and in the presence of a water-based cutting fluid. We found that the cutting mode is more ductile when scribing in the presence of cutting fluid compared to dry scribing. We explain the experimental observations by the chemo-mechanical effect of the cutting fluid on silicon, which lowers its hardness and promotes ductile mode material removal.

  2. Concentration Mechanism of Ore-Forming Fluid in Huize Lead-Zinc Deposits, Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhenliang; Huang Zhilong; Rao Bing; Guan Tao; Yan Zaifei

    2005-01-01

    The Huize Pb-Zn deposits of Yunnan Province, located in the south-central part of the Sichuan-Yunnan-Guizhou (SYG) Pb-Zn multimetal mineralization district (MMD), are strictly controlled by fault zones. The sources of ore-forming fluid in the deposits have been debated for a long time. Calcite, a gangue mineral, has uniform C and O isotopes. The δ13CPDB and δ18OSMOW values vary respectively from -2.1×10-3 to -3.5×10-3 (mean -2.8×10-3) and 16.7×10-3-18.6×10-3 (mean 17.7×10-3). No obvious difference can be found in C and O isotopes among occurrences and elevations and even ore-bodies. Types of inclusions include those of pure liquid (L), liquid-rich gas-liquid (L+V), and three-phase ones containing a daughter mineral (S+L+V) and immiscible CO2 with three-phases (VCO2+LCO2+LH2O). Their homogenization temperatures vary from 110 to 400 ℃, and two peaks are shown. (87Sr/86Sr)0 ratios of calcite in the deposits are higher than those in the mantle and Emeishan basalts, and slightly higher than those in the Baizuo Formation, which the Huize lead-zinc deposits are found in. All of the (87Sr/86Sr)0 are low relative to those in the basement rocks. Fractionation of Sr isotope did not occur in the ore-forming fluid during the precipitation of minerals. The results indicate that the ore-forming fluid is homogeneous and derived from the mixing of different fluids. Gas-liquid inclusions can be separated into two groups in 300-400 ℃ with a salinity of 5 %-6 % and 12 %-16 % NaCl respectively. However, the salinities of inclusions vary from 7 % to 23 % NaCl in 100-300 ℃, especially in 150-250 ℃. The formation pressures of faulted zones are (50-320)×105 Pa. The estimated pressures of the overlying rocks on the ore bodies are 574×105-640×105 Pa. The pressures of ore-forming processes would be 145×105 to 754×105 Pa. Therefore, pressure sharply reduced and boiling occurred when the ore-forming fluid flew into the fault zones. As a result, the ore-forming fluid was

  3. Mechanical instability induced by water weakening in laboratory fluid injection tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C.; Dautriat, J.; Sarout, J.; Delle Piane, C.; Menéndez, B.; Macault, R.; Bertauld, D.

    2015-06-01

    To assess water-weakening effects in reservoir rocks, previous experimental studies have focused on changes in the failure envelopes derived from mechanical tests conducted on rocks fully saturated either with water or with inert fluids. So far, little attention has been paid to the mechanical behavior during fluid injection under conditions similar to enhanced oil recovery operations. We studied the effect of fluid injection on the mechanical behavior of the weakly consolidated Sherwood sandstone in laboratory experiments. Our specimens were instrumented with 16 ultrasonic P wave transducers for both passive and active acoustic monitoring during loading and fluid injection to record the acoustic signature of fluid migration in the pore space and the development of damage. Calibration triaxial tests were conducted on three samples saturated with air, water, or oil. In a second series of experiments, water and inert oil were injected into samples critically loaded up to 80% or 70% of the dry or oil-saturated compressive strength, respectively, to assess the impact of fluid migration on mechanical strength and elastic properties. The fluids were injected with a low back pressure to minimize effective stress variations during injection. Our observations show that creep takes place with a much higher strain rate for water injection compared to oil injection. The most remarkable difference is that water injection in both dry and oil-saturated samples triggers mechanical instability (macroscopic failure) within half an hour whereas oil injection does not after several hours. The analysis of X-ray computed tomography images of postmortem samples revealed that the mechanical instability was probably linked to loss of cohesion in the water-invaded region.

  4. The fluid mechanics of scleral buckling surgery for the repair of retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William Joseph; Dowla, Nadia; Joshi, Saurabh Y; Nikolaou, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Scleral buckling is a common surgical technique used to treat retinal detachments that involves suturing a radial or circumferential silicone element on the sclera. Although this procedure has been performed since the 1960s, and there is a reasonable experimental model of retinal detachment, there is still debate as to how this surgery facilitates the re-attachment of the retina. Finite element calculations using the COMSOL Multiphysics system are utilized to explain the influence of the scleral buckle on the flow of sub-retinal fluid in a physical model of retinal detachment. We found that, by coupling fluid mechanics with structural mechanics, laminar fluid flow and the Bernoulli effect are necessary for a physically consistent explanation of retinal reattachment. Improved fluid outflow and retinal reattachment are found with low fluid viscosity and rapid eye movements. A simulation of saccadic eye movements was more effective in removing sub-retinal fluid than slower, reading speed, eye movements in removing subretinal fluid. The results of our simulations allow us to explain the physical principles behind scleral buckling surgery and provide insight that can be utilized clinically. In particular, we find that rapid eye movements facilitate more rapid retinal reattachment. This is contradictory to the conventional wisdom of attempting to minimize eye movements.

  5. A Comparison of the Mechanisms of Cold- and Microgravity-Induced Fluid Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-10

    endpoint of fluid and electrolyte loss through diuresis and natriuresis . Differences in the responses were also noted, although the data necessary to...SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessarynd..iien.nti., by c blo i("nunber ,. FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP cold, diuresis , microgravity,-w•_ightlessness...rff’dentify by block number)cC The physiological mechanisms involved in the diuresis and overall fluid loss associated with exposure to cold or microgravity

  6. A novel coarsening mechanism of droplets in immiscible fluid mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Ryotaro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    In our daily lives, after shaking a salad dressing, we see the coarsening of oil droplets suspended in vinegar. Such a demixing process is observed everywhere in nature and also of technological importance. For a case of high droplet density, domain coarsening proceeds with interdroplet collisions and the resulting coalescence. This phenomenon has been explained primarily by the so-called Brownian coagulation mechanism: stochastic thermal forces exerted by molecules induce random motion of in...

  7. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  8. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis in perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Buoyancy alters the flow in continuous flow electrophoresis chambers through the mechanism of hydrodynamic instability and, when the instability is supressed by careful cooling of the chamber boundaries, by restructuring the axial flow. The expanded roles of buoyancy follow upon adapting the size of the chamber and the electric field so as to fractionate certain sorts of cell populations. Scale-up problems, hydrodynamic stability and the altered flow fields are discussed to show how phenomena overlooked in the design and operations of narrow-gap devices take on an overwhelming importance in wide-gap chambers

  9. The Effects of Fluid Absorption on the Mechanical Properties of Joint Prostheses Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, David; Viano, Ann

    2010-02-01

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is the material playing the role of cartilage in human prosthetic joints. Wear debris from UHMWPE is a common reason for joint arthroplasty failure, and the exact mechanism responsible for wear remains an area of investigation. In this study, the microstructure of UHMWPE was examined as a function of fluid absorption. Samples with varying exposure to e-beam radiation (as part of the manufacturing process) were soaked for forty days in saline or artificial synovial fluid, under zero or 100 lbs load. Samples were then tensile-tested according to ASTM D-3895. The post-stressed material was then examined by transmission electron microscopy to evaluate the molecular response to stress, which correlates with macroscopic mechanical properties. Three parameters of the crystalline lamellae were measured: thickness, stacking ratio, and alignment to stress direction. Results indicate that fluid absorption does affect the mechanical properties of UHMWPE at both the microscopic and microscopic levels. )

  10. Potential mechanisms of pore-fluid movement from continental lithospheric mantle into upper continental crust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chong-bin; PENG Sheng-lin; LIU Liang-ming; B.E.HOBBS; A.ORD

    2008-01-01

    Through integrating the state of the art scientific knowledge in different research fields, some potential mechanisms of large-scale movements of underground pore-fluids such as H2O and CO2 in the continental lithosphere were presented and discussed. The results show that the generation and propagation of porosity waves are important mechanisms to transport mass and heat fluxes from the continental lithospheric mantle into the lower continental crust; the generation and propagation of porosity waves, pore-fluid flow focusing through lower and middle crustal faults, aclvection of pore-fluids through the lower and middle crust, and whole-crustconvection in some particular cases are important mechanisms to transport mass and heat fluxes from the lower into the upper continental crust; heat and mass transport through convective pore-fluid flow is the most effective mechanism of ore body formation and mineralization in hydrothermal systems; due to heat and mass exchange at the interface between the earth surface, hydrosphere and atmosphere, it is very important to consider the hydro-geological effect of the deep earth pore-fluids such as H2O and CO2 on the global warming and climate change in future investigations.

  11. Fluid Mechanics of Heart Valves and Their Replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Le, Trung Bao; Gilmanov, Anvar

    2016-01-01

    As the pulsatile cardiac blood flow drives the heart valve leaflets to open and close, the flow in the vicinity of the valve resembles a pulsed jet through a nonaxisymmetric orifice with a dynamically changing area. As a result, three-dimensional vortex rings with intricate topology emerge that interact with the complex cardiac anatomy and give rise to shear layers, regions of recirculation, and flow instabilities that could ultimately lead to transition to turbulence. Such complex flow patterns, which are inherently valve- and patient-specific, lead to mechanical forces at scales that can cause blood cell damage and thrombosis, increasing the likelihood of stroke, and can trigger the pathogenesis of various life-threatening valvular heart diseases. We summarize the current understanding of flow phenomena induced by heart valves, discuss their linkage with disease pathways, and emphasize the research advances required to translate in-depth understanding of valvular hemodynamics into effective patient therapies.

  12. A novel coarsening mechanism of droplets in immiscible fluid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ryotaro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-06-16

    In our daily lives, after shaking a salad dressing, we see the coarsening of oil droplets suspended in vinegar. Such a demixing process is observed everywhere in nature and also of technological importance. For a case of high droplet density, domain coarsening proceeds with inter-droplet collisions and the resulting coalescence. This phenomenon has been explained primarily by the so-called Brownian-coagulation mechanism: stochastic thermal forces exerted by molecules induce random motion of individual droplets, causing accidental collisions and subsequent interface-tension-driven coalescence. Contrary to this, here we demonstrate that the droplet motion is not random, but hydrodynamically driven by the composition Marangoni force due to an interfacial tension gradient produced in each droplet as a consequence of composition correlation among droplets. This alters our physical understanding of droplet coarsening in immiscible liquid mixtures on a fundamental level.

  13. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making. PMID:24198613

  14. Fluid mechanics of directional solidification at reduced gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed research is to provide additional groundbased support for the flight experiment 'Casting and Solidification Technology' (CAST). This experiment is to be performed in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) scheduled to be flown on a space shuttle mission scheduled for 1992. In particular, we will provide data on the convective motion and freckle formation during directional solidification of NH4Cl from its aqueous solution at simulated parameter ranges equivalent to reducing the gravity from the sea-level value down to 0.1 g or lower. The secondary objectives of the proposed research are to examine the stability phenomena associated with the onset of freckles and the mechanisms for their subsequent growth and decline (to eventual demise of some) by state-of-the-art imaging techniques and to formulate mathematical models for the prediction of the observed phenomena.

  15. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-04-22

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.

  16. Fluid Mechanics of Capillary-Elastic Instabilities in Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this project is to investigate the closure and reopening of lung airways due to surface tension forces, coupled with airway elasticity. Airways are liquid-lined, flexible tubes and closure of airways can occur by a Rayleigh instability of the liquid lining, or an instability of the elastic support for the airway as the surface tension of the air-liquid interface pulls the tube shut, or both. Regardless of the mechanism, the airway is closed because the liquid lining has created a plug that prevents axial gas exchange. In the microgravity environment, surface tension forces dominate lung mechanics and would lead to more prevalent, and more uniformly distributed air-way closure, thereby creating a potential for respiratory problems for astronauts. Once closed the primary option for reopening an airway is by deep inspiration. This maneuver will pull the flexible airways open and force the liquid plug to flow distally by the incoming air stream. Airway reopening depends to a large extent on this plug flow and how it may lead to plug rupture to regain the continuity of gas between the environment and the alveoli. In addition to mathematical modeling of plug flows in liquid-lined, flexible tubes, this work has involved benchtop studies of propagating liquid plugs down tube networks that mimic the human airway tree. We have extended the work to involve animal models of liquid plug propagation in rat lungs. The liquid is radio-opaque and x-ray video imaging is used to ascertain the movement and distribution of the liquid plugs so that comparisons to theory may be made. This research has other uses, such as the delivery of liquids or drugs into the lung that may be used for surfactant replacement therapy or for liquid ventilation.

  17. Formation and characterization of FeLV iscoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Akerblom; K. Strö mstedt; S. Hö glund; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B. Morein (Bror)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractImmunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) have been prepared from feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) envelope proteins. The ISCOMs were characterized biochemically in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showing the presence of proteins of estimated molecular weights of 15,000, 27,000 and 70,000

  18. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  19. Shape matters: Near-field fluid mechanics dominate the collective motions of ellipsoidal squirmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoya, K; Matsunaga, D; Imai, Y; Omori, T; Ishikawa, T

    2015-12-01

    Microswimmers show a variety of collective motions. Despite extensive study, questions remain regarding the role of near-field fluid mechanics in collective motion. In this paper, we describe precisely the Stokes flow around hydrodynamically interacting ellipsoidal squirmers in a monolayer suspension. The results showed that various collective motions, such as ordering, aggregation, and whirls, are dominated by the swimming mode and the aspect ratio. The collective motions are mainly induced by near-field fluid mechanics, despite Stokes flow propagation over a long range. These results emphasize the importance of particle shape in collective motion.

  20. Fluid-injection and the mechanics of frictional stability of shale-bearing faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, Marco Maria; Collettini, Cristiano; Marone, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for triggering tectonic fault slip and human-induced seismicity. This mechanism is appealing because fluids lubricate the fault and reduce the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. However, current models of earthquake nucleation, based on rate- and state- friction, imply that stable sliding is favored by the increase of pore fluid pressure. Despite this apparent dilemma, there are a few studies on the role of fluid pressure in frictional stability under controlled, laboratory conditions. Here, we describe laboratory experiments on shale fault gouge, conducted in the double direct shear configuration in a true-triaxial machine. To characterize frictional stability and hydrological properties we performed three types of experiments: 1) stable sliding shear experiment to determine the material failure envelope resulting in fault strength of µ=0.28 and fault zone permeability (k 10-19m2); 2) velocity step experiments to determine the rate- and state- frictional properties, characterized by a velocity strengthening behavior with a negative rate parameter b, indicative of stable aseismic creep; 3) creep experiment to study fault slip evolution with increasing pore-fluid pressure. In these creep experiments fault slip history can be divided in three main stages: a) for low fluid pressure the fault is locked and undergoes compaction; b) with increasing fluid pressurization, we observe aseismic creep (i.e. v=0.0001 µm/s) associated with fault dilation, with maintained low permeability; c) As fluid pressure is further increased and we approach the failure criteria fault begins to accelerate, the dilation rate increases causing an increase in permeability. Following the first acceleration we document complex fault slip behavior characterized by periodic accelerations and decelerations with slip velocity that remains slow (i.e. v 200 µm/s), never approaching dynamic slip rates. Surprisingly, this complex

  1. Mechanical Weakening during Fluid Injection in Critically Stressed Sandstones with Acoustic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C.; Dautriat, J. D.; Sarout, J.; Macault, R.; Bertauld, D.

    2014-12-01

    Water weakening is a well-known phenomenon which can lead to subsidence during the production of hydrocarbon reservoirs. The example of the Ekofisk oil field in the North Sea has been well documented for years. In order to assess water weakening effects in reservoir rocks, previous studies have focused on changes in the failure envelopes derived from mechanical tests conducted on rocks saturated either with water or with inert fluids. However, little attention has been paid so far on the mechanical behaviour during the fluid injection stage, like in enhanced oil recovery operations. We studied the effect of fluid injection on the mechanical behaviour of Sherwood sandstone, a weakly-consolidated sandstone sampled at Ladram Bay in UK. In order to highlight possible weakening effects, water and inert oil have been injected into critically-loaded samples to assess their effect on strength and elastic properties and to derive the acoustic signature of the saturation front for each fluid. The specimens were instrumented with 16 ultrasonic P-wave transducers for both passive and active acoustic monitoring during fluid injection and loading. After conducting standard triaxial tests on three samples saturated with air, water and oil respectively, mechanical creep tests were conducted on dry samples loaded at 80% of the compressive strength of the dry rock. While these conditions are kept constant, a fluid is injected at the bottom end of the sample with a low back pressure (0.5 MPa) to minimize effective stress variations during injection. Both water and oil were used as the injected pore fluid in two experiments. As soon as the fluids start to flow into the samples, creep is taking place with a much higher strain rate for water injection compared to oil injection. A transition from secondary creep to tertiary creep is observed in the water injection test whereas in the oil injection test no significant creep acceleration is observed after one pore volume of oil was

  2. Experimental approach and techniques for the evaluation of wet flue gas desulfurization scrubber fluid mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strock, T.W. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States). Research and Development Div.; Gohara, W.F. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Barberton, OH (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fluid mechanics within wet flue desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers involve several complex two-phase gas/liquid interactions. The fluid flow directly affects scrubber pressure drop, mist eliminator water removal, and the SO{sub 2} mass transfer/chemical reaction process. Current industrial efforts to develop cost-effective high-efficiency wet FGD scrubbers are focusing, in part, on optimizing the fluid mechanics. The development of an experimental approach and test facility for understanding and optimizing wet scrubber flow characteristics is discussed in this paper. Specifically, scaling procedures for downsizing a wet scrubber for the laboratory environment with field data comparisons are summarized. Furthermore, experimental techniques for the measurement of wet scrubber flow distribution, pressure drop, spray nozzle droplet size characteristics and wet scrubber liquid-to-gas ratio are discussed. Finally, the characteristics and capabilities of a new hydraulic test facility for wet FGD scrubbers are presented. (author)

  3. 10th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Adrian, R J; Heitor, M V; Maeda, M; Tropea, C; Whitelaw, J H

    2002-01-01

    This volume includes revised and extended versions of selected papers presented at the Tenth International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 10 to 13, 2000. The papers describe instrumentation developments for Velocity, Scalar and Multi-Phase Flows and results of measurements of Turbulent Flows, and Combustion and Engines. The papers demonstrate the continuing and healthy interest in the development of understanding of new methodologies and implementation in terms of new instrumentation. The prime objective of the Tenth Symposium was to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and communicate significant results to fluid mechanics. The application of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research was emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods were also considered where they facilita...

  4. The calculation of mechanical energy loss for incompressible steady pipe flow of homogeneous fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘士和; 薛娇; 范敏

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of the mechanical energy loss is one of the fundamental problems in the field of Hydraulics and Enginee- ring Fluid Mechanics. However, for a non-uniform flow the relation between the mechanical energy loss in a volume of fluid and the kinematical and dynamical characteristics of the flow field is not clearly established. In this paper a new mechanical energy equation for the incompressible steady non-uniform pipe flow of homogeneous fluid is derived, which includes the variation of the mean tur- bulent kinetic energy, and the formula for the calculation of the mechanical energy transformation loss for the non-uniform flow bet- ween two cross sections is obtained based on this equation. This formula can be simplified to the Darcy-Weisbach formula for the uniform flow as widely used in Hydraulics. Furthermore, the contributions of the mechanical energy loss relative to the time avera- ged velocity gradient and the dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy in the turbulent uniform pipe flow are discussed, and the con- tributions of the mechanical energy loss in the viscous sublayer, the buffer layer and the region above the buffer layer for the turbu- lent uniform flow are also analyzed.

  5. Fluid mechanics of human fetal right ventricles from image-based computational fluid dynamics using 4D clinical ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiputra, Hadi; Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Heng, Joel Jia Wei; Guo, Lan; Soomar, Sanah Merchant; Leo, Hwa Liang; Biwas, Arijit; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-12-01

    There are 0.6-1.9% of US children who were born with congenital heart malformations. Clinical and animal studies suggest that abnormal blood flow forces might play a role in causing these malformation, highlighting the importance of understanding the fetal cardiovascular fluid mechanics. We performed computational fluid dynamics simulations of the right ventricles, based on four-dimensional ultrasound scans of three 20-wk-old normal human fetuses, to characterize their flow and energy dynamics. Peak intraventricular pressure gradients were found to be 0.2-0.9 mmHg during systole, and 0.1-0.2 mmHg during diastole. Diastolic wall shear stresses were found to be around 1 Pa, which could elevate to 2-4 Pa during systole in the outflow tract. Fetal right ventricles have complex flow patterns featuring two interacting diastolic vortex rings, formed during diastolic E wave and A wave. These rings persisted through the end of systole and elevated wall shear stresses in their proximity. They were observed to conserve ∼25.0% of peak diastolic kinetic energy to be carried over into the subsequent systole. However, this carried-over kinetic energy did not significantly alter the work done by the heart for ejection. Thus, while diastolic vortexes played a significant role in determining spatial patterns and magnitudes of diastolic wall shear stresses, they did not have significant influence on systolic ejection. Our results can serve as a baseline for future comparison with diseased hearts.

  6. Introducing Innovative Approaches to Learning in Fluid Mechanics: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gynnild, Vidar; Myrhaug, Dag; Pettersen, Bjornar

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the current article is to examine the impact of laboratory demonstrations and computer visualizations on learning in a third-year fluid mechanics course at Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). As a first step, on entering the course, students were exposed to a laboratory demonstration focusing on the nature of…

  7. A variational principle for compressible fluid mechanics: Discussion of the multi-dimensional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozan, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The variational principle for compressible fluid mechanics previously introduced is extended to two dimensional flow. The analysis is stable, exactly conservative, adaptable to coarse or fine grids, and very fast. Solutions for two dimensional problems are included. The excellent behavior and results lend further credence to the variational concept and its applicability to the numerical analysis of complex flow fields.

  8. Introducing Innovative Approaches to Learning in Fluid Mechanics: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gynnild, Vidar; Myrhaug, Dag; Pettersen, Bjornar

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the current article is to examine the impact of laboratory demonstrations and computer visualizations on learning in a third-year fluid mechanics course at Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). As a first step, on entering the course, students were exposed to a laboratory demonstration focusing on the nature of…

  9. Simulation and Analysis of Microneedle for Drug Delivery based on Structural and Fluid Flow Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Neha Mane; Ashok Gaikwad

    2013-01-01

    MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) design systems are used for the development of microneedles, which are used for drug delivery. The drug delivery through micronnedle is painless which is not in case of transdermal needles. In this paper the simulation and analysis of microneedle is presented. The typical structure of a microneedle is simulated for studies of the structural behavior of microneedle and the fluid mechanics of the drug delivery. The studies show that the microneedle with si...

  10. Idiopathic cerebrospinal fluid overproduction: case-based review of the pathophysiological mechanism implied in the cerebrospinal fluid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisi, Gianluca; Frassanito, Paolo; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2014-08-28

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) overproduction results from either CSF infection or choroid plexus hypertrophy or tumor, with only a single idiopathic case described so far. We report a unique case of a male infant with Crouzon syndrome who presented with intracranial hypertension, caused by up to 4-fold increase in CSF daily production. Conditions related to CSF overproduction, namely central nervous system infections and choroid plexus hypertrophy or tumor, were ruled out by repeated magnetic resonance imaging and CSF samples. Medical therapy failed to reduce CSF production and the patient underwent several shunting procedures, cranial expansion, and endoscopic coagulation of the choroid plexus. This article thoroughly reviews pertinent literature on CSF production mechanisms and possible therapeutic implications.

  11. Low-energy degassing mechanisms for a fluid-based radioxenon detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, W.R.; Stuenkel, D.O.; Valentine, J.D. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Industrial and Nuclear Engineering; Gross, K.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Analysis Div.

    1998-09-01

    A method to concentrate heavy noble gases from the atmosphere using certain organic fluids is being developed. To use this technique in a system to monitor the atmosphere for important noble gas fission products (Xe-131, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe-133m, and Xe-135) generated by nuclear testing, the radionuclides captured in the fluid must either be detected in the fluid or degassed. This study presents experimental results for a number of possible degassing methods, including heating bubbling with a purge gas, ultrasonic agitation, vacuum, and combinations thereof. Methods were evaluated for energy and time requirements and dilution of the degas product. Initial experiments indicate that in addition to overcoming the standard desorption process dictated by partial pressures per Henry`s Law, a capture mechanism must also be overcome to degas. Some type of agitation, thermal or mechanical, can be used to release weakly trapped gas atoms from the fluid, while diffusional mass transfer can be enhanced through entrainment with a purge gas or use of a vacuum. Ultrasonic agitation of a thin film in a strong vacuum has been shown to be the most effective method of those tested. Implementation of an efficient degas system, along with an absorption system and radioxenon detector could result in an ultrasensitive fluid-based radioxenon measurement system that is more portable, less expensive, and simpler than charcoal-based systems which use cryogenic techniques.

  12. Mechanical membrane for the separation of a paramagnetic constituent from a fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurice, David

    2017-05-02

    The disclosure provides an apparatus and method for the separation of a paramagnetic component from a mixture using a mechanical membrane apparatus. The mechanical membrane comprises a supporting material having a plurality of pores where each pore is surrounded by a plurality of magnetic regions. The magnetic regions augment a magnetic field on one side of the supporting material while mitigating the field to near zero on the opposite side. In operation, a flow of fluid such as air comprising a paramagnetic component such as O.sub.2 is directed toward the mechanical membrane, and the paramagnetic component is typically attracted toward a magnetic field surrounding a pore while dimagnetic components such as N.sub.2 are generally repelled. As some portion of the fluid passes through the plurality of magnetic apertures to the opposite side of the mechanical membrane, the mechanical membrane generates a fluid enriched in the paramagnetic component. Alternately, the magnetic field may act to repel the paramagnetic component while diamagnetic components such as N.sub.2 are generally unaffected and pass to the opposite side of the mechanical membrane.

  13. Regulation of the immediate-early genes of white spot syndrome virus by Litopenaeus vannamei kruppel-like factor (LvKLF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping-Han; Lu, Shao-Chia; Yang, Shu-Han; Cai, Pei-Si; Lo, Chu-Fang; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2014-10-01

    Kruppel-like factors (KLFs) belong to a subclass of Cys2/His2 zinc-finger DNA-binding proteins, and act as important regulators with diverse roles in cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. Our previous research showed that PmKLF from Penaeus monodon is crucial for white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, yet the mechanisms by which PmKLF influences WSSV infection remain unclear. This study cloned KLF from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvKLF), which had 93% similarity with PmKLF. LvKLF formed a dimer via the C-terminal zinc-finger motif. Knockdown of LvKLF expression by dsRNA injection in WSSV-challenged shrimps was found to significantly inhibit the transcription of two important immediate-early (IE) genes, IE1 and WSSV304, and also reduced WSSV copy numbers. Moreover, reporter assays revealed that the promoter activities of these two WSSV IE genes were substantially enhanced by LvKLF. Mutations introduced in the promoter sequences of IE1 and WSSV304 were shown to abolish LvKLF activation of promoter activities; and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that LvKLF binds to putative KLF-response elements (KRE) in the promoters. Taken together, these results indicate that LvKLF transcriptional regulation of key IE genes is critical to WSSV replication.

  14. Avoided losses on LV networks as a result of microgeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Moises [Escola Superior Tecnologia Viseu, Instituto Politecnico Viseu, Campus Politecnico Repeses, 3504-510 Viseu (Portugal); Matos, Manuel A. [INESC Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2009-04-15

    In the scope of the discussions about microgeneration (and microgrids), the avoided electrical losses are often pointed out as an important value to be credited to those entities. Therefore, methods to assess the impact of microgeneration on losses must be developed in order to support the definition of a suitable regulatory framework for the economic integration of microgeneration on distribution networks. This paper presents an analytical method to quantify the value of avoided losses that microgeneration may produce on LV networks. Intervals of expected avoided losses are used to account for the variation of avoided losses due to the number, size and location of microgenerators, as well as for the kind of load distribution on LV networks. (author)

  15. Conceptual design of two-phase fluid mechanics and heat transfer facility for spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, B. F.; Hill, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Five specific experiments were analyzed to provide definition of experiments designed to evaluate two phase fluid behavior in low gravity. The conceptual design represents a fluid mechanics and heat transfer facility for a double rack in Spacelab. The five experiments are two phase flow patterns and pressure drop, flow boiling, liquid reorientation, and interface bubble dynamics. Hardware was sized, instrumentation and data recording requirements defined, and the five experiments were installed as an integrated experimental package. Applicable available hardware was selected in the experiment design and total experiment program costs were defined.

  16. Novel approach for automatic segmentation of LV endocardium via SPCNN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yurun; Wang, Deyuan; Ma, Yide; Lei, Ruoming; Wang, Kemin

    2017-02-01

    Automatic segmentation of Left Ventricle (LV) is an essential task in the field of computer-aided analysis of cardiac function. In this paper, a simplified pulse coupled neural network (SPCNN) based approach is proposed to segment LV endocardium automatically. Different from the traditional image-driven methods, the SPCNN based approach is independent of the image gray distribution models, which makes it more stable. Firstly, the temporal and spatial characteristics of the cardiac magnetic resonance image are used to extract a region of interest and to locate LV cavity. Then, SPCNN model is iteratively applied with an increasing parameter to segment an optimal cavity. Finally, the endocardium is delineated via several post-processing operations. Quantitative evaluation is performed on the public database provided by MICCAI 2009. Over all studies, all slices, and two phases (end-diastole and end-systole), the average percentage of good contours is 91.02%, the average perpendicular distance is 2.24 mm and the overlapping dice metric is 0.86.These results indicate that the proposed approach possesses high precision and good competitiveness.

  17. A Dynamic and Heuristic Phase Balancing Method for LV Feeders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Taghipour Boroujeni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the single-phase loads and their stochastic behavior, the current in the distribution feeders is not balanced. In addition, the single-phase loads are located in different positions along the LV feeders. So the amount of the unbalanced load and its location affect the feeder losses. An unbalanced load causes the feeder losses and the voltage drop. Because of time-varying behavior of the single-phase loads, phase balancing is a dynamic and combinatorial problem. In this research, a heuristic and dynamic solution for the phase balancing of the LV feeders is proposed. In this method, it is supposed that the loads’ tie could be connected to all phases through a three-phase switch. The aim of the proposed method is to make the feeder conditions as balanced as possible. The amount and the location of single-phase loads are considered in the proposed phase balancing method. Since the proposed method needs no communication interface or no remote controller, it is inexpensive, simple, practical, and robust. Applying this method provides a distributed and dynamic phase balancing control. In addition, the feasibility of reducing the used switches is investigated. The ability of the proposed method in the phase balancing of the LV feeders is approved by carrying out some simulations.

  18. Fluid and solid mechanics in a poroelastic network induced by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Olbricht, William L

    2011-01-04

    We made a theoretical analysis on the fluid and solid mechanics in a poroelastic medium induced by low-power ultrasound. Using a perturbative approach, we were able to linearize the governing equations and obtain analytical solutions. We found that ultrasound could propagate in the medium as a mechanical wave, but would dissipate due to frictional forces between the fluid and the solid phase. The amplitude of the wave depends on the ultrasonic power input. We applied this model to the problem of drug delivery to soft biological tissues by low-power ultrasound and proposed a mechanism for enhanced drug penetration. We have also found the coexistence of two acoustic waves under certain circumstances and pointed out the importance of very accurate experimental determination of the high-frequency properties of brain tissue.

  19. Enhancing the Connection to Undergraduate Engineering Students: A Hands-On and Team-Based Approach to Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tie; Ford, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the integration of innovative hands-on activities within a sophomore-level Fluid Mechanics course at New Mexico Tech. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with emphasis on teaching key equations and methods of analysis for solving real-world problems. Strategies and examples…

  20. Enhancing the Connection to Undergraduate Engineering Students: A Hands-On and Team-Based Approach to Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tie; Ford, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the integration of innovative hands-on activities within a sophomore-level Fluid Mechanics course at New Mexico Tech. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with emphasis on teaching key equations and methods of analysis for solving real-world problems. Strategies and examples…

  1. Fluid load support and contact mechanics of hemiarthroplasty in the natural hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawaskar, Sainath Shrikant; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2011-01-01

    The articular cartilage covering the ends of the bones of diarthrodial synovial joints is thought to have evolved so that the loads are transferred under different and complex conditions, with a very high degree of efficiency and without compromising the structural integrity of the tissue for the life of an individual. These loading conditions stem from different activities such as walking, and standing. The integrity of cartilage may however become compromised due to congenital disease, arthritis or trauma. Hemiarthroplasty is a potentially conservative treatment when only the femoral cartilage is affected as in case of femoral neck fractures. In hemiarthroplasty, a metallic femoral prosthesis is used to articulate against the natural acetabular cartilage. It has also been hypothesized that biphasic lubrication is the predominant mechanism protecting the cartilage through a very high fluid load support which lowers friction. This may be altered due to hemiarthroplasty and have a direct effect on the frictional shear stresses and potentially cartilage degradation and wear. This study modelled nine activities of daily living and investigated the contact mechanics of a hip joint with a hemiarthroplasty, focussing particularly on the role of the fluid phase. It was shown that in most of the activities studied the peak contact stresses and peak fluid pressures were in the superior dome or lateral roof of the acetabulum. Total fluid load support was very high (~90%) in most of the activities which would shield the solid phase from being subjected to very high contact stresses. This was dependent not only on the load magnitude but also the direction and hence on the location of the contact area with respect to the cartilage coverage. Lower fluid load support was found when the contact area was nearer the edges where the fluid drained easily.

  2. Mechanism of Elevated Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Levels in Peritoneal Fluids from Patients with Endometriosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘义; 吕立群

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in peritoneal fluids from patients with endometriosis, macrophages were recovered from peritoneal fluids obtained at the time of diagnostic laparoscopy from infertile women with endometriosis (EMT group, n = 20) and without endometriosis (control group, n = 20). Macrophages were cultured in vitro. The VEGF levels of peritoneal fluid and the supernatant of macrophages culture were determined by enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA). Meanwhile, the eutopic (n = 20) and ectopic endometrium (n=20) from endometriosis patients, and normal edometrium (n=20) from non-endometriosis patients were obtained for the analysis of VEGF expression by labeled Streptavidin Biotin (LSAB). It was found that VEGF levels in peritoneal fluid and macrophages culture supernatant were significantly higher in EMT group than in control group (P<0.01). In normal endometrium, VEGF showed a cyclic changes and similar in eutopic and ectopic endometrium from patients with endometriosis. There was no difference in the intensity of VEGF in endometrium between two groups within each menstrual phase. It is suggested that altered VEGF production by peritoneal macrophages and ectopic endometrium secretion may contribute to the elevated VEGF levels in the peritoneal fluid of patients with endometriosis.

  3. Fluid mechanical proximity effects in high-resolution gravure printing for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Gerd; Scheideler, William J.; Subramanian, Vivek

    2016-11-01

    Gravure printing is a very promising method for printed electronics because it combines high throughput with high resolution. Recently, printed lines with 2 micrometer resolution have been demonstrated at printing speeds on the order of 1m/s. In order to build realistic circuits, the fluid dynamics of complex pattern formation needs to be studied. Recently, we showed that highly-scaled lines printed in close succession exhibit proximity effects that can either improve or deteriorate print quality depending on a number of parameters. It was found that this effect occurs if cells are connected by a thin fluid film. Here, we present further experimental and modeling results explaining the mechanism by which this thin fluid film affects pattern formation. During the transfer of ink from the roll to the substrate, ink can flow in between connected cells. Asymmetry in the fluid distribution created by the preceding doctor blade wiping process results in net fluid flow from cells that transfer first to cells that transfer subsequently. The proximity of these cells thus affects the final ink distribution on the substrate, which is critically important to understand and design optimally when printing highly-scaled patterns of electronic materials. This work is based upon work supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement No. EEC-1160494.

  4. Remote monitoring of the mechanical instability induced by fluid substitution and water weakening in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautriat, Jeremie; Sarout, Joel; David, Christian; Bertauld, Delphine; Macault, Romaric

    2016-12-01

    We studied the effect of fluid injection on the mechanical behaviour of the poorly consolidated and layered Sherwood sandstone under varying stresses, with micro-seismic (MS) monitoring. In order to highlight possible weakening effects, water and inert oil have been injected into critically-loaded samples to assess their effect on strength and elastic properties, derive the ultrasonic signature of the saturation front for each fluid, and the potential development of damage. To this end, the specimens were instrumented with 16 ultrasonic P-wave transducers used for both passive and active monitoring during loading and fluid injection. A first set of injection tests in hydrostatic conditions, using either water or inert oil, has been performed on samples subjected to low confining pressure. Water invasion in the pore space induces a significant decrease of the P-wave velocity, whereas oil invasion shows a velocity increase. The velocity decrease associated with water injection is analysed in terms of attenuation mechanisms and corresponding critical frequencies. A second series of injection tests with the same fluids has been performed during creep tests on critically-loaded samples. The development of mechanical instability inducing micro-seismic activity is observed only when water is injected into the sample. The recorded micro-seismic events are spatially and temporally located thanks to the dedicated velocity models accounting for the initially homogeneous sample anisotropy and for the heterogeneous velocity field associated with fluid migration within the sample. The consistency between the relocated clusters of events and the final damage pattern is verified thanks to X-ray computed tomography images of the samples taken post-mortem.

  5. Thermal Fluid-Solid Interaction Model and Experimental Validation for Hydrostatic Mechanical Face Seals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Weifeng; LIAO Chuanjun; LIU Xiangfeng; SUO Shuangfu; LIU Ying; WANG Yuming

    2014-01-01

    Hydrostatic mechanical face seals for reactor coolant pumps are very important for the safety and reliability of pressurized-water reactor power plants. More accurate models on the operating mechanism of the seals are needed to help improve their performance. The thermal fluid-solid interaction (TFSI) mechanism of the hydrostatic seal is investigated in this study. Numerical models of the flow field and seal assembly are developed. Based on the mechanism for the continuity condition of the physical quantities at the fluid-solid interface, an on-line numerical TFSI model for the hydrostatic mechanical seal is proposed using an iterative coupling method. Dynamic mesh technology is adopted to adapt to the changing boundary shape. Experiments were performed on a test rig using a full-size test seal to obtain the leakage rate as a function of the differential pressure. The effectiveness and accuracy of the TFSI model were verified by comparing the simulation results and experimental data. Using the TFSI model, the behavior of the seal is presented, including mechanical and thermal deformation, and the temperature field. The influences of the rotating speed and differential pressure of the sealing device on the temperature field, which occur widely in the actual use of the seal, are studied. This research proposes an on-line and assembly-based TFSI model for hydrostatic mechanical face seals, and the model is validated by full-sized experiments.

  6. Influence of fluid and volume state on PaO2 oscillations in mechanically ventilated pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenstein, Marc; Bierschock, Stephan; Boehme, Stefan; Wang, Hemei; Vogt, Andreas; Kwiecien, Robert; David, Matthias; Markstaller, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Varying pulmonary shunt fractions during the respiratory cycle cause oxygen oscillations during mechanical ventilation. In artificially damaged lungs, cyclical recruitment of atelectasis is responsible for varying shunt according to published evidence. We introduce a complimentary hypothesis that cyclically varying shunt in healthy lungs is caused by cyclical redistribution of pulmonary perfusion. Administration of crystalloid or colloid infusions would decrease oxygen oscillations if our hypothesis was right. Therefore, n=14 mechanically ventilated healthy pigs were investigated in 2 groups: crystalloid (fluid) versus no-fluid administration. Additional volume interventions (colloid infusion, blood withdrawal) were carried out in each pig. Intra-aortal PaO2 oscillations were recorded using fluorescence quenching technique. Phase shift of oxygen oscillations during altered inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ventilation ratio and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) served as control methods to exclude that recruitment of atelectasis is responsible for oxygen oscillations. In hypovolemia relevant oxygen oscillations could be recorded. Fluid and volume state changed PaO2 oscillations according to our hypothesis. Fluid administration led to a mean decline of 105.3 mmHg of the PaO2 oscillations amplitude (PPaO2 oscillations.

  7. Wavefront sensors for optical diagnostics in fluid mechanics: Application to heated flow, turbulence and droplet evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, D.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Warren, M.E.; Shul, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKechnie, T.S. [POD Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Optical measurement techniques are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because of their non-invasive nature. However, it is often difficult to separate measurement effects due to pressure, temperature and density in real flows. Using a variation of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, we have made density measurements that have extremely large dynamic range coupled with excellent sensitivity at high temporal and spatial resolution. We have examined several classes of flow including volumetrically heated gas, turbulence and droplet evaporation.

  8. Numerical method and analysis of computational fluid mechanics for photoelectric semiconducting detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-rang YUAN; Chang-feng LI; Yun-xin LIU; Li-qin MA

    2009-01-01

    We propose a modified upwind finite difference fractional step scheme for the computational fluid mechanics simulations of a three-dimensional photoelectric semiconductor detector. We obtain the optimal l2-norm error estimates by using the techniques including the calculus of variations, the energy methods, the induction hypothesis, and a priori estimates. The proposed scheme is successfully applied to the simulation of the photoelectric semiconductor detectors.

  9. Adaptive implicit-explicit finite element algorithms for fluid mechanics problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.

    1988-01-01

    The adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE) approach is presented for the finite-element solution of various problems in computational fluid mechanics. In the AIE approach, the elements are dynamically (adaptively) arranged into differently treated groups. The differences in treatment could be based on considerations such as the cost efficiency, the type of spatial or temporal discretization employed, the choice of field equations, etc. Several numerical tests are performed to demonstrate that this approach can achieve substantial savings in CPU time and memory.

  10. 77 FR 21620 - Notice of the Buy America Waiver Request for Vossloh 101-LV Concrete Ties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Notice of the Buy America Waiver Request for Vossloh 101-LV Concrete Ties... requirements for the purchase of Vossloh 101-LV concrete ties, which contain certain components not... consist of the installation of Vossloh 101-LV concrete ties. FRA has received this request from the four...

  11. Regulation of amniotic fluid volume: mathematical model based on intramembranous transport mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Robert A; Anderson, Debra F; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2014-11-15

    Experimentation in late-gestation fetal sheep has suggested that regulation of amniotic fluid (AF) volume occurs primarily by modulating the rate of intramembranous transport of water and solutes across the amnion into underlying fetal blood vessels. In order to gain insight into intramembranous transport mechanisms, we developed a computer model that allows simulation of experimentally measured changes in AF volume and composition over time. The model included fetal urine excretion and lung liquid secretion as inflows into the amniotic compartment plus fetal swallowing and intramembranous absorption as outflows. By using experimental flows and solute concentrations for urine, lung liquid, and swallowed fluid in combination with the passive and active transport mechanisms of the intramembranous pathway, we simulated AF responses to basal conditions, intra-amniotic fluid infusions, fetal intravascular infusions, urine replacement, and tracheoesophageal occlusion. The experimental data are consistent with four intramembranous transport mechanisms acting in concert: 1) an active unidirectional bulk transport of AF with all dissolved solutes out of AF into fetal blood presumably by vesicles; 2) passive bidirectional diffusion of solutes, such as sodium and chloride, between fetal blood and AF; 3) passive bidirectional water movement between AF and fetal blood; and 4) unidirectional transport of lactate into the AF. Further, only unidirectional bulk transport is dynamically regulated. The simulations also identified areas for future study: 1) identifying intramembranous stimulators and inhibitors, 2) determining the semipermeability characteristics of the intramembranous pathway, and 3) characterizing the vesicles that are the primary mediators of intramembranous transport.

  12. "Audacity or Precision": The Paradoxes of Henri Villat's Fluid Mechanics in Interwar France

    CERN Document Server

    David, Aubin

    2011-01-01

    In Interwar France, Henri Villat became the true leader of theoretical researches on fluid mechanics. Most of his original work was done before the First World War; it was highly theoretical and its applicability was questioned. After having organized the first post-WWI International Congress of Mathematicians in 1920, Villat became the editor of the famous Journal de math\\'ematiques pure et appliqu\\'es and the director of the influential book series "M\\'emorial des sciences math\\'ematiques." From 1929 on, he held the fluid mechanics chair established by the Air Ministry at the Sorbonne in Paris and was heading the government's critical effort invested in fluid mechanics. However, while both his wake theory and his turbulence theory seemingly had little success outside France or in the aeronautical industry (except in the eyes of his students), applied mathematics was despised by the loud generation of Bourbaki mathematicians coming of age in the mid 1930s. How are we to understand the contrasted assessments ...

  13. Turbulent particle transport in streams: can exponential settling be reconciled with fluid mechanics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, James N; Newbold, J Denis

    2012-05-07

    Most ecological studies of particle transport in streams that focus on fine particulate organic matter or benthic invertebrates use the Exponential Settling Model (ESM) to characterize the longitudinal pattern of particle settling on the bed. The ESM predicts that if particles are released into a stream, the proportion that have not yet settled will decline exponentially with transport time or distance and will be independent of the release elevation above the bed. To date, no credible basis in fluid mechanics has been established for this model, nor has it been rigorously tested against more-mechanistic alternative models. One alternative is the Local Exchange Model (LEM), which is a stochastic advection-diffusion model that includes both longitudinal and vertical spatial dimensions and is based on classical fluid mechanics. The LEM predicts that particle settling will be non-exponential in the near field but will become exponential in the far field, providing a new theoretical justification for far-field exponential settling that is based on plausible fluid mechanics. We review properties of the ESM and LEM and compare these with available empirical evidence. Most evidence supports the prediction of both models that settling will be exponential in the far field but contradicts the ESM's prediction that a single exponential distribution will hold for all transport times and distances.

  14. Computational modelling of the mechanics of trabecular bone and marrow using fluid structure interaction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, E; Grogan, J A; Niebur, G L; McNamara, L M; McHugh, P E

    2013-04-01

    Bone marrow found within the porous structure of trabecular bone provides a specialized environment for numerous cell types, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Studies have sought to characterize the mechanical environment imposed on MSCs, however, a particular challenge is that marrow displays the characteristics of a fluid, while surrounded by bone that is subject to deformation, and previous experimental and computational studies have been unable to fully capture the resulting complex mechanical environment. The objective of this study was to develop a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model of trabecular bone and marrow to predict the mechanical environment of MSCs in vivo and to examine how this environment changes during osteoporosis. An idealized repeating unit was used to compare FSI techniques to a computational fluid dynamics only approach. These techniques were used to determine the effect of lower bone mass and different marrow viscosities, representative of osteoporosis, on the shear stress generated within bone marrow. Results report that shear stresses generated within bone marrow under physiological loading conditions are within the range known to stimulate a mechanobiological response in MSCs in vitro. Additionally, lower bone mass leads to an increase in the shear stress generated within the marrow, while a decrease in bone marrow viscosity reduces this generated shear stress.

  15. Voltage rise mitigation for solar PV integration at LV grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guangya; Marra, Francesco; Juamperez Goñi, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Solar energy from photovoltaic (PV) is among the fastest developing renewable energy systems worldwide. Driven by governmental subsidies and technological development, Europe has seen a fast expansion of solar PV in the last few years. Among the installed PV plants, most of them are situated...... at the distribution systems and bring various operational challenges such as power quality and power flow management. The paper discusses the modelling requirements for PV system integration studies, as well as the possible techniques for voltage rise mitigation at low voltage (LV) grids for increasing PV penetration...

  16. Simulation and Analysis of Microneedle for Drug Delivery based on Structural and Fluid Flow Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Mane

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System design systems are used for the development of microneedles, which are used for drug delivery. The drug delivery through micronnedle is painless which is not in case of transdermal needles. In this paper the simulation and analysis of microneedle is presented. The typical structure of a microneedle is simulated for studies of the structural behavior of microneedle and the fluid mechanics of the drug delivery. The studies show that the microneedle with silicon material can withstand the physical conditions also drugs of various viscosities with various velocities can be delivered successfully.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical Characteristics of Dropped Eggs Based on Fluid-Solid Coupling Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Song Haiyan; Wang Fang; Zhang Jianguo; Zhang Yinong; Yang Shugang

    2017-01-01

    It is important to study the properties and mechanics of egg drop impacts in order to reduce egg loss during processing and logistics and to provide a basis for the protective packaging of egg products. In this paper, we present the results of our study of the effects of the structural parameters on the mechanical properties of an egg using a finite element model of the egg. Based on Fluid-Solid coupling theory, a finite element model of an egg was constructed using ADINA, a finite element ca...

  18. Fluid mechanics of electroosmotic flow and its effect on band broadening in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2004-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) usually accompanies electrophoretic migration of charged species in capillary electrophoresis unless special precautions are taken to suppress it. The presence of the EOF provides certain advantages in separations. It is an alternative to mechanical pumps, which are inefficient and difficult to build at small scales, for transporting reagents and analytes on microfluidic chips. The downside is that any imperfection that distorts the EOF profile reduces the separation efficiency. In this paper, the basic facts about EOF are reviewed from the perspective of fluid mechanics and its effect on separations in free solution capillary zone electrophoresis is discussed in the light of recent advances.

  19. Electrification of particulate entrained fluid flows-Mechanisms, applications, and numerical methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Gu, Zhaolin

    2015-10-01

    Particulates in natural and industrial flows have two basic forms: liquid (droplet) and solid (particle). Droplets would be charged in the presence of the applied electric field (e.g. electrospray). Similar to the droplet charging, particles can also be charged under the external electric field (e.g. electrostatic precipitator), while in the absence of external electric field, tribo-electrostatic charging is almost unavoidable in gas-solid two-phase flows due to the consecutive particle contacts (e.g. electrostatic in fluidized bed or wind-blown sand). The particle charging may be beneficial, or detrimental. Although electrostatics in particulate entrained fluid flow systems have been so widely used and concerned, the mechanisms of particulate charging are still lack of a thorough understanding. The motivation of this review is to explore a clear understanding of particulate charging and movement of charged particulate in two-phase flows, by summarizing the electrification mechanisms, physical models of particulate charging, and methods of charging/charged particulate entrained fluid flow simulations. Two effective methods can make droplets charged in industrial applications: corona charging and induction charging. The droplet charge to mass ratio by corona charging is more than induction discharge. The particle charging through collisions could be attributed to electron transfer, ion transfer, material transfer, and/or aqueous ion shift on particle surfaces. The charges on charged particulate surface can be measured, nevertheless, the charging process in nature or industry is difficult to monitor. The simulation method might build a bridge of investigating from the charging process to finally charged state on particulate surface in particulate entrained fluid flows. The methodology combining the interface tracking under the action of the applied electric with the fluid flow governing equations is applicable to the study of electrohydrodynamics problems. The charge

  20. Fluid-structure interaction including volumetric coupling with homogenised subdomains for modeling respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Lena; Roth, Christian J; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-04-01

    In this article, a novel approach is presented for combining standard fluid-structure interaction with additional volumetric constraints to model fluid flow into and from homogenised solid domains. The proposed algorithm is particularly interesting for investigations in the field of respiratory mechanics as it enables the mutual coupling of airflow in the conducting part and local tissue deformation in the respiratory part of the lung by means of a volume constraint. In combination with a classical monolithic fluid-structure interaction approach, a comprehensive model of the human lung can be established that will be useful to gain new insights into respiratory mechanics in health and disease. To illustrate the validity and versatility of the novel approach, three numerical examples including a patient-specific lung model are presented. The proposed algorithm proves its capability of computing clinically relevant airflow distribution and tissue strain data at a level of detail that is not yet achievable, neither with current imaging techniques nor with existing computational models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The interior working mechanism and temperature characteristics of a fluid based micro-vibration isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Zhao, Shougen; Wu, Dafang; Jing, Xingjian

    2016-01-01

    Micro-vibration isolation is a hot topic in spacecraft vibration control, and fluid based vibration isolators alternatively provide a good and reliable solution to this challenging issue. In this paper, a novel fluid based micro-vibration isolator (FBMVI) is investigated. According to its inherent working principle and deformation pattern, the generation mechanisms of the damping and stiffness characteristics are derived, which are nonlinear functions of the environmental temperature. Then a lumped parameter model which is expressed by the physical design parameters (PDPs) is constructed, and the corresponding performance objective indices (POIs) are also obtained by applying the equivalence of mechanical impedance. Based on the finite element analysis of the internal damping component, a single variable method is further adopted to carry out the parametric study, and the influences of each PDP on the POIs are analyzed in details. Finally, experiments are conducted to identify the variation of fluid bulk modulus with the outside environmental temperature, and to validate the performance of the isolator under different temperature environments. The tested results show great consistence compared with the predicted tendencies of the parametric study. The results of this study can provide a very useful insight into and/or an important guidance for the design and application of this type of FBMVIs in engineering practice.

  2. The anti-apoptotic effect of fluid mechanics preconditioning by cells membrane and mitochondria in rats brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shan; Zhu, Fengping; Hu, Ruiping; Tian, Song; Chen, Xingxing; Lou, Dan; Cao, Bing; Chen, Qiulei; Li, Bai; Li, Fang; Bai, Yulong; Wu, Yi; Zhu, Yulian

    2017-10-05

    Exercise preconditioning is a simple and effective way to prevent ischemia. This paper further provided the mechanism in hemodynamic aspects at the cellular level. To study the anti-apoptotic effects of fluid mechanics preconditioning, Cultured rats brain microvascular endothelial cells were given fluid intervention in a parallel plate flow chamber before oxygen glucose deprivation. It showed that fluid mechanics preconditioning could inhibit the apoptosis of endothelial cells, and this process might be mediated by the shear stress activation of Tie-2 on cells membrane surface and Bcl-2 on the mitochondria surface. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The mechanism for large-volume fluid pumping via reversible snap-through of dielectric elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Wang, Yingxi; Foo, Choon Chiang; Godaba, Hareesh; Zhu, Jian; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2017-08-01

    Giant deformation of dielectric elastomers (DEs) via electromechanical instability (or the "snap-through" phenomenon) is a promising mechanism for large-volume fluid pumping. Snap-through of a DE membrane coupled with compressible air has been previously investigated. However, the physics behind reversible snap-through of a DE diaphragm coupled with incompressible fluid for the purpose of fluid pumping has not been well investigated, and the conditions required for reversible snap-through in a hydraulic system are unknown. In this study, we have proposed a concept for large-volume fluid pumping by harnessing reversible snap-through of the dielectric elastomer. The occurrence of snap-through was theoretically modeled and experimentally verified. Both the theoretical and experimental pressure-volume curves of the DE membrane under different actuation voltages were used to design the work loop of the pump, and the theoretical work loop agreed with the experimental work loop. Furthermore, the feasibility of reversible snap-through was experimentally verified, and specific conditions were found necessary for this to occur, such as a minimum actuation voltage, an optimal range of hydraulic pressure exerted on the DE membrane and a suitable actuation frequency. Under optimal working conditions, we demonstrated a pumping volume of up to 110 ml per cycle, which was significantly larger than that without snap-through. Furthermore, we have achieved fluid pumping from a region of low pressure to another region of high pressure. Findings of this study would be useful for real world applications such as the blood pump.

  4. Biofluid mechanics of special organs and the issue of system control. Sixth International Bio-Fluid Mechanics Symposium and Workshop, March 28-30, 2008 Pasadena, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Mair; Moore, James E; Fujioka, Hideki; Gaver, Donald P

    2010-03-01

    In the field of fluid flow within the human body, focus has been placed on the transportation of blood in the systemic circulation since the discovery of that system; but, other fluids and fluid flow phenomena pervade the body. Some of the most fascinating fluid flow phenomena within the human body involve fluids other than blood and a service other than transport--the lymphatic and pulmonary systems are two striking examples. While transport is still involved in both cases, this is not the only service which they provide and blood is not the only fluid involved. In both systems, filtration, extraction, enrichment, and in general some "treatment" of the fluid itself is the primary function. The study of the systemic circulation has also been conventionally limited to treating the system as if it were an open-loop system governed by the laws of fluid mechanics alone, independent of physiological controls and regulations. This implies that system failures can be explained fully in terms of the laws of fluid mechanics, which of course is not the case. In this paper we examine the clinical implications of these issues and of the special biofluid mechanics issues involved in the lymphatic and pulmonary systems.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of the Lubrucating Function of the Synovial Fluid Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Antonov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The author in his review presents up-to-date information, concerning the composition and properties of human synovial fluid with an emphasis on detailed description of the molecular mechanisms of the lubricating function control. Three main groups of molecules: (surface-active phospholipids (1, hyaluronic acid (2, and proteins group SZP/lubricine (3, were described in synovial fluid being able to support lubrication; the latter group was considered as the main biopolymers, ensuring the boundary lubrication. On author’s opinion, the modern practice of viscosupplementation is not fully functional, since it did not restore the function of the boundary lubrication, lost in the osteoarthritis progression. Besides the need to correct the composition of current drugs for viscosupplementary therapy, the ensuring of lubricating properties of tissue engineering constructs and media to grow cartilage tissue was in vitro attributed to the practical tasks of joints regenerative biomedicine.

  6. Suppression mechanism of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in compressible fluid flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mona; Girimaji, Sharath S

    2016-04-01

    The transformative influence of compressibility on the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) at the interface between two fluid streams of different velocities is explicated. When the velocity difference is small (subsonic), shear effects dominate the interface flow dynamics causing monotonic roll-up of vorticity and mixing between the two streams leading to the KHI. We find that at supersonic speed differentials, compressibility forces the dominance of dilatational (acoustic) rather than shear dynamics at the interface. Within this dilatational interface layer, traveling pressure waves cause the velocity perturbations to become oscillatory. We demonstrate that the oscillatory fluid motion reverses vortex roll-up and segregates the two streams leading to KHI suppression. Analysis and illustrations of the compressibility-induced suppression mechanism are presented.

  7. Extrema principles of entropy production and energy dissipation in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Karamcheti, Krishnamurty

    1988-01-01

    A survey is presented of several extrema principles of energy dissipation as applied to problems in fluid mechanics. An exact equation is derived for the dissipation function of a homogeneous, isotropic, Newtonian fluid, with terms associated with irreversible compression or expansion, wave radiation, and the square of the vorticity. By using entropy extrema principles, simple flows such as the incompressible channel flow and the cylindrical vortex are identified as minimal dissipative distributions. The principal notions of stability of parallel shear flows appear to be associated with a maximum dissipation condition. These different conditions are consistent with Prigogine's classification of thermodynamic states into categories of equilibrium, linear nonequilibrium, and nonlinear nonequilibrium thermodynamics; vortices and acoustic waves appear as examples of dissipative structures. The measurements of a typical periodic shear flow, the rectangular wall jet, show that direct measurements of the dissipative terms are possible.

  8. Extrema principles of entrophy production and energy dissipation in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Karamcheti, Krishnamurty

    1988-01-01

    A survey is presented of several extrema principles of energy dissipation as applied to problems in fluid mechanics. An exact equation is derived for the dissipation function of a homogeneous, isotropic, Newtonian fluid, with terms associated with irreversible compression or expansion, wave radiation, and the square of the vorticity. By using entropy extrema principles, simple flows such as the incompressible channel flow and the cylindrical vortex are identified as minimal dissipative distributions. The principal notions of stability of parallel shear flows appears to be associated with a maximum dissipation condition. These different conditions are consistent with Prigogine's classification of thermodynamic states into categories of equilibrium, linear nonequilibrium, and nonlinear nonequilibrium thermodynamics; vortices and acoustic waves appear as examples of dissipative structures. The measurements of a typical periodic shear flow, the rectangular wall jet, show that direct measurements of the dissipative terms are possible.

  9. Fluid mechanics for mechanical engineering. Technology and examples. 2. ed.; Stroemungslehre fuer den Maschinenbau. Technik und Beispiele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siekmann, Helmut E.; Thamsen, Paul Uwe [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fluidsystemtechnik - Stroemungstechnik in Maschinen und Anlagen

    2009-07-01

    Detailed information on turbomachinery; Practical examples as learning aids; Compact presentation with good text and picture quality; Ideal for self-studies and for university teaching. This practically oriented information on the fundamentals of fluid mechanics addresses engineers and students of the engineering sciences, physics, and application-oriented mathematics. The many practical examples are useful for producers and users of the fluid mechanics industry. The text is structured in the same manner as in the 'Grundlagen' volume: Hydrostatics, kinematics, momentum law, Navier-Stokes equation of motion, potential flow, eddy flow, boundary layer flow, turbulent flow. The book closes with information on tube flow, flow around bodies, similarity laws, and numeric flow calculation. This the second, revised and edited edition. (orig.) [German] - Fuer gruendliche Kenntnisse von Stroemungsmaschinen - Praxisbeispiele als Lernhilfen - Kompakte Darstellung in hoher Text- und Bildqualitaet - Ideal zum Selbststudium und fuer die Vorlesung Diese anwendungsbezogene Vertiefung der Themen aus den Grundlagen der Stroemunglehre wendet sich an Ingenieure und Studenten der Ingenieurwissenschaften, Physik und anwendungsorientierten Mathematik. Die zahlreichen Praxisbeispiele sind hilfreich fuer Hersteller und Anwender aus vorwiegend stroemungstechnischer Industrie. Die Einteilung der Kapitel entspricht im Wesentlichen der im Band Grundlagen: Hydrostatik, Kinematik, Impulssatz, NAVIER-STOKES-Bewegungsgleichung, Potential-, Wirbel- und Grenzschichtstroemung sowie turbulente Stroemung. Das Buch schliesst mit Darstellungen ueber Rohrstroemungen, Umstroemung von Koerpern, Aehnlichkeitsgesetzen und numerische Stroemungsberechnung. Die 2. Auflage wurde aktualisiert und korrigiert. (orig.)

  10. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis of an Undulatory Mechanical Fin Driven by Shape Memory Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Hua Zhang; Jian-Hui He; Jie Yang; Shi-Wu Zhang; Kin Huat Low

    2006-01-01

    Many fishes use undulatory fin to propel themselves in the underwater environment. These locomotor mechanisms have a popular interest to many researchers. In the present study, we perform a three-dimensional unsteady computation of an undulatory mechanical fin that is driven by Shape Memory Alloy (SMA). The objective of the computation is to investigate the fluid dynamics of force production associated with the undulatory mechanical fin. An unstructured,grid-based, unsteady Navier-Stokes solver with automatic adaptive remeshing is used to compute the unsteady flow around the fin through five complete cycles. The pressure distribution on fin surface is computed and integrated to provide fin forces which are decomposed into lift and thrust. The velocity field is also computed throughout the swimming cycle. Finally, a comparison is conducted to reveal the dynamics of force generation according to the kinematic parameters of the undulatory fin (amplitude, frequency and wavelength).

  11. Immiscibility of high salinity fluids in volcanic rocks and the mechanism of magma degassing in the Dongying sag, eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong; ZHOU Yaoqi; XIAO Huanqin; REN Yongjun; SUN Xinian; WANG Qiang; YAN Shiyong; LIU Chaoying

    2007-01-01

    Fluid inclusions that bear halite daughter min- erals were discovered in volcanic rocks at Pingnan area in the Dongying sag. The samples of the fluid inclusions collected from the BGX-15 well drill cores are hosted in quartz of diorite-porphyrite. The daughter minerals are identified as NaCl crystals after being observed under a microscope and analyzed by in situ Raman spectroscopy at -185℃. The results of micro-thermal analysis show that the homogeniza- tion temperatures of primary fluid inclusions are between 359 and 496℃, and the salinities of fluid inclusions are from 43.26 to 54.51 wt-%. All fluid inclusions in the studied sam- ples can be divided into five types including primary fluid inclusions and secondary fluid inclusions. The fact that five types of fluid inclusions were symbiotic in the same quartz grain implies that immiscibility happened in magma. Due to the decrease in temperature and pressure during the ascent of magma, the fluids became intensively immiscible. This pro- cess accelerates the degassing of CO2 from magma, but the remnant fluids with high salinity are preserved in fluid inclu- sions. Thus, the primary fluid inclusions are mainly in NaCl- H2O fluids and poor in CO2. The results of our study indicate that the degassing of magma and accumulation of CO2 gas at the Pingnan area are relative to the immiscibility of high salinity fluids. This discovery is important because it can help us have a further understanding of the mechanism of magma degassing and accumulation of the inorganic CO2 in eastern China.

  12. Stigmatic fluid aids self-pollination in Roscoea debilis (Zingiberaceae): a new delayed selfing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yong-Li; Li, Qing-Jun

    2012-10-01

    Delayed selfing is the predominant mode of autonomous self-pollination in flowering plants. However, few delayed selfing mechanisms have been documented. This research aims to explore a new delayed selfing mechanism induced by stigmatic fluid in Roscoea debilis, a small perennial ginger. Floral biology and flower visitors were surveyed. The capacity of autonomous selfing was evaluated by pollinator exclusion. The timing of autonomous selfing was estimated by emasculation at different flowering stages. The number of seeds produced from insect-pollination was assessed by emasculation and exposure to pollinators in the natural population. The breeding system was also tested by pollination manipulations. Autonomous self-pollination occurred after flowers wilted. The stigmatic fluid formed a globule on the stigma on the third day of flowering. The enlarged globule seeped into the nearby pollen grains on the fourth flowering day, thus inducing pollen germination. Pollen tubes then elongated and penetrated the stigma. Hand-selfed flowers produced as many seeds as hand-crossed flowers. There was no significant difference in seed production between pollinator-excluded flowers and hand-selfed flowers. When emasculated flowers were exposed to pollinators, they produced significantly fewer seeds than intact flowers. Visits by effective pollinators were rare. This study describes a new form of delayed autonomous self-pollination. As the predominant mechanism of sexual reproduction in R. debilis, delayed self-pollination ensures reproduction when pollinators are scarce.

  13. The Fluid Mechanics of the Bible: Miracles Explainable by Christian Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Amy

    2015-11-01

    The Bible is full of accounts clearly in violation of our scientific understanding of fluid mechanics. Examples include the floating axe head, Jesus walking on the water and immediately calming a storm. ``Jesus of Nazareth was the most scientific man that ever trod the globe. He plunged beneath the material surface of things, and found the spiritual cause,'' wrote Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910), the founder of a now well-established religion known as Christian Science, in her seminal work Science & Health with Key to the Scriptures. She asserted that Jesus' miracles were in accord with the, ``Science of God's unchangeable law.'' She also proclaimed that matter is a derivative of consciousness. Independently with the discovery of quantum mechanics, physicists such as Max Planck and Sir James Jeans began to make similar statements (``The Mental Universe'', Nature, 2005). More recently, Max Tegmark (MIT) theorized that consciousness is a state of matter (New Scientist, April 2014). Using a paradigm shift from matter to consciousness as the primary substance, one can scientifically explain how a mental activity (i.e. prayer) could influence the physical. Since this conference is next door to the original church of Christian Science (Const. 1894), this talk will discuss various fluid-mechanic miracles in the Bible and provide an explanation based on divine metaphysics while providing an overview of scientific Christianity and its unifying influence to the fields of science, theology and medicine.

  14. Static and Dynamic Mechanical Behavior of Hydroxyapatite-Polyacrylic Acid Composites Under Simulated Body Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana S. Katti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have investigated mechanical response of hydroxyapatite/polyacrylic composites under dry, wet and simulated body fluid conditions. Hydroxyapatite (HAP is mineralized under two conditions; one, in presence of polyacrylic acid (in situ HAP, second, in absence of polyacrylic acid (ex situ HAP. Further, in situ and ex situ HAP are mixed with polyacrylic acid to make HAP/PAAc composites. Interfacial interactions between PAAc and HAP have been studied using photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (PAS-FTIR. The mechanical response of the composites under wet condition is studied by soaking composite samples in simulated body fluid (SBF. Under wet conditions, SBF and water weaken the HAP-HAP interface significantly. PAS-FTIR data suggests that PAAc attaches to HAP through the dissociated carboxylate groups. The water and SBF soaked samples showed creep-like behavior and exhibit large residual strain after unloading. Loading under different strain rates has significant effect on mechanical properties of these composites. Both in situ and ex situ 70:30 composites exhibit highest elastic modulus at strain rate of 0.01 sec-1. XRD study indicates formation of Ca2P2O7 phase in ex situ composite after soaking in SBF and water for 3 hours, whereas in situ composites showed presence of only hydroxyapatite phase after soaking in SBF and water for same duration of time.

  15. AFM studies of cellular mechanics during osteogenic differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, Pan; Chen, Jia-Nan; Cai, Ji-Ye; Cai, Xiao-Fang; Ding, Hui; Pan, Yun-Long

    2010-01-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are becoming an important source of cells for regenerative medicine given with apparent advantages of accessibility, renewal capacity and multipotentiality. In this study, the mechanical properties of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs), such as the average Young's modulus, were determined by atomic force microscopy (3.97 ± 0.53 kPa for hAFSCs vs. 1.52 ± 0.63 kPa for fully differentiated osteoblasts). These differences in cell elasticity result primarily from differential actin cytoskeleton organization in these two cell types. Furthermore, ultrastructures, nanostructural details on the surface of cell, were visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was clearly shown that surface of osteoblasts were covered by mineralized particles, and the histogram of particles size showed that most of the particles on the surface of osteoblasts distributed from 200 to 400 nm in diameter, while the diameter of hAFSCs particles ranged from 100 to 200 nm. In contrast, there were some dips on the surface of hAFSCs, and particles were smaller than that of osteoblasts. Additionally, as osteogenic differentiation of hAFSCs progressed, more and more stress fibers were replaced by a thinner actin network which is characteristic of mature osteoblasts. These results can improve our understanding of the mechanical properties of hAFSCs during osteogenic differentiation. AFM can be used as a powerful tool for detecting ultrastructures and mechanical properties.

  16. Coupled thermal-fluid-mechanics analysis of twin roll casting of A7075 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Soo; Kim, Hyoung-Wook; Cho, Jae-Hyung; Chun, Se-Hwan

    2017-09-01

    Better understanding of temperature distribution and roll separation force during twin roll casting of aluminum alloys is critical to successfully fabricate good quality of aluminum strips. Therefore, the simulation techniques are widely applied to understand the twin roll casting process in a comprehensive way and to reduce the experimental time and cost of trial and error. However, most of the conventional approaches are considered thermally coupled flow, or thermally coupled mechanical behaviors. In this study, a fully coupled thermal-fluid-mechanical analysis of twin roll casting of A7075 aluminum strips was carried out using the finite element method. Temperature profile, liquid fraction and metal flow of aluminum strips with different thickness were predicted. Roll separation force and roll temperatures were experimentally obtained from a pilot-scale twin roll caster, and those results were compared with model predictions. Coupling the fluid of the liquid melt to the thermal and mechanical modeling reasonably predicted roll temperature distribution and roll separation force during twin roll casting.

  17. Fluid mechanics of additive manufacturing of metal objects by accretion of droplets – a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesař Václav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents a survey of principles of additive manufacturing of metal objects by accretion of molten metal droplets, focusing on fluid-mechanical problems that deserve being investigated. The main problem is slowness of manufacturing due to necessarily small size of added droplets. Increase of droplet repetition rate calls for basic research of the phenomena that take place inside and around the droplets: ballistics of their flight, internal flowfield with heat and mass transfer, oscillation of surfaces, and the ways to elimination of satellite droplets.

  18. An Approximate Solution for Boundary Value Problems in Structural Engineering and Fluid Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Variational iteration method (VIM is applied to solve linear and nonlinear boundary value problems with particular significance in structural engineering and fluid mechanics. These problems are used as mathematical models in viscoelastic and inelastic flows, deformation of beams, and plate deflection theory. Comparison is made between the exact solutions and the results of the variational iteration method (VIM. The results reveal that this method is very effective and simple, and that it yields the exact solutions. It was shown that this method can be used effectively for solving linear and nonlinear boundary value problems.

  19. On The Analysis of Labyrinth Seal Flow Induced Vibration by Oscillating Fluid Mechanics Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenZuoyi; JingYouhao; 等

    1994-01-01

    A numerical model and a solution method to analyze the labyrinth seal flow induced vibration by Oscillating Fluid Mechanics Method(OFMM) are presented in this paper,including the basic equations and solution procedure to determine the oscillating velocity,pressure and the dynamic characteristic coefficients of Labyrinth seal such as the stiffness coefficients and damping coefficients.The results show that this method has the advantages of both less time consuming and high accuracy.In addition it can be applied to the field diagnosis of the vibration of the axis of turbomachinery system.

  20. Spectral methods and their implementation to solution of aerodynamic and fluid mechanic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streett, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    Fundamental concepts underlying spectral collocation methods, especially pertaining to their use in the solution of partial differential equations, are outlined. Theoretical accuracy results are reviewed and compared with results from test problems. A number of practical aspects of the construction and use of spectral methods are detailed, along with several solution schemes which have found utility in applications of spectral methods to practical problems. Results from a few of the successful applications of spectral methods to problems of aerodynamic and fluid mechanic interest are then outlined, followed by a discussion of the problem areas in spectral methods and the current research under way to overcome these difficulties.

  1. Tectonic "short circuit" of sub-horizontal fluid-saturated bodies as a possible mechanism of the earthquake

    CERN Document Server

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    An alternative earthquake mechanism is proposed. The traditional stress mechanism of fracture formation assigned a support role. As a proximate cause of the earthquake the destruction of the roofs of sub-horizontal fluid-saturated bodies (SHFB) is considered. This collapse may occur due to redistribution of fluid pressure within the system of SHFB connected by cracks (tectonic or other nature). It can cause both shifts of rock blocks contributing to seismic shocks and various effects characteristic of foreshocks and aftershocks.

  2. Deformation Mechanisms and Safe Drilling Fluids Density in Extremely Thick Salt Formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Henglin; Chen Mian; Zhang Guangqing

    2007-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are very often associated with salt structures. The oil and gas industry is often required to drill along and through long salt sections to reach and recover hydrocarbons. The unique physical properties of salt require special techniques to ensure borehole stability and adequate casing design. This paper assumed that the mechanical behavior of salt is regulated by the magnitude of mean stress and octahedral shear stress and under the influence of different stress conditions,the deformation of rock salt can be represented by three domains, i.e. compression domain, volume unchanged domain, and dilatancy domain, which are separated by a stress dependent boundary. In the compression domain, the volume of salt decreases until all microcracks are closed, with only elastic deformation and pure creep; in the volume unchanged domain the deformation is considered steady incompressible flow controlled by pure creep; and in the dilatancy domain the volume of salt increases during deformation due to micro-cracking, causing damage and accelerating "creep" until failure. This paper presents a hypothesis that the borehole is stable only when the magnitude of octahedral shear stress is below the dilatancy boundary. It gives the design method for determining drilling fluids density, and calculates the closure rate of borehole with the recommended drilling fluids density. If the closure rate of the borehole is less than 0.1%, the drilling fluids density window can be used during drilling through extremely thick salt formations.

  3. Elastic contact mechanics: percolation of the contact area and fluid squeeze-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B N J; Prodanov, N; Krick, B A; Rodriguez, N; Mulakaluri, N; Sawyer, W G; Mangiagalli, P

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of fluid flow at the interface between elastic solids with rough surfaces depends sensitively on the area of real contact, in particular close to the percolation threshold, where an irregular network of narrow flow channels prevails. In this paper, numerical simulation and experimental results for the contact between elastic solids with isotropic and anisotropic surface roughness are compared with the predictions of a theory based on the Persson contact mechanics theory and the Bruggeman effective medium theory. The theory predictions are in good agreement with the experimental and numerical simulation results and the (small) deviation can be understood as a finite-size effect. The fluid squeeze-out at the interface between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces is studied. We present results for such high contact pressures that the area of real contact percolates, giving rise to sealed-off domains with pressurized fluid at the interface. The theoretical predictions are compared to experimental data for a simple model system (a rubber block squeezed against a flat glass plate), and for prefilled syringes, where the rubber plunger stopper is lubricated by a high-viscosity silicon oil to ensure functionality of the delivery device. For the latter system we compare the breakloose (or static) friction, as a function of the time of stationary contact, to the theory prediction.

  4. On the generation mechanisms of fluid-driven seismic signals related to volcano-tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Marco; Benson, Philip M.; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The generation mechanics of fluid-driven volcano seismic signals, and their evolution with time, remains poorly understood. We present a laboratory study aiming to better constrain the time evolution of such signals across temperature conditions 25 to 175°C in order to simulate a "bubbly liquid." Simulations used pressures equivalent to volcanic edifices up to 1.6 km in depth using a triaxial deformation apparatus equipped with an array of acoustic emission sensors. We investigate the origin of fluid-driven seismic signals by rapidly venting the pore pressure through a characterized damage zone. During the release of water at 25°C broadband signals were generated, with frequencies ranging from 50 to 160 kHz. However, the decompression of a water/steam phase at 175°C generated a bimodal spectrum of different signals, in the range 100-160 kHz. These new results are consistent with natural signals from active volcanoes, such as Mount Etna, and highlight the role of fluid and gas phases (such as bubbly liquids) in generating different types of volcano-tectonic seismicity.

  5. Ups and downs of using ``kitchen sink'' experiments in an introductory fluid mechanics class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Nigel

    2015-11-01

    Both positive and negative experiences from two semesters of using take home ``kitchen sink'' experiments in an introductory civil engineering fluid mechanics class are reported. Four different experimental assignments were given each semester to groups of four students. The students were tasked with using common household equipment to measure various properties of fluids or fluid flows. These included the density of cooking oil, the exit velocity from a garden hose, and the mass flux of air from a compressed air can. Students were given minimal guidance on how to do the measurements and each measurement had to be done in at least two different ways. The labs were used to relate their course work to everyday situations and was also used as a platform for discussing experimental uncertainty and error propagation in calculations. In general the students successfully completed each task using at least one method. Finding a second method sometimes proved problematic. The presentation will discuss the logistics of running the program and the positive and negative aspects from the instructor viewpoint. A summary of student feedback on the labs will also be presented. Links to resources for those interested in implementing such a program will be provided.

  6. A diffusion tensor imaging tractography algorithm based on Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Nathan S; Toga, Arthur W; Narr, Katherine L; Shattuck, David W

    2009-03-01

    We introduce a fluid mechanics based tractography method for estimating the most likely connection paths between points in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) volumes. We customize the Navier-Stokes equations to include information from the diffusion tensor and simulate an artificial fluid flow through the DTI image volume. We then estimate the most likely connection paths between points in the DTI volume using a metric derived from the fluid velocity vector field. We validate our algorithm using digital DTI phantoms based on a helical shape. Our method segmented the structure of the phantom with less distortion than was produced using implementations of heat-based partial differential equation (PDE) and streamline based methods. In addition, our method was able to successfully segment divergent and crossing fiber geometries, closely following the ideal path through a digital helical phantom in the presence of multiple crossing tracts. To assess the performance of our algorithm on anatomical data, we applied our method to DTI volumes from normal human subjects. Our method produced paths that were consistent with both known anatomy and directionally encoded color images of the DTI dataset.

  7. Cloning and characterization of a novel hemocyanin variant LvHMCV4 from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Lu, Hui; Guo, Lingling; Zhang, Zehui; Zhao, Xianliang; Zhong, Mingqi; Li, Shengkang; Zhang, Yueling

    2015-10-01

    Recently, we found 3 variants of hemocyanin subunit with higher molecular weight in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Named as LvHMCV1-3). In this study, a novel L. vannamei hemocyanin variant (Named as LvHMCV4) was further cloned and characterized. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that LvHMCV4 contains one open reading frame of 2137 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 678 amino acids. It shares 84-99% cDNA sequences identity to that of the classical form of L. vannamei hemocyanin (LvHMC, AJ250830.1) and LvHMCV1-3. LvHMCV4 possesses a conserved structure characteristic of the hemocyanin family and can be clustered into one branch along with other arthropod hemocyanins in a phylogenetic tree. Further, the full-length DNA of LvHMCV4 contains 2660 bp and two introns, which are located at the 80-538 bp and 2063-2227 bp regions, respectively. In addition, the mRNA transcript of LvHMCV4 was expressed highly in the hepatopancreas, lymphoid, brain and hemocytes, and weakly in the heart, intestine and gill, while no expression was found in the muscle, stomach and gut. Infection by Escherichia coli K12, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio fluvialis, Streptococcus pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus up-regulated significantly LvHMCV4 mRNA expression in the hepatopancreas. Furthermore, the recombinant protein of LvHMCV4 (rLvHMCV4) was prepared, which showed agglutination activities against six pathogenic bacteria at concentrations ranging from 15.6 to 125 μg/ml. When co-injected with V. parahaemolyticus in L.vannamei, rLvHMCV4 significantly increased the survival rate after 48 h injection. Together, these studies suggested that hemocyanin variant, LvHMCV4, might be involved in shrimp resistance to pathogenic infection.

  8. A Mechanism for Cytoplasmic Streaming: Kinesin-Driven Alignment of Microtubules and Fast Fluid Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Corey E; Brunner, Matthew E; Djagaeva, Inna; Bielecki, Anthony M; Deutsch, Joshua M; Saxton, William M

    2016-05-10

    The transport of cytoplasmic components can be profoundly affected by hydrodynamics. Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes offers a striking example. Forces on fluid from kinesin-1 are initially directed by a disordered meshwork of microtubules, generating minor slow cytoplasmic flows. Subsequently, to mix incoming nurse cell cytoplasm with ooplasm, a subcortical layer of microtubules forms parallel arrays that support long-range, fast flows. To analyze the streaming mechanism, we combined observations of microtubule and organelle motions with detailed mathematical modeling. In the fast state, microtubules tethered to the cortex form a thin subcortical layer and undergo correlated sinusoidal bending. Organelles moving in flows along the arrays show velocities that are slow near the cortex and fast on the inward side of the subcortical microtubule layer. Starting with fundamental physical principles suggested by qualitative hypotheses, and with published values for microtubule stiffness, kinesin velocity, and cytoplasmic viscosity, we developed a quantitative coupled hydrodynamic model for streaming. The fully detailed mathematical model and its simulations identify key variables that can shift the system between disordered (slow) and ordered (fast) states. Measurements of array curvature, wave period, and the effects of diminished kinesin velocity on flow rates, as well as prior observations on f-actin perturbation, support the model. This establishes a concrete mechanistic framework for the ooplasmic streaming process. The self-organizing fast phase is a result of viscous drag on kinesin-driven cargoes that mediates equal and opposite forces on cytoplasmic fluid and on microtubules whose minus ends are tethered to the cortex. Fluid moves toward plus ends and microtubules are forced backward toward their minus ends, resulting in buckling. Under certain conditions, the buckling microtubules self-organize into parallel bending arrays, guiding varying directions

  9. Numerical Modeling and Investigation of Fluid-Driven Fracture Propagation in Reservoirs Based on a Modified Fluid-Mechanically Coupled Model in Two-Dimensional Particle Flow Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is a useful tool for enhancing rock mass permeability for shale gas development, enhanced geothermal systems, and geological carbon sequestration by the high-pressure injection of a fracturing fluid into tight reservoir rocks. Although significant advances have been made in hydraulic fracturing theory, experiments, and numerical modeling, when it comes to the complexity of geological conditions knowledge is still limited. Mechanisms of fluid injection-induced fracture initiation and propagation should be better understood to take full advantage of hydraulic fracturing. This paper presents the development and application of discrete particle modeling based on two-dimensional particle flow code (PFC2D. Firstly, it is shown that the modeled value of the breakdown pressure for the hydraulic fracturing process is approximately equal to analytically calculated values under varied in situ stress conditions. Furthermore, a series of simulations for hydraulic fracturing in competent rock was performed to examine the influence of the in situ stress ratio, fluid injection rate, and fluid viscosity on the borehole pressure history, the geometry of hydraulic fractures, and the pore-pressure field, respectively. It was found that the hydraulic fractures in an isotropic medium always propagate parallel to the orientation of the maximum principal stress. When a high fluid injection rate is used, higher breakdown pressure is needed for fracture propagation and complex geometries of fractures can develop. When a low viscosity fluid is used, fluid can more easily penetrate from the borehole into the surrounding rock, which causes a reduction of the effective stress and leads to a lower breakdown pressure. Moreover, the geometry of the fractures is not particularly sensitive to the fluid viscosity in the approximate isotropic model.

  10. Does amniotic fluid volume affect fetofetal transfusion in monochorionic twin pregnancies? Modelling two possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umur, Asli; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Ross, Michael G.

    2002-06-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that increased amniotic fluid volume due to polyhydramnios increases placental vascular resistance. We have sought to model the possible effects of an increased amniotic fluid volume on the net fetofetal transfusion in monochorionic twin pregnancies. We wanted to compare these effects with the results of previous simulations, which aimed to explain why the twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) placentas more often include bidirectional arteriovenous (AV) rather than AV plus arterioarterial (AA) anastomoses. We extended our mathematical model of TTTS by simulating two different mechanisms that increase the placental vascular resistance as a consequence of polyhydramnios. First, there is an increase in the placental capillary resistance and hence in deep AV and opposite AV (denoted as VA) resistances due to polyhydramnios. Second, there is an increase in the resistance of chorionic veins due to polyhydramnios, assuming that these veins act as Starling resistors. We then simulated the effects of polyhydramnios on different placental anastomotic patterns. The results were as follows. In the first mechanism (polyhydramnios affects AV-VA resistances), an increased amniotic fluid volume hardly affected bidirectional AV, but slightly decreased fetofetal transfusion in AV plus AA anastomoses. However, for these effects to change the natural development of the pregnancy, polyhydramnios needed to persist for approximately 4 weeks, and by comparing the effects of polyhydramnios with the effects of amnioreduction, amnioreduction was more beneficial for normalizing the donor amniotic fluid volume. Therefore, these beneficial effects due to polyhydramnios have no practical clinical significance. In the second mechanism (Starling resistor for chorionic veins), polyhydramnios slightly increased fetofetal transfusion and hence slightly increased TTTS severity in bidirectional AV and AV plus VV, but did not affect AV plus AA anastomoses. In conclusion, we

  11. Coupled fluid and solid mechanics study for improved permeability estimation of fines' invaded porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabolghasemi, M.; Prodanovic, M.

    2012-12-01

    The problem of fine particle infiltration is seen in fields from subsurface transport, to drug delivery to industrial slurry flows. Sediment filtration and pathogen retention are well-known subsurface engineering problems that have been extensively studied through different macroscopic, microscopic and experimental modeling techniques Due to heterogeneity, standard constitutive relationships and models yield poor predictions for flow (e.g. permeability) and rock properties (e.g. elastic moduli) of the invaded (damaged) porous media. This severely reduces our ability to, for instance, predict retention, pressure build-up, newly formed flow pathways or porous medium mechanical behavior. We chose a coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) - discrete element modeling (DEM) approach to simulate the particulate flow through porous media represented by sphere packings. In order to minimize the uncertainty involved in estimating the flow properties of porous media on Darcy scale and address the dynamic nature of filtration process, this microscopic approach is adapted as a robust method that can incorporate particle interaction physics as well as the heterogeneity of the porous medium.. The coupled simulation was done in open-source packages which has both CFD (openFOAM) and DEM components (LIGGGHTS). We ran several sensitivity analyses over different parameters such as particle/grain size ratio, fluid viscosity, flow rate and sphere packing porosity in order to investigate their effects on the depth of invasion and damaged porous medium permeability. The response of the system to the variation of different parameters is reflected through different clogging mechanism; for instance, bridging is the dominant mechanism of pore-throat clogging when larger particles penetrate into the packing, whereas, in case of fine particles which are much smaller than porous medium grains (1/20 in diameter), this mechanism is not very effective due to the frequent formation and

  12. International Symposium on Boundary Element Methods : Advances in Solid and Fluid Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Tseng, Kadin

    1990-01-01

    The Boundary Element Method (BEM) has become established as an effective tool for the solutions of problems in engineering science. The salient features of the BEM have been well documented in the open literature and therefore will not be elaborated here. The BEM research has progressed rapidly, especially in the past decade and continues to evolve worldwide. This Symposium was organized to provide an international forum for presentation of current research in BEM for linear and nonlinear problems in solid and fluid mechanics and related areas. To this end, papers on the following topics were included: rotary­ wing aerodynamics, unsteady aerodynamics, design and optimization, elasticity, elasto­ dynamics and elastoplasticity, fracture mechanics, acoustics, diffusion and wave motion, thermal analysis, mathematical aspects and boundary/finite element coupled methods. A special session was devoted to parallel/vector supercomputing with emphasis on mas­ sive parallelism. This Symposium was sponsored by United ...

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical Characteristics of Dropped Eggs Based on Fluid-Solid Coupling Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to study the properties and mechanics of egg drop impacts in order to reduce egg loss during processing and logistics and to provide a basis for the protective packaging of egg products. In this paper, we present the results of our study of the effects of the structural parameters on the mechanical properties of an egg using a finite element model of the egg. Based on Fluid-Solid coupling theory, a finite element model of an egg was constructed using ADINA, a finite element calculation and analysis software package. To simplify the model, the internal fluid of the egg was considered to be a homogeneous substance. The egg drop impact was simulated by the coupling solution, and the feasibility of the model was verified by comparison with the experimental results of a drop test. In summary, the modeling scheme was shown to be feasible and the simulation results provide a theoretical basis for the optimum design of egg packaging and egg processing equipment.

  14. Changes to the geometry and fluid mechanics of the carotid siphon in the pediatric Moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Muhammad; Tan, Germaine Xin Yi; Huq, Mehnaz; Kang, Heidi; Lee, Zhi Rui; Tang, Phua Hwee; Hu, Xi Hong; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-12-01

    The Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular disease that causes occlusion of the distal end of the internal carotid artery, leading to the formation of multiple tiny collateral arteries. To date, the pathogenesis of Moyamoya is unknown. Improved understanding of the changes to vascular geometry and fluid mechanics of the carotid siphon during disease may improve understanding of the pathogenesis, prognosis techniques and disease management. A retrospective analysis of Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) images was performed for Moyamoya pediatric patients (MMD) (n = 23) and control (Ctrl) pediatric patients (n = 20). The Ctrl group was composed of patients who complained of headache and had normal MRA. We performed segmentation of MRA images to quantify geometric parameters of the artery. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was performed to quantify the hemodynamic parameters. MMD internal carotid and carotid siphons were smaller in cross-sectional areas, and shorter in curved vascular length. Vascular curvature remained constant over age and vascular size and did not change between Ctrl and MMD, but MMD carotid siphon had lower tortuosity in the posterior bend, and higher torsion in the anterior bend. Wall shear stress and secondary flows were significantly lower in MMD, but the ratio of secondary flow kinetic energy to primary flow kinetic energy were similar between MMD and Ctrl. There were alterations to both the geometry and the flow mechanics of the carotid siphons of Moyamoya patients but it is unclear whether hemodynamics is the cause or the effect of morphological changes observed.

  15. Multidimensional Generalized Functions in Aeroacoustics and Fluid Mechanics. Part 1; Basic Concepts and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farassat, Fereidoun; Myers, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a three part tutorial on multidimensional generalized functions (GFs) and their applications in aeroacoustics and fluid mechanics. The subject is highly fascinating and essential in many areas of science and, in particular, wave propagation problems. In this tutorial, we strive to present rigorously and clearly the basic concepts and the tools that are needed to use GFs in applications effectively and with ease. We give many examples to help the readers in understanding the mathematical ideas presented here. The first part of the tutorial is on the basic concepts of GFs. Here we define GFs, their properties and some common operations on them. We define the important concept of generalized differentiation and then give some interesting elementary and advanced examples on Green's functions and wave propagation problems. Here, the analytic power of GFs in applications is demonstrated with ease and elegance. Part 2 of this tutorial is on the diverse applications of generalized derivatives (GDs). Part 3 is on generalized Fourier transformations and some more advanced topics. One goal of writing this tutorial is to convince readers that, because of their powerful operational properties, GFs are absolutely essential and useful in engineering and physics, particularly in aeroacoustics and fluid mechanics.

  16. Fluid driven fracture mechanics in highly anisotropic shale: a laboratory study with application to hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehne, Stephan; Benson, Philip; Koor, Nick; Enfield, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The finding of considerable volumes of hydrocarbon resources within tight sedimentary rock formations in the UK led to focused attention on the fundamental fracture properties of low permeability rock types and hydraulic fracturing. Despite much research in these fields, there remains a scarcity of available experimental data concerning the fracture mechanics of fluid driven fracturing and the fracture properties of anisotropic, low permeability rock types. In this study, hydraulic fracturing is simulated in a controlled laboratory environment to track fracture nucleation (location) and propagation (velocity) in space and time and assess how environmental factors and rock properties influence the fracture process and the developing fracture network. Here we report data on employing fluid overpressure to generate a permeable network of micro tensile fractures in a highly anisotropic shale ( 50% P-wave velocity anisotropy). Experiments are carried out in a triaxial deformation apparatus using cylindrical samples. The bedding planes are orientated either parallel or normal to the major principal stress direction (σ1). A newly developed technique, using a steel guide arrangement to direct pressurised fluid into a sealed section of an axially drilled conduit, allows the pore fluid to contact the rock directly and to initiate tensile fractures from the pre-defined zone inside the sample. Acoustic Emission location is used to record and map the nucleation and development of the micro-fracture network. Indirect tensile strength measurements at atmospheric pressure show a high tensile strength anisotropy ( 60%) of the shale. Depending on the relative bedding orientation within the stress field, we find that fluid induced fractures in the sample propagate in two of the three principal fracture orientations: Divider and Short-Transverse. The fracture progresses parallel to the bedding plane (Short-Transverse orientation) if the bedding plane is aligned (parallel) with the

  17. Mechanism of diapirism and episodic fluid injections in the Yinggehai Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO; Fang

    2002-01-01

    [1]Jackson, M. P. A., Vendeville, B. C., Regional extension as a geologic trigger for diapirism, Geological Society of Ameri-ca Bulletin, 1994, 106(1): 57-73.[2]Pérez-Belzuz, F., Alonso, B., Ercilla, G., History of mud diapirism and trigger mechanisms in the Western Alboran Sea, Tectonophysics, 1996, 282(2): 399-422.[3]Hunt, J. M., Petroleum Geology and Geochemistry, 2nd ed., San Francisco: Freeman and Company, 1996, 743.[4]Gong Zaisheng, Li Sitian, Continental Margin Basin Analysis and Hydrocarbon Accumulation of the Northern South Chi-na Sea (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1997, 510.[5]Price, L. C., Basin richness and source rock disruption: A fundamental relationship? Journal of Petroleum Geology, 1994, 17(1): 5-38.[6]Roberts, S. J., Nunn, J. A., Episodic fluid expulsion from geopressured sediments, Marine and Petroleum Geology, 1995, 12(2): 195-204.[7]Dewers, T., Ortoleva, P., Nonlinear dynamical aspects of deep basin hydrology: Fluid compartment formation and episodic fluid release, American Journal of Science, 1994, 294(5): 713-755.[8]Dai, J. X., Song, Y., Dai, C. S. et al., Geochemistry and accumulation of carbon dioxide gases in China, AAPG Bulletin, 1996, 80(9): 1615-1626.[9]Hao Fang, Li Sitian, Sun Yongchuan et al., Organic maturation and petroleum generation model in the Yinggehai and Qiongdongnan Basins, Science in China, 1996, 39(6): 650-658.[10]Hao Fang, Li Sitian, Dong Weiliang et al., Abnormal organic matter maturation in the Yinggehai Basin, offshore South China Sea: Implications for hydrocarbon expulsion and fluid migration from overpressured systems, Journal of Petroleum Geology, 1998, 21(4): 427-444.[11]Pollastro, R. M., Considerations and applications of the illite/smectite geothermometer in hydrocarbon-bearing rocks of Miocene to Mississippian age, Clays and Clay Minerals, 1993, 41(2): 119-133.[12]Ko, J., Hesse, R., Illite/smectite diagenesis in the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin, Arctic Canada

  18. Experimental study of the mechanical stabilization of electric arc furnace dust using fluid cement mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, E F; Jiménez, J R; Ayuso, J; Fernández, J M; Brito, J de

    2017-03-15

    This article shows the results of an experimental study carried out in order to determine the maximum amount of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) that can be incorporated into fluid cement-based mortars to produce mechanically stable monolithic blocks. The leaching performance of all mixes was studied in order to classify them according to the EU Council Decision 2003/33/EC. Two mortars were used as reference and three levels of EAFD incorporation were tested in each of the reference mortars. As the incorporation ratio of EAFD/cement increases, the mechanical strength decreases. This is due to the greater EAFD/cement and water/cement ratios, besides the presence of a double-hydrated hydroxide of Ca and Zn (CaZn2(OH)6·2H2O) instead of the portlandite phase (Ca(OH)2) in the mixes made with EAFD, as well as non-hydrated tricalcium silicate. A mass ratio of 2:1 (EAFD: cement-based mortar) can be added maintaining a stable mechanical strength. The mechanical stabilization process also reduced the leaching of metals, although it was not able to reduce the Pb concentration below the limit for hazardous waste. The high amount of EAFD mechanically stabilized in this experimental study can be useful to reduce the storage volume required in hazardous waste landfills.

  19. Fluid-Thermal-Structural Coupled Analysis of a Radial Inflow Micro Gas Turbine Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Solid Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional fluid-thermal-structural coupled analysis for a radial inflow micro gas turbine is conducted. First, a fluid-thermal coupled analysis of the flow and temperature fields of the nozzle passage and the blade passage is performed by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The flow and heat transfer characteristics of different sections are analyzed in detail. The thermal load and the aerodynamic load are then obtained from the temperature field and the pressure distribution. The stress distributions of the blade are finally studied by using computational solid mechanics (CSM considering three cases of loads: thermal load, aerodynamics load combined with centrifugal load, and all the three types of loads. The detailed parameters of the flow, temperature, and the stress are obtained and analyzed. The numerical results obtained provide a useful knowledge base for further exploration of radial gas turbine design.

  20. Efficient Control of Active Transformers for Increasing the PV Hosting Capacity of LV Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi Toghroljerdi, Seyedmostafa; Østergaard, Jacob; Degner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    on decreasing the voltage rise along LV feeders, and the potential of active medium voltage to low voltage (MV/LV) transformers for overvoltage prevention has not been thoroughly investigated. This paper presents the application of active MV/LV transformers for increasing the PV hosting capacity of LV grids...... increase the PV hosting capacity of the grid, while eliminating the need for a complex and centralized controller. The voltages of specific locations or the grid state estimations provide adequate data for adjustments of the droop parameters. The simulations and field test results associated...

  1. Regulation of FeLV-945 by c-Myb binding and CBP recruitment to the LTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finstad Samantha L

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feline leukemia virus (FeLV induces degenerative, proliferative and malignant hematologic disorders in its natural host, the domestic cat. FeLV-945 is a viral variant identified as predominant in a cohort of naturally infected animals. FeLV-945 contains a unique sequence motif in the long terminal repeat (LTR comprised of a single copy of transcriptional enhancer followed by a 21-bp sequence triplicated in tandem. The LTR is precisely conserved among independent cases of multicentric lymphoma, myeloproliferative disease and anemia in animals from the cohort. The 21-bp triplication was previously shown to act as a transcriptional enhancer preferentially in hematopoietic cells and to confer a replicative advantage. The objective of the present study was to examine the molecular mechanism by which the 21-bp triplication exerts its influence and the selective advantage responsible for its precise conservation. Results Potential binding sites for the transcription factor, c-Myb, were identified across the repeat junctions of the 21-bp triplication. Such sites would not occur in the absence of the repeat; thus, a requirement for c-Myb binding to the repeat junctions of the triplication would exert a selective pressure to conserve its sequence precisely. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated specific binding of c-Myb to the 21-bp triplication. Reporter gene assays showed that the triplication-containing LTR is responsive to c-Myb, and that responsiveness requires the presence of both c-Myb binding sites. Results further indicated that c-Myb in complex with the 21-bp triplication recruits the transcriptional co-activator, CBP, a regulator of normal hematopoiesis. FeLV-945 replication was shown to be positively regulated by CBP in a manner dependent on the presence of the 21-bp triplication. Conclusion Binding sites for c-Myb across the repeat junctions of the 21-bp triplication may account for its precise conservation in

  2. Matrix mechanics and fluid shear stress control stem cells fate in three dimensional microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guobao; Lv, Yonggang; Guo, Pan; Lin, Chongwen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yang, Li; Xu, Zhiling

    2013-07-01

    Stem cells have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple mature cell types during early life and growth. Stem cells adhesion, proliferation, migration and differentiation are affected by biochemical, mechanical and physical surface properties of the surrounding matrix in which stem cells reside and stem cells can sensitively feel and respond to the microenvironment of this matrix. More and more researches have proven that three dimensional (3D) culture can reduce the gap between cell culture and physiological environment where cells always live in vivo. This review summarized recent findings on the studies of matrix mechanics that control stem cells (primarily mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)) fate in 3D environment, including matrix stiffness and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness. Considering the exchange of oxygen and nutrients in 3D culture, the effect of fluid shear stress (FSS) on fate decision of stem cells was also discussed in detail. Further, the difference of MSCs response to matrix stiffness between two dimensional (2D) and 3D conditions was compared. Finally, the mechanism of mechanotransduction of stem cells activated by matrix mechanics and FSS in 3D culture was briefly pointed out.

  3. Origin of Gold-Bearing Fluid and Its Initiative Localization Mechanism in Xiadian Gold Deposit, Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 王庆飞; 孙忠实

    2002-01-01

    The composition of quartz inclusions and trace elements in ore indicate that gold bearing fluid in the Xiadian gold deposit, Shandong Province, stemmed from both mantle and magma, belonging to a composite origin. Based on theoretical analysis and high temperature and high pressure experimental studies, gold-bearing fluid initiative localization mechanism and the forming environment of ore-host rocks are discussed in the present paper. The composite fluid extracted gold from rocks because of its expanding and injecting forces and flew through ore-conducive structures, leading to the breakup of rocks. The generation of ore-host faults and the precipitation of gold-bearing fluid occurred almost simultaneously. This study provides further information about the relationships between gold ore veins and basic-ultrabasic vein rocks and intermediate vein rocks, the spatial distribution of gold ore veins and the rules governing the migration of ore fluids.

  4. The Effect of Fluid Thermal Expansivity on Thermo-mechanical Solitary Shock Waves in the Underground of Volcanic Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, G.

    This work is a further development of the modern thermo-poro-elasticity theory which has recently been applied to understand how fluid-rock coupling dynamics related to unrest episodes in volcanic domains can both determine, and occur with, ground deformation and rock fracturing processes. In particular by reformulating the energy equation, one of the two nonlinear heat-like equations upon which the thermo-poroelasticity theory is based, it is shown here how fluid thermal expansivity may influence fluid migration during its movement through subsurface volcanic porous-per meable horizons. With these new considerations it is found that a recent theory in which fluid-rock coupling dynamics is interpreted in terms of thermal and mechanical solitary shock wave propagation remains valid. However, the natural time scale of the propagating wave is reduced and consequently Darcy's velocity is increased as a result of fluid thermal expansivity.

  5. 10A1-MuLV but not the related amphotropic 4070A MuLV is highly neurovirulent: importance of sequences upstream of the structural Gag coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münk, Carsten; Prassolov, Vladimir; Rodenburg, Michaela; Kalinin, Viacheslav; Löhler, Jürgen; Stocking, Carol

    2003-08-15

    Recombinants of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) with either an amphotropic (MoAmphoV) or 10A1-tropic host range (Mo10A1V) induce a spongiform neurodegenerative disease in susceptible mice. To test whether MoMuLV -derived sequences are required for induction of neuropathology, mice were inoculated with either the original 10A1 or the amphotropic (4070A) MuLV isolate. Strikingly, wild-type 10A1 was more neurovirulent than Mo10A1V, inducing severe neurological clinical symptoms with a median latency of 99 days in 100% of infected mice. In contrast, no motor disturbances were detected in any of the 4070A-infected mice, although limited central nervous system lesions were observed. A viral determinant conferring high neurovirulence to 10A1 was mapped to a region encompassing the first 676 bases of the viral genome, including the U5 LTR and encoding the amino-terminus of glycosylated Gag (glycoGag). In contrast to studies with the highly neurovirulent CasFr(KP) virus, an inverse correlation between surface expression levels of glycoGag and neurovirulence was not observed; however, this does not rule out a common underlying mechanism regulating virus pathogenicity.

  6. Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Methods for Fluid Mechanics: Thermal, Multi-phase and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikatamarla, Shyam; Boesch, F.; Frapolli, N.; Mazloomi, A.; Karlin, I.

    2014-11-01

    With its roots in statistical mechanics and kinetic theory, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a paradigm-changing innovation, offering for the first time an intrinsically parallel CFD algorithm. Over the past two decades, LBM has achieved numerous results in the field of CFD and is now in a position to challenge state-of-the art CFD techniques. Major restyling of LBM resulted in an unconditionally stable entropic LBM which restored Second Law (Boltzmann H theorem) in the LBM kinetics and thus enabled affordable direct simulations of fluid turbulence. In this talk, we shall review recent advances in ELBM as a practical, modeling-free tool for simulation of complex flow phenomenon. We shall present recent simulations of fluid turbulence including turbulent channel flow, flow past a circular cylinder, creation and dynamics of vortex tubes, and flow past a surface mounted cube. Apart from its achievements in turbulent flow simulations, ELBM has also presented us the opportunity to extend lattice Boltzmann method to higher order lattices which shall be employed for turbulent, multi-phase and thermal flow simulations. A new class of entropy functions are proposed to handle non-ideal equation of state and surface tension terms in multi-phase flows. It is shown the entropy principle brings unconditional stability and thermodynamic consistency to all the three flow regimes considered here. Acknowledgements: ERC Advanced Grant ``ELBM'' and CSCS grant s437 are deeply acknowledged. References:

  7. A new paradigm for variable-fidelity stochastic simulation and information fusion in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, Daniele; Parussini, Lucia; Perdikaris, Paris; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    Predicting the statistical properties of fluid systems based on stochastic simulations and experimental data is a problem of major interest across many disciplines. Even with recent theoretical and computational advancements, no broadly applicable techniques exist that could deal effectively with uncertainty propagation and model inadequacy in high-dimensions. To address these problems, we propose a new paradigm for variable-fidelity stochastic modeling, simulation and information fusion in fluid mechanics. The key idea relies in employing recursive Bayesian networks and multi-fidelity information sources (e.g., stochastic simulations at different resolution) to construct optimal predictors for quantities of interest, e.g., the random temperature field in stochastic Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The object of inference is the quantity of interest at the highest possible level of fidelity, for which we can usually afford only few simulations. To compute the optimal predictors, we developed a multivariate recursive co-kriging approach that simultaneously takes into account variable fidelity in the space of models (e.g., DNS vs. potential flow solvers), as well as variable-fidelity in probability space. Numerical applications are presented and discussed. This research was supported by AFOSR and DARPA.

  8. Effects of walking in deep venous thrombosis: a new integrated solid and fluid mechanics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Josep M; Fortuny, Gerard; Puigjaner, Dolors; Herrero, Joan; Marimon, Francesc; Garcia-Bennett, Josep

    2016-08-09

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common disease. Large thrombi in venous vessels cause bad blood circulation and pain; and when a blood clot detaches from a vein wall, it causes an embolism whose consequences range from mild to fatal. Walking is recommended to DVT patients as a therapeutical complement. In this study the mechanical effects of walking on a specific patient of DVT were simulated by means of an unprecedented integration of 3 elements: a real geometry, a biomechanical model of body tissues, and a computational fluid dynamics study. A set of computed tomography images of a patient's leg with a thrombus in the popliteal vein was employed to reconstruct a geometry model. Then a biomechanical model was used to compute the new deformed geometry of the vein as a function of the fiber stretch level of the semimembranosus muscle. Finally, a computational fluid dynamics study was performed to compute the blood flow and the wall shear stress (WSS) at the vein and thrombus walls. Calculations showed that either a lengthening or shortening of the semimembranosus muscle led to a decrease of WSS levels up to 10%. Notwithstanding, changes in blood viscosity properties or blood flow rate may easily have a greater impact in WSS.

  9. Cooling Systems Design in Hot Stamping Tools by a Thermal-Fluid-Mechanical Coupled Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Lin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot stamping tools with cooling systems are the key facilities for hot stamping process of Ultrahigh strength steels (UHSS in automotive industry. Hot stamping tools have significant influence on the final microstructure and properties of the hot stamped parts. In serials production, the tools should be rapidly cooled by cooling water. Hence, design of hot stamping tools with cooling systems is important not only for workpieces of good quality but also for the tools with good cooling performance and long life. In this paper, a new multifield simulation method was proposed for the design of hot stamping tools with cooling system. The deformation of the tools was also analyzed by this method. Based on MpCCI (Mesh-based parallel Code Coupling Interface, thermal-fluid simulation and thermal-fluid-mechanical coupled simulation were performed. Subsequently, the geometrical parameters of the cooling system are investigated for the design. The results show that, both the distance between the ducts and the distance between the ducts and the tools loaded contour have significant influence on the quenching effect. And better quenching effect can be achieved with the shorter distance from the tool surface and with smaller distance between ducts. It is also shown that, thermal expansion is the main reason for deformation of the hot forming tools, which causes the distortion of the cooling ducts, and the stress concentration at corner of the ducts.

  10. Nature-Inspired Fluid Mechanics Results of the DFG Priority Programme 1207 ”Nature-inspired Fluid Mechanics” 2006-2012

    CERN Document Server

    Bleckmann, Horst

    2012-01-01

    This book is the closing report of the national priority program Nature-Inspired Fluid Mechanics (Schwerpunktprogramm SPP 1207: Strömungsbeeinflussung in der Natur und Technik). Nature-inspired fluid mechanics is one subset of biomimetics, a discipline which has received increased attention over the last decade, with numerous faculties and degree courses devoted solely to exploring ‘nature as a model’ for engineering applications. To save locomotion energy, evolution has optimized the design of animals such that friction loss is minimized. In addition to many morphological adaptations, animals that are often exposed to water or air currents have developed special behaviors that allow them to use the energy contained in air or water fluctuations for energy savings. Such flow manipulation and control is not only important for many animals, but also for many engineering applications. Since living beings have been optimized by several million years of evolution it is very likely that many engineering discipl...

  11. Assessment of the LV-S2 & LV-S3 Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2014-09-30

    This document reports on a series of tests conducted to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 1-2A exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LV-C2, LV-S2, and LV-S3 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 1-2A). This report only covers the results of LV-S2 and LV-S3; LV-C2 will be reported on separately. Federal regulations1 require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. 2 These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  12. Spiral Phyllotaxis Pattern in an Animal Cell: A Fluid- Driven Mechanism for Red Cell Echinocytosis and Programmed Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Lofthouse, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that the pattern of lipid spiculesthat emerge on the surface of red blood cells in the classic 'Discocyte to Echinocyte' shape change is a generative spiral, and presents a qualitative, fluid- driven mechanism for their production, compatible with the work of Douady and Couder. Implications for the dynamics of cell growth, plant cell phyllotaxy, programmed cell death and gravity sensitivity are explained in terms of a new qualitative model of cellular fluid dynamics.

  13. Skylab fluid mechanics simulations: Oscillation, rotation, collision and coalescence of water droplets under low-gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Hung, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Skylab 4 crew members performed a series of demonstrations showing the oscillations, rotations, as well as collision coalescence of water droplets which simulate various physical models of fluids under low gravity environment. The results from Skylab demonstrations provide information and illustrate the potential of an orbiting space-oriented research laboratory for the study of more sophisticated fluid mechanic experiments. Experiments and results are discussed.

  14. Multiplex cytokine analysis of dermal interstitial blister fluid defines local disease mechanisms in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kristina En; Lopez, Henry; Abdi, Bahja Ahmed; Guerra, Sandra G; Shiwen, Xu; Khan, Korsa; Etomi, Oseme; Martin, George R; Abraham, David J; Denton, Christopher P; Stratton, Richard J

    2015-03-23

    Clinical diversity in systemic sclerosis (SSc) reflects multifaceted pathogenesis and the effect of key growth factors or cytokines operating within a disease-specific microenvironment. Dermal interstitial fluid sampling offers the potential to examine local mechanisms and identify proteins expressed within lesional tissue. We used multiplex cytokine analysis to profile the inflammatory and immune activity in the lesions of SSc patients. Dermal interstitial fluid sample from the involved forearm skin, and synchronous plasma samples were collected from SSc patients (n = 26, diffuse cutaneous SSc (DcSSc) n = 20, limited cutaneous SSc (LcSSc) n = 6), and healthy controls (HC) (n = 10) and profiled by Luminex® array for inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Luminex® profiling of the dermal blister fluid showed increased inflammatory cytokines (median interleukin ( IL)-6 in SSc 39.78 pg/ml, HC 5.51 pg/ml, p = 0.01, median IL-15 in SSc 6.27 pg/ml, HC 4.38 pg/ml, p = 0.03), chemokines (monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-3 9.81 pg/ml in SSc, 7.18 pg/ml HC, p = 0.04), and profibrotic growth factors (platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA 10.38 pg/ml versus 6.94 pg/ml in HC, p = 0.03). In general dermal fluid and plasma cytokine levels did not correlate, consistent with predominantly local production of these factors within the dermal lesions, rather than leakage from the serum. In hierarchical clustering and network analysis IL-6 emerged as a key central mediator. Our data confirm that an immuno-inflammatory environment and aberrant vascular repair are intimately linked to fibroblast activation in lesional skin in SSc. This non-invasive method could be used to profile disease activity in the clinic, and identifies key inflammatory or pro-fibrotic proteins that might be targeted therapeutically. Distinct subgroups of SSc may be defined that show innate or adaptive immune cytokine signatures.

  15. LvDJ-1 plays an important role in resistance against Vibrio alginolyticus in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingzhu; Liu, Yuan; Xie, Chenying; Wang, Wei-Na

    2015-05-01

    DJ-1 was first identified as an oncogene that transformed mouse NIH3T3 cells in cooperation with activated Ras. It has since exhibited a variety of functions in a range of organisms. In this study, the DJ-1 gene in Litopenaeus vannamei (LvDJ-1) was identified and characterized. A recombinant protein LvDJ-1 was produced in Pichia pastoris. LvDJ-1 expression in vivo was knocked down by dsRNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi), which led to significantly decreased levels of LvDJ-1 mRNA and protein. When the L. vannamei were challenged with RNAi and Vibrio alginolyticus, the transcription and expression of copper zinc superoxide dismutase (LvCZSOD) in the hepatopancreas were dramatically lower in shrimp with knocked down LvDJ-1 than in controls. Transcription and expression of P53 (LvP53) were significantly higher in shrimp lacking LvDJ-1 than in controls. Hepatopancreas samples were analyzed using real time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Moreover, blood samples from the shrimp, assessed with flow cytometry, showed significant increases in respiratory burst and apoptosis in those lacking LvDJ-1 compared to the controls. Cumulative mortality in the shrimp lacking LvDJ-1 was significantly different from that in the control group after challenge with V. alginolyticus. Altogether, the results prove that LvDJ-1 regulates apoptosis and antioxidant activity, and that these functions play an important role in L. vannamei resistance against V. alginolyticus.

  16. A novel fluid-feeding mechanism for microbivory in the Acariformes (Arachnida: Acari).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Samuel J; Bauchan, Gary R; Ochoa, Ronald; Klompen, Hans

    2015-07-01

    Low temperature scanning electron microscopy (LT-SEM) has revealed anatomical details suggesting that Osperalycus and Gordialycus (Acariformes: Nematalycidae) have an unusual feeding apparatus that is hypothesized to be specialized for feeding on the fluid contents of small microorganisms (diameter<5 μm). Both mite genera have a feeding strategy that appears to involve picking up small microorganisms and placing them onto the subcapitulum for puncturing. However, they have slightly different variants of the same basic rupturing mechanism. Whereas Gordialycus has evolved expansive and convergent rutella to hold the microorganisms in place while pushing chelicerae into them, Osperalycus has evolved a pouch into which a microorganism is inserted. The rutella reinforce this pouch while the chelicerae break up the microorganism. Both types of mouthpart apparatus seem to be adapted to minimize waste, an appropriate specialization given the organically impoverished habitats in which these mites live.

  17. Relaxation time diagram for identifying heat generation mechanisms in magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Enio, E-mail: lima@cab.cnea.gov.ar; De Biasi, Emilio; Zysler, Roberto D.; Vasquez Mansilla, Marcelo; Mojica-Pisciotti, Mary L. [Centro Atómico Bariloche/CONICET (Argentina); Torres, Teobaldo E.; Calatayud, M. Pilar; Marquina, C.; Ricardo Ibarra, M.; Goya, Gerardo F. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón INA (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    We present a versatile diagram to envisage the dominant relaxation mechanism of single-domain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under alternating magnetic fields, as those used in magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The diagram allows estimating the heating efficiency, measured by the Specific Power Absorption (SPA), originated in the magnetic and viscous relaxation times of single-domain MNPs for a given frequency of the ac magnetic field (AFM). The diagram has been successfully applied to different colloids, covering a wide variety of MNPs with different magnetic anisotropy and particle size, and dispersed in different viscous liquid carriers. From the general diagram, we derived a specific chart based on the Linear Response Theory in order to easily estimate the experimental condition for the optimal SPA values of most colloids currently used in MFH.

  18. [Concepts of basic physics that every cardiovascular surgeon should know: part I - mechanics of fluids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza de; Alves, Fernanda Tomé; Silva, Marcos Vinícius Pinto e; Croti, Ulisses Alexandre; Godoy, Moacir Fernandes de; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2010-01-01

    The professional activity that the cardiovascular surgeon performs is much more than a simple gesture to mechanically operate the patient's heart. There is in every act of intraoperative most notions of physiology and physics than we generally realize. This paper discusses, in the light of mathematics, on the dynamics of fluids, ie blood, focused on invasive measurements of blood pressure, the effect of vessel size on its internal resistance and the flow passing through it in conversion of various units of measurements of pressure and resistance, blood viscosity and its relationship to the vessel, hemodilution, differences in laminar and turbulent flow, velocity and blood pressure and wall tension after a stenosis and the origin of poststenotic aneurysm. This study is not to enable the reader to the knowledge of all physics, but to show it as a useful tool in explaining phenomena known in the routine of cardiovascular surgery.

  19. Modelling the Fluid Mechanics of Cilia and Flagella in Reproduction and Development

    CERN Document Server

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D; Smith, David J; Loghin, Daniel; Blake, John R

    2013-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are actively bending slender organelles, performing functions such as motility, feeding and embryonic symmetry breaking. We review the mechanics of viscous-dominated microscale flow, including time-reversal symmetry, drag anisotropy of slender bodies, and wall effects. We focus on the fundamental force singularity, higher order multipoles, and the method of images, providing physical insight and forming a basis for computational approaches. Two biological problems are then considered in more detail: (1) left-right symmetry breaking flow in the node, a microscopic structure in developing vertebrate embryos, and (2) motility of microswimmers through non-Newtonian fluids. Our model of the embryonic node reveals how particle transport associated with morphogenesis is modulated by the gradual emergence of cilium posterior tilt. Our model of swimming makes use of force distributions within a body-conforming finite element framework, allowing the solution of nonlinear inertialess Carreau flow. We ...

  20. Analytical approach to linear fractional partial differential equations arising in fluid mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momani, Shaher [Department of Mathematics, Mutah University, P.O. Box 7, Al-Karak (Jordan)]. E-mail: shahermm@yahoo.com; Odibat, Zaid [Prince Abdullah Bin Ghazi Faculty of Science and IT, Al-Balqa' Applied University, Salt (Jordan)]. E-mail: odibat@bau.edu.jo

    2006-07-10

    In this Letter, we implement relatively new analytical techniques, the variational iteration method and the Adomian decomposition method, for solving linear fractional partial differential equations arising in fluid mechanics. The fractional derivatives are described in the Caputo sense. The two methods in applied mathematics can be used as alternative methods for obtaining analytic and approximate solutions for different types of fractional differential equations. In these methods, the solution takes the form of a convergent series with easily computable components. The corresponding solutions of the integer order equations are found to follow as special cases of those of fractional order equations. Some numerical examples are presented to illustrate the efficiency and reliability of the two methods.

  1. Mosquitoes drink with a burst in reserve: explaining pumping behavior with a fluid mechanics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Souvick; Socha, Jake; Stremler, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Mosquitoes drink using a pair of in-line pumps in the head that draw liquid food through the proboscis. Experimental observations with synchrotron x-ray imaging indicate two modes of drinking: a predominantly occurring continuous mode, in which the cibarial and pharyngeal pumps expand cyclically at a constant phase difference, and an occasional, isolated burst mode, in which the pharyngeal pump expansion is 10 to 30 times larger than in the continuous mode. We have used a reduced order model of the fluid mechanics to hypothesize an explanation of this variation in drinking behavior. Our model results show that the continuous mode is more energetically efficient, whereas the burst mode creates a large pressure drop across the proboscis, which could potentially be used to clear blockages. Comparisons with pump knock-out configurations demonstrate different functional roles of the pumps in mosquito feeding. This material is based upon work supported by the NSF under Grant No. #0938047.

  2. Coordinate Systems, Numerical Objects and Algorithmic Operations of Computational Experiment in Fluid Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degtyarev Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the computer implementation of direct computational experiments in fluid mechanics, constructed on the basis of the approach developed by the authors. The proposed approach allows the use of explicit numerical scheme, which is an important condition for increasing the effciency of the algorithms developed by numerical procedures with natural parallelism. The paper examines the main objects and operations that let you manage computational experiments and monitor the status of the computation process. Special attention is given to a realization of tensor representations of numerical schemes for direct simulation; b realization of representation of large particles of a continuous medium motion in two coordinate systems (global and mobile; c computing operations in the projections of coordinate systems, direct and inverse transformation in these systems. Particular attention is paid to the use of hardware and software of modern computer systems.

  3. Analytical solutions for transport processes fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Brenn, Günter

    2017-01-01

    This book provides analytical solutions to a number of classical problems in transport processes, i.e. in fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer. Expanding computing power and more efficient numerical methods have increased the importance of computational tools. However, the interpretation of these results is often difficult and the computational results need to be tested against the analytical results, making analytical solutions a valuable commodity. Furthermore, analytical solutions for transport processes provide a much deeper understanding of the physical phenomena involved in a given process than do corresponding numerical solutions. Though this book primarily addresses the needs of researchers and practitioners, it may also be beneficial for graduate students just entering the field. .

  4. Fluid mechanics simulation of fog formation associated with polluted atmosphere produced by energy related fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO4(-2), NO3(-1), and NH4(+1) have been detected in highly industrialized areas. Most aerosol products come from energy-related fuel combustion. Fluid mechanics simulation of both microphysical and macrophysical processes is considered in studying the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results demonstrate that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog having condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere.

  5. The fluid mechanics of a sac-type ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C; Jin, W; Glaser, A

    1990-12-01

    Flow visualisation and velocity measurement studies have been carried out on the liquid side of a sac-type VAD. The objectives have been to identify both good (e.g. short residence times) and bad (e.g. high turbulence levels) flow characteristics. The flow was visualised using polystyrene micro-spheres illuminated with white light on selected transverse planes across the pumping chamber and its inlet and outlet connections. These results then served as a guide for velocity measurements using laser-Doppler anemometry. Flow tests were run using water or a water/glycerol mixture. Operating conditions were determined from the appropriate fluid mechanics modelling laws to ensure dynamical similarity. Initially, steady flow behaviour was investigated including the effects of removal and insertion of the tilting-disc inlet and outlet valves. In subsequent full pumping tests, using a pneumatic driver, regions of high shear, separation, and high turbulence intensity have been identified.

  6. A fluid mechanical model for mixing in a plankton predator-prey system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J.; Dabiri, J. O.

    2009-04-01

    A Lagrangian method is developed to study mixing of small particles in open flows. Particle Lagrangian Coherent Structures (pLCS) are identified as transport barriers in the dynamical systems of particles. We apply this method to a planktonic predator-prey system in which moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita uses its body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. With the flow generated by the jellyfish experimentally measured and the dynamics of prey particles in the flow described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation, we use pLCS to identify the capture region in which prey can be captured. The properties of the capture region enable analysis of the effects of several physiological and mechanical parameters on the predator-prey interaction, such as prey size, escape force, predator perception, etc. The method provides a new methodology to study dynamics and mixing of small organisms in general.

  7. Stroke volume variation compared with pulse pressure variation and cardiac index changes for prediction of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Aly Soliman

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Baseline stroke volume variation ⩾8.15% predicted fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with acute circulatory failure. The study also confirmed the ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness.

  8. Interstitial fluid flow in canaliculi as a mechanical stimulus for cancellous bone remodeling: in silico validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameo, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Taiji

    2014-08-01

    Cancellous bone has a dynamic 3-dimensional architecture of trabeculae, the arrangement of which is continually reorganized via bone remodeling to adapt to the mechanical environment. Osteocytes are currently believed to be the major mechanosensory cells and to regulate osteoclastic bone resorption and osteoblastic bone formation in response to mechanical stimuli. We previously developed a mathematical model of trabecular bone remodeling incorporating the possible mechanisms of cellular mechanosensing and intercellular communication in which we assumed that interstitial fluid flow activates the osteocytes to regulate bone remodeling. While the proposed model has been validated by the simulation of remodeling of a single trabecula, it remains unclear whether it can successfully represent in silico the functional adaptation of cancellous bone with its multiple trabeculae. In the present study, we demonstrated the response of cancellous bone morphology to uniaxial or bending loads using a combination of our remodeling model with the voxel finite element method. In this simulation, cancellous bone with randomly arranged trabeculae remodeled to form a well-organized architecture oriented parallel to the direction of loading, in agreement with the previous simulation results and experimental findings. These results suggested that our mathematical model for trabecular bone remodeling enables us to predict the reorganization of cancellous bone architecture from cellular activities. Furthermore, our remodeling model can represent the phenomenological law of bone transformation toward a locally uniform state of stress or strain at the trabecular level.

  9. Influence of fluid thermal sensitivity on the thermo-mechanical stability of the Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. G.; Sureshkumar, R.; Khomami, B.

    2003-11-01

    Recent theoretical [Al-Mubaiyedh et al., Phys. Fluids 11, 3217 (1999); J. Fluid Mech. 462, 111 (2002)] and experimental [White and Muller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 5130 (2000); J. Fluid Mech. 462, 133 (2002)] studies have revealed that viscous heating causes significant destabilization of the Taylor-Couette flow of highly viscous and thermally sensitive fluids. In this work, the roles of thermal sensitivity of fluid properties and co-rotation on the thermo-mechanical stability of Taylor-Couette flow are investigated theoretically. In turn, our theoretical findings are compared with the recent experimental ones by White and Muller [Phys. Fluids 14, 3880 (2002)]. It is shown that a finite gap temperature is necessary to predict the time-dependent transitions observed in the experiments. A universal scaling between the critical Reynolds number and the Nahme number is obtained for intermediate values of Nahme number ranging from 0.01 to 1.0. Studies are also performed to determine the influence of co-rotation of the outer cylinder relative to the inner one on the thermo-mechanical stability. Overall, a very favorable comparison between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  10. Alterations in cancer cell mechanical properties after fluid shear stress exposure: a micropipette aspiration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chivukula VK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Venkat Keshav Chivukula,1 Benjamin L Krog,1,2 Jones T Nauseef,2 Michael D Henry,2 Sarah C Vigmostad1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: Over 90% of cancer deaths result not from primary tumor development, but from metastatic tumors that arise after cancer cells circulate to distal sites via the circulatory system. While it is known that metastasis is an inefficient process, the effect of hemodynamic parameters such as fluid shear stress (FSS on the viability and efficacy of metastasis is not well understood. Recent work has shown that select cancer cells may be able to survive and possibly even adapt to FSS in vitro. The current research seeks to characterize the effect of FSS on the mechanical properties of suspended cancer cells in vitro. Nontransformed prostate epithelial cells (PrEC LH and transformed prostate cancer cells (PC-3 were used in this study. The Young's modulus was determined using micropipette aspiration. We examined cells in suspension but not exposed to FSS (unsheared and immediately after exposure to high (6,400 dyn/cm2 and low (510 dyn/cm2 FSS. The PrEC LH cells were ~140% stiffer than the PC-3 cells not exposed to FSS. Post-FSS exposure, there was an increase of ~77% in Young's modulus after exposure to high FSS and a ~47% increase in Young's modulus after exposure to low FSS for the PC-3 cells. There was no significant change in the Young's modulus of PrEC LH cells post-FSS exposure. Our findings indicate that cancer cells adapt to FSS, with an increased Young's modulus being one of the adaptive responses, and that this adaptation is specific only to PC-3 cells and is not seen in PrEC LH cells. Moreover, this adaptation appears to be graded in response to the magnitude of FSS experienced by the cancer cells. This is the first study

  11. Irreversible Aspects of Continuum Mechanics and Transfer of Physical Characteristics in Moving Fluids : Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Sedov, L

    1968-01-01

    At its meeting on April 23, 1965 in Paris the Bureau of IUTAM decided to have a Symposium on the Irreversible Aspects of Continaum Mechanics held in June 1966 in Vienna. In addition, a Symposium on the Transfer of Physical Characteristics in Moving Fluids which, orig­ inally, had been scheduled to take place in Stockholm was rescheduled to be held in Vienna immediately following the Symposium on the Irre­ versible Aspects of Continuum Mechanics. It was felt that the subjects of the two symposia were so closely related that participants should be given an opportunity to attend both. Both decisions were unanimously approved by the members of the General Assembly of IUTAM. Prof. H. PARKUS, Vienna, was appointed Chairman of the Symposium on the Irreversible Aspects, and Prof. L. I. SEDOV, Moscow, was appointed Chairman of the Symposium on the Transfer of Physical Characteristics, with Prof. P ARKUS being re­ sponsible for the local organization of both symposia. In accordance with the policy set forth by IUTAM...

  12. Thermal, mechanical and fluid flow aspects of the high power beam dump for FRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilov, Mikhail; Aaron, Adam; Amroussia, Aida; Bergez, Wladimir; Boehlert, Carl; Burgess, Thomas; Carroll, Adam; Colin, Catherine; Durantel, Florent; Ferrante, Paride; Fourmeau, Tiffany; Graves, Van; Grygiel, Clara; Kramer, Jacob; Mittig, Wolfgang; Monnet, Isabelle; Patel, Harsh; Pellemoine, Frederique; Ronningen, Reginald; Schein, Mike

    2016-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) under construction at Michigan State University is based on a 400 kW heavy ion accelerator and uses in-flight production and separation to generate rare isotope beams. The first section of the fragment separator houses the rare isotope production target, and the primary beam dump to stop the unreacted primary beam. The experimental program will use 400 kW ion beams from 16O to 238U. After interaction with the production target, over 300 kW in remaining beam power must be absorbed by the beam dump. A rotating water-cooled thin-shell metal drum was chosen as the basic concept for the beam dump. Extensive thermal, mechanical and fluid flow analyses were performed to evaluate the effects of the high power density in the beam dump shell and in the water. Many properties were optimized simultaneously, such as shell temperature, mechanical strength, fatigue strength, and radiation resistance. Results of the analyses of the beam dump performance with different design options will be discussed. For example, it was found that a design modification to the initial water flow pattern resulted in a substantial increase in the wall heat transfer coefficient. A detailed evaluation of materials for the shell is in progress. The widely used titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V (wt%), is presently considered as the best candidate, and is the subject of specific tests, such as studies of performance under heavy ion irradiation.

  13. Mechanical behavior of a fluid-sensitive material during liquid diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiastuti, Indah; Sbarski, Igor; Masood, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    This paper described the analytical study that we performed in an attempt to understand the combined effect of liquid diffusion and temperature on the mechanical response of viscoelastic liquid-sensitive material. A constitutive equation for linear viscoelasticity, which includes the effect of liquid diffusion, is used to model the mechanical response of a fluid-sensitive polymer such as PLA-based bioplastic. The viscoelastic characteristics which represent material degradation due to liquid diffusion were expressed using a creep-based formulation represented by Burger's model. Creep experiment data were fitted to the Burgers model to provide a liquid content-dependent set of input data for subsequent time-dependent analysis. Further, analytical solutions for stresses and deformations were obtained from the corresponding elastic solution by applying the Correspondence Principle, using previously defined material characteristics. Spatial and time variations of stress and deformation were evaluated to give a precise description of the material behavior under hygroscopic conditions. We propose a stress concentration factor to take into account the liquid diffusion-induced stress that may result in a failure of an application. The results emphasize the importance of considering liquid diffusion and viscoelastic properties in the design of components using liquid-absorbable material.

  14. Increased Cerebrospinal Fluid Production as a Possible Mechanism Underlying Caffeine's Protective Effect against Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wostyn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, the most common type of dementia among older people, is characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. Despite major advances in understanding the molecular etiology of the disease, progress in the clinical treatment of AD patients has been extremely limited. Therefore, new and more effective therapeutic approaches are needed. Accumulating evidence from human and animal studies suggests that the long-term consumption of caffeine, the most commonly used psychoactive drug in the world, may be protective against AD. The mechanisms underlying the suggested beneficial effect of caffeine against AD remain to be elucidated. In recent studies, several potential neuroprotective effects of caffeine have been proposed. Interestingly, a recent study in rats showed that the long-term consumption of caffeine increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF production, associated with the increased expression of Na+-K+ ATPase and increased cerebral blood flow. Compromised function of the choroid plexus and defective CSF production and turnover, with diminished clearance of Aβ, may be one mechanism implicated in the pathogenesis of late-onset AD. If reduced CSF turnover is a risk factor for AD, then therapeutic strategies to improve CSF flow are reasonable. In this paper, we hypothesize that long-term caffeine consumption could exert protective effects against AD at least in part by facilitating CSF production, turnover, and clearance. Further, we propose a preclinical experimental design allowing evaluation of this hypothesis.

  15. Influence of Reduced Mass Flow Rate and Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R Jeremy; Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Industry interest in variable-thrust liquid rocket engines places a demand on engine injector technology to operate over a wide range of liquid mass flow rates and chamber backpressures. One injection technology of current interest for variable thrust applications is an injector design with swirled fluids. Current swirl injector design methodologies do not take into account how swirl injector design parameters respond to elevated chamber backpressures at less than design mass flow rates. The current work was created to improve state-of-the-art swirl injector design methods in this area. The specific objective was to study the effects of elevated chamber backpressure and off-design mass flow rates on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a backpressure chamber with optical access, water was flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates. The film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section was measured through a transparent nozzle section of the injector. High speed video showed measurable increases in the film thickness profile with application of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates less than design. At prescribed combinations of chamber backpressure and injected mass flow rate, a discrete change in the film thickness profile was observed. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber backpressure at low mass flow rates as opposed to near-design mass flow rates. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber backpressure decreased the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. Experimental measurements and discussion of these results are reported in this paper.

  16. Influence of Reduced Mass Flow Rate and Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R Jeremy; Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Industry interest in variable-thrust liquid rocket engines places a demand on engine injector technology to operate over a wide range of liquid mass flow rates and chamber backpressures. One injection technology of current interest for variable thrust applications is an injector design with swirled fluids. Current swirl injector design methodologies do not take into account how swirl injector design parameters respond to elevated chamber backpressures at less than design mass flow rates. The current work was created to improve state-of-the-art swirl injector design methods in this area. The specific objective was to study the effects of elevated chamber backpressure and off-design mass flow rates on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a backpressure chamber with optical access, water was flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates. The film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section was measured through a transparent nozzle section of the injector. High speed video showed measurable increases in the film thickness profile with application of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates less than design. At prescribed combinations of chamber backpressure and injected mass flow rate, a discrete change in the film thickness profile was observed. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber backpressure at low mass flow rates as opposed to near-design mass flow rates. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber backpressure decreased the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. Experimental measurements and discussion of these results are reported in this paper.

  17. On acoustics of cavitating flows and wave mechanics of two-phase fluids; Zur Akustik kavitierender Stroemungen und Wellenmechanik zweiphasiger Fluide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricoeur, A.

    2000-07-01

    The subject under consideration is the development and propagation of sound in two-phase flows. The investigations are focused on fluids, which are composed of liquid and gas. The gaseous phase may consist of both noncondensable gas and of vapour, originating from phase transitions of the liquid. Fields of application are, among others, flow noise, sonochemistry, the acoustical surveillance of industrial flow processes or ocean acoustics. A stochastic model, which describes spectral properties of noise sources, conditioned by imploding vapour bubbles, is connected to transfer functions. The latter are based on constitutive equations, accounting for the wave mechanics of the two-phase fluids. In combination with a numerical algorithm they permit for the calculation of noise spectra at any distance from the noise sources. The field problem is solved by implementing the constitutive equations into a hybrid boundary element method, which combines low discretization effort with fast evaluation of domain variables. The constitutive equations are based on models for the dynamics of gas- and vapour bubbles. Therefore, the nonlinear and linear bubble dynamics are extensively investigated. Furthermore, fundamental knowledge concerning wave dispersion in two-phase fluids is presented. The constitutive equation for pseudocavitation is experimentally verified by means of an acoustical wave guide. Additionally the experimental set-up serves for investigating fluid-structure-interaction. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeit befasst sich mit der Entstehung und Ausbreitung von Schall in Zweiphasenstroemungen. Betrachtet werden Fluide aus Fluessigkeit und Gas, deren Gasphase sowohl als nichtkondensierendes Gas, als auch in Gestalt des Dampfes der Fluessigkeit vorliegt. Anwendungen liegen beispielsweise in der Stroemungsakustik, der Sonochemie, der akustischen Ueberwachung verfahrenstechnischer Prozesse oder der Meeresakustik. Ein stochastisches Modell zur spektralen Beschreibung von

  18. The role of lubricin in the mechanical behavior of synovial fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, G. D.; Torres, J. R.; Warman, M. L.; Laderer, M. C.; Breuer, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a semidilute hyaluronate (HA) polymer solution, the rheology of which depends on HA–protein interactions, and lubricin is a HA-binding protein found in synovial fluid and at cartilage surfaces, where it contributes to boundary lubrication under load. Individuals with genetic deficiency of lubricin develop precocious joint failure. The role of lubricin in synovial fluid rheology is not known. We used a multiple-particle-tracking microrheology technique to study the molecular interactions between lubricin and HA in synovial fluid. Particles (200 nm mean diameter) embedded in normal and lubricin-deficient synovial fluid samples were tracked separately by using multiple-particle-tracking microrheology. The time-dependent ensemble-averaged mean-squared displacements of all of the particles were measured over a range of physiologically relevant frequencies. The mean-squared displacement correlation with time lag had slopes with values of unity for simple HA solutions and for synovial fluid from an individual who genetically lacked lubricin, in contrast to slopes with values less than unity (α ≈ 0.6) for normal synovial fluid. These data correlated with bulk rheology studies of the same samples. We found that the subdiffusive and elastic behavior of synovial fluid, at physiological shear rates, was absent in fluid from a patient who lacks lubricin. We conclude that lubricin provides synovial fluid with an ability to dissipate strain energy induced by mammalian locomotion, which is a chondroprotective feature that is distinct from boundary lubrication. PMID:17404241

  19. Mechanics of granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids in civil and mining engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alehossein, H.; Qin, Z.

    2013-10-01

    The shear stress generated in mine backfill slurries and fresh concrete contains both velocity gradient dependent and frictional terms, categorised as frictional viscous plastic fluids. This paper discusses application of the developed analytical solution for flow rate as a function of pressure and pressure gradient in discs, pipes and cones for such frictional Bingham-Herschel-Bulkley fluids. This paper discusses application of this continuum fluid model to industrial materials like mine and mineral slurries, backfills and fresh concrete tests.

  20. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernathy, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code for application to traditional incompressible flow problems has been developed. The method is actually a slight compressibility approach which takes advantage of the bulk modulus and finite sound speed of all real fluids. The finite element numerical analog uses a dynamic differencing scheme based, in part, on a variational principle for computational fluid dynamics. The code was developed in order to study the feasibility of damping seals for high speed turbomachinery. Preliminary seal analyses have been performed.

  1. Implementation of a Modular Hands-on Learning Pedagogy: Student Attitudes in a Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgher, J. K.; Finkel, D.; Adesope, O. O.; Van Wie, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a within-subjects experimental design to compare the effects of learning with lecture and hands-on desktop learning modules (DLMs) in a fluid mechanics and heat transfer class. The hands-on DLM implementation included the use of worksheets and one of two heat exchangers: an evaporative cooling device and a shell and tube heat…

  2. Embedding Hands-On Mini Laboratory Experiences in a Core Undergraduate Fluid Mechanics Course: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Duanduan; Ugaz, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Three self-contained mini-labs were integrated into a core undergraduate fluid mechanics course, with the goal of delivering hands-on content in a manner scalable to large class sizes. These mini-labs supported learning objectives involving friction loss in pipes, flow measurement, and centrifugal pump analysis. The hands-on experiments were…

  3. Implementation of a Modular Hands-on Learning Pedagogy: Student Attitudes in a Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgher, J. K.; Finkel, D.; Adesope, O. O.; Van Wie, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a within-subjects experimental design to compare the effects of learning with lecture and hands-on desktop learning modules (DLMs) in a fluid mechanics and heat transfer class. The hands-on DLM implementation included the use of worksheets and one of two heat exchangers: an evaporative cooling device and a shell and tube heat…

  4. Comparison of Venous Return Characteristics with Right Ventricular Mechanics During Cephalic Fluid Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Morgan; Martin, David

    2015-01-01

    For my summer internship project, I organized a pilot study to analyze the effects of a cephalic fluid shift on venous return and right ventricular mechanics to increase right ventricular and venous knowledge. To accomplish this pilot study, I wrote a testing protocol, obtained Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, completed subject payment forms, lead testing sessions, and analyzed the data. This experiment used -20deg head down tilt (20 HDT) as the ground based simulation for the fluid shift that occurs during spaceflight and compared it to data obtained from the seated and supine positions. Using echocardiography, data was collected for the right ventricle, hepatic vein, internal jugular vein, external jugular vein, and inferior vena cava. Additionally, non-invasive venous pressure measurements, similar to those soon to be done in-orbit, were collected. It was determined that the venous return from below the heard is increased during 20 HDT, which was supported by increased hepatic vein velocities, increased right ventricular inflow, and increased right ventricular strain at 20 HDT relative to seated values. Jugular veins in the neck undergo an increase in pressure and area, but no significant increase in flow, relative to seated values when a subject is tilted 20 HDT. Contrary to the initial expectations based on this jugular flow, there was no significant increase in central venous pressure, as evidenced by no change in Doppler indices for right arterial pressure or inferior vena cava diameter. It is suspected that these differences in pressure are due to the hydrostatic pressure indifference point shifting during tilt; there is a potential for a similar phenomenon with microgravity. This data will hopefully lead to a more in-depth understanding of the response of the body to microgravity and how those relate to the previously mentioned cardiovascular risk of fluid shift that is associated with spaceflight. These results were presented in greater detail

  5. Analysis of fluid lubrication mechanisms in metal forming at mesoscopic scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubar, L.; Hubert, C.; Christiansen, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    The lubricant entrapment and escape phenomena in metal forming are studied experimentally as well as numerically. Experiments are carried out in strip reduction of aluminium sheet applying a transparent die to study the fluid flow between mesoscopic cavities. The numerical analysis involves two...... computation steps. The first one is a fully coupled fluid-structure Finite Element computation, where pockets in the surface are plastically deformed leading to the pressurization of the entrapped fluid. The second step computes the fluid exchange between cavities through the plateaus of asperity contacts...

  6. Selection principles and pattern formation in fluid mechanics and nonlinear shell theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Duane P.

    1987-01-01

    Research accomplishments are summarized and publications generated under the contract are listed. The general purpose of the research was to investigate various symmetry breaking problems in fluid mechanics by the use of structure parameters and selection principles. Although all of the nonlinear problems studied involved systems of partial differential equations, many of these problems led to the study of a single nonlinear operator equation of the form F(w, lambda, gamma) = 0, (w is an element of H), (lambda is an element of R1), (gamma is an element of R1). Instead of varying only the load parameter lambda, as is often done in the study of such equations, one of the main ideas used was to vary the structure parameter gamma in such a way that stable solutions were obtained. In this way one determines detailed stability results by making use of the structure of the model equations and the known physical parameters of the problem. The approach was carried out successfully for Benard-type convection problems, Taylor-like problems for short cylinders, rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flows, and plane Couette flows. The main focus of the research was on wave theory of vortex breakdown in a tube. A number of preliminary results for inviscid axisymmetric flows were obtained.

  7. Fluid mechanics of ventilation system generated by buoyancy and momentum sources and experiments research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin; HUANG Chen; FU Yu-ying; CAO Wei-wu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents fluid mechanics of ventilation system formed by the momentum source and the buoyancy source,which investigates inter-action between the plume and the non-isothermal air jet since buoyancy source is produced by the plume and momentum source is generated by the air jet,respectively.The interaction is discussed by a mathematical model,an idealized situation of the plume rising from a point heat source of buoyancy alone-in particular the initial momentum flux at the source is zero.Furthermore,the paper discusses the effects of the parameters such as strength of source,air-flow volume and air-flow velocity used in the mathematical-physical model.Considering the effect of the plume generated by the indoor heat source,one expression of trajectory of the non-isothermal air jet produced by jet diffuser is deduced.And field-experiment has also been carried out to illustrate the effect on flowing-action of the air jet and validate the theoretical work.It can be concluded that the heat sources do have effect on the flowing-action of the air jet,and the effect mainly depends on the interaction produced by the plume and the air jet.The results show that the thermal buoyant effect of plumes on the air jet should be taken into account if the indoor heat sources are large enough.Numerical simulation is conducted and coincides with the experimental results as well.

  8. Balancing Venturi and Laissez-Faire Management Styles: Insights from Fluid Mechanical Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud Weijermars

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Mobilizing distributed Organizational Intelligence involves managerial efforts whereby the generation of new tacit knowledge requires dissemination of newly codified externalized knowledge. The managerial role in the early stage of knowledge creation is to support and stimulate the process of knowledge generation and to aid the diffusion of knowledge across organizational boundaries. In contrast, the subsequent 'harvesting' and goal-oriented application of knowledge requires convergence of human actors (H as carriers of distributed intelligence (DI. Optimization of the organizational performance and improved workflow efficiency is best effectuated by applying insights from fluid mechanical analogs. Several such analogs are introduced here and these provide insight that helps to funnel tacit and explicit knowledge into tangible asset value. Three sets of managerial lessons are inferred from the analogs: (1 Social bonding between professionals needs to be stimulated because professionals with strong social bonds (S can sustain effective workflows under relatively high pressures, while weak social bonds lead to turbulence and disruption; (2 Effective vision sharing is essential for goal-oriented and accelerated knowledge development in DI systems, and; (3 Managerial pressure may not overheat the critical limit that can be handled by resilient and strongly bonded DI networks, as this would result in disruptive turbulence even in experienced neural networks.

  9. Flippin' Fluid Mechanics - Using Online Technology to Enhance the In-Class Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, D. R.; Majerich, D. M.

    2013-11-01

    This study provides an empirical analysis of using online technologies and team problem solving sessions to shift an undergraduate fluid mechanics course from a traditional lecture format to a collaborative learning environment. Students were from two consecutive semesters of the same course taught by the same professor. One group used online technologies and solved problems in class and the other did not. Out of class, the treatment group watched 72 short (11 minutes, average) video lectures covering course topics and example problems being solved. Three times a week students worked in teams of two to solve problems on desktop whiteboard tablets while the instructor and graduate assistants provided ``just-in-time'' tutoring. The number of team problems assigned during the semester exceeded 100. Weekly online homework was assigned to reinforce topics. The WileyPlus online system generated unique problem parameters for each student. The control group received three-50 minute weekly lectures. Data include three midterms and a final exam. Regression results indicate that controlling for all of the entered variables, for every one more problem solving session the student attended, the final grade was raised by 0.327 points. Thus, if a student participated in all 25 of the team problem solving sessions, the final grade would have been 8.2 points higher, a difference of nearly a grade. Using online technologies and teamwork appeared to result in improved achievement, but more research is needed to support these findings.

  10. Solution of Fractional Partial Differential Equations in Fluid Mechanics by Extension of Some Iterative Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Hemeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An extension of the so-called new iterative method (NIM has been used to handle linear and nonlinear fractional partial differential equations. The main property of the method lies in its flexibility and ability to solve nonlinear equations accurately and conveniently. Therefore, a general framework of the NIM is presented for analytical treatment of fractional partial differential equations in fluid mechanics. The fractional derivatives are described in the Caputo sense. Numerical illustrations that include the fractional wave equation, fractional Burgers equation, fractional KdV equation, fractional Klein-Gordon equation, and fractional Boussinesq-like equation are investigated to show the pertinent features of the technique. Comparison of the results obtained by the NIM with those obtained by both Adomian decomposition method (ADM and the variational iteration method (VIM reveals that the NIM is very effective and convenient. The basic idea described in this paper is expected to be further employed to solve other similar linear and nonlinear problems in fractional calculus.

  11. Modelling the fluid mechanics of cilia and flagella in reproduction and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D; Smith, Andrew A; Smith, David J; Loghin, Daniel; Blake, John R

    2012-10-01

    Cilia and flagella are actively bending slender organelles, performing functions such as motility, feeding and embryonic symmetry breaking. We review the mechanics of viscous-dominated microscale flow, including time-reversal symmetry, drag anisotropy of slender bodies, and wall effects. We focus on the fundamental force singularity, higher-order multipoles, and the method of images, providing physical insight and forming a basis for computational approaches. Two biological problems are then considered in more detail: 1) left-right symmetry breaking flow in the node, a microscopic structure in developing vertebrate embryos, and 2) motility of microswimmers through non-Newtonian fluids. Our model of the embryonic node reveals how particle transport associated with morphogenesis is modulated by the gradual emergence of cilium posterior tilt. Our model of swimming makes use of force distributions within a body-conforming finite-element framework, allowing the solution of nonlinear inertialess Carreau flow. We find that a three-sphere model swimmer and a model sperm are similarly affected by shear-thinning; in both cases swimming due to a prescribed beat is enhanced by shear-thinning, with optimal Deborah number around 0.8. The sperm exhibits an almost perfect linear relationship between velocity and the logarithm of the ratio of zero to infinite shear viscosity, with shear-thickening hindering cell progress.

  12. An oral exam model for teaching advanced "Batchelor-level" fluid mechanics in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    A teaching model is developed to meet the challenge of teaching fluid mechanics at what might be considered a high level, at least by the current norms in the US. The initial goal was to avoid loss of concepts amidst the challenge of particular mathematical manipulations on particular assignments. However, it evolved toward fostering facile working knowledge of challenging material, such as in the books by Batchelor (e.g. streaming flow), Whitham (e.g. ship waves), and van Dyke (e.g. second-order boundary layer). To this end, the course model forgoes traditional assigned problems to focus on completion, augmentation, and in-depth understanding of the lecture material. The lectures are relatively traditional in structure, albeit with somewhat more interactive examples. The main unusual feature-again, by modern US standards-was assessment via multiple half-hour oral exams. This model has now been successful over 8 semesters for 3 different graduate courses in 2 departments. For all, students were assume to have already completed a full course at a "Navier-Stokes level". The presentation will include specifics of the course and exam structure, impressions of positive outcomes from the instructor, and a summary of the overwhelmingly positive student feedback.

  13. An application of computational fluid mechanics to the air flow in an infant incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Hanai, S; Horio, H; Hasegawa, T

    1992-01-01

    An application of the computational fluid mechanical method to the air flow in a two-dimensional model of an infant incubator was described. The air flow in a numerical model was simulated and the Navier-Stokes equations were directly solved using a finite-volume method incorporating a body-fitted coordinate system on a mini-supercomputer. The model was based on a real infant incubator, slightly simplified for the sake of computing speed, and included a model of a baby. The number of computation grids was 101 x 61 = 6161. The calculation was carried out under the condition of unsteady, starting airflow and the results were examined by the means of color graphics animation. There were several very large scale eddies in the incubator free space, and their global structure did not show strong changes once they were established. Although the global structure did not change, small scale eddies were shown to be produced around the air inlet and convected down through the free space of the incubator. From these results, we believe that assuming steady and uniform flow in the incubator may not always be relevant when considering heat loss of a baby in an incubator. The steady and uniform flow has been previously assumed either implicitly or explicitly by most of the authors.

  14. Mechanics of Fluid-Filled Interstitial Gaps. II. Gap Characteristics in Xenopus Embryonic Ectoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Debanjan; Parent, Serge E; Winklbauer, Rudolf

    2017-08-22

    The ectoderm of the Xenopus embryo is permeated by a network of channels that appear in histological sections as interstitial gaps. We characterized this interstitial space by measuring gap sizes, angles formed between adjacent cells, and curvatures of cell surfaces at gaps. From these parameters, and from surface-tension values measured previously, we estimated the values of critical mechanical variables that determine gap sizes and shapes in the ectoderm, using a general model of interstitial gap mechanics. We concluded that gaps of 1-4 μm side length can be formed by the insertion of extracellular matrix fluid at three-cell junctions such that cell adhesion is locally disrupted and a tension difference between cell-cell contacts and the free cell surface at gaps of 0.003 mJ/m(2) is generated. Furthermore, a cell hydrostatic pressure of 16.8 ± 1.7 Pa and an interstitial pressure of 3.9 ± 3.6 Pa, relative to the central blastocoel cavity of the embryo, was found to be consistent with the observed gap size and shape distribution. Reduction of cell adhesion by the knockdown of C-cadherin increased gap volume while leaving intracellular and interstitial pressures essentially unchanged. In both normal and adhesion-reduced ectoderm, cortical tension of the free cell surfaces at gaps does not return to the high values characteristic of the free surface of the whole tissue. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. How stress and temperature conditions affect rock-fluid chemistry and mechanical deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders eNermoen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the results from a series of chalk flow-through-compaction experiments performed at three effective stresses (0.5 MPa, 3.5 MPa and 12.3 MPa and two temperatures (92℃ and and 130℃. The results show that both stress and temperature are important to both chemical alteration and mechanical deformation. The experiments were conducted on cores drilled from the same block of outcrop chalks from the Obourg quarry within the Saint Vast formation (Mons, Belgium. The pore pressure was kept at 0.7 MPa for all experiments with a continuous flow of 0.219 M MgCl2 brine at a constant flow rate; 1 original pore volume (PV per day. The experiments have been performed in tri-axial cells with independent control of the external stress (hydraulic pressure in the confining oil, pore pressure, temperature, and the injected flow rate. Each experiment consists of two phases; a loading phase where stress-strain dependencies are investigated (approx. 2 days, and a creep phase that lasts for more than 150-160 days. During creep, the axial deformation was logged, and the effluent samples were collected for ion chromatography analyses. Any difference between the injected and produced water chemistry gives insight into the rock-fluid interactions that occur during flow through of the core. The observed effluent concentration shows a reduction in Mg2+, while the Ca2+ concentration is increased. This, together with SEM-EDS analysis, indicates that magnesium-bearing mineral phases are precipitated leading to dissolution of calcite, an observation . This is in-line with other flow-through experiments reported earlier. The observed dissolution and precipitation are sensitive to the effective stress and test temperature. Typically. H, higher stress and temperature lead to increased concentration differences of Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentration changes.. The observed strain can be partitioned additively into a mechanical and chemical driven component.

  16. How stress and temperature conditions affect rock-fluid chemistry and mechanical deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar; Aursjø, Olav; Madland, Merete; Kjørslevik, Trygve Alexander; Østensen, Geir

    2016-02-01

    We report the results from a series of chalk flow-through-compaction experiments performed at three effective stresses (0.5 MPa, 3.5 MPa and 12.3 MPa) and two temperatures (92° and and 130°). The results show that both stress and temperature are important to both chemical alteration and mechanical deformation. The experiments were conducted on cores drilled from the same block of outcrop chalks from the Obourg quarry within the Saint Vast formation (Mons, Belgium). The pore pressure was kept at 0.7 MPa for all experiments with a continuous flow of 0.219 M MgCl2 brine at a constant flow rate; 1 original pore volume (PV) per day. The experiments have been performed in tri-axial cells with independent control of the external stress (hydraulic pressure in the confining oil), pore pressure, temperature, and the injected flow rate. Each experiment consists of two phases; a loading phase where stress-strain dependencies are investigated (approx. 2 days), and a creep phase that lasts for more than 150-160 days. During creep, the axial deformation was logged, and the effluent samples were collected for ion chromatography analyses. Any difference between the injected and produced water chemistry gives insight into the rock-fluid interactions that occur during flow through of the core. The observed effluent concentration shows a reduction in Mg2+, while the Ca2+ concentration is increased. This, together with SEM-EDS analysis, indicates that magnesium-bearing mineral phases are precipitated leading to dissolution of calcite, an observation . This is in-line with other flow-through experiments reported earlier. The observed dissolution and precipitation are sensitive to the effective stress and test temperature. Typically. H, higher stress and temperature lead to increased concentration differences of Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentration changes.. The observed strain can be partitioned additively into a mechanical and chemical driven component.

  17. Influence of mechanical rock properties and fracture healing rate on crustal fluid flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel; de Riese, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow in the Earth's crust is very slow over extended periods of time, during which it occurs within the connected pore space of rocks. If the fluid production rate exceeds a certain threshold, matrix permeability alone is insufficient to drain the fluid volume and fluid pressure builds up, thereby reducing the effective stress supported by the rock matrix. Hydraulic fractures form once the effective pressure exceeds the tensile strength of the rock matrix and act subsequently as highly effective fluid conduits. Once local fluid pressure is sufficiently low again, flow ceases and fractures begin to heal. Since fluid flow is controlled by the alternation of fracture permeability and matrix permeability, the flow rate in the system is strongly discontinuous and occurs in intermittent pulses. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and subsequent healing of hydraulic fractures depends on the local fluid pressure and on the time-span between fluid pulses. We simulate this process with a computer model and describe the resulting dynamics statistically. Special interest is given to a) the spatially and temporally discontinuous formation and closure of fractures and fracture networks and b) the total flow rate over time. The computer model consists of a crustal-scale dual-porosity setup. Control parameters are the pressure- and time-dependent fracture healing rate, and the strength and the permeability of the intact rock. Statistical analysis involves determination of the multifractal properties and of the power spectral density of the temporal development of the total drainage rate and hydraulic fractures. References Bons, P. D. (2001). The formation of large quartz veins by rapid ascent of fluids in mobile hydrofractures. Tectonophysics, 336, 1-17. Miller, S. a., & Nur, A. (2000). Permeability as a toggle switch in fluid-controlled crustal processes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 183(1-2), 133-146. Sachau, T., Bons, P. D

  18. Fluid-mechanical Representation of Plate Boundaries - Trench-Ridge System -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, M.; Fukao, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic tomography models have been used extensively to simulate mantle convection driven by density heterogeneity. Such simulation to date has been unsuccessful to reconcile itself with the most obvious convection-related phenomenon of plate motions. Here we present a theoretical framework for tomography-based convection modeling to include the plates as an integral part of the mantle convection. We model the lithosphere as a highly viscous, incompressible, Newtonian fluid layer and plate boundaries as faults across which tangential velocities are discontinuous. Fluid-mechanical expressions of such faults have their exact analogies in the seismic source representation theory and can be derived by referring to it. We test this idea against the simplest two-dimensional case with only trench and ridge as plate boundaries, and with only subducting slab as mass anomaly. We model ridge (trench) as the horizontal (vertical) tensile fault that comprises of a conjugate pair of 45-degree dip normal (reverse) faults extending over the entire thickness of the surface layer. The system comprises of three elementary convections, slab mass-driven convection, trench fault-driven convection and ridge fault-driven convection. Flow due to the slab excess mass imposes vertical tensile stress on trench, which is released by flow driven by trench faulting. This faulting converts efficiently the vertical tensile stress to the horizontal tensile stress, which can transmit to extreme distances through the surface viscous layer. This horizontal tensile stress is relieved by flow driven by ridge faulting. The three elementary convections are thus coupled through the stress minimum conditions at ridge and trench. The resultant coupled flow is very plate-like in the surface viscous layer. In this system the horizontal surface velocity depends little on the relative distance between the ridge and trench and depends mostly on the excess weight of the subducting slab. The horizontal speed can be

  19. Interstitial fluid flow:simulation of mechanical environment of cells in the interosseous membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Yao; Guang-Hong Ding

    2011-01-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that subtle fluid flow environment plays a significant role in living biological tissues,while there is no in vivo practical dynamical measurement of the interstitial fluid flow velocity. On the basis of a new finding that capillaries and collagen fibrils in the interosseous membrane form a parallel array,we set up a porous media model simulating the flow field with FLUENT software,studied the shear stress on interstitial cells' surface due to the interstitial fluid flow,and analyzed the effect of flow on protein space distribution around the cells. The numerical simulation results show that the parallel nature of capillaries could lead to directional interstitial fluid flow in the direction of capillaries. Interstitial fluid flow would induce shear stress on the membrane of interstitial cells,up to 30 Pa or so,which reaches or exceeds the threshold values of cells' biological response observed in vitro. Interstitial fluid flow would induce nonuniform spacial distribution of secretion protein of mast cells. Shear tress on cells could be affected by capillary parameters such as the distance between the adjacent capillaries,blood pressure and the permeability coefficient of capillary's wall. The interstitial pressure and the interstitial porosity could also affect the shear stress on cells. In conclusion,numerical simulation provides an effective way for in vivo dynamic interstitial velocity research,helps to set up the vivid subtle interstitial flow environment of cells,and is beneficial to understanding the physiological functions of interstitial fluid flow.

  20. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics modelling in continuum mechanics: fluid-structure interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenenboom P. H. L.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Within this study, the implementation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH method solving the complex problem of interaction between a quasi-incompressible fluid involving a free surface and an elastic structure is outlined. A brief description of the SPH model for both the quasi-incompressible fluid and the isotropic elastic solid is presented. The interaction between the fluid and the elastic structure is realised through the contact algorithm. The results of numerical computations are confronted with the experimental as well as computational data published in the literature.

  1. Mechanical Parameters of the Squeeze Film Curvilinear Bearing Lubricated with a Prandtl Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka, A.; Walicki, E.

    2016-12-01

    Based upon a Prandtl fluid flow model, a curvilinear squeeze film bearing is considered. The equations of motion are given in a specific coordinate system. After general considerations on the Prandtl fluid flow these equations are used to derive the Reynolds equation. The solution of this equation is obtained by a method of successive approximation. As a result one obtains formulae expressing the pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity. The numerical examples of the Prandtl fluid flow in gaps of two simple bearings are presented.

  2. Respiratory mechanics and results of cytologic examination of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in healthy adult alpacas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Ana P; Bedenice, Daniela; Mazan, Melissa R; Hoffman, Andrew M

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate respiratory mechanical function and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytologic results in healthy alpacas. 16 client-owned adult alpacas. Measurements of pulmonary function were performed, including functional residual capacity (FRC) via helium dilution, respiratory system resistance via forced oscillatory technique (FOT), and assessment of breathing pattern by use of respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) in standing and sternally recumbent alpacas. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed orotracheally during short-term anesthesia. Mean ± SD measurements of respiratory function were obtained in standing alpacas for FRC (3.19 ± 0.53 L), tidal volume (0.8 ± 0.13 L), and respiratory system resistance at 1 Hz (2.70 ± 0.88 cm H(2)O/L/s), 2 Hz (2.98 ± 0.70 cm H(2)O/L/s), 3 Hz (3.14 ± 0.77 cm H(2)O/L/s), 5 Hz (3.45 ± 0.91 cm H(2)O/L/s), and 7 Hz (3.84 ± 0.93 cm H(2)O/L/s). Mean phase angle, as a measurement of thoracoabdominal asynchrony, was 19.59 ± 10.06°, and mean difference between nasal and plethysmographic flow measurements was 0.18 ± 0.07 L/s. Tidal volume, peak inspiratory flow, and peak expiratory flow were significantly higher in sternally recumbent alpacas than in standing alpacas. Cytologic examination of BAL fluid revealed 58.52 ± 12.36% alveolar macrophages, 30.53 ± 13.78% lymphocytes, 10.95 ± 9.29% neutrophils, 0% mast cells, and several ciliated epithelial cells. Pulmonary function testing was tolerated well in nonsedated untrained alpacas. Bronchoalveolar lavage in alpacas yielded samples with adequate cellularity that had a greater abundance of neutrophils than has been reported in horses.

  3. Mechanism and physiologic significance of the suppression of cholesterol esterification in human interstitial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Eric Miller

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol esterification in high density lipoproteins (HDLs by lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT promotes unesterified cholesterol (UC transfer from red cell membranes to plasma in vitro. However, it does not explain the transfer of UC from most peripheral cells to interstitial fluid in vivo, as HDLs in afferent peripheral lymph are enriched in UC. Having already reported that the endogenous cholesterol esterification rate (ECER in lymph is only five per cent of that in plasma, we have now explored the underlying mechanism. In peripheral lymph from 20 healthy men, LCAT concentration, LCAT activity (assayed using an optimized substrate, and LCAT specific activity averaged respectively 11.8, 10.3, and 84.9 per cent of plasma values. When recombinant human LCAT was added to lymph, the increments in enzyme activity were similar to those when LCAT was added to plasma. Addition of apolipoprotein AI (apo AI, fatty acid-free albumin, Intralipid, or the d<1.006 g/ml plasma fraction had no effect on ECER. During incubation of lymph plus plasma, the ECER was similar to that observed with buffer plus plasma. When lymph was added to heat-inactivated plasma, the ECER was 11-fold greater than with lymph plus buffer. Addition of discoidal proteoliposomes of apo AI and phosphatidycholine (PC to lymph increased ECER ten-fold, while addition of apo AI/PC/UC discs did so by only six-fold. We conclude that the low ECER in lymph is due to a property of the HDLs, seemingly substrate inhibition of LCAT by excess cell-derived UC. This is reversed when lymph enters plasma, consequent upon redistribution of UC from lymph HDLs to plasma lipoproteins.

  4. An experimental study of the fluid mechanics associated with porous walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Heaman, J.; Smith, A.

    1992-01-01

    The fluid mechanics of air exiting from a porous material is investigated. The experiments are filter rating dependent, as porous walls with filter ratings differing by about three orders of magnitude are studied. The flow behavior is investigated for its spatial and temporal stability. The results from the investigation are related to jet behavior in at least one of the following categories: (1) jet coalescence effects with increasing flow rate; (2) jet field decay with increasing distance from the porous wall; (3) jet field temporal turbulence characteristics; and (4) single jet turbulence characteristics. The measurements show that coalescence effects cause jet development, and this development stage can be traced by measuring the pseudoturbulence (spatial velocity variations) at any flow rate. The pseudoturbulence variation with increasing mass flow reveals an initial increasing trend followed by a leveling trend, both of which are directly proportional to the filter rating. A critical velocity begins this leveling trend and represents the onset of fully developed jetting action in the flow field. A correlation is developed to predict the onset of fully developed jets in the flow emerging from a porous wall. The data further show that the fully developed jet dimensions are independent of the filter rating, thus providing a length scale for this type of flow field (1 mm). Individual jet characteristics provide another unifying trend with similar velocity decay behavior with distance; however, the respective turbulence magnitudes show vast differences between jets from the same sample. Measurements of the flow decay with distance from the porous wall show that the higher spatial frequency components of the jet field dissipate faster than the lower frequency components. Flow turbulence intensity measurements show an out of phase behavior with the velocity field and are generally found to increase as the distance from the wall is increased.

  5. Numerical investigation of the deformation mechanism of a bubble or a drop rising or falling in another fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Han; Zhang Zhen-Yu; Yang Yong-Ming; Hu Yue; Zhang Hui-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    A numerical method for simulating the motion and deformation of an axisymmetric bubble or drop rising or falling in another infinite and initially stationary fluid is developed based on the volume of fluid(VOF)method in the frame of two incompressible and immiscible viscous fluids under the action of gravity,taking into consideration of surface tension effects.A comparison of the numerical results by this method with those by other works indicates the validity of the method.In the frame of inviscid and incompressible fluids without taking into consideration of surface tension effects,the mechanisms of the generation of the liquid jet and the transition from spherical shape to toroidal shape during the bubble or drop deformation,the increase of the ring diameter of the toroidal bubble or drop and the decrease of its cross-section area during its motion,and the effects of the density ratio of the two fluids on the deformation of the bubble or drop are analysed both theoretically and numerically.

  6. Positive Fluid Balance Is Associated with Higher Mortality and Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation in Pediatric Patients with Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi R. Flori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We analyzed a database of 320 pediatric patients with acute lung injury (ALI, to test the hypothesis that positive fluid balance is associated with worse clinical outcomes in children with ALI. Methods. This is a post-hoc analysis of previously collected data. Cumulative fluid balance was analyzed in ml per kilogram per day for the first 72 hours after ALI while in the PICU. The primary outcome was mortality; the secondary outcome was ventilator-free days. Results. Positive fluid balance (in increments of 10 mL/kg/24 h was associated with a significant increase in both mortality and prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, independent of the presence of multiple organ system failure and the extent of oxygenation defect. These relationships remained unchanged when the subgroup of patients with septic shock (n=39 were excluded. Conclusions. Persistently positive fluid balance may be deleterious to pediatric patients with ALI. A confirmatory, prospective randomized controlled trial of fluid management in pediatric patients with ALI is warranted.

  7. Origin of Gold—Bearing Fluid and Its Initiative Localization Mechanism in Xiadian Gold Deposit,Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 孙忠实; 等

    2002-01-01

    The composition of quartz inclusions and trace elements in ore indicate that gold-bearing fluid in the Xiadian gold deposit,Shandong Province,stemmed from both mantle and magma,belonging to a composite origin.Based on theoretical analysis and high temperature and high pressure experimental studies,gold-bearing fluid initiative localization mechanism and the forming environment of ore-host rocks are discussed in the present paper.The composite fluid extracted gold from rocks because of its expanding and injecting forces and injecting forces and flew through ore-conducive structures,leading to the breakup of rocks.The generation of ore-host faults and the precipitation of gold-bearing fluid occurred almost simultaneously.This study provides fur-ther information about the relationships between gold ore veins and basic-ultrabasic vein rocks and intermediate vein rocks,the spatial distribution of gold ore veins and the rules governing the migration of ore fluids.

  8. THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

    2012-01-01

    Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability

  9. Development of Fluid Mechanics Methods in the 20th Century and Their Application to Laminar and Turbulent Flow Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durst, Franz

    1999-11-01

    A short review of the development of fluid mechanics is given and it is pointed out that all methods that permit us these days to study fluid flows in detail have been developed in the second half of this century. It applies to the experimental techniques like hot-wire and laser-Doppler anemometry and also particle image velocimetry. It also applies to the numerical techniques that are employed these days to effectively compute details of laminar and turbulent flows using high performance computer codes on parallel vector computers. All these methods are briefly outlined and applications are shown to bring out new flow information about turbulent flows. The second half of this century has also brought out new analytical approaches to turbulence, based on the invariance of the anisotropy of turbulence. The background of this analysis is indicated and a physically based turbulence model is put forward for axissymmetric turbulence, i.e. turbulence as it occurs in diffusers and confusers. Extension of this work is indicated utilizing new experimental and numerical information obtained in well selected turbulent flows. An extension of this work is indicated using new experimental and numerical information as well as information obtained in well selected flows. Although the work touches the general developments in the field of fluid mechanics, it mainly concentrates on the outcome of research efforts at the Institute of Fluid mechanics of the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg (LSTM-Erlangen). This research work aims for basic information yielding new knowledge that can be used for advanced developments of fluid flow equipment. The transfer of these developments into industry is also indicated.

  10. The fluid control mechanism of bionic structural heterogeneous composite materials and its potential application in enhancing pump efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Tian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that the structure of dolphin skin controls fluid media dynamically. Gaining inspiration from this phenomenon, a kind of bionic structural heterogeneous composite material was designed. The bionic structural heterogeneous composite material is composed of two materials: a rigid metal base layer with bionic structures and an elastic polymer surface layer with the corresponding mirror structures. The fluid control mechanism of the bionic structural heterogeneous composite material was investigated using a fluid–solid interaction method in ANSYS Workbench. The results indicated that the bionic structural heterogeneous composite material’s fluid control mechanism is its elastic deformation, which is caused by the coupling action between the elastic surface material and the bionic structure. This deformation can decrease the velocity gradient of the fluid boundary layer through changing the fluid–solid actual contact surface and reduce the frictional force. The bionic structural heterogeneous composite material can also absorb some energy through elastic deformation and avoid energy loss. The bionic structural heterogeneous composite material was applied to the impeller of a centrifugal pump in a contrast experiment, increasing the pump efficiency by 5% without changing the hydraulic model of the impeller. The development of this bionic structural heterogeneous composite material will be straightforward from an engineering point of view, and it will have valuable practical applications.

  11. Fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules provides mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min; Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2011-03-23

    Dental thermal pain is a significant health problem in daily life and dentistry. There is a long-standing question regarding the phenomenon that cold stimulation evokes sharper and more shooting pain sensations than hot stimulation. This phenomenon, however, outlives the well-known hydrodynamic theory used to explain dental thermal pain mechanism. Here, we present a mathematical model based on the hypothesis that hot or cold stimulation-induced different directions of dentinal fluid flow and the corresponding odontoblast movements in dentinal microtubules contribute to different dental pain responses. We coupled a computational fluid dynamics model, describing the fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules, with a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, describing the discharge behavior of intradental neuron. The simulated results agreed well with existing experimental measurements. We thence demonstrated theoretically that intradental mechano-sensitive nociceptors are not "equally sensitive" to inward (into the pulp) and outward (away from the pulp) fluid flows, providing mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain. The model developed here could enable better diagnosis in endodontics which requires an understanding of pulpal histology, neurology and physiology, as well as their dynamic response to the thermal stimulation used in dental practices.

  12. Variabilidade biológica de isolados do Citrus leprosis virus (CiLV oriundos de cultivares de laranjeira Biological variability of Citrus leprosis virus (CiLV isolates from sweet orange cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadier de Oliveira Cunha Junior

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A leprose, causada pelo Citrus leprosis virus (CiLV, é uma das principais doenças presentes em pomares cítricos fluminenses. O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar o quadro sintomatológico desenvolvido por isolados de CiLV obtidos de cultivares comerciais de laranjeira (Lima, Pêra e Seleta, inoculados mecanicamente em Chenopodium amaranticolor, em três diluições. Após cinco a sete dias da inoculação foram observadas lesões necróticas, com pequeno halo clorótico quando observadas contra a luz. O maior número de lesões, nas três diluições, foi obtido do isolado de 'Seleta', seguido por 'Pêra' e 'Lima'. A melhor diluição utilizada para a observação das lesões foi de 1:10. Os resultados demonstram uma possível variabilidade biológica entre os isolados virais e/ou uma menor ou maior replicação viral, dependendo da cultivar, indicando um possível mecanismo de resistência da planta ao vírus.Citrus leprosis, caused by Citrus leprosis virus (CiLV is one of the major diseases in citrus orchards in the State of Rio de Janeiro. The objective of this study was to compare the development of symptoms on Chenopodium amaranticolor inoculated with CiLV isolates from 'Lima', 'Pera' and 'Seleta' sweet oranges using three different dilutions. Five to seven-days after inoculation, necrotic lesions exhibiting a small chlorotic halo when exposed to the light, were observed. The highest number of lesions developed using the three dilutions was obtained from 'Seleta', an intermediate value from 'Pêra' and the lowest number from 'Lima'. The best dilution for lesions development was 1:10. The results demonstrate a possible biological variability among the virus isolates and/or a lower or higher viral replication, dependent on the cultivar. This indicates a putative mechanism of Citrus resistance to the virus.

  13. Pressure wave propagation in fluid-filled co-axial elastic tubes. Part 2: Mechanisms for the pathogenesis of syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, P W; Berkouk, K; Lucey, A D

    2003-12-01

    Our aim in this paper is to use a simple theoretical model of the intraspinal cerebrospinal-fluid system to investigate mechanisms proposed for the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. The model is based on an inviscid theory for the propagation of pressure waves in co-axial, fluid-filled, elastic tubes. According to this model, the leading edge of a pressure pulse tends to steepen and form an elastic jump, as it propagates up the intraspinal cerebrospinal-fluid system. We show that when an elastic jump is incident on a stenosis of the spinal subarachnoid space, it reflects to form a transient, localized region of high pressure within the spinal cord that for a cough-induced pulse is estimated to be 50 to 70 mm Hg or more above the normal level in the spinal subarachnoid space. We propose this as a new mechanism whereby pressure pulses created by coughing or sneezing can generate syrinxes. We also use the same analysis to investigate Williams' suck mechanism. Our results do not support his concept, nor, in cases where the stenosis is severe, the differential-pressure-propagation mechanism recently proposed by Greitz et al. Our analysis does provide some support for the piston mechanism recently proposed by Oldfield et al. and Heiss et al. For instance, it shows clearly how the spinal cord is compressed by the formation of elastic jumps over part of the cardiac cycle. What appears to be absent for this piston mechanism is any means whereby the elastic jumps can be focused (e.g., by reflecting from a stenosis) to form a transient, localized region of high pressure within the spinal cord. Thus it would seem to offer a mechanism for syrinx progression, but not for its formation.

  14. Fluid mechanics moderate the effect of implementation intentions on a health prospective memory task in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Sarah Susanne; Schnitzspahn, Katharina Marlene; Melzer, Marlen; Hagner, Franziska; Bernhard, Anka; Kliegel, Matthias

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to test if a cognitive strategy improves older adults' prospective memory performance in a naturalistic health task. Moreover, it was tested if a possible strategy effect is moderated by individual differences. Therefore, a group of older adults was asked to perform a task taken from the medication adherence literature (i.e., blood pressure monitoring). Half of them were asked to form implementation intentions. Additionally, crystallized pragmatics and fluid mechanics, conscientiousness, self-efficacy, and lifestyle factors were assessed as possible moderators. Results showed a strong positive strategy effect on prospective memory. Moreover, the effect was qualified by a significant interaction and only emerged for participants with low levels in fluid mechanics. No other moderator showed an effect. In conclusion, an enhancing effect of implementation intentions on prospective memory seems to be dependent on individual differences in cognitive capacity and less related to key motivational or personality variables.

  15. Thermo-mechanical effects in drilling using metal working fluids and cryogenic cooling and their impact in tool performance

    OpenAIRE

    OUTEIRO, José; LENOIR, Pierrick; BOSSELUT, A.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic machining opens up new industrial perspectives in difficult-to-cut materials like nickel-based alloys. In particular, drilling is an operation that generates high thermal and mechanical loading to the drill. There- fore, tool performance, hole geometry and surface integrity can be highly affected. The objective of this study is to analyse tool performance during drilling of IN718 using conventional metal working fluids (MWF) and cryogenic cooling conditions, and correlate it with th...

  16. Inquiry guided learning in a chemical engineering core curriculum: General instructional approach and specific application to the fluid mechanics case

    OpenAIRE

    Atilhan, Mert; Eljack, Fadwa; Alfadala, Hassan; Froyd, Jeffrey E.; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud; Mahalec, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results from a preliminary study of the effectiveness of using inquiry-guided learning instructional strategies both in chemical engineering classrooms and laboratories. For readers unfamiliar with the instructional strategy, the paper describes the general approach and then reports on results of its application for the fluid mechanics course taken by undergraduate students in the Chemical Engineering Department at Qatar University. Inquiry-guided activities were developed...

  17. Mechanisms controlling the volume of pleural fluid and extravascular lung water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Miserocchi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Pleural and interstitial lung fluid volumes are strictly controlled and maintained at the minimum thanks to the ability of lymphatics to match the increase in filtration rate. In the pleural cavity, fluid accumulation is easily accommodated by retraction of lung and chest wall (high compliance of the pleural space; the increase of lymph flow per unit increase in pleural fluid volume is high due to the great extension of the parietal lymphatic. However, for the lung interstitium, the increase in lymph flow to match increased filtration does not need to be so great. In fact, increased filtration only causes a minor increase in extravascular water volume (<10% due to a marked increase in interstitial pulmonary pressure (low compliance of the extracellular matrix which, in turn, buffers further filtration. Accordingly, a less extended lymphatic network is needed. The efficiency of lymphatic control is achieved through a high lymphatic conductance in the pleural fluid and through a low interstitial compliance for the lung interstitium. Fluid volume in both compartments is so strictly controlled that it is difficult to detect initial deviations from the physiological state; thus, a great physiological advantage turns to be a disadvantage on a clinical basis as it prevents an early diagnosis of developing disease.

  18. Robust and general method for determining surface fluid flow boundary conditions in articular cartilage contact mechanics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawaskar, Sainath Shrikant; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-01

    Contact detection in cartilage contact mechanics is an important feature of any analytical or computational modeling investigation when the biphasic nature of cartilage and the corresponding tribology are taken into account. The fluid flow boundary conditions will change based on whether the surface is in contact or not, which will affect the interstitial fluid pressurization. This in turn will increase or decrease the load sustained by the fluid phase, with a direct effect on friction, wear, and lubrication. In laboratory experiments or clinical hemiarthroplasty, when a rigid indenter or metallic prosthesis is used to apply load to the cartilage, there will not be any fluid flow normal to the surface in the contact region due to the impermeable nature of the indenter/prosthesis. In the natural joint, on the other hand, where two cartilage surfaces interact, flow will depend on the pressure difference across the interface. Furthermore, in both these cases, the fluid would flow freely in non-contacting regions. However, it should be pointed out that the contact area is generally unknown in advance in both cases and can only be determined as part of the solution. In the present finite element study, a general and robust algorithm was proposed to decide nodes in contact on the cartilage surface and, accordingly, impose the fluid flow boundary conditions. The algorithm was first tested for a rigid indenter against cartilage model. The algorithm worked well for two-dimensional four-noded and eight-noded axisymmetric element models as well as three-dimensional models. It was then extended to include two cartilages in contact. The results were in excellent agreement with the previous studies reported in the literature.

  19. Design of Accumulators and Liquid/Gas Charging of Single Phase Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop Heat Rejection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Dudik, Brenda; Birur, Gajanana; Karlmann, Paul; Bame, David; Mastropietro, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    For single phase mechanically pumped fluid loops used for thermal control of spacecraft, a gas charged accumulator is typically used to modulate pressures within the loop. This is needed to accommodate changes in the working fluid volume due to changes in the operating temperatures as the spacecraft encounters varying thermal environments during its mission. Overall, the three key requirements on the accumulator to maintain an appropriate pressure range throughout the mission are: accommodation of the volume change of the fluid due to temperature changes, avoidance of pump cavitation and prevention of boiling in the liquid. The sizing and design of such an accumulator requires very careful and accurate accounting of temperature distribution within each element of the working fluid for the entire range of conditions expected, accurate knowledge of volume of each fluid element, assessment of corresponding pressures needed to avoid boiling in the liquid, as well as the pressures needed to avoid cavitation in the pump. The appropriate liquid and accumulator strokes required to accommodate the liquid volume change, as well as the appropriate gas volumes, require proper sizing to ensure that the correct pressure range is maintained during the mission. Additionally, a very careful assessment of the process for charging both the gas side and the liquid side of the accumulator is required to properly position the bellows and pressurize the system to a level commensurate with requirements. To achieve the accurate sizing of the accumulator and the charging of the system, sophisticated EXCEL based spreadsheets were developed to rapidly come up with an accumulator design and the corresponding charging parameters. These spreadsheets have proven to be computationally fast and accurate tools for this purpose. This paper will describe the entire process of designing and charging the system, using a case study of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) fluid loops, which is en route to

  20. Flippin' Fluid Mechanics - Quasi-experimental Pre-test and Post-test Comparison Using Two Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, D. R.; Majerich, D. M.; Luo, J.

    2014-11-01

    A flipped classroom approach has been implemented in an undergraduate fluid mechanics course. Students watch short on-line videos before class, participate in active in-class problem solving (in dyads), and complete individualized on-line quizzes weekly. In-class activities are designed to achieve a trifecta of: 1. developing problem solving skills, 2. learning subject content, and 3. developing inquiry skills. The instructor and assistants provide critical ``just-in-time tutoring'' during the in-class problem solving sessions. Comparisons are made with a simultaneous section offered in a traditional mode by a different instructor. Regression analysis was used to control for differences among students and to quantify the effect of the flipped fluid mechanics course. The dependent variable was the students' combined final examination and post-concept inventory scores and the independent variables were pre-concept inventory score, gender, major, course section, and (incoming) GPA. The R-square equaled 0.45 indicating that the included variables explain 45% of the variation in the dependent variable. The regression results indicated that if the student took the flipped fluid mechanics course, the dependent variable (i.e., combined final exam and post-concept inventory scores) was raised by 7.25 points. Interestingly, the comparison group reported significantly more often that their course emphasized memorization than did the flipped classroom group.

  1. Fatigue of orthodontic nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires in different fluids under constant mechanical stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prymak, O.; Klocke, A.; Kahl-Nieke, B.; Epple, M

    2003-07-25

    The aim of this study was to analyze in vitro the fatigue resistance of nickel-titanium (NiTi) and CuNiTi orthodontic wires when subjected to forces and fluids which are present intraorally. The wires were subjected to dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) while they were immersed into different fluids with mechanical loading parameters similar to those that are subjected in the mouth. The characteristic temperatures of transitions and a rough surface structure on the perimeter of the wires were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively, before and after the DMA experiments. Stainless steel wires were used for comparison. In general, NiTi wires fractured earlier than the stainless steel specimens. Survival times were lower for the NiTi wires when immersed in fluids (water, citric acid, NaCl solution, artificial saliva, and fluoridated artificial saliva) than in air. SEM surface analysis showed that the NiTi and CuNiTi wires had a rougher surface than steel wires. The fracture occurred within a short number of loading cycles. Until fracture occurred, the mechanical properties remained mostly constant.

  2. Thermodynamic and fluid mechanic analysis of rapid pressurization in a dead-end tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Ian H.

    1989-01-01

    Three models have been applied to very rapid compression of oxygen in a dead-ended tube. Pressures as high as 41 MPa (6000 psi) leading to peak temperatures of 1400 K are predicted. These temperatures are well in excess of the autoignition temperature (750 K) of teflon, a frequently used material for lining hoses employed in oxygen service. These findings are in accord with experiments that have resulted in ignition and combustion of the teflon, leading to the combustion of the stainless steel braiding and catastrophic failure. The system analyzed was representative of a capped off-high-pressure oxygen line, which could be part of a larger system. Pressurization of the larger system would lead to compression in the dead-end line, and possible ignition of the teflon liner. The model consists of a large plenum containing oxygen at the desired pressure (500 to 6000 psi). The plenum is connected via a fast acting valve to a stainless steel tube 2 cm inside diameter. Opening times are on the order of 15 ms. Downstream of the valve is an orifice sized to increase filling times to around 100 ms. The total length from the valve to the dead-end is 150 cm. The distance from the valve to the orifice is 95 cm. The models describe the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the flow, and do not include any combustion phenomena. A purely thermodynamic model assumes filling to be complete upstream of the orifice before any gas passes through the orifice. This simplification is reasonable based on experiment and computer modeling. Results show that peak temperatures as high as 4800 K can result from recompression of the gas after expanding through the orifice. An approximate transient model without an orifice was developed assuming an isentropic compression process. An analytical solution was obtained. Results indicated that fill times can be considerably shorter than valve opening times. The third model was a finite difference, 1-D transient compressible flow model. Results from

  3. Education for fluid power in department of mechanical engineering of Sophia University; Jochi Daigaku Kikai kogakuka ni okeru yukuatsu kyooiku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukiji, T. [Sophia University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Faculty of Science and Technology

    2000-03-15

    Curricular guidelines are that importance be attached in the educating policy to the primary subjects of study and that compulsory subjects are to be acquired through practice. Out of primary subjects, those which should better be learned by all the students are set as compulsory subjects. Related subjects are divided into fluid-related subjects and control-related subjects. Experiments are conducted of the 'inspection of orifice flowmeter and Bourdon tube pressure gage,' 'fluid friction in round tube,' and 'servo-mechanism.' In a lesson on drafting, hydraulic equipment provided by business corporations is used. It is hoped that educating units be provided. Subjects of research for graduation and master's theses are the turbine-driven pump, constant pressure source system, hydraulic drive system, application of control theory to an injection molding machine, highly intelligent fluid, noise reduction for an automotive compressor, state of fluid in a hydraulic control valve, analysis of flow in pneumatic equipment elements, and cavitation in a vane pump. More than half of these subjects are pursued in collaboration with industrial or Government circles. It is expected that the Society will be an organization to benefit the students. (NEDO)

  4. Experimental investigations on the fluid flow mechanism in porous media of enhanced oil recovery by alkli/surfactant/polymer flooding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jialu; SHEN Pingping; CHEN Yongzhong; ZHANG Zubo; JIA Xu; TIAN Yuling

    2005-01-01

    The fluid flow mechanism in porous media of enhanced oil recovery by Alkli/ Surfactant/ Polymer (ASP) flooding is investigated by measuring production performance, pressure distribution and saturation distribution through installing differential pressure transducers and saturation measuring probes in a physical model of vertical heterogeneous reservoir. The fluid flow variation in porous media is the main reason of enhanced oil recovery of ASP flooding. The pressure field and saturation field are nonlinearly coupled together and the interaction between them results in the fluid flow variation in the reservoir. In a vertical heterogeneous reservoir, the ASP agents initially flow in the high permeability layer, and fluid changes the flow direction toward the low and the middle permeability layers because the resistance in the high permeability layer is increased under the physical and chemical action of adsorption, retention and emulsion. ASP flooding displaces out not only the residual oil in the high permeability layer, but also the remaining oil in the low and the middle permeability layers by increasing swept volume and displacing efficiency.

  5. Time-resolved PIV technique for high temporal resolution measurement of mechanical prosthetic aortic valve fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, R; Morbiducci, U; Rossi, M; Scalise, L; Verdonck, P; Grigioni, M

    2007-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) have been used to replace diseased native valves for more than five decades. Among these, mechanical PHVs are the most frequently implanted. Unfortunately, these devices still do not achieve ideal behavior and lead to many complications, many of which are related to fluid mechanics. The fluid dynamics of mechanical PHVs are particularly complex and the fine-scale characteristics of such flows call for very accurate experimental techniques. Adequate temporal resolution can be reached by applying time-resolved PIV, a high-resolution dynamic technique which is able to capture detailed chronological changes in the velocity field. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the evolution of the flow field in a detailed time domain of a commercial bileaflet PHV in a mock-loop mimicking unsteady conditions, by means of time-resolved 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The investigated flow field corresponded to the region immediately downstream of the valve plane. Spatial resolution as in "standard" PIV analysis of prosthetic valve fluid dynamics was used. The combination of a Nd:YLF high-repetition-rate double-cavity laser with a high frame rate CMOS camera allowed a detailed, highly temporally resolved acquisition (up to 10000 fps depending on the resolution) of the flow downstream of the PHV. Features that were observed include the non-homogeneity and unsteadiness of the phenomenon and the presence of large-scale vortices within the field, especially in the wake of the valve leaflets. Furthermore, we observed that highly temporally cycle-resolved analysis allowed the different behaviors exhibited by the bileaflet valve at closure to be captured in different acquired cardiac cycles. By accurately capturing hemodynamically relevant time scales of motion, time-resolved PIV characterization can realistically be expected to help designers in improving PHV performance and in furnishing comprehensive validation with experimental data

  6. Interaction between endoplasmic reticulum stress and caspase 8 activation in retrovirus MoMuLV-ts1-infected astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Scofield, Virginia L; Qiang, Wenan; Yan, Mingshan; Kuang, Xianghong; Wong, Paul K Y

    2006-05-10

    The murine retrovirus, MoMuLV-ts1, induces progressive paralysis and immune deficiency in FVB/N mice. We have reported previously that ts1 infection causes apoptosis in astrocytes via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial stress (Liu, N., Kuang, X., Kim, H.T., Stoica, G., Qiang, W., Scofield, V.L., Wong, P.K.Y. Wong. 2004. Possible involvement of both endoplasmic reticulum- and mitochondria-dependent pathways in MoMuLV-ts1-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. J. NeuroVirol. 10, 189-198). In the present study, we show that caspase 8 activation in these cells is mediated through ER stress-associated elevation of death receptor DR5 and the C/EBP homologous protein (GADD153/CHOP), an ER stress-initiated transcription factor, rather than through TNFalpha and TNF-R1 interactions on the cell surface. Treatment with Z-IETD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of caspase 8 enzymatic activity, reduced ER stress by two mechanisms: by inhibiting caspase 8 activation, and by preventing cleavage of the ER-associated membrane protein BAP31 into BAP20, which exacerbates the ER stress response. These findings suggest that caspase 8- and ER stress-associated apoptotic pathways are linked in ts1-infected astrocytes.

  7. Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Award: Onset of Dynamic Wetting Failure - The Mechanics of High-Speed Fluid Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandre, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting is crucial to processes where a liquid displaces another fluid along a solid surface, such as the deposition of a coating liquid onto a moving substrate. Dynamic wetting fails when process speed exceeds some critical value, leading to incomplete fluid displacement and transient phenomena that impact a variety of applications, such as microfluidic devices, oil-recovery systems, and splashing droplets. Liquid coating processes are particularly sensitive to wetting failure, which can induce air entrainment and other catastrophic coating defects. Despite the industrial incentives for careful control of wetting behavior, the hydrodynamic factors that influence the transition to wetting failure remain poorly understood from empirical and theoretical perspectives. This work investigates the fundamentals of wetting failure in a variety of systems that are relevant to industrial coating flows. A hydrodynamic model is developed where an advancing fluid displaces a receding fluid along a smooth, moving substrate. Numerical solutions predict the onset of wetting failure at a critical substrate speed, which coincides with a turning point in the steady-state solution path for a given set of system parameters. Flow-field analysis reveals a physical mechanism where wetting failure results when capillary forces can no longer support the pressure gradients necessary to steadily displace the receding fluid. Novel experimental systems are used to measure the substrate speeds and meniscus shapes associated with the onset of air entrainment during wetting failure. Using high-speed visualization techniques, air entrainment is identified by the elongation of triangular air films with system-dependent size. Air films become unstable to thickness perturbations and ultimately rupture, leading to the entrainment of air bubbles. Meniscus confinement in a narrow gap between the substrate and a stationary plate is shown to delay air entrainment to higher speeds for a variety of

  8. PROJECT SQUID. Field Survey Report. Volume 1, Part 4. Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-06-30

    Boltzmann and Gibbs appears to be assured. Since Bleakney (18) undertook experimental research on the most of the studies in fluid mechanies deal with...Turbulenz velocita," L’Aerotcuica, Vol. XV, fase . 3, 237- bei der Plattenstromung." Nach. Gesell d. Wis!;. 275, March 1935 and Vol. XV, fase . 7 and 8, z

  9. Fluid Dynamic Mechanisms and Interactions within Separated Flows and Their Effects on Missile Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    layer is being irves - tigated in a ser.es of two-dimensional experiments utilizing LDV measurements. The objectives of these experiments are to obtain a...1974, pp. 105-112. 16 8. Mazumder, M. K., Hoyle, B. D., and Kirsch , K. J., "Generation and Fluid Dynamics of Scattering Aerosols in Laser Doppler

  10. Asymptotic Analysis to Two Nonlinear Equations in Fluid Mechanics by Homotopy Renormalisation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jiang; Kai, Yue

    2016-09-01

    By the homotopy renormalisation method, the global approximate solutions to Falkner-Skan equation and Von Kármá's problem of a rotating disk in an infinite viscous fluid are obtained. The homotopy renormalisation method is simple and powerful for finding global approximate solutions to nonlinear perturbed differential equations arising in mathematical physics.

  11. Mechanisms underlying rhythmic locomotion: body-fluid interaction in undulatory swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Friesen, W O; Iwasaki, T

    2011-02-15

    Swimming of fish and other animals results from interactions of rhythmic body movements with the surrounding fluid. This paper develops a model for the body-fluid interaction in undulatory swimming of leeches, where the body is represented by a chain of rigid links and the hydrodynamic force model is based on resistive and reactive force theories. The drag and added-mass coefficients for the fluid force model were determined from experimental data of kinematic variables during intact swimming, measured through video recording and image processing. Parameter optimizations to minimize errors in simulated model behaviors revealed that the resistive force is dominant, and a simple static function of relative velocity captures the essence of hydrodynamic forces acting on the body. The model thus developed, together with the experimental kinematic data, allows us to investigate temporal and spatial (along the body) distributions of muscle actuation, body curvature, hydrodynamic thrust and drag, muscle power supply and energy dissipation into the fluid. We have found that: (1) thrust is generated continuously along the body with increasing magnitude toward the tail, (2) drag is nearly constant along the body, (3) muscle actuation waves travel two or three times faster than the body curvature waves and (4) energy for swimming is supplied primarily by the mid-body muscles, transmitted through the body in the form of elastic energy, and dissipated into the water near the tail.

  12. Mechanisms underlying rhythmic locomotion: body–fluid interaction in undulatory swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Friesen, W. O.; Iwasaki, T.

    2011-01-01

    Swimming of fish and other animals results from interactions of rhythmic body movements with the surrounding fluid. This paper develops a model for the body–fluid interaction in undulatory swimming of leeches, where the body is represented by a chain of rigid links and the hydrodynamic force model is based on resistive and reactive force theories. The drag and added-mass coefficients for the fluid force model were determined from experimental data of kinematic variables during intact swimming, measured through video recording and image processing. Parameter optimizations to minimize errors in simulated model behaviors revealed that the resistive force is dominant, and a simple static function of relative velocity captures the essence of hydrodynamic forces acting on the body. The model thus developed, together with the experimental kinematic data, allows us to investigate temporal and spatial (along the body) distributions of muscle actuation, body curvature, hydrodynamic thrust and drag, muscle power supply and energy dissipation into the fluid. We have found that: (1) thrust is generated continuously along the body with increasing magnitude toward the tail, (2) drag is nearly constant along the body, (3) muscle actuation waves travel two or three times faster than the body curvature waves and (4) energy for swimming is supplied primarily by the mid-body muscles, transmitted through the body in the form of elastic energy, and dissipated into the water near the tail. PMID:21270304

  13. Numerical simulation of the tumor interstitial fluid transport: Consideration of drug delivery mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Mohammad Charjouei; Deyranlou, Amin; Sharifi, Alireza; Niazmand, Hamid

    2015-09-01

    The interstitial fluid transport plays an important role in terms of its effect on the delivery of therapeutic agents to the cancerous organs. In this study, a comprehensive numerical simulation of the interstitial fluid transport establishing 3D models of tumor and normal tissue is accomplished. Different shapes of solid tumors and their surrounding normal tissues are selected, by employing the porous media model and incorporating Darcy's model and Starling's law. Besides, effects of the tumor radius, normal tissue size, tissue hydraulic conductivity and necrotic core are investigated on the interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and interstitial fluid velocity (IFV). Generally, results suggest that the configurations of the tumor and surrounding normal tissue affect IFP and IFV distributions inside the interstitium, which are much more pronounced for various configuration of the tumor. Furthermore, findings demonstrate that larger tumors are more prone for producing elevated IFP comparing with the smaller ones and impress both IFP and IFV dramatically. Nevertheless, normal tissue size has less impact on IFP and IFV, until its volume ratio to the tumor remains greater than unity; conversely, for the values lower than unity the variations become more significant. Finally, existence of necrotic core and its location in the tumor interstitium alters IFP and IFV patterns and increases IFV, considerably.

  14. Effect of lung resection on pleuro-pulmonary mechanics and fluid balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salito, C; Bovio, D; Orsetti, G; Salati, M; Brunelli, A; Aliverti, A; Miserocchi, G

    2016-01-15

    The aim of the study was to determine in human patients the effect of lung resection on lung compliance and on pleuro-pulmonary fluid balance. Pre and post-operative values of compliance were measured in anesthetized patients undergoing resection for lung cancer (N=11) through double-lumen bronchial intubation. Lung compliance was measured for 10-12 cm H2O increase in alveolar pressure from 5 cm H2O PEEP in control and repeated after resection. No air leak was assessed and pleural fluid was collected during hospital stay. A significant negative correlation (r(2)=0.68) was found between compliance at 10 min and resected mass. Based on the pre-operative estimated lung weight, the decrease in compliance following lung resection exceeded by 10-15% that expected from resected mass. Significant negative relationships were found by relating pleural fluid drainage flow to the remaining lung mass and to post-operative lung compliance. Following lung re-expansion, data suggest a causative relationship between the decrease in compliance and the perturbation in pleuro-pulmonary fluid balance.

  15. Rheological Properties with Temperature Response Characteristics and a Mechanism of Solid-Free Polymer Drilling Fluid at Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of drilling fluid have important effects during drilling in natural gas hydrate at low temperatures. The present study was performed using theoretical analysis. Experiments and micro-analyses were carried out to determine the rheological properties with temperature response characteristics and the mechanism involved in solid-free polymer drilling fluid (SFPDF at low temperatures when drilling in permafrost with natural gas hydrates (NGH. The curves of shear stress with the shear rates of three kinds of polymer drilling fluids, Semen Lepidii natural vegetable gum, polyacrylamide, and xanthan gum, were drawn. Then, statistical and related analyses of test data were performed using Matlab ver. 8.0. Through regression analysis, the Herschel–Bulkley model was used to characterize the rheological characteristics of SFPDF. On this basis, the laws regarding the rheological properties of the three kinds of SFPDF under changing temperatures were analyzed and rheological properties with temperature response state equations were established. Next, the findings of previous studies on rheological properties with temperature response characteristics of the SFPDF were reviewed. Finally, the rheological properties with temperature response mechanisms were assessed using scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectrum analysis.

  16. Home blood sodium monitoring, sliding-scale fluid prescription and subcutaneous DDAVP for infantile diabetes insipidus with impaired thirst mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Shihab

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims Infants with diabetes insipidus (DI, especially those with impaired thirst mechanism or hypothalamic hyperphagia, are prone to severe sodium fluctuations, often requiring hospitalization. We aimed to avoid dangerous fluctuations in serum sodium and improve parental independence. Methods A 16-month old girl with central DI, absent thirst mechanism and hyperphagia following surgery for hypothalamic astrocytoma had erratic absorption of oral DDAVP during chemotherapy cycles. She required prolonged hospitalizations for hypernatremia and hyponatremic seizure. Intensive monitoring of fluid balance, weight and clinical assessment of hydration were not helpful in predicting serum sodium. Discharge home was deemed unsafe. Oral DDAVP was switched to subcutaneous (twice-daily injections, starting with 0.01mcg/dose, increasing to 0.024mcg/dose. The parents adjusted daily fluid allocation by sliding-scale, according to the blood sodium level (measured by handheld i-STAT analyser, Abbott. We adjusted the DDAVP dose if fluid allocation differed from maintenance requirements for 3 consecutive days. Results After 2.5 months, sodium was better controlled, with 84% of levels within reference range (135-145 mmol/L vs. only 51% on the old regimen (p = 0.0001. The sodium ranged from 132-154 mmol/L, compared to 120–156 on the old regimen. She was discharged home. Conclusion This practical regimen improved sodium control, parental independence, and allowed discharge home.

  17. Lung fluid clearance in chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Dani-Louise; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Lawrence, Mark D; Cavallaro, Elena; Rubino, Vito; Bersten, Andrew D

    2017-10-01

    Chronic elevation of pulmonary microvascular pressure (Pmv) consistently leads to alveolocapillary barrier thickening and reduction in the filtration coefficient. In animal models of chronic heart failure (CHF) the lung remains dry despite hydrostatic forces. As fluid flux is bi-directional, it has been postulated that an increase in alveolar fluid clearance may facilitate the dry lung when Pmv is chronically elevated. In this study we aimed to examine alveolar fluid clearance in ambulatory patients with CHF secondary to left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction compared against non-CHF controls. Lung clearance following aerosol delivery of (99m)technetium (Tc)-diethyl triaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) was measured non-invasively by scintigraphy and half time of (99m)Tc-DTPA clearance (T (1/2)) was calculated by mono-exponential curve fit. Alveolar fluid clearance measured as half time DTPA clearance was significantly faster in CHF patients than controls (P=0.001). This was further defined by NYHA classification. No correlation was found between DTPA clearance and plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine or aldosterone hormone (P>0.05). Our results support an association between increasing alveolar fluid clearance and disease severity in CHF, and the concept of controlled bi-directional fluid flux in CHF associated with increasing Pmv, and represents another defence mechanism of the lung against pulmonary oedema. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms of arsenic enrichment in geothermal and petroleum reservoirs fluids in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkle, Peter; Bundschuh, Jochen; Sracek, Ondra

    2010-11-01

    The lack of chemical similarity between thermal fluids in geothermal and petroleum reservoirs in Mexico indicates a distinct origin for arsenic in both types of reservoirs. Deep fluids from geothermal reservoirs along the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) are characterized by elevated arsenic concentrations, within a range between 1 and 100 mg L(-1) at a depth from 600 to 3000 m b.s.l. Based on hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), arsenic is linked to typical geothermal species like lithium, silica, and boron. The lack of correlation between arsenic and salinity reflects the importance of secondary water-rock interaction processes. The predominance of arsenic compared to Fe- and Cu-concentrations, and the occurrence of secondary minerals (sulfides and clay minerals) in temperature-dependent hydrothermal zones, supports this hypothesis. Neither magmatic fluids input, nor As mineralization is a prerequisite for As enrichment in Mexican geothermal fluids. In contrast, petroleum reservoir waters from sedimentary basins in SE-Mexico show maximum As concentrations of 2 mg L(-1), at depths from 2900 to 6100 m b.s.l. The linear chloride-arsenic correlation indicates that evaporated seawater represents the major source for aqueous arsenic in oil reservoirs, and only minor arsenic proportions are derived from interaction with carbonate host rock. Speciation modeling suggests the lack of arsenic solubility control in both geothermal and petroleum reservoirs, but precipitation/co-precipitation of As with secondary sulfides could occur in petroleum reservoirs with high iron concentrations. Geothermal fluids from magmatic-type reservoirs (Los Azufres and Los Humeros at the TMVB and Las Tres Vírgenes with a granodioritic basement) show relative constant arsenic concentrations through varying temperature conditions, which indicates that temperatures above 230-250 °C provide optimal and stable conditions for arsenic mobility. In contrast, temperature conditions for sedimentary

  19. Reflections on the Mechanism of Calcium Phosphate Nucleation on Titanium in Simulated Body Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. T. Cheng

    2005-01-01

    The results and main findings of studies reported in the literature in relation to the deposition of calcium phosphate on Ti in simulated body fluids are summarized. The effects of the surface hydroxyl groups and the sign of surface charge on the nucleation of calcium phosphate are reviewed. One major controversy among the conclusions of different studies is the order of adsorption of the calcium ions and the phosphate ions in the initial stage of immersion. A simple model based on the amphoteric nature of the hydroxyl groups on Ti is proposed in an attempt to delineate the nucleation process for calcium phosphate on Ti in simulated body fluids. HPO42- ions interact with the hydroxyl groups via ion exchange and/or electrostatic attraction, and Ca2+ ions, via electrostatic attraction only. There is no preferential order of adsorption. Seemingly inconsistent results in different studies possibly arise from different prior treatments of the samples, which affect the adsorption properties.

  20. Frame Indifferent Formulation of Maxwell's Elastic Fluid and the Rational Continuum Mechanics of the Electromagnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Christov, Christo I

    2011-01-01

    We show that the linearized equations of the incompressible elastic medium admit a `Maxwell form' in which the shear component of the stress vector plays the role of the electric field, and the vorticity plays the role of the magnetic field. Conversely, the set of dynamic Maxwell equations are strict mathematical corollaries from the governing equations of the incompressible elastic medium. This suggests that the nature of `electromagnetic field' may actually be related to an elastic continuous medium. The analogy is complete if the medium is assumed to behave as fluid in shear motions, while it may still behave as elastic solid under compressional motions. Then the governing equations of the elastic fluid are re-derived in the Eulerian frame by replacing the partial time derivatives by the properly invariant (frame indifferent) time rates. The `Maxwell from' of the frame indifferent formulation gives the frame indifferent system that is to replace the Maxwell system. This new system comprises terms already p...

  1. Fluid mechanics and design aspects of a novel oscillatory flow screening mesoreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, N.; Harvey, Adam; Mackley, M. R.; Vicente, A.A.; Teixeira, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, continuous, oscillatory flow screening mesoreactor, composed of tubes with smooth periodic constrictions, is presented as a new option for small-scale reaction engineering applications, particularly those involving the screening of solid catalysts. Experimental studies using particle image velocimetry have demonstrated that this reactor provides good fluid mixing, and is able to suspend catalyst particles with a wide range of sedimentation velocities. Results from 2D and 3D CFD simul...

  2. 三洋推出Easy Radio IC系列LV24000PL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    三洋(Sanyo)公司日前推出Easy Radio IC系列LV24000PL。LV24000PL是一款不需要使用外部元器件的便携式Device用FM调谐器芯片,尺寸仅约5mm×5mm×0.8mm,尺寸缩减为原来的六分之一,适用于手机、PDA等便携式产品。

  3. La piattaforma POS/LV di Applanix nelle applicazioni di laser scanner cinematico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Santarsiero

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Applanix POS/LV platform in cinematic laser scanner applicationsOn the 11th of march the GEOmedia editorial unit had the pleasure of hosting a technical meeting dedicated to the Applanix LANDMark new Position and Orientation System for Land Vehicles (POS/LVfield test. The meeting, which is part of an italian tour organized by Louis Nastro (Applanix Director of Land Products and Terenzio Mariani (Sales manager for Italy, helped to test the functionalities of a complete POS/LV system equipped with a laser and an imaging acquisition software installed on board of a SUV.

  4. Tensor methodology and computational geometry in direct computational experiments in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyarev, Alexander; Khramushin, Vasily; Shichkina, Julia

    2017-07-01

    The paper considers a generalized functional and algorithmic construction of direct computational experiments in fluid dynamics. Notation of tensor mathematics is naturally embedded in the finite - element operation in the construction of numerical schemes. Large fluid particle, which have a finite size, its own weight, internal displacement and deformation is considered as an elementary computing object. Tensor representation of computational objects becomes strait linear and uniquely approximation of elementary volumes and fluid particles inside them. The proposed approach allows the use of explicit numerical scheme, which is an important condition for increasing the efficiency of the algorithms developed by numerical procedures with natural parallelism. It is shown that advantages of the proposed approach are achieved among them by considering representation of large particles of a continuous medium motion in dual coordinate systems and computing operations in the projections of these two coordinate systems with direct and inverse transformations. So new method for mathematical representation and synthesis of computational experiment based on large particle method is proposed.

  5. Statistical Mechanics Approach for Uniform and Non-uniform Fluid with Hard Core and Interaction Tail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shi-Qi; CHEN Hong; LING Si-Li; XIANG Xian-Wei; ZHANG Xiao-Qi

    2003-01-01

    One recently proposed self-consistent hard sphere bridge functional was combined with an exponential function exp(-cr) and a re-normalized indirect correlation function to construct the bridge function for fluid with hard core and interaction tail. In the present approach, the adjustable parameter α was determined by the thermodynamic consistency realized on the compressibility modulus, the re-normalization of the indirect correlation function was realized by a modified Mayer function with the interaction potential replaced by the perturbative part of the interaction potential. As an example, the present bridge function was combined with the Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) equation to predict structure and thermodynamics properties in very good agreement with the simulation data available for Lennard-Jones (L J). Based on the universality principle of the free energy density functional and the test particle trick, the numerical solution of the OZ equation was employed to construct the first order direct correlation function of the non-uniform fluid as a functional of the density distribution by means of the indirect correlation function. In the framework of the density functional theory, the numerically obtained functional predicted the density distribution of LJ fluid confined in two planar hard walls that is in good agreement with the simulation data.

  6. Mechanics of Fluid-Filled Interstitial Gaps. I. Modeling Gaps in a Compact Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Serge E; Barua, Debanjan; Winklbauer, Rudolf

    2017-08-22

    Fluid-filled interstitial gaps are a common feature of compact tissues held together by cell-cell adhesion. Although such gaps can in principle be the result of weak, incomplete cell attachment, adhesion is usually too strong for this to occur. Using a mechanical model of tissue cohesion, we show that, instead, a combination of local prevention of cell adhesion at three-cell junctions by fluidlike extracellular material and a reduction of cortical tension at the gap surface are sufficient to generate stable gaps. The size and shape of these interstitial gaps depends on the mechanical tensions between cells and at gap surfaces, and on the difference between intracellular and interstitial pressures that is related to the volume of the interstitial fluid. As a consequence of the dependence on tension/tension ratios, the presence of gaps does not depend on the absolute strength of cell adhesion, and similar gaps are predicted to occur in tissues of widely differing cohesion. Tissue mechanical parameters can also vary within and between cells of a given tissue, generating asymmetrical gaps. Within limits, these can be approximated by symmetrical gaps. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Achievements of engineering students on a fluid mechanics course in relation to the use of illustrative interactive simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Carlos; Martínez, Elvira

    2013-07-01

    Among other skills, a capacity for abstraction and good spatial awareness are needed to succeed in physics courses. According to the prevailing low percentages of passed students on these courses, a great proportion of those students are likely to lack these skills. Our working hypothesis is that simulations could help engineering students visualize physical phenomena and thereby gain a better understanding of physical theoretical concepts and achieve higher grades. Two groups of students (n1 = 40 and n2 = 43) took the same fluid mechanics course at an engineering school. Both groups took the same end-of-course examination, but only group 1 was simulation-taught. For that purpose, 15 original simulations were created with GeoGebra software. Simulation-taught students completed a questionnaire on the interest of using simulations to teach fluid mechanics. Simulations designed in this work covered all the concepts taught on the course and overcame criticisms made on previous simulations also created to teach fluid mechanics. At the examination, the average grade and the percentage of passed students were higher in group 1 than in group 2. When surveyed, group 1 students declared that they enjoyed interacting with the simulations and considered them to be a good complement to the theoretical explanations because simulations helped them revise previously explained concepts. Simulations assisted students with difficulties to visualize and understand physical theoretical concepts but still students performed poorly on the examination. Additional strategies need to be adopted in order to help students develop the skills required to succeed in physics courses.

  8. A new technique in constructing closed-form solutions for nonlinear PDEs appearing in fluid mechanics and gas dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Panayotounakos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a new unique technique in constructing closed-form solutions for several nonlinear partial differential systems appearing in fluid mechanics and gas dynamics. The obtained solutions include fewer arbitrary functions than needed for general solutions, fact that permits us to specify them according to the initial state, or the geometry, of each specific problem under consideration. In order to apply the before mentioned technique we construct closed-form solutions concerning the gas-dynamic equations with constant pressure, the dynamic equations of an ideal gas in isentropic flow, and the two-dimensional incompressible boundary layer flow.

  9. A new technique in constructing closed-form solutions for nonlinear PDEs appearing in fluid mechanics and gas dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayotounakos D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a new unique technique in constructing closed-form solutions for several nonlinear partial differential systems appearing in fluid mechanics and gas dynamics. The obtained solutions include fewer arbitrary functions than needed for general solutions, fact that permits us to specify them according to the initial state, or the geometry, of each specific problem under consideration. In order to apply the before mentioned technique we construct closed-form solutions concerning the gas-dynamic equations with constant pressure, the dynamic equations of an ideal gas in isentropic flow, and the two-dimensional incompressible boundary layer flow.

  10. Polymer films removed from solid surfaces by nanostructured fluids: microscopic mechanism and implications for the conservation of cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudino, Martina; Selvolini, Giulia; Montis, Costanza; Baglioni, Michele; Bonini, Massimo; Berti, Debora; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-03-25

    Complex fluids based on amphiphilic formulations are emerging, particularly in the field of conservation of works of art, as effective and safe liquid media for the removal of hydrophobic polymeric coatings. The comprehension of the cleaning mechanism is key to designing tailored fluids for this purpose. However, the interaction between nanostructured fluids and hydrophobic polymer films is still poorly understood. In this study, we show how the combination of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides interesting and complementary insight into this process. We focused on the interaction between an ethyl methacrylate/methyl acrylate 70:30 copolymer film deposited onto a glass surface and a water/nonionic surfactant/2-butanone (MEK) ternary system, with MEK being a good solvent and water being a nonsolvent for the polymer. Our results indicate a synergy between the organic solvent and the surfactant assemblies: MEK rapidly swells the outer layers of the polymer film allowing for the subsequent diffusion of solvent molecules, while the amphiphile decreases the interfacial energy between the polymeric coating and the liquid phase, favoring dewetting and dispersion of swollen polymer droplets in the aqueous phase. The chemical nature of the surfactant and the microstructure of the assemblies determine both the kinetics and the overall efficiency of polymer removal, as assessed by comparing the behavior of similar formulations containing an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS).

  11. Characterization and DNA sequence of the mobilization region of pLV22a from Bacteroides fragilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Novicki, T. J.; Hecht, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    A 4.2-kb plasmid (pLV22a) native to Bacteroides fragilis LV22 became fused to a transfer-deficient Bacteroides spp.-Escherichia coli shuttle vector by an inverse transposition event, resulting in a transferrable phenotype. The transfer phenotype was attributable to pLV22a, which was also capable of mobilization within E. coli when coresident with the IncP beta R751 plasmid. Transposon mutagenesis with Tn1000 localized the mobilization region to a 1.5-kb DNA segment in pLV22a. The mobilization...

  12. Left ventricular fluid mechanics: the long way from theoretical models to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Domenichini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    The flow inside the left ventricle is characterized by the formation of vortices that smoothly accompany blood from the mitral inlet to the aortic outlet. Computational fluid dynamics permitted to shed some light on the fundamental processes involved with vortex motion. More recently, patient-specific numerical simulations are becoming an increasingly feasible tool that can be integrated with the developing imaging technologies. The existing computational methods are reviewed in the perspective of their potential role as a novel aid for advanced clinical analysis. The current results obtained by simulation methods either alone or in combination with medical imaging are summarized. Open problems are highlighted and perspective clinical applications are discussed.

  13. Reduced combustion mechanism for C1-C4 hydrocarbons and its application in computational fluid dynamics flare modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodara, Vijaya; Chen, Daniel H; Lou, Helen H; Rasel, Kader M A; Richmond, Peyton; Wang, Anan; Li, Xianchang

    2017-05-01

    Emissions from flares constitute unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), soot, and other partially burned and altered hydrocarbons along with carbon dioxide (CO2) and water. Soot or visible smoke is of particular concern for flare operators/regulatory agencies. The goal of the study is to develop a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model capable of predicting flare combustion efficiency (CE) and soot emission. Since detailed combustion mechanisms are too complicated for (CFD) application, a 50-species reduced mechanism, LU 3.0.1, was developed. LU 3.0.1 is capable of handling C4 hydrocarbons and soot precursor species (C2H2, C2H4, C6H6). The new reduced mechanism LU 3.0.1 was first validated against experimental performance indicators: laminar flame speed, adiabatic flame temperature, and ignition delay. Further, CFD simulations using LU 3.0.1 were run to predict soot emission and CE of air-assisted flare tests conducted in 2010 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, using ANSYS Fluent software. Results of non-premixed probability density function (PDF) model and eddy dissipation concept (EDC) model are discussed. It is also noteworthy that when used in conjunction with the EDC turbulence-chemistry model, LU 3.0.1 can reasonably predict volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well. A reduced combustion mechanism containing 50 C1-C4 species and soot precursors has been developed and validated against experimental data. The combustion mechanism is then employed in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of modeling of soot emission and combustion efficiency (CE) of controlled flares for which experimental soot and CE data are available. The validated CFD modeling tools are useful for oil, gas, and chemical industries to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) mandate to achieve smokeless flaring with a high CE.

  14. 3D quantitative visualization of altered LV wall thickening dynamics caused by coronary microembolization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusemann, Christian D.; Mohlenkamp, Stefan; Ritman, Erik L.; Robb, Richard A.

    2001-05-01

    Regional heart wall dynamics has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of LV wall ischemia. Rates of local LV wall thickening during a cardiac cycle can be measured and illustrated using functional parametric mappings. This display conveys the spatial distribution of dynamic strain in the myocardium and thereby provides a rapid qualitative appreciation of the severity and extent of the ischemic region. 3D reconstructions were obtained in an anesthetized pig from 8 adjacent, shortaxis, slices of the left ventricle imaged with an Electron Beam Computer Tomograph at 11 time points through one complete cardiac cycle. The 3D reconstructions were obtained before and after injection of 100 micrometer microspheres into the Left Anterior Descending (LAD) coronary artery. This injection causes microembolization of LAD artery branches within the heart wall. The image processing involved radially dividing the tomographic images of the myocardium into small subdivisions with color encoding of the local magnitude of regional thickness or regional velocities of LV wall thickening throughout the cardiac cycle. We compared the effectiveness of animation of wall thickness encoded in color versus a static image of computed rate of wall thickness change in color. The location, extent and severity of regional wall akinesis or dyskinesis, as determined from these displays, can then be compared to the region of embolization as indicated by the distribution of altered LV wall perfusion.

  15. Extinction in the Galaxy from surface brightnesses of ESO-LV galaxies : Testing "standard" extinction maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choloniewski, J.; Valentijn, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for the determination of the extinction in the Galaxy is proposed. The method uses surface brightnesses of external galaxies in the B and R-bands. The observational data have been taken from the ESO-LV galaxy catalog. As a first application of our model we derive the ratio of R-band to

  16. Revisión diagramas de equilibrio Txy (LV y LLV)

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes Labarta, Juan Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Este tema se encarca en el contexto del estudio del equilibrio entre fases líquido-vapor. Se muestra de forma cualitativa diferentes ejemplos de diagramas de equilibrio LV, temperatura-composición (a presión constante), así como bibliografía relacionada. Universidad de Alicante. Dpto. Ingeniería Química

  17. Voltage unbalance mitigation in LV networks using three-phase PV systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Bajo, Cristina; Hashemi Toghroljerdi, Seyedmostafa; Bækhøj Kjær, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new method is proposed to mitigate voltage unbalance caused by single-phase solar inverters in low voltage (LV) networks. The method is based on uneven reactive power absorption and injection by three-phase solar inverters. Independent control of each phase is performed to achieve...

  18. Multi-Agent Optical Sensor Chip for Cryogenic Fluids Leak Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In space missions, launch vehicles (LV) are filled with cryogenic propellant fluids. It is important to protect these LVs from any leakage of liquid propellants...

  19. Desiccation of a pool of blood: from fluid mechanics to forensic investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicloux, Celine; Brutin, David

    2012-11-01

    The evaporation of biological fluids (with droplet configuration) has been studied since a few years due to several applications in medical fields such as medical tests, drug screening, biostabilization... The evaporation of a drop of whole blood leads to the formation of final typical pattern of cracks. Flow motion, adhesion, gelation and fracturation all occur during the evaporation of this complex matter. During the drying, a sol-gel transition develops. The evaporation of a pool of blood is studied in order to link the pattern formation and the evaporation dynamics. We intend to transfer the knowledge acquired for drops on pool to improve the forensic investigations. In this study, we focus on both pool of blood and pure water to determine the transition region from drop to pool and then to characterize the evaporation rate in the pool configuration. The spreading of blood which can be seen as a complex fluid is strongly influenced the substrate nature. The initial contact angle of blood on different substrate nature will influence the maximum thickness of the layer and then will influence the evaporation mass flux. The authors gratefully acknowledge the help and the fruitful discussions raised with A. Boccoz.

  20. Failure of fluid-saturated granular materials: a unified approach to capture diffuse and localized instability mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Constance; Buscarnera, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    Granular materials are susceptible to a wide variety of failure and deformation mechanisms, especially because of their interaction with the pore fluids and the surrounding environment. An adequate modeling of their mechanical response is therefore essential for understanding a number of geological processes, such as the onset of rapid landslides, hillslope denudation and sediment transport, or even the mechanics of fault gauges. Depending on the type of material, the groundwater conditions and the surrounding kinematic constraints, both diffuse and localized mechanisms are possible, and these may occur under either drained or undrained conditions. In the geomechanics literature, failure modes are usually explained and modeled with the tools of continuum mechanics, such as the mathematical theory of plasticity. Due to the complexity of granular material behavior, however, most classical models for frictional strength are unable to capture the variety of instability mechanisms observed for such class of geomaterials (e.g., liquefaction, shear banding, etc.). Sophisticated strain-hardening plasticity models are therefore required for numerical modeling purposes, thus making the evaluation of critical failure conditions less straightforward than in perfect plasticity theories. Here we propose a mathematical strategy that can be adapted to any elastoplastic model and allows the onset of failure in elastoplastic geomaterials to be expressed in a more general manner. More specifically, our theory expresses the failure conditions as a function of local kinematics and solid-fluid interactions. The stability criterion used in this study is based on the so-called stability modulus, a scalar index of failure that was formulated by linking the physical concept controllability to the mathematical notion of plastic admissibility upon an incremental loading path [Buscarnera et al, 2011]. In this contribution, different loading constraints are considered, accounting for the

  1. Mechanism of inhibitory actions of minocycline and doxycycline on ascitic fluid production induced by mouse fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, K; Ohmura, E; Satoh, T; Murakami, H; Isozaki, O; Emoto, N; Demura, H; Shizume, K; Tsushima, T

    1994-01-01

    Semisynthetic tetracyclines (TCNs) are used for the management of malignant pleural effusions as sclerosing agents. However, their precise mechanism of actions are uncertain. In the present study, the mechanism of inhibitory effects of minocycline (MINO) and doxycycline (DOXY), on the accumulation of ascitic fluid induced by mouse fibrosarcoma (Meth-A) cells were investigated using male mice. Meth-A cells inoculated intraperitoneally elicited 2.5-4 ml of bloody ascites 10 days after implantation. The production of ascitic fluid was suppressed in a dose-related manner by daily intraperitoneal injections of MINO or DOXY, whereas vehicle (normal saline with 0.01N HCl) did not exert a significant effect. The inhibitory activity of these two substances was quite similar; one mg/mouse of MINO or DOXY inhibited the accumulation of fluid by 87% and 84%, respectively. The survival rate of Meth-A-bearing mice treated with MINO or DOXY was higher than that of the controls. Macroscopic examination of the peritoneal cavity did not reveal any obvious effects, such as adhesions, in mice treated with either MINO or DOXY. In vitro studies showed that MINO and DOXY suppressed Meth-A cell growth with IC50s of 5 microM and 8 microM, respectively. Maximal suppression (95%) was achieved at MINO and DOXY concentrations of 25 microM. The above observations suggest that MINO and DOXY inhibit the accumulation of ascites by a direct effect on Meth-A cell growth. Therefore, it appears that TCNs injected into the pleural cavity to manage malignant effusions in man exert their activity, at least in part, by suppressing malignant cell growth.

  2. Estimation of the physiological mechanical conditioning in vascular tissue engineering by a predictive fluid-structure interaction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, Claudia; Bianchi, Elena; Pellegata, Alessandro Filippo; Dubini, Gabriele; Mantero, Sara

    2017-08-01

    The in vitro replication of physiological mechanical conditioning through bioreactors plays a crucial role in the development of functional Small-Caliber Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels. An in silico scaffold-specific model under pulsatile perfusion provided by a bioreactor was implemented using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach for viscoelastic tubular scaffolds (e.g. decellularized swine arteries, DSA). Results of working pressures, circumferential deformations, and wall shear stress on DSA fell within the desired physiological range and indicated the ability of this model to correctly predict the mechanical conditioning acting on the cells-scaffold system. Consequently, the FSI model allowed us to a priori define the stimulation pattern, driving in vitro physiological maturation of scaffolds, especially with viscoelastic properties.

  3. New version of quantum mechanics at finite temperatures as a ground for description of nearly perfect fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhanov, A D

    2010-01-01

    We suggest a more general than quantum statistical mechanics ($QSM$) microdescription of objects in a heat bath taken into account a vacuum as an object environment - modification of quantum mechanics at finite temperatures; we call it $(\\hbar, k)$-dynamics ($ \\hbar kD$). This approach allows us in a new manner to calculate some important macroparameters and to modify standard thermodynamics. We create an effective apparatus for features description of nearly perfect fluids in various mediums. As an essentially new model of an object environment we suppose a quantum heat bath and its properties, including cases of cold and warm vacuums, are studied. We describe the thermal equilibrium state in place of the traditional density operator in term of a wave function the amplitude and phase of which have temperature dependence. We introduce a new generative operator, Schroedingerian, or stochastic action operator, and show its fundamental role in the microdescription. We demonstrate that a new macroparameter, namel...

  4. Hydrologic Mechanisms Governing Fluid Flow in a Partially Saturated, Fractured, Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. S. Y.; Narasimhan, T. N.

    1985-12-01

    In contrast to the saturated zone within which fluid moves rapidly along fractures, the fractures (with apertures large relative to the size of matrix pores) will desaturate first during the drainage process, and the bulk of fluid flow would be through interconnected pores in the matrix. Within a partially drained fracture, the presence of a relatively continuous air phase will produce practically an infinite resistance to liquid flow in the direction parallel to the fracture. The residual liquid will be held by capillary force, in regions around fracture contact areas where the apertures are small. Normal to the fracture surfaces, the drained portion of the fractures will reduce the effective area for liquid flow from one matrix block to another matrix block. A general statistical theory is constructed for flow along the fracture and for flow between the matrix blocks to the fractures under partially saturated conditions. Results are obtained from an aperture distribution model for fracture saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and effective matrix-fracture flow areas as functions of pressure. The effects of distortion of flow paths by the air pockets are taken into account by a phase-separation constriction factor in a generalized cubic law for fracture flow under a partially saturated condition. The reduction of matrix-fracture flow area is taken into account by summing the aperture distribution function to a saturation cutoff aperture, which is inversely proportional to the suction head. Drainage from a column of fractured tuff is simulated using available parameters for the densely welded tuff of the Topopah Spring Member at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada. The column is bounded by discrete vertical fractures and dissected by horizontal fractures with the fracture spacings determined by the frequencies and orientations of fractured cores. The fraction of fracture surfaces with coatings is assumed to correspond to the fraction of in situ fracture contact area

  5. Corrosion mechanism of 13Cr stainless steel in completion fluid of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory for Environmental Fracture (MOE), Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Xu, Lining, E-mail: xulining@ustb.edu.cn [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory for Environmental Fracture (MOE), Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Lu, Minxu [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory for Environmental Fracture (MOE), Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Meng, Yao [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Zhu, Jinyang; Zhang, Lei [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory for Environmental Fracture (MOE), Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The corrosion behavior of 13Cr steel exposed to bromine salt completion fluid containing high concentration bromine ions was investigated. • There are passive circles around pits on the 13Cr steel surface after 7 d of exposure. • Macroscopic galvanic corrosion formed between the passive halo and the pit. • The mechanism of pitting corrosion on 13Cr stainless steel exposed to heavy bromine brine was established. - Abstract: A series of corrosion tests of 13Cr stainless steel were conducted in a simulated completion fluid environment of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt. Corrosion behavior of specimens and the component of corrosion products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that 13Cr steel suffers from severe local corrosion and there is always a passive halo around every pit. The formation mechanism of the passive halo is established. OH{sup −} ligand generates and adsorbs in a certain scale because of abundant OH{sup −} on the surface around the pits. Passive film forms around each pit, which leads to the occurrence of passivation in a certain region. Finally, the dissimilarities in properties and morphologies of regions, namely the pit and its corresponding passive halo, can result in different corrosion sensitivities and may promote the formation of macroscopic galvanic pairs.

  6. Identification and function analysis of a novel vascular endothelial growth factor, LvVEGF3, in the Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xie, Shijun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-10-01

    VEGF signaling pathway is first discovered in mammals and proved to play important roles in the biological processes of angiogenesis, tumor migration, cell differentiation, apoptosis, host-virus interaction etc. Three members in the VEGF signaling pathway, including LvVEGFR, LvVEGF1 and LvVEGF2 in shrimp have been proved to be related with WSSV infection in our previous studies. Currently, another member of VEGF family, LvVEGF3, was isolated and its function during the WSSV infection of shrimp was studied. The deduced amino acid sequence of LvVEGF3 contained a signal peptide, a typical PDGF/VEGF domain and a cysteine-knot motif (CXCXC). Tissue distribution analysis showed that LvVEGF3 was predominantly expressed in hemocytes. The transcriptional level of LvVEGF3 in hemocytes was apparently up-regulated during WSSV infection. Silencing of LvVEGF3 with double-stranded RNA caused a reduction of the cumulative mortality rate of shrimp during WSSV infection. The expression of LvVEGFR was apparently down-regulated after LvVEGF3 silencing and up-regulated after injection of recombinant LvVEGF3 protein, suggesting an interaction between LvVEGF3 and LvVEGFR. Furthermore, the interaction between LvVEGFR and LvVEGF3 was confirmed using the yeast two-hybrid system. The results provided new insights into understanding the role of VEGF signaling pathway during virus infection.

  7. Engineering Mathematics I : Electromagnetics, Fluid Mechanics, Material Physics and Financial Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Rančić, Milica

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the latest advances in engineering mathematics with a main focus on the mathematical models, structures, concepts, problems and computational methods and algorithms most relevant for applications in modern technologies and engineering. In particular, it features mathematical methods and models of applied analysis, probability theory, differential equations, tensor analysis and computational modelling used in applications to important problems concerning electromagnetics, antenna technologies, fluid dynamics, material and continuum physics and financial engineering. The individual chapters cover both theory and applications, and include a wealth of figures, schemes, algorithms, tables and results of data analysis and simulation. Presenting new methods and results, reviews of cutting-edge research, and open problems for future research, they equip readers to develop new mathematical methods and concepts of their own, and to further compare and analyse the methods and results discussed. The ...

  8. Finite approximations in fluid mechanics II: DFG priority research programme results 1986-1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschel, Ernst Heinrich

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics and their practical applications in aircraft and automotive design, turbomachinery, heat exchangers and furnaces, and atmospheric modeling are discussed, summarizing the results of studies undertaken in the second half of a DFG-sponsored research program (1986-1988). Topics addressed include a vortex-lattice method for vortex-sheet roll-up and wing-vortex interaction, FEM extrapolation techniques for Stokes and Navier-Stokes flow over a backward-facing step, a method of characteristics for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and unsteady separating flow on an oscillating airfoil. Consideration is given to Lagrangian and BEM approaches for viscous compressible flow, a close-coupled zonal solution for viscous flows, turbomachine calculations with an unstructured-grid FEM, hypersonic flow simulations for blunt bodies at incidence, and double-helical wave motion in supersonic reacting channel flow.

  9. Large Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Systems for International Collaboration In Fluid Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald M. McEligot; Stefan Becker; Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.

    2010-07-01

    In recent international collaboration, INL and Uni. Erlangen have developed large MIR flow systems which can be ideal for joint graduate student education and research. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages and around objects to be obtained without locating a disturbing transducer in the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. The MIR technique is not new itself; others employed it earlier. The innovation of these MIR systems is their large size relative to previous experiments, yielding improved spatial and temporal resolution. This report will discuss the benefits of the technique, characteristics of the systems and some examples of their applications to complex situations. Typically their experiments have provided new fundamental understanding plus benchmark data for assessment and possible validation of computational thermal fluid dynamic codes.

  10. Personal computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.-C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processsed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes commputation.

  11. Experimental studies in fluid mechanics and materials science using acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Robey, J.; Arce, A.; Gaspar, M.

    1987-01-01

    Ground-based and short-duration low gravity experiments have been carried out with the use of ultrasonic levitators to study the dynamics of freely suspended liquid drops under the influence of predominantly capillary and acoustic radiation forces. Some of the effects of the levitating field on the shape as well as the fluid flow fields within the drop have been determined. The development and refinement of measurement techniques using levitated drops with size on the order of 2 mm in diameter have yielded methods having direct application to experiments in microgravity. In addition, containerless melting, undercooling, and freezing of organic materials as well as low melting metals have provided experimental data and observations on the application of acoustic positioning techniques to materials studies.

  12. Effects of mechanical dispersion on the morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front in a fluid-saturated porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Lai, Geng-Xin; Ni, Chuen-Fa

    2009-06-01

    SummaryThe dissolution-induced finger or wormhole patterns in porous medium or fracture rock play a crucial role in a variety of scientific, industrial, and engineering practices. Although previous studies have extensively presented a number of numerical models which couples a system of nonlinear governing equations of porosity change due to mineral dissolution, the conservations of groundwater flow and transport of chemical species to investigate the morphological pattern of a chemical dissolution front within a fluid-saturated porous medium, whereas the mechanical dispersion effect has generally been neglected in the model development. This study addresses the effects of mechanical dispersion on the morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front for a variety of cases. Mechanical dispersion processes is incorporated with the coupled nonlinear governing equation system so as to rebuild a newly numerical model. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that mechanical dispersion has pronounced impacts on the morphological pattern of the chemical dissolution front. For single local non-uniformity case, mechanical dispersion reduces the finger length of an unstable single-fingering front or retains the shape of a stable planar front while speeding up the front advancement. In the case of two local non-uniformities, adding mechanical dispersion with different flow conditions can yield one of the following results: (1) the shape of the stable planar front is maintained but its advancement is accelerated; (2) the shape of the unstable single-fingering front is maintained but its length is reduced; (3) the unstable double-fingering front is merged into an unstable single-fingering front; and (4) the shape of the unstable double-fingering front is preserved but its fingering length is reduced. A comparison between the behavior diagrams of dissolution front morphology (with and without considering mechanical dispersion) shows that the double-fingering front

  13. Modeling of fluid injection and withdrawal induced fault activation using discrete element based hydro-mechanical and dynamic coupled simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeoung Seok; Zang, Arno; Zimmermann, Günter; Stephansson, Ove

    2016-04-01

    Operation of fluid injection into and withdrawal from the subsurface for various purposes has been known to induce earthquakes. Such operations include hydraulic fracturing for shale gas extraction, hydraulic stimulation for Enhanced Geothermal System development and waste water disposal. Among these, several damaging earthquakes have been reported in the USA in particular in the areas of high-rate massive amount of wastewater injection [1] mostly with natural fault systems. Oil and gas production have been known to induce earthquake where pore fluid pressure decreases in some cases by several tens of Mega Pascal. One recent seismic event occurred in November 2013 near Azle, Texas where a series of earthquakes began along a mapped ancient fault system [2]. It was studied that a combination of brine production and waste water injection near the fault generated subsurface pressures sufficient to induced earthquakes on near-critically stressed faults. This numerical study aims at investigating the occurrence mechanisms of such earthquakes induced by fluid injection [3] and withdrawal by using hydro-geomechanical coupled dynamic simulator (Itasca's Particle Flow Code 2D). Generic models are setup to investigate the sensitivity of several parameters which include fault orientation, frictional properties, distance from the injection well to the fault, amount of fluid withdrawal around the injection well, to the response of the fault systems and the activation magnitude. Fault slip movement over time in relation to the diffusion of pore pressure is analyzed in detail. Moreover, correlations between the spatial distribution of pore pressure change and the locations of induced seismic events and fault slip rate are investigated. References [1] Keranen KM, Weingarten M, Albers GA, Bekins BA, Ge S, 2014. Sharp increase in central Oklahoma seismicity since 2008 induced by massive wastewater injection, Science 345, 448, DOI: 10.1126/science.1255802. [2] Hornbach MJ, DeShon HR

  14. Competition between Bending and Internal Pressure Governs the Mechanics of Fluid Nanovesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorselen, Daan; MacKintosh, Fred C; Roos, Wouter H; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2017-03-28

    Nanovesicles (∼100 nm) are ubiquitous in cell biology and an important vector for drug delivery. Mechanical properties of vesicles are known to influence cellular uptake, but the mechanism by which deformation dynamics affect internalization is poorly understood. This is partly due to the fact that experimental studies of the mechanics of such vesicles remain challenging, particularly at the nanometer scale where appropriate theoretical models have also been lacking. Here, we probe the mechanical properties of nanoscale liposomes using atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation. The mechanical response of the nanovesicles shows initial linear behavior and subsequent flattening corresponding to inward tether formation. We derive a quantitative model, including the competing effects of internal pressure and membrane bending, that corresponds well to these experimental observations. Our results are consistent with a bending modulus of the lipid bilayer of ∼14kbT. Surprisingly, we find that vesicle stiffness is pressure dominated for adherent vesicles under physiological conditions. Our experimental method and quantitative theory represents a robust approach to study the mechanics of nanoscale vesicles, which are abundant in biology, as well as being of interest for the rational design of liposomal vectors for drug delivery.

  15. The immune responses triggered by CpG ODNs in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei are associated with LvTolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Lingling; Yue, Feng; Yi, Qilin; Huang, Mengmeng; Liu, Rui; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2014-03-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) represent a kind of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as well as a novel adjuvant that activate the innate immune system through interaction with Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in mammals. In the present study, the synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, CpG ODN 2395, was employed to investigate the interactive mode of CpG ODNs with three known Tolls (LvToll1-3) from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. The mature peptides of extracellular domains of LvTolls (LvToll-ECDs) were recombinant expressed and their binding activities to CpG ODN 2395 were further examined by ELISA. rLvToll1-ECD and rLvToll3-ECD exhibited affinity to CpG ODN 2395 in a dose-dependent manner when their concentrations ranged from 0.25 to 2.00 μmol/L, while rLvToll2-ECD did not show any binding activities to CpG ODN 2395 in tested concentrations. Additionally, after the stimulation of CpG ODN 2395, the luciferase activities of HEK293T cells transfected with LvToll1-mosaic or LvToll3-mosaic were significantly increased to 2.38-fold (pvannamei were indispensable for the triggering of immune responses by CpG ODNs, and the results provided a foundation for the application of CpG ODNs as the novel immunostimulants in aquaculture.

  16. Simulations of Magnetic Reconnection - Kinetic Mechanisms Underlying the Fluid Description of Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunai, icolas; Belmont, Gerard; Smets, Roch

    2012-01-01

    Because of its ability to transfer the energy stored in magnetic field together with the breaking of the flux freezing constraint, magnetic reconnection is considered as one of the most important phenomena in plasma physics. When it happens in a collision less environment such as the terrestrial magnetosphere, it should a priori be modelled with in the framework of kinetic physics. The evidence of kinetic features has incidentally for a long time, been shown by researchers with the help of both numerical simulations and satellite observations. However, most of our understanding of the process comes from the more intuitive fluid interpretation with simple closure hypothesis which do not include kinetic effects. To what extent are these two separate descriptions of the same phenomenon related? What is the role of kinetic effects in the averaged/fluid dynamics of reconnection? This thesis addresses these questions for the proton population in the particular case of anti parallel merging with the help of 2D Hybrid simulations. We show that one can not assume, as is usually done, that the acceleration of the proton flow is only due to the Laplace force. Our results show, for symmetric and asymmetric connection, the importance of the pressure force, opposed to the electric one on the separatrices, in the decoupling region. In the symmetric case, we emphasize the kinetic origin of this force by analyzing the proton distribution functions and explain their structure by studying the underlying particle dynamics. Protons, as individual particles, are shown to bounce in the electric potential well created by the Hall effect. The spatial divergence of this well results in a mixing in phase space responsible for the observed structure of the pressure tensor. A detailed energy budget analysis confirms the role of the pressure force for the acceleration; but, contrary to what is sometimes assumed, it also reveals that the major part of the incoming Poynting flux is transferred to

  17. Hemodynamic improvement in cardiac resynchronization does not require improvement in left ventricular rotation mechanics: three-dimensional tagged MRI analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Leclercq, Christophe; Wang, Jiangxia; Kass, David A; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2010-07-01

    Earlier studies have yielded conflicting evidence on whether or not cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves left ventricular (LV) rotation mechanics. In dogs with left bundle branch block and pacing-induced heart failure (n=7), we studied the effects of CRT on LV rotation mechanics in vivo by 3-dimensional tagged magnetic resonance imaging with a temporal resolution of 14 ms. CRT significantly improved hemodynamic parameters but did not significantly change the LV rotation or rotation rate. LV torsion, defined as LV rotation of each slice with respect to that of the most basal slice, was not significantly changed by CRT. CRT did not significantly change the LV torsion rate. There was no significant circumferential regional heterogeneity (anterior, lateral, inferior, and septal) in LV rotation mechanics in either left bundle branch block with pacing-induced heart failure or CRT, but there was significant apex-to-base regional heterogeneity. CRT acutely improves hemodynamic parameters without improving LV rotation mechanics. There is no significant circumferential regional heterogeneity of LV rotation mechanics in the mechanically dyssynchronous heart. These results suggest that LV rotation mechanics is an index of global LV function, which requires coordination of all regions of the left ventricle, and improvement in LV rotation mechanics appears to be a specific but insensitive index of acute hemodynamic response to CRT.

  18. Comparison of three feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) point-of-care antigen test kits using blood and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Mark E; Malik, Richard; Hall, Evelyn; Sheehy, Paul A; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2017-02-01

    Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) can be a challenging infection to diagnose due to a complex feline host-pathogen relationship and occasionally unreliable test results. This study compared the accuracy of three point-of-care (PoC) FeLV p27 antigen test kits commonly used in Australia and available commercially worldwide (SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo, Witness FeLV/FIV and Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV), using detection of FeLV provirus by an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay as the diagnostic gold standard. Blood (n=563) and saliva (n=419) specimens were collected from a population of cats determined to include 491 FeLV-uninfected and 72 FeLV-infected individuals (45 progressive infections [p27 and qPCR positive], 27 regressive infections [p27 negative, qPCR positive]). Sensitivity and specificity using whole blood was 63% and 94% for SNAP Combo, 57% and 98% for Witness, and 57% and 98% for Anigen Rapid, respectively. SNAP Combo had a significantly lower specificity using blood compared to the other two kits (P=0.004 compared to Witness, P=0.007 compared to Anigen Rapid). False-positive test results occurred with all three kits using blood, and although using any two kits in parallel increased specificity, no combination of kits completely eliminated the occurrence of false-positive results. We therefore recommend FeLV proviral PCR testing for any cat that tests positive with a PoC FeLV antigen kit, as well as for any cat that has been potentially exposed to FeLV but tests negative with a FeLV antigen kit, before final assignment of FeLV status can be made with confidence. For saliva testing, sensitivity and specificity was 54% and 100%, respectively, for all three test kits. The reduced sensitivity of saliva testing compared to blood testing, although not statistically significant, suggests saliva testing with the current generation of PoC FeLV antigen kits is unsuitable for screening large populations of cats, such as in shelters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  19. Fluids double-fracturing genetic mechanism and mineralization of gold-copper of the breccia pipe at Qibaoshan in Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐兴旺; 蔡新平; 秦大军; 王杰; 梁光河; 张小允; 刘立金

    2000-01-01

    After studying the characteristics and special texture of the fluidogenous tectonics, mineral assemblage in the cemented vein between breccia and their special distribution, and stress analyzing the joint structures in and around the breccia pipe, it is found that the observed phenomena are caused by a new tectonic dynamic mechanics of fluid——double-fracturing caused bytemperature and pressure of fluids and pulsating expansion. Under the actions of thermal stress and the pressure of fluids, thermal cracks and joints that developed along parts of the thermal cracks formed systematically in the rocks. Under these conditions, up-arching fracture zones that pulsatively expanded upward and cylindrical pressing breccia body were formed. Rocks at the peak of the pyramidal fractures zone break down instantly. Where the difference between pressure of fluids and the overburden pressure exceeded greatly the competence of the rocks, fluid junctions occurred and the velocity of the fluid flow increased as a result.

  20. Tribological properties and lubricating mechanism of SiO2 nanoparticles in water-based fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Y. Y.; Sun, J. L.; Kong, L. H.

    2017-03-01

    The tribological properties of surface modified SiO2 nanoparticles suspension in water-based lubricant have been studied. SiO2 (30 nm) nanoparticles were dispersed through surface modification with polyethylene glycol-200. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy show that SiO2 nanoparticles disperse well and stably in the water-based lubricant. The diameter of the nanoparticles is about 60 nm. Tribological properties of the water-based lubricant were evaluated using four-ball wear test machine and pin-on-disk tester under different loads and different concentrations of SiO2 nanoparticles. Wear surface morphology, element chemistry configuration of steel balls and steel rings were studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results show that the tribological properties of the water-based fluid have been improved by addition of nanoparticles ranging from 0.1% to 0.3% concentrations. SiO2 nanoparticles deposited onto the wear surface during the sliding, which helped to reduce the friction coefficients and increase the anti-wear properties due to the miniature ball bearing effect and self-repairing performance of nanoparticles between the friction pairs. With the increase of test load, the friction coefficients decrease but the wear of the surface increase.