WorldWideScience

Sample records for lupus

  1. Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can ... vessels, and brain. There are several kinds of lupus Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common ...

  2. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lupus) English Español 繁體中文 한국어 tiếng Việt Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus) Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus) Lupus can affect many body parts, ...

  3. Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in men and most often strikes during the child-bearing years. Nine out of 10 people who have lupus are women. Lupus is also more common in people of African or Asian background. African Americans and Asian Americans ...

  4. Different Types of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Different types of lupus Lupus Foundation of America September 18, 2017 Resource ... lupus. Learn more about each type below. Systemic lupus erythematosus Systemic lupus is the most common form ...

  5. Lupus nephritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... A recent large Australian series! on lupus nephritis emphasises .... patent capillary lumina and thickened capillary walls. ... (Australia). 135. 27. 58. 15. This study (RSA). 51. 33. 63. 4 have been documented.2-5 All included patients with lupus nephritis, but while the series from Natal' gave a detailed list.

  6. Discoid Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Share | Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic skin condition of sores ... diagnosis because other conditions can look like discoid lupus erythematosus. If the skin biopsy shows discoid lupus erythematosus, ...

  7. Discoid Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Share | Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic skin condition of ... occur. A small percentage of patients with discoid lupus can develop disease of the internal organs, which ...

  8. Lupus nephritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... will benefit from immunosuppressive therapy. Our study found hypertension, which persisted at the most recent follow-up, to be associated with a poor outcome, as was poor renal function both at biopsy and follow-up. Leaker er al. I found that survival in lupus nephritis is unaffected by age, sex, nephrotic ...

  9. Lupus panniculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondello, Eduardo; Vega, Alejandro de la; Eyheremendy, EduardoP.

    2002-01-01

    Lupus panniculitis (LP) is a benign entity. To our knowledge LP has not been reported in the radiology literature. Our objective is to describe imaging findings as previous articles have not focused on this aspect. Computed Tomography and MR imaging demonstrate lipoatrophy and isolated areas with inflammatory activity in the subcutaneous tissue. (author)

  10. Children & Teens (with Lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nine. blog Lupus at school: A guide for parents and kids Advice for communicating with your child's school about their lupus and ... teens on adjusting to life with lupus For teens, living with lupus can require some major ... in school Advice from parents and education experts on 504 and Individualized Education ...

  11. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood clots - lupus anticoagulants; DVT - anticoagulants ... Most often, lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  12. Living with Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Lupus Affects the Body Lupus and the Workplace Mental Health and Wellbeing Overlapping Diseases Reproductive Health Self-Advocacy Treatment Options all resource types Videos Articles Downloadable PDFs Slideshow Q & A List Personal Stories ...

  13. Lupus Foundation of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store Read About Our $3.8M Commitment to Stem Cell Research. Learn More Committed to Advancing Research on Lupus ... person with lupus? Get Answers Latest News & Stories Research News | Nov. 16, 2017 Major Lupus Stem Cell Study Receives Funding $3.8 million committed by ...

  14. Lupus among Asians and Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Lupus among Asians and Hispanics Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... compared with white women. Signs and Symptom of Lupus Lupus can affect people of all ages. However, ...

  15. Diet and Nutrition With Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Pinterest Email Print Diet and nutrition with lupus Lupus Foundation of America April 19, 2018 Resource ... living Recipe collection Guidance on alcohol use with lupus Moderate use of alcohol is usually not a ...

  16. Living with Lupus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Living With Lupus KidsHealth / For Parents / Living With Lupus What's in ... disease for both doctors and their patients. About Lupus A healthy immune system produces proteins called antibodies ...

  17. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... psychological problems (including personality changes, paranoia, mania, and schizophrenia), seizures, transverse myelitis, and paralysis and stroke. Treatment There is no cure for lupus. Treatment is symptomatic. With a combination ...

  18. Oral manifestations of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, S; O'Shea, F; Galvin, S; Wynne, B

    2018-02-01

    Mucosal involvement is commonly seen in patients with lupus; however, oral examination is often forgotten. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within oral lupoid plaques has been described, emphasizing the importance of identifying and treating oral lupus. We undertook a retrospective single-centre study looking at oral findings in patients attending our multidisciplinary lupus clinic between January 2015 and April 2016. A total of 42 patients were included. The majority of patients were female (88%) and had a diagnosis of discoid lupus erythematosus (62%). Half of the patients had positive oral findings, 26% had no oral examination documented, and 24% had documented normal oral examinations. Our findings suggest that oral pathology is common in this cohort of patients. Regular oral examination is warranted to identify oral lupus and provide treatment. Associated diseases such as Sjogren's syndrome may also be identified. Patients should be encouraged to see their general dental practitioners on a regular basis for mucosal review. Any persistent ulcer that fails to respond to treatment or hard lump needs urgent histopathological evaluation to exclude malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma.

  19. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Alexandra; Kao, Amy H

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is the least understood, yet perhaps the most prevalent manifestation of lupus. The pathogenesis of NPSLE is multifactorial and involves various inflammatory cytokines, autoantibodies, and immune complexes resulting in vasculopathic, cytotoxic and autoantibody-mediated neuronal injury. The management of NPSLE is multimodal and has not been subjected to rigorous study. Different treatment regimens include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulation, and immunosuppressives such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate. For refractory NPSLE, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, and rituximab have been used. Adjunctive symptomatic treatment complements these therapies by targeting mood disorders, psychosis, cognitive impairment, seizures or headaches. Several new biological agents are being tested including Belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that targets B lymphocyte stimulator. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, treatment, and new potential therapies for neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22379459

  20. Genetics Home Reference: systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Systemic lupus erythematosus Systemic lupus erythematosus Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease that causes inflammation ...

  1. Ectopic Axillary Breast during Systemic Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besma Ben Dhaou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many breast changes may occur in systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a 41-year-old woman with lupus who presented three years after the onset of lupus an ectopic mammary gland confirmed by histological study.

  2. Kutan lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandreva, Tatjana; Voss, Anne; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease. The most common clinical forms are acute cutaneous LE (ACLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE) and discoid LE (DLE). Cutaneous LE, mainly ACLE, can be the first sign of systemic LE (SLE). DLE and SCLE are less associated with development of...... hydroxychloroquine....

  3. Lupus induced by medicaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canas D, Carlos Alberto; Perafan B, Pablo Eduardo

    2001-01-01

    We describe a 55 years old female patient who consulted by fever syndrome, artralgias and the presence of high tittles positives antinuclear antibodies. She had arterial hypertension in treatment with captopril. We suspected the clinical diagnoses of drug-induced lupus; the withdraw of captopril was associated with the remission of the clinical and laboratory manifestations

  4. Chilblain lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of chilblain lupus erythematosus (CLE were seen in females aged 33 years and 18 years. Photosensitivity, chronicity and aggravation in winters were present in both cases. Histopathology revealed follicular keratosis, atrophy and extensive liquefaction of basal cells. Oral pradinisolone with chloroquine resulted in marked improvement in the skin lesions.

  5. Kutan lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandreva, Tatjana; Voss, Anne; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease. The most common clinical forms are acute cutaneous LE (ACLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE) and discoid LE (DLE). Cutaneous LE, mainly ACLE, can be the first sign of systemic LE (SLE). DLE and SCLE are less associated with development...

  6. 77 FR 38305 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ...] Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical... ``Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment... of medical products for the treatment of lupus nephritis. Dated: June 22, 2012. Leslie Kux, Assistant...

  7. Kidney disease in lupus is not always 'lupus nephritis'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Anders (Hans-Joachim); J.J. Weening (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn lupus erythematosus, elevated serum creatinine levels and urinary abnormalities implicate a kidney disorder, which may not always be lupus nephritis as defined by the current classification of the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society. The signs of renal

  8. Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Marie-Louise From; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and SLE with concomitant or subsequent lupus nephritis (LN) in Denmark during 1995.2011, using data from the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR).  Methods. To assess the incidence of SLE, we identified all persons aged...

  9. Headache in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Urowitz, Murray B; O'Keeffe, Aidan G

    2013-01-01

    To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).......To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)....

  10. Pro: Cyclophosphamide in lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Based on efficacy and toxicity considerations, both low-dose pulse cyclophosphamide as part of the Euro-Lupus Nephritis protocol and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with corticosteroids may be considered for induction of remission in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis. The long-term follow-up

  11. THE CAROLINA LUPUS STUDY (CLU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolina Lupus (CLU) Study, an epidemiologic study of risk factors for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a severe, chronic, systemic autoimmune disease that disproportionately affects women and African-Americans. The CLU Study focuses on measures of endogenous hormone ex...

  12. Prognostic factors in lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Starklint, Henrik; Halberg, Poul

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical and renal biopsy findings in an unselected cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and nephritis.......To evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical and renal biopsy findings in an unselected cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and nephritis....

  13. Filaments in Lupus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Rodon, J.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Plunkett, A.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms behind the formation of sub-stellar mass sources are key to determine the populations at the low-mass end of the stellar distribution. Here, we present mapping observations toward the Lupus I cloud in C18O(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) obtained with APEX. We have identified a few velocity-coherent filaments. Each contains several substellar mass sources that are also identified in the 1.1mm continuum data (see also SOLA catalogue presentation). We will discuss the velocity structure, fragmentation properties of the identified filaments, and the nature of the detected sources.

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus serositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, V.H.S.; Robins, P.D.; Sweeney, D.J. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1995-08-01

    The imaging appearances of a case of systemic lupus erythematosus, which manifested initially as a serositis, is described. Barium small bowel study showed segments of spiculation with tethering, angulation, and obstruction. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen confirmed ascites. It was also useful in demonstrating free fluid, bowel wall oedema, and serosal thickening . Follow up scanning to demonstrate resolution of changes may also be of value. The definitive diagnosis was made on the basis of marked elevation of antinuclear and anti-double stranded DNA antibodies. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  15. The Pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is an immune complex GN that develops as a frequent complication of SLE. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis involves a variety of pathogenic mechanisms. The extrarenal etiology of systemic lupus is based on multiple combinations of genetic variants that compromise those mechanisms normally assuring immune tolerance to nuclear autoantigens. This loss of tolerance becomes clinically detectable by the presence of antinuclear antibodies. In addition, nucleic acids released from netting or apoptotic neutrophils activate innate and adaptive immunity via viral nucleic acid-specific Toll-like receptors. Therefore, many clinical manifestations of systemic lupus resemble those of viral infection. In lupus, endogenous nuclear particles trigger IFN-α signaling just like viral particles during viral infection. As such, dendritic cells, T helper cells, B cells, and plasma cells all contribute to the aberrant polyclonal autoimmunity. The intrarenal etiology of lupus nephritis involves antibody binding to multiple intrarenal autoantigens rather than the deposition of circulating immune complexes. Tertiary lymphoid tissue formation and local antibody production add to intrarenal complement activation as renal immunopathology progresses. Here we provide an update on the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to lupus nephritis and provide the rationale for the latest and novel treatment strategies. PMID:23929771

  16. Lupus nephritis in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthman, I W; Muffarij, A A; Mudawar, W A; Nasr, F W; Masri, A F

    2001-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of the clinicopathological characteristics of 50 systemic lupus erythematosus patients with nephritis who underwent a kidney biopsy and were admitted to the American University of Beirut Medical Center, in Lebanon, between 1979 and 1999. There were 43 females and seven males, with a median age of 24 y. Renal histology slides from these patients were assessed according to the World Health Organization classification, and were distributed as follows: class I (n = 3, 6%); class II (n = 14, 28%); class III (n = 11, 22%); class IV (n = 19, 38%); class V (n = 1, 2%); class VI (n = 2, 4%). All the patients received oral prednisone, in addition the following treatments were used: pulse intravenous (i.v.) cyclophosphamide (n = 23, 46%); azathioprine (n = 22, 44%); pulse i.v. steroids (n = 19, 38%); chloroquine sulfate (n = 17, 34%); methotrexate (n = 5, 10%); and plasmapheresis (n = 2, 4%). The median duration of follow-up was 5 y (range 1-33 y). On their last evaluation, out of 37 patients who were followed, 20 patients (54%) had controlled disease, eight patients (22%) were still on active medical treatment, four patients (11%) were on chronic hemodialysis, and five patients (13%) had died. Unlike three other Arab populations studies from Kuwait, United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, where the most frequent histopathologic abnormality was class III, diffuse proliferative LN (class IV) was the most common type of lupus nephritis in Lebanon, similarly to reports from USA, France, Netherlands, South Africa, Thailand and Taiwan.

  17. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tsokos GC, ed. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 54. Habif TP. Connective tissue diseases. ... TP, ed. Clinical Dermatology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 17. Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster ...

  18. "Bound" globulin in the skin of patients with chronic discoid lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormane, R.H.

    1964-01-01

    In what respect chronic discoid lupus erythematosus is related to systemic lupus erythematosus is still uncertain. In discoid lupus the lupus-erythematosus (L.E.) phenomenon is negative, and the history does not suggest vascular lesions or involvement of serous membranes. In both diseases the

  19. Historia del Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Rodríguez Gama

    2004-09-01

    Se encontrarán los lectores con una gran cantidad y calidad de biografías sobre investigaciones, médicos y científicos que han enfrentado el reto de tratar de entender y tratar el lupus, desde los médicos clásicos como Hipócrates, Galeno y Celso, los protodermatólogos Daniel Turner, Jean Astruc, Antoine Lorry y Josef von Plenk; el primer dematológo Robert Willam y médicos de los siglos XVIII y XIX como Thomas Bateman, Jean Lous Alibert, Theódore Biett, Olive Rayer, Pierre Cazenave, Antoine Bazin, Ferdinand von Hebra, Moriz Kaposi, Ernest Besnier, Alfred Fournier, Louis Brocq, Jean Darier, el clasificador Jonathan Hutchinson, Paul Unna, William Osler, Emanuel Libman, George Baehr y así decenas de colosos de la ciencia médica, cuyas historias son descritas minuciosamente por el Dr. Iglesias...

  20. [Systemic lupus erythematodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukác, J; Rovenský, J; Lukácová, O; Kozáková, D

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE) is chronic autoimmune disease, characteristic by production of autoantibodies against different autoantigens. Etiopathogenesis in not precise determinated, but genetic, immunologic, hormonal factors or influence of environment are assumed. It manifests by various symptoms and it can affect whichever organ or system in the body. Clinical manifestation are due chronic inflammation in the tissues, which is caused first of all by deposit of immunocomplex and by cytotoxic damage. At the last decades the mortality of patients with SLE is markly lower and their live is prolong. In spite of this diagnostic, to follow up and therapy of this disease is complicated and it requires the colaboration of more branches of medicine.

  1. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  2. Lupus, discoid on a child's face (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The round or disk shaped (discoid) rash of lupus produces red, raised patches with scales. The pores ( ... The majority (approximately 90%) of individuals with discoid lupus have only skin involvement as compared to more ...

  3. An unusual presentation of juvenile lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malleshwar Bottu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of juvenile lupus varies widely ranging between 4 and 250 per 100,000 population. Most common organ involvement in juvenile lupus is kidney. Neurological, cutaneous and hematological involvements are also involved. Skeletal muscle involvement in the form of myositis is rare. Myositis as presenting manifestation in juvenile lupus is also unusual. Herein, we report one such case wherein myositis preceded the onset of lupus nephritis

  4. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Grace K.; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus is centered upon formulating a regimen of topical and systemic therapies designed to reduce disease activity and minimize cosmetic damage. Sun avoidance and sunscreen are important preventative measures proven to minimize cutaneous lupus erythematosus exacerbations. Limited disease is typically managed with topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Antimalarial therapy is the gold standard of systemic therapy. Many other treatments have been studied in patients with recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and their use must be evaluated based on individual risk-benefit concerns. R-salbutamol and pulsed dye laser therapy have proven to be effective topical alternatives. Additional systemic agents include retinoids, immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, biologics, and other experimental therapies with novel modes of action. According to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria for evaluating the strength of evidence supporting an individual treatment measure, no therapy for cutaneous lupus erythematosus has achieved Level 1 status. This demonstrates the need for randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of all cutaneous lupus erythematosus interventions in order to meet increasing standards and demand for evidence-based practice. PMID:23320123

  5. Lupus nephritis management guidelines compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmus, Suzanne; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bertsias, George K; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Gordon, Caroline; Lightstone, Liz; Tesar, Vladimir; Jayne, David R

    2016-06-01

    In the past years, many (randomized) trials have been performed comparing the treatment strategies for lupus nephritis. In 2012, these data were incorporated in six different guidelines for treating lupus nephritis. These guidelines are European, American and internationally based, with one separate guideline for children. They offer information on different aspects of the management of lupus nephritis including induction and maintenance treatment of the different histological classes, adjunctive treatment, monitoring of the patient, definitions of response and relapse, indications for (repeat) renal biopsy, and additional challenges such as the presence of vascular complications, the pregnant SLE patient, treatment in children and adolescents and considerations about end-stage renal disease and transplantation. In this review, we summarize the guidelines, determine the common ground between them, highlight the differences and discuss recent literature. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  6. Lupus panniculitis involving the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabate, Josep M.; Gomez, Antonio; Torrubia, Sofia; Salinas, Teresa; Clotet, Montse; Lerma, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Lupus panniculitis is an unusual immunological disease that characteristically affects the subcutaneous fat and occurs in 2% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a case of lupus panniculitis involving the breast, which represents a very uncommon location. Mammographically, it presented as a suspicious irregular mass involving the subcutaneous fat pad with skin thickening. High echogenicity constituted the most relevant sonographic finding. To the best of our knowledge, the magnetic resonance (MR) features have not been previously described. High signal intensity was found on both T1- and T2-weighted precontrast MR images. A dynamic contrast-enhanced study revealed a suspicious focal mass with irregular margins and rim enhancement, with a type 3 time-signal intensity curve. Differential diagnosis with carcinoma and fat necrosis and the value of core biopsy are discussed. (orig.)

  7. BERTAHAN DENGAN LUPUS: GAMBARAN RESILIENSI PADA ODAPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggun Resdasari Prasetyo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease in which an abnormal immune system can cause inflammation on several organ or body systems. The risk of mortality rate caused by Lupus is high and late diagnosis is also prevalent which impact the psychological aspect of individual affected with Lupus (so-called Odapus. Therefore, resiliency is needed; that is individual ability to survive and keep optimistic attitude towards recovery. This study aims to describe the resiliency of the affected individuals with Lupus. This is a qualitative study. Eight persons affected with Lupus who were still coping with Lupus participated in this study. The results indicated that subjects developed a negatives constructs to adapt with Lupus. Therefore, psychological intervention is needed to improve their resiliency.

  8. Ultraviolet light and cutaneous lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors known to trigger cutaneous disease activity in (systemic) lupus erythematosus patients. UV light, UVB in particular, is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Currently, disturbed clearance of apoptotic cells is one of the concepts explaining

  9. Lymphoma risk in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, Sasha; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Joseph, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine disease activity versus treatment as lymphoma risk factors in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: We performed case-cohort analyses within a multisite SLE cohort. Cancers were ascertained by regional registry linkages. Adjusted HRs for lymphoma were generated...

  10. Systemisk lupus erythematosus og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Karen; Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease which most often affects women of childbearing age. Pregnancy is therefore an important issue for the patient and the responsible physician. Pregnancy outcomes in women with SLE has improved significantly over the latest decades...

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Green, A; Junker, P

    1998-01-01

    A population based cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was recruited from a for epidemiological purposes representative Danish region. Patients were ascertained from 4 different sources with a high degree of completeness as estimated by using capture-recapture analysis...

  12. Derivation and validation of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Michelle; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2012-01-01

    The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group revised and validated the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification criteria in order to improve clinical relevance, meet stringent methodology requirements, and incorporate new...

  13. ENDOCARDITIS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMEL Harzallah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis is one of the most prevalent forms of cardiac involvement in patients with lupus, as it is considered as one a life-threatening complication. Libman-Sacks endocarditis is common. Infective endocarditis can also cause complications within immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study is to determine particularities of endocarditis in patients with lupus and to look for distinguishing features between infectious or immunological origin. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with lupus presenting endocarditis. Lupus was diagnosed according to the American college of rheumatology criteria. The diagnosis of endocarditis was made based on the modified Duke criteria. The present case report studies seven cases of endocarditis. Six of these patients are women and the other one is a man. They are aged meanly of 29.4 years (extremes: 20-36. Fever was present in all the cases with a new cardiac murmur in six cases and a modification of its intensity in one case. Biologic inflammatory syndrome was present in six cases. Cardiac ultrasound performed in six cases made the diagnosis of endocarditis which involved the left heart valves in five cases and the right heart valves in one case. Valvular insufficiency was identified in six patients. The valve involvement was mitral in two cases, mitro-aortic in two others, aortic in the fifth one and tricuspid in the sixth one. Endocarditis was infectious in 4 cases, thanks to positive blood culture. The germs identified were gram negative bacilli in two cases, anaerobic organism in one case and gram positive cocci in one case. Candida albicans was isolated in one case. Libman-Sacks endocarditis was objectified in three cases. A combination of Libman-Sacks endocarditis with infectious endocarditis was diagnosed in one case. The treatment consisted of antibiotics in four cases with surgery in two cases. The outcome was favorable in five cases and fatal in the two others. Endocarditis in lupus

  14. Unusual presentation of childhood Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sathish; Agarwal, Indira

    2007-01-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is a rare blistering condition with a distinctive combination of clinical, histological and immunopathologic features that together constitute a unique bullous disease phenotype. It is often associated with autoimmunity to type VII collagen. Here we report a child who presented with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. Rapid resolution of the blisters occurred following treatment with dapsone. PMID:18028550

  15. Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessier Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    2013-01-01

    Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.......Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries....

  16. Biomarkers for Lupus Nephritis: A Critical Appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chiu Mok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney disease is one of the most serious manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Despite the improvement in the medical care of SLE in the past two decades, the prognosis of lupus nephritis remains unsatisfactory. Besides exploring more effective but less toxic treatment modalities that will further improve the remission rate, early detection and treatment of renal activity may spare patients from intensive immunosuppressive therapies and reduce renal damage. Conventional clinical parameters such as creatinine clearance, proteinuria, urine sediments, anti-dsDNA, and complement levels are not sensitive or specific enough for detecting ongoing disease activity in the lupus kidneys and early relapse of nephritis. Thus, novel biomarkers are necessary to enhance the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of lupus renal disease, prognostic stratification, monitoring of treatment response, and detection of early renal flares. This paper reviews promising biomarkers that have recently been evaluated in longitudinal studies of lupus nephritis.

  17. Lupus mastitis - peculiar radiological and pathological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Hussain, Waleed Mohd; Fatani, Mohamed I; Shakour, Bothaina Abdul

    2009-01-01

    Lupus mastitis is a form of lupus profundus that is seen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. It usually presents as a swelling (or swellings) in the breasts, with or without pain. The condition is recurrent and progresses along with the underlying disease, with fat necrosis, calcification, fibrosis, scarring, and breast atrophy. Lupus mastitis is often confused with malignancy and lymphoma and, in our part of the world, with tuberculosis. Confusion is especially likely when it occurs in an unusual clinical setting. In this article, we present a case that presented with unique radiological, pathological, and clinical features. Awareness of the various manifestations of lupus mastitis is essential if unnecessary interventions such as biopsies and surgeries, and their consequences, are to be avoided

  18. Mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Chi Chiu; Que, Tak Lun; Tsui, Edmund Yik Kong; Lam, Wing Yin

    2003-10-01

    To describe a case of mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to review other patients reported in the English literature. A Medline search for articles about mucormycosis in SLE published between 1970 and 2002 was performed by using the key words "lupus," "mucormycosis," "zygomycosis," "Mucorales," "Rhizopus," and "Mucor." Cases were pooled for analysis, and the mycology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of mucormycosis in SLE was reviewed. Eight cases of mucormycosis in SLE were identified (female:male = 7:1). The mean age at the time of infection was 31.8 +/- 7.6 years and the mean duration of SLE was 6.3 +/- 3.9 years. All except 1 patient had active lupus and all were receiving high-dose corticosteroids. Concomitant cytotoxic agents were used in 4 patients. Additional predisposing factors for opportunistic infection included hypocomplementemia, nephrotic syndrome, uremia, leukopenia, and diabetes mellitus. The disseminated form of mucormycosis was the most common presentation and the diagnosis often was made only at autopsy (63%). For cases with positive culture results, Rhizopus was the causative species. In 4 patients, manifestations of the fungal infection mimicked those of active SLE. The overall mortality of mucormycosis was very high (88%) and, in most cases, was probably a function of delayed diagnosis and treatment. The cutaneous form appeared to have the best prognosis with combined medical and surgical treatment. Mucormycosis is a rare but usually fatal fungal infection in SLE. Judicious use of immunosuppressive agents, a high index of suspicion, early diagnosis, and combination treatment with amphotericin B and surgical debridement may improve the prognosis of this serious infection.

  19. Childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, D M R; Gomes, R Cunha; Aikawa, N E; Campos, L M A; Romiti, R; Silva, C A

    2014-11-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has rarely been described in pediatric lupus population and the real prevalence of childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has not been reported. From January 1983 to November 2013, 303 childhood-onset SLE (c-SLE) patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Childreńs Institute of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina Universidade da Universidade de São Paulo, three of them (1%) diagnosed as childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. All three cases presented tense vesiculobullous lesions unassociated with lupus erythematosus lesions, with the median duration of 60 days (30-60). All patients fulfilled bullous systemic lupus erythematosus criteria. Two had nephritis and serositis and presented specific autoantibodies. The histological pattern demonstrated subepidermal blisters with neutrophils-predominant infiltrates within the upper dermis. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) showed deposits of IgG and complement along the epidermal basement membrane, in the presence or absence of IgA and/or IgM. A positive indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin demonstrating dermal binding was observed in two cases. All of them had moderate/severe disease activity at diagnosis with median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) of 18 (14-24). Two patients received dapsone and one with severe nephritis received immunosuppressive drugs. In conclusion, in the last 30 years the prevalence of bullous lupus in childhood-onset lupus population was low (1%) in our tertiary University Hospital. A diagnosis of SLE should always be considered in children with recurrent tense vesiculobullous lesions with or without systemic manifestations. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Periosteal reaction in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, M.; Neustadter, L.; Dalinka, M.; Kricun, M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report three patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and periosteal reaction. Two of the three cases had systemic vasculitis and the third had local ischemia with ischemic necrosis. (orig.)

  1. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Acute Adrenal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    presented to us with a history of anorexia, progressive darkening of the face ... to us in an acute hypoadrenal state and was found to have Systemic lupus erythematosus with renal involvement. .... Textbook of Endocrinology. 11th ed. Saunders: ...

  2. I Am Newly Diagnosed with Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding the Right Doctor Flares Lupus and the Workplace Mental Health and Wellbeing Self-Advocacy Signs and Symptoms Treatment Options all resource types Articles Downloadable PDFs Q & A List Blog Personal Stories ...

  3. Renal Tubular Function in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    immune' diseases such as. Sjogren's syndrome,'" systemic lupus erythematosus. (SLE),3 alveolitis' and chronic active hepatitis.' The reported abnormalities of renal tubular function include impairment of acid excretion and urinary concentration.

  4. Systemisk lupus erythematosus i Fyns Amt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Anne B.; Green, Anders; Junker, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has never been investigated in Denmark, whereas international studies have reached divergent results. In the study patients were ascertained from diagnosis-based registers of inpatients and outpatients, notifications from physicians...

  5. Lupus, discoid on the face (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by red, raised patches with adherent scales. The skin pores (follicles) may be plugged, and scarring often occurs in older lesions. Approximately 90% of individuals with discoid lupus have only skin involvement as compared to more generalized involvement in ...

  6. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as morbid jealousy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, A.; Carney, M. W.; Denman, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    A patient fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus and presenting with morbid jealousy is described. There was evidence of cerebral lupus. Her physical and mental symptoms responded to a combination of chlorpromazine and steroids. The morbid mental process was probably caused by her physical condition while the content of her disordered thought and behaviour was determined by her introverted premorbid personality, religiosity, unhappy childhood experiences and frustrated desire for children. PMID:7413541

  7. Hypoparathyroidism associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazarian, M; Laxer, R M; Kooh, S W; Silverman, E D

    1995-11-01

    We describe a 15-year-old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who presented with hypocalcemia and a generalized seizure in the setting of an intercurrent illness and active central nervous system lupus. She was subsequently found to have idiopathic hypoparathyroidism. The association of SLE with hypoparathyroidism is extremely rare and this case represents the first pediatric report of this rare association. We suggest there may be a common underlying pathophysiological process linking these diseases.

  8. Radiological changes in systemic lupus erythematosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, R.; Freyschmidt, J.; Suedhof-Mueller, G.; Menninger, H.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1981-01-01

    In a study of 50 patients with systemic lupus erythematosis, radiologically demonstrable lung changes and pleural effusions were found in 50%. Changes in the peripheral skeleton, such as osteoporosis, erosions or mutilations, were seen in only two patients. Our radiological analysis has shown that systemic lupus erythematosis does not produce changes in the joints, but is responsible for abnormalities in the lungs, as well as for pericardial and pleural effusions. (orig.) [de

  9. Radiological changes in systemic lupus erythematosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, R; Freyschmidt, J; Suedhof-Mueller, G; Menninger, H

    1981-05-01

    In a study of 50 patients with systemic lupus erythematosis, radiologically demonstrable lung changes and pleural effusions were found in 50%. Changes in the peripheral skeleton, such as osteoporosis, erosions or mutilations, were seen in only two patients. Our radiological analysis has shown that systemic lupus erythematosis does not produce changes in the joints, but is responsible for abnormalities in the lungs, as well as for pericardial and pleural effusions.

  10. Epidemiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus and the associated risk of systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, M Prütz; Möller, S; Bygum, A

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this paper are to describe the epidemiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and its subtypes in Denmark, and to investigate the probability of receiving a subsequent diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the related time course. Methods A nationwide...

  11. Pregnancy complications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Helene; Jacobsen, Søren; Tvede, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis had two pregnancies which both resulted in complications known to be associated with SLE, i.e. late abortion, preterm delivery and pre-eclampsia. We conclude that disease quiescence is important for a successful outcome...

  12. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus are associated with clinically significant cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, J Halskou; Ahlehoff, O; Dreyer, L

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a well-known cardiovascular risk factor. Less is known about cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated the risk of mortality and adverse cardiovascular events in patients diagnosed...

  13. Graviditetskomplikationer hos en patient med systemisk lupus erythematosus og lupus nefritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Helene; Jacobsen, Søren; Tvede, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis had two pregnancies which both resulted in complications known to be associated with SLE, i.e. late abortion, preterm delivery and pre-eclampsia. We conclude that disease quiescence is important for a successful outcome...

  14. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Franco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM, is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of this review is to describe widespread pain and fatigue in SLE, and the association of SLE and FM. Although secondary FM is not correlated with the disease activity, it may interfere with the daily activities of SLE patients. Therefore it is necessary to identify its symptoms and treat them promptly to improve the quality of life of patients. In conclusion, it is essential to identify the origin of pain in SLE in order to avoid dangerous over-treatment in patients with co-existing widespread pain and FM.

  15. OSTEOPOROSIS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Seredavkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE form a high risk group osteoporosis (OP. Its main causes are autoimmune inflammation, concomitant pathology, and their treatment. When OP occurs in SLE, bone mass loss is shown to occur early and is associated with the use of glucocorticosteroids (GC. To prevent OP, all patients with SLE should modify their lifestyle. To verify bone changes, densitometry is performed in patients who have risk factors of OP and/or a menopause. Calcium preparations and vitamin D are used to prevent OP; bisphosphonates that significantly reduce the risk of fractures of the vertebral column and femoral neck are employed for therapy of OP. A SLE patient with gluco-corticoid-induced OP and a good effect of bisphophonate treatment is described.

  16. Breast cancer in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, S.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Petri, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi......-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results...... There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug...

  17. Humor in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Cristiano S; Li, Rui; Lawrie, Sarah; Bar-Or, Amit; Clarke, Ann E; Da Costa, Deborah; Banerjee, Devi; Bernatsky, Sasha; Lee, Jennifer L; Pineau, Christian A

    2015-03-01

    Humor has neurophysiological effects influencing the release of cortisol, which may have a direct impact on the immune system. Laughter is associated with a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines both in the general population and in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to explore the effects of humor on serum cytokines [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6)] and cortisol levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), after a standard intervention (120 min of visual comedy). We enrolled 58 females with SLE from consecutive patients assessed in the Montreal General Hospital lupus clinic. The subjects who consented to participate were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention (watching 120 min of comedy) or control group (watching a 120 min documentary). Measurements of cytokine and serum cortisol levels as well as 24-h urine cortisol were taken before, during, and after the interventions. We compared serum cytokine levels and serum and 24-h urine cortisol levels in the humor and control groups and performed regression analyses of these outcomes, adjusting for demographics and the current use of prednisone. There were no significant differences between the control and humor groups in demographics or clinical variables. Baseline serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and B-cell activating factor were also similar in both groups. There was no evidence of a humor effect in terms of decreasing cytokine levels, although there was some suggestion of lowered cortisol secretion in the humor group based the 24-h urinary cortisol levels in a subgroup. In contrast to what has been published for RA, we saw no clear effects of humor in altering cytokine levels in SLE, although interesting trends were seen for lower cortisol levels after humor intervention compared with the control group.

  18. A 12-year retrospective review of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanprapaph, K; Sawatwarakul, S; Vachiramon, V

    2017-10-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features, laboratory findings, systemic manifestations, treatment and outcome of patients with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary care center in Thailand. Methods We performed a retrospective review from 2002 to 2014 of all patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for bullous systemic lupus erythematosus to evaluate for the clinical characteristics, extracutaneous involvement, histopathologic features, immunofluorescence pattern, serological abnormalities, internal organ involvement, treatments and outcome. Results Among 5149 patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus and/or systemic lupus erythematosus, 15 developed vesiculobullous lesions. Ten patients had validation of the diagnosis of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus, accounting for 0.19%. Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus occurred after the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus in six patients with a median onset of 2.5 months (0-89). Four out of 10 patients developed bullous systemic lupus erythematosus simultaneously with systemic lupus erythematosus. Hematologic abnormalities and renal involvement were found in 100% and 90%, respectively. Polyarthritis (40%) and serositis (40%) were less frequently seen. Systemic corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, antimalarials and dapsone offered resolution of cutaneous lesions. Conclusion Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is an uncommon presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Blistering can occur following or simultaneously with established systemic lupus erythematosus. We propose that clinicians should carefully search for systemic involvement, especially hematologic and renal impairment, in patients presenting with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

  19. Spontaneous ureteral rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, C.H.; Pennebaker, J.B.; Harisdangkul, V.; Songcharoen, S.

    1983-01-01

    A patient with known systemic lupus erythematosus had fever and symptoms of a lower urinary tract infection. Bone scintigraphy showed left ureteral perforation and necrosis with no demonstrable nephrolithiasis. It is speculated that this episode was due to lupus vasculitis

  20. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  1. Proton pump inhibitor-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholdt, L H; Laurinaviciene, R; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized.......Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized....

  2. Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women's Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201 1-800-994- ...

  3. Dutch guidelines for diagnosis and therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tellingen, A.; Voskuyl, A. E.; Vervloet, M. G.; Bijl, M.; de Sevaux, R. G. L.; Berger, S. P.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Berden, J. H. M.

    Proliferative lupus nephritis is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Despite improvements in the management of lupus nephritis, a significant number of the patients do not respond to immunosuppressive therapy and progress to end-stage renal

  4. Burden of lupus on work: Issues in the employment of individuals with lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Neelam; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-10-17

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or Lupus is one of the leading causes of work disability in the United States, accounting for about 20% of the more than estimated 1.5 million Americans with a work disability. The symptoms of lupus can have a profound impact on the person's employment. Impacts of lupus are more pronounced among young and middle-adulthood. Studies have shown that loss in work hours cost the nation nearly $13 billion annually. The loss also impacts the individual's work, quality of life, self-management, and self-efficacy. In this article, the author describes the financial burden of lupus. The article also describes the substantial impact of lupus on employment outcomes for individuals living with the condition. The author also reviews major signs and symptoms of disease and their impact on employment. Findings from this research can be used to identify various accommodations and strategies for individuals to prevent flare-ups. The paper presents innovative strategies that include early interventions and how employers andco-workers can provide helpful support that includes job accommodations to individuals with lupus.

  5. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy may be beneficial and safe for various manifestations in SLE. A structured literature search of articles published on the efficacy of IVIg in the treatment of SLE between 1983 and 2005 was conducted. We searched the terms "IVIg," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "lupus," "SLE," and "systemic lupus erythematosus." The various clinical manifestations of SLE that were reported to be successfully treated by IVIg in case reports include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, acquired factor VIII inhibitors, acquired von Willebrand disease, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, myelofibrosis, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiogenic shock, nephritis, end-stage renal disease, encephalitis, neuropsychiatric lupus, psychosis, peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and vasculitis. The most extensive experience is with lupus nephritis. There are only a few case series of IVIg use in patients with SLE with various manifestations, in which the response rate to IVIg therapy ranged from 33 to 100%. We suggest that IVIg devoid of sucrose, at a dose of 2 g/kg over a 5-d period given uniformly and at a slow infusion rate in patients without an increased risk for thromboembolic events or renal failure, is a safe and beneficial adjunct therapy for cases of SLE that are resistant to or refuse conventional treatment. The duration of therapy is yet to be established. Controlled trials are warranted.

  6. B cell signature during inactive systemic lupus is heterogeneous: toward a biological dissection of lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Garaud

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosous (SLE is an autoimmune disease with an important clinical and biological heterogeneity. B lymphocytes appear central to the development of SLE which is characterized by the production of a large variety of autoantibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia. In mice, immature B cells from spontaneous lupus prone animals are able to produce autoantibodies when transferred into immunodeficient mice, strongly suggesting the existence of intrinsic B cell defects during lupus. In order to approach these defects in humans, we compared the peripheral B cell transcriptomas of quiescent lupus patients to normal B cell transcriptomas. When the statistical analysis is performed on the entire group of patients, the differences between patients and controls appear quite weak with only 14 mRNA genes having a false discovery rate ranging between 11 and 17%, with 6 underexpressed genes (PMEPA1, TLR10, TRAF3IP2, LDOC1L, CD1C and EGR1. However, unforced hierarchical clustering of the microarrays reveals a subgroup of lupus patients distinct from both the controls and the other lupus patients. This subgroup has no detectable clinical or immunological phenotypic peculiarity compared to the other patients, but is characterized by 1/an IL-4 signature and 2/the abnormal expression of a large set of genes with an extremely low false discovery rate, mainly pointing to the biological function of the endoplasmic reticulum, and more precisely to genes implicated in the Unfolded Protein Response, suggesting that B cells entered an incomplete BLIMP1 dependent plasmacytic differentiation which was undetectable by immunophenotyping. Thus, this microarray analysis of B cells during quiescent lupus suggests that, despite a similar lupus phenotype, different biological roads can lead to human lupus.

  7. Increased risk of depression in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, J H; Egeberg, A; Kofoed, K

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reported prevalences of depression in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) range widely, while the prevalence of depression in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) remains severely understudied. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether patients with SLE or CLE have increased risk...... of primary and secondary care, analyses of risk for depression and antidepressant use were performed in Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, smoking, alcohol abuse, prior depression, and prior antidepressant use. RESULTS: A total of 3,489 patients with lupus erythematosus were...

  8. The LupusQoL and associations with demographics and clinical measurements in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhone, Kathleen; Castelino, Madhura; Abbott, Janice; Bruce, Ian N; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shelmerdine, Joanna; Peers, Kate; Isenberg, David; Ferenkeh-Koroma, Ada; Griffiths, Bridget; Akil, Mohammed; Maddison, Peter; Gordon, Caroline; Teh, Lee-Suan

    2010-11-01

    Having developed and validated a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measure for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the LupusQoL, we determined its relationship to demographic and clinical measurements in a group of patients with SLE. A group of 322 outpatients completed the LupusQoL. Demographic (age, sex, marital status, ethnicity) and clinical variables (disease duration, disease activity, damage) were recorded. Associations between the 8 LupusQoL domains and age, disease duration, disease activity, and damage were explored using Spearman's correlation coefficients. Differences in LupusQoL scores were examined for sex and marital status using the Mann-Whitney U test. Ethnic groups were compared using ANOVA. All domains of LupusQoL were impaired, with fatigue (56.3) being the worst affected and body image (80.0) the least. The correlations between the LupusQoL domain scores and age (r = -0.01 to -0.22) and disease duration (r = 0 to 0.16) were absent or weak. Similarly, there were no significant differences in the LupusQoL scores regarding sex, marital status, or the 3 main ethnic groups (Black-Caribbean, Asian, White). Although there were statistically significant correlations between the scores of the LupusQoL domains and some scores of the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group index (r = -0.22 to 0.09) and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (r = -0.29 to 0.21), these were weak. HRQOL was impaired in this cohort of outpatients with SLE as assessed by the validated lupus-specific LupusQoL. There were no clinically important associations between the 8 domains of the LupusQoL and clinical or demographic variables in this group of patients. Thus, the LupusQoL is a relatively independent outcome measure in patients with SLE.

  9. Drug-induced cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, Rasa; Holm Sandholdt, Linda; Bygum, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing number of drugs have been linked to drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE). The recognition and management of DI-SCLE can be challenging, as the condition may be triggered by different classes of drugs after variable lengths of time. OBJECTIVES......: To determine the proportion of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) whose drugs are an inducing or aggravating factor. MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with CLE at a dermatological department over a 21-year period. We registered clinical......, serological, and histological data with a focus on drug intake. RESULTS: Of 775 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of lupus erythematosus (LE) or suspected LE, a diagnosis of CLE could be confirmed in 448 patients. A total of 130 patients had a drug intake that could suggest DI-SCLE. In 88 cases, a drug...

  10. Mood Disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Su, Li; Urowitz, Murray B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency, characteristics, and outcome of mood disorders, as well as clinical and autoantibody associations, in a multiethnic/racial, prospective inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: Patients were assessed annually for mood...... disorders (4 types, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) and 18 other neuropsychiatric events. Global disease activity scores (SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 [SLEDAI-2K]), damage scores (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College...... was associated with Asian race/ethnicity (P = 0.01) and treatment with immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.003). Mood disorders were associated with lower mental health and mental component summary scores but not with the SLEDAI-2K, SDI, or lupus autoantibodies. Among the 232 patients with depression, 168 (72...

  11. Biomarkers for CNS involvement in pediatric lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Tamar B; Putterman, Chaim; Goilav, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    CNS disease, or central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (cNPSLE), occurs frequently in pediatric lupus, leading to significant morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. Diagnosing cNPSLE is especially difficult in pediatrics; many current diagnostic tools are invasive and/or costly, and there are no current accepted screening mechanisms. The most complicated aspect of diagnosis is differentiating primary disease from other etiologies; research to discover new biomarkers is attempting to address this dilemma. With many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cNPSLE, biomarker profiles across several modalities (molecular, psychometric and neuroimaging) will need to be used. For the care of children with lupus, the challenge will be to develop biomarkers that are accessible by noninvasive measures and reliable in a pediatric population. PMID:26079959

  12. [Cardiac tamponade disclosing systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour-Eddine, M; Bennis, A; Soulami, S; Chraibi, N

    1996-02-01

    Cardiac tamponade secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus is rare and has a very serious prognosis. The authors report a case of cardiac tamponade confirmed by echocardiography, which constituted the presenting sign of systemic lupus erythematosus in a 20-year-old patient, who required emergency pericardial aspiration. The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was established on the basis of the combination of pericardial involvement, non-erosive arthritis, leukopenia with lymphopenia, presence of LE cells and anti-native DNA antibodies and positive antinuclear antibody titre of 1/2560. The clinical course was favourable in response to 3 months of corticosteroid treatment. The possibility of SLE should be considered in any case of cardiac tamponade in a young patient in which the aetiology is not explained.

  13. Systemic lupus erythematosus in a male patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibarani, H.; Zubir, Z.

    2018-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder with a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. Female to male ratio is approximately 9:1.A 20 years old male was admitted to HAM Hospital 3 months ago with chief complaint pain in both knees joint. After anamneses, physical examination and laboratory test the patient was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus. The patient tested positive for ANA and anti-ds-DNA antibody test. The patient was with giving non-biologic DMARDS @myfortic 360mg, methylprednisolone, chloroquine and other symptomatic drugs.

  14. A rare case of unilateral discoid lupus erythematosus mimicking lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Parul; Pathania, Sucheta; Kubba, Asha

    2017-11-08

    Discoidlupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic type of cutaneous lupus erythematosus which can present in various morphologies, and the diagnosis can be rather confounding. Prompt evaluation and treatment is necessary to prevent disfigurement and systemic involvement associated with DLE. The following case presented a diagnostic dilemma as the lesion mimicked lupus vulgaris. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Lupus Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... W. Clark NIAMS For our readers who have lupus or are the loved ones of someone with ...

  16. Lupus and Depression: Know the Signs and How to Get Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate Share on Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Lupus and depression: Know the signs and how to ... free of lupus. Facts about clinical depression and lupus Between 15 and 60 percent of people with ...

  17. Lupus: When the Body Attacks Itself | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Lupus Lupus: When the Body Attacks Itself Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents fast facts 1 Lupus occurs when the body's immune system attacks the ...

  18. Environmental Factors, Toxicants and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Mak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an immune-complex-mediated multi-systemic autoimmune condition of multifactorial etiology, which mainly affects young women. It is currently believed that the onset of SLE and lupus flares are triggered by various environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. Various environmental agents and toxicants, such as cigarette smoke, alcohol, occupationally- and non-occupationally-related chemicals, ultraviolet light, infections, sex hormones and certain medications and vaccines, have been implicated to induce SLE onset or flares in a number case series, case-control and population-based cohort studies and very few randomized controlled trials. Here, we will describe some of these recognized environmental lupus triggering and perpetuating factors and explain how these factors potentially bias the immune system towards autoimmunity through their interactions with genetic and epigenetic alterations. Further in-depth exploration of how potentially important environmental factors mechanistically interact with the immune system and the genome, which trigger the onset of SLE and lupus flares, will certainly be one of the plausible steps to prevent the onset and to decelerate the progress of the disease.

  19. Gastrointestinal system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, S; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder which can affect the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although GI symptoms can manifest in 50% of patients with SLE, these have barely been reviewed due to difficulty in identifying different causes. This study aims to clarify clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the four major SLE-related GI system complications: protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO), hepatic involvement and pancreatitis. It is a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the major search terms were SLE, PLE, IPO, hepatitis and pancreatitis. A total of 125 articles were chosen for our study. SLE-related PLE was characterized by edema and hypoalbuminemia, with Technetium 99m labeled human albumin scintigraphy ( 99m Tc HAS) and alpha-1-antitrypsin fecal clearance test commonly used as diagnostic test. The most common site of protein leakage was the small intestine and the least common site was the stomach. More than half of SLE-related IPO patients had ureterohydronephrosis, and sometimes they manifested as interstitial cystitis and hepatobiliary dilatation. Lupus hepatitis and SLE accompanied by autoimmune hepatitis (SLE-AIH overlap) shared similar clinical manifestations but had different autoantibodies and histopathological features, and positive anti-ribosome P antibody highly indicated the diagnosis of lupus hepatitis. Lupus pancreatitis was usually accompanied by high SLE activity with a relatively high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and timely intervention were crucial, and administration of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants was effective for most of the patients.

  20. How do women with lupus manage fatigue?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kier, Anne Ørnholt; Midtgaard, Julie; Hougaard, Karin Sørig

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Half of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) consider fatigue to be the most disabling disease symptom. To develop and promote strategies to prevent and control fatigue, this study aimed to describe how women with SLE manage the experience of fatigue. Methods: Four focus...

  1. The frequency and outcome of lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Su, Li

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine nephritis outcomes in a prospective multi-ethnic/racial SLE inception cohort. METHODS: Patients in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics inception cohort (≤15 months of SLE diagnosis) were assessed annually for estimated glomerular filtration rate (e...

  2. Hair and Scalp Changes in Cutaneous and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udompanich, Siriorn; Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Suchonwanit, Poonkiat

    2018-06-09

    Cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) commonly involves the hair and scalp. Alopecia can result from direct activity of disease on the scalp or from the state of physical stress in the form of telogen effluvium. Discoid lupus erythematosus and lupus panniculitis/profundus are known to cause scarring alopecia, while accumulation of recent studies has shown that non-scarring alopecia in SLE may have different subtypes, comprising lupus erythematosus-specific and lupus erythematosus-nonspecific changes on histology. This review aims to summarize the clinical pattern, trichoscopic, histopathological, and direct immunofluorescence features of different types of alopecia in cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as exploring their relationship with SLE disease activity.

  3. A Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus-Like Eruption Induced by Hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Daniel A; Mosser-Goldfarb, Joy L

    2017-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a medication with many well-described cutaneous side effects, notably the dermatomyositis-like eruption known as hydroxyurea dermopathy. Although systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported with hydroxyurea use, cutaneous lupus has not. We report a novel case of chronic cutaneous lupus induced by hydroxyurea and propose that this is a side effect that is distinct from hydroxyurea dermopathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Autologous Fat Transfer in a Patient with Lupus Erythematosus Profundus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimi Yoon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lupus erythematosus profundus, a form of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus, is a rare inflammatory disease involving in the lower dermis and subcutaneous tissues. It primarily affects the head, proximal upper arms, trunk, thighs, and presents as firm nodules, 1 to 3 cm in diameter. The overlying skin often becomes attached to the subcutaneous nodules and is drawn inward to produce deep, saucerized depressions. We present a rare case of lupus erythematosus profundus treated with autologous fat transfer.

  5. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Anti-C1q has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis in previous studies. We studied anti-C1q specificity for SLE (vs rheumatic disease controls) and the association with SLE manifestations in an international multicenter study. METHODS: Information...... in combination with anti-dsDNA and low complement was the strongest serological association with renal involvement. These data support the usefulness of anti-C1q in SLE, especially in lupus nephritis....

  6. Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0205 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lisa Laury-Kleintop...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0205 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Systemic lupus erythematosus, autoantibodies. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF

  7. Recent insights into the genetic basis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Kathy L.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Harley, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic variation was first shown to be part of the cause of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus) in the 1970s with associations in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Almost four decades later, and with the help of increasingly powerful genetic approaches, more than 25 genes are now known to contribute to the mechanisms that predispose individuals to lupus. Over half of these loci have been discovered in the past two years, underscoring the extraordinary success of recent genome...

  8. [Lupus erythematosus panniculitis presenting as palpebral edema and parotiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pastor, G; Valcuende, F; Tomás, G; Moreno, M

    2007-10-01

    Lupus erythematosus panniculitis or lupus erythematosus profundus is characterized by inflammation of the deep dermis and subcutaneous tissue. It can occur in isolation or associated with chronic systemic or discoid lupus erythematosus. It usually consists of nodules and hardened subcutaneous plaques on the forehead, cheeks, proximal extremities, and buttocks. Periorbital and parotid involvement are rare and can lead to misdiagnosis. We present the case of a patient with lupus erythematosus panniculitis who presented with palpebral edema and involvement of the periocular fat and parotid gland.

  9. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus

  10. Occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus in a Danish community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustrup, H; Voss, A; Green, A

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and annual incidence of definite systemic lupus erythematosus (D-SLE) and incomplete SLE (I-SLE) in a community-based lupus cohort of predominantly Nordic ancestry in an 8-year prospective study from 1995 to 2003, and also to calculate the annual transition......-years at risk [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.44-7.55]. Conclusions: Denmark is a low-incidence lupus area but lupus prevalence is increasing slowly. I-SLE is a disease variant that may eventually convert into D-SLE....

  11. Lupus nephritis, pregnancy and rituximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Dorado

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available La nefritis lúpica (NL proliferativa es una de las complicaciones más graves del LES. La respuesta terapéutica con los esquemas clásicos no existe en el 20 al 70% de los casos, siendo la amplitud de dicho rango explicada por variaciones étnicas, falta de consenso en la definición de remisión, diferencias en los tiempos de tratamiento, seguimiento y en la clase de NL. En presencia de NL recidivante o refractaria los tratamientos y el nivel de evidencia sobre su eficacia son más limitados. Rituximab es un anticuerpo monoclonal quimérico (ratón-humano dirigido contra el antígeno CD 20 localizado en la superficie celular de los linfocitos B. Estos participan en la patogénesis del LES a partir de su maduración en células plasmáticas, producción de anticuerpos, secreción de citoquinas proinflamatorias, presentación de autoantígenos a las células T y en la activación de células T. La administración de rituximab genera un rápido y sostenido descenso de los linfocitos B CD 20+ circulantes y una reducción de los títulos de auto-anticuerpos. Se reportó una disminución significativa en los niveles de antiDNA a partir de la semana 14 y de los niveles de IgM, sin compromiso de IgG ni de IgA. Se detectó droga activa en sangre periférica luego de la semana 24 de la última infusión. La depleción de linfocitos B se puede mantener por 6 meses, su reconstitución es heterogénea y puede tardar más de un año. Esta linfopenia selectiva tendría un valor predictivo de respuesta terapéutica, la remisión clínica prolongada tendría asociación con repoblación incompleta de células B de memoria varios años luego del tratamiento. En estudios observacionales realizados en pacientes con NL refractaria se reportó respuesta terapéutica con rituximab entre 67-77 % luego de 6 a 12 meses de seguimiento. Sin embargo los resultados del estudio Lupus Nephritis Assesment with Rituximab (LUNAR, randomizado controlado, a doble ciego

  12. Extensive hypertrophic lupus erythematosus: Atypical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Narang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus erythematosus (LE is a disease with a wide spectrum of cutaneous and systemic manifestations. Clinical features of patients with LE show a great variation, and for this reason it is difficult to develop a unifying concept of this disease. Our objective is to present a case of hypertrophic LE with atypical morphology and extensive involvement, who responded favorably to isotretinoin. Diagnosis of hypertrophic lupus erythematosus (HLE was confirmed by characteristic histopathological findings. Combination therapy with isotretinoin and hydroxychloroquine resulted in flattening and repression of previously refractory skin lesions. Sometimes, HLE lesions may present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. In long standing lesions, squamous cell carcinoma may arise. Therefore, HLE requires adequate therapy with clinical and histopathological follow up.

  13. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus presenting as poikiloderma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a recognised variant of lupus erythematosus (LE), which accounts for 10-15% of all cases of cutaneous LE, occurring most commonly in young to middle-aged white women. Diagnosis is based on the detection of anti-Ro\\/SS-A antibodies in the skin and serum, characteristic clinical and histological cutaneous involvement, and relatively mild systemic involvement. Several unusual variants of SCLE have been reported including erythrodermic SCLE, SCLE with vitiligo-like lesions, acral SCLE and bullous SCLE. Poikoilodermatous SCLE is a recognised but rare variant of SCLE. There are currently only two case reports, comprising five individual cases, in the literature. We present a case of SCLE in which the main clinical findings were an extensive photodistributed poikilodermatous rash and alopecia.

  14. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  15. Ocular findings in systemic lupus erythemato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir S. Shoughy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease. Ocular complications occur in up to one-third of patients with SLE. The ocular findings may represent the initial manifestation of the disease and may lead to severe ocular morbidity and loss of vision. Early diagnosis and prompt management of patients with SLE are mandatory and require collaboration between the ophthalmologist and the rheumatologist.

  16. Ocular findings in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoughy, Samir S; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease. Ocular complications occur in up to one-third of patients with SLE. The ocular findings may represent the initial manifestation of the disease and may lead to severe ocular morbidity and loss of vision. Early diagnosis and prompt management of patients with SLE are mandatory and require collaboration between the ophthalmologist and the rheumatologist.

  17. Brain MRI findings of neuropsychiatric lupus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang-Wook; Kwon, Bae Ju; Lee, Seung-Ro; Hahm, Chang-Kok; Moon, Won Jin; Jeon, Eui Yong; Bae, Sang-Chul [Hanyang Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate the brain MRI findings in patients with neuropsychiatric lupus. In 26 patients (M:F = 2:24 ; aged 9-48 years) in whom the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus was clinically or pathologically proven and in whom neuropsychiatric lupus was also clinically diagnosed, the findings of brain MRI were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were analyzed with regard to the distribution, location, size and number of lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction, the presence of cerebral atrophy, and the extent and degree of brain parenchymal and intravascular enhancement. The most common MRI findings were lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction occurring in 18 patients (69%), and located within deep periventricular white matter (n=10), subcortical white matter (n=8), the cerebral cortex (n=7), basal ganglia (n=7), or brain stem or cerebellum (n=2). The lesions were single (n=3) or multiple (n=15), and in 17 patients were less than 1cm in diameter in regions other than the cerebral cortex. In six of these patients, lesions of 1-4cm in diameter in this region were combined, and one occurred in the cerebral cortex only. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 16 patients (62%), in ten of whom there was no past history of treatment with steroids for more than six months. In 15 patients (58%), contrast-enhanced MR image revealed diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia or intravascular enhancement. In no case were MRI findings normal. The primary mainfestations of neuropsychiatric lupus are multifocal ischemia or infarctions in the cerebral cortex, and subcortical and deep white matter, and the cerebral atrophy. Contrast-enhanced MR images also demonstrated diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia and intravascular enhancement, both thought to be related to the congestion due to the stagnation of cerebral blood flow.

  18. Sweet syndrome revealing systemic lupus erythematosus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, N

    2015-02-01

    Sweet Syndrome is an acute inflammatory skin eruption which is rare in children. We report a case of childhood Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) that presented with Sweet syndrome. This case is a unique presentation of a common disorder which provides a new facet for the differential diagnosis of SLE in children. It is also the first paediatric case to be reported in a Caucasian child.

  19. Brain MRI findings of neuropsychiatric lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang-Wook; Kwon, Bae Ju; Lee, Seung-Ro; Hahm, Chang-Kok; Moon, Won Jin; Jeon, Eui Yong; Bae, Sang-Chul

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the brain MRI findings in patients with neuropsychiatric lupus. In 26 patients (M:F = 2:24 ; aged 9-48 years) in whom the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus was clinically or pathologically proven and in whom neuropsychiatric lupus was also clinically diagnosed, the findings of brain MRI were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were analyzed with regard to the distribution, location, size and number of lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction, the presence of cerebral atrophy, and the extent and degree of brain parenchymal and intravascular enhancement. The most common MRI findings were lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction occurring in 18 patients (69%), and located within deep periventricular white matter (n=10), subcortical white matter (n=8), the cerebral cortex (n=7), basal ganglia (n=7), or brain stem or cerebellum (n=2). The lesions were single (n=3) or multiple (n=15), and in 17 patients were less than 1cm in diameter in regions other than the cerebral cortex. In six of these patients, lesions of 1-4cm in diameter in this region were combined, and one occurred in the cerebral cortex only. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 16 patients (62%), in ten of whom there was no past history of treatment with steroids for more than six months. In 15 patients (58%), contrast-enhanced MR image revealed diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia or intravascular enhancement. In no case were MRI findings normal. The primary mainfestations of neuropsychiatric lupus are multifocal ischemia or infarctions in the cerebral cortex, and subcortical and deep white matter, and the cerebral atrophy. Contrast-enhanced MR images also demonstrated diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia and intravascular enhancement, both thought to be related to the congestion due to the stagnation of cerebral blood flow

  20. Hydroxychloroquine in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, C; Moroni, G

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an alkalinizing lysosomatropic drug that accumulates in lysosomes where it inhibits some important functions by increasing the pH. HCQ has proved to be effective in a number of autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Areas covered: In this review the mechanisms of action, the efficacy, and the safety of HCQ in the management of patients with SLE have been reviewed. HCQ may reduce the risk of flares, allow the reduction of the dosage of steroids, reduce organ damage, and prevent the thrombotic effects of anti-phospholipid antibodies. The drug is generally safe and may be prescribed to pregnant women. However, some cautions are needed to prevent retinopathy, a rare but serious complication of the prolonged use of HCQ. Expert opinion: HCQ may offer several advantages not only in patients with mild SLE but can also exert important beneficial effects in lupus patients with organ involvement and in pregnant women. The drug has a low cost and few side effects. These characteristics should encourage a larger use of HCQ, also in lupus patients with organ involvement.

  1. Thymus function in drug-induced lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R L; Salomon, D R; Guerrero, R S

    2001-01-01

    Autoimmunity develops when a lupus-inducing drug is introduced into the thymus of normal mice, but the relevance of this model to the human disorder is unclear in part because it is widely assumed that the thymus is non-functional in the adult. We compared thymus function in 10 patients with symptomatic procainamide-induced lupus to that in 13 asymptomatic patients who only developed drug-induced autoantibodies. T cell output from the thymus was quantified using a competitive polymerase chain reaction that detects T cell receptor DNA excision circles in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Despite the advanced age of the patient population under study, newly generated T cells were detected in all subjects. Although there was no overall quantitative difference between the symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, we found a positive correlation between the level of T cell receptor excision circles in peripheral lymphocytes and serum IgG anti-chromatin antibody activity in patients with drug-induced lupus. The association between autoantibodies and nascent peripheral T cells supports the requirement for T cells in autoantibody production. Our observations are consistent with findings in mice in which autoreactive T cells derived from drug-induced abnormalities in T cell development in the thymus.

  2. Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Emese; Bhattoa, Harjit P; Bettembuk, Peter; Balogh, Adam; Szegedi, Gyula

    2002-03-10

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder which may be affected by hormonal changes, such as those of pregnancy. Women with SLE have increased adverse pregnancy outcomes. A retrospective analysis of the gynecologic and immunologic case history of 140 women with SLE and the outcome of 263 pregnancies in 99 women with SLE. In patients diagnosed with SLE, the proportion of pregnancies ending with live birth at term decreased to one-third compared with three quarters in those without a diagnosis of SLE and the incidence of pre-term deliveries and spontaneous abortions increased by 6.8 and 4.7 times, respectively. When SLE was associated with secondary antiphospholipid (APL) syndrome, and lupus anticoagulant (LA) or beta2-glycoprotein antibodies were present, a further increase in the incidence of pregnancy loss was observed. Pregnancy did not cause a flare-up of SLE in all cases, the disease remained stable in about 30% of the patients. Lupus was mild in the majority of the women who carried out their pregnancy to term. We also observed mothers with active SLE who successfully carried out pregnancies to term. These findings accord with previous literature and should inform rheumatologists, obstetricians and neonatologists who guide patients in their reproductive decisions.

  3. Catatonia due to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Pinto Cabral Júnior Rabello

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Discuss neuropsychiatric aspects and differential diagnosis of catatonic syndrome secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a pediatric patient. Methods Single case report. Result A 13-year-old male, after two months diagnosed with SLE, started to present psychotic symptoms (behavioral changes, hallucinations and delusions that evolved into intense catatonia. During hospitalization, neuroimaging, biochemical and serological tests for differential diagnosis with metabolic encephalopathy, neurological tumors and neuroinfections, among other tests, were performed. The possibility of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, steroid-induced psychosis and catatonia was also evaluated. A complete reversal of catatonia was achieved after using benzodiazepines in high doses, associated with immunosuppressive therapy for lupus, which speaks in favor of catatonia secondary to autoimmune encephalitis due to lupus. Conclusion Although catatonia rarely is the initial clinical presentation of SLE, the delay in recognizing the syndrome can be risky, having a negative impact on prognosis. Benzodiazepines have an important role in the catatonia resolution, especially when associated with parallel specific organic base cause treatment. The use of neuroleptics should be avoided for the duration of the catatonic syndrome as it may cause clinical deterioration.

  4. Lupus and leprosy: beyond the coincidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, F M; Gomez, V E; Albuquerque, E M N; Klumb, E M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2015-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that presents an increased susceptibility to infections which may trigger reactivation. Disease flares have been mostly associated with parvovirus B19, cytomegalovirus, EBV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, but it is probable that many other agents may also induce innate and adaptive immune system stimulation including the production of autoantibodies as ANA, anti nDNA and anti-ß2-GPI mainly in lepromatous leprosy. Mycobacterium leprae not only may determine symptoms that mimic lupus flares, including autoantibodies production, but could also act as a trigger for lupus reactivation; however, its association is still not fully explored. As demonstrated for tuberculosis, it is quite possible that molecular mimicry may also be involved in the interface of these two diseases. Some studies reported shared epitopes among idiotypes derived from 8E7 and TH9 lepromatous antibodies and those obtained from SLE patients, and it could partially explain the triggering phenomenon of SLE caused by M. leprae. We report and discuss three Brazilian patients whose disease was inactive and presented disease flares concurrently with the diagnosis of leprosy.

  5. Bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus patients through clinical and laboratorial evaluation, ultrasonography, radiological and endoscopic examination. Methods: Thirty-nine patients, either outpatients or inpatients at the Department of Rheumatology of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina from Universidade de São Paulo were evaluated as to clinical and laboratorial data. All patients were submitted to ultrasonographic evaluation of the upper urinary tract, radiological and endoscopic examinations of the middle and lower urinary tracts. Rresults: Mean age of patients varied between 13 and 62 years (median = 29 years. Thirty-six were females and three were males. The disease varied from 6 months to 22 years (median three years and one month. Clinical and laboratory activity of the disease was present in 30 patients. Twenty-two patients had the diagnosis of lupus established for three years or more. Twenty-five patients were asymptomatic and all had received corticosteroids for treatment at least once. Twenty-three received antimalarial drugs; ten received cytostatics, and seven patients received non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Upper urinary tract ultrasonography was normal in all cases but one with staghorn calculus associated with neurogenic bladder secondary to neurological involvement by the disease. Vesicoureteral reflux was observed in two cases. Other two patients had significant post-voiding residual urine, both with neurogenic bladder secondary to nervous system involvement by lupus. The average bladder maximum capacity in an awaken patient was 342 mL, and was decreased in 18.9% of cases. This subgroup of patients presented a greater frequency of urinary symptoms and greater use of cytostatic drugs (Z > Z5%. A pathognomonic cystoscopic pattern of bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus could not be established. Cystoscopic aspects similar to those seen in the initial or minor

  6. Research Progress on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Complicated with Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weisan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, in treatment standardization of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, infections and serious complications became the leading cause of death related to this disease, exceeding those of renal involvement and lupus encephalopathy. SLE coinfection is mainly related to defects in humoral immunity and cellular immunity, SLE disease activity, and doses of hormone and immune inhibitors.

  7. Case Report: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We hereby report a case of a 20 year‑old female who presented to us in an acute hypoadrenal state and was found to have Systemic lupus erythematosus with renal involvement. Patient was successfully managed with steroids and improved clinically. Keywords: Addison's disease, Autoimmune diseases, Systemic lupus ...

  8. Cardiac tamponade as an initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Diego M; Carrion, Andres F

    2012-06-12

    Clinical manifestations of pericardial disease may precede other signs and symptoms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Although pericardial effusion is one of the most common cardiac problems in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, haemodynamically significant effusions manifesting as cardiac tamponade are rare and require prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Unique Protein Signature of Circulating Microparticles in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer; Iversen, Line V

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases.......To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases....

  10. Dyslipidemia in systemic lupus erythematosus: just another comorbidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Konstantinos; Koumaras, Charalambos; Gladman, Dafna D; Urowitz, Murray B

    2016-04-01

    Among traditional atherosclerotic risk factors, dyslipidemia is believed to decisively affect the long-term prognosis of lupus patients, not only with regard to cardiovascular events but also by influencing other manifestations, such as lupus nephritis. The aim of this study was to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, evidence for its impact on atherosclerosis manifestations and management of dyslipidemia in lupus patients. English-restricted MEDLINE database search (Medical Subject Headings: lupus or systemic lupus erythematosus and dyslipidemia or hyperlipidemia). The prevalence of dyslipidemia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) ranges from 36% at diagnosis to 60% or even higher after 3 years, depending on definition. Multiple pathogenetic mechanisms are implicated, including antibodies against lipoprotein lipase and cytokines affecting the balance between pro- and anti-atherogenic lipoproteins. Dyslipidemia has a clear impact on clinical cardiovascular disease and surrogate markers for subclinical atherosclerosis. Moreover, it negatively affects end-organ damage (kidneys and brain). Treatment with statins yielded contradictory results as per minimizing cardiovascular risk. Dyslipidemia is a significant comorbidity of lupus patients with multiple negative effects in the long term. Its treatment represents a modifiable risk factor; prompt and adequate treatment can minimize unnecessary burden in lupus patients, thus reducing hospitalizations and their overall morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prognosis and predictors of convulsion among pediatric lupus nephritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Einollahi, Behzad; Taheri, Saeed; Panahi, Yunes; Maddani, Abbas; Esfahani, Taher; Sharifi-Bonab, Mir Mohsen

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to analyze features and outcome of convulsion in pediatric lupus nephritis patients. We retrospectively reviewed data of 14 Iranian children with lupus nephritis who developed seizures and compared them with a group of the same number of well matched pediatric lupus nephritis patients. Higher serum creatinine levels and higher frequencies of anemia and lymphopenia were observed in the convulsion group. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the only risk factor for development of convulsion in pediatric lupus patients with nephritis was lymphopenia. Survival analysis showed that convulsion had no impact on patient and renal function outcomes in our pediatric lupus nephritis subjects. In conclusion, we found that lymphopenia is a predictive factor for convulsion occurrence in our patients and special attention to neurological status assessment may be needed in this situation. (author)

  12. Economic evaluation of lupus nephritis in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics inception cohort using a multistate model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barber, Megan R W; Hanly, John G; Su, Li

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the long-term costs of lupus nephritis (LN). These were compared between patients with and without LN based on multistate modelling. METHODS: Patients from 32 centres in 11 countries were enrolled in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC...

  13. Tir8/Sigirr prevents murine lupus by suppressing the immunostimulatory effects of lupus autoantigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Maciej; Kulkarni, Onkar P.; Pfeiffer, Stephanie; Savarese, Emina; Krug, Anne; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    The Sigirr gene (also known as Tir8) encodes for an orphan receptor of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin 1 receptor family that inhibits TLR-mediated pathogen recognition in dendritic cells. Here, we show that Sigirr also inhibits the activation of dendritic cells and B cells upon exposure to RNA and DNA lupus autoantigens. To evaluate the functional role of Sigirr in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we generated Sigirr-deficient C57BL/6-lpr/lpr mice. These mice developed a progressive lymphoproliferative syndrome followed by severe autoimmune lung disease and lupus nephritis within 6 mo of age as compared with the minor abnormalities observed in C57BL/6-lpr/lpr mice. Lack of Sigirr was associated with enhanced activation of dendritic cells and increased expression of multiple proinflammatory and antiapoptotic mediators. In the absence of Sigirr, CD4 T cell numbers were increased and CD4+CD25+ T cell numbers were reduced. Furthermore, lack of Sigirr enhanced the activation and proliferation of B cells, including the production of autoantibodies against multiple nuclear lupus autoantigens. These data identify Sigirr as a novel SLE susceptibility gene in mice. PMID:18644972

  14. Gut Microbiota in Human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin M; Edwards, Michael R; Mu, Qinghui; Yu, Yang; Vieson, Miranda D; Reilly, Christopher M; Ahmed, S Ansar; Bankole, Adegbenga A

    2018-02-15

    Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been observed in a number of autoimmune diseases. However, the role of the gut microbiota in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototypical autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation in multiple organs of the body, remains elusive. Here we report the dynamics of the gut microbiota in a murine lupus model, NZB/W F1, as well as intestinal dysbiosis in a small group of SLE patients with active disease. The composition of the gut microbiota changed markedly before and after the onset of lupus disease in NZB/W F1 mice, with greater diversity and increased representation of several bacterial species as lupus progressed from the predisease stage to the diseased stage. However, we did not control for age and the cage effect. Using dexamethasone as an intervention to treat SLE-like signs, we also found that a greater abundance of a group of lactobacilli (for which a species assignment could not be made) in the gut microbiota might be correlated with more severe disease in NZB/W F1 mice. Results of the human study suggest that, compared to control subjects without immune-mediated diseases, SLE patients with active lupus disease possessed an altered gut microbiota that differed in several particular bacterial species (within the genera Odoribacter and Blautia and an unnamed genus in the family Rikenellaceae ) and was less diverse, with increased representation of Gram-negative bacteria. The Firmicutes / Bacteroidetes ratios did not differ between the SLE microbiota and the non-SLE microbiota in our human cohort. IMPORTANCE SLE is a complex autoimmune disease with no known cure. Dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been reported for both mice and humans with SLE. In this emerging field, however, more studies are required to delineate the roles of the gut microbiota in different lupus-prone mouse models and people with diverse manifestations of SLE. Here, we report changes in the gut microbiota in NZB/W F1 lupus-prone mice and a

  15. Treatment Algorithms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangchan, Chayawee; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Bernatsky, Sasha R; Smith, C Douglas; Hudson, Marie; Inanç, Murat; Rothfield, Naomi F; Nash, Peter T; Furie, Richard A; Senécal, Jean-Luc; Chandran, Vinod; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Pope, Janet E

    2015-09-01

    To establish agreement on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment. SLE experts (n = 69) were e-mailed scenarios and indicated preferred treatments. Algorithms were constructed and agreement determined (≥50% respondents indicating ≥70% agreement). Initially, 54% (n = 37) responded suggesting treatment for scenarios; 13 experts rated agreement with scenarios. Fourteen of 16 scenarios had agreement as follows: discoid lupus: first-line therapy was topical agents and hydroxychloroquine and/or glucocorticoids then azathioprine and subsequently mycophenolate (mofetil); uncomplicated cutaneous vasculitis: initial treatment was glucocorticoids ± hydroxychloroquine ± methotrexate, followed by azathioprine or mycophenolate and then cyclophosphamide; arthritis: initial therapy was hydroxychloroquine and/or glucocorticoids, then methotrexate and subsequently rituximab; pericarditis: first-line therapy was nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, then glucocorticoids with/without hydroxychloroquine, then azathioprine, mycophenolate, or methotrexate and finally belimumab or rituximab, and/or a pericardial window; interstitial lung disease/alveolitis: induction was glucocorticoids and mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide, then rituximab or intravenous gamma globulin (IVIG), and maintenance followed with azathioprine or mycophenolate; pulmonary hypertension: glucocorticoids and mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide and an endothelin receptor antagonist were initial therapies, subsequent treatments were phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and then prostanoids and rituximab; antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: standard anticoagulation with/without hydroxychloroquine, then a thrombin inhibitor for venous thrombosis, versus adding aspirin or platelet inhibition drugs for arterial events; mononeuritis multiplex and central nervous system vasculitis: first-line therapy was glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide followed by maintenance with azathioprine or mycophenolate, and

  16. Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kee Hyuk; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Pulmonary involvement is more common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in any other connective tissue disease, and more than half of patients with SLE suffer from respiratory dysfunction during the course of their illness. Although sepsis and renal disease are the most common causes of death in SLE, lung disease is the predominant manifestation and is an indicator of overall prognosis. Respiratory disease may be due to direct involvement of the lung or as a secondary consequence of the effect of the disease on other organ systems.

  17. Systemic lupus erythematosus : abdominal radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae Cheon; Cho, On Koo; Lee, Yong Joo; Bae, Jae Ik; Kim, Yong Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Ko, Byung Hee [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) is a systemic disease of unknown etiology. Its main pathology is vasculitis and serositis, due to deposition of the immune complex or antibodies. Most findings are nonspecific ; abdominal manifestations include enteritis, hepatomegaly, pancreatic enlargement, serositis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, nephritis, interstitial cystitis, and thrombophlebitis. We described radiologic findings of various organ involvement of SLE; digestive system, serosa, reticuloendothelial system, urinary system, and venous system. Diagnosis of SLE was done according to the criteria of American Rheumatism Association. Understanding of the variable imaging findings in SLE may be helpful for the early detection of abdominal involvement and complications.

  18. Bone health, vitamin D and lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Andréu, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is high. This is likely due to photoprotection measures in addition to intrinsic factors of the disease. Low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of low bone mineral density and fracture. Vitamin D deficiency could also have undesirable effects on patients' immune response, enhancing mechanisms of loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Vitamin D levels should be periodically monitored and patients should be treated with the objective of reaching vitamin D levels higher than 30-40 ng/ml. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Associated with Extreme Hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Sung Huang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Only a few cases of hypertriglyceridemia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE have been reported. We report a case of a 13-year-old girl suffering from SLE associated with severe hypertriglyceridemia. The persistent hypertriglyceridemia was extremely well tolerated. As a result of steroid treatment, serum triglycerides fell dramatically from a high of 5601 mg/dL to 75 mg/dL despite the patient switching to a free diet. We considered the presence of an autoantibody to lipoprotein lipase and commenced immunosuppression. The role of steroids in completely correcting deficient lipoprotein lipase activity is discussed.

  20. Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kee Hyuk; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement is more common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in any other connective tissue disease, and more than half of patients with SLE suffer from respiratory dysfunction during the course of their illness. Although sepsis and renal disease are the most common causes of death in SLE, lung disease is the predominant manifestation and is an indicator of overall prognosis. Respiratory disease may be due to direct involvement of the lung or as a secondary consequence of the effect of the disease on other organ systems

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE

  2. Brain MR imaging of systemic lupus erythematodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Ueda, Fumiaki; Arai, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kadoya, Masumi; Matsui, Osamu; Takashima, Tsutomu

    1996-01-01

    Brain MR imaging of 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematodus (SLE) were reviewed. Two major findings was obtained. One was deep white matter hyperintensity (DWMH) and periventricular hyperintensity (PVH), the other was cerebral infarction. In comparison with the same age group, relatively severe brain atrophy was also observed. It was thought that these findings were induced from the vasculitis caused by SLE. However, the influence of the steroid therapy could not be excluded. No definite correlation between MR findings and clinical symptoms were seen. In conclusion, when we interpret brain MR imaging of the patients with SLE, special attention should be paid to their age. (author)

  3. The existential experience of everyday life with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Janni Lisander; Hall, Elisabeth O C; Jacobsen, Søren; Birkelund, Regner

    2018-05-01

    To explore from the perspective of women the nature of basic existential conditions while living with systemic lupus erythematosus. Systemic lupus erythematosus has an unpredictable disease course and is documented to cause an existential rearrangement of life. The significance of changes in existential conditions and related experiences are unclear in the context of nursing and women with systemic lupus erythematosus. A qualitative design guided by Van Manen's hermeneutic-phenomenological methodology. Individual in-depth interviews with 15 women diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus and of various ages, disease durations and severities were undertaken from September 2013 - October 2015. Data were analysed following van Manen's phenomenological approach and using drawing as an interpretive tool. The main existential experience was interpreted as a person "moving with the waves of systemic lupus erythematosus" constituted by the themes "oscillating between presence and absence of systemic lupus erythematosus," "recognizing space and bodily possibilities and limitations" and "being enriched through relationships and activities." When systemic lupus erythematosus was flaring, well-being was threatened and a laborious time to escape the feeling of a setback-in-life persisted long after the disease was medically under control. Daily life with systemic lupus erythematosus is conditioned by a prominent need to be in existential motion, related to the absence and presence of systemic lupus erythematosus. The experience of a setback-in-life by illness might challenge well-being and indicates that periods of disease flares or disturbing symptoms are critical time points to provide support. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Neurological Disease in Lupus: Toward a Personalized Medicine Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlasson, Sarah; Wiseman, Stewart; Wardlaw, Joanna; Dhaun, Neeraj; Hunt, David P J

    2018-01-01

    The brain and nervous system are important targets for immune-mediated damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), resulting in a complex spectrum of neurological syndromes. Defining nervous system disease in lupus poses significant challenges. Among the difficulties to be addressed are a diversity of clinical manifestations and a lack of understanding of their mechanistic basis. However, despite these challenges, progress has been made in the identification of pathways which contribute to neurological disease in SLE. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of neurological disease in lupus will inform both classification and approaches to clinical trials.

  5. Massive intracranial calcifications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Ono, Sergio E.

    2004-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement is frequently reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies usually show brain atrophy, cerebral infarction and/or intracranial bleeding. Extensive intracranial calcification in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with seizures and massive basal ganglia calcification and mild calcifications in the frontal lobes, seen on the brain computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensity on FLAIR images and hypointense signals on T2 * gradient echo images in the basal ganglia. (author)

  6. Renal cell apoptosis in human lupus nephritis: a histological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, M; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, C B

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear autoantigens from apoptotic cells are believed to drive the immunological response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Conflicting data exist as to the possible renal origin of apoptotic cells in SLE patients with nephritis. We assessed the level of renal cell apoptosis in kidney...... biopsies from 35 patients with lupus nephritis by means of terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL). Five samples of normal kidney tissue served as control specimens. We did not observe apoptotic glomerular cells in any...... cells constitute a quantitatively important source of auto-antibody-inducing nuclear auto-antigens in human lupus nephritis....

  7. Neurological Disease in Lupus: Toward a Personalized Medicine Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlasson, Sarah; Wiseman, Stewart; Wardlaw, Joanna; Dhaun, Neeraj; Hunt, David P. J.

    2018-01-01

    The brain and nervous system are important targets for immune-mediated damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), resulting in a complex spectrum of neurological syndromes. Defining nervous system disease in lupus poses significant challenges. Among the difficulties to be addressed are a diversity of clinical manifestations and a lack of understanding of their mechanistic basis. However, despite these challenges, progress has been made in the identification of pathways which contribute to neurological disease in SLE. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of neurological disease in lupus will inform both classification and approaches to clinical trials. PMID:29928273

  8. Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus onset patterns in Vietnamese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dung, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Loan, Huynh Thoai; Nielsen, Susan

    2013-01-01

    to have systemic lupus erythematosus (f/m = 4/1) were referred to the Ho Chi Minh City Children's Hospital No.1 during a 12-month period in 2009. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (SD = 2.5). Thirty-seven (82%) fulfilled criteria for lupus nephritis (LN). At diagnosis, impressively high...... No. 1 during a16 month period from 2008-2009. These patients had a strikingly high prevalence of Coombs positive anaemia, a high prevalence of lupus nephritis, and very high SLEDAI and ECLAM scores at the time of diagnosis. While there may be referral biases, our Vietnamese SLE patients appear...

  9. Health-related quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: development and validation of a lupus specific symptom checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootscholten, C.; Ligtenberg, G.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Schreurs, K. M. G.; de Glas-Vos, J. W.; Hagen, E. C.; van den Wall Bake, A. W. L.; Huizinga, T. W. J.; van den Hoogen, F. H. J.; Bijl, M.; van Houwelingen, J. C.; Snoek, F. J.; Berden, J. H. M.

    2003-01-01

    Reliable and sensitive measures are needed to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). No lupus specific questionnaires are available. This study describes the development and validation of a disease-specific questionnaire for lupus patients, which

  10. CT findings at lupus mesenteric vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, S.F.; Lee, T.Y.; Cheng, T.T.; Ng, S.H.; Lai, H.M.; Cheng, Y.F.; Tsai, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of early CT findings of lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV) and to assess the utility of CT in the management of this uncommon entity. Methods: Abdominal CT was performed within 1-4 days (average 2.2 days) of the onset of severe abdominal pain and tenderness in 15 women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Prompt high-dose i.v. corticosteroid in 11 patients after the CT diagnosis of LMV was made. CT was performed after abdominal symptoms subsided. Results: Eleven cases revealed CT features suggestive of LMV including conspicuous prominence of mesentric vessels with palisade pattern or comb-like appearance (CT comb sign) supplying focal or diffuse dilated bowel loops (n=11), ascites with slightly increased peritoneal enhancement (n=11), small bowel wall thickening (n=10) with double halo or target sign (n=8). Follow-up CT before high-dose steroid therapy revealed complete or marked resolution of the abnormal CT findings. Conclusion: CT is helpful for confirming the diagnosis of LMV, especially the comb sign which may be an early sign. Bowel ischemia due to LMV is less ominous than previously expected, and the abnormal CT findings were reversible when early diagnosis and prompt i.v. steroid therapy could be achieved. (orig.)

  11. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Definitions, Contexts, Conflicts, Enigmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2018-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inadequately defined syndrome. Etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. SLE is on the other hand a seminal syndrome that has challenged immunologists, biologists, genetics, and clinicians to solve its nature. The syndrome is characterized by multiple, etiologically unlinked manifestations. Unexpectedly, they seem to occur in different stochastically linked clusters, although single gene defects may promote a smaller spectrum of symptoms/criteria typical for SLE. There is no known inner coherence of parameters (criteria) making up the disease. These parameters are, nevertheless, implemented in The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The Systemic Lupus Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria to classify SLE. Still, SLE is an abstraction since the ACR or SLICC criteria allow us to define hundreds of different clinical SLE phenotypes. This is a major point of the present discussion and uses “The anti-dsDNA antibody” as an example related to the problematic search for biomarkers for SLE. The following discussion will show how problematic this is: the disease is defined through non-coherent classification criteria, its complexity is recognized and accepted, its pathogenesis is plural and poorly understood. Therapy is focused on dominant symptoms or organ manifestations, and not on the syndrome itself. From basic scientific evidences, we can add substantial amount of data that are not sufficiently considered in clinical medicine, which may change the paradigms linked to what “The Anti-DNA antibody” is—and is not—in context of the imperfectly defined syndrome SLE. PMID:29545801

  12. CT findings at lupus mesenteric vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, S.F. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Lee, T.Y. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Cheng, T.T. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Rheumatology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Ng, S.H. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Lai, H.M. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Rheumatology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Cheng, Y.F. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan); Tsai, C.C. [Chang Gung Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kaohsiung Hsien (Taiwan)

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of early CT findings of lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV) and to assess the utility of CT in the management of this uncommon entity. Methods: Abdominal CT was performed within 1-4 days (average 2.2 days) of the onset of severe abdominal pain and tenderness in 15 women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Prompt high-dose i.v. corticosteroid in 11 patients after the CT diagnosis of LMV was made. CT was performed after abdominal symptoms subsided. Results: Eleven cases revealed CT features suggestive of LMV including conspicuous prominence of mesentric vessels with palisade pattern or comb-like appearance (CT comb sign) supplying focal or diffuse dilated bowel loops (n=11), ascites with slightly increased peritoneal enhancement (n=11), small bowel wall thickening (n=10) with double halo or target sign (n=8). Follow-up CT before high-dose steroid therapy revealed complete or marked resolution of the abnormal CT findings. Conclusion: CT is helpful for confirming the diagnosis of LMV, especially the comb sign which may be an early sign. Bowel ischemia due to LMV is less ominous than previously expected, and the abnormal CT findings were reversible when early diagnosis and prompt i.v. steroid therapy could be achieved. (orig.).

  13. On lupus, vitamin D and leukopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Juliana A; Heimovski, Flavia; Skare, Thelma L

    2016-01-01

    Immune regulation is among the noncalcemic effects of vitamin D. So, this vitamin may play a role in autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To study the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in SLE and its association with clinical, serological and treatment profile as well as with disease activity. Serum OH vitamin D3 levels were measured in 153 SLE patients and 85 controls. Data on clinical, serological and treatment profile of lupus patients were obtained through chart review. Blood cell count and SLEDAI (SLE disease activity index) were measured simultaneously with vitamin D determination. SLE patients have lower levels of vitamin D than controls (p=0.03). In univariate analysis serum vitamin D was associated with leukopenia (p=0.02), use of cyclophosphamide (p=0.007) and methotrexate (p=0.03). A negative correlation was verified with prednisone dose (p=0.003). No association was found with disease activity measured by SLEDAI (p=0.88). In a multiple regression study only leukopenia remained as an independent association (B=4.04; p=0.02). A negative correlation of serum vitamin level with granulocyte (p=0.01) was also found, but not with lymphocyte count (p=0.33). SLE patients have more deficiency of vitamin D than controls. This deficiency is not associated with disease activity but with leucopenia (granulocytopenia). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. [Immunodiagnostic methods in lupus erythematosus disseminatus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, H; Schwenke, H; Helbig, W

    1975-12-01

    In 27 patients with lupus erythematodes diseminatus the determinations of the LE-cells according to the macromethod (Zimmer and Hargraves) and the micromethod (Mudrik and co-workers) were compared with the demonstration of antinuclear factors according to the indirect immunofluorescence and immune enzyme technique. The sensitiveness of the two last-mentioned immunomorphological methods is somewhat larger. In these cases the size of the titre of the antinuclear factor almost always correlates positively with the number of the LE-cells. For the purpose of the initial diagnostics and the judgment of the course a morphological method cannot be renounced, since in the acute episode a high consumption of the antinuclear factor the immunological methods negatively correlate with the number of the LE-cells. The immune enzyme technique is to be recommended on account of the smaller expenditure, permanence of the preparations and high sensitiveness as alternative method of the immunofluorescence technique. In the micromethod the large variation is opposite to the advantage of the slight quantity of blood and to an always existing evaluability. Investigations of the lymphocytes of patients with lupus erythematodes disseminatus by means of the lymphocyte transformation test and the determination of the B-cells with the help of the direct immune peroxidase technique refer to the close pathogenetic connections of cellular and humoral immune reactions in this disease.

  15. Massive intracranial calcifications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus; Calcificacoes intracranianas macicas em um paciente com lupus eritematoso sistemico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica. Servico de Radiologia Medica]. E-mail: gasparetto@hotmail.com; Ono, Sergio E. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2004-12-01

    Central nervous system involvement is frequently reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies usually show brain atrophy, cerebral infarction and/or intracranial bleeding. Extensive intracranial calcification in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with seizures and massive basal ganglia calcification and mild calcifications in the frontal lobes, seen on the brain computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensity on FLAIR images and hypointense signals on T2{sup *} gradient echo images in the basal ganglia. (author)

  16. The serum levels of connective tissue growth factor in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F-M; Yu, F; Tan, Y; Liu, G; Zhao, M-H

    2014-06-01

    The expression of connective tissue growth factor mRNA in human kidneys may serve as an early marker for lupus nephritis progression. Therefore, we speculated that connective tissue growth factor may be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. In this study, we set out to investigate the associations between serum connective tissue growth factor levels and clinicopathological features of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. Serum samples from patients with non-renal systemic lupus erythematosus, renal biopsy-proven lupus nephritis and healthy control subjects were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serum connective tissue growth factor levels. The associations between connective tissue growth factor levels and clinicopathological features of the patients were further analysed. The levels of serum connective tissue growth factor in patients with non-renal systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis were both significantly higher than those in the normal control group (34.14 ± 12.17 ng/ml vs. 22.8 ± 3.0 ng/ml, plupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis group (34.14 ± 12.17 ng/ml vs. 44.1 ± 46.8 ng/ml, p = 0.183). Serum connective tissue growth factor levels were significantly higher in lupus nephritis patients with the following clinical manifestations, including anaemia (51.3 ± 51.4 ng/ml vs. 23.4 ± 9.7 ng/ml, plupus nephritis (63.3 ± 63.4 ng/ml vs. 38.3 ± 37.9 ng/ml, p = 0.035, respectively). Serum connective tissue growth factor levels were negatively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = -0.46, plupus nephritis (plupus and correlated with chronic renal interstitial injury and doubling of serum creatinine in patients with lupus nephritis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Cardiovascular events prior to or early after diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus in the systemic lupus international collaborating clinics cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Anderson, N M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the frequency of myocardial infarction (MI) prior to the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and within the first 2 years of follow-up. METHODS: The systemic lupus international collaborating clinics (SLICC) atherosclerosis inception cohort enters patients within......% CI 2.38 to 23.57) remained significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: In some patients with lupus, MI may develop even before the diagnosis of SLE or shortly thereafter, suggesting that there may be a link between autoimmune inflammation and atherosclerosis....

  18. Skin lesion resembling malignant atrophic papulosis in lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutre, M S; Beylot, C; Bioulac, P; Busquet, M; Conte, M

    1987-01-01

    This case demonstrates, as do the 3 others reported in literature, that a diagnosis of malignant atrophic papulosis can only be made once the possibility of a lupus erythematosus has been totally excluded.

  19. Perihepatitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus: computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenwaelder, M.; Stuckey, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    The imaging findings of a 29-year-old woman with known systemic lupus erythematosus, and a clinical presentation and CT appearances consistent with perihepatitis are presented Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  20. Distinct proteome pathology of circulating microparticles in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Tanassi, Julia T

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is poorly understood but has been linked to defective clearance of subcellular particulate material from the circulation. This study investigates the origin, formation, and specificity of circulating microparticles (MPs) in patients...

  1. New aspects in the clinical spectrum of neonatal lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, Rasa; Christesen, Henrik Thybo; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE) is a rare, passively acquired autoimmune disease, caused by maternal autoantibodies. Characteristic clinical features of NLE are transient rash and congenital heart block (CHB), but also hematological abnormalities and hepatobiliary dysfunction may occur...

  2. Discoid lupus erythematosus exacerbated by X-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eedy, D J; Corbett, J R

    1988-05-01

    The authors describe a patient, previously known to have discoid lupus erythematosus (LE) developing a LE rash in the precise distribution of radiation therapy given for the treatment of a bronchogenic neoplasm.

  3. Type I Interferon in the Pathogenesis of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have applied insights from studies of the innate immune response to define type I interferon (IFN-I), with IFN-α the dominant mediator, as central to the pathogenesis of this prototype systemic autoimmune disease. Genetic association data identify regulators of nucleic acid degradation and components of TLR-independent, endosomal TLR-dependent, and IFN-I signaling pathways as contributors to lupus disease susceptibility. Together with a gene expression signature characterized by IFNI-induced gene transcripts in lupus blood and tissue, those data support the conclusion that many of the immunologic and pathologic features of this disease are a consequence of a persistent self-directed immune reaction driven by IFN-I and mimicking a sustained anti-virus response. This expanding knowledge of the role of IFN-I and the innate immune response suggests candidate therapeutic targets that are being tested in lupus patients. PMID:24907379

  4. Discoid lupus erythematosus exacerbated by X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eedy, D.J.; Corbett, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe a patient, previously known to have discoid lupus erythematosus (LE) developing a LE rash in the precise distribution of radiation therapy given for the treatment of a bronchogenic neoplasm. (author)

  5. Prevalence of Lupus Anticoagulant in Women with Spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... ... pregnancy. Presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA), one of the antiphospholipid antibodies, ... pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia/eclampsia and small for date deliveries. ... changes in a background of APL syndrome.

  6. Clinical features of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of this study was to determine the most common features of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus ... Conclusion: Most of the findings correlate with similar studies worldwide. .... Sciences, University of the Free State to conduct the study.

  7. The existential experience of everyday life with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Janni Lisander; Hall, Elisabeth; Jacobsen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    with systemic lupus erythematosus and of various ages, disease durations and severities were undertaken from September 2013 - October 2015. Data were analysed following van Manen's phenomenological approach and using drawing as an interpretive tool. Findings: The main existential experience was interpreted......Aim: To explore from the perspective of women the nature of basic existential conditions while living with systemic lupus erythematosus. Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus has an unpredictable disease course and is documented to cause an existential rearrangement of life. The significance...... of changes in existential conditions and related experiences are unclear in the context of nursing and women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Design: A qualitative design guided by Van Manen's hermeneutic-phenomenological methodology. Method: Individual in-depth interviews with 15 women diagnosed...

  8. Cell death in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pragnesh; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2017-12-01

    Nephritis is one of the most severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). One key characteristic of lupus nephritis (LN) is the deposition of immune complexes containing nucleic acids and/or proteins binding to nucleic acids and autoantibodies recognizing these molecules. A variety of cell death processes are implicated in the generation and externalization of modified nuclear autoantigens and in the development of LN. Among these processes, apoptosis, primary and secondary necrosis, NETosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis, and autophagy have been proposed to play roles in tissue damage and immune dysregulation. Cell death occurs in healthy individuals during conditions of homeostasis yet autoimmunity does not develop, at least in part, because of rapid clearance of dying cells. In SLE, accelerated cell death combined with a clearance deficiency may lead to the accumulation and externalization of nuclear autoantigens and to autoantibody production. In addition, specific types of cell death may modify autoantigens and alter their immunogenicity. These modified molecules may then become novel targets of the immune system and promote autoimmune responses in predisposed hosts. In this review, we examine various cell death pathways and discuss how enhanced cell death, impaired clearance, and post-translational modifications of proteins could contribute to the development of lupus nephritis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Early Prediction of Lupus Nephritis Using Advanced Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Gupta IR . Evaluation of activity, chronicity and tubulointerstitial indices for childhood lupus nephritis. Pediatr Nephrol 2008;23:83–91. 34. Isenberg DA...University of Okla- homa Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City: Drs. Michael Hen- drickson and James N. Jarvis (data collection); Tracy Fuelling...Duffy CM, Bernard C, Gupta IR : Evaluation of activity, chronicity and tubulointerstitial indices for childhood lupus nephritis. Pediatr Nephrol 2008

  10. Minocycline induced lupus with yellow colored chylous exudative pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Starobin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ninety years old male was admitted to hospital due to breathlessness. The prominent findings were extensive blue-grey skin pigmentation and large left chylothorax. Drug induced lupus was diagnosed due to either minocycline chronic treatment or no alternative illness to explain his sub-acute disease. Minocycline therapy was stopped with gradual improvement of pleural effusion and skin discoloration. This case is the first presentation of minocycline induced lupus with chylothorax.

  11. The Pathology of T Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Mak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is characterized by the production of a wide array of autoantibodies. Thus, the condition was traditionally classified as a “B-cell disease”. Compelling evidence has however shown that without the assistance of the helper T lymphocytes, it is indeed difficult for the “helpless” B cells to become functional enough to trigger SLE-related inflammation. T cells have been recognized to be crucial in the pathogenicity of SLE through their capabilities to communicate with and offer enormous help to B cells for driving autoantibody production. Recently, a number of phenotypic and functional alterations which increase the propensity to trigger lupus-related inflammation have been identified in lupus T cells. Here, potential mechanisms involving alterations in T-cell receptor expressions, postreceptor downstream signalling, epigenetics, and oxidative stress which favour activation of lupus T cells will be discussed. Additionally, how regulatory CD4+, CD8+, and γδ T cells tune down lupus-related inflammation will be highlighted. Lastly, while currently available outcomes of clinical trials evaluating therapeutic agents which manipulate the T cells such as calcineurin inhibitors indicate that they are at least as efficacious and safe as conventional immunosuppressants in treating lupus glomerulonephritis, larger clinical trials are undoubtedly required to validate these as-yet favourable findings.

  12. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Primary Care Approach to Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nguyet-Cam Vu; Ghetu, Maria V; Bieniek, Marzena L

    2016-08-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that affects many systems, including the skin, musculoskeletal, renal, neuropsychiatric, hematologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and reproductive systems. Family physicians should be familiar with the manifestations of lupus to aid in early diagnosis, monitoring patients with mild disease, recognizing warning signs that require referral to a rheumatologist, and helping to monitor disease activity and treatment in patients with moderate to severe disease. The American College of Rheumatology has 11 classification criteria for lupus. If a patient meets at least four criteria, lupus can be diagnosed with 95% specificity and 85% sensitivity. All patients with lupus should receive education, counseling, and support. Hydroxychloroquine is the cornerstone of treatment because it reduces disease flares and other constitutional symptoms. Low-dose glucocorticoids can be used to treat most manifestations of lupus. The use of immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents depends on the body systems affected. Patients with mild disease that does not involve major organ systems can be monitored by their family physician. Patients with increased disease activity, complications, or adverse effects from treatment should be referred to a rheumatologist. To optimize treatment, it is important that a rheumatologist coordinate closely with the patient's family physician to improve chronic care as well as preventive health services.

  13. Antiphospholipid antibodies and non-thrombotic manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlgen, U; Yayla, M E; Ateş, A; Okatan, İ E; Yurteri, E U; Torgutalp, M; Keleşoğlu, A B D; Turgay, T M; Kınıklı, G

    2018-04-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association between antiphospholipid antibodies and non-thrombotic and non-gestational manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Systemic lupus erythematosus patients with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies or lupus anticoagulant were identified and grouped as systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid syndrome (SLE-APS), systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antiphospholipid antibodies/lupus anticoagulant without antiphospholipid syndrome (SLE-aPL), and systemic lupus erythematosus with negative aPLs (SLE-No aPL). Groups were compared in terms of non-thrombotic systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations and laboratory features retrospectively. Results A total of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 26 with SLE-APS, 25 with SLE-aPL, and 99 with SLE-No aPL, were identified. Livedo reticularis, neurologic involvement, and thrombocytopenia were more common in antiphospholipid antibody positive systemic lupus erythematosus cases. Malar rash, arthritis, and pleuritis were more common in the SLE-No aPL, SLE-APS, and SLE-aPL groups, respectively. Positivity rates and titers of specific antiphospholipid antibodies did not differ between the SLE-APS and SLE-aPL groups. Conclusions Presence of antiphospholipid syndrome or persistent antiphospholipid antibodies may be related to non-thrombotic and non-gestational systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus plus antiphospholipid syndrome and persistent antiphospholipid antibodies without antiphospholipid syndrome also differ in terms of systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations.

  14. Lack of recording of systemic lupus erythematosus in the death certificates of lupus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Alén, J; Alarcón, G S; Campbell, R; Fernández, M; Reveille, J D; Cooper, G S

    2005-09-01

    To determine to what extent the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in deceased lupus patients is under-reported in death certificates, and the patient characteristics associated with such an occurrence. The death certificates of 76 of the 81 deceased SLE patients from two US lupus cohorts (LUMINA for Lupus in Minorities: Nature vs Nurture and CLU for Carolina Lupus Study), including 570 and 265 patients, respectively, were obtained from the Offices of Vital Statistics of the states where the patients died (Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas). Both cohorts included patients with SLE as per the American College of Rheumatology criteria, aged > or =16 yr, and disease duration at enrolment of < or =5 yr. The median duration of follow-up in each cohort at the time of these analyses ranged from 38.1 to 53.0 months. Standard univariable analyses were performed comparing patients with SLE recorded anywhere in the death certificate and those without it. A multivariable logistic regression model was performed to identify the variables independently associated with not recording SLE in death certificates. In 30 (40%) death certificates, SLE was not recorded anywhere in the death certificate. In univariable analyses, older age was associated with lack of recording of SLE in death certificates [mean age (standard deviation) 50.9 (15.6) years and 39.1 (18.6) yr among those for whom SLE was omitted and included on the death certificates, respectively, P = 0.005]. Patients without health insurance, those dying of a cardiovascular event and those of Caucasian ethnicity were also more likely to be in the non-recorded group. In the multivariable analysis, variables independently associated with not recording SLE as cause of death were older age [odds ratio = (95% confidence interval) 1.043 (1.005-1.083 per yr increase); P = 0.023] and lack of health insurance [4.649 (1.152-18.768); P = 0.031]. A high proportion of SLE diagnoses are not

  15. The caregiver burden in lupus: findings from UNVEIL, a national online lupus survey in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sawah, S; Daly, R P; Foster, S A; Naegeli, A N; Benjamin, K; Doll, H; Bond, G; Moshkovich, O; Alarcón, G S

    2017-01-01

    Lupus imposes a substantial burden on patients; however, little is known about its impact on those caring for patients with the disease. In this study, we examined the impact 'caring for patients with lupus' has on caregivers from their own perspective. UNVEIL was a one-time online national cross-sectional survey developed in partnership with the Lupus Foundation of America and fielded targeting the US Lupus Foundation of America constituents in 2014. Eligible caregivers were adults who self-identified as unpaid caregivers of patients with lupus. Eligible caregivers had to complete a series of sociodemographic questions as well as a series of well established outcome measures, such as the Short Form 12v2 Health Survey, the Work Productivity and Activity Index, the Caregiver Burden Inventory, and the Perceived Benefits of Caregiving Scale. A total of 253 caregivers completed the survey. The majority of caregivers (90.1%) were aged 60 years or younger, more than half (54.2%) were men, and more than half (59.7%) identified themselves as either a spouse or a partner to the patient with lupus they were caring for. Overall health-related quality of life was close to the norm mean of the general US population. Caregivers who were employed missed an average of 12.8% of paid work time due to caregiving responsibilities and reported a 33.5% reduction in on-the-job effectiveness. Nearly half of the caregivers surveyed (49.4%) indicated that their caregiving responsibilities impacted their ability to socialize with friends, and almost all caregivers (97.6%) reported experiencing increased anxiety and stress in relation to their caregiving role. Caregiving for patients with lupus has a substantial impact on the work productivity and the social and emotional functioning of caregivers. Healthcare professionals and policymakers should continually assess the impact of healthcare decisions on the well-being of those caring for patients with lupus. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojan, George; Petri, Michelle

    2018-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototypical systemic autoimmune disease with a significant disease burden across the world among different ethnic, racial, and age groups. The pathophysiological understanding of SLE is constantly evolving and with it, the need for a better definition of the disease itself, for understanding the risk among the different affected populations, and for identifying the factors responsible for the damage accrual through the years. More accurate estimates of incidence and prevalence of SLE among different ethnicities and minority groups not only in the USA, but also in Europe, Middle East, and Asia have provided new insights into the disease burden around the world. Despite advances in treatment, mortality among SLE patients remains high with significant ethnic and geographic variations. Sex, race, and ethnicity significantly affect SLE incidence, prevalence, and mortality.

  17. Central nervous system lupus erythematosus in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kimura, Kazue; Yoshida, Naotaka; Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Ibe, Masa-aki; Shimizu, Hiroko (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    Clinical features of central nervous system (CNS) invlvement in childhood systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was investigated. Neuropsychiatric manifestations including seizures, chorea, headache, overt psychosis, tremor, increase of muscle spastisity, and disturbed memory were found in 47% of 15 patients with SLE. There was a well correlatin between CNS abnormalities and SLE disease activity judged by serum complement levels and anti-nuclear antibody and anti-DNA antibody titers. The administration of Prednisolon was effective for the treatment of these CNS abnormalities and steroid psychosis was rare in the present study. EEG abnormalities involving diffuse slowing and slowing bursts were found in 73% of the patients. Cranial CT scan revealed basel ganglia calcifications in 2 patients, and marked brain atrophy in 3 patients. This study indicated that in the long term following of SLE children CNS abnormalities need to be serially checked by EEG and cranial CT scans as well as serological investigations. (author).

  18. [NEUROPSYCHIATRIC MANIFESTATIONS OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjer, Rafael; Shriki Tal, Liron; Gizunterman, Alex; Amital, Daniela; Amital, Howard; Kotler, Moshe

    2017-12-01

    This review deals with the neuropsychiatric disorders resulting from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease that impacts all systems in the human body, including the central nervous system. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in SLE are a common complication of the disease. This complication has significant implications for the severity of the illness. In most cases no thorough psychiatric assessment is performed during initial evaluation of the disease and no protocol or clear guidelines for treating the psychiatric symptoms in SLE are available. Early diagnosis of the psychiatric symptoms in SLE is critical since absence of treatment may result in severe psychiatric complications. Clinical pharmacological studies are needed in order to develop guidelines for treating psychiatric symptoms in SLE.

  19. Biological Therapy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Postal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototypic inflammatory autoimmune disorder characterized by multisystem involvement and fluctuating disease activity. Symptoms range from rather mild manifestations such as rash or arthritis to life-threatening end-organ manifestations. Despite new and improved therapy having positively impacted the prognosis of SLE, a subgroup of patients do not respond to conventional therapy. Moreover, the risk of fatal outcomes and the damaging side effects of immunosuppressive therapies in SLE call for an improvement in the current therapeutic management. New therapeutic approaches are focused on B-cell targets, T-cell downregulation and costimulatory blockade, cytokine inhibition, and the modulation of complement. Several biological agents have been developed, but this encouraging news is associated with several disappointments in trials and provide a timely moment to reflect on biologic therapy in SLE.

  20. Central nervous system lupus erythematosus in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kimura, Kazue; Yoshida, Naotaka; Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Ibe, Masa-aki; Shimizu, Hiroko

    1989-01-01

    Clinical features of central nervous system (CNS) invlvement in childhood systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was investigated. Neuropsychiatric manifestations including seizures, chorea, headache, overt psychosis, tremor, increase of muscle spastisity, and disturbed memory were found in 47% of 15 patients with SLE. There was a well correlatin between CNS abnormalities and SLE disease activity judged by serum complement levels and anti-nuclear antibody and anti-DNA antibody titers. The administration of Prednisolon was effective for the treatment of these CNS abnormalities and steroid psychosis was rare in the present study. EEG abnormalities involving diffuse slowing and slowing bursts were found in 73% of the patients. Cranial CT scan revealed basel ganglia calcifications in 2 patients, and marked brain atrophy in 3 patients. This study indicated that in the long term following of SLE children CNS abnormalities need to be serially checked by EEG and cranial CT scans as well as serological investigations. (author)

  1. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery

  2. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing, E-mail: ydqahmu@gmail.com

    2016-08-15

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. - Highlights: • Studies have discovered thousands of circRNAs and interpreted their biogenesis. • Cytoplasmic circRNAs sponge miRNA and nuclear circRNAs modulate gene transcription. • Aberrant expression of circRNAs has been observed in various cancers. • CircRNAs may partake in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  3. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. - Highlights: • Studies have discovered thousands of circRNAs and interpreted their biogenesis. • Cytoplasmic circRNAs sponge miRNA and nuclear circRNAs modulate gene transcription. • Aberrant expression of circRNAs has been observed in various cancers. • CircRNAs may partake in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. Oral candidiasis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangtham, M; Magder, L S; Petri, M A

    2014-06-01

    We assessed the frequency of oral candidiasis and the association between demographic variables, disease-related variables, corticosteroid treatment, other treatments and the occurrence of oral candidiasis in the Hopkins Lupus Cohort. In this large prospective cohort study of 2258 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), demographic and clinical associates of oral candidiasis were estimated by univariate, multivariate and within-person regression models. There were 53,548 cohort visits. Oral candidiasis was diagnosed at 675 visits (1.25%) in 325 (14%) of the patients. In the multivariate analyses, oral candidiasis was associated with African-American ethnicity, SELENA-SLEDAI disease activity, high white blood cell count, a history of bacterial infection, prednisone use and immunosuppressive use. The urine protein by urine dip stick was higher in SLE patients with oral candidiasis. Considering only patients who had candidiasis at some visits in a 'within-person' analysis, candidiasis was more frequent in visits with higher SELENA-SLEDAI disease activity, high white blood cell count, proteinuria by urine dip stick, a history of bacterial infection and prednisone use. The use of hydroxychloroquine was associated with a lower risk of oral candidiasis, but was not statistically significant (p = 0.50) in the within-person analysis models. This study identified multiple risk factors for oral candidiasis in SLE. Inspection of the oral cavity for signs of oral candidiasis is recommended especially in SLE patients with active disease, proteinuria, high white blood cell count, taking prednisone, immunosuppressive drugs or antibiotics. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. [CD4 lymphocytopenia in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sofia; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Marinho, António; Farinha, Fátima; Almeida, Isabel; Correia, João; Barbosa, Paulo; Mendonça, Teresa; Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an inflammatory chronic disease characterized by the presence of autoantibodies, immunocomplex production and organ injury. Several alterations of the immune system have been described, namely of CD4 T cells, with particular focus on regulatory subgroup. Quantify peripheral CD4 T cells in a population of patients with SLE and correlate it with lupus activity, affected organs, therapeutics and infections. Retrospective study involving all SLE patients seen in the clinical immunology outpatient clinic of the Hospital Geral Santo António, Porto that has done some peripheral blood flow cytometry study. Twenty-nine patients have been evaluated, 16 were taking glucocorticoids and six immunossupressors. The mean SLEDAI at the study time was nine and the ECLAM was three. Thirty-one percent of the patients had leukopenia, 76% lymphocytopenia and the same number CD4 depletion. Fifty-five percent of the patients had CD4 levels lower than 500/mm3, 31% lower than 200/mm3. All patients with SLEDAI > or = 20 and ECLAM > or = 4 had CD4 counts inferior to 500/mm3 and all patients with inactive disease had CD4 superior to 500/mm3. There have been three opportunistic infections: cryptococcal meningitis, pulmonary aspergilosis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, all in patients with CD4 counts lower than 500/mm3. Decreased CD4 T cells counts have been very common in this study population. There is an inverse relation between CD4 cells counts and disease activity. Opportunistic infections occurred in patients with severe CD4 depletion.

  6. Lupus eritematoso sistêmico associado a miastenia gravis: relato de caso Systemic lupus erythematosus and myasthenia gravis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCIO F. DE CARVALHO

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem o caso de uma mulher branca de 24 anos de idade admitida com lupus eritematoso sistêmico (com 4 anos de evolução de doença e início recente de miastenia gravis. São discutidos os principais diagnósticos diferenciais para a fraqueza muscular e a fadiga apresentadas por esta paciente. Uma revisão de literatura abordando a associação de miastenia gravis e lupus eritematoso é feita, com ênfase às características clínicas desses pacientes e ao papel do timoma e timectomia no desenvolvimento de lupus eritematoso em pacientes previamente miastênicos.We report the case of a 24-year-old white woman admitted with a four year diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus and the recent onset of myasthenia gravis discussing the main differential diagnosis of weakness and fatigue in this patient. A review of literature approaching the association of myasthenia gravis and systemic lupus erythematosus is also done with emphasis on the clinical characteristics of these patients and the role of thymoma and thymectomy in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus in myasthenic patients.

  7. Evaluating fatigue in lupus-prone mice: preliminary assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Allison; Larson, Susan J

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is a debilitating condition suffered by many as the result of chronic disease, yet relatively little is known about its biological basis or how to effectively manage its effects. This study sought to evaluate chronic fatigue by using lupus-prone mice and testing them at three different time periods. Lupus-prone mice were chosen because fatigue affects over half of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Eleven MLR⁺/(+) (genetic controls) and twelve MLR/MpJ-Fas/J (MRL/lpr; lupus-prone) mice were tested three times: once at 12, 16 and 20 weeks of age. All mice were subjected to a variety of behavioral tests including: forced swim, post-swim grooming, running wheel, and sucrose consumption; five of the MLR⁺/(+) and five of the MLR/lpr mice were also tested on a fixed ratio-25 operant conditioning task. MRL/lpr mice showed more peripheral symptoms of lupus than controls, particularly lymphadenopathy and proteinuria. Lupus mice spent more time floating during the forced swim test and traveled less distance in the running wheel at each testing period. There were no differences between groups in post-swim grooming or in number of reinforcers earned in the operant conditioning task indicating the behavioral changes were not likely due simply to muscle weakness or motivation. Correlations between performance in the running wheel, forced swim test and sucrose consumption were conducted and distance traveled in the running wheel was consistently negatively correlated with time spent floating. Based on these data, we conclude that the lupus-prone mice were experiencing chronic fatigue and that running wheel activity and floating during a forced swim test can be used to evaluate fatigue, although these data cannot rule out the possibility that both fatigue and a depressive-like state were mediating these effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of audiovestibular dysfunction in children with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Ghada Ibrahim; Mohamed, Somaia Tawfik; Awwad, Khaled Salah; Mohamed, Rehab Fetoh

    2013-09-01

    Inner ear dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosis patients has been reported but audiovestibular involvement is not well documented especially in pediatrics. This study was designed to evaluate silent audiovestibular dysfunction among SLE children. Case control study examined in allergy and immunology clinic; pediatrics hospital and audiovestibular clinic; Ain Shams University from January 2009 to December 2010. Thirty-five systemic lupus erythematosus children (diagnosed according to American College of Rheumatology); age group 8-16 years, were randomly selected. Five of them were excluded due to one or more exclusion criteria (previous otitis media, stroke, lupus cerebritis, meningitis or encephalitis, audiovestibular symptom). Ten of them refused enrollment or could not complete full battery. Seventeen females and three males, mean age 12.9 ± 2.6 years, completed the study. Control group included 20 normal subjects, age and sex matched. Full clinical assessment, basic audiological evaluation and vestibular testing (videonystagmography VNG and computerized dynamic posturography CDP) were conducted for children included in the study. Five systemic lupus erythematosus patients had sensorineural hearing loss strongly associated with +ve antiphospholipid antibody and two had conductive hearing loss. Two children in control group had conductive hearing loss (p=0.05). Abnormal VNG findings was significantly higher among systemic lupus erythematosus children (40%) compared to controls (0%) and associated with +ve antiphospholipid antibodies (χ(2)=10, p=0.002, Fisher exact test=0.003). Twenty-five percentage of systemic lupus erythematosus children had abnormal CDP findings reflecting impaired balance function associated with positive antiphospholipid antibodies showing significant statistical difference compared to controls (0% affection) (χ(2)=5.7, p=0.017, Fisher exact test=0.047). Silent audiovestibular dysfunction is prevalent among systemic lupus

  9. [Central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus - diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyrka, Magdalena

    Nervous system involvement in lupus belongs to its severe complications and significantly impacts its prognosis. Neuropsychiatric lupus includes 19 disease manifestations concerning both central and peripheral nervous system. This paper presents clinical aspects of central nervous system involvement in lupus. It reviews its epidemiology, risk factors and principles of diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Successful treatment of massive ascites due to lupus peritonitis with hydroxychloroquine in old- onset lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Sonia; Bdioui, Fethia; Ouaz, Afef; Loghmari, Hichem; Mahjoub, Sylvia; Saffar, Hamouda

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is an auto-immune disease with multiple organ involvements that occurs mainly in young women. Literature data suggest that serositis is more frequent in late-onset SLE. However, peritoneal serositis with massive ascites is an extremely rare manifestation. We report a case of old-onset lupus peritonitis treated successfully by Hydroxychloroquine. A 77-year-old Tunisian woman was hospitalized because of massive painful ascites. Her family history did not include any autoimmune disease. She was explored 4 years prior to admission for exudative pleuritis of the right lung without any established diagnosis. Physical examination showed only massive ascites. Laboratory investigations showed leucopenia: 3100/mm3, lymphopenia: 840/mm3 and trace protein (0.03 g/24 h). Ascitic fluid contained 170 cells mm(3) (67% lymphocytes), 46 g/L protein, but no malignant cells. The main etiologies of exudative ascites were excluded. She had markedly elevated anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) titer of 1/1600 and a significantly elevated titer of antibody to double-stranded DNA (83 IU/mL) with hypo-complementemia (C3 levl was at 67 mg/dL). Antibody against the Smith antigen was also positive. Relying on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with SLE and treated with Hydroxychloroquine 200 mg daily in combination with diuretics. One month later, there was no detectable ascitic fluid and no pleural effusions. Five months later she remained free from symptoms while continuing to take chloroquine. This case was characterized by old age of onset of SLE, the extremely rare initial presentation with lupus peritonitis and massive painful ascites with dramatic response to only hydroxychloroquine treatment.

  11. Genomics of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Insights Gained by Studying Monogenic Young-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Linda T; Silverman, Earl D

    2017-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic, autoimmune, multisystem disease with a heterogeneous clinical phenotype. Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple susceptibility loci, but these explain a fraction of the estimated heritability. This is partly because within the broad spectrum of SLE are monogenic diseases that tend to cluster in patients with young age of onset, and in families. This article highlights insights into the pathogenesis of SLE provided by these monogenic diseases. It examines genetic causes of complement deficiency, abnormal interferon production, and abnormalities of tolerance, resulting in monogenic SLE with overlapping clinical features, autoantibodies, and shared inflammatory pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lupus erythematosus cell preparation, antinuclear factor and antideoxyribonucleic acid antibody incongruity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Y C

    1983-01-01

    'Total antinuclear antibody' (ANF) is detected by the fluorescent antinuclear antibody technique which is a screening test, positive in 99% of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) sera. The LE factor (positive in 75% of SLE sera), like the anti-DNA antibody, is an antinuclear antibody but directed against DNA-histone. ANF-negative SLE is a clinical entity with absence of these antibodies. A false negative ANF, in the presence of high titre anti-DNA antibody and/or LE cells, is illustrated in two cases of SLE. Postulated mechanisms for this phenomenon are interference in ANF detection by rheumatoid factor, and the prozone effect on the immunofluorescent tests.

  13. Embarazo y lupus eritematoso sistémico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Campillo Motilva

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available El lupus eritematoso sistémico es una enfermedad autoinmune y sistémica, que se presenta con frecuencia en mujeres jóvenes y por tanto en su etapa reproductiva; se asocia a un alto riesgo de morbilidad y mortalidad perinatal. Las complicaciones más frecuentes son los abortos, la muerte fetal, la prematurez, el retardo del crecimiento intrauterino y el lupus neonatal. Los anticuerpos potencialmente perjudiciales sobre la gestación son los antifosfolípidos (anticoagulante lúpico y anticardiolipinas y anti-Ro y anti-La. Con un correcto asesoramiento preconcepcional y un adecuado seguimiento durante el embarazo y el puerperio, se puede encarar con una gran probabilidad de éxito la maternidad en estas pacientes.Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune and systemic disease that appears frequently in young women and, therefore, during the reproductive stage. It is associated with a high risk of morbidity and perinatal mortality. The most common complications are abortions, fetal death, prematurity, retarded intrauterine growth and neonatal lupus.The potentially harmful antibodies for gestation are the antiphospholipids (lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipins and anti-Ro and anti-La. With a correct preconceptional counselling and an adequate follow-up during pregnancy and puerperium, maternity may be faced with great probabilities of success in these patients.

  14. Understanding lupus nephritis: diagnosis, management, and treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok CC

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Chi Chiu MokDepartment of Medicine, Tuen Mun Hospital and Center for Assessment and Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases, Pok Oi Hospital, Hong Kong, ChinaAbstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE predominantly affects women in their reproductive years. Renal disease (glomerulonephritis is one of the most frequent and serious manifestations of SLE. Of the various histological types of lupus glomerulonephritis, diffuse proliferative nephritis carries the worst prognosis. Combined with high-dose prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF has emerged as a first-line immunosuppressive treatment, although data regarding the efficacy of MMF on the long-term preservation of renal function are forthcoming. Cyclophosphamide is reserved for more severe forms of lupus nephritis, such as crescentic glomerulonephritis with rapidly deteriorating renal function, patients with significant renal function impairment at presentation, and refractory renal disease. Evidence for the calcineurin inhibitors in the treatment of lupus nephritis is weaker, and it concerns patients who are intolerant or recalcitrant to other agents. While further controlled trials are mandatory, B cell modulation therapies, such as rituximab, belimumab and epratuzumab are confined to refractory disease. Non-immunosuppressive measures, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, vigorous blood pressure control, prevention and treatment of hyperlipidemia and osteoporosis, are equally important.Keywords: lupus, nephritis, nephropathy, glomerulonephritis, treatment, therapy, women

  15. Retracted Association of STAT4 gene polymorphism with systemic lupus erythematosus / lupus nephritis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian-Biao; Jiang, Zong-Pei; Qin, Yuan-Han; Zhou, Jia-Fan

    2014-04-16

    The association of STAT4 gene polymorphism with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) / lupus nephritis (LN) results from the published studies is still conflicting. This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between STAT4 rs7574865, rs16833431, rs11889341, rs8179673, rs10168266, rs7582694, rs3821236, rs7601754 gene polymorphism and SLE / LN, and to explore whether STAT4 gene polymorphism could become a predictive marker for SLE / LN risk. Association studies were identified from the databases of PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and CBM-disc (China Biological Medicine Database) as of September 1, 2013, and eligible investigations were synthesized using meta-analysis method. 24 investigations were identified for the analysis of association between STAT4 gene polymorphism and SLE, consisting of 31190 patients with SLE and 43940 controls. In STAT4 rs7574865, there was a marked association between T allele or TT genotype and SLE susceptibility (T: OR=1.53, 95% CI: 1.30-1.79, Prs7574865 gene polymorphism was not associated with the LN risk. Our results indicate that T allele or TT homozygous is a significant risk genetic molecular marker to predict the SLE susceptibility and GG genotype is a valuable marker to against the SLE risk, but the association was not found for LN. However, more investigations are required to further clarify the association of the T allele or TT homozygous with SLE / LN susceptibility. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Refractory Angioedema in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Habibagahi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Angioedema secondary to C1 inhibitor deficiency has been rarely reported to be associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. A genetic defect of C1 inhibitor produces hereditary angioedema, which is usually presented with cutaneous painless edema, but edema of the genital area, gastrointestinal and laryngeal tracts have also been reported. In lupus patients, angioedema may be the result of an acquired type of C1 inhibitor deficiency, most probably due to antibody formation directed against the C1 inhibitor molecule. Herein we report a new case of lupus nephritis that developed angioedema and a rapid course of disease progression with acute renal failure and alveolar hemorrhage without response to high dose steroid and plasmapheresis.

  17. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus, morphea profunda and psoriasis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arpa, Mónica; Flores-Terry, Miguel A; Ramos-Rodríguez, Claudia; Franco-Muñoz, Monserrat; González-Ruiz, Lucía; Ramírez-Huaranga, Marco Aurelio

    2018-04-03

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory dermatosis that may be associated with a number of diseases. Recent studies provide evidence that there is a greater frequency of autoimmune diseases, but association with autoimmune connective tissue diseases is uncommon. The coexistence of psoriasis and lupus erythematosus is rare. Besides, the occurrence of morphea has rarely been reported in patients with lupus or psoriasis. We report a woman with cutaneous lupus and morphea profunda associated with psoriasis, with an excellent response to methotrexate, and review the literature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiologic findings in late-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Weissman, B.N.; Sosman, J.L.; Schur, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus in the elderly has a different clinical and serologic course from that in young patients. Radiographic findings in patients in whom the diagnosis was made after age 50 were compared with findings in younger patients to see if the radiologic patterns are also different. The only significant radiographic difference between the two groups was that the older group had a greater incidence of soft-tissue swelling of the hands and wrists (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in osteopenia, erosion, soft-tissue calcification, alignment abnormalities, or intrathoracic findings. Of 24 patients over age 50, two developed lymphoma and another developed multiple myeloma. The data agree with clinical observations that there is a higher incidence of arthritis in late-onset lupus, but clinical findings of increased incidence of pleuropericardial disease are not confirmed radiographically. The coincidence of hematologic malignancy with late-onset lupus in this series is noteworthy

  19. Lupus community panel proposals for optimising clinical trials: 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Joan T; Manzi, Susan; Aranow, Cynthia; Askenase, Anca; Bruce, Ian; Chakravarty, Eliza; Chong, Ben; Costenbader, Karen; Dall’Era, Maria; Ginzler, Ellen; Hanrahan, Leslie; Kalunian, Ken; Merola, Joseph; Raymond, Sandra; Rovin, Brad; Saxena, Amit; Werth, Victoria P

    2018-01-01

    Formidable impediments stand in the way of treatment development for lupus. These include the unwieldy size of current trials, international competition for scarce patients, complex outcome measures and a poor understanding of these outcomes in the world at large. The heterogeneity of the disease itself coupled to superimposition of variegated background polypharmacy has created enough immunological noise to virtually ensure the failure of lupus treatment trials, leaving an understandable suspicion that at least some of the results in testing failed drugs over the years may not have been negative, but merely uninterpretable. The authors have consulted with many clinical trial investigators, biopharmaceutical developers and stakeholders from government and voluntary sectors. This paper examines the available evidence that supports workable trial designs and proposes approaches to improve the odds of completing interpretable treatment development programs for lupus. PMID:29657738

  20. Association of Sweet's Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Barton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet's syndrome is an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis which usually presents as an idiopathic disorder but can also be drug induced, associated with hematopoetic malignancies and myelodysplastic disorders, and more, infrequently, observed in autoimmune disorders. Sweet's syndrome has been reported in three cases of neonatal lupus, three cases of hydralazine-induced lupus in adults, and in nine pediatric and adult systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients. We describe three additional adult cases of Sweet's associated with SLE and provide a focused review on nondrug-induced, nonneonatal SLE and Sweet's. In two of three new cases, as in the majority of prior cases, the skin rash of Sweet's paralleled underlying SLE disease activity. The pathogenesis of Sweet's remains elusive, but evidence suggests that cytokine dysregulation may be central to the clinical and pathological changes in this condition, as well as in SLE. Further research is needed to define the exact relationship between the two conditions.

  1. Survival in systemic lupus erythematosus, 1995-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Laustrup, H; Hjelmborg, J

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveThe objective of this paper is to investigate survival and causes of death in a Danish lupus population.MethodsTwo hundred and fifteen SLE patients (94% Caucasians) were followed prospectively for up to 16 years. Thirty-eight patients died. Survival rate and causes of death were analysed......%) and malignancies (13%). Deaths due to infections and active SLE were rare and predominated within the first seven years after diagnosis and before age 40, while cardiovascular deaths prevailed after 20 years' follow-up.ConclusionThis study shows that despite progress in lupus management, including direct access...... to specialized hospital care and increased use of hydroxychloroquine, mortality in lupus patients is still increased. Main causes of death were active disease and infections among the young and newly diagnosed, while cardiovascular deaths prevailed in longstanding disease....

  2. Total lymphoid irradiation in refractory systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Gross, D.J.; Braverman, A.; Weshler, Z.; Fuks, Z.; Slavin, S.; Eliakim, M.

    1986-01-01

    In two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, conventional therapy was considered to have failed because of persistent disease activity and unacceptable side effects. Both were treated with total lymphoid irradiation without clinical benefit, despite adequate immunosuppression as documented by markedly reduced numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte-dependent proliferative responses in vitro. The first patient developed herpes zoster, gram-negative septicemia, neurologic symptoms, and deterioration of lupus nephritis. The second patient developed massive bronchopneumonia, necrotic cutaneous lesions, and progressive nephritis and died 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. These observations, although limited to two patients, indicate that total lymphoid irradiation in patients with severe systemic lupus erythematosus should be regarded as strictly experimental

  3. Bilateral acute lupus pneumonitis in a case of rhupus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhupus syndrome, the overlap of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, is an extremely uncommon condition. Organ damages found due to SLE are usually mild in rhupus. Lupus pneumonitis in rhupus syndrome has not been reported worldwide. We are reporting a 23-year-old female with bilateral symmetric erosive arthritis, oral ulcer, alopecia, polyserositis, anemia, leucopenia, positive RA-factor, anti nuclear antibody (ANA and anti ds-DNA. She presented with acute onset dyspnea, high fever, chest pain, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypoxia and respiratory alkalosis. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT-thorax showed bilateral, basal consolidation with air bronchogram. Repeated sputum and single broncho alveolar lavage (BAL fluid examination revealed no organism or Hemosiderin-laden macrophage. The diagnosis of rhupus was confirmed by combined manifestations of RA and SLE, and the diagnosis of acute lupus pneumonitis was established by clinico-radiological picture and by excluding other possibilities.

  4. Systemic lupus erythematosus diagnostics in the ‘omics’ era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriens, Cristina; Mohan, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a complex autoimmune disease affecting multiple organ systems. Currently, diagnosis relies upon meeting at least four out of eleven criteria outlined by the ACR. The scientific community actively pursues discovery of novel diagnostics in the hope of better identifying susceptible individuals in early stages of disease. Comprehensive studies have been conducted at multiple biological levels including: DNA (or genomics), mRNA (or transcriptomics), protein (or proteomics) and metabolites (or metabolomics). The ‘omics’ platforms allow us to re-examine systemic lupus erythematosus at a greater degree of molecular resolution. More importantly, one is hopeful that these ‘omics’ platforms may yield newer biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus that can help clinicians track the disease course with greater sensitivity and specificity. PMID:24860621

  5. Acute macular neuroretinopathy associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D H; Lee, S C; Kim, M

    2016-04-01

    Acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN) is a rare disorder that presents with abrupt visual change with wedge-shaped or flower-like lesions pointing towards the fovea. Ischemic insults to the retinal capillary plexus may be important for development of this disease. While many case reports have been published on AMN, none have described AMN in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we report a case of AMN associated with newly-diagnosed SLE. We speculate that in patients with lupus flares, immune complex-mediated vascular injury and microvascular thrombosis may disrupt the deep retinal capillary network, causing ischemic damages to the outer retina and leading to the development of AMN. AMN can develop in patients with lupus flares, and must be considered as an SLE-associated ophthalmologic complication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of AMN associated with SLE. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosenpud, J.D.; Montanaro, A.; Hart, M.V.; Haines, J.E.; Specht, H.D.; Bennett, R.M.; Kloster, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in young patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is well documented; however, the prevalence of coronary involvement is unknown. Accordingly, 26 patients with systemic lupus were selected irrespective of previous cardiac history to undergo exercise thallium-201 cardiac scintigraphy. Segmental perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of the 26 studies (38.5 percent). Five patients had reversible defects suggesting ischemia, four patients had persistent defects consistent with scar, and one patient had both reversible and persistent defects in two areas. There was no correlation between positive thallium results and duration of disease, amount of corticosteroid treatment, major organ system involvement or age. Only a history of pericarditis appeared to be associated with positive thallium-201 results (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that segmental myocardial perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Whether this reflects large-vessel coronary disease or small-vessel abnormalities remains to be determined

  7. Brain MR imaging in systemic lupus erythematous

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    Park, Hyun Ae; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Kyung Hwon; Kim, Sung Kwon; Lee, Jung Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Sang Hoon [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-09-15

    To present MR imaging findings of intracranial lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE), a retrospective study was performed on MR images of 33 SLE patients with neurologic symptoms and signs. MR imaging was performed on either a 0.5 T (21 patients) or 2.0 T unit (12 patients), using T1-weighted, proton-density-weighted, and T2-weighted spin echo sequences in all patients. In seven patients, post-contrast T1-weighted images were also obtained after administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The main MR findings consisted of focal lesions suggesting ischemia/infarct (15 patients), diffuse brain atrophy (8), and findings associated with infection (4). The MR findings were normal in 11 patients (33%). The focal lesions suggesting ischemia/infarcts presumably secondary to vasculitis were distributed in the cortex or subcortical white matter (7 patients), deep periventricular white matter (3), or in both areas (5). Most of the focal lesions were multiple and small in size. The findings associated with infection were variable and included communicating hydrocephalus, meningeal enhancement, granuloma, etc. MR findings of SLE were non-specific and therefore clinical correlation is needed when evaluating SLE in MR.

  8. The management of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardoin, Stacy P; Schanberg, Laura E

    2005-12-01

    Most children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) now survive into adulthood, leading the pediatric rheumatology community to focus on preventing long-term complications of SLE, including atherosclerosis, obesity, and osteoporosis, and their treatment. Unfortunately, because of the paucity of data in pediatric SLE, little is known about epidemiology, long-term outcome, and optimal treatment. Most research focuses on adults with SLE, but pediatric SLE differs significantly from adult SLE in many aspects, including disease expression, approaches to pharmacologic intervention, management of treatment toxicity, and psychosocial issues. Children and adolescents with SLE require specialized, multidisciplinary care. Treatment can be optimized by early recognition of disease flares and complications, minimizing medication toxicity, educating families about prevention, promoting school performance, addressing concerns about reproductive health, and negotiating the transition to adult-centered medical care. Developmentally appropriate concerns about pain, appearance, and peers often affect treatment adherence and must be addressed by the health-care team. Research in pediatric SLE is desperately needed and provides a unique opportunity to understand how developmental immunology and the hormonal changes associated with puberty affect the pathophysiology of SLE.

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus and splenic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnizo Z, Pilar; Ramirez R, Francisco Alejandro; Ramirez G, Luis Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease in which there is an increase risk of infections by common germ as by opportunistic germs. This fact is explained by the alterations in the humoral and cellular immunity, and phagocytic mononuclear system due to the disease and the immunosuppressive therapy use for its treatment. Multiple infectious processes have been describes in patients with SLE and within them, the splenic abscess, although in few cases. Usually its presence is associated with an underlying disease such as sepsis or peritonitis, with multiple outcomes. Due to its low frequency as well as the unusual presentation, we reported a case of a solitary splenic abscess documented by ultrasound in a teenager with SLE and immunosuppressive treatment, without any underlying infection, who presents with fever, abdominal pain, leucocytosis and elevation of acute phase reactants. He received antibiotic therapy with clindamycin and ceftriaxone and percutaneous drainage of the abscess guided by ultrasound and sent to culture in which grew non-typificable anaerobe germs, with a favorable evolution after 5 year of follow up

  10. Unmet medical needs in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of diverse manifestations, with onset usually in young women in the third to fourth decade of life. The chronic nature of this relapsing remitting disease leads to organ damage accrual over time. Mortality and morbidity are increased in patients with SLE compared with the general population. Therapeutic advances over the last few decades have led to significant improvements in patient outcomes. Five-year survival has improved to over 90% from a low of 50% in the 1950s. However, multiple aspects of the management of SLE patients are still far from optimal. Early diagnosis remains a challenge; diagnostic delays leading to delay in definitive treatment are common. Monitoring treatment remains problematic due to the paucity of sensitive biomarkers. Current treatment regimens rely heavily on corticosteroids, even though corticosteroids are well known to cause organ damage. Treatment of refractory disease manifestations such as nephritis, recalcitrant cutaneous lesions and neurological involvement require new approaches with greater efficacy. Cognitive dysfunction is common in SLE patients, but early recognition and adequate treatment are yet to be established. Premature accelerated atherosclerosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Fatigue is one of the most disabling symptoms, and contributes to the poor quality of life in patients with SLE. Ongoing research in SLE faces many challenges, including enrollment of homogeneous patient populations, use of reliable outcome measures and a standard control arm. The current review will highlight some of the outstanding unmet challenges in the management of this complex disease. PMID:23281889

  11. Verrucous form of chilblain lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pock, L; Petrovská, P; Becvár, R; Mandys, V; Hercogová, J

    2001-09-01

    A 45-year-old woman had symmetrical livid plaques with yellowish hyperkeratoses for 5 years, which progressed on to the fingers and toes and on the soles of the feet. Two years later creamy, whitish areas and maceration appeared on the buccal mucosa and the lips. A skin biopsy revealed massive collagen hyaline degeneration in the perivascular area, hyperkeratosis and hypergranulosis, small lymphocyte infiltrates with several melanophages and extravasates of erythrocytes in the upper corium in perivascular areas and hydropic degeneration of basal keratinocytes. The findings using direct immunofluorescence were compatible with lupus erythematosus (LE). Laboratory investigation showed a slight leucopenia and thrombopenia, a slightly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, hypocomplementaemia C3 and C4, a high titre of rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies positivity of extractable nuclear antigen. The results reflected probably the development of a systemic form of the disease. The patient was successfully managed by methylprednisolone and hydroxychloroquine. After 1 year of therapy, a new skin biopsy revealed a substantial reduction of hyperkeratosis and hyaline degeneration of collagen tissue in the perivascular areas. The combination of the extensive hyperkeratosis and hyalinization thus seems to be features of the long-lasting, untreated lesions in chilblain LE.

  12. Lupus anticoagulants: first French interlaboratory Etalonorme survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussi, J; Roisin, J P; Goguel, A

    1996-06-01

    In 1994, the, French National Quality Control Group for Hematology, Etalonorme, conducted a large-scale interlaboratory survey concerning the detection of lupus anticoagulants (LA) involving all the 4,500 French laboratories. Each laboratory received the same batch of a lyophilized citrated plasma (94B3) prepared from a patient with LA that had been confirmed by all the techniques used in the intralaboratory study. In the interlaboratory survey, the screening test was activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT); mean APTT calculated from the results reported by 4,029 labs was prolonged (clotting ratio = 1.44) with a large dispersion (coefficients of variation = 18.8%). APTT of the mixture 94B3 + normal plasma were performed by 2,698 laboratories. No correction of APTT was obtained (R = 1.36, Rosner index = 24) with a wide variation between reagents (17 kaolin. This survey allowed Etalonorme to inform French biologists and draft an educational program for the biologic detection of LA and the identification of its mechanism of action.

  13. Quantity discrimination in wolves (Canis lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina eUtrata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantity discrimination has been studied extensively in different non-human animal species. In the current study, we tested eleven hand-raised wolves (Canis lupus in a two-way choice task. We placed a number of food items (one to four sequentially into two opaque cans and asked the wolves to choose the larger amount. Moreover, we conducted two additional control conditions to rule out non-numerical properties of the presentation that the animals might have used to make the correct choice. Our results showed that wolves are able to make quantitative judgments at the group, but also at the individual level even when alternative strategies such as paying attention to the surface area or time and total amount are ruled out. In contrast to previous canine studies on dogs (Canis familiaris and coyotes (Canis latrans, our wolves’ performance did not improve with decreasing ratio, referred to as Weber’s law. However, further studies using larger quantities than we used in the current setup are still needed to determine whether and when wolves’ quantity discrimination conforms to Weber’s law.

  14. [Biological disturbances during the lupus-associated pancreatitis: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayagh, Sanae; Benchekroun, Leila; Bouabdellah, Mounya; Jaouhar, Nezha; El Aoufi, Farida; El Oufir, Fatiha; Alaoui, Meryem; Adnaoui, Mohammed; Chabraoui, Layachi

    2015-01-01

    We report in this paper the case of female patient, hypertriglyceridemia associated with milky serum and hyperglycemia have been the alarm signal of a lupus-associated pancreatitis, the confirmation of this entity was done with elevated rate of serum lipase activity. It is about a 33 years age female. She has as unique antecedent a lupus diagnosed on January of the same. The patient was admitted on august 2013 for another episode of lupus associated to the lower lamb edema with a rate of C3 at 0.4 g/L (0.82-1,93) and C4 at 0.05 g/L (0.15-0.57). One day after the beginning of the corticotherapy, the patient presented hyperthermia, ataxis and behavior troubles, epigastric and articular pains and vomiting. Biochemical tests found hyperglycemia at 38.9 mmol/L (3.9-6.1), dyslipidemia with hypertriglyceridemia at 15.7 mmol/L (0.3-1.7) and total cholesterol rate at 5.2 mmol/L (<5.2) associated with milky serum. Haematological tests objective normocytic normochromic anemia with 81 g/L of hemoglobin, lymphopenia at 0.88 G/L and normal platelet rate. Lupus associated pancreatitis was suggested and confirmed biologically with an hyperlipasemia at 180 UI/L (8-78) and radiologicaly with the image of focal hepatic steatosis. We conclude that on the presence of lupus, gastrointestinal and/or biological signs must motivate the measurement of the serum lipase activity as quickly as possible to assess the diagnosis of lupus-associated pancreatitis.

  15. Invasive fungal infections in Colombian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Alza, Y; Sánchez-Bautista, J; Fajardo-Rivero, J F; Figueroa, C L

    2018-06-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease with multi-organ involvement. Complications, such as invasive fungal infections usually occur in patients with a greater severity of the disease. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk variables associated with invasive fungal infections in a Colombian systemic lupus erythematosus population. Materials and methods A cross-sectional, retrospective study that evaluated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus for six years. The primary outcome was invasive fungal infection. Descriptive, group comparison and bivariate analysis was performed using Stata 12.0 software. Results Two hundred patients were included in this study; 84.5% of the patients were women and the median age was 36 years; 68% of the subjects had haematological complications; 53.3% had nephropathy; 45% had pneumopathy and 28% had pericardial impairment; 7.5% of patients had invasive fungal infections and the most frequently isolated fungus was Candida albicans. Pericardial disease, cyclophosphamide use, high disease activity, elevated ESR, C3 hypocomplementemia, anaemia and lymphopenia had a significant association with invasive fungal infection ( P lupus erythematosus, which was higher than that reported in other latitudes. In this population the increase in disease activity, the presence of pericardial impairment and laboratory alterations (anaemia, lymphopenia, increased ESR and C3 hypocomplementemia) are associated with a greater possibility of invasive fungal infections. Regarding the use of drugs, unlike other studies, in the Colombian population an association was found only with the previous administration of cyclophosphamide. In addition, patients with invasive fungal infections and systemic lupus erythematosus had a higher prevalence of mortality and hospital readmission compared with patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without invasive fungal infection.

  16. Ultraviolet-A1 irradiation therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, H

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus, SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies, which bind to antigens and are deposited within tissues to fix complement, resulting in widespread systemic inflammation. The studies presented herein are consistent with hyperpolarized, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-deficient mitochondria being central to the disease process. These hyperpolarized mitochondria resist the depolarization required for activation-induced apoptosis. The mitochondrial ATP deficits add to this resistance to apoptosis and also reduce the macrophage energy that is needed to clear apoptotic bodies. In both cases, necrosis, the alternative pathway of cell death, results. Intracellular constituents spill into the blood and tissues, eliciting inflammatory responses directed at their removal. What results is "autoimmunity." Ultraviolet (UV)-A1 photons have the capacity to remediate this aberrancy. Exogenous exposure to low-dose, full-body, UV-A1 radiation generates singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen has two major palliative actions in patients with lupus and the UV-A1 photons themselves have several more. Singlet oxygen depolarizes the hyperpolarized mitochondrion, triggering non-ATP-dependent apoptosis that deters necrosis. Next, singlet oxygen activates the gene encoding heme oxygenase (HO-1), a major governor of systemic homeostasis. HO-1 catalyzes the degradation of the oxidant heme into biliverdin (converted to bilirubin), Fe, and carbon monoxide (CO), the first three of these exerting powerful antioxidant effects, and in conjunction with a fourth, CO, protecting against injury to the coronary arteries, the central nervous system, and the lungs. The UV-A1 photons themselves directly attenuate disease in lupus by reducing B cell activity, preventing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity, slowing an epigenetic progression toward SLE, and ameliorating discoid and subacute cutaneous lupus. Finally, a combination of these

  17. Ultraviolet-A1 irradiation therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus, SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies, which bind to antigens and are deposited within tissues to fix complement, resulting in widespread systemic inflammation. The studies presented herein are consistent with hyperpolarized, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-deficient mitochondria being central to the disease process. These hyperpolarized mitochondria resist the depolarization required for activation-induced apoptosis. The mitochondrial ATP deficits add to this resistance to apoptosis and also reduce the macrophage energy that is needed to clear apoptotic bodies. In both cases, necrosis, the alternative pathway of cell death, results. Intracellular constituents spill into the blood and tissues, eliciting inflammatory responses directed at their removal. What results is “autoimmunity.” Ultraviolet (UV)-A1 photons have the capacity to remediate this aberrancy. Exogenous exposure to low-dose, full-body, UV-A1 radiation generates singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen has two major palliative actions in patients with lupus and the UV-A1 photons themselves have several more. Singlet oxygen depolarizes the hyperpolarized mitochondrion, triggering non-ATP-dependent apoptosis that deters necrosis. Next, singlet oxygen activates the gene encoding heme oxygenase (HO-1), a major governor of systemic homeostasis. HO-1 catalyzes the degradation of the oxidant heme into biliverdin (converted to bilirubin), Fe, and carbon monoxide (CO), the first three of these exerting powerful antioxidant effects, and in conjunction with a fourth, CO, protecting against injury to the coronary arteries, the central nervous system, and the lungs. The UV-A1 photons themselves directly attenuate disease in lupus by reducing B cell activity, preventing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity, slowing an epigenetic progression toward SLE, and ameliorating discoid and subacute cutaneous lupus. Finally, a combination of

  18. Type I interferon signature in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezalel, Shira; Guri, Keren Mahlab; Elbirt, Daniel; Asher, Ilan; Sthoeger, Zev Moshe

    2014-04-01

    Type I interferons (IFN) are primarily regarded as an inhibitor of viral replication. However, type I IFN, mainly IFNalpha, plays a major role in activation of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multi-systemic, inflammatory autoimmune disease with undefined etiology. SLE is characterized by dysregulation of both the innate and the adaptive immune systems. An increased expression of type I IFN-regulated genes, termed IFN signature, has been reported in patients with SLE. We review here the role of IFNalpha in the pathogenesis and course of SLE and the possible role of IFNalpha inhibition as a novel treatment for lupus patients.

  19. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  20. Nitrated nucleosome levels and neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus;

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Isabel; Croca, Sara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) there is no serological test that will reliably distinguish neuropsychiatric (NP) events due to active SLE from those due to other causes. Previously we showed that serum levels of nitrated nucleosomes (NN) were elevated in a small...... number of patients with NPSLE. Here we measured serum NN in samples from a larger population of patients with SLE and NP events to see whether elevated serum NN could be a marker for NPSLE. METHODS: We obtained serum samples from patients in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics (SLICC...

  1. Pregnancies in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has preponderance in women in their childbearing years; consequently pregnancy has always been an important issue of concern for the patient and the treating physician. Based upon numerous reports on successful pregnancy outcomes in the past decades, the initial...... of Pregnancy Outcome: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (PROMISSE) study, so far the largest multicentre cohort study of pregnant women with underlying stable SLE, has given some important answers to long-discussed questions. Future studies on data collected from...

  2. Manifestaciones pulmonares del Lupus Eritematoso Sistémico Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erithematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Molina

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available En esta revisión se describen las diversas manifestacionespulmonares del Lupus Eritematoso Sistémico; se Incluyen tanto los cuadrosrelacionados con la enfermedad (pleuritis con o sin derrame, neumonitis lúpicaaguda, enfermedad intersticlaidifusa, hipertensión pulmonar, disfunción diafragmática,atelectasia y hemorragia pulmonar como los asociados a ella (infección, edemapulmonar urémico, embolismo pulmonar, neumotórax, pseudolinfoma y sarcoidosis.Se consideran someramente aspectos clínicos, patológicos, patogénicos,diagnósticos y terapéuticos. En cuanto a los últimos se enfatizan algunasconsideraciones generales de importancia en el manejo de estos pacientes; sonellas: la necesidad de descartar ante todo la posibilidad de un proceso Infecciosoy de emplear antibióticos de amplio espectro hasta excluir1o; la de agotarrecursos hasta establecer un diagnóstico definitivo y la de recurrir a laterapia inmunosupresora una vez excluida la infección O cuando no ha habidorespuesta a los antibióticos adecuados

    The various pulmonary manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus are described in this review; it includes related (pleurisy with/without effusion, acute lupus pneumonitis, diffuse interstitial disease, pulmonary hypertension, diaphragmatic dysfunction, atelectasis, pulmonary hemorrhage as well as associated (infection, uremic pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax, pseudolymphoma, sarcoldosis, miscellaneous conditions. Clinical, pathological, pathogenic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects are con. sidered. Emphasis is done on certain general therapeutic considerations, namely: to rule out the possibillty of an infectious process and use wide-spectrum antibiotics until certainty is acquired that it is not present; to use every available diagnostic resource until a definite diagnosis Is established

  3. Voice disorder in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena S F C de Macedo

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic disease characterized by progressive tissue damage. In recent decades, novel treatments have greatly extended the life span of SLE patients. This creates a high demand for identifying the overarching symptoms associated with SLE and developing therapies that improve their life quality under chronic care. We hypothesized that SLE patients would present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can reduce life quality, identifying a potential SLE-related dysphonia could be relevant for the appraisal and management of this disease. We measured objective vocal parameters and perceived vocal quality with the GRBAS (Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain scale in SLE patients and compared them to matched healthy controls. SLE patients also filled a questionnaire reporting perceived vocal deficits. SLE patients had significantly lower vocal intensity and harmonics to noise ratio, as well as increased jitter and shimmer. All subjective parameters of the GRBAS scale were significantly abnormal in SLE patients. Additionally, the vast majority of SLE patients (29/36 reported at least one perceived vocal deficit, with the most prevalent deficits being vocal fatigue (19/36 and hoarseness (17/36. Self-reported voice deficits were highly correlated with altered GRBAS scores. Additionally, tissue damage scores in different organ systems correlated with dysphonic symptoms, suggesting that some features of SLE-related dysphonia are due to tissue damage. Our results show that a large fraction of SLE patients suffers from perceivable dysphonia and may benefit from voice therapy in order to improve quality of life.

  4. Distinct proteome pathology of circulating microparticles in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Tanassi, Julia Tanas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is poorly understood but has been linked to defective clearance of subcellular particulate material from the circulation. This study investigates the origin, formation, and specificity of circulating microparticles (MPs) in patien...... generation of MPs may partake in the pathology of SLE and that new diagnostic, monitoring, and treatment strategies targeting these processes may be advantageous....

  5. Crusted scabies in a chid with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurimar C.F. Wanke

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available A child with systemic lupus erythematosus who has been treated with prednisone for three years, developed crusted scabies. Scrapings from lesions revealed Sarcoptes scabiei adult mites mad eggs. The patient died with septicemia and renal failure soon after starting topical 20% sulfur. A marked improvement was observed in the cutaneous lesions.

  6. A Case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Confused with Infective Endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Sibel Serin; Kevser Kutlu Tatar; Tayyibe Saler

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic autoimmune disease resulting from immune system-mediated tissue damage. Clinical findings of SLE can involve skin, kidney, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, serosal membranes, and the hematologic and immune systems. In the differential diagnosis, other connective tissue diseases, infective endocarditis, infections such as viral hepatitis, endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism, sarcoidosis, and some malignant tumors should...

  7. Transancestral mapping and genetic load in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langefeld, Carl D.; Ainsworth, Hannah C.; Graham, Deborah S. Cunninghame; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; Howard, Timothy D.; Ramos, Paula S.; Croker, Jennifer A.; Morris, David L.; Sandling, Johanna K.; Almlof, Jonas Carlsson; Acevedo-Vasquez, Eduardo M.; Alarcon, Graciela S.; Babini, Alejandra M.; Baca, Vicente; Bengtsson, Anders A.; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; Bijl, Marc; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Brunner, Hermine I.; Cardiel, Mario H.; Catoggio, Luis; Cervera, Ricard; Cucho-Venegas, Jorge M.; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapaa; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Da Silva, Berta Martins; de la Rua Figueroa, Inigo; Doria, Andrea; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Endreffy, Emoke; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A.; Fortin, Paul R.; Freedman, Barry I.; Frostegard, Johan; Garcia, Mercedes A.; Garcia de la Torre, Ignacio; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gunnarsson, Iva; Guthridge, Joel M.; Huggins, Jennifer L.; James, Judith A.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Kamen, Diane L.; Karp, David R.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kottyan, Leah C.; Kovacs, Laszlo; Laustrup, Helle; Lauwerys, Bernard R.; Li, Quan-Zhen; Maradiaga-Cecena, Marco A.; Martin, Javier; McCune, Joseph M.; McWilliams, David R.; Merrill, Joan T.; Miranda, Pedro; Moctezuma, Jose F.; Nath, Swapan K.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Orozco, Lorena; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Petri, Michelle; Pineau, Christian A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Pope, Janet; Raj, Prithvi; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D.; Russell, Laurie P.; Sabio, Jose M.; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Scorza, Raffaella; Seldin, Michael F.; Sjowall, Christopher; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Thompson, Susan D.; Toloza, Sergio M. A.; Truedsson, Lennart; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Vila, Luis M.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Weisman, Michael H.; Wither, Joan E.; Bhangale, Tushar; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Rioux, John D.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Ronnblom, Lars; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Tsao, Betty P.; Schanberg, Laura E.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Silverman, Earl D.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Harley, John B.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Graham, Robert R.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with marked gender and ethnic disparities. We report a large transancestral association study of SLE using Immunochip genotype data from 27,574 individuals of European (EA), African (AA) and Hispanic Amerindian (HA) ancestry. We identify 58

  8. Case Report: An atypical case of systemic lupus erythematosus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease that can be a diagnostic conundrum. Case report: We describe a patient who presented with recurrent fleeting exudative and hemorrhagic pleural effusion. It took multiple visits over 3 months and renal biopsy to con rm the diagnosis of SLE.

  9. Echocardiographic evaluation of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, S.; Malik, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac disease occurs in various forms and is a common cause of death in systemic lupus erythematosus. The objective was to detect cardiac abnormalities by transthoracic echocardiography and determine their association in SLE patients. We conducted a transthoracic echocardiographic study in 48 inpatients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical and serological evaluation to confirm the diagnosis of lupus was done in all patients. There were 44 women (91.6%) and 4 men with a mean age of 26 years. Anti ds DNA was positive in 34 patients (68.75%). Transthoracic echocardiography revealed abnormality in 28 patients (58.33%). Of these, 16 patients (57%) had pericardial involvement with variable amount of effusion. Twelve patients (43%) had some valvular involvement and some degree of myocardial systolic dysfunction was found in 12 patients (43%). Only 4 patients (14%) had all three abnormalities. Anti ds DNA was positive in 71% of patients with cardiac abnormalities. Cardiac involvement is common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Serological abnormalities had an association with cardiac abnormalities, and were found to be more prevalent in young patients. (author)

  10. THE LUPUS TRANSIT SURVEY FOR HOT JUPITERS: RESULTS AND LESSONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Sackett, Penny D.; Weldrake, David T. F.; Tingley, Brandon W.; Lewis, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a deep, wide-field transit survey targeting 'Hot Jupiter' planets in the Lupus region of the Galactic plane conducted over 53 nights concentrated in two epochs separated by a year. Using the Australian National University 40-inch telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO), the survey covered a 0.66 deg 2 region close to the Galactic plane (b = 11 0 ) and monitored a total of 110,372 stars (15.0 ≤ V ≤ 22.0). Using difference imaging photometry, 16,134 light curves with a photometric precision of σ < 0.025 mag were obtained. These light curves were searched for transits, and four candidates were detected that displayed low-amplitude variability consistent with a transiting giant planet. Further investigations, including spectral typing and radial velocity measurements for some candidates, revealed that of the four, one is a true planetary companion (Lupus-TR-3), two are blended systems (Lupus-TR-1 and 4), and one is a binary (Lupus-TR-2). The results of this successful survey are instructive for optimizing the observational strategy and follow-up procedure for deep searches for transiting planets, including an upcoming survey using the SkyMapper telescope at SSO.

  11. Micromanagement of lupus autoimmunity by microRNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, N.

    2012-01-01

    De observaties die Nan Shen deed in zijn promotieonderzoek verschaffen nieuwe inzichten in het ontstaan van de auto-immuunziekte systemische lupus erythematodes (SLE). Ook dragen ze bij aan De observaties die Nan Shen deed in zijn promotieonderzoek verschaffen nieuwe inzichten in het ontstaan van de

  12. Integrative medicine for managing the symptoms of lupus nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tae-Young; Jun, Ji Hee; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Integrative medicine is claimed to improve symptoms of lupus nephritis. No systematic reviews have been performed for the application of integrative medicine for lupus nephritis on patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Thus, this review will aim to evaluate the current evidence on the efficacy of integrative medicine for the management of lupus nephritis in patients with SLE. Methods and analyses: The following electronic databases will be searched for studies published from their dates of inception February 2018: Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), as well as 6 Korean medical databases (Korea Med, the Oriental Medicine Advanced Search Integrated System [OASIS], DBpia, the Korean Medical Database [KM base], the Research Information Service System [RISS], and the Korean Studies Information Services System [KISS]), and 1 Chinese medical database (the China National Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI]). Study selection, data extraction, and assessment will be performed independently by 2 researchers. The risk of bias (ROB) will be assessed using the Cochrane ROB tool. Dissemination: This systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated both electronically and in print. The review will be updated to inform and guide healthcare practice and policy. Trial registration number: PROSPERO 2018 CRD42018085205 PMID:29595669

  13. Automated detection of Lupus white matter lesions in MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Roura Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML. In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM, gray matter (GM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection (True Positive Rate (62% and Positive Prediction Value (80% respectively as well as segmentation accuracy (Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration.

  14. Pericarditis as initial clinical manifestation of systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, recurrent multi- systemic ... present with many years' history of nonspecific symptoms that are frequently attributed to other ... the assumed diagnoses of peptic ulcer disease, reflux oesophagitis, gastritis and ... The jugular venous pressure was not elevated. The apex beat ...

  15. The lupus anticoagulant in a population of healthy Nigerian adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. Keywords: lupus coagulant; aPTT; KCT; antiphospholipid syndrome. Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine Vol. 3 (1) 2005: pp. 45-48. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/aipm.v3i1.39077 · AJOL African ...

  16. New developments in lupus-associated antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lockshin, M. D.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is the disease in which the antiphospholipid syndrome was first described more than 20 years ago and which is the most frequent underlying disorder in secondary antiphospholipid syndrome. With respect to pathogenic concepts and treatment, the subjects of this review, no

  17. Paraoxonase 1 activity and genotyping in systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by an enhanced risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Human serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1), an antioxidant enzyme closely associated with high density lipoprotein (HDL), has been implicated in the prevention of low density ...

  18. What People with Lupus Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caucasian women and is also more common in women of Hispanic, Asian, and Native American descent. African American and Hispanic ... percent of the people affected with lupus are women, a group already at increased risk ... Management Strategies Strategies for the prevention and treatment of ...

  19. Treat-to-target in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Mosca, Marta; Bertsias, George

    2014-01-01

    guidance for healthcare providers and administrators. Thus, an initiative to evaluate possible therapeutic targets and develop treat-to-target guidance was believed to be highly appropriate in the management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients as well. Specialists in rheumatology, nephrology...

  20. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  1. Evaluation of TRAF6 in a large multiancestral lupus cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namjou, Bahram; Choi, Chan-Bum; Harley, Isaac T W

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease with significant immune system aberrations resulting from complex heritable genetics as well as environmental factors. We undertook to study the role of TRAF6 as a candidate gene for SLE, since it plays a major role in several...

  2. Pulmonary arterial hypertension as a manifestation of lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, P; Sargent, E N; Boylen, T; Jaramillo, D

    1987-08-01

    We present five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed pulmonary arterial hypertension and cor pulmonale in the course of their disease. The clinical features, as well as, the radiological manifestations of this rare manifestation of SLE are discussed. A vasculitic process is the most likely cause of this complication. Therapy is ineffective and the prognosis is poor.

  3. Autoantibody Profiling in Lupus Patients using Synthetic Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klecka, Martin; Thybo, Christina; Macaubas, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    Autoantibodies to nuclear components of cells (antinuclear antibodies, ANA), including DNA (a-DNA), are widely used in the diagnosis and subtyping of certain autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Despite clinical use over decades, precise, reproducible measurement of a...

  4. Aquaporin-4-autoimmunity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, Nasrin; Jarius, Sven; Laustrup, Helle

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum immunoglobulin G targeting the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in the central nervous system (CNS) is a biomarker for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disease (NMOSD). Co-existence of NMOSD with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) putatively suggests susceptibility...

  5. Circulating surfactant protein D is decreased in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, Silje Vermedal; Voss, Anne; Sorensen, Grith Lykke

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Deficiencies of innate immune molecules like mannan binding lectin (MBL) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Surfactant protein D (SP-D) and MBL belong to the same family of innate immune molecules - the collectins, which share important...

  6. Grasping the Existential Experience of Living with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Janni Lisander

    Dette projekt havde til formål at undersøge eksistentielle vilkår hos kvinder med sygdommen, systemisk lupus erythematosus, herunder hvordan disse vilkår blev erfaret gennem et langvarigt sygdomsforløb. Data blev konstrueret gennem 3 konsekutive, personlige interview sessions på dag 0, efter 6 og...

  7. Transancestral mapping and genetic load in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langefeld, Carl D; Ainsworth, Hannah C; Graham, Deborah S Cunninghame

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with marked gender and ethnic disparities. We report a large transancestral association study of SLE using Immunochip genotype data from 27,574 individuals of European (EA), African (AA) and Hispanic Amerindian (HA) ancestry. We identify...

  8. A Size-Luminosity Relationship for Protoplanetary Disks in Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Marie; Andrews, Sean

    2018-01-01

    The sizes of the 340 GHz continuum emission from 56 protoplanetary disks in the Lupus star-forming region were measured by modeling their ALMA visibility profiles. We describe the mechanism for these measurements and some preliminary results regarding the correlation between the continuum luminosities and sizes.

  9. Gastrointestinal manifestation's history in the systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Chalem, Philippe; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed the history of the gastrointestinal manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus since century XIX to our days, making a review of every organ and system involved, with special emphasis in gastropathy, enteritis, ileitis, malabsorption syndrome vasculitis bowel vasculopathy, mesenteric thrombosis, pancreatitis, ascites, peritonitis autoimmune hepatitis and more

  10. Tofacitinib Ameliorates Murine Lupus and Its Associated Vascular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Yasuko; Smith, Carolyne K; Blanco, Luz; Zhao, Wenpu; Brooks, Stephen R; Thacker, Seth G; Abdalrahman, Zarzour; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Tsai, Wanxia L; Trier, Anna M; Nunez, Leti; Mast, Laurel; Hoffmann, Victoria; Remaley, Alan T; O'Shea, John J; Kaplan, Mariana J; Gadina, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses contributes to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its associated premature vascular damage. No drug to date targets both systemic inflammatory disease and the cardiovascular complications of SLE. Tofacitinib is a JAK inhibitor that blocks signaling downstream of multiple cytokines implicated in lupus pathogenesis. While clinical trials have shown that tofacitinib exhibits significant clinical efficacy in various autoimmune diseases, its role in SLE and the associated vascular pathology remains to be characterized. MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice were administered tofacitinib or vehicle by gavage for 6 weeks (therapeutic arm) or 8 weeks (preventive arm). Nephritis, skin inflammation, serum levels of autoantibodies and cytokines, mononuclear cell phenotype and gene expression, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) release, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and endothelial differentiation were compared in treated and untreated mice. Treatment with tofacitinib led to significant improvement in measures of disease activity, including nephritis, skin inflammation, and autoantibody production. In addition, tofacitinib treatment reduced serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and interferon responses in splenocytes and kidney tissue. Tofacitinib also modulated the formation of NETs and significantly increased endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and endothelial differentiation. The drug was effective in both preventive and therapeutic strategies. Tofacitinib modulates the innate and adaptive immune responses, ameliorates murine lupus, and improves vascular function. These results indicate that JAK inhibitors have the potential to be beneficial in SLE and its associated vascular damage. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Evidence-based treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk of congenital heart block in infants. ↓ Number and severity of lupus flares. TG = triglycerides; VLDL = very lowdensity lipoproteins; TC = total cholesterol; .... immunosuppressive therapy, whereas ischaemic events may require anticoagulation. Moreover, SLE is a wellknown risk factor for depres sion, anxiety and fatigue ...

  12. Prevalence and pattern of Lupus erythematosus cell positivity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence and pattern of lupus erythematosus (LE) cell positivity in diseases in Ile-Ife, Osun state was carried out between January 1999 and June 2004 (5½ years). A total of 96 patients with different diseases were screened for LE cell using standard techniques. Of this number, 63 (65.6%) were females and 33 ...

  13. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Almeida

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, with episodic course. It is characterized by periods of relative quiescence and periods of exacerbations which may involve any organ or system. About a young woman with a clinical delirium state, we revised the clinical neuropsychiatric features of SLE in the literature.

  14. Renal cell apoptosis in human lupus nephritis: a histological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, M; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, C B

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear autoantigens from apoptotic cells are believed to drive the immunological response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Conflicting data exist as to the possible renal origin of apoptotic cells in SLE patients with nephritis. We assessed the level of renal cell apoptosis in kidney...

  15. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a young woman with systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage (DAH) is rarely reported complication of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). A young woman diagnosed SLE, with a previously normal plain chest radiograph, developed acute onset cough, dyspnoea and hemoptysis. The repeat urgent chest radiograph revealed alveolar opacities. The triad ...

  16. Pulmonary arterial hypertension as a manifestation of lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.; Jaramillo, D.

    1987-01-01

    We present five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed pulmonary arterial hypertension and cor pulmonale in the course of their disease. The clinical features, as well as, the radiological manifestations of this rare manifestation of SLE are discussed. A vasculitic process is the most likely cause of this complication. Therapy is ineffective and the prognosis is poor. (orig.) [de

  17. Treat-to-target in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosca, Marta; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-01-01

    on May 8, 2012 to discuss whether a treat-to-target approach could be applied in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (T2T/SLE), define a research agenda, and establish a plan for moving forward. In the present paper, observations raised at the meeting and literature data on potential...

  18. Serious Infections among Adult Medicaid Beneficiaries with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Candace H.; Hiraki, Linda T.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Marty, Francisco M.; Franklin, Jessica M.; Kim, Seoyoung C.; Costenbader, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective While serious infections are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the epidemiology in a nationwide cohort of SLE and lupus nephritis (LN) patients has not been examined. Methods Using the Medicaid Analytic eXtract (MAX) database, 2000-2006, we identified patients 18-64 years with SLE and a subset with LN. We ascertained hospitalized serious infections using validated algorithms, and 30-day mortality rates. We used Poisson regression to calculate infection incidence rates (IR), and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for first infection, adjusted for sociodemographics, medication use, and a SLE-specific risk adjustment index. Results We identified 33,565 patients with SLE and 7,113 with LN. There were 9,078 serious infections in 5,078 SLE patients and 3,494 infections in 1,825 LN patients. The infection IR per 100 person-years was 10.8 in SLE and 23.9 in LN. In adjusted models, in SLE, we observed increased risks of infection among males compared to females (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.20-1.47), in Blacks compared to Whites (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.21), and glucocorticoid users (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.43-1.61) and immunosuppressive users (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20) compared with non-users. Hydroxychloroquine users had a reduced risk of infection compared to non-users (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.68-0.77). The 30-day mortality rate per 1,000 person-years among those hospitalized with infections was 21.4 in SLE and 38.7 in LN. Conclusion In this diverse, nationwide cohort of SLE patients, we observed a substantial burden of serious infections with many subsequent deaths. PMID:25772621

  19. Correlation between the Modified Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 and the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, J O; Corrente, J E; Saad-Magalhães, C

    2016-11-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess Modified Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM) disease activity correlation in addition to their respective correlation to Pediatric Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) Damage Index (Ped-SDI), in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE). Methods The activity indices were scored retrospectively and summarized by adjusted means during follow-up. The Ped-SDI was scored during the last visit for those with more than six months follow-up. Pearson correlation between the Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM, as well as Spearman correlations between the Modified SLEDAI-2K, ECLAM, and Ped-SDI were calculated. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated for both activity indices discriminating damage measured by Ped-SDI. Results Thirty-seven patients with mean age at diagnosis 11 ± 2.9 years and mean follow-up time 3.2 ± 2.4 years were studied. The Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM adjusted means were highly correlated ( r = 0.78, p  0.7, p < 0.001), but Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM correlation with Ped-SDI was only moderate. ROC analysis discriminant performance for both activity indices resulted in area under curve (AUC) of 0.74 and 0.73 for Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM, respectively. Conclusion The high correlation found between the Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM adjusted means indicated that both tools can be equally useful for longitudinal estimates of JSLE activity.

  20. Control of lupus nephritis by changes of gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Qinghui; Zhang, Husen; Liao, Xiaofeng; Lin, Kaisen; Liu, Hualan; Edwards, Michael R; Ahmed, S Ansar; Yuan, Ruoxi; Li, Liwu; Cecere, Thomas E; Branson, David B; Kirby, Jay L; Goswami, Poorna; Leeth, Caroline M; Read, Kaitlin A; Oestreich, Kenneth J; Vieson, Miranda D; Reilly, Christopher M; Luo, Xin M

    2017-07-11

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, characterized by persistent inflammation, is a complex autoimmune disorder with no known cure. Immunosuppressants used in treatment put patients at a higher risk of infections. New knowledge of disease modulators, such as symbiotic bacteria, can enable fine-tuning of parts of the immune system, rather than suppressing it altogether. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota promotes autoimmune disorders that damage extraintestinal organs. Here we report a role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction in lupus. Using a classical model of lupus nephritis, MRL/lpr, we found a marked depletion of Lactobacillales in the gut microbiota. Increasing Lactobacillales in the gut improved renal function of these mice and prolonged their survival. We used a mixture of 5 Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus oris, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus gasseri), but L. reuteri and an uncultured Lactobacillus sp. accounted for most of the observed effects. Further studies revealed that MRL/lpr mice possessed a "leaky" gut, which was reversed by increased Lactobacillus colonization. Lactobacillus treatment contributed to an anti-inflammatory environment by decreasing IL-6 and increasing IL-10 production in the gut. In the circulation, Lactobacillus treatment increased IL-10 and decreased IgG2a that is considered to be a major immune deposit in the kidney of MRL/lpr mice. Inside the kidney, Lactobacillus treatment also skewed the Treg-Th17 balance towards a Treg phenotype. These beneficial effects were present in female and castrated male mice, but not in intact males, suggesting that the gut microbiota controls lupus nephritis in a sex hormone-dependent manner. This work demonstrates essential mechanisms on how changes of the gut microbiota regulate lupus-associated immune responses in mice. Future studies are warranted to determine if these results can be replicated in human subjects.

  1. Value of HLA-DR genotype in systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhili; Zhang, Pingan; Tong, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 allele polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, but the results of these previous studies have been inconsistent. The purpose of the present study was to systematically summarize and explore whether specific HLA-DRB1 alleles confer susceptibility or resistance to SLE and lupus nephritis. This review was guided by the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) approach. A comprehensive search was made for articles from PubMed, Medline, Elsevier Science, Springer Link and Cochrane Library database. A total of 25 case-control studies on the relationship between gene polymorphism of HLA-DRB l and SLE were performed and data were analyzed and processed using Review Manager 5.2 and Stata 11.0. At the allelic level, HLA-DR4, DR11 and DR14 were identified as protective factors for SLE (0.79 [0.69,0.91], P  0.05). DR4 and 11 (OR, 0.55 [0.39, 0.79], P  0.05; 0.90 [0.64, 1.27], P > 0.05; 0.61 [0.36, 1.03], P > 0.05, respectively) were not statistically significant between the lupus nephritis and control groups. The HLA-DR4, DR11, DR14 alleles might be protective factors for SLE and HLA-DR3, DR9, DR15 were potent risk factors. In addition, HLA-DR4 and DR11 alleles might be protective factors for lupus nephritis and DR3 and DR15 suggest a risk role. These results proved that HLA-DR3, DR15, DR4 and DR11 might be identified as predictors for lupus nephritis and SLE. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Systemic lupus erythaematosus in a multiethnic US cohort (LUMINA) LIII: disease expression and outcome in acute onset lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, A M; Vilá, L M; Reveille, J D; Alarcón, G S

    2008-04-01

    To determine the features associated with acute onset systemic lupus erythaematosus (SLE). A total of 631 SLE patients from LUMINA (for "lupus in minority populations: nature vs nurture"), a multiethnic (Hispanics, African-Americans and Caucasians) cohort, were studied. Acute disease onset was defined as the accrual of > or = 4 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for the classification of SLE in < or = 4 weeks. Socioeconomic demographic features, clinical manifestations, disease activity, damage accrual, mortality, autoantibodies, HLA class II and FCGR alleles, behavioural/psychological variables were compared between patients with acute and insidious disease onset by univariable (chi(2) and Student t test) and multivariable (stepwise logistic regression) analyses. A total of 94 (15%) patients had acute disease onset. In the multivariable analysis, patients with acute onset lupus had more renal involvement (odds ratio (OR) = 1.845, 95% CI 1.076-3.162; p = 0.026) and higher disease activity (OR = 1.057, 95% CI 1.005-1.112; p = 0.030). By contrast, age (OR = 0.976, 95% CI 0.956-0.997; p = 0.025), education (OR = 0.901, 95% CI 0.827-0.983, p = 0.019), health insurance (OR = 0.423, 95% CI 0.249-0.718; p = 0.001) and skin involvement (OR = 0.346, 95% CI 0.142-0.843; p = 0.019) were negatively associated with acute onset lupus. No differences were found regarding the serological, genetic and behavioural/psychological features; this was also the case for damage accrual and mortality. Patients with acute onset lupus seem to be younger, have a lower socio-economic status and display more severe disease in terms of clinical manifestations and disease activity. However, intermediate (damage) and long-term (mortality) outcomes appear not to be influenced by the type of disease onset in SLE.

  3. SLE disease patterns in a Danish population-based lupus cohort: an 8-year prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustrup, H; Voss, A; Green, A

    2009-01-01

    In 1995 all systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in the county of Funen were retrieved from four separate and independent sources as part of an 8-year prospective study to determine the pattern of disease activity and damage accumulation in a community based lupus cohort of predominantly...... Scandinavian ancestry. Incident cases were subsequently identified by surveillance of these sources. Established and new cases underwent annual, structured interviews, clinical examination and blood sampling. The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Diseases Activity Index SLEDAI and Systemic Lupus International...

  4. Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in a patient with antidomain I antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Joris; Mohamed, Shirine; Revuz, Sabine; de Maistre, Emmanuel; de Laat, Bas; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Zuily, Stéphane; Lévy, Bruno; Regnault, Véronique; Wahl, Denis

    2016-07-01

    Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by the association of acquired factor II deficiency and lupus anticoagulant. Contrary to classical antiphospholipid syndrome, it may cause severe life-threatening bleeding (89% of published cases). We report a patient, positive for antidomain I antibodies, with initially primary lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome without previous clinical manifestation or underlying systemic disease. Five years later, he experienced the first systemic lupus erythematous flare. Within a few days, catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome was diagnosed with heart, liver and kidney involvement. The patient recovered under pulse steroids, intravenous heparin and intravenous immunoglobulins.

  5. A case of "refractory" lupus erythematosus profundus responsive to rituximab [case report].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McArdle, Adrian

    2012-02-01

    Lupus erythematosus profundus is a rare complication of systemic lupus erythematosus characterized by the presence of deep, tender subcutaneous nodules. A 22-year-old African-American female with extensive lupus profundus resistant to conventional therapies was treated with two infusions of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab, at a dosage of 1,000 mg each. The patient demonstrated a remarkable clinical response as indicated by the disappearance of the nodules. B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab used alone or in combination with other therapies may be a viable option in patients with lupus profundus refractory to current therapies.

  6. Management of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight CL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Caroline L Knight, Catherine Nelson-Piercy Division of Women’s Health, Women’s Health Academic Centre, King’s College London and King’s Health Partners, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease predominantly affecting women, particularly those of childbearing age. SLE provides challenges in the prepregnancy, antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods for these women, and for the medical, obstetric, and midwifery teams who provide their care. As with many medical conditions in pregnancy, the best maternal and fetal–neonatal outcomes are obtained with a planned pregnancy and a cohesive multidisciplinary approach. Effective prepregnancy risk assessment and counseling includes exploration of factors for poor pregnancy outcome, discussion of risks, and appropriate planning for pregnancy, with consideration of discussion of relative contraindications to pregnancy. In pregnancy, early referral for hospital-coordinated care, involvement of obstetricians and rheumatologists (and other specialists as required, an individual management plan, regular reviews, and early recognition of flares and complications are all important. Women are at risk of lupus flares, worsening renal impairment, onset of or worsening hypertension, preeclampsia, and/or venous thromboembolism, and miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, and/or neonatal lupus syndrome (congenital heart block or neonatal lupus erythematosus. A cesarean section may be required in certain obstetric contexts (such as urgent preterm delivery for maternal and/or fetal well-being, but vaginal birth should be the aim for the majority of women. Postnatally, an ongoing individual management plan remains important, with neonatal management where necessary and rheumatology follow-up. This article explores the challenges at each stage of pregnancy, discusses the effect of SLE on pregnancy and

  7. Cognitive functions and autoantibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bogaczewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autoantibodies may occur in the course of various diseases. In the case of systemic lupus erythematosus the presence of specific autoantibodies is included in the classification criteria of the disease. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the presence of the serologic markers of systemic lupus erythematosus, i.e. anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm and anticardiolipin antibodies of the class IgM and IgG are linked with the results of neuropsychological tests evaluating selected cognitive functions in patients without overt neuropsychiatric lupus and without antiphospholipid syndrome. Material and methods: The study included 22 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. For the assessment of anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm and anticardiolipin antibodies the immunoenzymatic method was used. For neuropsychological estimation of the selected cognitive functions the attention switching test and the choice reaction time were applied, in which the results are expressed as the average delay i.e. mean correct latency, using the computer-based Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB. Results: The results of attention switching test in patients with anti-Sm antibodies were lower, but not significantly different from those obtained by the patients without such antibodies: 75.0 (73.12–88.12 vs. 92.5 (85–95. Choice reaction time was significantly longer in patients with anti-Sm antibodies in comparison to the patients without antiSm antibodies: 614.9 (520.6–740.8 vs. 476.7 (396.6–540 (p = 0.01. No significant difference was demonstrated in the results of attention switching test and choice reaction time with regard to the presence of anti-dsDNA antibodies. The results of attention switching test and choice reaction time were not different between the groups of patients with and without anticardiolipin antibodies in the IgM and IgG class. Conclusions: Anti-Sm antibodies seem to contribute to

  8. Early Lupus Project - A multicentre Italian study on systemic lupus erythematosus of recent onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, G D; Prevete, I; Piga, M; Iuliano, A; Bettio, S; Bortoluzzi, A; Coladonato, L; Tani, C; Spinelli, F R; Fineschi, I; Mathieu, A

    2015-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a high degree of variability at onset that is problematic for a correct and prompt diagnosis. We undertook this project with the purpose of collecting an inception cohort of Italian patients with recent-onset SLE, in order to obtain information on the main clinical and serological characteristics at the beginning of the disease. In this first report we describe the characteristics of this cohort at study entry. All patients with a diagnosis of SLE (1997 ACR criteria) and a disease duration less than 12 months were consecutively enrolled between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013 in a multicentre prospective study. Information on clinical and serological characteristics at study entry and then every six months was collected into a specific electronic database. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Openstat program. Among 122 patients enrolled (103 F) 94.3% were Caucasians. Mean age (SD) of patients at study entry was 37.3 (14.3) years, mean age at disease onset was 34.8 (14.3) years, mean age at diagnosis was 36.9 (14.3) years, and mean disease duration was 2.9 (3.9) months. The frequency of the manifestations included in the 1997 ACR criteria was as follows: ANA 97.5%, immunologic disorders (anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, antiphospholipid antibodies) 85.2%, arthritis 61.8%, haematologic disorders 55.7%, malar rash 31.1%, photosensitivity 29.5%, serositis 27%, renal disorders 27%, oral/nasal ulcers 11.5%, neurologic disorders 8.2%, and discoid rash 5.7%. The cumulative frequency of mucocutaneous symptoms was 77.8%. At enrolment, autoantibody frequency was: ANA 100%, anti-dsDNA 83.6%, anti-SSA 28%, anticardiolipin 24.5%, anti-nRNP 20.4%, anti-beta2GPI 17.2%, lupus anticoagulant 16.3%, anti-Sm 16%, and anti-SSB 13.1%. In this paper we describe the main clinical and serological characteristics of an Italian inception cohort of patients with recent-onset SLE. At disease onset, mucocutaneous

  9. A Longitudinal Analysis of Outcomes of Lupus Nephritis in an International Inception Cohort Using a Multistate Model Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Su, Li; Urowitz, Murray B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study bidirectional change and predictors of change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and proteinuria in lupus nephritis (LN) using a multistate modeling approach. METHODS: Patients in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics inception cohort were classifie...

  10. Shrinking lung syndrome complicating pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Natalie S. [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Stevens, Anne M. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle, WA (United States); Iyer, Ramesh S. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) can affect the lungs and pleura, usually manifesting with pleural effusions or diffuse parenchymal disease. A rare manifestation of SLE is shrinking lung syndrome, a severe restrictive respiratory disorder. While pleuropulmonary complications of pediatric SLE are common, shrinking lung syndrome is exceedingly rare in children. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl previously diagnosed with lupus, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion and restrictive pulmonary physiology. Her chest radiographs on presentation demonstrated low lung volumes, and CT showed neither pleural nor parenchymal disease. Fluoroscopy demonstrated poor diaphragmatic excursion. While shrinking lung syndrome is described and studied in adults, there is only sparse reference to shrinking lung syndrome in children. (orig.)

  11. Mitral Valve Surgery in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, Manouchehr; Ghorbani, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Hamid; Majidi, Masoud; Beheshti, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is the common cardiac manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with a tendency for mitral valve regurgitation. In this study we report a case of mitral valve replacement for mitral stenosis caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis in the setting of SLE. In addition, we provide a systematic review of the literature on mitral valve surgery in the presence of Libman-Sacks endocarditis because its challenge on surgical options continues. Surgical decision depends on structural involvement of mitral valve and presence of active lupus nephritis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Review of the literature has also shown that outcome is good in most SLE patients who have undergone valvular surgery, but association of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with SLE has negative impact on the outcome. PMID:25401131

  12. MASTICATORY MUSCLE MYOSITIS IN A GRAY WOLF (CANIS LUPUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Marc; Glass, Eric N; Castro, Fernando A; Miller, Andrew D; de Lahunta, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    A 10-yr-old male, neutered gray wolf ( Canis lupus ) was presented for atrophy of the temporalis and masseter muscles. Clinical signs and magnetic resonance imaging were consistent with a myopathy. Positive serology for antibody titers directed against Type 2M myofibers, and the observation of a mixed mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate along with eosinophils and neutrophils within the temporalis muscle, were diagnostic for masticatory muscle myositis. Importantly, protozoal myositis was excluded based on other clinicopathologic data. The case highlights the potential for immune-mediated polymyositis in canids other than the domesticated dog ( Canis lupus familaris). Additionally, awareness of a diet in which raw meat is used should prompt a thorough investigation for an underlying infectious myositis in the gray wolf.

  13. Echolalia as a novel manifestation of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapor, M; Murphy, F T; Enzenauer, R

    2001-01-01

    "That tongue of yours, by which I have been tricked, shall have its power curtailed and enjoy the briefest use of speech." With these words, Hera, of Greek mythology, deprived the nymph Echo of spontaneous speech, constraining her instead to merely repeating the words of others. Echolalia, which derives from the word "echo," is disordered speech in which an individual persistently repeats what is heard. Echolalia has been described in patients with a number of neuropsychiatric illnesses including autism and Tourette's syndrome. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is a heterogeneous disease with protean manifestations that may occur in approximately 25% to 50% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although the most common manifestations include cognitive dysfunction (50%) and seizures (20%), NPSLE may also present as peripheral neuropathy (15%), psychosis (10%), or other central nervous system abnormalities. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with SLE and echolalia.

  14. Shrinking lung syndrome complicating pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Natalie S.; Stevens, Anne M.; Iyer, Ramesh S.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) can affect the lungs and pleura, usually manifesting with pleural effusions or diffuse parenchymal disease. A rare manifestation of SLE is shrinking lung syndrome, a severe restrictive respiratory disorder. While pleuropulmonary complications of pediatric SLE are common, shrinking lung syndrome is exceedingly rare in children. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl previously diagnosed with lupus, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion and restrictive pulmonary physiology. Her chest radiographs on presentation demonstrated low lung volumes, and CT showed neither pleural nor parenchymal disease. Fluoroscopy demonstrated poor diaphragmatic excursion. While shrinking lung syndrome is described and studied in adults, there is only sparse reference to shrinking lung syndrome in children. (orig.)

  15. Parvovirus B19 induced lupus-like syndrome with nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Elodie; Rihova, Zuzana; Cmejla, Radek; Decleire, Pierre-Yves; Langen, Corinne

    2016-12-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old man who developed an acute illness with fever, arthralgia and nephritic syndrome. Antinuclear antibodies were slightly positive and complement levels were low. Renal biopsy showed exudative diffuse proliferative endocapillary glomerulonephritis with diffuse immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA, IgM) and complement deposition (C3d, C4d, C1q) on immunofluorescence. The patient was first treated with corticosteroids and mycophenolate mofetil for suspected lupus with WHO class IV glomerulonephritis. The diagnosis was questioned and a diagnosis of parvovirus B19-associated nephritis was made based on elevation of serum IgM antibodies for parvovirus B19 and detection of parvovirus B19 DNA on renal biopsy. The immunosuppressive treatment was stopped and progressive spontaneous regression of clinical and laboratory abnormalities was observed. We conclude that human parvovirus B19 infection should be considered as a cause of lupus-like symptomatology and acute glomerulonephritis.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, A; Robaina, R; Pérez, G; Cairoli, E

    2016-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive destructive soft tissue infection with high mortality. Streptococcus pneumoniae as etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is extremely unusual. The increased susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is probably a multifactorial phenomenon. We report a case of a patient, a 36-year-old Caucasian female with 8-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus who presented a fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis. The role of computed tomography and the high performance of blood cultures for isolation of the causative microorganism are emphasized. Once diagnosis is suspected, empiric antibiotic treatment must be prescribed and prompt surgical exploration is mandatory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Inmunodeficiencias en Lupus Eritematoso Sistémico

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Beato, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Cada vez hay más evidencias de que las enfermedades autoinmunes sistémicas como el lupus eritematoso sistémico (LES) y las inmunodeficiencias no son enfermedades separadas. El objetivo de este estudio es determinar si la inmunodeficiencia es una constante en el LES, así como determinar la relación con el tratamiento inmunosupresor, y el tipo y gravedad de las infecciones. Otro Grado en Medicina

  18. Radiodiagnosis of pulmonary alterations in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenetskij, M.S.; Lezova, T.F.; Kajzerman, I.A.; Sinyachenko, O.V.; Dyadyk, A.I.; Nikolenko, Yu.I.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray examination was carried out in 170 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Certain parameters of specific immunity were studied in 60 of them, while X-ray data were compared with morphological findings on autopsy in 20 cases. A tendency toward escalation of specific cell and humoral parameters was discovered in pulmonary lesion, predetermined by vasculitis and perivasculitis, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic alterations in the interstitial tissue

  19. Pharmacokinetic modeling of therapies for systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Sherwin, Catherine MT; Yu, Tian; Yellepeddi, Venkata K; Brunner, Hermine I; Vinks, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of different types of therapies in treating autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), there is a need to utilize pharmacokinetic (PK) strategies to optimize the clinical outcome of these treatments. Various PK analysis approaches, including population PK modeling and physiologically based PK modeling, have been used to evaluate drug PK characteristics and population variability or to predict drug PK profiles in a mechanistic manner. This review ou...

  20. A quality-of-life study of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalla, A; García-Doval, I; Peón, G; de la Torre, C

    2013-11-01

    The study of quality of life in patients with skin disorders has become more important in recent decades. In the case of lupus erythematosus, most quality-of-life studies have focused on the systemic form of the disease, with less attention being paid to the cutaneous form. The main objective of this study was to evaluate quality of life in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) using a dermatology-specific questionnaire: the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Our secondary objective was to investigate associations between DLQI scores and other aspects of the disease. Thirty-six patients with CLE completed the DLQI questionnaire. Other factors assessed were disease severity (measured using the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index), time since diagnosis, body surface area affected, previous and current treatments, and the presence of criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). According to the DLQI, CLE had a moderate, very large, or extremely large effect on quality of life in 50% of the patients analyzed (18/36). No significant associations were found between DLQI scores and disease severity, time since diagnosis, body surface area affected, number, type, or duration of pharmacologic treatments, or the presence or absence of SLE criteria. CLE has a significant and lasting effect on patient quality of life. This effect is probably primarily due to multiple factors, including the chronic nature of the disease, the visibility of the lesions, and the fact that they can cause disfigurement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Infodemiology of systemic lupus erythematous using Google Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, M; Sciascia, S

    2017-07-01

    Objective People affected by chronic rheumatic conditions, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), frequently rely on the Internet and search engines to look for terms related to their disease and its possible causes, symptoms and treatments. 'Infodemiology' and 'infoveillance' are two recent terms created to describe a new developing approach for public health, based on Big Data monitoring and data mining. In this study, we aim to investigate trends of Internet research linked to SLE and symptoms associated with the disease, applying a Big Data monitoring approach. Methods We analysed the large amount of data generated by Google Trends, considering 'lupus', 'relapse' and 'fatigue' in a 10-year web-based research. Google Trends automatically normalized data for the overall number of searches, and presented them as relative search volumes, in order to compare variations of different search terms across regions and periods. The Menn-Kendall test was used to evaluate the overall seasonal trend of each search term and possible correlation between search terms. Results We observed a seasonality for Google search volumes for lupus-related terms. In the Northern hemisphere, relative search volumes for 'lupus' were correlated with 'relapse' (τ = 0.85; p = 0.019) and with fatigue (τ = 0.82; p = 0.003), whereas in the Southern hemisphere we observed a significant correlation between 'fatigue' and 'relapse' (τ = 0.85; p = 0.018). Similarly, a significant correlation between 'fatigue' and 'relapse' (τ = 0.70; p < 0.001) was seen also in the Northern hemisphere. Conclusion Despite the intrinsic limitations of this approach, Internet-acquired data might represent a real-time surveillance tool and an alert for healthcare systems in order to plan the most appropriate resources in specific moments with higher disease burden.

  2. Molecular pathology of systemic lupus erythematosus in Asians

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Hwa Chia

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease affecting various parts of the body. Polymorphisms in genes involved in toll-like receptor (TLR)/interferon (IFN) signalling pathways have been reported previously to be associated with SLE in many populations. This study aimed to investigate the role of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within TNFAIP3 (rs2230936 and rs3757173), STAT4 (rs7574865, rs10168266, and rs7601754), and IRF5 (rs4728142 and rs729302), that...

  3. Neonatal lupus erythematosus in a Nigerian infant | Ezeudu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of neonatal lupus erythematosus in a six-week-old Nigerian infant seen at NAUTH, Nnewi. The objective of this report is to highlight the existence of this very rare condition in infants. A 6-week-old female infant presented at the paediatric unit of our facility with a history of a pre-auricular skin eruptions of five ...

  4. Denning behaviour of non-gravid wolves, Canis lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L.D.; Phillips, M.K.; Smith, D.W.; Kreeger, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    Wild wolves (Canis lupus) that had produced pups in earlier years but were not currently pregnant, and ovariectomized captive wolves, dug dens during and after the whelping season even though they produced no pups. These observations suggest that den digging is not a function of pregnancy or of ovarian estrogen or progesterone. We hypothesize that increasing prolactin in spring elicits or mediates den-digging behavior.

  5. Lupus enteritis: from clinical findings to therapeutic management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Lupus enteritis is a rare and poorly understood cause of abdominal pain in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we report a series of 7 new patients with this rare condition who were referred to French tertiary care centers and perform a systematic literature review of SLE cases fulfilling the revised ACR criteria, with evidence for small bowel involvement, excluding those with infectious enteritis. We describe the characteristics of 143 previously published and 7 new cases. Clinical symptoms mostly included abdominal pain (97%), vomiting (42%), diarrhea (32%) and fever (20%). Laboratory features mostly reflected lupus activity: low complement levels (88%), anemia (52%), leukocytopenia or lymphocytopenia (40%) and thrombocytopenia (21%). Median CRP level was 2.0 mg/dL (range 0–8.2 mg/dL). Proteinuria was present in 47% of cases. Imaging studies revealed bowel wall edema (95%), ascites (78%), the characteristic target sign (71%), mesenteric abnormalities (71%) and bowel dilatation (24%). Only 9 patients (6%) had histologically confirmed vasculitis. All patients received corticosteroids as a first-line therapy, with additional immunosuppressants administered either from the initial episode or only in case of relapse (recurrence rate: 25%). Seven percent developed intestinal necrosis or perforation, yielding a mortality rate of 2.7%. Altogether, lupus enteritis is a poorly known cause of abdominal pain in SLE patients, with distinct clinical and therapeutic features. The disease may evolve to intestinal necrosis and perforation if untreated. Adding with this an excellent steroid responsiveness, timely diagnosis becomes primordial for the adequate management of this rare entity. PMID:23642042

  6. ALMA Survey of Lupus Protoplanetary Disks. II. Gas Disk Radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansdell, M.; Williams, J. P.; Trapman, L.; van Terwisga, S. E.; Facchini, S.; Manara, C. F.; van der Marel, N.; Miotello, A.; Tazzari, M.; Hogerheijde, M.; Guidi, G.; Testi, L.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2018-05-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-Millimeter Array (ALMA) Band 6 observations of a complete sample of protoplanetary disks in the young (∼1–3 Myr) Lupus star-forming region, covering the 1.33 mm continuum and the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 2–1 lines. The spatial resolution is ∼0.″25 with a medium 3σ continuum sensitivity of 0.30 mJy, corresponding to M dust ∼ 0.2 M ⊕. We apply Keplerian masking to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios of our 12CO zero-moment maps, enabling measurements of gas disk radii for 22 Lupus disks; we find that gas disks are universally larger than millimeter dust disks by a factor of two on average, likely due to a combination of the optically thick gas emission and the growth and inward drift of the dust. Using the gas disk radii, we calculate the dimensionless viscosity parameter, α visc, finding a broad distribution and no correlations with other disk or stellar parameters, suggesting that viscous processes have not yet established quasi-steady states in Lupus disks. By combining our 1.33 mm continuum fluxes with our previous 890 μm continuum observations, we also calculate the millimeter spectral index, α mm, for 70 Lupus disks; we find an anticorrelation between α mm and millimeter flux for low-mass disks (M dust ≲ 5), followed by a flattening as disks approach α mm ≈ 2, which could indicate faster grain growth in higher-mass disks, but may also reflect their larger optically thick components. In sum, this work demonstrates the continuous stream of new insights into disk evolution and planet formation that can be gleaned from unbiased ALMA disk surveys.

  7. Computerized tomography data on CNS affection in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, M.M.; Bliznyuk, O.I.; Todua, F.I.; Tumanova, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain was employed in 40 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Clinical cerebral pathology was obvious in 30 and absent in 10 patients. By CT cerebral symptoms were divided of 4 groups. Clinical symptom complexes of CNS defects and SLE were reflected on definite CT images correlated with focal damage to the brain. CT picture of enlarged subarachnoid space, ventricles and basal cisterns can be observed in SLE patients without neurological symptoms. This indicated likely subclinical cerebral affection

  8. Tuberculoid leprosy masquerading as systemic lupus erythematosus: an interesting observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawar, Vijay; Kumavat, Shrikant; Pawar, Manoj; Desai, Dipti

    2017-09-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infectious multisystem disease that may present with protean manifestations. It mimics many systemic and dermatological disorders. Here we report a case in which an elderly female presented with malar rash, intermittent fever, and arthralgia. Her diagnosis was significantly delayed due to a close clinical resemblance to systemic lupus erythematosus. It is important to be aware of such manifestations of leprosy and improve awareness of it in clinicians to avoid misdiagnosis and delay in treatment.

  9. Chronic hydroxychloroquine improves endothelial dysfunction and protects kidney in a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Guzmán, Manuel; Jiménez, Rosario; Romero, Miguel; Sánchez, Manuel; Zarzuelo, María José; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; O'Valle, Francisco; López-Farré, Antonio José; Algieri, Francesca; Gálvez, Julio; Pérez-Vizcaino, Francisco; Sabio, José Mario; Duarte, Juan

    2014-08-01

    Hydroxychloroquine has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus. Hydroxychloroquine-treated lupus patients showed a lower incidence of thromboembolic disease. Endothelial dysfunction, the earliest indicator of the development of cardiovascular disease, is present in lupus. Whether hydroxychloroquine improves endothelial function in lupus is not clear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of hydroxychloroquine on hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and renal injury in a female mouse model of lupus. NZBWF1 (lupus) and NZW/LacJ (control) mice were treated with hydroxychloroquine 10 mg/kg per day by oral gavage, or with tempol and apocynin in the drinking water, for 5 weeks. Hydroxychloroquine treatment did not alter lupus disease activity (assessed by plasma double-stranded DNA autoantibodies) but prevented hypertension, cardiac and renal hypertrophy, proteinuria, and renal injury in lupus mice. Aortae from lupus mice showed reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilator responses to acetylcholine and enhanced contraction to phenylephrine, which were normalized by hydroxychloroquine or antioxidant treatments. No differences among all experimental groups were found in both the relaxant responses to acetylcholine and the contractile responses to phenylephrine in rings incubated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. Vascular reactive oxygen species content and mRNA levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits NOX-1 and p47(phox) were increased in lupus mice and reduced by hydroxychloroquine or antioxidants. Chronic hydroxychloroquine treatment reduced hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and organ damage in severe lupus mice, despite the persistent elevation of anti-double-stranded DNA, suggesting the involvement of new additional mechanisms to improve cardiovascular complications. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Pediatric lupus nephritis presenting with terminal renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besouw, Martine T P; Vande Walle, Johan G; Ilias, Mohamad I; Raes, Ann M; Prytula, Agnieszka A; Claeys, Lieve; Dehoorne, Jo L

    2016-12-01

    A 12-year-old Congolese girl presented with acute renal failure, edema, hypertension, hemoptysis, hematuria, and proteinuria after a history of throat infection. Renal ultrasound showed kidneys of normal size, with increased echogenicity of the cortical parenchyma and decreased corticomedullary differentiation. Other additional investigations showed pancytopenia with decreased complement (low C3 and C4). Antinuclear antibodies were strongly positive, including anti-double stranded DNA. Renal biopsy confirmed severe grade IV lupus nephritis. She was treated with high-dose steroids, mycophenolate mofetil and hydroxychloroquine, in addition to hemodialysis. After one week of intensive treatment, diuresis recovered and dialysis could be stopped after six sessions. We describe an uncommon case of severe lupus nephritis, presenting with terminal renal failure. Since the rarity of this disease presentation, other more common diagnoses have to be considered. Once the diagnosis of lupus nephritis is established, a choice has to be made between the different induction treatment protocols. The patient's ethnic background and other supportive therapies, such as the need for dialysis, can help to make this choice.

  11. Gastrointestinal symptomatology as first manifestation of systemic erythematous lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erithematodes (SLE is chronic, often febrile, multisystemic disease unknown origin and relapsing course which affects connective tissue of the skin, joints, kidney and serous membranes. Gastrointestinal manifestations are rarely the first sign of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case report. We presented a female patient, 35 years old, whose first symptoms of SLE were paralitic ileus (chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and polyserositis (pleural effusion and ascites. Except for high parameters of inflammation, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia, all immunological and laboratory tests for SLE were negative in the onset of the disease. During next six months the patient had clinical signs of paralitic ileus several times and was twice operated with progressive malabsorptive syndrome. The full picture of SLE was manifested seven months later associated with lupus nephritis. Treatment with cyclophosphamide, corticosteroids and total parenteral nutrition (30 days induced stable remission of the disease. Conclusion. The SLE can be initially manifested with gastroenterological symptoms without any other clinical and immunologic parameters of the disease. If in patients with SLE and gastrointestinal tract involvement malabsorption syndrom is developed, a treatment success depends on both immunosupressive therapy and total parenteral nutrition.

  12. International consensus for a definition of disease flare in lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, N; Hanrahan, L M; Alarcón, G S; Belmont, H M; Brey, R L; Brunetta, P; Buyon, J P; Costner, M I; Cronin, M E; Dooley, M A; Filocamo, G; Fiorentino, D; Fortin, P R; Franks, A G; Gilkeson, G; Ginzler, E; Gordon, C; Grossman, J; Hahn, B; Isenberg, D A; Kalunian, K C; Petri, M; Sammaritano, L; Sánchez-Guerrero, J; Sontheimer, R D; Strand, V; Urowitz, M; von Feldt, J M; Werth, V P; Merrill, J T

    2011-04-01

    The Lupus Foundation of America (LFA) convened an international working group to obtain a consensus definition of disease flare in lupus. With help from the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization (PRINTO), two web-based Delphi surveys of physicians were conducted. Subsequently, the LFA held a second consensus conference followed by a third Delphi survey to reach a community-wide agreement for flare definition. Sixty-nine of the 120 (57.5%) polled physicians responded to the first survey. Fifty-nine of the responses were available to draft 12 preliminary statements, which were circulated in the second survey. Eighty-seven of 118 (74%) physicians completed the second survey, with an agreement of 70% for 9/12 (75%) statements. During the second conference, three alternative flare definitions were consolidated and sent back to the international community. One hundred and sixteen of 146 (79.5%) responded, with agreement by 71/116 (61%) for the following definition: "A flare is a measurable increase in disease activity in one or more organ systems involving new or worse clinical signs and symptoms and/or laboratory measurements. It must be considered clinically significant by the assessor and usually there would be at least consideration of a change or an increase in treatment." The LFA proposes this definition for lupus flare on the basis of its high face validity.

  13. Recent insights into the genetic basis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, K L; Kelly, J A; Lessard, C J; Harley, J B

    2009-07-01

    Genetic variation was first shown to be important in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus) in the 1970s with associations in the human leukocyte antigen region. Almost four decades later, and with the help of increasingly powerful genetic approaches, more than 25 genes are now known to contribute to the mechanisms that predispose individuals to lupus. Over half of these loci have been discovered in the past 2 years, underscoring the extraordinary success of genome-wide association approaches in SLE. Well-established risk factors include alleles in the major histocompatibility complex region (multiple genes), IRF5, ITGAM, STAT4, BLK, BANK1, PDCD1, PTPN22, TNFSF4, TNFAIP3, SPP1, some of the Fcgamma receptors, and deficiencies in several complement components, including C1q, C4 and C2. As reviewed here, many susceptibility genes fall into key pathways that are consistent with previous studies implicating immune complexes, host immune signal transduction and interferon pathways in the pathogenesis of SLE. Other loci have no known function or apparent immunological role and have the potential to reveal novel disease mechanisms. Certainly, as our understanding of the genetic etiology of SLE continues to mature, important new opportunities will emerge for developing more effective diagnostic and clinical management tools for this complex autoimmune disease.

  14. FAKTOR LINGKUNGAN YANG DAPAT MENINGKATKAN RISIKO PENYAKIT LUPUS ERITEMATOSUS SISTEMIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy M. Komalig

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Risk of Lupus Erythematosus Systemic Disease caused by Enviromental Factor.The cause of Lupus Erythematosus Systemic (LES disease has not yet found, however, experts said that environment factor is considered to be dominant cause. It might increase the risk of LES. Environmental factor consists of physics, biology and chemical. Moreover, there are also stress, herediter and hormonne factors. This study used a cross sectional design with two hospital as a population target. They are Cipto Mangunkusumo and Kramat 128 hospital in which patients of LES included in Indonesian Lupus Foundation. Structural interview was used in this research to know the LES patients history before they experienced LES. From 202 LES patients, the research results showed percentage of patient exposed with direct sunlight (22.2%, ISPA (58.9%, drugs such as ampisilin/amoksisilin (63.1%, passive smoker (81.7%, active smoker (11.9%, fertility woman with age 15-44 years (88.4%, used contraception/tablet (91.0%, herediter (1.5% and stress (85.6%. In summary, physical factor, for instance, time frequently exposed by direct sunlight, used drugs, nicotine, infected by bacteria, mush room and or virus could risk LES disease. The risk of LES happens also for patients who used contraception such as tablet/injection and woman in fertility age group.Keywords: LES, environmental factor, hormone, stress

  15. B-cell-depleting Therapy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Sanz, Iñaki; Bosch, Xavier; Stone, John H.; Khamashta, Munther A.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a new class of agents (B-cell-depleting therapies) has opened a new era in the therapeutic approach to systemic lupus erythematosus, with belimumab being the first drug licensed for use in systemic lupus erythematosus in more than 50 years. Four agents deserve specific mention: rituximab, ocrelizumab, epratuzumab, and belimumab. Controlled trials have shown negative results for rituximab, promising results for epratuzumab, and positive results for belimumab. Despite these negative results, rituximab is the most-used agent in patients who do not respond or are intolerant to standard therapy and those with life-threatening presentations. B-cell-depleting agents should not be used in patients with mild disease and should be tailored according to individual patient characteristics, including ethnicity, organ involvement, and the immunological profile. Forthcoming studies of B-cell-directed strategies, particularly data from investigations of off-label rituximab use and postmarketing studies of belimumab, will provide new insights into the utility of these treatments in the routine management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22444096

  16. [Dyslipidaemia and atherogenic risk in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batún Garrido, José Antonio de Jesús; Radillo Alba, Hugo Alberto; Hernández Núñez, Éufrates; Olán, Francisco

    2016-07-15

    Dyslipidaemia is a common comorbidity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Fifty-one patients were included. Variables associated with the disease and the drugs used were recorded. Atherogenic risk was calculated. Chi square was used for categorical variables. ANOVA was performed and a logistic regression model to determine the association of the variables with the presence of dyslipidaemia. A percentage of 68.6 had dyslipidaemia. A significant difference between the presence of dyslipidaemia and activity index measured by SLEDAI was found, the presence of lupus nephritis, use of prednisone≥20mg/day, evolution of the disease<3 years. Significance between the absence of dyslipidaemia and use of hydroxychloroquine was found. SLEDAI≥4 and the use of prednisone≥20mg/day were independently associated with the presence of dyslipidaemia. The average of Castelli rate was 5.02, the Kannel index was 2.97 and triglyceride/HDL-C ratio was 5.24. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have a high prevalence of dyslipidaemia and a high atherogenic rate, which increases cardiovascular risk significantly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. 76 FR 81665 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revising the Listing of the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... Wolf (Canis lupus) in the Western Great Lakes; Final rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 249... (Canis lupus) in the Western Great Lakes AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final rule... Minnesota population of gray wolves (Canis lupus) to conform to current statutory and policy requirements...

  18. Validation of the LupusPRO version 1.8: an update to a disease-specific patient-reported outcome tool for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizoddin, D R; Weinberg, S; Gandhi, N; Arora, S; Block, J A; Sequeira, W; Jolly, M

    2018-04-01

    Objectives LupusPRO has shown good measurement properties as a disease-specific patient-reported outcome tool in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). For the purpose of clinical trials, the version 1.7 (v1.7) domain of Pain-Vitality was separated into distinct Pain, Vitality and Sleep domains in v1.8, and the psychometric properties examined. Methods A total of 131 consecutive SLE patients were self-administered surveys assessing fatigue (FACIT, SF-36), pain (Pain Inventory, SF-36), insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index), emotional health (PHQ-9, SF-36) and quality of life (SF-36, LupusPRO) at routine care visits. Internal consistency reliability (ICR) for each domain was obtained using Cronbach's alpha. The convergent construct validity of LupusPRO domains with corresponding SF-36 domains or tools were tested using Spearman correlation. Varimax rotations were conducted to assess factor structures of the LupusPRO v1.8. Results Mean (SD) age was 40.04 (14.10) years. Scores from the LupusPRO-Sleep domain strongly correlated with insomnia scores, while LupusPRO-Vitality correlated strongly with fatigue (FACIT) and SF-36 vitality. The LupusPRO-Pain domain correlated strongly with pain (SF36 Bodily-Pain, Pain Inventory) scores. Similarly, the LupusPRO domains of Physical and Emotional Health had significant correlations with corresponding SF-36 domains. The ICR for HRQoL and non-HRQoL were 0.96 and 0.81. LupusPRO (domains HRQoL and QoL) scores correlated with disease activity. Principal component analysis included seven factor loadings presenting for the HRQOL subscales (combined Sleep, Vitality, and Pain), and three factors for the NHRQoL (Combined Coping and Social Support). Conclusions LupusPRO v1.8 (including its Sleep, Vitality, and Pain domains) has acceptable reliability and validity. Use of LupusPRO as an outcome measure in clinical trials would facilitate responsiveness assessment.

  19. Influence of Education on Disease Activity and Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Data From the 1000 Canadian Faces of Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Angela; Wong-Pak, Andrew; Peschken, Christine A; Silverman, Earl; Pineau, Christian; Smith, C Douglas; Arbillaga, Hector; Zummer, Michel; Bernatsky, Sasha; Hudson, Marie; Hitchon, Carol; Fortin, Paul R; Nevskaya, Tatiana; Pope, Janet E

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether socioeconomic status assessed by education is associated with disease activity and the risk of organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Data from the 1000 Canadian Faces of Lupus, a multicenter database of adult SLE patients, was used to compare education as either low (did not complete high school) or high (completed high school or further) for disease activity and damage. Education was also studied as a continuous variable. The relationships between education and SLE outcomes (any organ damage defined as a Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index [SDI] score ≥1, serious organ damage [SDI score ≥3], and end-stage renal disease) were evaluated using logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and disease duration. A total of 562 SLE patients met inclusion criteria (mean age 47 years, 91% female, and mean disease duration of 10 years); 81% had high education. The low education group was twice as likely to be work disabled (30%; P education was significantly associated with higher disease activity at enrollment into the 1000 Canadian Faces of Lupus database, after adjustment for age (at entry and at diagnosis), race/ethnicity, and sex (B 1.255 + 0.507 [SE], β = 0.115, P = 0.014). In our adjusted logistic regression models we were unable to demonstrate significant associations between education and SLE damage. Results did not change when varying the education variable. In this cohort, low education was associated cross-sectionally with higher disease activity and work disability, but not damage. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Prevention of reproductive losses in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydova Iu.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose — to explore the peculiarities of pregnancy and childbirth in women with systemic lupus erythematosus in view of pregravid preparation. Patients and methods. The study included three groups. I group — 24 pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus who received pregravid preparation, group II of 28 pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus, have spontaneously pregnancy, III — control group 28 pregnant women without autoimmune diseases. Groups comparable in age, education, eating habits and living in similar climatic conditions. In pregravid preparations include micronized progesterone (utrozhestan in a daily dose of 200 mg of 16 to 25 days of the cycle when detecting failure II cycle phase — Tivortin in therapeutic dosage, drug containing iodine and folic acid at daily dosages recommended by WHO for preconception period (respectively, 200 mg and 400 mg. Results. In all three groups there were no spontaneous termination of pregnancy up to 12 weeks. In the first group shows significantly better results when comparing the frequency of pregnancy complications, pregnancy outcomes, metabolic disorders. Conduct prevention of endothelial dysfunction drug Tivortin and continued therapy support L-arginine in the early stages of gestation, in groups of pregnant women with high titers of anti-Ro antibodies, antiphospholipid antibodies, along with prolonged intake of micronized progesterone (utrozhestan, helped to reduce the incidence of hypertensive complications of pregnancy (gestational hypertension, pre!eclampsia and the birth of children with IUGR or low birth weight for gestational age. Group II women were not able to modify the drug therapy. Pregnant women in this group were receiving corticosteroids due to activation of an autoimmune disease. In some women was the need to enhance the treatment of SLE with corticosteroids in pulse mode using a 2-line therapy in the postpartum period. Conclusions. Pregnancy in women with

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus in Spanish males: a study of the Spanish Rheumatology Society Lupus Registry (RELESSER) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros Frutos, A; Casas, I; Rúa-Figueroa, I; López-Longo, F J; Calvo-Alén, J; Galindo, M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Pego-Reigosa, J M; Olivé Marqués, A

    2017-06-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical, and immunological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in male patients. Methods A cross-sectional, multicenter study was carried out of 3651 patients (353 men, 9.7%, and 3298 women, 90.2%) diagnosed with SLE, included in the Spanish Rheumatology Society SLE Registry (RELESSER). Results Mean ages (18-92 years) of symptom onset were 37 (SD 17) years (men) and 32 (SD 14) years (women). Male/female ratio was 1/9. Age of onset of symptoms and age at diagnosis were higher in men than in women ( p lupus nephritis was more common in men, being present in 155 (44.8%) of males versus 933 (29%) of females ( p  50 years had a higher mortality (odds ratios 3.6 and 2.1, respectively). Furthermore, SLE patients who developed pulmonary hemorrhage, pulmonary hypertension, psychiatric involvement, complement deficiency, and hemophagocytic syndrome also had higher mortality, regardless of gender. Conclusion Patients with SLE over the age of 50 years have an increased risk of mortality. In Caucasians, age at diagnosis and symptom onset is higher in men than in women. The diagnostic delay is shorter in men. Male SLE patients present more cardiovascular comorbidities, and also more serositis, adenopathies, splenomegaly, renal involvement, convulsion, thrombosis, and lupus anticoagulant positivity than women.

  2. Plasma ficolin levels and risk of nephritis in Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanha, Nima; Pilely, Katrine; Faurschou, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Given the scavenging properties of ficolins, we hypothesized that variation in the plasma concentrations of the three ficolins may be associated with development of lupus nephritis (LN), type of LN, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and/or mortality among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus...

  3. Experience of long-term belimumab use in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gennadyevna Klyukvina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years considerable progress has been made in the treatment of systemic lupus erythe-matosus; however, not all questions have been answered. The range of medications has substan-tially increased. The paper describes a case of the long-term use of the new genetically engineered agent belimumab in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. Mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms and susceptibility to infection in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, P; Madsen, H O; Halberg, P

    1999-01-01

    To determine whether variant alleles in the coding portion of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene are associated with increased susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and concomitant infections.......To determine whether variant alleles in the coding portion of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene are associated with increased susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and concomitant infections....

  5. New study shows normally helpful natural bacteria may also trigger lupus | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR scientists have discovered that a protein produced by bacteria that naturally inhabit our bodies may trigger the autoimmune disease lupus. The results of the study could unveil an entirely new set of drug targets for treating lupus and other autoimmune diseases. Read more…

  6. What Social Workers in Health Care Should Know about Lupus: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Charles; Beckerman, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on findings from a cross-sectional study (N = 378) of patients living with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The purpose of this study was to identify and clarify the unique psychosocial challenges for those living with lupus. The specific analysis will help to develop a model to determine how different factors influence SLE…

  7. Study of Flare Assessment in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Based on Paper Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isenberg, D; Sturgess, J; Allen, E

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the level of agreement of disease flare severity (distinguishing severe, moderate, and mild flare and persistent disease activity) in a large paper-patient exercise involving 988 individual cases of systemic lupus erythematosus. METHODS: A total of 988 individual lupus cas...

  8. Renal expression of polyomavirus large T antigen is associated with nephritis in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenton, Kristin Andreassen; Mjelle, Janne Erikke; Jacobsen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    ) that these complexes bound induced anti-nucleosome antibodies and finally (iv) that they associated with glomerular membranes as immune complexes. This process may be relevant for human lupus nephritis, since productive polyomavirus infection is associated with this organ manifestation. Here, we compare nephritis...... to the evolution of lupus nephritis in human SLE....

  9. The systemic lupus erythematosus travel burden survey: baseline data among a South Carolina cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Edith M; Ortiz, Kasim; Zhang, Jiajia; Zhou, Jie; Kamen, Diane

    2016-04-29

    Many studies on the impact of systemic lupus erythematosus or lupus have identified patient travel costs as being problematic. We administered a survey that examined the impact of self-rated travel burden on lupus patients. The systemic lupus erythematosus travel burden survey included 41 patients enrolled in the systemic lupus erythematosus database project at the Medical University of South Carolina. Most participants reported that travel caused medications to be discontinued or appointments to be missed. In unadjusted logistic regressions of the relationship between these outcomes and medical travel burden, both distance to rheumatologists and time to lupus medical care were significant. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to examine the influence of travel burden among this population, but data from this report could help to inform physicians, academic researchers, and other health professionals in South Carolina and other areas with significant rural populations on how travel burden may impact patients receiving care for lupus and provide an opportunity for the development of interventions aimed at assisting lupus patients with management of stressors related to travel burden.

  10. High risk of ischemic heart disease in patients with lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Starklint, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in a cohort of 104 Danish patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis (LN).......To investigate the occurrence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in a cohort of 104 Danish patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis (LN)....

  11. LARGE-SCALE CO MAPS OF THE LUPUS MOLECULAR CLOUD COMPLEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tothill, N. F. H.; Loehr, A.; Stark, A. A.; Lane, A. P.; Harnett, J. I.; Bourke, T. L.; Myers, P. C.; Parshley, S. C.; Wright, G. A.; Walker, C. K.

    2009-01-01

    Fully sampled degree-scale maps of the 13 CO 2-1 and CO 4-3 transitions toward three members of the Lupus Molecular Cloud Complex-Lupus I, III, and IV-trace the column density and temperature of the molecular gas. Comparison with IR extinction maps from the c2d project requires most of the gas to have a temperature of 8-10 K. Estimates of the cloud mass from 13 CO emission are roughly consistent with most previous estimates, while the line widths are higher, around 2 km s -1 . CO 4-3 emission is found throughout Lupus I, indicating widespread dense gas, and toward Lupus III and IV. Enhanced line widths at the NW end and along the edge of the B 228 ridge in Lupus I, and a coherent velocity gradient across the ridge, are consistent with interaction between the molecular cloud and an expanding H I shell from the Upper-Scorpius subgroup of the Sco-Cen OB Association. Lupus III is dominated by the effects of two HAe/Be stars, and shows no sign of external influence. Slightly warmer gas around the core of Lupus IV and a low line width suggest heating by the Upper-Centaurus-Lupus subgroup of Sco-Cen, without the effects of an H I shell.

  12. Childhood lupus nephritis: 12 years of experience from a developing country's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Moumita; Nandi, Madhumita; Mondal, Rakesh; Hazra, Avijit; Sarkar, Sumatra; Sabui, Tapas; Kundu, Chanchal Kumar; Biswas, Arnab

    2017-09-01

    To assess the long-term outcome of lupus nephritis in children with systemic lupus erythematosus followed up over 12 years at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Eastern India. This is a retrospective observational study of the clinicopathological presentation, management, and outcome in 46 children with lupus nephritis over a period of 12 years at a tertiary teaching hospital in Eastern India. Mortality was compared between different lupus classes and therapy groups with Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test. The incidence of lupus nephritis was 58.97% [95% confidence interval (CI) 48.06%-59.89%] with the mean age at presentation being 10.2±2.43 years (range 5.5-14.5) years. Majority belonged to class IV (30.43%), followed by class II (26.91%), class III (23.91), and class V (8.70%). Outcome analysis of children with lupus nephritis over 12 years revealed that 24 (52.17%) achieved complete remission of disease activity, 5 attained partial remission, 4 continued to have active disease, 5 developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and 8 died. Overall mortality thus observed was 17.39% with septicemia in the background of ESRD being the commonest cause. No significant difference in mortality was observed between different lupus nephritis classes or therapy arm groups. The study throws light on various aspects of lupus nephritis and their long-term outcome patterns in children from developing countries such as India.

  13. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a patient with previous diagnosis of severe congenital lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotstein Grein, I. H.; Armbrust, W.; van der Molen, A. M.; van Royen-Kerkhof, A.

    Neonatal lupus (NL) is an acquired autoimmune disease of the newborn, caused by transplacental passage of the maternal autoantibodies anti SS-A/Ro and anti SS-B/La. When the clinical picture starts directly at birth, it is known as congenital lupus (CL). The clinical manifestations are variable.

  14. A Case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus developing Two years after Remission of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Seung-Jae; Yoo, Bin; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Yoo, Mi-Ran; Choi, Seung-Won; Yoo, Eun-Sil; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Moon, Hee-Bom

    1996-01-01

    We describe a 17-year-old male who presented with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and 2 years thereafter developed central nervous system lupus and nephritis. The association of TTP and systemic lupus erythematosus has been described, but the unusual sequence and chronological separation is very rare. PMID:8854658

  15. Histological aspects of the bladder in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to study pathological data from bladders of systemic lupus erythematosus patients, correlate them to clinical events and the use of therapeutic drugs, and compare them to bladder histopathological findings in individuals not affected by systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods: thirty-nine out or inpatients of the Department of Rheumatology at Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus were clinically and cystoscopically evaluated. Bladder biopsy was also performed. As a normal parameter, bladders taken from 20 corpses collected at the Death Verification Department  of São Paulo city, without autolysis or evidence of urinary tract or autoimmune disease were also histologically studied. This group was considered as a Control Group. A correlation among clinical, cystoscopic and histopathological data was carried out. Rresults: the patients’ mean age was 29 years (range 13-62. Thirty-six were females and three were males. Twenty-five patients were asymptomatic during the study period. In the Control Group the age range was 20-65 years. Nineteen were females (95% and one was male (5%. Cystoscopic examination of the group with systemic lupus erythematosus showed interstitial pattern in 16 cases (41.0% and normal in 15 (38.5%. The bladder was normal in four patients (10.3%. Chronic unspecific cystitis was observed in 18 (46.2% patients. In the remaining, several alterations were found, including bladder vasculitis in seven patients (17.9%. The mean number of mast cells in the bladder area was 2.223/mm2. In the Control Group, unspecific cystitis was found in three cases (15.0%. No other abnormalities were found. The mean number of mast cells in this group was 0.777/mm2 (±2.7. Chronic unspecific cystitis, bladder vasculitis and the mean number of mast cells were compared with each other and no statistical differences were found (p > 0.05. There were

  16. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, S; Shorer, R; Wollman, J; Dotan, G; Paran, D

    2017-11-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus. Atrophy of the corpus callosum and hippocampus have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown impaired white matter integrity, suggesting that white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus may underlie the cognitive impairment as well as other neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as assessed by optical coherence tomography, has been suggested as a biomarker for white matter damage in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning may occur early, even in patients with mild clinical symptoms. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the association of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as a biomarker of white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, including cognitive impairment. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus underwent neuropsychological testing using a validated computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test. All 21 patients, as well as 11 healthy, age matched controls, underwent optical coherence tomography testing to assess retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and results in eight cognitive domains assessed by the computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test were assessed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with and without neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus, and compared to retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in healthy controls. Results No statistically significant correlation was found between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as compared to healthy

  17. Pancreatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus Pancreatitis y lupus eritematoso sistémico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lariño Noia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with SLE are common, specifically abdominal pain. However, the rate of pancreatic diseases is much lower and does not reach 5% according to published series in Europe and the USA. This association between SLE and pancreatic disease is basically at the expense of episodes of acute pancreatitis. An association with chronic pancreatitis is much more uncommon, and only four articles have been published showing this relationship. Three cases of SLE-associated pancreatitis are described, and disease onset, etiological factors, and clinical progression are analyzed. A review of the literature and a brief discussion about pathophysiological mechanisms and the role of corticosteroids are also included.Los síntomas gastrointestinales en los pacientes con lupus eritematoso sistémico (LES son comunes, específicamente el dolor abdominal. Sin embargo la tasa de enfermedades pancreáticas es mucho menor, una tasa que no alcanza ni al 5% según las series publicadas en Europa y EE. UU. Esta asociación entre enfermedades pancreáticas y LES es fundamentalmente a expensas de episodios de pancreatitis aguda. La asociación con pancreatitis crónica es muchísimo más infrecuente, teniendo en cuenta que tan sólo cuatro artículos han sido publicados reflejando esta asociación. Describimos tres casos de asociación entre pancreatitis y LES, analizando el debut de la enfermedad, los factores etiológicos y también la evolución clínica. Hemos realizado, además, una breve discusión de la fisiopatología y del papel de corticosteroides, así como una revisión de la literatura.

  18. Cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus: far beyond Th1/Th2 dualism lupus: cytokine profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Poliana Macedo; Scavuzzi, Bruna Miglioranza; Stadtlober, Nicole Perugini; Franchi Santos, Lorena Flor da Rosa; Lozovoy, Marcell Alysson Batisti; Iriyoda, Tatiana Mayumi Veiga; Costa, Neide Tomimura; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Maes, Michael; Dichi, Isaias; Simão, Andréa Name Colado

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were to delineate cytokine profiles of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), construct prediction models for diagnosis and disease activity using those profiles, and to examine the associations between TNFB Ncol polymorphism, body mass index (BMI) and vitamin D levels with cytokine levels. Two hundred SLE patients and 196 healthy controls participated in this case-control study. Plasma cytokines levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL- 4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-17 were measured and cytokines profiles were computed. IL-6, IL-12, IL-17, IFN-γ and IL-10 levels were significantly higher in SLE, while IL-4 was lower in SLE. The Th1/Th2 and Th1+Th17/Th2 profiles were significantly higher in SLE than in healthy controls, whereas there were no significant differences in the proinflammatory cytokine profile (TNFα+IL-6+IL-1β). In total, 90.4% of all subjects were correctly classified using Th1+Th17 profile and IL-10 (positively associated) and IL-4 (negatively associated) as predictor variables (sensitivity=66.7% and specificity=96.9%). In all, 20.9% of the variance in the SLE Disease Activity Index was predicted by the Th1+Th17/Th2 ratio, IL-10 and BMI (all positively) and proinflammatory profile (inversely associated). B1/B1 genotype is accompanied by increased IL-17 and Th17/Th2 ratio, while B1/B2 genotype is accompanied by higher IL-4 and IFNγ values. 25-OH vitamin D was inversely associated with IFN-γ levels. SLE is accompanied by Th1, Th17 and Treg profile and lowered IL-4 production. Lowered vitamin D levels and B1/B1 genotype, but not BMI, contribute to changes in cytokines profiles. Future treatments should target Th1, Th2 and Th17 profiles rather than inflammatory cytokines.

  19. LUPUS ERITEMATOSO CUTÁNEO: ANÁLISIS CLÍNICOS Y DE LABORATORIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Maria da Silva Gomes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available El lupus eritematoso (LE se incluye entre las llamadas enfermedades del tejido conectivo y se divide en una forma sistémica lupus eritematoso sistémico (LES y una forma eritematoso piel lupus cutáneo (LEC. La LE es una enfermedad autoinmune heterogénea y multisistémica caracterizada por la producción de anticuerpos que combaten su propio cuerpo en lugar de antígenos que luchan. El lupus es una enfermedad con mayor frecuencia entre las edades de 20 a 50 años, que afecta a más mujeres que hombres que implican, en la mayoría de los casos, los pacientes con antecedentes familiares de lupus y otras enfermedades autoinmunes.

  20. X-ray characteristics of the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A [California Univ., Livermore (USA). Lawrence Livermore Lab.

    1980-01-01

    The spatial extent of the Lupus Loop and spectra for the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants have been determined with a rocket-borne payload. The Lupus Loop is an extended source of soft X-rays (approx. 300' diam) that shows a correlation between its brightest X-ray and radio-emission regions. Its spectrum is characterized by a temperature of 350 eV. Thus, the Lupus Loop appears similar to Vela X and Cygnus Loop, although much weaker. Emission from SN1006 is spatially unresolved and exhibits a harder spectrum than that of the Lupus Loop. All spectral data (0.2 100 keV) from our observation and previous observations are satisfactorily fit with a power law (index = 2.15). This spectral dependence suggests the possibility that a rotating neutron star is the underlying source of the radiated energy although such an interpretation appears inconsistent with the remnant's morphology.

  1. X-ray characteristics of the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toor, A.

    1980-01-01

    The spatial extent of the Lupus Loop and spectra for the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants have been determined with a rocket-borne payload. The Lupus Loop is an extended source of soft X-rays (approx. 300' diam) that shows a correlation between its brightest X-ray and radio-emission regions. Its spectrum is characterized by a temperature of 350 eV. Thus, the Lupus Loop appears similar to Vela X and Cygnus Loop, although much weaker. Emission from SN1006 is spatially unresolved and exhibits a harder spectrum than that of the Lupus Loop. All spectral data (0.2 100 keV) from our observation and previous observations are satisfactorily fit with a power law (index = 2.15). This spectral dependence suggests the possibility that a rotating neutron star is the underlying source of the radiated energy although such an interpretation appears inconsistent with the remnant's morphology. (orig.)

  2. Leptin levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus inversely correlate with regulatory T cell frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Qiao, Y; Yang, L; Song, S; Han, Y; Tian, Y; Ding, M; Jin, H; Shao, F; Liu, A

    2017-11-01

    Leptin levels are increased in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but little is known on how this correlates with several disease characteristics including the frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here we compared serum leptin levels with frequency of circulating Tregs in 47 lupus patients vs. 25 healthy matched controls. Correlations with lupus disease activity were also analyzed, as well as Treg proliferation potential. It was found that leptin was remarkably increased in SLE patients as compared to controls, particularly in SLE patients with moderate and severe active SLE, and the increase correlated with disease activity. Importantly, increased leptin in lupus patients inversely correlated with the frequency of Tregs but not in controls, and leptin neutralization resulted in the expansion of Tregs ex vivo. Thus, hyperleptinemia in lupus patients correlates directly with disease activity and inversely with Treg frequency. The finding that leptin inhibition expands Tregs in SLE suggests possible inhibition of this molecule for an enhanced Treg function in the disease.

  3. Breakdown of Immune Tolerance in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihl, Alec M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with multiple tissue manifestations. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of conventional DC and plasmacytoid DC in the development of both murine lupus and human SLE. In the past decade, studies using selective DC depletions have demonstrated critical roles of DC in lupus progression. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggest activation of DC by self-antigens in lupus pathogenesis, followed by breakdown of immune tolerance to self. Potential treatment strategies targeting DC have been developed. However, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms by which DC modulate lupus pathogenesis that require further investigations. PMID:27034965

  4. Toll-like receptor activation in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Georg; Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-12-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis is complex but no longer enigmatic. Much progress has been made to on the polygenetic origin of lupus in identifying gene variants that permit the loss of tolerance against nuclear autoantigens. Along the same line in about 50% of lupus patients additional genetic weaknesses promote immune complex glomerulonephritis and filtration barrier dysfunction. Here we briefly summarize the pathogenesis of SLE with a focus on loss of tolerance and the role of toll-like receptors in the "pseudo"-antiviral immunity concept of systemic lupus. In addition, we discuss the local role of Toll-like receptors in intrarenal inflammation and kidney remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Therapeutic strategies evaluated by the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE) Core Set Questionnaire in more than 1000 patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigges, Johanna; Biazar, Cyrus; Landmann, Aysche

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective, cross-sectional, multicentre study performed by the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE) was to investigate different therapeutic strategies and their efficacies in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) throughout Europe. Using the EUSCLE Core Set...... Questionnaire, topical and systemic treatment options were analysed in a total of 1002 patients (768 females and 234 males) with different CLE subtypes. The data were correlated with the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI) and the criteria of the American College...... of Rheumatology (ACR) for the classification of systemic lupus erythematosus. Sunscreens were applied by 84.0% of the study cohort and showed a high efficacy in preventing skin lesions in all disease subtypes, correlating with a lower CLASI activity score. Topical steroids were used in 81.5% of the patients...

  6. [Treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: myths, certainties and doubts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Danza, Alvaro; Khamashta, Munther

    2013-12-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease with different clinical forms of presentation, including a wide range of severity and organic involvement. Such circumstance, along with the fact of the uncommon nature of the disease and the absence of clinically representative response criteria, make it difficult to design controlled clinical trials in SLE patients. As a result, observational studies have a special relevance, being a source of valuable information of SLE prognosis and outcome as well as of the efficacy and adverse effects of the different therapies. Herein we update some of the main treatments used in SLE. Steroids may have more risks than benefits if used at high doses. New mechanisms of action have been described, supporting the use of lower doses, possibly with the same efficacy and less adverse effects. Intravenous pulses of cyclophosphamide still have a role in the treatment of proliferative lupus nephritis and other serious SLE manifestations. Mycophenolate mofetil has shown its efficacy both as induction and maintenance therapy of selected cases of lupus nephritis. Biological therapies have emerged as new promising options. Although clinical trials have not confirmed a clear superiority of rituximab in SLE, observational studies have shown good response rates in severe SLE manifestations or refractory forms. Belimumab has recently been added to the therapeutic armamentarium of SLE; although its place in clinical practice is not well-defined, it may be recommended in active patients with no response or good tolerance to standard therapies. Hydroxichloroquine improves survival, decreases the risk of thrombosis and flares and is safe in pregnancy, and should be considered the baseline therapy in most SLE patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Purtscher-like retinopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chan; Dai, Rongping; Dong, Fangtian; Wang, Qian

    2014-12-01

    To investigate clinical characteristics of Purtscher-like retinopathy and its clinical implications among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Observational case series. setting: Tertiary medical center. patient population: Patients with SLE who were diagnosed with Purtscher-like retinopathy between 2002 and 2013. observation procedures: Assessment and follow-up in the ophthalmology department. main outcome measure: Visual acuity and funduscopic examination at presentation and at 6 month follow-up, with analysis of the association between Purtscher-like retinopathy and other systemic involvement of SLE and overall disease activity. Among 5688 patients with SLE evaluated, 8 cases of Purtscher-like retinopathy were diagnosed. Typical fundus abnormalities included Purtscher flecken, cotton-wool spots, retinal hemorrhages, macular edema, optic disk swelling, and a pseudo-cherry red spot. Fluorescein angiography abnormalities included areas of capillary nonperfusion corresponding to the retinal whitening, late leakage, peripapillary staining, precapillary occlusion, and slower filling of vessels. The prevalence of central nervous system lupus was significantly higher among those with Purtscher-like retinopathy (6/8) than among 240 patients randomly sampled from those without Purtscher-like retinopathy. A very high SLE Disease Activity Index (≥20) was present in all 8 patients with Purtscher-like retinopathy. All patients received corticosteroids combined with immunosuppressants. For the majority of patients, optic atrophy developed during follow-up with persistent low visual acuity. As a rare and severe ophthalmic complication of SLE, Purtscher-like retinopathy was associated with central nervous system lupus and highly active disease. Visual acuity recovery was usually poor despite prompt treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulse cyclophospamide in severe lupus nephritis: Southern Indian experience

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    Das Uttara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the monthly pulse IV cyclophosphamide (IVC therapy in patients with severe lupus nephritis, we studied 39 patients of lupus nephritis on IVC therapy between 1998 to 2002. Single monthly cyclophosphamide (0.75-1 g/m² was infused intravenously with oral prednisolone (0.5 mg/kg per day and appropriate hydration. Of the 39 pa-tients 25 (86.2% patients were females and 4 (13.8% were males. Six (2% cases had irregular follow-up and 3 patients had expired during the initial cycles and were excluded from the study. The mean age was 25.6 + 6.72 years (range 10-40 years. The mean duration of the disease from the onset to renal biopsy was 24.2 + 18.5 months. The clinical presentations included nephrotic syndrome (34.5%, acute glomerulonephritis (31.0%, Pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO (10.3%, and rapidly progressive renal failure (6.7%. Renal insufficiency was present in 47.2% cases. Twenty-two (75.9% patients had diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (class IV, 6 (20.7% focal proliferative glomerulonephritis (class III, and one (3.4% class Vd. After a mean follow-up of 15.8 months, out of 29 patients, 13 (44.8% had achieved complete remission, 7 (24.1% partial remission and 9 (31.0% cases did not respond to the therapy. Side effects of the therapy included vomiting and nausea (100% and hair loss during the first few doses of IVC. In addition, one case had dysfunctional uterine bleeding and two patients had avascular necrosis of femoral head. We conclude that our data indicate that IVC in severe lupus nephritis is effective in Indian patients though longer follow-up is required.

  9. Hashimoto thyroiditis, anti-thyroid antibodies and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, Rayana T; Coelho, Vinícius N; Skare, Thelma L

    2018-01-01

    To study the prevalence of Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), anti-thyroid autoantibodies (anti-thyroglobulin or TgAb and thyroperoxidase or TPOAb) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. To analyze if associated HT, TgAb and/or TPOAb influence clinical or serological profiles, disease activity and/or its cumulative damage. Three hundred and one SLE patients and 141 controls were studied for thyroid stimulating hormone, thyroxin, TgAb and TPOAb by chemiluminescence and immunometric assays. Patients' charts were reviewed for serological and clinical profiles. Activity was measured by SLE Disease Activity Index and cumulative damage by Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index for SLE. SLE patients were divided into: (i) with HT; (ii) with anti-thyroid antibodies but without HT; and (iii) without HT and without anti-thyroid antibodies, and were then compared. Furthermore, SLE patients were compared according to the number of positive anti-thyroid antibodies. Hashimoto thyroiditis prevalence in SLE was 12.6% and 5.6% in controls (P = 0.02; odds ratio = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.09-5.2). Lupus patients with HT had less malar rash (P = 0.02) and more anti-Sm (P = 0.04). Anti-Sm was more common in those with two anti-thyroid antibodies than in those with one or negative. The presence of HT or the number of positive autoantibodies did not associate either with disease activity (P = 0.95) or with cumulative damage (P = 0.98). There is a two-fold increased risk of HT in SLE patients. Anti-Sm antibodies favor this association and also double antibody positivity. Disease activity and cumulative damage are not related to HT or with autoantibodies. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Treat-to-target in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosca, Marta; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-01-01

    Multiple clinical trials performed over twenty years in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have clearly demonstrated that patients have better outcomes if their disease activity at each time-point for follow-up includes a pre-specified target. A European SLE expert panel met in Zurich...... on May 8, 2012 to discuss whether a treat-to-target approach could be applied in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (T2T/SLE), define a research agenda, and establish a plan for moving forward. In the present paper, observations raised at the meeting and literature data on potential...

  11. Macrophage Activation Syndrome as Initial Presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Say-Tin Yeap

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS is known to be a severe and potentially life-threatening complication of rheumatic disorder, especially systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. It is very rare for MAS to be an initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Here, we report a 14-year-old girl in whom MAS developed as an initial presentation of SLE. With early diagnosis and administration of cyclosporine A, she had a fair outcome. Further testing showed positive anti-dsDNA about 8 months later.

  12. Estrogen in cardiovascular disease during systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Emily L; Ryan, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that disproportionately affects women during their childbearing years. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in this patient population at an age when women often have low cardiovascular risk. Hypertension is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor, and its prevalence is markedly increased in women with SLE. Estrogen has traditionally been implicated in SLE disease progression because of the prevalence of the disease in women; however, its role in cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension is unclear. The objective of this review is to discuss evidence for the role of estrogen in both human and murine SLE with emphasis on the effect of estrogen on cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension. PubMed was used to search for articles with terms related to estradiol and SLE. The references of retrieved publications were also reviewed. The potential permissive role of estrogen in SLE development is supported by studies from experimental animal models of lupus in which early removal of estrogen or its effects leads to attenuation of SLE disease parameters, including autoantibody production and renal injury. However, data about the role of estrogens in human SLE are much less clear, with most studies not reaching firm conclusions about positive or negative outcomes after hormonal manipulations involving estrogen during SLE (ie, oral contraceptives, hormone therapy). Significant gaps in knowledge remain about the effect of estrogen on cardiovascular risk factors during SLE. Studies in women with SLE were not designed to determine the effect of estrogen or hormone therapy on blood pressure even though hypertension is highly prevalent, and risk of premature ovarian failure could necessitate use of hormone therapy in women with SLE. Recent evidence from an experimental animal model of lupus found that estrogen may protect against cardiovascular risk factors in

  13. [Thallium poisoning which stimulated systemic lupus erythematosus in a child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Cabrera, M A; Sauceda-García, J M; Escalante-Galindo, P; López-Morales, E

    1991-01-01

    We report the case of a preschool boy who, without knowledge of his relatives, ingested thallium sulfate in a dose calculated in 30 mg/kg. He presented a systemic lupus erythematosus-like syndrome and only further alopecia oriented the diagnosis of thallium toxicosis; thallium blood levels were; 37.2 micrograms/dl and in urine: 2330 micrograms/L. Treatment with the chelating agent D. penicillamine was effective, the clinical picture disappeared and the decrease of the thallium levels was observed. Thallium intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of connective tissue disease as the above mentioned.

  14. Cardiac manifestation's history in the systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Rondon, Federico; Restrepo, Jose Felix

    2001-01-01

    In this paper it is broadly and in depth reviewed the cardiac manifestation's history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), since an historical analysis of clinical manifestations both in pre and post corticosteroids period. The way how the heart and the cardiovascular system's functions have been studied by clinical and semiological views are showed, through clinical manifestations such as myocarditis pericarditis, endocarditis, rhythm alterations, etc, and the evolution of laboratory methods used to its study as well as immunologic prognostic markers and risk factors for coronary disease in SLE

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Kodama, Kazuhiro; Sato, Toshio; Koseki, Keijiro

    1987-09-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus manifested by neurologic symptoms. The results were compared with those of the concurrent X-ray computed tomography (CT). CT scans showed slight cerebral atrophy in four patients, including one with coexisting enlargement of the lateral ventricle. In three of them, MRI scans showed additional abnormal appearance, possibly reflecting cerebral infarction and reversible changes in water content of cerebral tissues. The findings of MRI and CT in a small series of patients was disappointing in the explanation of the occurrence of neurologic symptoms. (Namekawa, K.).

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazuhiro; Sato, Toshio; Koseki, Keijiro

    1987-01-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus manifested by neurologic symptoms. The results were compared with those of the concurrent X-ray computed tomography (CT). CT scans showed slight cerebral atrophy in four patients, including one with coexisting enlargement of the lateral ventricle. In three of them, MRI scans showed additional abnormal appearance, possibly reflecting cerebral infarction and reversible changes in water content of cerebral tissues. The findings of MRI and CT in a small series of patients was disappointing in the explanation of the occurrence of neurologic symptoms. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, A.G.; Boyer, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Ischemic neurologic events and neuropsychiatric disorders occur in approximately 70% of patients with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The CT and MR findings in adults with central nervous system (CNS) SLE have been described, but to the authors' knowledge no pediatric series has been reported. The MR and CT findings in four children with CNS SLE are compared with those reported in adults. Large infarcts are less frequent in children than in adults with CNS SLE, while multiple small infarctions and white matter lesions are more common. These findings in children who have no obvious source of emboli, intracardiac shunt, or history of trauma should raise the suspicion of SLE

  18. Estrogen in Cardiovascular Disease during Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Emily L.; Ryan, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that disproportionately affects women during their childbearing years. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in this patient population at an age when women often have low cardiovascular risk. Hypertension is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor, and its prevalence is markedly increased in women with SLE. Estrogen has traditionally been implicated in SLE disease progression because of the prevalence of the disease in women; however, its role in cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension is unclear. The objective of this review is to discuss evidence for the role of estrogen in both human and murine SLE with emphasis on the effect of estrogen on cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension. Methods PubMed was used to search for articles with terms related to estradiol and SLE. The references of retrieved publications were also reviewed. Findings The potential permissive role of estrogen in SLE development is supported by studies from experimental animal models of lupus in which early removal of estrogen or its effects leads to attenuation of SLE disease parameters, including autoantibody production and renal injury. However, data about the role of estrogens in human SLE are much less clear, with most studies not reaching firm conclusions about positive or negative outcomes after hormonal manipulations involving estrogen during SLE (ie, oral contraceptives, hormone therapy). Significant gaps in knowledge remain about the effect of estrogen on cardiovascular risk factors during SLE. Studies in women with SLE were not designed to determine the effect of estrogen or hormone therapy on blood pressure even though hypertension is highly prevalent, and risk of premature ovarian failure could necessitate use of hormone therapy in women with SLE. Recent evidence from an experimental animal model of lupus found that estrogen may protect against

  19. Lichen planus: a distinct entity from lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, E D; Rowell, N R

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with classical lichen planus (LP) were extensively investigated with special reference to immunohistological changes and histocompatibility (HLA) typing. There was no evidence of lupus erythematosus (LE) in any patient, although one patient with LP and eczema had an elevated titre of antinuclear factor. There was no increased incidence of any HLA type--in particular HLA-B7 and HLA-B8--known to be associated with LE. The results suggest that LE and LP are separate disorders.

  20. Chronic meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: An unusual etiology

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    Anu Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic aseptic meningitis is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Apart from immunological causes and drugs, the aseptic meningitis group can include some unidentified viral infections that cannot be detected by routine microbiological testing. It is imperative to do complete cerebrospinal fluid (CSF workup before implicating the symptoms to disease activity or drugs, as untreated infections cause significant mortality in SLE. We present a case of young female with SLE who presented with chronic meningitis of an uncommon etiology.

  1. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the hip in systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report

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    Anders Hans-Joachim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease of unknown etiology mostly affecting the knee and foot. Until now an association with autoimmune diseases has not been reported. Case presentation The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made in a 15-year-old Caucasian girl based on otherwise unexplained fatigue, arthralgia, tenosynovitis, leukopenia, low platelets and the presence of antinuclear and deoxyribonucleic antibodies. At the age of 20 a renal biopsy revealed lupus nephritis class IV and she went into complete remission with mycophenolate mofetil and steroids. She was kept on mycophenolate mofetil for maintenance therapy. At the age of 24 she experienced a flare-up of lupus nephritis with nephrotic syndrome and new onset of pain in her right hip. Magnetic resonance imaging, arthroscopy and subtotal synovectomy identified pigmented villonodular synovitis as the underlying diagnosis. Although her systemic lupus erythematosus went into remission with another course of steroids and higher doses of mycophenolate mofetil, the pigmented villonodular synovitis persisted and she had to undergo open synovectomy to control her symptoms. Conclusion Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with many different musculoskeletal manifestations including synovitis and arthritis. Pigmented villonodular synovitis has not previously been reported in association with systemic lupus erythematosus, but as its etiology is still unknown, the present case raises the question about a causal relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus and pigmented villonodular synovitis.

  2. Aplastic anemia as a feature of systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalayer, Émilie; Ffrench, Martine; Cathébras, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral cytopenias are common in systemic lupus erythematosus, but bone marrow involvement is rarely reported. Aplastic anemia is the result of immune-mediated destruction of hematopoietic stem cells causing pancytopenia and characterized by an empty bone marrow. This rare but serious disease has been described as an unusual manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. We reviewed the 25 cases published in the English language literature and discuss the clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology of aplastic anemia as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. We report here the first case of aplastic anemia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus treated with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Over one half of patients received concomitantly the diagnoses of systemic lupus erythematosus and aplastic anemia. No clinical or histological features can distinguish primary aplastic anemia from aplastic anemia occurring in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The overall mortality is about 15% and corticosteroid-based therapy alone or in combination with other immunomodulatory drugs can restore bone marrow function. Systemic lupus erythematosus may be complicated by bone marrow involvement. The diagnosis of peripheral cytopenias should be confirmed by bone marrow aspiration. All these patients should receive cortisone as a first treatment. Plasma exchanges seem to have some efficacy. Other different immunomodulatory therapies were used with variable results.

  3. Effective Self-Management Interventions for Patients With Lupus: Potential Impact of Peer Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Edith M; Egede, Leonard; Faith, Trevor; Oates, James

    2017-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with significant mortality, morbidity and cost for the individual patient and society. In the United States, African Americans (AAs) have 3-4 times greater prevalence of lupus, risk of developing lupus at an earlier age and lupus-related disease activity, organ damage and mortality compared with whites. Evidence-based self-management interventions that incorporate both social support and health education have reduced pain, improved function and delayed disability among patients with lupus. However, AAs and women are still disproportionately affected by lupus. This article presents the argument that peer mentoring may be an especially effective intervention approach for AA women with SLE. SLE peers with a track record of success in lupus management and have a personal perspective that clinicians often lack. This commonality and credibility can establish trust, increase communication and, in turn, decrease disparities in healthcare outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. HISTORIA SOBRE EL PAPEL DE LAS HORMONAS Y LOS ANTICONCEPTIVOS EN EL LUPUS

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    Édgar Peñaranda-Parada

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Resumen

    Tarea difícil y prolongada sería revisar la literatura para aquellos que quieran conocer el inicio de una serie de descubrimientos acerca de hormonas y lupus. Ante esto, nos hemos propuesto el objetivo de encontrar datos acerca de cómo las hormonas pueden tener una relación con la patogénesis del lupus. De esta manera hemos revisado los artículos publicados desde el inicio del siglo XX hasta su final, para poder recabar y poner en un orden esos descubrimientos y reconocer los méritos de los diferentes investigadores.

    Palabras clave: Anticonceptivos hormonales, lupus eritematoso sistémico.

    Historic View on the Role of Hormones and Hormonal Contraceptives in Pathogenesis of Systemic Lupus 

    Abstract

    Those interested in knowing a number of discoveries that link hormones and systemic lupus could face a long and troublesome search. This way, our objective in paper is to find data that shows an effect of hormones in lupus pathogenesis. Articles published on the subject since the beginning of the 20th Century until its end, were reviewed. Importance of discoveries and merits of different investigators were placed in perspective.

    Key words: oral contraceptives, systemic lupus.

  5. Neuraminidase activity mediates IL-6 production by activated lupus-prone mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaj, Kamala; Rodgers, Jessalyn I; Marimuthu, Subathra; Siskind, Leah J; Bruner, Evelyn; Nowling, Tamara K

    2018-04-01

    The development of nephritis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in lupus patients. Although the general pathophysiological progression of lupus nephritis is known, the molecular mediators and mechanisms are incompletely understood. Previously, we demonstrated that the glycosphingolipid (GSL) catabolic pathway is elevated in the kidneys of MRL/lpr lupus mice and human lupus patients with nephritis. Specifically, the activity of neuraminidase (NEU) and expression of Neu1, an enzyme in the GSL catabolic pathway is significantly increased. To better understand the role and mechanisms by which this pathway contributes to the progression of LN, we analyzed the expression and effects of NEU activity on the function of MRL/lpr lupus-prone mesangial cells (MCs). We demonstrate that NEU1 and NEU3 promote IL-6 production in MES13 MCs. Neu1 expression, NEU activity, and IL-6 production are significantly increased in stimulated primary MRL/lpr lupus-prone MCs, and blocking NEU activity inhibits IL-6 production. NEU1 and NEU3 expression overlaps IgG deposits in MCs in vitro and in renal sections from nephritic MRL/lpr mice. Together, our results suggest that NEU activity mediates IL-6 production in lupus-prone MCs possibly through an IgG-receptor complex signaling pathway.

  6. Sunlight triggers cutaneous lupus through a CSF-1-dependent mechanism in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Byrne, Katelyn T; Lucas, Julie A; Rabacal, Whitney A; Croker, Byron P; Zong, Xiao-Hua; Stanley, E Richard; Kelley, Vicki R

    2008-11-15

    Sunlight (UVB) triggers cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and systemic lupus through an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that UVB triggers CLE through a CSF-1-dependent, macrophage (Mø)-mediated mechanism in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. By constructing mutant MRL-Fas(lpr) strains expressing varying levels of CSF-1 (high, intermediate, none), and use of an ex vivo gene transfer to deliver CSF-1 intradermally, we determined that CSF-1 induces CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Fas(lpr) mice, but not in lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. UVB incites an increase in Møs, apoptosis in the skin, and CLE in MRL-Fas(lpr), but not in CSF-1-deficient MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. Furthermore, UVB did not induce CLE in BALB/c mice. Probing further, UVB stimulates CSF-1 expression by keratinocytes leading to recruitment and activation of Møs that, in turn, release mediators, which induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. Thus, sunlight triggers a CSF-1-dependent, Mø-mediated destructive inflammation in the skin leading to CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Fas(lpr) but not lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. Taken together, CSF-1 is envisioned as the match and lupus susceptibility as the tinder leading to CLE.

  7. Tuberculosis and systemic lupus erythematosus: a case-control study in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-González, Pedro; Romero-Díaz, Juanita; Cervera-Hernández, Miguel Enrique; Ocampo-Torres, Mario; Chaires-Garza, Luis Gerardo; Lastiri-González, Ernesto Alejandro; Atisha-Fregoso, Yemil; Bobadilla-Del-Valle, Miriam; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José

    2018-04-20

    To determine, among systemic lupus erythematosus patients, factors associated with active tuberculosis. We performed a case-control study, in a tertiary-care center in Mexico City. We defined cases as systemic lupus erythematosus patients with active tuberculosis and matched them 1:1 with systemic lupus erythematosus patients without tuberculosis (controls) by age, date of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis, and disease duration. We analyzed clinical variables, lupus disease activity (SLEDAI-2K), and accumulated damage (SLICC/ARC-DI). We performed a nonconditional logistic regression to determine factors associated with tuberculosis. We identified 72 tuberculosis cases among systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 58% were culture confirmed. Thirty-three percent (24/72) were pulmonary only, 47.2% (34/72) extrapulmonary only, and 19.4% both. After adjustment for age, gender, and socioeconomic status, SLEDAI-2K and SLICC/ARC-DI, a 1-year cumulative dose of prednisone ≥ 3 g (odds ratios (OR), 18.85; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 6.91-51.45) was associated with tuberculosis, and the antimalarial treatment was protective (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.04-0.36). Among systemic lupus erythematosus patients, cumulative dose of prednisone is associated with tuberculosis. Further research is required to elucidate the protective effect of antimalarial drugs for tuberculosis. Preventive strategies must be implemented in patients at risk.

  8. Lupus anticoagulant, disease activity and low complement in the first trimester are predictive of pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankee, Anil; Petri, Michelle; Magder, Laurence S

    2015-01-01

    Multiple factors, including proteinuria, antiphospholipid syndrome, thrombocytopenia and hypertension, are predictive of pregnancy loss in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the PROMISSE study of predictors of pregnancy loss, only a battery of lupus anticoagulant tests was predictive of a composite of adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined the predictive value of one baseline lupus anticoagulant test (dilute Russell viper venom time) with pregnancy loss in women with SLE. From the Hopkins Lupus Cohort, there were 202 pregnancies from 175 different women after excluding twin pregnancies and pregnancies for which we did not have a first trimester assessment of lupus anticoagulant. We determined the percentage of women who had a pregnancy loss in groups defined by potential risk factors. The lupus anticoagulant was determined by dilute Russell viper venom time with appropriate mixing and confirmatory testing. Generalised estimating equations were used to calculate p values, accounting for repeated pregnancies in the same woman. The age at pregnancy was 40 (3%). 55% were Caucasian and 34% African-American. Among those with lupus anticoagulant during the first trimester, 6/16 (38%) experienced a pregnancy loss compared with only 16/186 (9%) of other pregnancies (p=0.003). In addition, those with low complement or higher disease activity had a higher rate of pregnancy loss than those without (p=0.049 and 0.005, respectively). In contrast, there was no association between elevated anticardiolipin in the first trimester and pregnancy loss. The strongest predictor of pregnancy loss in SLE in the first trimester is the lupus anticoagulant. In addition, moderate disease activity by the physician global assessment and low complement measured in the first trimester were predictive of pregnancy loss. These data suggest that treatment of the lupus anticoagulant could be considered, even in the absence of history of pregnancy loss.

  9. Speckle tracking echocardiography in acute lupus myocarditis: comparison to conventional echocardiography

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    Riëtte Du Toit

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Lupus myocarditis occurs in 5–10% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. No single feature is diagnostic of lupus myocarditis. Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE can detect subclinical left ventricular dysfunction in SLE patients, with limited research on its utility in clinical lupus myocarditis. We report on STE in comparison to conventional echocardiography in patients with clinical lupus myocarditis. Methods and results: A retrospective study was done at a tertiary referral hospital in South Africa. SLE patients with lupus myocarditis were included and compared to healthy controls. Echocardiographic images were reanalyzed, including global longitudinal strain through STE. A poor echocardiographic outcome was defined as final left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF <40%. 28 SLE patients fulfilled the criteria. Global longitudinal strain correlated with global (LVEF: r = −0.808; P = 0.001 and regional (wall motion score: r = 0.715; P < 0.001 function. In patients presenting with a LVEF ≥50%, global longitudinal strain (P = 0.023, wall motion score (P = 0.005 and diastolic function (P = 0.004 were significantly impaired vs controls. Following treatment, LVEF (35–47% (P = 0.023 and wall motion score (1.88–1.5 (P = 0.017 improved but not global longitudinal strain. Initial LVEF (34%; P = 0.046 and global longitudinal strain (−9.5%; P = 0.095 were lower in patients with a final LVEF <40%. Conclusions: This is the first known report on STE in a series of patients with clinical lupus myocarditis. Global longitudinal strain correlated with regional and global left ventricular function. Global longitudinal strain, wall motion score and diastolic parameters may be more sensitive markers of lupus myocarditis in patients presenting with a preserved LVEF ≥50%. A poor initial LVEF and global longitudinal strain were associated with a persistent LVEF <40%. Echocardiography is a non-invasive tool with diagnostic and

  10. Contraception in women with systemic erythematosus lupus = Anticoncepción en mujeres con lupus eritematoso sistémico

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    Luis Alonso González Naranjo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of contraceptives, particularly of those containing estrogens by women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, has been thought to carry risks such as disease exacerbation, thrombosis and other adverse effects. However, the available evidence suggests that many women with SLE, particularly those with stable disease, are not at increased risk of disease flare while taking oral contraceptives and therefore can be good candidates for most contraceptive methods, including the hormonal ones. Contrariwise, women with positive antiphospholipid antibodies are at increased risk of arterial and venous thrombosis and therefore the use of combined hormonal contraceptive methods should be avoided in them.

  11. The SOLA Team: A Star Formation Project To Study the Soul of Lupus with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Saito, M.; Rodon, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2017-06-01

    The SOLA team is a multi-national and multi-wavelength collaboration composed by scientists with technical expertise in ALMA and in infrared and optical techniques. The aim of the team is to establish a low-mass star formation scenario based on the Lupus molecular clouds. In this talk I will present our unique catalog of pre-stellar and proto-stellar cores toward Lupus molecular clouds, the results on our latest studies in protoplanetary disks, as well as our ALMA Cycle 3 data aiming at testing the formation mechanism of sub-stellar objects in Lupus molecular clouds.

  12. Isolated Tricuspid Valve Libman-Sacks Endocarditis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Secondary Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unic, Daniel; Planinc, Mislav; Baric, Davor; Rudez, Igor; Blazekovic, Robert; Senjug, Petar; Sutlic, Zeljko

    2017-04-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis, one of the most prevalent cardiac presentations of systemic lupus erythematosus, typically affects the aortic or mitral valve; tricuspid valve involvement is highly unusual. Secondary antiphospholipid syndrome increases the frequency and severity of cardiac valvular disease in systemic lupus erythematosus. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman with lupus and antiphospholipid syndrome whose massive tricuspid regurgitation was caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis isolated to the tricuspid valve. In addition, we discuss this rare case in the context of the relevant medical literature.

  13. A pediatric case of disseminated mutilating lupus vulgaris: A disgrace for society

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    Suresh Kumar Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus vulgaris (LV is a chronic and progressive form of cutaneous tuberculosis. The lesions may sometimes be associated with extensive destruction of tissue resulting in marked disfigurement and morbidity. A high index of suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis and treatment and thereby prevention of cosmetic deformity. Lupus vulgaris presenting as disseminated mutilating lesions in a child is uncommon, especially in today's era. Herein, we report an unusual case of lupus vulgaris with coexistence of multiple ulcerative mutilating lesions over face and classical plaque over distant site (right thigh in a 9 year old girl.

  14. A multicenter study of outcome in systemic lupus erythematosus. II. Causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, S; Ginzler, E M; Diamond, H S; Weiner, M; Schlesinger, M; Fries, J F; Wasner, C; Medsger, T A; Ziegler, G; Klippel, J H; Hadler, N M; Albert, D A; Hess, E V; Spencer-Green, G; Grayzel, A; Worth, D; Hahn, B H; Barnett, E V

    1982-06-01

    Causes of death were examined for 1,103 systemic lupus erythematosus patients who were followed from 1965 to 1978 at 9 centers that participated in the Lupus Survival Study Group. A total of 222 patients (20%) died. Lupus-related organ system involvement (mainly active nephritis) and infection were the most frequent primary causes of death. Causes of death were similar throughout the followup period. Hemodialysis had little impact on the length of survival for patients with nephritis. Active central nervous system disease and myocardial infarction were infrequent causes of death. There were no deaths from malignancy.

  15. Tumid lupus erythematosus: An intriguing dermatopathological connotation treated successfully with topical tacrolimus and hydroxyxhloroquine combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumid lupus erythematosus (LE is a rare variant of lupus erythematosus, which often follows a favorable course. A case of a young woman is illustrated, who presented with an asymptomatic erythematous, solitary plaque over her face. Histopathological and direct immunofluorescence examination established a diagnosis of tumid lupus erythematosus. She responded slowly and near-completely to hydroxychloroquine sulfate; however, a flare up occurred a month later. Addition of topical tacrolimus 0.1% resulted in complete regression without leaving any residual changes. No recurrence was seen subsequently.

  16. Tumid Lupus Erythematosus: An Intriguing Dermatopathological Connotation Treated Successfully with Topical Tacrolimus and Hydroxyxhloroquine Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prashant; Sharma, Sonal; Yadav, Pravesh; Namdeo, Chaitanya; Mahajan, Garima

    2014-01-01

    Tumid lupus erythematosus (LE) is a rare variant of lupus erythematosus, which often follows a favorable course. A case of a young woman is illustrated, who presented with an asymptomatic erythematous, solitary plaque over her face. Histopathological and direct immunofluorescence examination established a diagnosis of tumid lupus erythematosus. She responded slowly and near-completely to hydroxychloroquine sulfate; however, a flare up occurred a month later. Addition of topical tacrolimus 0.1% resulted in complete regression without leaving any residual changes. No recurrence was seen subsequently. PMID:24700961

  17. Validity of LupusQoL-China for the assessment of health related quality of life in Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-li Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To adapt and assess the validity and reliability of LupusQoL for use in Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. METHODS: Debriefing interviews of subjects with SLE guided the language modifications of the tool. The process of adaptation proceeded according to the guideline and pre-testing results of LupusQoL-China. 220 SLE patients completed LupusQoL-China and a generic preference-based measurement of health EuroQoL scale (EQ-5D, and 20 patients repeated them after 2 weeks. Internal consistency (ICR and test-retest (TRT reliability, convergent and discriminant validity were examined. Factor analysis and Rasch analysis were performed. RESULTS: The mean (SD age of the 208 subjects with SLE was 33.93 (± 9.19 years. ICR and TRT of the eight domains ranged from 0.811 to 0.965 and 0.836 to 0.974, respectively. The LupusQoL-China domains demonstrated substantial evidence of construct validity when compared with equivalent domains on the EQ-5D (physical health and usual activities r = -0.63, pain and pain/discomfort r = -0.778, emotional health and anxiety/depression r = -0.761, planning and usual activities r = -0.560. Most LupusQoL-China domains could discriminate patients with varied disease activities and end-organ damage (according to SELENA-SLEDAI and SLICC-DI. The principal component analysis revealed six factors, and confirmatory factor analysis result of which is similar to eight factors model. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide evidence that the LupusQoL-China is valid as a disease-specific HRQoL assessment tool for Chinese patients with SLE.

  18. Evaluation of cerebral perfusion in patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus using 123I-IMP SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Atsuko; Shishido, Fumio; Kato, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Seino, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    In the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), central nervous system (CNS) complications occur at a high frequency. An accurate diagnosis of CNS lupus, differentiated from secondary CNS involvement, is difficult. CNS lupus is indicative of advancing primary disease and is treated by steroid pulse therapy or increased dosage of steroids. In contrast, if symptoms are caused by secondary CNS complications, it is possible to observe or treat these complications using symptomatic therapy. We examined whether quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured using cerebral perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used to differentiate CNS lupus from secondary CNS involvement. We divided 18 SLE patients with CNS symptoms into a CNS lupus group and a non-CNS lupus group, and then compared the mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) of each group of patients. SPECT was performed with N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I] iodoamphetamine (IMP), with quantitation carried out by table look-up and autoradiographic methods. The mCBF of both groups was decreased; however, the mCBF of patients with CNS lupus was significantly lower than that of non-CNS lupus patients. Quantitative CBF may provide a useful tool to distinguish CNS lupus from non-CNS lupus. (author)

  19. Low prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in hospitalized patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: review of a clinical data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, T M; Mahadeshwar, P; Nguyen, S; Li, J; Kapoor, S; Bathon, J; Giles, J; Askanase, A

    2017-12-01

    Objective In the era of powerful immunosuppression, opportunistic infections are an increasing concern in systemic lupus erythematosus. One of the best-studied opportunistic infections is Pneumocystis pneumonia; however, the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in systemic lupus erythematosus is not clearly defined. This study evaluates the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in hospitalized systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with a focus on validating the Pneumocystis pneumonia and systemic lupus erythematosus diagnoses with clinical information. Methods This retrospective cohort study evaluates the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in all systemic lupus erythematosus patients treated at Columbia University Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital between January 2000 and September 2014, using electronic medical record data. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and patients with renal transplants (including both early and late post-transplant patients) represented immunocompromised control groups. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Pneumocystis pneumonia, HIV/AIDS, or renal transplant were identified using diagnostic codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9). Results Out of 2013 hospitalized systemic lupus erythematosus patients, nine had presumed Pneumocystis pneumonia, yielding a low prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in systemic lupus erythematosus of 0.45%. Three of the nine Pneumocystis pneumonia cases were patients with concomitant systemic lupus erythematosus and HIV/AIDS. Only one of these nine cases was histologically confirmed as Pneumocystis pneumonia, in a patient with concomitant systemic lupus erythematosus and HIV/AIDS and a CD4 count of 13 cells/mm 3 . The prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in renal transplant patients and HIV/AIDS patients was 0.61% and 5.98%, respectively. Conclusion Given the reported high rate of adverse effects

  20. Intracranial hypertension: A rare presentation of lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Praveen; Nair, Anishkumar; Cherian, Ajith; Sibi, N S; Kumar, Ashwini

    2010-07-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with bilateral papilledema, growth retardation and absent secondary sexual characters. He had a past history of fever, headache and fatigue of 6 months duration. The diagnosis of intracranial hypertension (IH) was confirmed by an increased intracranial pressure and normal neuroimaging studies of the brain, except for partial empty sella, prominent perioptic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and buckling of optic nerves. Evaluation showed erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 150 mm/hr, positive antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti dsDNA and anti ribosomal P protein. Renal biopsy revealed diffuse segmental proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) class IV S (A) confirming the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Treatment of LN with intravenous pulse methyl prednisolone and cyclophosphamide was effective in normalizing the CSF pressure, resulting in express and dramatic resolution of symptomatology. In a case of IH, SLE must be considered. IH, growth retardation and absence of sexual characters may be presenting manifestations of a chronic systemic inflammatory disease like SLE. These manifestations may act as a pointer to associated advanced grades of LN, which can be totally asymptomatic and missed without a renal biopsy.

  1. IgE in lupus pathogenesis: Friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Jean-François; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Charles, Nicolas; Blanco, Patrick; Richez, Christophe

    2018-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease involving multiple immunological pathways. Recently, several studies have suggested an implication of Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the pathophysiology of SLE. In the Lyn -/- and FcγIIB -/- .Yaa lupus mouse models, autoreactive IgE activate basophils, and promote a Th2 environment with, subsequently, production of autoantibodies by plasma cells. Autoreactive IgE has been also shown to play a role in the activation of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), in synergy with IgG, which results in an increase of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production. In contrast, a protective effect of total non-autoreactive IgE has also been suggested, through a decreased ability of FcεRI-triggered pDCs to secrete IFN-α. This review summarizes in a comprehensive manner the emerging recent literature in the field, and propose new concepts to reconcile the observations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Autoimmune retinopathy associated with systemic lupus erythematosus: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadakarn Wuthisiri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual loss in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE due to autoimmune retinopathy (AIR is rare and easily misdiagnosed as hydroxychloroquine retinopathy. We report the rare clinical presentation of severe visual loss in a patient with SLE due to nonparaneoplastic AIR as differentiated from hydroxychloroquine toxicity. A 70-year-old female diagnosed and treated for lupus for 17 years and had been taking hydroxychloroquine for 15 years. Over the past 2 years, she developed progressive peripheral visual loss oculus uterque which rapidly advanced in the latter 6 months. Hydroxychloroquine toxicity was initially suspected, but diagnostic testing revealed a retinal degeneration. Antiretinal autoantibody testing using Western blot analysis revealed autoantibodies against 44-kDa, 46-kDa (anti-enolase, and 68-kDa proteins. Visual acuity improved in the first 6 months of treatment with mycophenolate mofetil. Our case suggests that AIR should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rapid, severe visual loss in patients with hydroxychloroquine treatment.

  3. Ocular manifestations of systematic lupus erythematosus in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M.; Al-Hemidan, Amal I.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and spectrum of ocular manifestations in children with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to examine the correlation of the ocular manifestations with disease activity , other organ involvement and the presence of circulating of autoantibodies. This study was performed at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from June 2002 to November 2002. It included detailed eye examination, measuring circulating autoantibodies (antinuclear,anti phospholipid antibodies) and circulation of SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI). 52 consecutive children (45 females) with SLE completed the evaluation .The mean age of the patients was 11.3 years and the mean SLEDAI was 9.5 Thirty patients (57.7%) had the disease for more than 1 year. 18 patients(34.6%) had ocular manifestations.7 patients had abnormal . Schirmer's test. 5 patients had ratinal vascular lesions. 1 patient had bilateral iridocyclitis. 3 patients had unilateral optic neuropathy and 11 patients had visual field defects.Fisher extract test revealed positive correlation between optic neuropathy and central nervous system(CNS) involvement. There was no correlation among other variables; probably due to sample size. Ocular manifestations including sight threatening complications are not rare in children with SLE.Optic neuropathy had a strong prediction for CNS lupus. (author)

  4. Lupus Flare: An Uncommon Presentation of Disseminated Gonorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uyen To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gonorrhea is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the US with 700,000 annual cases. Although most cases of gonorrhea are localized, approximately 0.5–3% become disseminated. Here we discuss a rare case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE who developed septic shock from disseminated gonorrhea infection (DGI. Our patient is a 24-year-old woman with SLE, mixed connective tissue disease with cutaneous vasculitis, and lupus nephritis who presented with several weeks of malaise and generalized body aches associated with a diffuse rash along her fingers, palms, and trunk. Infectious workup was unrevealing with the exception of a positive gonorrhea test obtained from a cervical swab. Given her symptoms of tenosynovitis, the appearance of her skin lesions, and her positive gonorrhea test, she was diagnosed with septic shock secondary to DGI. With antibiotic treatment, the patient reported a dramatic improvement of the pain in her swollen joints and her rash receded. Patients diagnosed with SLE carry an increased risk of gonorrhea regardless of whether or not they are being treated for their SLE. Although it is well-documented that SLE is associated with severe DGI, few describe it resulting in overt septic shock.

  5. Serum markers thrombophilia in pregnant women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Marcon de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: to determine the frequency of serum markers for hereditary and acquired thrombophilia and their association with pregnancy in women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE. Methods: a case-control study was conducted among 25 pregnant women with SLE (study group and 32 pregnant women without known disease and with at least one previous pregnancy (control group. The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies and hereditary thrombophilia were examined in both groups. We used the y2 Test with Yates correction or Fisher's Exact Test to verify the associations and calculate the relative risk. Results: thrombophilia was present in 72.0% of pregnant women with SLE and in 6.0% of patients in the control group. A significant association was found between the presence of SLE and serum markers for hereditary thrombophilia / antiphospholipid antibodies (p<0.05. The relative risks for antiphospholipid antibodies were 13.20 (ICR95%= 1.81 - 96.46 in pregnant women with SLE, 7.26 (CI95%= 1.77 - 29.86 for the presence of serum markers of hereditary thrombophilia and 7.92 (CI95%= 2.62 - 3.94 for the presence of hereditary thrombophilia and/or antiphospholipid antibodies. Conclusions: the identification of markers for hereditary and/or acquired thrombophilia in pregnant women with lupus may be clinically useful to determine which patients have a higher risk of obstetric complications.

  6. Treatment of intractable lupus nephritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strober, S.; Field, E.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kotzin, B.L.; Shemesh, O.; Engleman, E.; Ross, J.C.; Myers, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    Ten patients with lupus nephritis and marked proteinuria (3.9 g or more/d) that did not respond adequately to treatment with prednisone alone or prednisone in combination with azathioprine were treated with total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled feasibility study. Within 6 weeks after the start of total lymphoid irradiation, the serum albumin level rose in all patients in association with a reduction in the serum level of anti-DNA antibodies, an increase in the serum complement level, or both. Improvement in these variables persisted in eight patients followed for more than 1 year, with the stabilization or reduction of the serum creatinine level. Urinary leakage of albumin was substantially reduced in all patients. Side effects associated with radiotherapy included transient constitutional complaints in ten patients, transient blood element depressions in three, localized viral and bacterial infections in four, and ovarian failure in one. The results suggest that total lymphoid irradiation may provide an alternative to cytotoxic drugs in the treatment of lupus nephritis

  7. Fc receptor gamma subunit polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ansari, Aliya; Ollier, W.E.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Gul, Ahmet; Inanac, Murat; Ordi, Jose; Teh, Lee-Suan; Hajeer, Ali H.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the possible association between Fc receptor gamma polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We have investigated the full FcR gamma gene for polymorphisms using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand confirmational polymorphisms and DNA sequencing .The polymorphisms identified were genotype using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Systemic lupus erythematosus cases and controls were available from 3 ethnic groups: Turkish, Spanish and Caucasian. The study was conducted in the year 2001 at the Arthritis Research Campaign, Epidemiology Unit, Manchester University Medical School, Manchester, United Kingdom. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, 2 in the promoter, one in intron 4 and, 2 in the 3'UTR. Four of the 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were relatively common and investigated in the 3 populations. Allele and genotype frequencies of all 4 investigated SNPs were not statistically different cases and controls. fc receptor gamma gene does not appear to contribute to SLE susceptibility. The identified polymorphisms may be useful in investigating other diseases where receptors containing the FcR gamma subunit contribute to the pathology. (author)

  8. The African Lupus Genetics Network (ALUGEN) registry: standardized, prospective follow-up studies in African patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkinson, B; Mapiye, D; Jayne, D; Kalla, A; Tiffin, N; Okpechi, I

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence and severity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) differs between ethnic groups and geographical regions. Although initially reported as rare, there is growing evidence that SLE is prevalent and runs a severe course in Africa. There is a paucity of prospective studies on African SLE patients. The African Lupus Genetics Network (ALUGEN) is a multicentred framework seeking to prospectively assess outcomes in SLE patients in Africa. Outcomes measured will be death, hospital admission, disease activity flares, and SLE-related damage. We will explore predictors for these outcomes including clinical, serological, socio-demographic, therapeutic and genetic factors. Further, we will investigate comorbidities and health-related quality of life amongst these patients. Data of patients recently (≤ 5 yrs) diagnosed with SLE will be collected at baseline and annual follow-up visits, and captured electronically. The ALUGEN project will facilitate standardized data capture for SLE cases in Africa, allowing participating centres to develop their own SLE registries, and enabling collaboration to enrich our understanding of inter-ethnic and regional variations in disease expression. Comprehensive, high-quality multi-ethnic data on African SLE patients will expand knowledge of the disease and inform clinical practice, in addition to augmenting research capacity and networking links and providing a platform for future biomarker and interventional studies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. The Involvement of MicroRNAs in Modulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Paulina; von Rauchhaupt, Ekaterina

    2018-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs), represent a family of RNA molecules that do not translate into protein. Nevertheless, they have the ability to regulate gene expression and play an essential role in immune cell differentiation and function. MicroRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in various tissues, and changes in their expression have been associated with several pathological processes. Yet, their roles in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis (LN) remain to be elucidated. Both SLE and LN are characterized by a complex dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immunity. Recently, significant findings have been made in understanding SLE through the use of genetic variant identification and expression pattern analysis and mouse models, as well as epigenetic analyses. Abnormalities in immune cell responses, cytokine and chemokine production, cell activation, and apoptosis have been linked to a unique expression pattern of a number of miRNAs that have been implicated in the immune pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. The recent evidence that significantly increased the understanding of the pathogenesis of SLE drives a renewed interest in efficient therapy targets. This review aims at providing an overview of the current state of research on the expression and role of miRNAs in the immune pathogenesis of SLE and LN. PMID:29854836

  10. Being a victim or an aggressor: Different functions of triadic post-conflict interactions in wolves (Canis lupus lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoni, Giada; Palagi, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Animals adopt different behavioral strategies to cope with the conflict of interests coming from the competition over limited resources. Starting from the study on chimpanzees, post-conflict third-party affiliation (the affiliative contact provided by a third-party toward the victim--VTA--or the aggressor--ATA) was investigated mainly in primates. Later, this post-conflict mechanism has been demonstrated also in other mammals, such as wallabies, horses, dolphins, domestic dogs, and wolves. Here, we present data on triadic post-conflict affiliation in wolves (Canis lupus lupus) by exploring some of the hypotheses already proposed for primates and never tested before in other social mammals. In this carnivore species, the study of VTA and ATA revealed that these strategies cannot be considered as a unique behavioral category since they differ in many functional aspects. VTA serves to protect the victim by reducing the likelihood of reiterated attacks from the previous aggressor and to reinforce the relationship shared by the third-party and the victim. On the other hand, ATA has a role in bystander protection by limiting the renewed attacks of the previous aggressor toward uninvolved group-members (potential third-parties). In conclusion, exploring VTA and ATA gives the opportunity to concurrently demonstrate some functional differences in triadic post-conflict affiliation according to the different targets of bystanders (victims or aggressors). The data comparison between primates and other social mammals should permit to open new lines of research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Involvement of MicroRNAs in Modulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarpisheh, Mohsen; Köhler, Paulina; von Rauchhaupt, Ekaterina; Lech, Maciej

    2018-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs), represent a family of RNA molecules that do not translate into protein. Nevertheless, they have the ability to regulate gene expression and play an essential role in immune cell differentiation and function. MicroRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in various tissues, and changes in their expression have been associated with several pathological processes. Yet, their roles in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis (LN) remain to be elucidated. Both SLE and LN are characterized by a complex dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immunity. Recently, significant findings have been made in understanding SLE through the use of genetic variant identification and expression pattern analysis and mouse models, as well as epigenetic analyses. Abnormalities in immune cell responses, cytokine and chemokine production, cell activation, and apoptosis have been linked to a unique expression pattern of a number of miRNAs that have been implicated in the immune pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. The recent evidence that significantly increased the understanding of the pathogenesis of SLE drives a renewed interest in efficient therapy targets. This review aims at providing an overview of the current state of research on the expression and role of miRNAs in the immune pathogenesis of SLE and LN.

  12. Fc gamma receptors in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reefman, E; Dijstelbloem, HM; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM; Bijl, M

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, a systemic autoimmune disorder, is characterized by the production of autoantibodies to nuclear constituents and inflammatory lesions in multiple organ systems. Although the pathogenesis of the disease is largely unknown, recent studies have suggested that disturbances

  13. [Systemic lupus erythematosus masking the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A report on four cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyla, Przemysław; Kucharz, Eugeniusz J

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic inflammatory disease of connective tissue with an unknown etiology and a rich clinical picture with involvement of multiple organs. Given the rich symptomatology, application of the current classification criteria is associated with a significant risk of attributing symptoms of other pathologies to lupus and/or other connective tissue disease. Inherited and acquired immune deficiencies may sometimes demonstrate a lupus-like clinical symptomatology. In this work we reviewed 4 of cases referred to the Department of Internal Diseases and Rheumatology of the Silesian Medical University in Katowice with suspected or confirmed systemic lupus erythematosus. A positive anti-HIV antibody test led to the diagnosis of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Due to the close similarity of the clinical picture and the presence of antinuclear antibodies in both diseases, the authors postulate that the anti-HIV antibody test should be done routinely in patients with connective tissue diseases.

  14. Photoprotective behaviour and sunscreen use: impact on vitamin D levels in cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cusack, Caitriona

    2008-10-01

    Sun exposure of the skin, independent of dietary sources, may provide sufficient vitamin D in healthy individuals. A recent study of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus concluded that over 70% of them restrict their sun exposure.

  15. Replication of recently identified systemic lupus erythematosus genetic associations: a case-control study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suarez-Gestal, M.; Calaza, M.; Endreffy, E.; Pullmann, R.; Ordi-Ros, J.; Sebastiani, D.G.; Růžičková, Šárka; Santos, J.M.; Papasteriades, C.; Marchini, M.; Skopouli, F.N.; Suarez, A.; Blanco, F.J.; D'Alfonso, S.; Bijl, M.; Carreira, P.; Witte, T.; Migliaresi, S.; Gomez-Reino, J.J.; Gonzalez, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2009), R69 ISSN 1478-6362 Keywords : Single nucleotide polymorphism susceptibility * sytemic lupus erythematosus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.271, year: 2009

  16. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary referral center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kole Alakes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with multiorgan involvement. The skin is the second most commonly affected organ. SLE with skin lesions can produce considerable morbidity resulting from painful skin lesions, alopecia, disfigurement, etc. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific (LE specific or may be non specific (LE non specific. Acute cutaneous LE (Lupus specific has a strong association with systemic disease and non-specific skin lesions always indicate disease activity for which patients present to rheumatologists and internists. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for most efficient management. Aims: The aims of this study were to evaluate the patterns and prevalence of skin lesions in patients with SLE and to assess the relationship between skin lesions and other systemic involvement. Materials and Methods: At the Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, IPGME&R in Kolkata, 150 patients with SLE fulfilling the clinical and laboratory criteria of the American Rheumatology Association (updated 1982 were examined and followed-up for cutaneous manifestations between January 2002 and January 2007. Results: Skin lesions were important clinical features. About 45 patients (30% presented with skin lesions although all patients had skin lesions during the follow-up period. Skin changes noted were as follows: Lupus specific lesions: malar rash in 120 patients (80%, photosensitive dermatitis in 75 patients (50%, generalized maculopapular rash in 40 patients (26.67%, discoid rash in 30 patients (20%, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE in 5 patients (3.34%, lupus profundus in 5 patients (3.34%. The lupus non-specific lesions were non-scarring alopecia in 130 patients (86.67%, oral ulcers in 85 patients (56.67%, vasculitic lesions in 50 patients (33.34%, bullous lesions in 15 patients (10%, Raynaud′s phenomenon in 10 patients (6

  17. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis-Like Lesions and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Possibly Triggered by Sulfasalazine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Gül, Cigdem; Andersen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    elevated ferritin, and muscle wasting. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made, and mycophenolate mofetil and systemic glucocorticoids brought this severe disease under control. Toxic epidermal necrolysis-like lesions and hemophagocytic syndrome have been reported as manifestations of systemic...... lupus erythematosus. This patient possibly had spondyloarthritis or an undifferentiated connective tissue disease at presentation, and we suggest, based on the timing of events, that sulfasalazine may have acted as a trigger of the severe disease manifestations....

  18. Association of STAT4 polymorphism with severe renal insufficiency in lupus nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Bolin

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis is a cause of significant morbidity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and its genetic background has not been completely clarified. The aim of this investigation was to analyze single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for association with lupus nephritis, its severe form proliferative nephritis and renal outcome, in two Swedish cohorts. Cohort I (n = 567 SLE cases, n = 512 controls was previously genotyped for 5676 SNPs and cohort II (n = 145 SLE cases, n = 619 controls was genotyped for SNPs in STAT4, IRF5, TNIP1 and BLK. Case-control and case-only association analyses for patients with lupus nephritis, proliferative nephritis and severe renal insufficiency were performed. In the case-control analysis of cohort I, four highly linked SNPs in STAT4 were associated with lupus nephritis with genome wide significance with p = 3.7 × 10(-9, OR 2.20 for the best SNP rs11889341. Strong signals of association between IRF5 and an HLA-DR3 SNP marker were also detected in the lupus nephritis case versus healthy control analysis (p <0.0001. An additional six genes showed an association with lupus nephritis with p <0.001 (PMS2, TNIP1, CARD11, ITGAM, BLK and IRAK1. In the case-only meta-analysis of the two cohorts, the STAT4 SNP rs7582694 was associated with severe renal insufficiency with p = 1.6 × 10(-3 and OR 2.22. We conclude that genetic variations in STAT4 predispose to lupus nephritis and a worse outcome with severe renal insufficiency.

  19. Isolated HBsAg positivity in a Mexican patient with newly diagnosed lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Delgado-García

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Isolated HBsAg positivity may result from multiple causes, one of which is cross-reactivity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a false-positive reading using CMIA technique in an active lupus patient. It is reasonable to stress that lupus patients with a positive screening for HBV should undergo a confirmatory assay (such as genomic detection, since this diagnosis may have important therapeutic implications.

  20. Antibodies to early EBV, CMV, and HHV6 antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, N S; Draborg, A H; Nielsen, C T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We investigated the antibody levels against early antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls, and further correlated these antibodies to haematology/biochemistry, serol......OBJECTIVES: We investigated the antibody levels against early antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls, and further correlated these antibodies to haematology...

  1. Widespread osteonecrosis of the foot in systemic lupus erythematosus: Radiographic and gross pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, D; Pineda, C; Trudell, D

    1985-01-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus required an amputation of the foot related to the presence of vascular disease and infection. Radiographs obtained prior to amputation revealed osteonecrosis in virtually every bone of the foot. Radiographic-pathologic correlation documented this widespread osseous involvement. Although ischemic necrosis of bone is a well-known feature of systemic lupus erythematosus, its localization in the small bones of the foot is rare.

  2. Heart rate variability in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review and methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusik, P S; Matusik, P T; Stein, P K

    2018-07-01

    Aim The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge about the scientific findings and potential clinical utility of heart rate variability measures in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods PubMed, Embase and Scopus databases were searched for the terms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and heart rate variability, including controlled vocabulary, when appropriate. Articles published in English and available in full text were considered. Finally, 11 publications were selected, according to the systematic review protocol and were analyzed. Results In general, heart rate variability, measured in the time and frequency domains, was reported to be decreased in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus compared with controls. In some systemic lupus erythematosus studies, heart rate variability was found to correlate with inflammatory markers and albumin levels. A novel heart rate variability measure, heart rate turbulence onset, was shown to be increased, while heart rate turbulence slope was decreased in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Reports of associations of changes in heart rate variability parameters with increasing systemic lupus erythematosus activity were inconsistent, showing decreasing heart rate variability or no relationship. However, the low/high frequency ratio was, in some studies, reported to increase with increasing disease activity or to be inversely correlated with albumin levels. Conclusions Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have abnormal heart rate variability, which reflects cardiac autonomic dysfunction and may be related to inflammatory cytokines but not necessarily to disease activity. Thus measurement of heart rate variability could be a useful clinical tool for monitoring autonomic dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus, and may potentially provide prognostic information.

  3. Recovery from UV-induced potentially lethal damage in systemic lupus erythematosus skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamansky, G B

    1986-08-01

    The repair of ultraviolet light-induced potentially lethal damage was investigated in density-inhibited skin fibroblast cell strains derived from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The effect of exposure to polychromatic ultraviolet light composed of environmentally relevant wavelengths or to the more commonly studied, short wavelength (254 nm) ultraviolet light was studied. Systemic lupus erythematosus cells, which are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light under growth promoting conditions, were able to repair potentially lethal damage as well as normal cells.

  4. Widespread osteonecrosis of the foot in systemic lupus erythematosus: Radiographic and gross pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnick, D.; Pineda, C.; Trudell, D.; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla

    1985-01-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus required an amputation of the foot related to the presence of vascular disease and infection. Radiographs obtained prior to amputation revealed osteonecrosis in virtually every bone of the foot. Radiographic-pathologic correlation documented this widespread osseous involvement. Although ischemic necrosis of bone is a well-known feature of systemic lupus erythematosus, its localization in the small bones of the foot is rare. (orig.)

  5. Recovery from UV-induced potentially lethal damage in systemic lupus erythematosus skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamansky, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    The repair of ultraviolet light-induced potentially lethal damage was investigated in density-inhibited skin fibroblast cell strains derived from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The effect of exposure to polychromatic ultraviolet light composed of environmentally relevant wavelengths or to the more commonly studied, short wavelength (254 nm) ultraviolet light was studied. Systemic lupus erythematosus cells, which are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light under growth promoting conditions, were able to repair potentially lethal damage as well as normal cells. (author)

  6. Appearance of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis following Thymectomy: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Yun-A; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2004-01-01

    We report two cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients who had undergone thymectomy. SLE developed in the patients 3 months or 13 yr after thymectomy, and polyarthritis was the main clinical manifestation of SLE. Both patients fulfilled at least four of the revised criteria for the classification of SLE. In this report, we describe two postthymectomy lupus patients and perform a comparative review of previous cases.

  7. Long-term mortality and renal outcome in a cohort of 100 patients with lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Dreyer, Lene; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term mortality and renal outcome in a cohort of Danish patients with lupus nephritis (LN) and to identify outcome predictors among findings registered at the time of the first renal biopsy.......To evaluate the long-term mortality and renal outcome in a cohort of Danish patients with lupus nephritis (LN) and to identify outcome predictors among findings registered at the time of the first renal biopsy....

  8. MRI changes in the central nervous system in a child with lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieron, M.A.; Khoromi, S.; Campos, A.

    1995-01-01

    We report on a 10-year-old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented in status epilepticus as the only manifestation of central nervous system involvement. MRI of the brain showed diffuse gray and white matter lesions which almost completely resolved after treatment with methylprednisolone. MRI findings in this child are similar to those in adults with diffuse clinical manifestations. The study is essential in the initial evaluation of patients suspected of central nervous system lupus. (orig.)

  9. MRI changes in the central nervous system in a child with lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieron, M A [Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of South Florida, Coll. of Medicine, Tampa, FL (United States); Khoromi, S [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of South Florida, Coll. of Medicine, Tampa, FL (United States); Campos, A [Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of South Florida, Coll. of Medicine, Tampa, FL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    We report on a 10-year-old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented in status epilepticus as the only manifestation of central nervous system involvement. MRI of the brain showed diffuse gray and white matter lesions which almost completely resolved after treatment with methylprednisolone. MRI findings in this child are similar to those in adults with diffuse clinical manifestations. The study is essential in the initial evaluation of patients suspected of central nervous system lupus. (orig.)

  10. Outcome of childhood lupus nephritis in Saudi children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Mohammed Al-Mayouf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim in this study is to report the long-term renal outcome of a cohort of Saudi children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. All patients with childhood lupus nephritis (cLN proved by renal biopsy seen between January 2000 and June 2015 were reviewed. The renal outcome was assessed according to serum creatinine level, protein/creatinine ratio at the last follow-up visit, and/or evidence of renal impairment during follow-up period and end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Additional outcome measures include accrual damage measured by pediatric adaptation of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (pSDI, and death related to SLE was determined. A total of 84 (72 females cLN patients with follow-up duration of 9.3 years (±5.2 were included in this study. The mean current age was 19.4 years (±5.5 and mean age at onset was 9.2 years (±2.4. The most frequent histopathological class was proliferative glomerulonephritis (64.3% followed by membranous nephritis (27.4%. The mean activity and chronicity indices were 5.9 (±3.9 and 2.9 (±2.2, respectively. Renal microthrombosis was found in 9 (10.7% patients. All patients treated with immunosuppressive medications; cyclophosphamide used in 64 followed by mycophenolate mofetil in 42, then azathioprine in 19 patients, while rituximab used in 24 patients. At the last follow-up visit, the mean serum creatinine was 147 umol/L (±197 and the mean protein/ creatinine ratio was 0.8 (± 1.1 while the mean total pSDI was 1.9 (±1.9 and mean renal SDI was 0.7 (±1.1. Sixteen (19% patients had ESRD and eight of them had class IV nephritis. However, there was no significant difference in ESRD by histological class. The overall survival rates were five years: 94% and 10 years: 87%. Infection was the leading cause of mortality. Our patients had severe cLN and required intensive treatment. Despite the survival rate is comparable to other studies, ESRD is more

  11. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. IV. LUPUS V AND VI OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezzi, Loredana; Vernazza, Pierre; Merin, Bruno; Allen, Lori E.; Evans, Neal J. II; Harvey, Paul M.; Joergensen, Jes K.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Peterson, Dawn; Cieza, Lucas A.; Dunham, Michael M.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nick F. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer C ore to Disk(c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including two transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main-sequence star from previous optical, near-IR, and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; ∼79% in Lupus V and ∼87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photoevaporation due to nearby OB stars is not responsible for the high fraction of Class III objects. The gas surface densities measured for Lupus V and VI lie below the star formation threshold (A V ∼ 8.6 mag), while this is not the case for other Lupus clouds. Thus, few Myr older age for the YSOs in Lupus V and VI with respect to other Lupus clouds is the most likely explanation of the high fraction of Class III objects in these clouds, while a higher characteristic stellar mass might be a contributing factor. Better constraints on the age and binary fraction of the Lupus clouds might solve the puzzle but require further observations.

  12. The involvement of galectin-3 in skin injury in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; Meng, Z; Han, Y; Cao, C; Tan, G; Wang, L

    2018-04-01

    Objective Our previous research suggested that anti-galectin-3 antibody was highly associated with the development of lupus skin lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study we aimed to investigate the involvement of galectin-3 in SLE skin damage. Methods The study consisted of 49 patients with SLE, 16 with dermatomyositis and 11 with systemic scleroderma and 20 healthy controls. Galectin-3 was examined by ELISA and immunohistochemical staining in serum and skin, respectively. Results Serum galectin-3 was significantly higher in patients with SLE than in those with dermatomyositis ( P  0.05). As for subtypes of skin lesions in SLE, galectin-3 expression was lower in chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus than in acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus ( P = 0.0439). Conclusion Serum galectin-3 is unlikely to play a role in the pathogenesis of lupus skin damage, but can be a potential biomarker for the measurement of SLE disease activity. Galectin-3 is greatly reduced in patients with lupus lesions compared with healthy controls, which may contribute to the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the skin.

  13. MR imaging findings suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muscal, Eyal; De Guzman, Marietta M.; Myones, Barry L. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and Pediatric Rheumatology Center, Houston, TX (United States); Traipe, Elfrides; Hunter, Jill V. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Brey, Robin L. [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Neurology, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Endothelial damage, hypertension and cytotoxic medications may serve as risk factors for the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in systemic lupus erythematosus. There have been few case reports of these findings in pediatric lupus patients. We describe clinical and neuroimaging findings in children and adolescents with lupus and a PRES diagnosis. We identified all clinically acquired brain MRIs of lupus patients at a tertiary care pediatric hospital (2002-2008). We reviewed clinical features, conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings of patients with gray- and white-matter changes suggestive of vasogenic edema and PRES. Six pediatric lupus patients presenting with seizures and altered mental status had MRI findings suggestive of PRES. In five children clinical and imaging changes were seen in conjunction with hypertension and active renal disease. MRI abnormalities were diffuse and involved frontal regions in five children. DWI changes reflected increased apparent diffusivity coefficient (unrestricted diffusion in all patients). Clinical and imaging changes significantly improved with antihypertensive and fluid management. MRI changes suggestive of vasogenic edema and PRES may be seen in children with active lupus and hypertension. The differential diagnosis of seizures and altered mental status should include PRES in children, as it does in adults. (orig.)

  14. Experimental anti-GBM disease as a tool for studying spontaneous lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuyang; Du, Yong; Mohan, Chandra

    2007-08-01

    Lupus nephritis is an immune-mediated disease, where antibodies and T cells both play pathogenic roles. Since spontaneous lupus nephritis in mouse models takes 6-12 months to manifest, there is an urgent need for a mouse model that can be used to delineate the pathogenic processes that lead to immune nephritis, over a quicker time frame. We propose that the experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease model might be a suitable tool for uncovering some of the molecular steps underlying lupus nephritis. This article reviews the current evidence that supports the use of the experimental anti-GBM nephritis model for studying spontaneous lupus nephritis. Importantly, out of about 25 different molecules that have been specifically examined in the experimental anti-GBM model and also spontaneous lupus nephritis, all influence both diseases concordantly, suggesting that the experimental model might be a useful tool for unraveling the molecular basis of spontaneous lupus nephritis. This has important clinical implications, both from the perspective of genetic susceptibility as well as clinical therapeutics.

  15. Defective B cell response to T-dependent immunization in lupus-prone mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Haitao; Sobel, Eric S.; Morel, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Lupus anti-nuclear Abs show the characteristics of Ag-driven T cell-dependent (TD) humoral responses. If autoAgs elicit the same response as exogenous Ags, lupus should enhance humoral responses to immunization. Blunted responses to various immunizations have, however, been reported in a significant portion of lupus patients. In this study, we show that lupus-prone B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (B6.TC) mice produce significantly less Ab in response to TD immunization than congenic controls, while producing significantly more total Ig. This blunted Ab response to TD Ag could be reconstituted with B6.TC B and CD4+ T cells. Multiple defects were found in the B6.TC response to NP-KLH as compared to total Ig, including a smaller percentage of B cells participating to the NP-response, a reduced entry into germinal centers, and highly defective production of NP-specific long-lived plasma cells in the bone marrow. B6.TC plasma cells expressed reduced levels of FcγRIIb, which suggests that reduced apoptosis in resident plasma cells prevents the establishment of newly-formed NP-specific plasma cells in bone marrow niches. Overall, these results show that lupus-prone mice responded differently to auto- and exogenous antigens and suggest that low FcγRIIb, hypergammaglobulinemia and high autoantibody production would be predictive of a poor response to immunization in lupus patients. PMID:18924209

  16. Pregnancy and renal outcomes in lupus nephritis: an update and guide to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramham, K; Soh, M C; Nelson-Piercy, C

    2012-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) commonly affects women of child bearing-age, and advances in treatment have resulted in an increasing number of women with renal involvement becoming pregnant. Knowledge of the relationship of the condition with respect to fertility and pregnancy is important for all clinicians involved in the care of women with lupus nephritis because they have complicated pregnancies. Presentation of lupus nephritis can range from mild asymptomatic proteinuria to rapidly progressive renal failure and may occur before, during, or after pregnancy. The timing of diagnosis may influence pregnancy outcome. Pregnancy may also affect the course of lupus nephritis. All pregnancies in women with lupus nephritis should be planned, preferably after more than six-months of quiescent disease. Predictors of poor obstetric outcome include active disease at conception or early pregnancy, baseline poor renal function with Creatinine >100 μmol/L, proteinuria >0.5 g/24 hours, presence of concurrent antiphospholipid syndrome and hypertension. In this review the most recent studies of pregnancies in women with lupus nephritis are discussed and a practical approach to managing women prepregnancy, during pregnancy and post-partum is described.

  17. MR imaging findings suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscal, Eyal; De Guzman, Marietta M.; Myones, Barry L.; Traipe, Elfrides; Hunter, Jill V.; Brey, Robin L.

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial damage, hypertension and cytotoxic medications may serve as risk factors for the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in systemic lupus erythematosus. There have been few case reports of these findings in pediatric lupus patients. We describe clinical and neuroimaging findings in children and adolescents with lupus and a PRES diagnosis. We identified all clinically acquired brain MRIs of lupus patients at a tertiary care pediatric hospital (2002-2008). We reviewed clinical features, conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings of patients with gray- and white-matter changes suggestive of vasogenic edema and PRES. Six pediatric lupus patients presenting with seizures and altered mental status had MRI findings suggestive of PRES. In five children clinical and imaging changes were seen in conjunction with hypertension and active renal disease. MRI abnormalities were diffuse and involved frontal regions in five children. DWI changes reflected increased apparent diffusivity coefficient (unrestricted diffusion in all patients). Clinical and imaging changes significantly improved with antihypertensive and fluid management. MRI changes suggestive of vasogenic edema and PRES may be seen in children with active lupus and hypertension. The differential diagnosis of seizures and altered mental status should include PRES in children, as it does in adults. (orig.)

  18. Biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus: challenges and prospects for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Amy H.; Manzi, Susan; Ahearn, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    The search for lupus biomarkers to diagnose, monitor, stratify, and predict individual response to therapy is currently more intense than ever before. This effort is essential for several reasons. First, epidemic overdiagnosis and underdiagnosis of lupus, even by certified rheumatologists, leads to errors in therapy with concomitant side effects which may be more serious than the disease itself. Second, identification of lupus flares remains as much an art as it is a science. Third, the capacity to stratify patients so as to predict those who will develop specific patterns of organ involvement is not currently possible but would potentially lead to preventive therapeutic strategies. Fourth, only one new drug for the treatment of lupus has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in over 50 years. A major obstacle in this pipeline is the dearth of biomarkers available to prove a patient has responded to an experimental therapeutic intervention. This review will summarize the challenges faced in the discovery and validation of lupus biomarkers, the most promising lupus biomarkers identified to date, and the promise of future directions. PMID:23904865

  19. Risk of infective endocarditis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in Taiwan: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y S; Chang, C C; Chen, Y H; Chen, W S; Chen, J H

    2017-10-01

    Objectives Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus are considered vulnerable to infective endocarditis and prophylactic antibiotics are recommended before an invasive dental procedure. However, the evidence is insufficient. This nationwide population-based study evaluated the risk and related factors of infective endocarditis in systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We identified 12,102 systemic lupus erythematosus patients from the National Health Insurance research-oriented database, and compared the incidence rate of infective endocarditis with that among 48,408 non-systemic lupus erythematosus controls. A Cox multivariable proportional hazards model was employed to evaluate the risk of infective endocarditis in the systemic lupus erythematosus cohort. Results After a mean follow-up of more than six years, the systemic lupus erythematosus cohort had a significantly higher incidence rate of infective endocarditis (42.58 vs 4.32 per 100,000 person-years, incidence rate ratio = 9.86, p endocarditis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Conclusions A higher risk of infective endocarditis was observed in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Risk factors for infective endocarditis in the systemic lupus erythematosus cohort included heart disease, chronic kidney disease, steroid pulse therapy within 30 days, and a recent invasive dental procedure within 30 days.

  20. Different types of headache in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badry, Reda; Gamal, Rania M

    2015-05-01

    Headache in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered a common neurological finding, although the relationship is unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate frequency and characteristics of different types of headache in patients with SLE. 40 SLE patients were chosen from those referred to the out patient clinic using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for the diagnosis of SLE. Headache classification was done regarding the ICD-II criteria in the patients. Headache severity was assessed by visual analog scale (VAS), and subjects with VAS ≥4 were included in the study. 30 patients out of 40 SLE patients (75%) have different headache types: tension type in 37.5% (n = 15) and migraine in 30% (n = 12), cluster 2.5% (n = 1), and intracranial hypertension 5% (n = 2) of all patients. Headache is frequent in SLE especially tension and migraine types, but overall, it is not associated with disease activity.

  1. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    1988-01-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis. (author)

  2. Autoantibody Profiling in Lupus Patients using Synthetic Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klecka, Martin; Thybo, Christina; Macaubas, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    specificity and reproducibility. Applying the ELISA tests to serological studies of pediatric and adult SLE, we identified novel clinical correlations. We also observed preferential recognition of a specific synthetic antigen by antibodies in SLE sera. We determined the probable basis for this finding using...... computational analyses, providing valuable structural information for future development of DNA antigens. Synthetic nucleic acid molecules offer the opportunity to standardize assays and to dissect antibody-antigen interactions.......Autoantibodies to nuclear components of cells (antinuclear antibodies, ANA), including DNA (a-DNA), are widely used in the diagnosis and subtyping of certain autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Despite clinical use over decades, precise, reproducible measurement of a...

  3. Immunoregulation of NKT Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junwei; Wu, Meng; Wang, Jing; Li, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with different variety of clinical manifestations. Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate lymphocytes that play a regulatory role during broad range of immune responses. A number of studies demonstrated that the quantity and quality of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells showed marked defects in SLE patients in comparison to healthy controls. This finding suggests that iNKT cells may play a regulatory role in the occurrence and development of this disease. In this review, we mainly summarized the most recent findings about the behavior of NKT cells in SLE patients and mouse models, as well as how NKT cells affect the proportion of T helper cells and the production of autoreactive antibodies in the progress of SLE. This will help people better understand the role of NKT cells in the development of SLE and improve the therapy strategy.

  4. Microchimeric cells in systemic lupus erythematosus: targets or innocent bystanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, A M

    2006-01-01

    During pregnancy maternal and fetal cells commute back and forth leading to fetal microchimerism in the mother and maternal microchimerism in the child that can persist for years after the birth. Chimeric fetal and maternal cells can be hematopoietic or can differentiate into somatic cells in multiple organs, potentially acting as targets for 'autoimmunity' and so have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases that resemble graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplantation. Fetal cells have been found in women with systemic lupus erythematosus, both in the blood and a target organ, the kidney, suggesting that they may be involved in pathogenesis. Future studies will address how the host immune system normally tolerates maternal and fetal cells or how the balance may change during autoimmunity.

  5. Multichannel perimetric alterations in systemic lupus erythematosus treated with hydroxychloroquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, David P; Monllor, Begoña; Camps, Vicente J; de Fez, Dolores

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. We report the first case of SLE in which visual alterations were evaluated with multichannel perimetry. Some achromatic and color vision alterations may be present in SLE, especially when treated with hydroxychloroquine. The sensitivity losses detected in the chromatic channels in the central zone of the visual field were consistent with the results of the FM 100 Hue color test. Likewise, the multichannel perimetry detected sensitivity losses in the parafoveal area for both chromatic channels, especially for the blue-yellow. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. USE OF MYCOPHENOLATE MOPHETYL IN PATIENT WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Valiyeva,

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reports a case of highly active SLE and lupusbnephritis in a 15 years old boy, who was treated with mycophenolate mophetyl the case was notable for high activity and aggressive course of the disease with rapid development of renal unsufficiency, polyorganic unsufficiency and antiphospholipid syndrome. Although the patient received an appropriate active therapy, including synchronized therapy (consisting of timebrelated plasmopherresis and infusions of cyclophosphamide and metyl prednisolone, glucocorticoides, preparations improving blood circulation (pentoxyphillin, dipiridamol, heparine, intravenous immunoglobulins, the disease activity control was unsufficient. The administration of mycophenolate mophetyl has led to diminuition of the disease activity, which was registered at the end of the second week of treatment, and finally has reached a level of clinical and laboratoty remission of the disease.Key words: systemic lupus erythematosus, mycophenolate mophetyl, children, treatment.

  7. Tuberculosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Spain's situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Miras, María del Mar; Hidalgo Tenorio, Carmen; Jimenez Alonso, Juan

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been an increase in the incidence of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) due mainly to earlier diagnosis, and increased survival. Tuberculosis in our country is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases, and one of the underlying causes would be HIV infection and increased immigration from areas with high tuberculosis prevalence; this phenomenon is truly important in patients with autoimmune diseases, as clinical presentation, severity and prognosis of tuberculosis are often different to that of immunocompetent patients. Studies of tuberculosis in patients with SLE are scarce and inconclusive, with many doubts existing about the performance or non-tuberculous prophylaxis in this population and the absence of a protocol due to lack of conclusive studies. New techniques for diagnosis of tuberculosis (IGRAs) may be useful in this population due to higher sensitivity than Mantoux, helping avoid false negatives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Manifestaciones mucocutaneas en pacientes con lupus eritematoso sistemico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Saurit

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue estudiar en pacientes con lupus eritematoso sistémico (LES la prevalencia de las lesiones mucocutáneas. Se incluyeron 77 pacientes. Las lesiones mucocutáneas fueron clasificadas en específicas y no específicas. Se definió el fototipo, exposición solar y fotoprotección. Se relacionaron las lesiones con la serología y la actividad de la enfermedad. Las lesiones específicas encontradas fueron: agudas (67.5%, lupus subagudo (6.3% y lesiones crónicas (26.0%. Las lesiones no específicas fueron: alopecia difusa (59%, fotosensibilidad (57%, fenómeno de Raynaud (47%, úlceras orales (16% y livedo reticularis (12%. El fototipo 3 (35% fue predominante; la exposición a las radiaciones ultravioletas fue moderada en 74%. Sólo 47% utilizaron protectores solares. Los anticuerpos anti-Ro se relacionaron en forma significativa con eritema malar, fotosensibilidad, livedo reticularis y alopecia. Los anticuerpos anti-Sm se relacionaron con fenómeno de Raynaud. Todas estas lesiones se observaron con mayor frecuencia en pacientes con enfermedad activa. La prevalencia de las manifestaciones mucocutáneas fue ligeramente más elevada a la informada en otras series. Hubo mayor prevalencia de eritema malar, alopecia difusa, fotosensibilidad y livedo reticularis en pacientes con enfermedad activa y anti-Ro (+ y de fenómeno Raynaud con anti-Sm.(+.The objective was to analyze the prevalence of mucocutaneous lesions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. During a 3-year period, we analyzed 77 patients with a diagnosis of SLE. The mucocutaneous lesions were classified into specific and non-specific. We defined skin type, sunlight exposure and photoprotection and correlated these lesions with serology and disease activity. Acute specific lesions were found in 67.5% of the patients, subacute lupus in 6.5% and chronic lesions in 26.0%. The most prevalent non-specific lesions were alopecia (59.7%, photosensitivity (57.1%, Raynaud

  9. Digital Blood Flow In Systemic Lupus Erythematosus By Photoplethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sanjay

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital vascular status in 10 patients of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE suffering for 1 to 5 years and 5 control (normal subjects was assessed by a highly sensitive, non-invasive technique called photoplethysmography (PPG. Six patients (Group A showed clinical sign. PPG recordings were done by applying the PPG probe serially to the distal phalanges of all the digits of four limbs with Velcro-strap at an ambient temperature of 27 to 31C and humidity 60 to 65% Diminished capillary flow. On average, 12 digits (60% in Group A and 8 digits (40% in group B patients showed reduced blood circulation. Degree of vascular impairment had no bearing upon the duration of the disease. The PPG has objectively shown digital vascular impairment in all SLE patients having no correlation with the extent of clinical manifestations and the duration of the disease.

  10. A Unique Case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pelvic Vasculitis

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    Pamela Traisak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is diverse and vasculitis can be a potential manifestation. Cutaneous lesions involving small vessels are the most frequent presentation. However, medium and large vessel vasculitis may present with life-threatening visceral manifestations. We present a unique case of pelvic vasculitis mimicking a pelvic mass as an initial presentation of SLE. There are case reports of systemic vasculitis involving the female genital tract with giant cell arteritis (GCA, polyarteritis nodosa (PAN, and granulomatous with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis (GPA/MPA, among others, but only a few cases attributed to SLE. Awareness of this condition and a prompt diagnosis are warranted as this is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition.

  11. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki and others

    1988-09-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis.

  12. Xeroderma pigmentosum exhibiting neurological disorders and systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Hananian, J; Cleaver, J E

    1980-01-01

    A patient is described who has a unique combination of symptoms that correspond with two sun-sensitive conditions: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both of these conditions have been suggested as being associated with a defect in DNA repair, but this is only clearly established for XP. The patient described is the only known case among US blacks, thus far, although African black cases are known. Her DNA repair levels are 20-30% of normal, within the range found for many XP cell cultures and consistent with her assignment to group C by other investigators. Unusual for group C cases, however, are the neurological disorders, some of which correspond to those found in the de Sanctis Cacchione form of XP, which is commonly assigned to group A. Whether the associated SLE is a consequence of some special aspect of this particular XP condition or whether it is fortuitous cannot be resolved at present. 25 references, 2 figures.

  13. Repair of uv damaged DNA in systemic lupus erythematosus. [Mice

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    Beighlie, D J; Teplitz, R L

    1975-06-01

    The NZB NZW hybrid mouse is an animal model of human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Two breeding schemes were devised using NZB, NZW, B/W, and CBA mice, which permit definitive decisions regarding genetic and/or viral origin of the disease. It is proposed that at least two factors must be involved: a genetic abnormality producing hyper-responsiveness to nucleic acid antigens, and a DNA repair defect which results in liberation of DNA and RNA when cells are lethally injured. Evidence is presented for a DNA repair deficit in human SLE lymphocytes following in vitro irradiation with ultraviolet (uv) light. Lymphocytes from adult New Zealand and control mice were found to lack normal amounts of endonuclease necessary for repairing uv damage.

  14. Prolonged intensive dominance behavior between gray wolves, Canis lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Cluff, H. Dean

    2010-01-01

    Dominance is one of the most pervasive and important behaviors among wolves in a pack, yet its significance in free-ranging packs has been little studied. Insights into a behavior can often be gained by examining unusual examples of it. In the High Arctic near Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, we videotaped and described an unusually prolonged and intensive behavioral bout between an adult male Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) and a male member of his pack, thought to be a maturing son. With tail raised, the adult approached a male pack mate about 50 m from us and pinned and straddled this packmate repeatedly over 6.5 minutes, longer than we had ever seen in over 50 years of studying wolves. We interpreted this behavior as an extreme example of an adult wolf harassing a maturing offspring, perhaps in prelude to the offspring?s dispersal.

  15. Association between systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis: lupoid sclerosis

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    Medina, Yimy F; Martinez, Jose B; Fernandez, Andres R; Quintana, Gerardo; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Gamarra, Antonio Iglesias

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with/without antiphospholipid syndrome are autoimmune illnesses. It has been described in many occasions the association of these two illnesses and the clinical picture of MS with characteristics of laboratory of SLE. When they affect to the central nervous system they can make it in a defined form for each illness or they can also make it in interposed or combined form of the two illnesses what has been called lupoid sclerosis; making that in some cases difficult the differentiation of the two illnesses and therefore to address the treatment. We present four cases of lupoid sclerosis, discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this entity and we make a differentiation of the multiple sclerosis with the neurological affectation of SLE especially for images and laboratory results.

  16. Regulatory T-Cell-Associated Cytokines in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Akiko Okamoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody production, complement activation, and immune complex deposition, resulting in tissue and organ damage. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for homeostatic control of inflammation, which involve both innate and adoptive immune responses, will enable the development of novel therapies for SLE. Regulatory T cells (Treg play critical roles in the induction of peripheral tolerance to self- and foreign antigens. Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ Treg, which characteristically express the transcription factor forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3, have been intensively studied because their deficiency abrogates self-tolerance and causes autoimmune disease. Moreover, regulatory cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10 also play a central role in controlling inflammatory processes. This paper focuses on Tregs and Treg-associated cytokines which might regulate the pathogenesis of SLE and, hence, have clinical applications.

  17. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Hepatosplenic Granuloma: A Rare Case

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    Anju Bharti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease which is known to present with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Case Report. A 15-year-old male presented with complaints of moderate grade fever and generalized body swelling. There was no history of cough, weight loss, joint pain, oral ulcerations, skin rash, photosensitivity, loss of hair, pain abdomen, jaundice, or any significant illness in the past. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography of the abdomen revealed hypodense lesions in both liver and spleen (without contrast enhancement, suggestive of granulomas along with few retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes. On the basis of immunological tests and renal biopsy report, SLE with hepatosplenic granulomatosis diagnosis was made. He was given pulse methylprednisolone 500 mg, for 3 days and he showed dramatic improvement clinically. Conclusion. Hepatic and splenic granulomas are not common in SLE, but this should be kept in differential diagnosis.

  18. The Real Culprit in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Abnormal Epigenetic Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease involving multiple organs and the presence of anti-nuclear antibodies. The pathogenesis of SLE has been intensively studied but remains far from clear. B and T lymphocyte abnormalities, dysregulation of apoptosis, defects in the clearance of apoptotic materials, and various genetic and epigenetic factors are attributed to the development of SLE. The latest research findings point to the association between abnormal epigenetic regulation and SLE, which has attracted considerable interest worldwide. It is the purpose of this review to present and discuss the relationship between aberrant epigenetic regulation and SLE, including DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs in patients with SLE, the possible mechanisms of immune dysfunction caused by epigenetic changes, and to better understand the roles of aberrant epigenetic regulation in the initiation and development of SLE and to provide an insight into the related therapeutic options in SLE. PMID:25988383

  19. A critical review of clinical trials in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Mary A.; Strand, Vibeke; Simon, Lee S.; Lipsky, Peter E.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    One challenge in caring for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a paucity of approved therapeutics for treatment of the diverse disease manifestations. In the last 60 years, only one drug, belimumab, has been approved for SLE treatment. Critical evaluation of investigator initiated and pharma-sponsored randomized controlled trials (RCTs) highlights barriers to successful drug development in SLE, including disease heterogeneity, inadequate trial size or duration, insufficient dose finding before initiation of large trials, handling of background medications, and choice of primary endpoint. Herein we examine lessons learned from landmark SLE RCTs and subsequent advances in trial design, as well as discuss efforts to address limitations in current SLE outcome measures that will improve detection of true therapeutic responses in future RCTs. PMID:27497257

  20. Why Targeted Therapies are Necessary for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcan, Laura; Petri, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) continues to have important morbidity and accelerated mortality despite therapeutic advances. Targeted therapies offer the possibility of improved efficacy with fewer side-effects. Current management strategies rely heavily on non-specific immunosuppressive agents. Prednisone, in particular, is responsible for a considerable burden of later organ damage. There are a multitude of diverse mechanisms of disease activity, immunogenic abnormalities and clinical manifestations to take into consideration in SLE. Many targeted agents with robust mechanistic pre-clinical data and promising early phase studies have ultimately been disappointing in phase III randomized controlled studies. Recent efforts have focused on B cell therapies, in particular given the success of belimumab in clinical trials, with limited success. We remain optimistic regarding other specific therapies being evaluated including interferon alpha blockade. It is likely that in SLE, given the heterogeneity of the population involved, precision medicine is needed, rather than expecting that any single biologic will be universally effective. PMID:27497251

  1. Psoriatic Alopecia in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Wimolsiri Iamsumang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, recurrent, and relatively common inflammatory dermatologic condition, which demonstrates various clinical manifestations including hair loss. It was once believed that alopecia was not a presentation of scalp psoriasis, but it is now widely accepted that psoriatic alopecia exists. Although the majority of patients get hair regrowth, it can potentially lead to permanent hair loss. Herein, we report a case of 26-year-old female patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with scalp hair loss and nonpruritic scaly plaques on the scalp. Her clinical presentation, dermoscopic, and histopathologic findings were consistent with psoriatic alopecia. Additionally, we also described a novel scalp dermoscopic pattern of “patchy dotted vessels” which we detected in the lesion of scalp psoriasis.

  2. Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Upper Eyelid Edema and Erythema

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    Abbas Darjani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE is an autoimmune disorder that usually occurs on sun exposed areas of head and neck. Infrequently it could be presented by palpebral involvement and rarely unilateral upper eye lid edema and erythema have been reported as the sole manifestation of DLE. We describe a 38-year-old woman with chronic left upper eye lid edema and erythema from one year ago which was induced by steroid injection for left eyebrow alopecia. Histopathologic and direct immunofluorescent studies were made on palpebral skin tissue and confirmed DLE diagnosis. Antinuclear antibody (ANA titer was 1/160 with speckled pattern. She was treated by oral hydroxychloroquine (400 mg daily with moderate improvement after three months. We should think about DLE in cases with chronic upper eye lid edema and erythema. The aim of this case report is to emphasize that ophthalmologist and dermatologists should be aware of different presentations of DLE in the periorbital area to prevent misdiagnosis.

  3. Are Toll-Like Receptors and Decoy Receptors Involved in the Immunopathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus-Like Syndromes?

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    Giuliana Guggino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we focus our attention on the role of two families of receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLR and decoy receptors (DcR involved in the generation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and lupus-like syndromes in human and mouse models. To date, these molecules were described in several autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, antiphospholipids syndrome, bowel inflammation, and SLE. Here, we summarize the findings of recent investigations on TLR and DcR and their role in the immunopathogenesis of the SLE.

  4. Prevalence, incidence, and demographics of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis from 2000 to 2004 among children in the US Medicaid beneficiary population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Linda T; Feldman, Candace H; Liu, Jun; Alarcón, Graciela S; Fischer, Michael A; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Costenbader, Karen H

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the nationwide prevalence, incidence, and sociodemographics of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis among children in the US Medicaid beneficiary population. Children ages 3 years to Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9] code of 710.0 for SLE, each >30 days apart) were identified from the US Medicaid Analytic eXtract database from 2000 to 2004. This database contains all inpatient and outpatient Medicaid claims for 47 US states and the District of Columbia. Lupus nephritis was identified from ≥2 ICD-9 billing codes for glomerulonephritis, proteinuria, or renal failure, each recorded >30 days apart. The prevalence and incidence of SLE and lupus nephritis were calculated among Medicaid-enrolled children overall and within sociodemographic groups. Of the 30,420,597 Medicaid-enrolled children during these years, 2,959 were identified as having SLE. The prevalence of SLE was 9.73 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 9.38-10.08) per 100,000 Medicaid-enrolled children. Among the children with SLE, 84% were female, 40% were African American, 25% were Hispanic, 21% were White, and 42% resided in the South region of the US. Moreover, of the children with SLE, 1,106 (37%) had lupus nephritis, representing a prevalence of 3.64 (95% CI 3.43-3.86) per 100,000 children. The average annual incidence of SLE was 2.22 cases (95% CI 2.05-2.40) and that of lupus nephritis was 0.72 cases (95% CI 0.63-0.83) per 100,000 Medicaid enrollees per year. The prevalence and incidence rates of SLE and lupus nephritis increased with age, were higher in girls than in boys, and were higher in all non-White racial/ethnic groups. In the current study, the prevalence and incidence rates of SLE among Medicaid-enrolled children in the US are high compared to studies in other populations. In addition, these data represent the first population-based estimates of the prevalence and incidence of lupus nephritis in the US to date. Copyright © 2012 by the American

  5. Efficacy of Intravenous Cyclophosphamide Pulse Therapy for P-Glycoprotein-expressing B Cell-associated Active True Renal Lupus Vasculitis in Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Akio; Tsujimura, Shizuyo; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2017-01-01

    True renal lupus vasculitis (TRLV), a vascular lesion usually associated with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN), is resistant to conventional treatments. The expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) on activated lymphocytes causes drug resistance. We herein report a patient with TRLV, minimal change LN, overexpression of P-gp on peripheral B cells, and accumulation of P-gp+ B cells at the site of TRLV. High-dose corticosteroids combined with intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy resulted in clinical remission and the long-term normal renal function. PMID:28626187

  6. A multi-group confirmatory factor analyses of the LupusPRO between southern California and Filipino samples of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizoddin, D R; Olmstead, R; Cost, C; Jolly, M; Ayeroff, J; Racaza, G; Sumner, L A; Ormseth, S; Weisman, M; Nicassio, P M

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) leads to a range of biopsychosocial health outcomes through an unpredictable and complex disease path. The LupusPRO is a comprehensive, self-report measure developed specifically for populations with SLE, which assesses both health-related quality of life and non-health related quality of life. Given its increasingly widespread use, additional research is needed to evaluate the psychometric integrity of the LupusPRO across diverse populations. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of the LupusPRO in two divergent patient samples and the model fit between both samples. Methods Two diverse samples with SLE included 136 patients from an ethnically-diverse, urban region in southern California and 100 from an ethnically-homogenous, rural region in Manila, Philippines. All patients met the ACR classification criteria for SLE. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFAs) were conducted in each sample separately and combined to provide evidence of the factorial integrity of the 12 subscales in the LupusPRO. Results Demographic analyses indicated significant differences in age, disease activity and duration, education, income, insurance, and medication use between groups. Results of the separate CFAs indicated moderate fit to the data for the hypothesized 12-factor model for both the Manila and southern California groups, respectively [χ 2 (794) = 1283.32, p < 0.001, Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.793; χ 2 (794) =1398.44, p < 0.001, CFI = 0.858]. When the factor structures of the LupusPRO in the southern California and Manila groups were constrained to be equal between the two groups, findings revealed that the factor structures of measured variables fit the two groups reasonably well [χ 2  (1697) = 2950.413, df = 1697, p < 0.000; CFI = 0.811]. After removing seven constraints and eight correlations suggested by the Lagrange multiplier test, the model fit improved

  7. The Incidence and Prevalence of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in New York County (Manhattan), New York: The Manhattan Lupus Surveillance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmirly, Peter M; Wan, Isabella; Sahl, Sara; Buyon, Jill P; Belmont, H Michael; Salmon, Jane E; Askanase, Anca; Bathon, Joan M; Geraldino-Pardilla, Laura; Ali, Yousaf; Ginzler, Ellen M; Putterman, Chaim; Gordon, Caroline; Helmick, Charles G; Parton, Hilary

    2017-10-01

    The Manhattan Lupus Surveillance Program (MLSP) is a population-based registry designed to determine the prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 2007 and the incidence from 2007 to 2009 among residents of New York County (Manhattan), New York, and to characterize cases by race/ethnicity, including Asians and Hispanics, for whom data are lacking. We identified possible SLE cases from hospital records, rheumatologist records, and administrative databases. Cases were defined according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria, the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) classification criteria, or the treating rheumatologist's diagnosis. Rates among Manhattan residents were age-standardized, and capture-recapture analyses were conducted to assess case underascertainment. By the ACR definition, the age-standardized prevalence and incidence rates of SLE were 62.2 and 4.6 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Rates were ∼9 times higher in women than in men for prevalence (107.4 versus 12.5) and incidence (7.9 versus 1.0). Compared with non-Hispanic white women (64.3), prevalence was higher among non-Hispanic black (210.9), Hispanic (138.3), and non-Hispanic Asian (91.2) women. Incidence rates were higher among non-Hispanic black women (15.7) compared with non-Hispanic Asian (6.6), Hispanic (6.5), and non-Hispanic white (6.5) women. Capture-recapture adjustment increased the prevalence and incidence rates (75.9 and 6.0, respectively). Alternate SLE definitions without capture-recapture adjustment revealed higher age-standardized prevalence and incidence rates (73.8 and 6.2, respectively, by the SLICC definition and 72.6 and 5.0 by the rheumatologist definition) than the ACR definition, with similar patterns by sex and race/ethnicity. The MLSP confirms findings from other registries on disparities by sex and race/ethnicity, provides new estimates among Asians and Hispanics, and provides estimates using the

  8. White matter correlates of neuropsychological dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Rex E Jung

    Full Text Available Patients diagnosed with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus have similar levels of neuropsychological dysfunction (i.e., 20-50% as those with Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (NPSLE. We hypothesized a gradient between cognition and white matter integrity, such that strongest brain-behavior relationships would emerge in NPSLE, intermediate in non-NPSLE, and minimal in controls. We studied thirty-one patients (16 non-NPSLE; 15 NPSLE, ranging in age from 18 to 59 years old (100% female, and eighteen age and gender matched healthy controls. DTI examinations were performed on a 1.5T scanner. A broad neuropsychological battery was administered, tapping attention, memory, processing speed, and executive functioning. The Total z-score consisted of the combined sum of all neuropsychological measures. In control subjects, we found no significant FA-Total z-score correlations. NPSLE, non-NPSLE, and control subjects differed significantly in terms of Total z-score (NPSLE = -2.25+/-1.77, non-NPSLE = -1.22+/-1.03, Controls = -0.10+/-.57; F = 13.2, p<.001. In non-NPSLE subjects, FA within the right external capsule was significantly correlated with Total z-score. In NPSLE subjects, the largest FA-Total z-score clusters were observed within the left anterior thalamic radiation and right superior longitudinal fasciculus. In subsequent analyses the largest number of significant voxels linked FA with the Processing Speed z-score in NPSLE. The current results reflect objective white matter correlates of neuropsychological dysfunction in both NPSLE and (to a lesser degree in non-NPSLE. non-NPSLE and NPSLE subjects did not differ significantly in terms of depression, as measured by the GDI; thus, previous hypotheses suggesting moderating effects of depression upon neuropsychological performance do not impact the current FA results.

  9. Pathogenic inflammation and its therapeutic targeting in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Timothy Andrew Gottschalk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, lupus is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues including skin, kidneys and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B and T lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as Belimumab which targets the B cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immuno-suppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and

  10. Serum Renalase Levels Correlate with Disease Activity in Lupus Nephritis.

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    Chaojun Qi

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is among the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, which causes significant morbidity and mortality. Renalase is a novel, kidney-secreted cytokine-like protein that promotes cell survival. Here, we aimed to investigate the relationship of serum renalase levels with LN and its role in the disease progression of LN.For this cross-sectional study, 67 LN patients and 35 healthy controls were enrolled. Seventeen active LN patients who received standard therapies were followed up for six months. Disease activity was determined by the SLE Disease Activity-2000 (SLEDAI-2K scoring system and serum renalase amounts were determined by ELISA. Predictive value of renalase for disease activity was assessed. Furthermore, the expression of renalase in the kidneys of patients and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry.Serum renalase amounts were significantly higher in LN patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, patients with proliferative LN had more elevated serum renalase levels than Class V LN patients. In proliferative LN patients, serum renalase levels were significantly higher in patients with active LN than those with inactive LN. Serum renalase levels were positively correlated with SLEDAI-2K, 24-h urine protein excretion, ds-DNA and ESR but inversely correlated with serum albumin and C3. Renalase amounts decreased significantly after six-months of standard therapy. The performance of renalase as a marker for diagnosis of active LN was 0.906 with a cutoff value of 66.67 μg/ml. We also observed that the amount of renalase was significantly higher in glomerular of proliferative LN along with the co-expression of macrophages.Serum renalase levels were correlated with disease activity in LN. Serum renalase might serve as a potential indicator for disease activity in LN. The marked increase of glomerular renalase and its association with macrophages suggest that it might play an

  11. Modified Framingham Risk Factor Score for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urowitz, Murray B; Ibañez, Dominique; Su, Jiandong; Gladman, Dafna D

    2016-05-01

    The traditional Framingham Risk Factor Score (FRS) underestimates the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to determine whether an adjustment to the FRS would more accurately reflect the higher prevalence of CAD among patients with SLE. Patients with SLE without a previous history of CAD or diabetes followed regularly at the University of Toronto Lupus Clinic were included. A modified FRS (mFRS) was calculated by multiplying the items by 1.5, 2, 3, or 4. In the first part of the study, using one-third of all eligible patients, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the FRS and the different multipliers for the mFRS. In the second part of the study, using the remaining 2/3 of the eligible patients, we compared the predictive ability of the FRS to the mFRS. In the third part of the study, we assessed the prediction for CAD in a time-dependent analysis of the FRS and mFRS. There were 905 women (89.3%) with a total of 95 CAD events included. In part 1, we determined that a multiplier of 2 provided the best combination of sensitivity and specificity. In part 2, 2.4% of the patients were classified as moderate/high risk based on the classic FRS and 17.3% using the 2FRS (the FRS with a multiplier of 2). In part 3, a time-dependent covariate analysis for the prediction of the first CAD event revealed an HR of 3.22 (p = 0.07) for the classic FRS and 4.37 (p mFRS in which each item is multiplied by 2 more accurately predicts CAD in patients with SLE.

  12. Anti-Myeloperoxidase Antibodies Associate with Future Proliferative Lupus Nephritis

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    S. W. Olson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The subclinical pathophysiology of proliferative lupus nephritis (PLN has not been fully elucidated. Myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA is associated with PLN, but prediagnostic levels have not been reported. Methods. We performed a retrospective case-control Department of Defense Serum Repository (DoDSR study comparing MPO-ANCA levels in longitudinal prediagnostic serum samples for 23 biopsy confirmed proliferative lupus nephritis (PLN patients to DoDSR identified age, sex, race, and age of serum matched healthy and SLE without LN disease controls. We also compared the temporal relationship of MPO-ANCA to anti-double stranded DNA antibodies (dsDNAab. Results. A greater proportion of PLN patients had prediagnostic MPO-ANCA levels above ≥3 U/mL and ≥6 U/mL compared to SLE without LN (91% versus 43%, p<0.001; 57% versus 5%, p<0.001, resp.. In subgroup analysis, the MPO-ANCA threshold of ≥3 U/mL was significant at <1 year (88% versus 39%, p=0.007 and 1–4 years (87% versus 38%, p=0.009 prior to diagnosis. Statistically significant subclinical MPO-ANCA levels (≥3 U/mL occurred prior to statistically significant dsDNAab ≥ 3 IU/ml (89% versus 11%, p=0.003. Conclusions. Subclinical MPO-ANCA levels could distinguish future PLN from SLE without LN. MPO-ANCA manifests prior to clinical disease and subclinical dsDNAab to suggest that it may contribute directly to PLN pathogenicity.

  13. Pathogenic Inflammation and Its Therapeutic Targeting in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Timothy A.; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Hibbs, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues, including skin, kidneys, and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B- and T-lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as belimumab which targets the B-cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B-cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and review the known

  14. Clinical and immunological characteristics of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus patients in Jamaica: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, K C; Ferguson, T S; Stewart, H D; Myers, A A; De Ceulaer, K

    2017-11-01

    Background Epidemiological studies in systemic lupus erythematosus have been reported in the literature in many countries and ethnic groups. Although systemic lupus erythematosus in Jamaica has been described in the past, there has not been a detailed evaluation of systemic lupus erythematosus patients in urban Jamaica, a largely Afro-Caribbean population. The goal of this study was to describe the clinical features, particularly disease activity, damage index and immunological features, of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus subjects. Methods 150 adult patients (≥18 years) followed in rheumatology clinic at a tertiary rheumatology hospital centre (one of two of the major public referral centres in Jamaica) and the private rheumatology offices in urban Jamaica who fulfilled Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria were included. Data were collected by detailed clinical interview and examination and laboratory investigations. Hence demographics, SLICC criteria, immunological profile, systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and SLICC/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) damage index (SDI) were documented. Results Of the 150 patients, 145 (96.7%) were female and five (3.3%) were male. The mean age at systemic lupus erythematosus onset was 33.2 ± 10.9. Mean disease duration was 11.3 ± 8.6 years. The most prevalent clinical SLICC criteria were musculoskeletal, with 141 (94%) of subjects experiencing arthralgia/arthritis, followed by mucocutaneous manifestations of alopecia 103 (68.7%) and malar rash 46 (30.7%), discoid rash 45 (30%) and photosensitivity 40 (26.7%). Lupus nephritis (biopsy proven) occurred in 42 (28%) subjects and 25 (16.7%) met SLICC diagnostic criteria with only positive antinuclear antibodies/dsDNA antibodies and lupus nephritis on renal biopsy. The most common laboratory SLICC criteria were positive antinuclear antibodies 136 (90.7%) followed by anti-dsDNA antibodies 95 (63.3%) and

  15. The Incidence and Prevalence of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in San Francisco County, California: The California Lupus Surveillance Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Era, Maria; Cisternas, Miriam G; Snipes, Kurt; Herrinton, Lisa J; Gordon, Caroline; Helmick, Charles G

    2017-10-01

    Estimates of the incidence and prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the US have varied widely. The purpose of this study was to conduct the California Lupus Surveillance Project (CLSP) to determine credible estimates of SLE incidence and prevalence, with a special focus on Hispanics and Asians. The CLSP, which is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is a population-based registry of individuals with SLE residing in San Francisco County, CA, from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2009. Data sources included hospitals, rheumatologists, nephrologists, commercial laboratories, and a state hospital discharge database. We abstracted medical records to ascertain SLE cases, which we defined as patients who met ≥4 of the 11 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for SLE. We estimated crude and age-standardized incidence and prevalence, which were stratified by sex and race/ethnicity. The overall age-standardized annual incidence rate was 4.6 per 100,000 person-years. The average annual period prevalence was 84.8 per 100,000 persons. The age-standardized incidence rate in women and men was 8.6 and 0.7 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. This rate was highest among black women (30.5), followed by Hispanic women (8.9), Asian women (7.2), and white women (5.3). The age-standardized prevalence in women per 100,000 persons was 458.1 in blacks, 177.9 in Hispanics, 149.7 in Asians, and 109.8 in whites. Capture-recapture modeling estimated 33 additional incident cases and 147 additional prevalent cases. Comprehensive methods that include intensive case-finding provide more credible estimates of SLE in Hispanics and Asians, and confirm racial and ethnic disparities in SLE. The disease burden of SLE is highest in black women, followed by Hispanic women, Asian women, and white women. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus in an African Caribbean population: incidence, clinical manifestations, and survival in the Barbados National Lupus Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Cindy; Hennis, Anselm J M; Hambleton, Ian R; Nicholson, George D; Liang, Matthew H

    2012-08-01

    To assess the epidemiology, clinical features, and outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the predominantly African Caribbean population of Barbados. A national registry of all patients diagnosed with SLE was established in 2007. Complete case ascertainment was facilitated by collaboration with the island's sole rheumatology service, medical practitioners, and the lupus advocacy group. Informed consent was required for inclusion. Between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2009, there were 183 new cases of SLE (98% African Caribbean) affecting 172 women and 11 men for unadjusted annual incidence rates of 12.21 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 10.46-14.18) and 0.84 (95% CI 0.42-1.51) per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Excluding pediatric cases (ages <18 years), the unadjusted incidence rate among women was 15.14 per 100,000 person-years. The principal presenting manifestations were arthritis (84%), nephritis (47%), pleuritis (41.5%), malar rash (36.4%), and discoid lesions (33.1%). Antinuclear antibody positivity was 95%. The overall 5-year survival rate was 79.9% (95% CI 69.6-87.1), decreasing to 68% in patients with nephritis. A total of 226 persons with SLE were alive at the end of the study for point prevalences of 152.6 (95% CI 132.8-174.5) and 10.1 (95% CI 5.4-17.2) per 100,000 among women and men, respectively. Rates of SLE in Barbadian women are among the highest reported to date, with clinical manifestations similar to African American women and high mortality. Further study of this population and similar populations of West African descent might assist our understanding of environmental, genetic, and health care issues underpinning disparities in SLE. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Acquired activated protein C resistance is associated with lupus anticoagulants and thrombotic events in pediatric patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, C; Mitchell, L; Julian, J; Vegh, P; Joshua, P; Adams, M; David, M; Andrew, M E

    2001-02-15

    Acquired activated protein C resistance (APCR) has been hypothesized as a possible mechanism by which antiphospholipid antibodies (APLAs) cause thrombotic events (TEs). However, available evidence for an association of acquired APCR with APLAs is limited. More importantly, an association of acquired APCR with TEs has not been demonstrated. The objective of the study was to determine, in pediatric patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), whether (1) acquired APCR is associated with the presence of APLAs, (2) APCR is associated with TEs, and (3) there is an interaction between APCR and APLAs in association with TEs. A cross-sectional cohort study of 59 consecutive, nonselected children with SLE was conducted. Primary clinical outcomes were symptomatic TEs, confirmed by objective radiographic tests. Laboratory testing included lupus anticoagulants (LAs), anticardiolipin antibodies (ACLAs), APC ratio, protein S, protein C, and factor V Leiden. The results revealed that TEs occurred in 10 (17%) of 59 patients. Acquired APCR was present in 18 (31%) of 58 patients. Acquired APCR was significantly associated with the presence of LAs but not ACLAs. Acquired APCR was also significantly associated with TEs. There was significant interaction between APCR and LAs in the association with TEs. Presence of both APCR and LAs was associated with the highest risk of a TE. Protein S and protein C concentrations were not associated with the presence of APLAs, APCR, or TEs. Presence of acquired APCR is a marker identifying LA-positive patients at high risk of TEs. Acquired APCR may reflect interference of LAs with the protein C pathway that may represent a mechanism of LA-associated TEs. (Blood. 2001;97:844-849)

  18. Economic evaluation of lupus nephritis in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics inception cohort using a multistate model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Megan R W; Hanly, John G; Su, Li; Urowitz, Murray B; Pierre, Yvan St; Romero-Diaz, Juanita; Gordon, Caroline; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bernatsky, Sasha; Wallace, Daniel J; Isenberg, David A; Rahman, Anisur; Ginzler, Ellen M; Petri, Michelle; Bruce, Ian N; Fortin, Paul R; Gladman, Dafna D; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Khamashta, Munther A; Aranow, Cynthia; Mackay, Meggan; Alarcón, Graciela S; Manzi, Susan; Nived, Ola; Jönsen, Andreas; Zoma, Asad A; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Sam Lim, S; Kalunian, Kenneth C; Inanc, Murat; Kamen, Diane L; Peschken, Christine A; Jacobsen, Soren; Askanase, Anca; Theriault, Chris; Farewell, Vernon; Clarke, Ann E

    2017-11-28

    Little is known about the long-term costs of lupus nephritis (LN). These were compared between patients with and without LN based on multistate modelling. Patients from 32 centres in 11 countries were enrolled in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) inception cohort within 15 months of diagnosis and provided annual data on renal function, hospitalizations, medications, dialysis, and selected procedures. LN was diagnosed by renal biopsy or the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. Renal function was assessed annually using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or proteinuria (ePrU). A multistate model was used to predict 10-year cumulative costs by multiplying annual costs associated with each renal state by the expected state duration. 1,545 patients participated, 89.3% female, mean age at diagnosis 35.2 years (SD 13.4), 49.0% Caucasian, and mean follow up 6.3 years (SD 3.3). LN developed in 39.4% by the end of follow up. Ten-year cumulative costs were greater in those with LN and an eGFR 60 ml/min) or with LN and ePrU > 3 g/d ($84 040 versus $20 499 if no LN and ePrU < 0.25 g/d). Patients with eGFR < 30 ml/min incurred 10-year costs 15-fold higher than those with normal eGFR. By estimating the expected duration in each renal state and incorporating associated annual costs, disease severity at presentation can be used to anticipate future healthcare costs. This is critical knowledge for cost-effectiveness evaluations of novel therapies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors related to outcomes in lupus-related protein-losing enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Doo-Ho; Kim, Yong-Gil; Bae, Seung-Hyeon; Ahn, Soomin; Hong, Seokchan; Lee, Chang-Keun; Yoo, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), characterized by severe hypoalbuminemia and peripheral edema, is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. This present study aimed to identify the distinctive features of lupus-related PLE and evaluate the factors related to the treatment response. From March 1998 to March 2014, the clinical data of 14 patients with lupus PLE and seven patients with idiopathic PLE from a tertiary center were reviewed. PLE was defined as a demonstration of protein leakage from the gastrointestinal tract by either technetium 99m-labelled human albumin scanning or fecal α1-antitrypsin clearance. A positive steroid response was defined as a return of serum albumin to ≥ 3.0 g/dL within 4 weeks after initial steroid monotherapy, and remission as maintenance of serum albumin ≥ 3.0 g/dL for at least 3 months. A high serum total cholesterol level was defined as a level of ≥ 240 mg/dL. The mean age of the lupus-related PLE patients was 37.0 years, and the mean follow-up duration was 55.8 months. Significantly higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum total cholesterol levels were found for lupus PLE than for idiopathic PLE. Among the 14 patients with lupus PLE, eight experienced a positive steroid response, and the serum total cholesterol level was significantly higher in the positive steroid response group. A positive steroid response was associated with an initial high serum total cholesterol level and achievement of remission within 6 months. In lupus-related PLE, a high serum total cholesterol level could be a predictive factor for the initial steroid response, indicating a good response to steroid therapy alone.

  20. Lupus risk variants in the PXK locus alter B-cell receptor internalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Vaughn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies have identified variants in PXK that confer risk for humoral autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and more recently systemic sclerosis. While PXK is involved in trafficking of epidermal growth factor Receptor (EGFR in COS-7 cells, mechanisms linking PXK to lupus pathophysiology have remained undefined. In an effort to uncover the mechanism at this locus that increases lupus-risk, we undertook a fine-mapping analysis in a large multi-ancestral study of lupus patients and controls. We define a large (257kb common haplotype that confers lupus risk detected only in European ancestral populations and spans the promoter through the 3’ UTR of PXK. The strongest association was found at rs6445972 with P < 4.62 x 10-10, OR 0.81 (0.75 – 0.86. Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, we demonstrate that one signal drives the genetic association in the region. Bayesian analysis confirms our results, identifying a 95% credible set consisting of 172 variants spanning 200kb.Functionally, we found that PXK operates on the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR; we confirmed that PXK influenced the rate of BCR internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individuals carrying the risk haplotype exhibited a decreased rate of BCR internalization, a process known to impact B cell survival and cell fate. Taken together, these data define a new candidate mechanism for the genetic association of variants around PXK with lupus risk and highlight the regulation of intracellular trafficking as a genetically regulated pathway mediating human autoimmunity.

  1. HLA-G genotype and HLA-G expression in systemic lupus erythematosus: HLA-G as a putative susceptibility gene in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzo, R; Hviid, T V F; Govoni, M

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease mainly mediated by the deposit of immune complexes and defects in T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells along with a high production of T-helper 2 cytokines. A tolerance-inducible function of nonclassical class Ib human leukocyte...

  2. Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse (EBV-EA/D)-directed immunoglobulin A antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draborg, A H; Jørgensen, J M; Müller, H

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine whether the serological response towards lytic cycle antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is altered in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients.......We sought to determine whether the serological response towards lytic cycle antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is altered in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients....

  3. PP144. Profile of lupus pregnancy in internal medecine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, T; Hakem, D; Berrah, A

    2012-07-01

    The pregnancies in systemic erythematous lupus (SLE) disease is a situation of high risk and involve both the mother and the fetus. The prematurity and the miscarriage are there more frequent, with increase risks of eclampsia, acute hypertension, HELP syndrome and of worsening renal disease. So the morbimortality is multiplied particularly when a anti-phospholipid syndrome 'APLS' is associated. The pregnancy remains however authorized when the SLE is in remission for more than 6 months with a validated treatment and successful means of monitoring. To review the clinical profile of the pregnancies at the SLE patients with or without APLS in Internal Medicine Practice. it's a retrospective study, in an internal medical centre over a period going from January, 2008 till December, 2011. The collection of the data is made from the index cards of clinical observations collecting items to interpret the data. All the patients are diagnosed referring to the criteria ACR (SLE/APLS) and all benefit from a follow-up in a obstetrics monitoring (ultrasounds to monitor growth and placental development). On a cohort of 80 SLE young patients hospitalized we brought together 20 patients answering eligibility criteria. The average age is of 26 years (21-41), SLE evolve with an average of 2.5years, the parity is estimated at 5 on average by patient. The pregnancies are programmed in only in 25% . The others cases of pregnancy remain the consequence of a not adapted contraception (50%). Lupus patients have history of renal damage (8) requiring immunosuppressive therapy (4) but renal function is preserved at all the patient's. The treatment is adapted to the clinical context and prophylactic doses of heparin and a baby aspirin are required in most situations. The cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors show an overweight (12), one dyslipemia (10), type 2 diabetes (2), and hypertension (3). The pregnancy is at the origin of a degradation of the renal function (4) with definitive

  4. Prognostic implications of active discoid lupus erythematosus and malar rash at the time of diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus: Results from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, A M; Su, J; Mussani, F; Siddha, S K; Gladman, D D; Urowitz, M B

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) may have prognostic implications for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to determine the impact of discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and malar rash on SLE disease activity. Data were analyzed from the Toronto Lupus Clinic prospective cohort study. We compared SLE patients with active DLE or malar rash at SLE diagnosis to SLE patients who never developed CLE. Outcomes were assessed at one and five years, including Adjusted Mean Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (AMS). A total of 524 SLE patients (284 without CLE, 65 with DLE, and 175 with malar rash) were included. Mean AMS scores in patients without CLE at one and five years were 5.96 ± 5.06 and 4.00 ± 3.52, which did not differ significantly from scores at one (6.93 ± 5.31, p = 0.17) and five years (4.29 ± 2.62, p = 0.63) in the DLE group. In patients with malar rash, AMS scores at one (8.30 ± 6.80, p < 0.001) and five years (5.23 ± 3.06, p = 0.004) were higher than controls without CLE. Malar rash may be a marker of more severe systemic disease over time, while DLE has no significant impact on general SLE disease activity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Metabolic syndrome in Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and its determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Alimohammad; Ghanbarian, Azadeh; Sayedbonakdar, Zahra; Kazemi, Mehdi; Smiley, Abbas

    2018-01-05

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its determinants. In a cross-sectional study, 98 patients with SLE and 95 controls were enrolled. Prevalence of MetS was determined based on American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI) and 2009 harmonizing criteria. In addition, demographic features and lupus characteristics such as disease duration, pharmacological treatment, laboratory data, SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage index (SDI) were recorded. The predictors of MetS were obtained by backward stepwise regression analysis. Using AHA/NHLBI, MetS was observed in 35 (35.7%) patients and 28 (29.8%) controls (P = 0.4). Using harmonizing criteria, MetS was observed in 37 (37.7%) patients and 33 (35.1%) controls (P = 0.7). There was no difference in frequency distribution of MetS components between the patients and the controls. In multivariate regression analysis, low C3, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and body mass index were independent determinants of MetS in lupus patients. BUN, low C3, and body mass index were the major determinants of MetS in lupus patients.

  6. Role of MHC-Linked Susceptibility Genes in the Pathogenesis of Human and Murine Lupus

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    Manfred Relle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies against nuclear antigens and a systemic inflammation that can damage a broad spectrum of organs. SLE patients suffer from a wide variety of symptoms, which can affect virtually almost any tissue. As lupus is difficult to diagnose, the worldwide prevalence of SLE can only be roughly estimated to range from 10 and 200 cases per 100,000 individuals with dramatic differences depending on gender, ethnicity, and location. Although the treatment of this disease has been significantly ameliorated by new therapies, improved conventional drug therapy options, and a trained expert eye, the underlying pathogenesis of lupus still remain widely unknown. The complex etiology reflects the complex genetic background of the disease, which is also not well understood yet. However, in the past few years advances in lupus genetics have been made, notably with the publication of genome-wide association studies (GWAS in humans and the identification of susceptibility genes and loci in mice. This paper reviews the role of MHC-linked susceptibility genes in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  7. Management of cardiovascular risk in systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrades, C; Fuego, C; Manrique-Arija, S; Fernández-Nebro, A

    2017-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular complications. The aim of this study was to review the effectiveness of interventions for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality and to review the effectiveness of interventions for cardiovascular risk factor reduction in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. A systematic review was conducted. Electronic databases Medline and Embase (1961-2015) were searched. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria and were selected. Low-calorie and/or low glycaemic index calories may be a useful option for secondary prevention in obese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and exercise would be useful in improving the endothelial function measured by flow-mediated dilation in this group of patients. The use of lipid-lowering drugs may improve the lipid profile in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and hyperlipidaemia, but the effect of this treatment on overall cardiovascular mortality remains unknown. Antiplatelets, anticoagulants, antimalarials and lipid-lowering drugs may be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of major cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Similarly, lipid-lowering drugs and antimalarial drugs appear to reduce the serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, glucose, diastolic blood pressure and calcium deposition at the coronary arteries. They may also improve insulin resistance and the level of high-density lipoproteins. It appears that treatment with antihypertensive drugs reduces blood pressure in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, but the available studies are of low quality.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Control Complement C5 Activation by Factor H in Lupus Nephritis

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    Haijun Ma

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is one of the most severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE caused by uncontrolled activation of the complement system. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs exhibit clinical efficacy for severe LN in our previous studies, but the underlying mechanisms of MSCs regulating complement activation remain largely unknown. Here we show that significantly elevated C5a and C5b-9 were found in patients with LN, which were notably correlated with proteinuria and different renal pathological indexes of LN. MSCs suppressed systemic and intrarenal activation of C5, increased the plasma levels of factor H (FH, and ameliorated renal disease in lupus mice. Importantly, MSCs transplantation up-regulated the decreased FH in patients with LN. Mechanistically, interferon-α enhanced the secretion of FH by MSCs. These data demonstrate that MSCs inhibit the activation of pathogenic C5 via up-regulation of FH, which improves our understanding of the immunomodulatory mechanisms of MSCs in the treatment of lupus nephritis. Keywords: Lupus nephritis, C5, MSCs, FH

  9. Frequency and Type of Hepatic and Gastrointestinal Involvement in Juvenile Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Leila Tahernia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a frequent rheumatology disorder among children. Since hepatic involvement is a common systemic manifestation in lupus, the frequency and type of hepatic involvement were determined in pediatric cases of SLE admitted to Children’s Medical Hospital from 2005 to 2014. Methods and Patients. In this observational case-series study, 138 pediatric cases of SLE were admitted in Children’s Medical Center (a pediatric rheumatology referral center in Tehran, Iran enrolled from 2005 to 2014 and the outcomes, frequency, and type of hepatic involvement were assessed among them. Results. Hepatic involvement was reported in 48.55% of total SLE patients. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and both enzymes higher than normal upper limits were detected in 8.7%, 5%, and 34.7% of lupus patients, respectively. Increased level of liver enzymes was categorized as less than 100, between 100 and 1000, and more than 1000 levels in 23.1%, 23.1%, and 2.1% of cases. The only gastrointestinal involvement in lupus patients contributing to hepatic involvement was gastrointestinal bleeding. Rising in liver enzymes was detected mostly in lupus patients without gastrointestinal bleeding (52.2% without versus 25.8% with gastrointestinal bleeding, P=0.007. Conclusion. Approximately half of the pediatric patients suffering from SLE have hepatic involvement. No significant correlation was observed between various organs involvement and abnormal level of liver enzymes.

  10. A case of systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as bilateral avascular necrosis of femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikari, Madura; Gunawardane, Aloka; Illangantilaka, Sachithra; Atukorale, Himantha; Rubasinghe, Jeevanie

    2016-08-05

    Avascular necrosis occur as a result of diverse etiology. Chronic inflammatory conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus considered as a recognize cause. Many cases were reported in systemic lupus erythematosus after treating with corticosteroids. We report a case of a corticosteroid naïve patient presented as bilateral avascular necrosis of femoral head and later progressed to a case of systemic lupus erythematosus. A 26 year old lady presented with right sided hip pain and diagnosed as avascular necrosis of the femoral head. After 6 months she presented a similar pain in left hip, which revealed avascular necrosis of left femoral head as well. A probable cause for her clinical presentation could not be found after extensive clinical and laboratory evaluation. Patient reported high erythrocyte sedimentation rate persistently, and over the next few years progressed as a case of systemic lupus erythematosus. Above case illustrated avascular necrosis could be an early musculoskeletal manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus even in the absence of corticosteroid administration.

  11. Cytokines in relation to autoantibodies before onset of symptoms for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, C; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S

    2014-06-01

    A number of cytokines and chemokines were analysed and related to autoantibodies in blood samples pre-dating the onset of symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus. Thirty-five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (American College of Rheumatology criteria) were identified as having donated blood samples, prior to symptom onset, to the Biobank of northern Sweden. Altogether, 140 age- and sex-matched controls were also identified. The concentrations of interferon-α, interleukin-4, interleukin-9, interleukin-10, interferon inducible protein-10 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were analysed using multiplex technology and related to autoantibodies (ANA, ENA, anti-dsDNA and anti-histone antibodies) analysed from the same blood sample. The interferon-γ inducible protein-10 levels were higher in the pre-symptomatic individuals than in controls (p systemic lupus erythematosus. An increased concentration of interferon-γ inducible protein-10 pre-dated the onset of systemic lupus erythematosus and was related to autoantibodies before the onset of disease. The levels of interferon-γ inducible protein-10 and interferon-α were correlated. These findings support the proposal that the interferon system is important early in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and autoantibody formation. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Neurodevelopmental disorders in children born to mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinet, É; Pineau, C A; Clarke, A E; Fombonne, É; Platt, R W; Bernatsky, S

    2014-10-01

    Children born to women with systemic lupus erythematosus seem to have a potentially increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders compared to children born to healthy women. Recent experimental data suggest in utero exposure to maternal antibodies and cytokines as important risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders. Interestingly, women with systemic lupus erythematosus display high levels of autoantibodies and cytokines, which have been shown, in animal models, to alter fetal brain development and induce behavioral anomalies in offspring. Furthermore, subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus and neurodevelopmental disorders share a common genetic predisposition, which could impair the fetal immune response to in utero immunologic insults. Moreover, systemic lupus erythematosus pregnancies are at increased risk of adverse obstetrical outcomes and medication exposures, which have been implicated as potential risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge on neurodevelopmental disorders and their potential determinants in systemic lupus erythematosus offspring. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Aggressive periodontitis in a patient with chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietmann, Christina; Bissada, Nabil F

    2006-05-01

    Lupus erythematosus is considered to be a high risk factor for periodontitis. As an autoimmune disease of unknown origin, cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is subdivided into 3 categories: chronic (CCLE), subacute (SCLE), and acute (ACLE). While the ACLE has a high prevalence of conjunctive periodontal lesions, aggressive periodontitis in patients with CCLE has been rarely reported. This article describes the case of a patient diagnosed with aggressive periodontitis. Three months after the diagnosis of periodontitis, the patient experienced advancing hair loss (alopecia), pale fingers and toes, as well as edema in the legs and around the eyes. Skin biopsy showed follicular hyperkeratosis with perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrate. Colliquation of the basal cells, thickening of the basal lamina, and vacuolar degeneration of basal keratinocytes were also found. A lupus band test was positive, and diagnosis of CCLE was established. Three months following the treatment of lupus with antimalarial agents, the periodontal condition became stable with no further exacerbation or progression of the existing periodontitis. An 11-month postsurgical follow-up revealed stable periodontal and general medical conditions. A patient's medical history should be re-evaluated in the event of recurrence of periodontal lesions refractory to periodontal treatment. The control of systemic conditions like lupus erythematosus is essential for a good prognosis in the treatment of periodontitis as well as for the general health of the patient.

  14. Inflammatory etiopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podolska MJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Malgorzata J Podolska, Mona HC Biermann, Christian Maueröder, Jonas Hahn, Martin Herrmann Department of Internal Medicine 3, Institute for Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: The immune system struggles every day between responding to foreign antigens and tolerating self-antigens to delicately maintain tissue homeostasis. If self-tolerance is broken, the development of autoimmunity can be the consequence, as it is in the case of the chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. SLE is considered to be a multifactorial disease comprising various processes and cell types that act abnormally and in a harmful way. Oxidative stress, infections, or, in general, tissue injury are accompanied by massive cellular demise. Several processes such as apoptosis, necrosis, or NETosis (formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps [NETs] may occur alone or in combination. If clearance of dead cells is insufficient, cellular debris may accumulate and trigger inflammation and leakage of cytoplasmic and nuclear autoantigens like ribonucleoproteins, DNA, or histones. Inadequate removal of cellular remnants in the germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs may result in the presentation of autoantigens by follicular dendritic cells to autoreactive B cells that had been generated by chance during the process of somatic hypermutation (loss of peripheral tolerance. The improper exposure of nuclear autoantigens in this delicate location is consequently prone to break self-tolerance to nuclear autoantigens. Indeed, the germline variants of autoantibodies often do not show autoreactivity. The subsequent production of autoantibodies plays a critical role in the development of the complex immunological disorder fostering SLE. Immune complexes composed of cell-derived autoantigens and autoantibodies are formed and get deposited in various tissues, such as the

  15. Retinal vasculopathy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, N; Li, M T; Li, Y H; Zhang, S H; Dai, R P; Zhang, S Z; Zhao, L D; Wang, L; Zhang, F C; Zhao, Y; Zeng, X F

    2017-10-01

    A retrospective case control study was conducted in the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Medical records were reviewed for demographic data, clinical features, laboratory results, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity evaluations, and ophthalmic examinations to investigate the clinical characteristics and significance of retinal vasculopathy (RV) in Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The prevalence of RV was approximately 0.66% (35/5298) in SLE patients. A total of 60 eyes were involved. The ocular presentations included decrease of visual acuity (48/60, 80%), visual field loss (7/60, 11.7%), and diplopia (3/60, 5%). Ophthalmic fundoscopic examination revealed cotton-wool spots (30/60, 50%), retinal vascular attenuation (31/60, 51.6%), and hemorrhages (41/60, 68.3%). Retinal angiogram showed that 72.7% (16/22) eyes had vaso-occlusion. The ophthalmic episodes could occur at any stage of SLE duration, with a median of 12 months (0-168 months) following SLE onset. Twenty-one (35%) eyes did not recover, or even worsened, during hospital stay. RV was found to be significantly associated with neuropsychiatric lesions (51.4% vs. 21.3%, p = .005) and hematological disturbance (62.9% vs. 34.3%, p = .005). SLE patients with RV had significantly higher SLE disease activity index scores than controls (19.9 ± 0.9 vs. 10.2 ± 0.7, p < .001). An inverse association of anti-SSA antibody with RV was detected (34.3% vs. 67.1%, p = .001). Nervous system disturbance (odds ratio (OR) = 4.340, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.438, 13.094, p = .009) and leukocytopenia (OR = 6.385, 95% CI 1.916, 21.278, p = .003) were independent risk factors, while anti-SSA antibody positivity (OR = 0.249, 95% CI 0.087, 0.710, p = .009) was a protective factor for RV in SLE patients. In certain cases, RV is a threatening condition for SLE patients presenting with clinical ocular manifestations. Ophthalmo

  16. Achados capilaroscópicos no lúpus eritematoso Capillaroscopy findings in lupus erythematosus

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    Anamaria da Silva Facina

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: A capilaroscopia é método não invasivo e reprodutível capaz de analisar diretamente os capilares na região periungueal, auxiliando no diagnóstico diferencial das doenças do tecido conectivo. OBJETIVOS: Estudar, por meio da capilaroscopia periungueal, pacientes com lúpus eritematoso cutâneo crônico, lúpus eritematoso sistêmico e grupo controle. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados 70 pacientes pela capilaroscopia periungueal, sendo 37 com lúpus eritematoso cutâneo crônico e 33 com forma sistêmica, comparados a 32 indivíduos sadios. RESULTADOS: A presença de capilares ectasiados (p=0,027; p=0,001, enovelados (p=0,001; p=0,007 e em saca-rolhas (p=0,011;p=0,005, além de hemorragias capilares (p=0,004; p=0,001 foram parâmetros capazes de discriminar os dois grupos de pacientes do grupo controle. A variável capilar enovelado demonstrou ser preditiva para o diagnóstico de lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (OR=8,308. As variáveis independentes capilares ectasiados (OR=12,164 e hemorragias capilares (OR=5,652 foram preditoras para lúpus eritematoso cutâneo crônico. CONCLUSÃO: A capilaroscopia é útil na prática clínica, pois pacientes com alterações capilaroscópicas específicas parecem ter maior probabilidade de desenvolver lúpus eritematoso. As variáveis preditoras independentes para lúpus eritematoso sistêmico foram capilares enovelados e para lúpus eritematoso cutâneo crônico foram capilares ectasiados e hemorragias capilares.BACKGROUND: Capillaroscopy is an useful diagnostic tool that is non-invasive, reproducible, able to assess the capillaries in the periungal region and that assists in the differential diagnosis of connective tissue diseases. OBJETIVES: The aim of the study was to distinguish chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus from controls assessed by nailfold capillaroscopy. METHODS: Seventy patients with lupus erythematosus (37 with chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus

  17. Sytemic lupus erythematosus presenting with protein losing enteropathy in a resource limited centre: a case report

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    Ratnayake Eranda C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is a disease which may initially present with varying symptoms, most commonly a photosensitive rash and arthritis. Protein losing enteropathy is a recognized but rare presenting manifestation. Diagnosing protein losing enteropathy in resource limited centres is challenging but possible through the exclusion of other possible causes of hypoalbunaemia. Case Presentation We report a case of protein losing gastroenteropathy secondary to intestinal lymphangiectasia as the initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus in a 57 year old Sri Lankan (South Asian male patient. The diagnosis was made by the exclusion of other causes of hypoalbuminaemia as the gold standard investigations for protein losing enteropathy were not available at this centre. Conclusions Protein losing enteropathy is a diagnosis of exclusion in resource limited centres in the world. Systemic lupus erythematosus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of protein losing enteropathy. Intestinal lymphangiectasia should also be recognized as a possible pathophysiological mechanism.

  18. The renal metallothionein expression profile is altered in human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, Claus Bøgelund

    2008-01-01

    of standard statistical methods. RESULTS: Proximal tubules displaying epithelial cell MT-I+II depletion in combination with luminal MT-I+II expression were observed in 31 out of 37 of the lupus nephritis specimens, but not in any of the control sections (P = 0.006). The tubular MT score, defined as the median......INTRODUCTION: Metallothionein (MT) isoforms I + II are polypeptides with potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. In healthy kidneys, MT-I+II have been described as intracellular proteins of proximal tubular cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the renal MT......-I+II expression profile is altered during lupus nephritis. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry was performed on renal biopsies from 37 patients with lupus nephritis. Four specimens of healthy renal tissue served as controls. Clinicopathological correlation studies and renal survival analyses were performed by means...

  19. Autoantibodies against complement components in systemic lupus erythematosus - role in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, M H; Stoyanova, V S

    2017-12-01

    Many complement structures and a number of additional factors, i.e. autoantibodies, receptors, hormones and cytokines, are implicated in the complex pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Genetic defects in the complement as well as functional deficiency due to antibodies against its components lead to different pathological conditions, usually clinically presented. Among them hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, different types of glomerulonephritis as dense deposit disease, IgA nephropathy, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome and lupus nephritis are very common. These antibodies cause conformational changes leading to pathological activation or inhibition of complement with organ damage and/or limited capacity of the immune system to clear immune complexes and apoptotic debris. Finally, we summarize the role of complement antibodies in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and discuss the mechanism of some related clinical conditions such as infections, thyroiditis, thrombosis, acquired von Willebrand disease, etc.

  20. Male lupus: a diagnosis often delayed--a case series and review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ambrose, N L

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an auto-immune disease that is characterised by autoantibody production. Male lupus is rare, apart from at either end of the age spectrum. AIM: In this series, we review the histories of six male lupus patients attending our service. RESULTS: Our patients presented in middle age and tended to develop haematological abnormalities, renal involvement and neurological manifestations which preceded the onset of their skin and joint complaints. Our patients accrued damage rapidly and overall did badly. They tended to respond sub-optimally to standard treatments. These cases highlight the need an increased awareness that male SLE patients present with a wide variety of symptoms, and that they accrue damage quickly. There is a need for timely diagnosis and appropriate initiation of treatment. This may help avoid preventable organ damage and increase the survival of men with SLE.

  1. CANIS LUPUS (MAMMALIA, CANIDAE FROM THE LATE PLEISTOCENE DEPOSIT OF AVETRANA (TARANTO, SOUTHERN ITALY

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    DAVIDE F.BERTÈ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we described the remains of Canis lupus from the bed 8 of Avetrana karst filling (Late Pleistocene; Taranto, Southern Italy. The studied specimens are larger than those collected from the early Late Pleistocene Apulian localities and those referred to the recent Italian wolf. Moreover, the remains from Avetrana are morphometrically close to Canis lupus maximus from France and to C. lupus collected from Central and Northern Italian localities, chronologically related to MIS 2 and MIS 3. Morphologically, the studied specimens slightly differ from both C. l. maximus and other Pleistocene Apulian wolves. The dimensional differences between the Avetrana wolves and those collected from the other early Late Pleistocene Apulian localities could be explained through a spread of a large-sized morphotype from the Northern Italy.

  2. Radiographic findings of systemic lupus erythematosus enteritis (a report of 4 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ailian; Li Ruilan; Gao Yu'ao

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the radiographic findings and diagnosis in lupus enteritis. Methods: 4 cases of lupus enteritis (male 1, female 3) were studied. Abdominal pain was the chief complaint in all these cases. Before and after steroid therapy, small bowel contrast study was performed. Results: In one patient abdominal plain film revealed slight dilatation of jejunum with air-fluid levels. Small bowel contrast study showed effacement and (or) nodules of the mucosal folds, thumb printing, spasm and some degree of rigidity and narrowing of the lumen. Clinical symptoms and radiographic findings became normal after steroid therapy. Conclusions: If a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus presents abdominal symptoms, small bowel contrast study should be done. It is important and helpful to assist the diagnosis, to decide therapeutic plan and to follow up the effect of treatment

  3. Lupus erythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome: successful treatment with acitretin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lospinoso, D J; Fernelius, C; Edhegard, K D; Finger, D R; Arora, N S

    2013-07-01

    Lupus erythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome is a rare disorder combining the clinical, histological and immunopathological features of both lupus erythematosus (LE) and lichen planus (LP). Cutaneous lesions mostly affect the distal arms, legs, face and trunk. Palmoplantar involvement is felt to be characteristic of this condition. Plaques are often painful, centrally atrophic, bluish-red to hypopigmented in color, large, and scaly. On biopsy of clinically ambiguous lesions, histopathological features of one or both processes can be found, obscuring the diagnosis and complicating prognosis and treatment. Thus, direct immunofluorescence has become an essential tool in helping to diagnose this condition. In this report we describe the unique clinical and immunohistopathological manifestations of lupus erythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome along with a successful response to treatment with acitretin.

  4. Epidemiology and sociodemographics of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis among US adults with Medicaid coverage, 2000-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Candace H; Hiraki, Linda T; Liu, Jun; Fischer, Michael A; Solomon, Daniel H; Alarcón, Graciela S; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Costenbader, Karen H

    2013-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis (LN) disproportionately affect individuals who are members of racial/ethnic minority groups and individuals of lower socioeconomic status (SES). This study was undertaken to investigate the epidemiology and sociodemographics of SLE and LN in the low-income US Medicaid population. We utilized Medicaid Analytic eXtract data, with billing claims from 47 states and Washington, DC, for 23.9 million individuals ages 18-65 years who were enrolled in Medicaid for >3 months in 2000-2004. Individuals with SLE (≥3 visits >30 days apart with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9] code of 710.0) and with LN (≥2 visits with an ICD-9 code for glomerulonephritis, proteinuria, or renal failure) were identified. We calculated SLE and LN prevalence and incidence, stratified by sociodemographic category, and adjusted for number of American College of Rheumatology (ACR) member rheumatologists in the state and SES using a validated composite of US Census variables. We identified 34,339 individuals with SLE (prevalence 143.7 per 100,000) and 7,388 (21.5%) with LN (prevalence 30.9 per 100,000). SLE prevalence was 6 times higher among women, nearly double in African American compared to white women, and highest in the US South. LN prevalence was higher among all racial/ethnic minority groups compared to whites. The areas with lowest SES had the highest prevalence; areas with the fewest ACR rheumatologists had the lowest prevalence. SLE incidence was 23.2 per 100,000 person-years and LN incidence was 6.9 per 100,000 person-years, with similar sociodemographic trends. In this nationwide Medicaid population, there was sociodemographic variation in SLE and LN prevalence and incidence. Understanding the increased burden of SLE and its complications in this low-income population has implications for resource allocation and access to subspecialty care. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Healthcare Utilization and Costs of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Medicaid

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    Hong J. Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Healthcare utilization and costs associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a US Medicaid population were examined. Methods. Patients ≥ 18 years old with SLE diagnosis (ICD-9-CM 710.0x were extracted from a large Medicaid database 2002–2009. Index date was date of the first SLE diagnosis. Patients with and without SLE were matched. All patients had a variable length of followup with a minimum of 12 months. Annualized healthcare utilization and costs associated with SLE and costs of SLE flares were assessed during the followup period. Multivariate regressions were conducted to estimate incremental healthcare utilization and costs associated with SLE. Results. A total of 14,777 SLE patients met the study criteria, and 14,262 were matched to non-SLE patients. SLE patients had significantly higher healthcare utilization per year than their matched controls. The estimated incremental annual cost associated with SLE was $10,984, with the highest increase in inpatient costs (P<0.001. Cost per flare was $11,716 for severe flares, $562 for moderate flares, and $129 for mild flares. Annual total costs for patients with severe flares were $49,754. Conclusions. SLE patients had significantly higher healthcare resource utilization and costs than non-SLE patients. Patients with severe flares had the highest costs.

  6. Prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 infection in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Sun Shipeng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For decades, scientists have tried to understand the environmental factors involved in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, in which viral infections was included. Previous studies have identified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV to incite SLE. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, another member of the gammaherpesvirus family, shares a lot in common with EBV. The characteristics of HHV-8 make it a well-suited candidate to trigger SLE. Results In the present study, serum samples from patients (n = 108 with diagnosed SLE and matched controls (n = 122 were collected, and the prevalence of HHV-8 was compared by a virus-specific nested PCR and a whole virus enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA. There was significant difference in the prevalence of HHV-8 DNA between SLE patients and healthy controls (11 of 107 vs 1 of 122, p = 0.001; significant difference was also found in the detection of HHV-8 antibodies (19 of 107 vs 2 of 122, p We also detected the antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1. Both patients and controls showed high seroprevalence with no significant difference (106 of 107 vs 119 of 122, p = 0.625. Conclusion Our finding indicated that there might be an association between HHV-8 and the development of SLE.

  7. Aberrant T Cell Signaling and Subsets in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Takayuki Katsuyama

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic multi-organ debilitating autoimmune disease, which mainly afflicts women in the reproductive years. A complex interaction of genetics, environmental factors and hormones result in the breakdown of immune tolerance to “self” leading to damage and destruction of multiple organs, such as the skin, joints, kidneys, heart and brain. Both innate and adaptive immune systems are critically involved in the misguided immune response against self-antigens. Dendritic cells, neutrophils, and innate lymphoid cells are important in initiating antigen presentation and propagating inflammation at lymphoid and peripheral tissue sites. Autoantibodies produced by B lymphocytes and immune complex deposition in vital organs contribute to tissue damage. T lymphocytes are increasingly being recognized as key contributors to disease pathogenesis. CD4 T follicular helper cells enable autoantibody production, inflammatory Th17 subsets promote inflammation, while defects in regulatory T cells lead to unchecked immune responses. A better understanding of the molecular defects including signaling events and gene regulation underlying the dysfunctional T cells in SLE is necessary to pave the path for better management, therapy, and perhaps prevention of this complex disease. In this review, we focus on the aberrations in T cell signaling in SLE and highlight therapeutic advances in this field.

  8. Cortical Thickness and Episodic Memory Impairment in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzo, Bernardo Canedo; Sanchez, Tiago Arruda; Tukamoto, Gustavo; Zimmermann, Nicolle; Netto, Tania Maria; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in brain cortical thickness of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with and without episodic memory impairment and healthy controls. We studied 51 patients divided in 2 groups (SLE with episodic memory deficit, n = 17; SLE without episodic memory deficit, n = 34) by the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test and 34 healthy controls. Groups were paired based on sex, age, education, Mini-Mental State Examination score, and accumulation of disease burden. Cortical thickness from magnetic resonance imaging scans was determined using the FreeSurfer software package. SLE patients with episodic memory deficits presented reduced cortical thickness in the left supramarginal cortex and superior temporal gyrus when compared to the control group and in the right superior frontal, caudal, and rostral middle frontal and precentral gyri when compared to the SLE group without episodic memory impairment considering time since diagnosis of SLE as covaried. There were no significant differences in the cortical thickness between the SLE without episodic memory and control groups. Different memory-related cortical regions thinning were found in the episodic memory deficit group when individually compared to the groups of patients without memory impairment and healthy controls. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus observations of travel burden: A qualitative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Edith M; Ortiz, Kasim; Flournoy-Floyd, Minnjuan; Bruner, Larisa; Kamen, Diane

    2015-09-01

    Explorations of travel impediments among patients suffering from rheumatic diseases have been very limited. Research has consistently indicated a shortage of rheumatologists, resulting in patients potentially having to travel long distances for care. The purpose of our study was to explore how systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients experience travel issues differentially by race and socio-economic status. We conducted semi-structured interviews and a brief demographic survey with 10 patients diagnosed with SLE. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed using NVivo Analysis Software to facilitate the reporting of recurrent themes and supporting quotations, and an initial codebook was independently developed by two researchers on the study team and then verified together. Patients described three major areas of concern with respect to travel burden in accessing their rheumatologists: reliance on caregivers; meeting financial priorities; and pain and physical limitations. Our data suggest general traveling challenges interfering with medical appointment compliance for several participants and the importance of socio-economic issues when considering travel issues. This study highlights an important area with implications for adherence to medical appointments and participation in research among patients with SLE. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Variants of psychiatric disorders in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

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    T A Lisitsyna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze prevalence and structure of psychiatric disorders in pts with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE examining in the Institute of rheumatology of RAMS. Material and methods. 115 pts with SLE with median age 34 [24; 45] years and median disease duration 8 [4; 17] years were included. SLE activity was assessed with SLEDAI. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed by a psychiatrist according to ICD-10 using some psychiatric and psychological scales. Results. Psychiatric disorders were revealed in 76 from 115 (66% pts. Anxiety-depressive spectrum disorders prevailed (83%: depressive episode (40%, adjustment disorders (24%, generalized anxiety disorder (10%, dysthymia (9%. Severe cognitive dysfunction was revealed in 7% of pts. Pts with and without psychiatric disorders did not significantly differ in age, sex, duration and activity of the disease, duration of treatment and cumulative dose of prednisolone and cytotoxic drugs. Conclusion. Psychiatric disorders are frequent in pts with SLE (66%. Anxiety-depressive disorders prevail among them (83%. Relationship between SLE and psychiatric disorders requires further examination.

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus and the Crithidia luciliae immunofluorescent test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, I.J.; Fehr, K.; Wagenhaeuser, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study of the Crithidia luciliae immunofluorescence (CL-IF) assay and an adapted Farr radioimmunoassay (RIA), for the measurement of antibodies to native deoxyribonucleic acid, was performed using forty-two sera from patients with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and another forty-two from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Both assays were specific for SLE. The CL-IF assay was statistically significantly more sensitive than the adapted RIA assay. This significant difference was due to greater sensitivity of the CL-IF assay in the cases of sera from patients with SLE of slight activity. Additional advantages of the CL-IF assay were its use to classify the immunoglobulin types of the antibodies (most commonly IgG or IgM) and to measure complement-fixing antibodies to native deoxyribonucleic acid; it affords a simple method of selecting and following SLE patients at risk of developing severe renal disease. These advantages plus the simplicity and inexpensiveness of the CL-IF assay make it a useful tool, especially for use in small laboratories, for the study of antibodies to native deoxyribonucleic acid in patients with SLE. (orig.) [de

  12. Cigarette smoking and the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speyer, Cameron B; Costenbader, Karen H

    2018-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system inflammatory autoimmune disease of incompletely understood etiology. It is thought that environmental exposures 'trigger' or accelerate the disease in genetically-predisposed individuals. Areas covered: Substantial epidemiological evidence exists to support the association between cigarette smoking and the risk of incident SLE. Recent evidence points to current smoking as the specific risk factor, with decreasing risk 5 years after smoking cessation, and the greatest risk for disease characterized by the presence of SLE-specific autoantibodies. Research has begun to search for possible explanations for the temporal nature of the relationship between current smoking and autoantibody positive-SLE. Here we review potential biologic mechanisms linking smoking and SLE risk, including effects upon T and B cells, inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, and the formation of short-lived DNA adducts. Expert commentary: The directions for future research in this field include studies of gene-environment interactions, epigenetics, metabolomics and putative biologic mechanisms.

  13. Periodontal disease in Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Feng, Guijaun; Fu, Ting; Yin, Rulan; Zhang, Lijuan; Feng, Xingmei; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2017-08-01

    Disease of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and periodontal disease (PD) shares the common multiple characteristics. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease in Chinese SLE patients and to determine the association between SLE features and periodontal parameters. A cross-sectional study of 108 SLE patients together with 108 age- and sex-matched healthy controls was made. Periodontal status was conducted by two dentists independently. Sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, medication use, and clinical parameters were also assessed. The periodontal status was significantly worse in SLE patients compared to controls. In univariate logistic regression, SLE had a significant 2.78-fold [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.60-4.82] increase in odds of periodontitis compared to healthy controls. Adjusted for potential risk factors, patients with SLE had 13.98-fold (95% CI 5.10-38.33) increased odds against controls. In multiple linear regression model, the independent variable negatively and significantly associated with gingival index was education (P = 0.005); conversely, disease activity (P periodontitis of SLE in multivariate logistic regression (OR 1.348; 95% CI: 1.183-1.536, P < 0.001). Chinese SLE patients were likely to suffer from higher odds of PD. These findings confirmed the importance of early interventions in combination with medical therapy. It is necessary for a close collaboration between dentists and clinicians when treating those patients.

  14. Tolerogenic probiotics: potential immunoregulators in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Seyed-Alireza; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Momtazi, Amir Abbas; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Doulabi, Hassan; Rastin, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    Probiotics are commensal or nonpathogenic microbes that colonize the gastrointestinal tract and confer beneficial effects on the host through several mechanisms such as competitive exclusion, anti-bacterial effects, and modulation of immune responses. There is growing evidence supporting the immunomodulatory ability of some probiotics. Several experimental and clinical studies have been shown beneficial effect of some probiotic bacteria, particularly Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria strains, on inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is mainly characterized by immune intolerance towards self-antigens. Some immunomodulatory probiotics have been found to regulate immune responses via tolerogenic mechanisms. Dendritic and T regulatory (Treg) cells, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-23 can be considered as the most determinant dysregulated mediators in tolerogenic status. As demonstrated by documented experimental and clinical trials on inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, a number of probiotic bacterial strains can restore tolerance in host through modification of such dysregulated mediators. Since there are limited reports regarding to impact of probiotic supplementation in SLE patients, the preset review was aimed to suggest a number of probiotics bacteria, mainly from Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus strains that are able to ameliorate immune responses. The aim was followed through literature survey on immunoregulatory probiotics that can restore tolerance and also modulate the important dysregulated pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines contributing to the pathogenesis of SLE. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Systemic lupus erythematosus activity and beta two microglobulin levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Larocca Skare

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with a cyclical clinical course. Evaluation of the clinical activity of this disease is important for choosing the correct treatment. The objective of this study was to analyze the value of beta-2 microglobulin (β2M serum levels in determining SLE clinical activity.DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional analytical study conducted at the rheumatology outpatient clinic of a private university hospital.METHODS: 129 SLE patients were studied regarding disease activity using SLEDAI (SLE Disease Activity Index and cumulative damage using SLICC ACR (SLE International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index for SLE. At the same time, the β2M serum level, ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anti-dsDNA (anti-double-stranded DNA and C3 and C4 complement fractions were determined.RESULTS: β2M levels correlated positively with SLEDAI (P = 0.02 and ESR (P = 0.0009 and negatively with C3 (P = 0.007. Patients who were positive for anti-dsDNA had higher β2M serum levels (P = 0.009.CONCLUSION: β2M levels are elevated in SLE patients with active disease.

  16. Aberrant T Cell Signaling and Subsets in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, Takayuki; Tsokos, George C.; Moulton, Vaishali R.

    2018-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multi-organ debilitating autoimmune disease, which mainly afflicts women in the reproductive years. A complex interaction of genetics, environmental factors and hormones result in the breakdown of immune tolerance to “self” leading to damage and destruction of multiple organs, such as the skin, joints, kidneys, heart and brain. Both innate and adaptive immune systems are critically involved in the misguided immune response against self-antigens. Dendritic cells, neutrophils, and innate lymphoid cells are important in initiating antigen presentation and propagating inflammation at lymphoid and peripheral tissue sites. Autoantibodies produced by B lymphocytes and immune complex deposition in vital organs contribute to tissue damage. T lymphocytes are increasingly being recognized as key contributors to disease pathogenesis. CD4 T follicular helper cells enable autoantibody production, inflammatory Th17 subsets promote inflammation, while defects in regulatory T cells lead to unchecked immune responses. A better understanding of the molecular defects including signaling events and gene regulation underlying the dysfunctional T cells in SLE is necessary to pave the path for better management, therapy, and perhaps prevention of this complex disease. In this review, we focus on the aberrations in T cell signaling in SLE and highlight therapeutic advances in this field. PMID:29868033

  17. Accounts of famous North American Wolves, Canis lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, P.S.; Ballard, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    We examined historical accounts of 59 famous North American Gray Wolves (Canis lupus) reported during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Fifty of the 59 wolves were purportedly responsible for great losses to livestock, but for 29 reports, evidence suggested that ???2 wolves (e.g., packs) were responsible for the purported kills; in addition, seven wolves had traits that suggested they were hybrids with dogs, and one wolf was probably not from the area where the damage purportedly occurred. Reported livestock losses, especially to Longhorn cattle, from individual wolves appeared excessively high in relation to current literature. Most famous wolves were old and/or impaired from past injuries: 19 were reportedly ???10 years old, 18 had mutilated feet from past trap injuries, and one had a partially severed trachea from being in a snare. Old age and physical impairments probably contributed to livestock depredations by some famous wolves. Several accounts appeared exaggerated, inaccurate, or fabricated. Historical accounts of famous wolves should be interpreted with great caution, especially when considering impacts of wolf reintroductions or when modeling predation rates.

  18. Splenectomy increases the subsequent risk of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Hsu, Chung Y; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-02-01

    Splenectomy may be necessary to treat systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with thrombocytopenia; however, whether performing a splenectomy on patients without SLE increases the subsequent risk of SLE remains unknown. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the association between splenectomy and SLE. We conducted a cohort study by using data from the Taiwan National Health Institute Research Database to identify 10,298 patients with received a splenectomy between 2000 and 2006 and 41,192 participants without received a splenectomy who were selected by frequency matched based on sex, age, and the index year. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of developing SLE associated with splenectomy compared with patients who did not receive a splenectomy. During the study period, the overall incidence density rate of SLE was higher in the splenectomy cohort than in the non-splenectomy cohort (adjusted HR 10.55; 95 % CI 50.55-20.05). The incidence density rates of SLE in women and men who received a splenectomy were higher than those of patients who did not receive a splenectomy. Non-traumatic splenectomy increases the subsequent risk of SLE. The risk of SLE should be considered before performing a splenectomy, particularly in women and younger patients.

  19. Acquired Von Willebrand’s Syndrome in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Taveras Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS is an uncommon, underdiagnosed, and heterogeneous disease which is increasingly recognized as a cause of bleeding diatheses. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an infrequent cause of AVWS. Herein, we report a case of AVWS diagnosed during the initial presentation of SLE in a previously healthy young man with no family history of bleeding diathesis who presented with worsening epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and anasarca. He was found to have severe anemia and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT with severely decreased levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF measurements in addition to markedly decreased factor VIII levels. Further evaluation revealed nephrotic syndrome and interstitial lung disease due to SLE. He initially received combination therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and von Willebrand factor/factor VIII concentrates without significant improvement. Treatment with steroids, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab was followed by clinical improvement evidenced by cessation of bleeding. The short follow-up did not allow us to definitely prove the therapeutic effect of immunosuppressive treatment on AVWS in SLE patients. This case adds to the literature supporting the relationship between AVWS and SLE and highlights the importance of combination therapy in the treatment of severe AVWS as well as the role of IVIG, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab in AVWS associated with SLE.

  20. Alveolar hemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus: a cohort review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, C; Mendonça, T; Farinha, F; Correia, J; Marinho, A; Almeida, I; Vasconcelos, C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare but potentially catastrophic manifestation with a high mortality. Among rheumatologic diseases, it occurs most frequently in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic vasculitis. Despite new diagnostic tools and therapies, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this work was to characterize the SLE patients with an episode of alveolar hemorrhage followed in our Clinical Immunology Unit (CIU). A retrospective chart review was carried out for all patients with SLE followed in CIU between 1984 and the end of 2013. We reviewed the following data: demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory data, radiologic investigations, histologic studies, treatment, and outcome. We identified 10 episodes of DAH, corresponding to seven patients, all female. These represent 1.6% of SLE patients followed in our Unit. The age at DAH attack was 42.75 ± 18.9 years. The average time between diagnosis of SLE and the onset of DAH was 7.1 years. Three patients had the diagnosis of SLE and the DAH attack at the same time. Disease activity according to SLEDAI was high, ranging from 15 to 41. All patients were treated with methylprednisolone, 37.5% cyclophosphamide and 28.6% plasmapheresis. The overall mortality rate was 28.6%. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. The clinical significance of antiphospholipid antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünlü, Ozan; Zuily, Stephane; Erkan, Doruk

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the association of thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Thirty to forty percent of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are tested positive for aPL, which may have an impact on the SLE presentation, management, and prognosis. Compared with SLE patients without aPL, those with aPL have a higher prevalence of thrombosis, pregnancy morbidity, valve disease, pulmonary hypertension, livedo reticularis, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, acute/chronic renal vascular lesions, and moderate/severe cognitive impairment; worse quality of life; and higher risk of organ damage. The use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is controversial for primary thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity prevention because of the lack of strong prospective controlled data. Similarly, the use of anticoagulation is controversial for patients with an aPL-related nephropathy. Until further studies are available, physicians should discuss the risk/benefits of LDA or anticoagulation as well as the available literature with patients. PMID:27708976

  2. Where and How Wolves (Canis lupus Kill Beavers (Castor canadensis.

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    Thomas D Gable

    Full Text Available Beavers (Castor canadensis can be a significant prey item for wolves (Canis lupus in boreal ecosystems due to their abundance and vulnerability on land. How wolves hunt beavers in these systems is largely unknown, however, because observing predation is challenging. We inferred how wolves hunt beavers by identifying kill sites using clusters of locations from GPS-collared wolves in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. We identified 22 sites where wolves from 4 different packs killed beavers. We classified these kill sites into 8 categories based on the beaver-habitat type near which each kill occurred. Seasonal variation existed in types of kill sites as 7 of 12 (58% kills in the spring occurred at sites below dams and on shorelines, and 8 of 10 (80% kills in the fall occurred near feeding trails and canals. From these kill sites we deduced that the typical hunting strategy has 3 components: 1 waiting near areas of high beaver use (e.g., feeding trails until a beaver comes near shore or ashore, 2 using vegetation, the dam, or other habitat features for concealment, and 3 immediately attacking the beaver, or ambushing the beaver by cutting off access to water. By identifying kill sites and inferring hunting behavior we have provided the most complete description available of how and where wolves hunt and kill beavers.

  3. Identification of unique microRNA signature associated with lupus nephritis.

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    Jeannie L Te

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNA have emerged as an important new class of modulators of gene expression. In this study we investigated miRNA that are differentially expressed in lupus nephritis. Microarray technology was used to investigate differentially expressed miRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV-transformed cell lines obtained from lupus nephritis affected patients and unaffected controls. TaqMan-based stem-loop real-time polymerase chain reaction was used for validation. Microarray analysis of miRNA expressed in both African American (AA and European American (EA derived lupus nephritis samples revealed 29 and 50 differentially expressed miRNA, respectively, of 850 tested. There were 18 miRNA that were differentially expressed in both racial groups. When samples from both racial groups and different specimen types were considered, there were 5 primary miRNA that were differentially expressed. We have identified 5 miRNA; hsa-miR-371-5P, hsa-miR-423-5P, hsa-miR-638, hsa-miR-1224-3P and hsa-miR-663 that were differentially expressed in lupus nephritis across different racial groups and all specimen types tested. Hsa-miR-371-5P, hsa-miR-1224-3P and hsa-miR-423-5P, are reported here for the first time to be associated with lupus nephritis. Our work establishes EBV-transformed B cell lines as a useful model for the discovery of miRNA as biomarkers for SLE. Based on these findings, we postulate that these differentially expressed miRNA may be potential novel biomarkers for SLE as well as help elucidate pathogenic mechanisms of lupus nephritis. The investigation of miRNA profiles in SLE may lead to the discovery and development of novel methods to diagnosis, treat and prevent SLE.

  4. Testing the Formation Mechanism of Sub-Stellar Objects in Lupus (A SOLA Team Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Lopez, C.; Takahashi, S.; Santamaria-Miranda

    2017-06-01

    The international SOLA team (Soul of Lupus with ALMA) has identified a set of pre- and proto-stellar candidates in Lupus 1 and 3 of substellar nature using 1.1mm ASTE/AzTEC maps and our optical to submillimeter database. We have observed with ALMA the most promising pre- and proto-brown dwarfs candidates. Our aims are to provide insights on how substellar objects form and evolve, from the equivalent to the pre-stellar cores to the Class II stage in the low mass regime of star formation. Our sample comprises 33 pre-stellar objects, 7 Class 0 and I objects, and 22 Class II objects.

  5. Numerous Fusiform and Saccular Cerebral Aneurysms in Central Nervous System Lupus Presenting with Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shahram; Leon Guerrero, Christopher R; Gandhy, Shreya; Burger, Kathleen M; Sigounas, Dimitri

    2017-07-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement occurs in up to 50% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Cerebral aneurysm formation is a rare complication of CNS lupus. The majority of these patients present with subarachnoid hemorrhage. We report a patient with an active SLE flare who presented with a recurrent ischemic stroke and was found to have numerous unruptured fusiform and saccular aneurysms in multiple vascular territories. He was treated with high-dose steroid and rituximab along with aspirin and blood pressure control for stroke prevention. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Resultados perinatales en mujeres mexicanas con lupus eritematoso sistémico

    OpenAIRE

    B. Farfan-Labonne; I. Luis-Vásquez; A. Ávila-Carrasco; J. Ramírez-Peredo; M. Rodríguez-Bosch; J. Beltrán-Montoya; E. Reyes-Muñoz

    2017-01-01

    Objetivo: Conocer la incidencia de resultados perinatales en mujeres mexicanas con embarazo único y lupus eritematoso sistémico. Materiales y métodos: Estudio de cohorte histórica en el que se incluyeron mujeres diagnosticadas con lupus eritematoso sistémico, embarazo único, control prenatal y resolución entre 2010 y 2015. Se calculó la incidencia de los siguientes resultados perinatales: nacimiento pretérmino, muerte fetal temprana, oligohidramnios, aborto, rotura prematura de membranas, ...

  7. Soft x-ray emission from the Lupus Loop and SN 1006 supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, P.F. Jr.; Hearn, D.R.; Richardson, J.A.; Behnken, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    X-ray maps of the Lupus region have been obtained in a raster scan observation from SAS 3. These show the Lupus Loop to be a faint, extended source of soft x-rays with a temperature about 2.5 x 10 6 K. The most prominent feature of the region is the A.D. 1006 supernova remnant, which is unexpectedly bright at 0.2--1.0 keV. One speculative interpretation of the low-energy flux from SN 1006 is as blackbody radiation from a hot neutron star

  8. Off-label use of rituximab for systemic lupus erythematosus in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryden-Aulin, Monica; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Bultink, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Rituximab (RTX) is a biological treatment used off-label in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This survey aimed to investigate the off-label use of RTX in Europe and compare the characteristics of patients receiving RTX with those receiving conventional therapy. Methods...... organ manifestations for which either RTX or conventional therapy was initiated were lupus nephritis followed by musculoskeletal and haematological. The reason for treatment was, besides disease control, corticosteroid-sparing for patients treated with conventional therapy. Conclusions: RTX use for SLE...

  9. Ficolins and the lectin pathway of complement in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Nielsen, Louise Aas; Nielsen, Christoffer T

    2015-01-01

    The complement system plays a pathophysiological role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aims to investigate whether an association exists between the ficolins that are part of the lectin complement pathway and SLE. EDTA plasma samples from 68 Danish SLE patients and 29 healthy...... Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Damage Index] (SDI) (Rho=0.27, P=0.026). The Ficolin-1 concentration was also associated with the occurrence of arterial (P=0.0053) but not venous thrombosis (P=0.42). Finally, deposition of C4, C3 and TCC...

  10. Do subjective cognitive complaints correlate with cognitive impairment in systemic lupus erythematosus? A Danish outpatient study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, A; Bhattacharya, S; Larsen, J L

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of cognitive impairment and its association with depressive symptoms and self-reported cognitive complaints in Danish outpatients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Fifty-seven consecutive female SLE-outpatients were examined with a comprehensive neuropsyc......This study examined the prevalence of cognitive impairment and its association with depressive symptoms and self-reported cognitive complaints in Danish outpatients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Fifty-seven consecutive female SLE-outpatients were examined with a comprehensive...

  11. Purified umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment in a case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christopher D; Wongsaisri, Pornpatcharin; Htut, Thein; Grossman, Terry

    2017-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiple organ system autoimmune disorder for which there is no known cure. We report a case of a young adult lady with SLE and Sjogren's with diagnostic and clinical resolution following purified umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and globulin component protein macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) therapy in a combined multidisciplinary integrative medicine protocol. Our patient had complete reversal of all clinical and laboratory markers. We recommend a prospective randomized double blind study to assess the sustained efficacy of MSC and GcMAF in the treatment of autoimmune connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus.

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus and myelofibrosis: A case report and revision of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Del Porto

    Full Text Available Blood cytopenia represents one of the diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and may occur as the first symptom of the disease. Antibody-mediated peripheral destruction of blood cells is the main cause of cytopenia observed in patients affected by SLE, however, inflammatory anemia, nutritional deficiencies, immunosuppressive therapy and, more rarely, myelofibrosis (MF have also been documented. In the literature, 45 cases of autoimmune MF (AIMF and SLE have been previously reported. Here the 46th case of a 43-year-old female with a SLE and an underhand cytopenia, with a review of the literature. Keywords: Systemic lupus erythematosus, Autoimmune myelofibrosis, Blood cytopenia

  13. [Clinical guideline for the treatment of lupus nephritis and single-centre results of mycofenolate mofetil among patients with lupus nephritis in the National Institute of Rheumatology and Physiotherapy, Budapest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Melinda Zsuzsanna; Kiss, Emese

    2016-08-01

    The authors present the latest guideline for the treatment of lupus nephritis and their own single-centre results with mycofenolate mofetil treated lupus nephritis. Lupus nephritis and mainly its proliferative form is a frequent and potentially life-threatening manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus that can lead to end-stage renal disease. The treatment of lupus nephritis greatly improved in the last decades; mycofenolate mofetil has become an alternative of cyclophosphamide both in remission induction and as a maintenance regimen as well in the treatment of Class III and IV glomerulonephritis. The authors ordered mycofenolate mofetil for 25 patients with lupus nephritis so far. Histologically most of them had Class III (A/C) or IV (A) glomerulonephritis (30-30%), and only 16% of the patients had renal impairment at that time. Mycofenolate mofetil given after glucocorticoid and cyclophosphamide induction therapy reduced the daily proteinuria from 3.18 grs to 1.06 grs. Complete remission could be achieved in 24% and partial remission in 48% of the patients. The authors conclude that mycofenolate mofetil is effective in the therapy of lupus nephritis. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(35), 1385-1393.

  14. A case of urticarial vasculitis in a female patient with lupus: Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection or lupus reactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diplomatico, Mario; Gicchino, Maria Francesca; Ametrano, Orsola; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Olivieri, Alma Nunzia

    2017-05-01

    A 17-year-old female patient affected by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (who had been taking 300 mg/die of hydroxychloroquine for 3 years), Graves' disease (treated with 10 mg/die of tapazole), and celiac disease came to our attention for urticarial vasculitis. She had been taking prednisone (25 mg/die) for 3 days, and her blood tests showed high levels of Mycoplasma pneumoniae IgM and IgG antibodies. The association between urticaria and M. pneumoniae infections can be present in up to 7% of the cases and, to the best of our knowledge, only two reports of urticarial vasculitis and M. pneumoniae in adults are available in the literature. Urticarial vasculitis can also be a rare cutaneous manifestation of SLE (affecting 2% of the patients), and our case is the first in the literature describing the coexistence of M. pneumoniae infection, SLE, and urticarial vasculitis in a pediatric patient, a case that rises an important differential diagnosis issue about the origin of urticarial vasculitis: SLE reactivation or urticarial vasculitis due to M. pneumoniae infection?

  15. Psychological profiles and health status in Japanese female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: the Miyagi Lupus Collaborative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yuko; Sasaki, Takeshi; Arai, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Toru; Hisamichi, Shigeru

    2002-03-01

    Psychological factors have been suspected to be associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and patient's health status. However, psychological profiles among Japanese patients with SLE have been poorly understood. We started a prospective study of female patients with SLE in 1995. Using the baseline data from 279 patients in this prospective study, we cross-sectionally analyzed the relations of clinical factors and social factors to psychological factors, and the association between psychological factors and mental and physical health status. We used the Japanese notion ikigai as an indicator of mental health, and ambulatory activity as an indicator of their physical health, respectively. To measure psychological factors, the short-form of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (short EPQ-R) and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (HLOC) scale were used. Active phase of the disease was significantly related to the neuroticism score in the short EPQ-R. Educational level was inversely related to the scores of powerful others and chance HLOC belief. As for health status, the internal HLOC belief was significantly associated with ikigai, and the chance HLOC belief was inversely associated with ambulatory activity. The scores on the short EPQ-R (Extraversion/Introversion and Neuroticism) were exclusively related to ikigai. This study suggests that psychological factors may have effects on both the development of SLE and patient's health status.

  16. Terbinafine-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus in two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus successfully treated with topical corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalińska-Bienias, Agnieszka; Kowalewski, Cezary; Woźniak, Katarzyna

    2013-08-01

    So far in the literature there have been reported only 5 patients with a recognized and well-documented history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed SCLE after terbinafine introduction. Here we report two women suffering from SLE who developed SCLE after initiation of oral terbinafine for onychomycosis. Skin lesions in both of them were extensive, located on the trunk, and upper and lower extremities. No exacerbation of SLE symptoms was observed at that time. Despite severe skin lesions, patients revealed good response to topical corticosteroids within a few weeks. The systemic review of the literature and our experience on terbinafine-induced SCLE developing in patients with SLE allowed to create a description for this special subset: a) terbinafine-induced SCLE usually develop in 1-8 weeks after terbinafine introduction, b) skin lesions are usually severe, disseminated including lower extremities, c) patients present Ro/SS-A La/SS-B antibodies, but anti-histone antibodies are rarely observed, d) exacerbation of SLE symptoms is rather not observed, e) eruptions clear within 2-8 weeks, f) withdrawal of terbinafine and topical corticosteroids should be considered as a first-line therapy in these cases, g) terbinafine should be carefully used in patients suffering from SLE.

  17. Interleukin-6 promotes systemic lupus erythematosus progression with Treg suppression approach in a murine systemic lupus erythematosus model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaoli; Wu, Yunyun; Diao, Huitian; Hao, Jianlei; Tian, Gaofei; Jia, Zhenghu; Li, Zheng; Xiong, Sidong; Wu, Zhenzhou; Wang, Puyue; Zhao, Liqing; Yin, Zhinan

    2014-11-01

    Our aim is to reveal the role of interleukin 6 (IL-6) in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a murine model of SLE. Normal female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with syngeneic-activated lymphocyte-derived DNA (ALD-DNA) to induce SLE. Non-immunized mice were used as control. SLE-associated markers, including anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) Abs, urine protein, and kidney histopathology, were assayed to ensure the induction of the disease. Compared with control mice, ALD-DNA immunized mice exhibited high levels of anti-dsDNA Abs, IL-6 expression in vivo and in vitro. We also found that IL-6 knockout (IL-6KO) mice were resistant to ALD-DNA-induced SLE. The activation of CD4(+) T cells in immunized IL-6KO mice was lower than in immunized wild-type (Wt) mice. Intracellular cytokine staining showed that Foxp3 expression in immunized IL-6KO mice was higher than in immunized Wt mice, which might be associated with the disease severity. We further discovered that ALD-DNA-stimulated dendritic cells supernatants could result in higher IL-6 and TNF-α expression and could suppress Foxp3 expression. In addition, blocking IL-6 could up-regulate Foxp3 expression. Therefore, our findings show that IL-6 promotes the progression of SLE via suppressing Treg differentiation.

  18. Clinical correlates and outcomes in a group of Puerto Ricans with systemic lupus erythematosus hospitalized due to severe infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán-González, Patricia; Shum, Lee Ming; González-Sepúlveda, Lorena

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus patients hospitalized due to infections vary among different ethnic populations. Thus, we determined the outcomes and associated factors in a group of Hispanics from Puerto Rico with systemic lupus erythematosus admitted due to severe infections. Methods: Records of systemic lupus erythematosus patients admitted to the Adult University Hospital, San Juan, Puerto Rico, from January 2006 to December 2014 were examined. Demographic parameters, lupus manifestations, comorbidities, pharmacologic treatments, inpatient complications, length of stay, readmissions, and mortality were determined. Patients with and without infections were compared using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results: A total of 204 admissions corresponding to 129 systemic lupus erythematosus patients were studied. The mean (standard deviation) age was 34.7 (11.6) years; 90% were women. The main causes for admission were lupus flare (45.1%), infection (44.0%), and initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus (6.4%). The most common infections were complicated urinary tract infections (47.0%) and soft tissue infections (42.0%). In the multivariate analysis, patients admitted with infections were more likely to have diabetes mellitus (odds ratio: 4.20, 95% confidence interval: 1.23–14.41), exposure to aspirin prior to hospitalization (odds ratio: 4.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–15.80), and higher mortality (odds ratio: 6.00, 95% confidence interval: 1.01–35.68) than those without infection. Conclusion: In this population of systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 44% of hospitalizations were due to severe infections. Patients with infections were more likely to have diabetes mellitus and higher mortality. Preventive and control measures of infection could be crucial to improve survival in these patients.

  19. Clinical and serological manifestations associated with interferon-α levels in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Postal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the serum levels of interferon alpha in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients, their first-degree relatives and healthy controls and to evaluate the associations between serum interferon alpha and disease activity, laboratory findings and treatment features. METHODS: We screened consecutive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients in a longitudinal cohort at the pediatric rheumatology unit of the State University of Campinas between 2009 and 2010. All patients demonstrated disease onset before the age of 16. Disease status was assessed according to the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI. Interferon alpha levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. RESULTS: We included 57 childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients (mean age 17.33±4.50, 64 firstdegree relatives (mean age 39.95±5.66, and 57 healthy (mean age 19.30±4.97 controls. Serum interferon alpha levels were significantly increased in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to their firstdegree relatives and healthy controls. Interferon alpha levels were significantly increased in patients with positive dsDNA antibodies, patients with cutaneous vasculitis, patients with new malar rash and patients who were not receiving medication. Interferon alpha levels correlated with C3 levels and systemic lupus erythematosus Disease Activity Index scores. In addition, we observed an inverse correlation between patient age and interferon alpha levels. CONCLUSION: Interferon alpha may play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus, especially in cutaneous manifestations and dsDNA antibody formation. The observation that interferon alpha levels are increased in patients who are not taking medication should be investigated in

  20. Typing TREX1 gene in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fredi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An impaired expression of interferon-α regulated genes has been reported in patients with either systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS, a rare monogenic encephalopathy with onset in infancy. One of mutations causing AGS is located in the TREX1 gene on chromosome 3. Heterozygous mutations in TREX1 were reported in SLE patients. TREX1 is a DNA exonuclease with specificity for ssDNA. An impairment of its activity may result in the accumulation of nucleid acid. A recent study described a significant association between a haplotype including several common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of TREX1 and neurological manifestations in European SLE patients. Fifty-one SLE patients were screened for TREX1 gene, and the corresponding data were collected from clinical charts. A novel heterozygous variant (p.Asp130Asn was identified in one patient and in none of 150 controls. A missense variation was located in one of the three active sites of the gene and was classified as probably damaging. Variations of SNP rs11797 were detected in 33 SLE patients and a variation of rs3135944 in one. A significantly higher rate of the minor allele (T nucleotide of SNP rs11797 was found in SLE patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations [12/16 (75% vs 28/86 (32.5% O=0.002, odds ratio=6.42 95% confidence interval (1.7-26.2]. Only 1 out of 8 patients (12.5% with neuropsychiatric SLE carried the wild-type form in homozygosity. Although we analyzed a small number of patients, we found a novel variation of TREX1, which may be pathogenic. The polymorphism of rs11797 was more frequent in SLE patients with neurological manifestations.