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Sample records for lupus erythematosus relative

  1. Discoid Lupus Erythematosus

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    ... Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Share | Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic skin condition of ... occur. A small percentage of patients with discoid lupus can develop disease of the internal organs, which ...

  2. Headache in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Urowitz, Murray B; O'Keeffe, Aidan G

    2013-01-01

    To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).......To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)....

  3. "Bound" globulin in the skin of patients with chronic discoid lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormane, R.H.

    1964-01-01

    In what respect chronic discoid lupus erythematosus is related to systemic lupus erythematosus is still uncertain. In discoid lupus the lupus-erythematosus (L.E.) phenomenon is negative, and the history does not suggest vascular lesions or involvement of serous membranes. In both diseases the pathog

  4. "Bound" globulin in the skin of patients with chronic discoid lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormane, R.H.

    1964-01-01

    In what respect chronic discoid lupus erythematosus is related to systemic lupus erythematosus is still uncertain. In discoid lupus the lupus-erythematosus (L.E.) phenomenon is negative, and the history does not suggest vascular lesions or involvement of serous membranes. In both diseases the

  5. "Bound" globulin in the skin of patients with chronic discoid lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormane, R.H.

    1964-01-01

    In what respect chronic discoid lupus erythematosus is related to systemic lupus erythematosus is still uncertain. In discoid lupus the lupus-erythematosus (L.E.) phenomenon is negative, and the history does not suggest vascular lesions or involvement of serous membranes. In both diseases the pathog

  6. Melanotic lupus erythematosus: A rare variant of discoid lupus erythematosus

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    Seval Doğruk Kaçar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE is characterized by atrophic patches with peripheral hyperpigmentation on sun exposed skin areas. It rarely presents with diffuse hyperpigmented patches without erythema, adherent scale and atrophy on face and neck. This presentation is called as melanotic lupus erythematosus and it is rarely reported in literature. Other diseases that cause facial pigmentation as melasma, Riehl melanosis, lichen planus pigmentosus, drug related pigmentation should be considered in the differential diagnosis. We herein report a 66 year old male patient with diffuse blue-brown pigmentations on his face which was diagnosed as melanotic lupus erythematosus with the clinical, histopathological and immunofluoresence findings.

  7. Lupus-related advanced liver involvement as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Lu, Ming-Chi; Li, Ko-Jen; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Wu, Cheng-Han; Yu, Chia-Li

    2006-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of systemic autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement with diverse clinical and serological manifestations, principally affects women in their child-bearing years. Clinically significant hepatic abnormality as the initial presentation of SLE has rarely been reported. Eleven patients with lupus with initial presentation of lupus-related hepatitis were included in this retrospective review. Clinical manifestation, immunological profiles, and risk factors for poor prognosis were analyzed. The most commonly associated clinical manifestations were found to be thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, advancing age, and presence of anti-SSA/Ro antibody and anti-thyroid antibodies. The diagnosis of SLE was delayed due to dominant hepatic abnormalities. Age greater than 50 years and marked hepatic decompensation in accordance with Child classification B and C might suggest poor prognosis (p=0.06). However, the p value was not statistically significant because of the small sample size. Lupus-related hepatitis, particularly in late-onset lupus, is common. In addition, the presence of anti-SSA, anti-thyroglobulin, and anti-microsomal antibodies is indicative of hepatic involvement in patients with SLE.

  8. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus

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    Biazar, Cyrus; Sigges, Johanna; Patsinakidis, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study, we assessed clinical and laboratory characteristics from patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) using the Core Set Questionnaire of the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE). 1002 (768 females, 234 males...... included gender, age at onset of disease, LE-specific and LE-nonspecific skin lesions, photosensitivity, laboratory features, and the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) for the classification of systemic lupus erythematosus. The mean age at onset of disease was 43.0±15.7 years...

  9. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

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    M. Carrabba

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced lupus is a syndrome which share symptoms and laboratory characteristics with the idiopathic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. The list of medications implicated as etiologic agents in drug-induced lupus continues to grow. The terms used for this condition are lupus-like syndrome, drug-induced lupus erythematosus (DILE and drug related lupus. More than 80 drugs have been associated with DILE. The first case of DILE was reported in 1945 and associated with sulfadiazin. In 1953 it was reported that DILE was related to the use of hydralazine. Drugs responsible for the development of DILE can divided into three groups, but the list of these drugs is quite long because new drugs are included yearly in the list. The syndrome is characterised by arthralgia, myalgia, pleurisy, rash and fever in association with antinuclear antibodies in the serum. Recognition of DILE is important because it usually reverts within a few weeks after stopping the drug.

  10. Cytokines in relation to autoantibodies before onset of symptoms for systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Eriksson, C; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S

    2014-06-01

    A number of cytokines and chemokines were analysed and related to autoantibodies in blood samples pre-dating the onset of symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus. Thirty-five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (American College of Rheumatology criteria) were identified as having donated blood samples, prior to symptom onset, to the Biobank of northern Sweden. Altogether, 140 age- and sex-matched controls were also identified. The concentrations of interferon-α, interleukin-4, interleukin-9, interleukin-10, interferon inducible protein-10 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were analysed using multiplex technology and related to autoantibodies (ANA, ENA, anti-dsDNA and anti-histone antibodies) analysed from the same blood sample. The interferon-γ inducible protein-10 levels were higher in the pre-symptomatic individuals than in controls (p systemic lupus erythematosus. An increased concentration of interferon-γ inducible protein-10 pre-dated the onset of systemic lupus erythematosus and was related to autoantibodies before the onset of disease. The levels of interferon-γ inducible protein-10 and interferon-α were correlated. These findings support the proposal that the interferon system is important early in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and autoantibody formation. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Hypertrophic discoid lupus erythematosus.

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    Farley-Loftus, Rachel; Elmariah, Sarina B; Ralston, Jonathan; Kamino, Hideko; Franks, Andrew G

    2010-11-15

    Hypertrophic discoid lupus erythematosus is a distinct form of chronic cutaneous (discoid) lupus, which is characterized by hyperkeratotic plaques that typically are observed over the face, arms, and upper trunk. We present the case of a 43-year-old man with verrucous plaques that were distributed symmetrically over the face, who initially was treated with oral antibiotics and topical glucocorticoids for acne vulgaris. A biopsy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of hypertrophic discoid lupus erythematosus. The clinical and histopathologic features of this clinical variant are reviewed.

  12. Pregnancy-related issues in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Singh, Abha G; Chowdhary, Vaidehi R

    2015-02-01

    While fertility is preserved in females with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), it is well established that pregnancy in these patients is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, including pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery and intrauterine growth retardation, as well as neonatal mortality. Mechanisms underlying these adverse outcomes are poorly understood, and better understanding of these would allow development of targeted and personalized treatment strategies. Established risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes include active disease within 6 months prior to conception and during pregnancy, active nephritis, maternal hypertension, antiphospholipid antibodies and hypocomplementemia. While intensive monitoring is recommended, the comparative effectiveness of appropriate management strategies is unclear. While current strategies are able to achieve live births in 85-90% of pregnancies, certain aspects such as prevention of preterm birth, treatment of congenital heart block due to neonatal lupus and recurrent pregnancy loss despite best management, remains challenging. Pregnancy is also associated with an increased risk of flare of lupus, particularly in patients with active disease at time of conception or within 6 months prior to conception. Pregnant patients with SLE should be followed in a high-risk obstetric clinic, and care should be closely coordinated between the obstetrician and rheumatologist.

  13. Autoantibodies persist in relatives to systemic lupus erythematosus patients during 12 years follow-up

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    Langkilde, Henrik; Voss, A; Heegaard, N

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with presence of autoantibodies and characteristic multi-organ involvement. Relatives of SLE patients have an increased risk of autoantibody production and autoimmune diseases. METHODS: In 2001, 226 first degree relatives (FDRs...

  14. Episcleritis Related to Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus following Infliximab Therapy: A Case Report

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    Irini P. Chatziralli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure which resolves after discontinuation of the offending drug. Herein, we describe a patient with distinct clinical manifestations of anti-TNF-associated DILE related to infliximab therapy. The patient exhibited clinical and laboratory findings of lupus-like illnesses as well as ocular disorders, such as episcleritis. The main message is that the symptoms of DILE should not be overlooked, although sometimes other systematic conditions may underlie them. As a result, it is very important for the clinicians to evaluate the symptoms of DILE and manage appropriately these cases.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: systemic lupus erythematosus

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    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions systemic lupus erythematosus systemic lupus erythematosus Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease that causes ...

  16. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Antiphospholipid Syndrome

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    Aleksandra Plavsic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder defined as association of vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy complications with presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin and anti-β2 glycoprotein I. It is the most common cause of acquired thrombophilia, and can occur as an independent entity or in relation with other diseases, especially systemic lupus erythematosus. Presence of antiphospholipid syndrome in systemic lupus erythematosus is additional vaso occlusive factor in already present inflammation, bringing further risk for thrombotic events. Clinical and serological manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus are very similar, so possible connection for these two autoimmune disorders is assumed.

  17. Kutan lupus erythematosus

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    Sandreva, Tatjana; Voss, Anne; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease. The most common clinical forms are acute cutaneous LE (ACLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE) and discoid LE (DLE). Cutaneous LE, mainly ACLE, can be the first sign of systemic LE (SLE). DLE and SCLE are less associated with development...

  18. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Popescu, Alexandra; Kao, Amy H

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is the least understood, yet perhaps the most prevalent manifestation of lupus. The pathogenesis of NPSLE is multifactorial and involves various inflammatory cytokines, autoantibodies, and immune complexes resulting in vasculopathic, cytotoxic and autoantibody-mediated neuronal injury. The management of NPSLE is multimodal and has not been subjected to rigorous study. Different treatment regimens include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulation, and immunosuppressives such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate. For refractory NPSLE, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, and rituximab have been used. Adjunctive symptomatic treatment complements these therapies by targeting mood disorders, psychosis, cognitive impairment, seizures or headaches. Several new biological agents are being tested including Belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that targets B lymphocyte stimulator. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, treatment, and new potential therapies for neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22379459

  19. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Pregnancy.

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    Lateef, Aisha; Petri, Michelle

    2017-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a strong female predilection. Pregnancy remains a commonly encountered but high-risk situation in this setting. Both maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity are still significantly increased despite improvements in outcomes. Maternal morbidity includes higher risk of disease flares, preeclampsia and other pregnancy-related complications. Fetal issues include higher rates of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and neonatal lupus syndromes. Treatment options during pregnancy are also limited and maternal benefit has to be weighed against fetal risk. A coordinated approach, with close monitoring by a multidisciplinary team, is essential for optimal outcomes.

  20. Impact of systemic lupus erythematosus on oral health-related quality of life.

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    Corrêa, J D; Branco, L G A; Calderaro, D C; Mendonça, S M S; Travassos, D V; Ferreira, G A; Teixeira, A L; Abreu, L G; Silva, T A

    2017-01-01

    Oral symptoms in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are often unexplored and affect the health-related quality of life. The aims of this study were: (a) to evaluate the oral health condition of SLE patients compared to control subjects without rheumatic diseases; (b) to determine the consequences of oral health condition in the quality of life of these two groups. Individuals with SLE ( n = 75) and without SLE ( n = 78) (control group), paired for gender and age, underwent complete oral examination. Sociodemographic and clinical information was obtained, and interviews were conducted using the Brazilian version of the oral health impact profile. The activity and damage of SLE disease were assessed, respectively, by the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology damage index for systemic lupus erythematosus. When we analysed the oral health condition and hygiene habits of the participants, SLE patients exhibited an increased number of missing teeth despite their higher frequency of tooth brushing. No significant differences were verified in other habits and clinical parameters evaluated such as smoking, flossing, salivary flux, periodontitis, decayed and filled teeth. Patients with SLE presented with worse oral health-related quality of life than controls ( P = 0.011). The significant difference was on individuals' physical disability ( P = 0.002). The determinant of the negative impact on the oral health-related quality of life was prosthesis wearing ( P < 0.05). Overall, the oral health impact profile score was higher in individuals with moderate SLE damage compared to SLE individuals with no damage ( P = 0.043). Patients with SLE had a negative impact of oral condition on their quality of life. The evaluation of the oral health-related quality of life might be useful to monitor the effects of SLE on oral condition.

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus serositis

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    Low, V.H.S.; Robins, P.D.; Sweeney, D.J. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1995-08-01

    The imaging appearances of a case of systemic lupus erythematosus, which manifested initially as a serositis, is described. Barium small bowel study showed segments of spiculation with tethering, angulation, and obstruction. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen confirmed ascites. It was also useful in demonstrating free fluid, bowel wall oedema, and serosal thickening . Follow up scanning to demonstrate resolution of changes may also be of value. The definitive diagnosis was made on the basis of marked elevation of antinuclear and anti-double stranded DNA antibodies. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisnevskaia, Larissa; Murphy, Grainne; Isenberg, David

    2014-11-22

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a remarkable and challenging disorder. Its diversity of clinical features is matched by the complexity of the factors (genetic, hormonal, and environmental) that cause it, and the array of autoantibodies with which it is associated. In this Seminar we reflect on changes in its classification criteria; consider aspects of its more serious clinical expression; and provide a brief review of its aetiopathogenesis, major complications, coping strategies, and conventional treatment. Increased understanding of the cells and molecules involved in the development of the diseases has encouraged the identification of new, better targeted biological approaches to its treatment. The precise role of these newer therapies remains to be established.

  3. Immunogenetics of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Aimee O; Arkin, Lisa M; Prahalad, Sampath

    2016-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototypic autoimmune condition, often affecting multiple organ systems, including the skin. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is distinct from SLE and may be skin limited or associated with systemic disease. Histopathologically, the hallmark of lupus-specific manifestations of SLE and CLE is an interface dermatitis. The cause of SLE and CLE is likely multifactorial and may include shared genetic factors. In this review, we will discuss the genetic findings related to the cutaneous manifestations of SLE and isolated CLE, with a particular focus on the lupus-specific CLE subtypes. Several major histocompatibility complex and nonmajor histocompatibility complex genetic polymorphisms have been identified which may contribute to the cutaneous manifestations of SLE and to CLE. Most of these genetic variants are associated with mechanisms attributed to the pathogenesis of SLE, including pathways involved in interferon and vitamin D regulation and ultraviolet light exposure. Although there is overlap between the genetic factors associated with SLE and CLE, there appear to be unique genetic factors specific for CLE. Improved understanding of the genetics of CLE may lead to the creation of targeted therapies, improving outcomes for patients with this challenging dermatologic condition.

  4. Recurrent podocytopathy in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Paramalingam, Shereen; Wong, Daniel D; Dogra, Gursharan K; Nossent, Johannes C

    2017-01-01

    Podocytopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus is characterised by diffuse foot process effacement without significant peripheral capillary wall immune deposits as seen on electron microscopy. Lupus podocytopathy falls outside the scope of the current International Society of Nephrology and the Renal Pathology Society classification of lupus nephritis. We present a case of relapsing podocytopathy with nephrotic syndrome occurring simultaneously with two extra-renal and serological disease flares, which makes it likely that podocytopathy was related to systemic lupus erythematosus activity. This case adds to the growing body of evidence that lupus podocytopathy must be considered in the differential diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus patients presenting with nephrotic syndrome.

  5. Recurrent podocytopathy in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramalingam, Shereen; Wong, Daniel D; Dogra, Gursharan K; Nossent, Johannes C

    2017-01-01

    Podocytopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus is characterised by diffuse foot process effacement without significant peripheral capillary wall immune deposits as seen on electron microscopy. Lupus podocytopathy falls outside the scope of the current International Society of Nephrology and the Renal Pathology Society classification of lupus nephritis. We present a case of relapsing podocytopathy with nephrotic syndrome occurring simultaneously with two extra-renal and serological disease flares, which makes it likely that podocytopathy was related to systemic lupus erythematosus activity. This case adds to the growing body of evidence that lupus podocytopathy must be considered in the differential diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus patients presenting with nephrotic syndrome.

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with systemic lupus erythematosus: a possible relation to proliferative nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, A; Yahia, S; Laimon, W; Hamed, S M; Shouma, A; Shalaby, N M; Abdel-Hady, D; Ghanem, R; El-Farahaty, R M; El-Bassiony, S R; Hammad, E M

    2017-06-01

    Introduction Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is crucial in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus through angiotensin II which regulates vascular tone and endothelial functions. Objectives To study the frequency of ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with systemic lupus erythematosus and its possible relation to the renal pathology in cases with lupus nephritis. Subjects and methods The frequency of ACE gene insertion/deletion polymorphism genotypes was determined in 78 Egyptian children with systemic lupus erythematosus and compared to a matched group of 140 healthy controls using polymerase chain reaction. Results The DD genotype of the ACE gene was higher in systemic lupus erythematosus patients when compared to controls ( Psystemic lupus erythematosus patients in comparison to controls ( P lupus nephritis group, the DD genotype was significantly higher in those with proliferative lupus nephritis when compared to those with non-proliferative lupus nephritis ( P = 0.02; OR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.4-1.6). Also, patients with proliferative lupus nephritis showed a higher frequency of the D allele ( P systemic lupus erythematosus and occurrence of proliferative nephritis in Egyptian children.

  7. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and weakness].

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    Vinagre, Filipe; Santos, Maria José; da Silva, José Canas

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of a 13-year old young girl, with Juvenile Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and recent onset of muscle weakness. Investigations lead to the diagnosis of Myasthenia Gravis. The most important causes of muscle weakness in lupus patients are discussed.

  8. Systemic lupus erythematosus and Klinefelter's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    French, M A; Hughes, P

    1983-01-01

    A case of Klinefelter's syndrome presenting with systemic lupus erythematosus while receiving androgen replacement therapy is described. The association of systemic lupus erythematosus with Klinefelter's syndrome is discussed, particularly in terms of the effect of sex hormones.

  9. Dyslipidemia in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Melinda Zsuzsanna; Szodoray, Peter; Kiss, Emese

    2017-02-07

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Accelerated atherosclerosis is related to traditional (age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, smoking, and positive family history) and non-traditional, disease-related factors. Traditional risk factors are still more prominent in patients with lupus, as both hypertension and hypercholesterinemia were independently associated with premature atherosclerosis in several SLE cohorts. In this work, the authors summarize the epidemiology of dyslipidemia in lupus patients and review the latest results in the pathogenesis of lipid abnormalities. The prevalence of dyslipidemia, with elevations in total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride (TG), and apolipoprotein B (ApoB), and a reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels are about 30% at the diagnosis of SLE rising to 60% after 3 years. Multiple pathogenetic mechanism is included, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) can suppress HDL and increase TG, auto-antibodies can cause the injury of the endothelium, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity can be reduced by circulating inflammatory mediators and antibodies, and increased oxidative stress may trigger a wide range of pro-atherogenic lipid modifications. As a major risk factor, dyslipidemia should be treated aggressively to minimize the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Randomized controlled trials with statins are controversial in the detention of atherosclerosis progression, but can be favorable by inhibiting immune activation that is the arterial wall and by decreasing lupus activity.

  10. Health related quality of life in Mexican women with systemic lupus erythematosus: a descriptive study using SF-36 and LupusQoL(C).

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    García-Carrasco, M; Mendoza-Pinto, C; Cardiel, M H; Méndez-Martínez, S; García-Villaseñor, A; Jiménez-Hernández, C; Alonso-García, N E; Briones-Rojas, R; Ramos-Álvarez, G; López-Colombo, A

    2012-10-01

    The LupusQoL© questionnaire is a disease-specific health related quality of life (HRQOL) instrument for adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The Short Form-36 (SF-36) is a generic instrument that captures the physical, psychological, and social impact. We conducted a descriptive study of women aged ≥ 18 years attending our Lupus Clinic. HRQOL was assessed by applying the LupusQoL© and SF-36. Lupus activity was measured using the Mexican Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (Mex-SLEDAI) and chronic damage using the Systemic Lupus Collaborative Clinics Damage Index (SDI). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the chi-square test and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient. A total of 127 patients were included with a mean age of 40.5 ± 12.6 years. The mean disease duration was 8.2 ± 5.6 years, the mean disease activity score was 2.4 ± 3.0, and the mean SDI score 0.77 ± 1.06. The mean SF-36 score was 58.1 ± 21.1 and the mean LupusQoL© score was 69 ± 22.7. The correlation between global scores of the SF-36 and LupusQoL© was rho = 0.73 (p Mexican lupus female patients. The usefulness of the LupusQoL© should be evaluated in lupus patients with moderate to severe disease activity.

  11. Gestational outcomes in patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    de Jesus, G R; Rodrigues, B C; Lacerda, M I; Dos Santos, F C; de Jesus, N R; Klumb, E M; Levy, R A

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzed maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancies of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients followed in a reference unit. This retrospective cohort study included 26 pregnancies of patients seen between 2011 and 2015 included with history and/or active neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus among 135 pregnancies. Three patients had active neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus at conception, but only one remained with neurological activity during gestation, characteristically related to the inadvertent suspension of medications. Twenty six percent of the newborns were small for gestational age and 40% of live births were premature, with no neonatal death or early complications of prematurity. Preeclampsia was diagnosed in nine pregnancies, with two cases of early severe form that resulted in intrauterine fetal death. Patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus had more prematurity and preeclampsia compared to patients without neuropsychiatric disease. However, when concomitant lupus nephritis was excluded, the gestational results of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients were more favorable.

  12. Mercury in Hair Is Inversely Related to Disease Associated Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    William Crowe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune inflammatory disease, and environmental factors are proposed to exacerbate existing symptoms. One such environmental factor is mercury. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between exposure to mercury (Hg and disease activity and disease associated damage in Total Hg concentrations in hair and urine were measured in 52 SLE patients. Dental amalgams were quantified. Disease activity was assessed using three indexes including the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group Index (BILAG. Disease associated damage was measured using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology SLICC/ACR Damage Index. Pearson’s correlation identified a significant negative correlation between hair Hg and BILAG (r = −0.323, p = 0.029 and SLICC/ACR (r = −0.377, p = 0.038. Multiple regression analysis identified hair Hg as a significant predictor of disease associated damage as determined by SLICC/ACR (β = −0.366, 95% confidence interval (CI: −1.769, −0.155 p = 0.019. Urinary Hg was not related to disease activity or damage. Fish consumption is the primary route of MeHg exposure in humans and the inverse association of hair Hg with disease activity observed here might be explained by the anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids also found in fish.

  13. Mercury in Hair Is Inversely Related to Disease Associated Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, William; Doherty, Leanne; Watson, Gene; Armstrong, David; Ball, Elisabeth; Magee, Pamela; Allsopp, Philip; Bell, Aubrey; Strain, J J; McSorley, Emeir

    2015-12-23

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease, and environmental factors are proposed to exacerbate existing symptoms. One such environmental factor is mercury. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between exposure to mercury (Hg) and disease activity and disease associated damage in Total Hg concentrations in hair and urine were measured in 52 SLE patients. Dental amalgams were quantified. Disease activity was assessed using three indexes including the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group Index (BILAG). Disease associated damage was measured using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology SLICC/ACR Damage Index. Pearson's correlation identified a significant negative correlation between hair Hg and BILAG (r = -0.323, p = 0.029) and SLICC/ACR (r = -0.377, p = 0.038). Multiple regression analysis identified hair Hg as a significant predictor of disease associated damage as determined by SLICC/ACR (β = -0.366, 95% confidence interval (CI): -1.769, -0.155 p = 0.019). Urinary Hg was not related to disease activity or damage. Fish consumption is the primary route of MeHg exposure in humans and the inverse association of hair Hg with disease activity observed here might be explained by the anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids also found in fish.

  14. SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS : CASE REPORT

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    Ida Ayu Tri Wedari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE, an autoimmune disease characterized by the production of antibodies against components of the cellnucleus that is associated with a broad clinical manifestations. Ninety percent of casesof systemic lupus erythematosus attacking a young woman with a peak incidence at 1540yearsofageduringthereproductiveperiodwiththeratioofwomenandmen5:1.Itsetiologyis unclear, allegedly associated with a specific immune response genes in themajor histocompatibility complex class II, HLA-DR2 and HLA DR3. Clinicalmanifestations which appear heterogeneous and involve almost all organ systems of thecondition of the joints and skin of patients with mild to severe disease that attacks thecentral nervous system, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys. Treatment is mainlyaimed at controlling the symptoms of the acute attack and suppress symptoms andweight at a level that can be tolerated and prevent organ damage.

  15. Biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Ahearn, Joseph M; Liu, Chau-Ching; Kao, Amy H; Manzi, Susan

    2012-04-01

    The urgent need for lupus biomarkers was demonstrated in September 2011 during a Workshop sponsored by the Food and Drug Administration: Potential Biomarkers Predictive of Disease Flare. After 2 days of discussion and more than 2 dozen presentations from thought leaders in both industry and academia, it became apparent that highly sought biomarkers to predict lupus flare have not yet been identified. Even short of the elusive biomarker of flare, few biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) diagnosis, monitoring, and stratification have been validated and employed for making clinical decisions. This lack of reliable, specific biomarkers for SLE hampers proper clinical management of patients with SLE and impedes development of new lupus therapeutics. As such, the intensity of investigation to identify lupus biomarkers is climbing a steep trajectory, lending cautious optimism that a validated panel of biomarkers for lupus diagnosis, monitoring, stratification, and prediction of flare may soon be in hand.

  16. Lupus Erythematosus Panniculitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Swati Gondane; Rajkumar Kothiwala; Sapna Dangi; Ashok Meherda

    2015-01-01

    A case of lupus erythematosus (LE) panniculitis in pregnancy without any lesions of discoid LE or systemic LE is being reported. There were no systemic symptoms. Her ANA, anti-dsDNA, anti-Ro/SSA, and anti-La/SSB antibodies were within normal limits. Diagnosis of lupus panniculitis was considered on clinical and histopathological grounds. The condition responded favorably to systemic steroid therapy.

  17. Lupus erythematosus panniculitis in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Gondane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of lupus erythematosus (LE panniculitis in pregnancy without any lesions of discoid LE or systemic LE is being reported. There were no systemic symptoms. Her ANA, anti-dsDNA, anti-Ro/SSA, and anti-La/SSB antibodies were within normal limits. Diagnosis of lupus panniculitis was considered on clinical and histopathological grounds. The condition responded favorably to systemic steroid therapy.

  18. Management of Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Current Approaches and Future Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Magro-Checa (César); E.J. Zirkzee (Elisabeth J.); T.W.J. Huizinga (Tom); G.M. Steup-Beekman (G.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractNeuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is a generic definition referring to a series of neurological and psychiatric symptoms directly related to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). NPSLE includes heterogeneous and rare neuropsychiatric (NP) manifestations involving both t

  19. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz-da-Costa, Teresa; Centeno, Mónica; Pinto, Luísa; Marques, Aurora; Mendes-Graça, Luís

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory disease, resulting from an auto-immune dysfunction. The etiology of this disease is unknown. It frequently occurs in women of childbearing age. Pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus may be associated with several complications (maternal, obstetrical and fetal). The prognosis for both mother and child is better when systemic lupus erythematosus has been quiescent for at least six months before pregnancy. Thus, preconceptional assessment and management is crucial for helping women to achieve a period of disease remission before pregnancy as well as for allowing an adjustment of therapy. Maternal health and fetal development should be closely monitored during pregnancy. These patients should be surveilled by a multidisciplinary team (obstetrician, rheumatologist or internist, nephrologist if necessary and a pediatrician), in a tertiary care hospital. Antiphospholipid syndrome, positivity for anti-SSA/Ro or anti-SSB/LA antibodies, hypertension or renal involvement are associated with an increase of adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this article the authors review the main aspects of Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pregnancy.

  20. Systemisk lupus erythematosus og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Karen; Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease which most often affects women of childbearing age. Pregnancy is therefore an important issue for the patient and the responsible physician. Pregnancy outcomes in women with SLE has improved significantly over the latest decades...

  1. Systemisk lupus erythematosus og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Karen; Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease which most often affects women of childbearing age. Pregnancy is therefore an important issue for the patient and the responsible physician. Pregnancy outcomes in women with SLE has improved significantly over the latest decades...

  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Green, A; Junker, P

    1998-01-01

    A population based cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was recruited from a for epidemiological purposes representative Danish region. Patients were ascertained from 4 different sources with a high degree of completeness as estimated by using capture-recapture analysis...

  3. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the fields of medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine, the health care system, and preclinical sciences. Hope for the Future With research advances and a better understanding of lupus, the prognosis for people with lupus today is ...

  4. Factors influencing the health related quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: long-term results (2001--2005) of patients in the German Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Organization (LULA Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, T; Fischer-Betz, R; Beer, S; Winkler-Rohlfing, B; Schneider, M

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine disease-specific and individual factors associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) organized in the German Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Organization. Three hundred and seventeen patients aged between 11 and 77 years participated annually in five surveys carried out between 2001 and 2005. Regression analyses were carried out for physical and mental HRQOL as dependent variables. Factors influencing HRQOL were the respective HRQOL scores of the previous year, SLE activity as measured by the Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ), and impairments in everyday life. Social support indicated by living in marriage or in a marriage-like partnership had a positive influence on both mental and physical HRQOL, whereas individual factors such as education seemed to be of minor importance.

  5. Fatigue in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Grace E; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease often characterized by fatigue, with significant effects on physical functioning and wellbeing. The definition, prevalence and factors associated with fatigue, including physical activity, obesity, sleep, depression, anxiety, mood, cognitive dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency, pain, effects of medications and comorbidities, as well as potential therapeutic options of fatigue in the systemic lupus erythematosus population are reviewed. Due to variability in the reliability and validity of various fatigue measures used in clinical studies, clinical trial data have been challenging to interpret. Further investigation into the relationships between these risk factors and fatigue, and improved measures of fatigue, may lead to an improvement in the management of this chronic inflammatory disease.

  6. Pathophysiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Achtman, Jordan C; Werth, Victoria P.

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) encompasses the complex interactions between genetics, the environment, and cells and their products. Recent data have provided enhanced understanding of these interactions and the mechanism by which they cause disease. A number of candidate genes have been identified which increase the risk of developing CLE. Ultraviolet radiation, the predominant environmental exposure associated with CLE, appears to initiate CLE lesion formation by...

  7. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM), is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of...

  8. Age-related differences in the clinical characteristics of systemic lupus erythematosus in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia; Wu, Fengqi; Huang, Xiaolan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how the clinical presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus in pediatric varied with the age of onset of the disease. We reviewed the charts of a total of 88 Chinese pediatric patients (pSLE) diagnosed and admitted first time to our hospitals between 2005 and 2008. Patients were divided into 3 groups, depending on the age at diagnosis: preschool (1-6 years), school age (7-11 years), and adolescent groups (12-18 years). Among the three groups, we compared the sex ratio, disease duration at diagnosis, symptoms at the onset of the disease, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, SLEDAI (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index) 2000, and SLICC/ACR SDI (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus). Most pediatric patients were in the adolescent group (47.7%), while the disease duration at diagnosis was shortest in preschool-age patients (0.65 ± 0.5 months). The most common symptoms at the onset of pSLE were fever, rash, arthritis, and seizures. Hematologic system and neuropsychiatric system were damaged commonly. The preschool-age patients had the shortest disease duration at diagnosis, the highest incidence of neuropsychiatric system involvement, and the poorest prognosis of all the age groups, especially the boys. Patients in adolescence had the peak incidence of pediatric SLE and high disease activity, begins to acquire some of the adult characteristics. School-age is a transition stage between other stages.

  9. Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessier Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    2013-01-01

    Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.......Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries....

  10. Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, J P

    2010-08-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus with unique immunologic and clinical features. The first description dates back to 1985 when a series of five patients were found to have hydrochlorothiazide-induced SCLE. Since that time, at least 40 other drugs have been implicated in the induction of SCLE.

  11. Increased serum level of prolactin is related to autoantibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Li, Q; Yang, X; Li, M

    2016-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is known to aid effector B cells and augment autoimmunity, but the role of PRL in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between the serum levels of PRL and autoantibody production in SLE. Blood levels of PRL, anti-double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) antibody, immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) were determined in samples from 30 adult patients with SLE and 25 healthy controls. The relationships between the serum level of PRL and SLE disease activity, as well as the titres of the ds-DNA antibody, IgM and IgG were determined. The serum level of PRL was higher in the SLE patients than in the healthy controls. PRL concentration increased during SLE flares-ups and decreased following disease remission. There was a positive correlation between the PRL concentration and serum levels of IgM, IgG and ds-DNA antibody titre. These data suggest that the serum level of PRL was closely related to the antibody production and disease activity of SLE patients. PRL concentration was dramatically reduced upon the remission of disease activity, indicating that PRL levels might be a promising predictor of SLE disease severity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Health-related quality of life assessed by LupusQoL questionnaire and SF-36 in Turkish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz-Oner, Sibel; Oner, Can; Dogukan, Fatih Mert; Moses, Toklong Filam; Demir, Kubra; Tekayev, Nazar; Atagunduz, Pamir; Tuglular, Serhan; Direskeneli, Haner

    2016-03-01

    The LupusQoL is a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measure for patients with lupus. We conducted this study to compare the efficiency of LupusQoL-TR (validated Turkish version of the LupusQoL questionnaire) with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), a generic quality of life (QoL) scale, in Turkish patients with lupus. Both questionnaires were conducted at a single visit to the clinic. Disease activity was measured with the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Associations between the LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 domains were examined while also examining age, disease duration, and disease activity for each questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Spearman's correlation coefficients, and Students t test were performed to analyze the data. A total of 113 consecutive patients with lupus (F/M 108:5, mean age 40.6 ± 11.9 years, mean disease duration 8.5 ± 7.0 years) were included, and 69 % of these were active. The median SLEDAI score was 2 (0-24), the mean global LupusQoL-TR score was 60.9 ± 23.3, and the mean SF-36 score was 41.2 ± 9.0. There was a significant correlation between LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 mean scores (r = 0.83; p SF-36 did not correlate with disease activity (r = -0.11; p = 0.244 and r = -0.03; p = 0.721, respectively). LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 questionnaires were beneficial instruments in evaluating HRQoL in Turkish lupus patients. However, LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 were not associated with SLEDAI scores, which suggested that QoL might be affected by other factors besides disease activity, especially in clinically inactive or mildly active patients.

  13. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus presenting as poikiloderma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a recognised variant of lupus erythematosus (LE), which accounts for 10-15% of all cases of cutaneous LE, occurring most commonly in young to middle-aged white women. Diagnosis is based on the detection of anti-Ro\\/SS-A antibodies in the skin and serum, characteristic clinical and histological cutaneous involvement, and relatively mild systemic involvement. Several unusual variants of SCLE have been reported including erythrodermic SCLE, SCLE with vitiligo-like lesions, acral SCLE and bullous SCLE. Poikoilodermatous SCLE is a recognised but rare variant of SCLE. There are currently only two case reports, comprising five individual cases, in the literature. We present a case of SCLE in which the main clinical findings were an extensive photodistributed poikilodermatous rash and alopecia.

  14. Gene-set meta-analysis of lung cancer identifies pathway related to systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Albert; Sohns, Melanie; Friedrichs, Stefanie; Hung, Rayjean J; Fehringer, Gord; McLaughlin, John; Amos, Christopher I; Brennan, Paul; Risch, Angela; Brüske, Irene; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Bickeböller, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Gene-set analysis (GSA) is an approach using the results of single-marker genome-wide association studies when investigating pathways as a whole with respect to the genetic basis of a disease. We performed a meta-analysis of seven GSAs for lung cancer, applying the method META-GSA. Overall, the information taken from 11,365 cases and 22,505 controls from within the TRICL/ILCCO consortia was used to investigate a total of 234 pathways from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. META-GSA reveals the systemic lupus erythematosus KEGG pathway hsa05322, driven by the gene region 6p21-22, as also implicated in lung cancer (p = 0.0306). This gene region is known to be associated with squamous cell lung carcinoma. The most important genes driving the significance of this pathway belong to the genomic areas HIST1-H4L, -1BN, -2BN, -H2AK, -H4K and C2/C4A/C4B. Within these areas, the markers most significantly associated with LC are rs13194781 (located within HIST12BN) and rs1270942 (located between C2 and C4A). We have discovered a pathway currently marked as specific to systemic lupus erythematosus as being significantly implicated in lung cancer. The gene region 6p21-22 in this pathway appears to be more extensively associated with lung cancer than previously assumed. Given wide-stretched linkage disequilibrium to the area APOM/BAG6/MSH5, there is currently simply not enough information or evidence to conclude whether the potential pleiotropy of lung cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus is spurious, biological, or mediated. Further research into this pathway and gene region will be necessary.

  15. Malignancies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Mruganka; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Gordon, Caroline; Clarke, Ann E; Bernatsky, Sasha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to underline important advancements in the understanding of cancer risks in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, there is an increased risk of specific kinds of malignancy. For example, the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is increased several-fold in SLE versus the general population. In addition, heightened risks for lung cancer, thyroid cancer and cervical dysplasia in SLE have been found. Some have postulated that immunosuppressive drugs play a role, as well as other important mediators, such as lupus disease activity itself. One new frontier being explored is the significant finding of a decreased risk of certain nonhematologic cancers (e.g., breast, ovarian, endometrial and prostate) in SLE. The reasons for this are currently under study. PMID:19643208

  16. Renal biopsy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Not just lupus glomerulonephritis!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, David N

    2017-01-01

    Kidney biopsy is a mainstay in the diagnosis and management of renal disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Though biopsies from patients with lupus typically show various forms of immune complex glomerulonephritis, other pathologies are occasionally encountered, including unusual lupus-related nephropathies, other forms of autoimmune disease, and occasional renal disorders without any direct connection with lupus or autoimmunity. Electron microscopy is a powerful tool for detecting and classifying these unusual conditions, which frequently have important therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  17. Pregnancy-related systemic lupus erythematosus: clinical features, outcome and risk factors of disease flares--a case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaxia Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical features, outcome, and risk factors of disease flares in patients with pregnancy-related lupus (PRL. METHODS: Medical charts of 155 consecutive PRL inpatients were systematically reviewed, including demographic data, clinical features, laboratory findings, treatment, complications, and outcome. RESULTS: PRL cases were divided into active (a-PRL (n = 82, 53.0% and stable lupus (s-PRL (n = 73, 47.0%. Compared with nonpregnant active female systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients, a-PRL including new-onset lupus (n-PRL and flare lupus (f-PRL (n = 41 respectively, had a higher incidence of renal and hematological involvement but less mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal involvement (p<0.05. The incidence of preeclampsia/eclampsia, fetal loss, and preterm birth were significantly higher in a-PRL than in s-PRL (p<0.05. Despite receiving a more vigorous glucocorticoid treatment, a-PRL mothers had a poorer prognosis (p<0.001. Five (6.1% of them died and 13 (15.9% developed severe irreversible organ failure, whereas none of these events was observed in the s-PRL group. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that a history of lupus flares and serological activity (hypocomplementemia and/or anti-dsDNA positivity at the time of conception were associated with lupus flares in PRL mothers. CONCLUSIONS: SLE patients with a flare history and serological activity at the time of conception were at an increased risk of disease flares during pregnancy and puerperium. a-PRL patients were more prone to renal and hematological involvement, pregnancy complications, and a poorer prognosis despite more vigorous glucocorticoid treatment.

  18. Health-related quality of life of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in Asia: how can this be improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumboo, J; Fong, K-Y

    2010-10-01

    The multicultural and multilinguistic landscape in Asia poses interesting challenges in the assessment and improvement of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in Asian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This article highlights some of these challenges and addresses the issue of how to improve HRQoL of these patients by: (1) framing important concepts in HRQoL in relation to the chronic relapsing nature and multisystem involvement in this condition; (2) discussing ways to improve measurement of HRQoL of SLE patients in Asia by reviewing existing HRQoL instruments (both generic (i.e. the SF-36) and disease-specific (i.e. the L-QoL, LupusQoL, SLEQoL and SLE Symptom Checklist)) and item banking; and (3) discussing approaches to improving HRQoL in SLE.

  19. Lupus erythematosus panniculitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besma Ben Dhaou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lupus erythematosus panniculitis (LEP, an uncommon variant in the clinicopathological spectrum of lupus erythematosus (LE, is rare. There are only a few reported series of patients with this condition; none in individuals of North African ancestry. LEP is characterized by inflammation of the deep dermis and subcutaneous tissue. It usually consists of nodules and hardened subcutaneous plaques on the forehead, cheeks, proximal extremities, and buttocks. Leg involvement is rare and can lead to misdiagnosis. A case of LEP, with unusual involvement of legs, is reported in a 40-year-old woman who had the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE four years ago.

  20. Anti-ribosomal P antibodies related to depression in early clinical course of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Karimifar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric lupus is still a major challenge in clinical practice. We investigated the association between depression and anti-ribosomal P (anti-P antibodies in a sample of Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on adult patients with SLE referring to a referral out-patient clinic of rheumatology. Demographic data and clinical data with regards to measuring disease activity with the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index were gathered. Anti-P antibodies were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Depression severity was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Results: One hundred patients (80% female and 20% male, age = 34.8 ± 10.9 years were included. Anti-P antibodies were present more frequently in depressed than non-depressed patients (30% vs. 10%, P = 0.015. Depression severity was correlated with anti-P antibodies level only in patients with disease duration of less than 2 years (r = 0.517, P = 0.019. There was no association between the depression severity and disease activity. Binary logistic regression analysis showed age (B = 0.953, CI 95%: 0.914-0.993 and positive anti-P antibodies (B = 4.30, CI 95%: 1.18-15.59 as factors that independently associated with depression. Conclusion: We found an association between depression and presence of anti-P antibodies, and also strong correlation between depression severity and anti-P antibodies level in newly diagnosed SLE patients. Depression severity in newly diagnosed SLE patients may reflect a neuropsychiatric involvement, and in later phases, it is more affected by the chronicity of the disease as well as other environmental factors.

  1. Manifestasi Systematic Lupus Erythematosus pada Paru

    OpenAIRE

    Helmi, Luthfi

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systematical chronic inflammatory disease occurred as the effect from the auto-immune process. The most frequent to the death is infection. Lupus may attack all ages and it is mostly on women. SLE also attack some parts of the body and it is most dangerous on the heart, joint, skin, lung, blood gland, liver, and nervous system. Lupus can be treated simtosisly and it is particularly with corticosteroids and immunosuppressant. The type of the lupus shows...

  2. Osteonecrosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontero, Romina Patricia; Bedoya, María Eugenia; Benavente, Emilio; Roverano, Susana Graciela; Paira, Sergio Oscar

    2015-01-01

    To define the proportion of osteonecrosis (ON) in our patient population with lupus and to identify factors associated with the development of ON in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as to carry out a descriptive analysis of ON cases. Observational retrospective study of 158 patients with SLE (ACR 1982 criteria). Demographic and laboratory data, clinical manifestations, SLICC, SLEDAI, cytotoxic and steroid treatments were compared. In patients with ON, we analyzed time of disease progression and age at ON diagnosis, form of presentation, joints involved, diagnostic methods, Ficat-Arlet classification, and treatment. To compare the means, t-test or Mann-Whitney's test were employed and the cHi-2 test or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate, were used to measure the equality of proportions. ON was present in 15 out 158 patients (9.5%), 13 women and 2 men, with a mean age of 30 (r: 16-66) at diagnosis and 35 months of evolution until diagnosis (r: 1-195). Among the 15 patients, 34 joints presented ON, 23 were symptomatic and 22 were diagnosed by magnetic resonance images. Twenty-six occurred in hips (24 bilateral), 4 in knees and 4 in shoulders. In 13 patients, ON involved 2 or more joints. At onset, 28 joints were in stage i-ii, one in stage iii and 5 had no data and; in the end, 14 were in stage iii-iv, 5 in stage i-ii and 15 had no data. Twenty-nine underwent conservative treatment with rest and 8 hips required joint replacement. ON progression was associated with Cushing's syndrome (P=0.014) OR 4.16 (95% CI 1.4-12.6) and 2nd year SLICC (P=0.042). No relation with clinical manifestations, lab results, cytotoxic treatment, steroid treatment (total accumulated dose, mean daily dose and duration) metilprednisolone pulses, nor activity was found. All patients with ON received antimalarials, in contrast to 77% of those without ON. The proportion of ON was 9.5%, mainly in women, 76% in hips (26) and 92% bilaterally. They were associated significantly with Cushing

  3. [Management of systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aringer, M; Schneider, M

    2016-11-01

    In the last few decades a number of small, often largely unrecognized steps have fundamentally changed the management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The current goal is to stop all disease activity without long-term use of more than 5 mg prednisolone per day. Remission, i.e. absence of activity in the SLE activity score of choice, is the defined target in the treat to target approach. The essential basic measures include life-long hydroxychloroquine as well as protection from sunlight (UV) and vitamin D substitution. Patients suffering from SLE need more vaccinations than the healthy population and control of risk factors for atherosclerosis is critical for long-term survival. Methotrexate is on par with azathioprine. If disease activity cannot be controlled in this way, belimumab is an approved therapeutic option. Cyclophosphamide is still used but only in life-threatening situations, such as lupus nephritis or central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis and in drastically reduced doses. Alternatively, off-label mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) can be used particularly for lupus nephritis and off-label rituximab in refractory disease courses. Numerous novel approaches are being tested in controlled trials and it is hoped that new drugs will be available for SLE patients within a few years.

  4. Neonatal lupus erythematosus in a Nigerian infant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-15

    Jun 15, 2017 ... mon condition in children and usually manifests as the cutaneous form in ... area with a significant hair loss on the affected areas. ... totosis with follicular plugging. ... ous manifestations of lupus erythematosus seen in adults.

  5. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Acute Adrenal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototypic autoimmune disease ... association with diverse clinical manifestations encompassing almost all organ .... acute adrenal insufficiency. The diagnosis of Addison's disease in our patient was.

  6. A unique case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar

    2009-01-01

    An 18-year-old Asian girl was referred to the nephrology unit with rapidly progressive renal failure. At the age of 15 she was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus but had defaulted treatment. Her renal functions improved with cyclophosphamide pulse treatment but she continued to have central nervous system vasculitis, gastrointestinal vasculitis and opportunistic infections making her a unique and challenging case of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  7. Serum interleukin-17 in Egyptian children with systemic lupus erythematosus: is it related to pulmonary affection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, A; Osman, E; Mosaad, Y; Wahba, M

    2017-04-01

    Objective Pulmonary involvement in paediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (pSLE) is not an uncommon finding; however, subclinical affection occurs more frequently. Many studies have reported that cytokine dysregulation as interleukin-17 (IL-17) over-expression plays a key role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aim to assess serum levels of IL-17 A and their association with pulmonary involvement in children with SLE. Methods Serum IL-17A levels - determined by solid phase sandwich ELISA - were assessed in forty-two pSLE patients and compared to 45 age-matched healthy controls. All patients were subjected to pulmonary function tests to detect subclinical pulmonary affection. High-resolution CT (HRCT) chest scan was carried out in patients with abnormal pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and those with chronic respiratory symptoms. Results Abnormal PFTs were found in 73% of patients; of them, only 25% had abnormal findings in HRCT chest. Serum levels of IL-17 A were significantly elevated in pSLE patients as compared to healthy controls ( p < 0.001). The serum levels of IL-17 A had a highly significant positive correlation with SLEDAI ( r = 0.811 and p < 0.001) Strong negative correlation was found between serum levels of IL-17A with both FEV1 and FVC ( p < 0.05). Conclusions Serum IL-17A is elevated in pSLE patients, which correlates with disease activity. IL-17 seems to have a possible role in the pathogenesis of subclinical lung affection. Abnormal PFTS may be found in pSLE patients even with normal radiology.

  8. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE.

  9. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, M; Guzzo, M P; Spinelli, F R; Atzeni, F; Sarzi-Puttini, P; Conti, F; Iannuccelli, C

    2014-06-06

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM), is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of this review is to describe widespread pain and fatigue in SLE, and the association of SLE and FM. Although secondary FM is not correlated with the disease activity, it may interfere with the daily activities of SLE patients. Therefore it is necessary to identify its symptoms and treat them promptly to improve the quality of life of patients. In conclusion, it is essential to identify the origin of pain in SLE in order to avoid dangerous over-treatment in patients with co-existing widespread pain and FM.

  10. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Franco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM, is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of this review is to describe widespread pain and fatigue in SLE, and the association of SLE and FM. Although secondary FM is not correlated with the disease activity, it may interfere with the daily activities of SLE patients. Therefore it is necessary to identify its symptoms and treat them promptly to improve the quality of life of patients. In conclusion, it is essential to identify the origin of pain in SLE in order to avoid dangerous over-treatment in patients with co-existing widespread pain and FM.

  11. OSTEOPOROSIS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Seredavkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE form a high risk group osteoporosis (OP. Its main causes are autoimmune inflammation, concomitant pathology, and their treatment. When OP occurs in SLE, bone mass loss is shown to occur early and is associated with the use of glucocorticosteroids (GC. To prevent OP, all patients with SLE should modify their lifestyle. To verify bone changes, densitometry is performed in patients who have risk factors of OP and/or a menopause. Calcium preparations and vitamin D are used to prevent OP; bisphosphonates that significantly reduce the risk of fractures of the vertebral column and femoral neck are employed for therapy of OP. A SLE patient with gluco-corticoid-induced OP and a good effect of bisphophonate treatment is described.

  12. Gastrointestinal system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, S; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder which can affect the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although GI symptoms can manifest in 50% of patients with SLE, these have barely been reviewed due to difficulty in identifying different causes. This study aims to clarify clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the four major SLE-related GI system complications: protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO), hepatic involvement and pancreatitis. It is a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the major search terms were SLE, PLE, IPO, hepatitis and pancreatitis. A total of 125 articles were chosen for our study. SLE-related PLE was characterized by edema and hypoalbuminemia, with Technetium 99m labeled human albumin scintigraphy ((99m)Tc HAS) and alpha-1-antitrypsin fecal clearance test commonly used as diagnostic test. The most common site of protein leakage was the small intestine and the least common site was the stomach. More than half of SLE-related IPO patients had ureterohydronephrosis, and sometimes they manifested as interstitial cystitis and hepatobiliary dilatation. Lupus hepatitis and SLE accompanied by autoimmune hepatitis (SLE-AIH overlap) shared similar clinical manifestations but had different autoantibodies and histopathological features, and positive anti-ribosome P antibody highly indicated the diagnosis of lupus hepatitis. Lupus pancreatitis was usually accompanied by high SLE activity with a relatively high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and timely intervention were crucial, and administration of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants was effective for most of the patients.

  13. Ethnic differences in the epidemiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, P; Thornley, S; Scragg, R

    2016-11-01

    Background The prevalence and variation by ethnicity of cutaneous lupus in New Zealand is not known. Therefore, a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence and variation by ethnicity of cutaneous lupus in the ethnically diverse community of South Auckland, New Zealand, was undertaken. Methods Multiple sources were examined to determine the prevalence of acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, subacute cutaneous erythematosus and discoid lupus erythematosus. Ethnicities examined were European, Māori/Pacific and Indian/Asian. Capture-recapture was used to determine the overall population prevalence of cutaneous lupus. Results A total of 145 cases of cutaneous lupus were identified. There were 22 men and 123 women, with an average age (standard deviation), respectively, of 46.4 (±21.5) and 43.1 (±14.8) years. There were 53 cases of acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, 19 cases of subacute cutaneous erythematosus and 66 cases of discoid lupus erythematosus. The age and sex adjusted relative risk (95% confidence interval; CI) of Māori/Pacific compared to the European population was 2.47 (95% CI 1.67-3.67) for all types of cutaneous lupus, 1.60 (95% CI 0.84-3.18) for acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, 0.09 (95% CI 0.01-1.1) for subacute cutaneous erythematosus and 5.96 (95% CI 3.06-11.6) for discoid lupus erythematosus. The overall prevalence of cutaneous lupus was 30.1 (95% CI 25.5-35.4) per 100,000. However, capture-recapture estimated the unadjusted prevalence of cutaneous lupus to be 86.0 (95% CI 78.1-94.7) per 100,000. Conclusion Māori and Pacific people in Auckland, New Zealand, have a greater relative risk of all types of cutaneous lupus compared to the European population and a particularly high risk of discoid lupus erythematosus.

  14. A 12-year retrospective review of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanprapaph, K; Sawatwarakul, S; Vachiramon, V

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features, laboratory findings, systemic manifestations, treatment and outcome of patients with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary care center in Thailand. Methods We performed a retrospective review from 2002 to 2014 of all patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for bullous systemic lupus erythematosus to evaluate for the clinical characteristics, extracutaneous involvement, histopathologic features, immunofluorescence pattern, serological abnormalities, internal organ involvement, treatments and outcome. Results Among 5149 patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus and/or systemic lupus erythematosus, 15 developed vesiculobullous lesions. Ten patients had validation of the diagnosis of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus, accounting for 0.19%. Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus occurred after the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus in six patients with a median onset of 2.5 months (0-89). Four out of 10 patients developed bullous systemic lupus erythematosus simultaneously with systemic lupus erythematosus. Hematologic abnormalities and renal involvement were found in 100% and 90%, respectively. Polyarthritis (40%) and serositis (40%) were less frequently seen. Systemic corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, antimalarials and dapsone offered resolution of cutaneous lesions. Conclusion Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is an uncommon presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Blistering can occur following or simultaneously with established systemic lupus erythematosus. We propose that clinicians should carefully search for systemic involvement, especially hematologic and renal impairment, in patients presenting with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

  15. Management of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammaritano, Lisa R

    2017-01-14

    Reproductive issues including contraception, fertility, and pregnancy are important components of the comprehensive care of women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE pregnancies are complicated due to risk for maternal disease exacerbation and potential for fetal and neonatal complications. Pre-pregnancy assessment is important to identify patients with severe disease-related damage who should avoid pregnancy, counsel patients to conceive when disease has been stable and inactive on appropriate medications, and assess relevant risk factors including renal disease, antiphospholipid antibody, and anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B antibodies. With careful planning, monitoring, and care, most women with SLE can anticipate a successful pregnancy.

  16. Proton pump inhibitor-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholdt, L H; Laurinaviciene, R; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized.......Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized....

  17. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  18. Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Marie-Louise F.; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and SLE with concomitant or subsequent lupus nephritis (LN) in Denmark during 1995.2011, using data from the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR).  Methods. To assess the incidence of SLE, we identified all persons aged...

  19. Childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, D M R; Gomes, R Cunha; Aikawa, N E; Campos, L M A; Romiti, R; Silva, C A

    2014-11-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has rarely been described in pediatric lupus population and the real prevalence of childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has not been reported. From January 1983 to November 2013, 303 childhood-onset SLE (c-SLE) patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Childreńs Institute of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina Universidade da Universidade de São Paulo, three of them (1%) diagnosed as childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. All three cases presented tense vesiculobullous lesions unassociated with lupus erythematosus lesions, with the median duration of 60 days (30-60). All patients fulfilled bullous systemic lupus erythematosus criteria. Two had nephritis and serositis and presented specific autoantibodies. The histological pattern demonstrated subepidermal blisters with neutrophils-predominant infiltrates within the upper dermis. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) showed deposits of IgG and complement along the epidermal basement membrane, in the presence or absence of IgA and/or IgM. A positive indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin demonstrating dermal binding was observed in two cases. All of them had moderate/severe disease activity at diagnosis with median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) of 18 (14-24). Two patients received dapsone and one with severe nephritis received immunosuppressive drugs. In conclusion, in the last 30 years the prevalence of bullous lupus in childhood-onset lupus population was low (1%) in our tertiary University Hospital. A diagnosis of SLE should always be considered in children with recurrent tense vesiculobullous lesions with or without systemic manifestations. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Periorbital mucinosis: a variant of cutaneous lupus erythematosus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Burgos, Adisbeth; Sánchez, Jorge L; Gonzalez-Chávez, José; Vega, Janelle; Justiniano, Hildamari

    2010-04-01

    Lupus erythematosus has a wide spectrum of cutaneous manifestations, including periorbital mucinosis. We report 3 cases of periorbital mucinosis occurring in association with other cutaneous signs of lupus erythematosus. Based on a review of the literature, periorbital mucinosis is a rare and not widely recognized clinical manifestation of the disease. Although unusual, familiarity with periorbital mucinosis as a manifestation of lupus erythematosus broadens our understanding of these entities and expands the spectrum of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

  1. 75 FR 35492 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus... nephritis (LN) caused by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This guidance finalizes the parts of the draft guidance entitled ``Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Drugs for Treatment'' (the draft guidance...

  2. Clinical Profile of Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Paudyal, B; M Gyawalee

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical features of Systemic lupus erythematosus vary between different parts of the World; however, this information on Nepalese Sytemic lupus erythematosus does not exist. Methods: Patients with Systemic lupus erythematosus fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria treated in Patan Hospital were studied by means of retrospective review of their case records. The results were compared with various regional and international studies. Res...

  3. Epigenetics and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Unmet Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meroni, Pier Luigi; Penatti, Alessandra Emiliana

    2016-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic relapsing-remitting autoimmune disease affecting several organs. Although the management of lupus patients has improved in the last years, several aspects still remain challenging. More sensitive and specific biomarkers for an early diagnosis as well as for monitoring disease activity and tissue damage are needed. Genome-wide association and gene mapping studies have supported the genetic background for SLE susceptibility. However, the relatively modest risk association and the studies in twins have suggested a role for environmental and epigenetic factors, as well as genetic-epigenetic interaction. Accordingly, there is evidence that differences in DNA methylation, histone modifications, and miRNA profiling can be found in lupus patients versus normal subjects. Moreover, impaired DNA methylation on the inactive X-chromosome was suggested to explain, at least in part, the female prevalence of the disease. Epigenetic markers may be help in fulfilling the unmet needs for SLE by offering new diagnostic tools, new biomarkers for monitoring disease activity, or to better characterize patients with a silent clinical disease but with an active serology. Anti-DNA, anti-phospholipid, and anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies are thought to be pathogenic for glomerulonephritis, recurrent thrombosis and miscarriages, and neonatal lupus, respectively. However, tissue damage occurs occasionally or, in some patients, only in spite of the persistent presence of the antibodies. Preliminary studies suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may explain why the damage takes place in some patients only or at a given time.

  4. Contemporary concepts for the clinical and laboratory evaluation of systemic lupus erythematosus and "lupus-like" syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R M; Bylund, D J

    1994-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a nonorgan-specific autoimmune disease which affects multiple organ systems and is multifactorial in etiology. SLE is the prototypic systemic rheumatic disease with immune dysregulation characterized by (1) polyclonal activation of B-cells and (2) production of a large spectrum of autoantibodies with a marked preference for nuclear and intracellular antigens. The clinical and laboratory manifestations and criteria for classification and diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus, lupus-like syndromes, and various subsets of systemic lupus erythematosus, are reviewed. The differential diagnosis of SLE and related diseases is described with correlation of specific intracellular autoantibodies.

  5. Humor in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Cristiano S; Li, Rui; Lawrie, Sarah; Bar-Or, Amit; Clarke, Ann E; Da Costa, Deborah; Banerjee, Devi; Bernatsky, Sasha; Lee, Jennifer L; Pineau, Christian A

    2015-03-01

    Humor has neurophysiological effects influencing the release of cortisol, which may have a direct impact on the immune system. Laughter is associated with a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines both in the general population and in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to explore the effects of humor on serum cytokines [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6)] and cortisol levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), after a standard intervention (120 min of visual comedy). We enrolled 58 females with SLE from consecutive patients assessed in the Montreal General Hospital lupus clinic. The subjects who consented to participate were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention (watching 120 min of comedy) or control group (watching a 120 min documentary). Measurements of cytokine and serum cortisol levels as well as 24-h urine cortisol were taken before, during, and after the interventions. We compared serum cytokine levels and serum and 24-h urine cortisol levels in the humor and control groups and performed regression analyses of these outcomes, adjusting for demographics and the current use of prednisone. There were no significant differences between the control and humor groups in demographics or clinical variables. Baseline serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and B-cell activating factor were also similar in both groups. There was no evidence of a humor effect in terms of decreasing cytokine levels, although there was some suggestion of lowered cortisol secretion in the humor group based the 24-h urinary cortisol levels in a subgroup. In contrast to what has been published for RA, we saw no clear effects of humor in altering cytokine levels in SLE, although interesting trends were seen for lower cortisol levels after humor intervention compared with the control group.

  6. PULMONARY-FUNCTION IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS-ERYTHEMATOSUS IS RELATED TO DISTINCT CLINICAL, SEROLOGIC, AND NAILFOLD CAPILLARY PATTERNS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GROEN, H; TERBORG, EJ; POSTMA, DS; WOUDA, AA; VANDERMARK, TW; KALLENBERG, CGM

    1992-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether systemic lupus erythematosus (SlE) patients with interstitial lung disease represent a particular subset of patients characterized by the presence of clinical, serologic, and nailfold capillary patterns overlapping scleroderma. PATIENTS A

  7. Risk of infective endocarditis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in Taiwan: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y S; Chang, C C; Chen, Y H; Chen, W S; Chen, J H

    2017-10-01

    Objectives Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus are considered vulnerable to infective endocarditis and prophylactic antibiotics are recommended before an invasive dental procedure. However, the evidence is insufficient. This nationwide population-based study evaluated the risk and related factors of infective endocarditis in systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We identified 12,102 systemic lupus erythematosus patients from the National Health Insurance research-oriented database, and compared the incidence rate of infective endocarditis with that among 48,408 non-systemic lupus erythematosus controls. A Cox multivariable proportional hazards model was employed to evaluate the risk of infective endocarditis in the systemic lupus erythematosus cohort. Results After a mean follow-up of more than six years, the systemic lupus erythematosus cohort had a significantly higher incidence rate of infective endocarditis (42.58 vs 4.32 per 100,000 person-years, incidence rate ratio = 9.86, p systemic lupus erythematosus cohort had lower risk (adjusted hazard ratio 11.64) than that of the younger-than-60-years systemic lupus erythematosus cohort (adjusted hazard ratio 15.82). Cox multivariate proportional hazards analysis revealed heart disease (hazard ratio = 5.71, p systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Conclusions A higher risk of infective endocarditis was observed in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Risk factors for infective endocarditis in the systemic lupus erythematosus cohort included heart disease, chronic kidney disease, steroid pulse therapy within 30 days, and a recent invasive dental procedure within 30 days.

  8. Discerning Risk of Disease Transition in Relatives of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Utilizing Soluble Mediators and Clinical Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Melissa E; Young, Kendra A; Kamen, Diane L; Guthridge, Joel M; Niewold, Timothy B; Costenbader, Karen H; Weisman, Michael H; Ishimori, Mariko L; Wallace, Daniel J; Gilkeson, Gary S; Karp, David R; Harley, John B; Norris, Jill M; James, Judith A

    2017-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases cause significant morbidity. Identifying populations at risk of developing SLE is essential for curtailing irreversible inflammatory damage. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with transition to classified disease that would inform our understanding of the risk of SLE. Previously identified blood relatives of patients with SLE, who had information, including the SLE-specific portion of the Connective Tissue Disease Screening Questionnaire (SLE-CSQ). Serum and plasma samples were tested for the presence of lupus-associated autoantibodies and 52 soluble mediators. Generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were applied to identify factors predictive of disease transition. Of the 409 unaffected relatives of SLE patients, 45 (11%) had transitioned to classified SLE at follow-up (mean time to follow-up 6.4 years). Relatives who transitioned to SLE displayed more lupus-associated autoantibody specificities and higher SLE-CSQ scores (P < 0.0001) at baseline than did relatives who did not transition. Importantly, those who had developed SLE during the follow-up period also had elevated baseline plasma levels of inflammatory mediators, including B lymphocyte stimulator, stem cell factor (SCF), and interferon-associated chemokines (P ≤ 0.02), with concurrent decreases in the levels of regulatory mediators, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), and interleukin-10 (P ≤ 0.03). GEE analyses revealed that baseline SLE-CSQ scores or ACR scores (number of ACR criteria satisfied) and plasma levels of SCF and TGFβ, but not autoantibodies, were significant and independent predictors of SLE transition (P ≤ 0.03). Preclinical alterations in levels of soluble mediators may predict transition to classified disease in relatives of SLE patients. Thus, immune perturbations precede SLE classification and can help identify high-risk relatives for rheumatology referral and potential

  9. Drug-induced cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, Rasa; Sandholdt, Linda Holm; Bygum, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing number of drugs have been linked to drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE). The recognition and management of DI-SCLE can be challenging, as the condition may be triggered by different classes of drugs after variable lengths of time. OBJECTIVES......: To determine the proportion of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) whose drugs are an inducing or aggravating factor. MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with CLE at a dermatological department over a 21-year period. We registered clinical......, serological, and histological data with a focus on drug intake. RESULTS: Of 775 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of lupus erythematosus (LE) or suspected LE, a diagnosis of CLE could be confirmed in 448 patients. A total of 130 patients had a drug intake that could suggest DI-SCLE. In 88 cases, a drug...

  10. Vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barile-Fabris, L; Hernández-Cabrera, M F; Barragan-Garfias, J A

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex heterogeneous autoimmune disease with a wide variety of clinical and serological manifestations that may affect any organ. Vasculitis prevalence in SLE is reported to be between 11% and 36%. A diverse clinical spectrum, due to inflammatory involvement of vessels of all sizes, is present. Even though cutaneous lesions, representing small vessel involvement, are the most frequent, medium and large vessel vasculitis may present with visceral affection, with life-threatening manifestations such as mesenteric vasculitis, pulmonary hemorrhage, or mononeuritis multiplex, with detrimental consequences. Early recognition and an appropriate treatment are crucial. Recent studies have shown that vasculitis in patients with SLE may present different clinical forms based on the organ involved and the size of the affected vessel. It is noteworthy that the episodes of vasculitis are not always accompanied by high disease activity. Recent articles on this topic have focused on new treatments for the control of vascular disease, such as biological therapies such as Rituximab and Belimumab, among others.

  11. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Rubim Camara Sete

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that periodontal disease is a disease characterized by inflammation influenced by infectious factors, such as SLE, it is plausible to suggest that SLE would influence periodontal disease and vice-versa. However, this issue is not yet fully elucidated and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association, as deregulation mainly in innate immune system, with action of phagocytic cells and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 in both conditions’ pathogenesis, leading to tissue destruction. However, studies assessing the relationship between these diseases are scarce, and more studies focused on common immunological mechanisms should be conducted to further understanding.

  12. Depressive symptoms and associated factors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karol, David E; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa G; Lin, Min; Clowse, Megan E B

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms affect anywhere from 11% to 71% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which may be related to SLE disease activity, other clinical variables, or sociodemographic factors. We aimed to measure the rate of depressive symptoms in our cohort of patients with SLE and to identify modifiable factors associated with depressive symptoms. Patients in our university-based SLE registry completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), pain scores, and demographic information. Disease activity was measured using the physician's global assessment (PGA) and Selena-SLE disease activity index (Selena-systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI)). Patients were identified as having moderate or severe depressive symptoms (BDI-II ≥ 18) or not (BDI-II lupus arthritis (P lupus arthritis, may result in alleviation of depressive symptoms in patients with SLE. Copyright © 2013 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Smoking is not associated with autoantibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, unaffected first-degree relatives, nor healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K A; Terrell, D R; Guthridge, J M; Kamen, D L; Gilkeson, G S; Karp, D R; Ishimori, M L; Weisman, M H; Holers, V M; Harley, J B; Norris, J M; James, J A

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine whether smoking is associated with autoantibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, unaffected first-degree relatives (FDR) of individuals with SLE--a group at increased risk of developing SLE--or unaffected, unrelated controls. Detailed demographic, environmental, clinical, and therapeutic information was collected by questionnaire on 1242 SLE patients, 981 FDRs, and 946 controls in the Lupus Family Registry and Repository; a blood sample was obtained. All sera were tested for multiple lupus autoantibodies by immunofluorescence and luminex bead-based assays. Generalized estimating equations, adjusting for age, gender, and ethnicity and accounting for correlation within families, were used to assess smoking status with the dichotomous outcome variables of positivity for SLE status, positivity of ANA by immunofluorescence (≥1:120), positivity for ≥1 autoantibody by the luminex assay, and positivity for each of the 11 autoantibodies. Current smoking was associated with being positive for ≥1 autoantibody (excluding ANA) (adjusted OR = 1.53, 95% CI 1.04-2.24) in our subjects with SLE. No association was observed in unaffected FDRs or healthy controls. Former smoking was associated with anti-Ro/SS-A60 in our unaffected FDRs. There was an increased association with anti-nRNP A seropositivity, as well as a decreased association with anti-nRNP 68 positivity, in current smokers in SLE subjects. No clear association between smoking status and individual autoantibodies was detected in SLE patients, unaffected FDRs, nor healthy controls within this collection. The association of smoking with SLE may therefore manifest its risk through mechanisms outside of autoantibody production, at least for the specificities tested.

  14. Influence of vitamin D on cell cycle, apoptosis, and some apoptosis related molecules in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafise Tabasi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Genetic and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Autoreactive lymphocytes are cleared through apoptosis and any disturbance in the apoptosis or clearance of apoptotic cells may disturb tolerance and lead to autoimmunity. Vitamin D has anti-proliferative effects and controls cell cycle progression. In this study we investigated the effects of vitamin D on cell cycle and apoptosis induction in lupus patients. Materials and Methods:Isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 25 SLE patients were cultured in the presence of 50 nM of 1,25(OH2D3; then one part of the cells were stained with FITC labeled Annexin V and PI and were analyzed for apoptosis determination. For gene expression assessment of FasL, Bcl-2 and Bax, RNA was extracted from one another part of the cells, cDNA was synthesized and gene expression analysis was performed using Real time PCR. An additional part of the cells were treated with PI and the cell cycle was analyzed using flowcytometer. Results: The mean number of early apoptotic cells in vitamin D treated cells decreased significantly (18.48±7.9% compared to untreated cells (22.02±9.4% (P=0.008. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant increase in G1 phase in vitamin D treated cells (67.33±5.2% compared to non treated ones (60.77±5.7% (P =0.02. Vitamin D up-regulated the expression levels of Bcl-2 by (18.87 fold increase, and down-regulated expression of Bax (23% and FasL (25%. Conclusion:Vitamin D has regulatory effects on cell cycle progression, apoptosis and apoptosis related molecules in lupus patients.

  15. Systemic lupus erythematosus. Unusual cutaneous manifestations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockinger, T.; Richter, L.; Kanzler, M.; Melichart-Kotik, M.; Pas, H.; Derfler, K.; Schmidt, E.; Rappersberger, K.

    2016-01-01

    Various different mucocutaneous symptoms may affect up to 80 % of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. To investigate, various unspecific, but otherwise typical clinical symptoms of skin and mucous membranes that arise in SLE patients other than those defined as SLE criteria such as butterfl

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus : a behavioural medicine perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daleboudt, Gabriëlle Mathilde Nicoline

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its immunosuppressive treatment have a great impact on the patient’s life. Previous studies on SLE have focused on the optimisation of diagnosis and treatment. Less attention has been given to the impact of diagnosis and treatment on patients’ well-being. Accor

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, M. E. J.; Porta, G.; Fiorot, F. J.; Campos, L. M. A.; Sallum, A. M. E.; Silva, C. A. A.

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are both autoimmune disorders that are rare in children and have a widespread clinical manifestation. A few case reports have shown a JSLE-AIH associated disorder. To our knowledge, this is the first study that simultaneousl

  18. Vascular- and pregnancy-related outcomes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antiphospholipid profile and thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, A; Gladman, D D; Ibañez, D; Urowitz, M B

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether patients with lupus and a positive antiphospholipid profile with thrombocytopenia are at a higher risk for obstetric complications or thrombotic events than patients without thrombocytopenia. We conducted a case-control study matched 3:1 by sex, age of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis, age at study start, disease duration and length of follow-up time. Time to first event following study start was compared using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests and it was not statistically significant. In this study setting and population, thrombocytopenia was not associated with a higher risk for obstetrical complications or thrombotic events.

  19. Management of pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateef, Aisha; Petri, Michelle

    2012-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoantibody-mediated systemic autoimmune disease, predominantly affecting young females. Pregnancy is increasingly common in the setting of SLE, as survival and quality of life of patients improve. Although live births can be achieved in the most cases, pregnancy in patients with SLE remains a high-risk condition. Maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity are considerably increased, compared with the general population. Aberrations in pregnancy-related maternal immune adaptations are likely contributors. Active maternal disease, renal involvement, specific autoantibody subsets and advanced organ damage are predictors of poor outcome. Therapeutic options are limited during pregnancy as maternal benefit has to be weighed against fetal risk. Prevention of preterm birth and refractory pregnancy loss, as well as management of established neonatal heart block remain unmet needs. Further research should address these important issues that affect young patients with SLE and their babies.

  20. 77 FR 38305 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... availability of a guidance entitled ``Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment; Withdrawal of Guidance AGENCY: Food and...

  1. Psychosis in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE are common; however, psychosis per se is bit uncommon. They may be cognitive deficit, lupus headache, psychoses, seizures, peripheral neuropathy, and cerebrovascular events. Psychiatric symptoms in SLE can be functionally independent psychiatric disorders. It can be due to drugs (steroids used for SLE or secondary to SLE because of its brain involvement, which is termed as neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE. No single clinical, laboratory, neuropsychological, and imaging test can be used to differentiate NPSLE from non-NPSLE patients with similar neuropsychiatric manifestations. Presently we are discussing about three cases of SLE with psychosis and which had different clinical presentation. The present reports also depict the approach to case differential diagnosis and management of the same.

  2. Novel approaches to therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus: update 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Orbach, Hedi; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-07-01

    This review covers the major advances in the therapeutic potentials related to systemic lupus erythematosus published in Medline between 2000 and February 2005. Controlled, open and Phase I-III trials were included. Anecdotal reports were excluded. Several trials have defined the role of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, antimalarials, hormonal treatment and mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept) in the management of systemic lupus erythematosus. The aims of novel biologics for systemic lupus erythematosus are to target the autoimmune disease at different points: B-cell depletion (rituximab [Rituxan], anti-BLys antibodies [Lymphostat-B]), inhibition of T-B interaction (rituximab), blockade of cytokines (anti-interleukin-10 antibodies), manipulation of idiotypes (intravenous immunoglobulin), tolerance induction to DNA and immunoglobulin-peptides and peptide therapy (abetimus sodium [Riquent]). Low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (Euro-Lupus protocol) is as effective as the conventional National Institutes of Health protocol and is also associated with less toxicity. Stem cell transplantation for severe disease induces remission in most patients, however, the relapse rate in a third of patients and the associated morbity and mortality restricts its use to selected patients with life-threatening disease. Intravenous immunoglobulin, although utilized in open trials, is effective and safe for various manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Major advances have been associated with mycophenolate mofetil and rituximab. Mycophenolate mofetil is effective for induction and maintenance therapy of lupus proliferative glomerulonephritis and is associated with fewer adverse events than monthly intravenous cyclophosphamide. Rituximab is a promising agent, and although its utilization is presently limited, it appears to be effective for lupus patients with severe disease.

  3. Breastfeeding in mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noviani, M; Wasserman, S; Clowse, M E B

    2016-08-01

    Breastfeeding is known to improve the well-being of a mother and her infant, and about half of all new mothers breastfeed, but it is unknown how breastfeeding is pursued in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; lupus) patients. We sought to determine the rate of breastfeeding and the factors influencing this among women with lupus. In addition, we reassessed the current safety data in lactation of lupus medications. Data were collected from lupus patients enrolled in a prospective registry who fulfilled the 2012 SLICC criteria, had a live birth, and for whom postpartum breastfeeding status was known. Data included physician assessments of lupus activity and medications, breastfeeding intentions during pregnancy and practice following pregnancy. The safety of medications in breastfed infants was assessed through a comprehensive review of LactMed, a national database about medications in lactation. A total of 51 pregnancies in 84 women with lupus were included in the study. Half of the lupus patients (n = 25, 49%) chose to breastfeed. The rate of breastfeeding was not significantly affected by socioeconomic factors. In contrast, low postpartum lupus activity, term delivery, and a plan to breastfeed early in pregnancy were significantly associated with breastfeeding in lupus patients. In reviewing the most up-to-date data, the majority of lupus medications appear to have very minimal transfer into breast milk and are likely compatible with breastfeeding. Half of women with lupus breastfed and most desire to breastfeed. Hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and prednisone have very limited transfer into breast milk and may be continued while breastfeeding. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. The epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Sònia; Cervera, Ricard; Font, Josep; Ingelmo, Miguel

    2003-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most diverse of the autoimmune diseases because it may affect any organ of the body and display a broad spectrum of clinical and immunological manifestations. Although previously considered a rare disease, SLE now appears to be relatively common in certain groups of the population. This is probably due to the development of several immunological tests that have allowed the description of many atypical or benign cases that otherwise might not be diagnosed. Furthermore, with the introduction since 1982 of a set of more sensitive criteria for SLE classification, more cases can nowadays be detected. In the present article, we review the most important data regarding the incidence and prevalence of this disease in the general population, the epidemiologic information on the patterns of disease expression in specific subsets and the studies on mortality in SLE. An important amount of information comes from the data obtained from the "Euro-Lupus Cohort," a series of 1000 patients with SLE from several European countries that have been followed prospectively since 1991.

  5. Autologous Fat Transfer in a Patient with Lupus Erythematosus Profundus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimi Yoon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lupus erythematosus profundus, a form of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus, is a rare inflammatory disease involving in the lower dermis and subcutaneous tissues. It primarily affects the head, proximal upper arms, trunk, thighs, and presents as firm nodules, 1 to 3 cm in diameter. The overlying skin often becomes attached to the subcutaneous nodules and is drawn inward to produce deep, saucerized depressions. We present a rare case of lupus erythematosus profundus treated with autologous fat transfer.

  6. Lupus erythematosus associated with erythema multiforme: does Rowell's syndrome exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteyngarts, A R; Warner, M R; Camisa, C

    1999-05-01

    We describe a patient with lupus erythematosus who experienced an unusual erythema multiforme-like eruption suggestive of Rowell's syndrome. We compare our case and 9 other reports of lupus erythematosus associated with erythema multiforme to the 4 cases reported by Rowell. Our findings indicate that Rowell's original criteria are not well preserved. The coexistence of lupus erythematosus with erythema multiforme does not impart any unusual characteristics to either disease, and the immunologic disturbances in such patients are probably coincidental.

  7. Lupus Enteritis as an Initial Presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisira Sran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disorder which can affect multiple organs and clinical presentation is often a myriad of symptoms; therefore, the index of suspicion should rise when evaluating patients with multiorgan symptomatology. Lupus enteritis is a distinct subset of SLE, defined as either vasculitis or inflammation of the small bowel, with supportive image and/or biopsy findings. The clinical picture of lupus enteritis is often nonspecific, with mild to severe abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting being the cardinal manifestations. Although considered a form of visceral or serosal vasculitis, lupus enteritis is seldom confirmed on histology, making computerized tomography (CT the gold standard for diagnosis. Lupus enteritis is generally steroid-responsive, and the route of administration is based on clinical status and organ involvement, with preference for intravenous (IV route in flares with significant tissue edema. The following case describes a young woman presenting with lupus enteritis and lupus panniculitis as an initial manifestation of SLE, the utilization of abdominal CT in diagnosis, and current treatment protocols used for lupus enteritis.

  8. [Lupus erythematosus panniculitis presenting as palpebral edema and parotiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pastor, G; Valcuende, F; Tomás, G; Moreno, M

    2007-10-01

    Lupus erythematosus panniculitis or lupus erythematosus profundus is characterized by inflammation of the deep dermis and subcutaneous tissue. It can occur in isolation or associated with chronic systemic or discoid lupus erythematosus. It usually consists of nodules and hardened subcutaneous plaques on the forehead, cheeks, proximal extremities, and buttocks. Periorbital and parotid involvement are rare and can lead to misdiagnosis. We present the case of a patient with lupus erythematosus panniculitis who presented with palpebral edema and involvement of the periocular fat and parotid gland.

  9. Mood Disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Su, Li; Urowitz, Murray B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency, characteristics, and outcome of mood disorders, as well as clinical and autoantibody associations, in a multiethnic/racial, prospective inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: Patients were assessed annually for mood...... disorders (4 types, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) and 18 other neuropsychiatric events. Global disease activity scores (SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 [SLEDAI-2K]), damage scores (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College...... time. The lack of association with global SLE disease activity, cumulative organ damage, and lupus autoantibodies emphasizes the multifactorial etiology of mood disorders and a role for non-lupus-specific therapies....

  10. Autoimmunity-related neutrophilic dermatosis: a newly described entity that is not exclusive of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Charli-Joseph, Yann; Rodríguez-Acosta, Elva Dalia; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophilic dermatoses have long been known to be associated with autoinmune systemic diseases. Recently, a small number of cases of a disorder distinct from Sweet syndrome or bullous lupus erythematosus (LE) have been described as specifically related to systemic LE under diverse terms, including nonbullous neutrophilic dermatosis, nonbullous neutrophilic LE, and Sweet-like neutrophilic dermatosis. We describe 7 patients that developed urticarial lesions in the context of a known or concurrently diagnosed autoimmune connective tissue disease. Of a total of 7 patients, 6 were afflicted by systemic LE and 1 by rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren syndrome. Histological findings in all patients included an interstitial and perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate with leukocytoclasia, vacuolar alteration along the dermal-edidermal junction, and no vasculitis. Most patients had active systemic disease at the time of the cutaneous eruption. Skin lesions resolved rapidly after the administration of immunomodulating agents. In conclusion, we provide additional evidence of the existence of a recently defined nonbullous neutrophilic dermatosis in the context of autoimmune connective tissue diseases and propose the term autoimmunity-related neutrophilic dermatosis as an appropriate designation. Furthermore, we believe that this entity should prompt physicians to screen the presence of an active systemic disorder in afflicted patients.

  11. Spontaneous ureteral rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.H.; Pennebaker, J.B.; Harisdangkul, V.; Songcharoen, S.

    1983-08-01

    A patient with known systemic lupus erythematosus had fever and symptoms of a lower urinary tract infection. Bone scintigraphy showed left ureteral perforation and necrosis with no demonstrable nephrolithiasis. It is speculated that this episode was due to lupus vasculitis.

  12. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy may be beneficial and safe for various manifestations in SLE. A structured literature search of articles published on the efficacy of IVIg in the treatment of SLE between 1983 and 2005 was conducted. We searched the terms "IVIg," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "lupus," "SLE," and "systemic lupus erythematosus." The various clinical manifestations of SLE that were reported to be successfully treated by IVIg in case reports include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, acquired factor VIII inhibitors, acquired von Willebrand disease, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, myelofibrosis, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiogenic shock, nephritis, end-stage renal disease, encephalitis, neuropsychiatric lupus, psychosis, peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and vasculitis. The most extensive experience is with lupus nephritis. There are only a few case series of IVIg use in patients with SLE with various manifestations, in which the response rate to IVIg therapy ranged from 33 to 100%. We suggest that IVIg devoid of sucrose, at a dose of 2 g/kg over a 5-d period given uniformly and at a slow infusion rate in patients without an increased risk for thromboembolic events or renal failure, is a safe and beneficial adjunct therapy for cases of SLE that are resistant to or refuse conventional treatment. The duration of therapy is yet to be established. Controlled trials are warranted.

  13. [Pregnancy and systemic lupus erythematosus: compatible?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, M; von Frenckell, C; Emonts, P

    2012-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease that predominantly occurs in women of childbearing age. The risk of obstetric complications in lupus parturients is significant. In addition, pregnancy may be associated with flares of the disease requiring immunosuppressive therapy. For these reasons, SLE pregnancies are considered high risk and involve careful collaboration of the obstetrician and rheumatologist. Through the latter and medical advances including a better and better understanding of the binomial mother-child, most pregnancies end in a success.

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Is it one disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Larrauri, Francisco; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic disease with a variety of clinical presentations. Monogenic predisposing conditions to the development of this disease have been described. As examples, an impaired expression of interferon-α regulated genes or complement deficiencies have been reported in patients with SLE, with particular clinical presentations. Those defects present particular presentations and a different severity, making an argument that lupus is not a single disease but many. Treatment could be individualized depending on the underlying defect generating the subtype of the disease.

  15. Anastrozole-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Juliya; Patel, Mital; Miller, Michael; Burris, Katy

    2016-08-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE) has been associated with numerous drugs, but there are limited reports of its association with aromatase inhibitor anastrozole. We report the case of a patient undergoing treatment with anastrozole for breast cancer who presented with clinical, serological, and histological evidence consistent with DI-SCLE. Her condition quickly began to improve after the use of anastrozole was discontinued and hydroxychloroquine therapy was initiated. Cases such as ours as well as several others that implicate antiestrogen drugs in association with DI-SCLE seem to be contradictory to studies looking at the usefulness of treating systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with antiestrogen therapy. Further research on this relationship is warranted.

  16. Sweet syndrome revealing systemic lupus erythematosus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, N

    2015-02-01

    Sweet Syndrome is an acute inflammatory skin eruption which is rare in children. We report a case of childhood Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) that presented with Sweet syndrome. This case is a unique presentation of a common disorder which provides a new facet for the differential diagnosis of SLE in children. It is also the first paediatric case to be reported in a Caucasian child.

  17. Uncommon cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaro, J M; Herrero, C; Hausmann, G

    1997-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus (LE) are, usually, characteristic enough to permit an easy diagnosis. However, some patients may present less typical lesions, associated or not to the classic ones. Therefore, irrespectively of the variety of LE (acute, subacute and chronic), in absence of the typical butterfly rash, erythematosquamous papules or plaques, or any of the characteristic cutaneous alterations, it is important (even though not always easy) to recognize the uncommon and/or atypical changes of the skin.

  18. Intraveous gammaglobulin in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badillo Tenorio Rocio Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoinmune multisystemic disease. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg have been previously used for the treatment of primary immunodefi- ciency diseases. In addition IVIg is used for a few autoimmune diseases, such as immune thrombocytopenic purpura. IVIg is an immunomodulatory agent capable of modulating autoinmu- nity and also provide defense against infection, IVIg has been used successfully in SLE. We review the role of IVIg in SLE as a therapeutic option.

  19. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus are associated with clinically significant cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, J Halskou; Ahlehoff, O; Dreyer, L

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a well-known cardiovascular risk factor. Less is known about cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated the risk of mortality and adverse cardiovascular events in patients diagnosed....... The corresponding HRs for all-cause mortality were 1.32 (95% CI 1.20-1.45) for CLE and 2.21 (95% CI 2.03-2.41) for SLE. CLE and SLE were associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD and all-cause mortality. Local and chronic inflammation may be the driver of low-grade systemic inflammation....

  20. Is chronic periodontitis premature in systemic lupus erythematosus patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Débora Cerqueira; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Corrêa, Jôice Dias; Mendonça, Santuza Maria Souza; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Costa, Fernando Oliveira; Lúcio Teixeira, Antônio

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the frequency and severity of chronic periodontitis (CP) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with individuals without rheumatic diseases. Seventy-five patients with SLE were compared to 75 individuals without rheumatic diseases (control group) matched for age, educational level, and income. The activity of SLE was assessed with the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000. Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus evaluated SLE-related damage. Dental evaluation included measuring plaque index and parameters of periodontal disease (probing depth, clinical attachment level, and bleeding on probing). Fifty-one (68 %) SLE patients and 42 (56 %) control individuals had CP (p = 0.13). Periodontal status was similar in both groups. Considering only individuals with CP, SLE patients were younger than controls (40.7 ± 9.8 versus 46.14 ± 12.5 years of age, p = 0.02). CP was not associated with activity or therapeutics in SLE patients. Severity of periodontal parameters was similar in SLE patients and control subjects; however, CP occurred earlier in SLE patients.

  1. Sharing experiences and social support requests in an Internet forum for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Davide; Cicognani, Elvira

    2014-05-01

    Internet forums represent a useful but understudied resource to understand psychosocial aspects of living with systemic lupus erythematosus. This study was aimed to describe the demand/supply of social support through the Internet in relation with the description of personal illness experiences. All the posts (118) from an Italian forum for systemic lupus erythematosus patients were collected and analyzed combining qualitative content analysis with statistical textual analysis. The results showed different purposes for posts: starting new relationships, seeking information, receiving emotional support, and giving a contribution. Lexical analysis identified three ways of describing patients' experiences. Discussion focuses on the relationship between the requested/offered support and systemic lupus erythematosus experiences.

  2. A case of subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus as a result of ranibizumab (Lucentis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Andric

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous lupus erythematosus is a previously undiagnosed side-effect of ranibizumab. Here, we present a case of an 82-year-old female Caucasian patient with wet age-related macular degeneration. Following a single intraocular injection of Lucentis (ranibizumab, she developed a subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus which, with treatment, took nearly 12 months to resolve. This shows that cutaneous lupus erythematosus is a potential side-effect of many medications, including ranibizumab, as in our case and, in an aging population where polypharmacy is a growing reality, clinicians should be aware of how to diagnose and best manage such cases.

  3. Cardiac tamponade as an initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Diego M; Carrion, Andres F

    2012-06-12

    Clinical manifestations of pericardial disease may precede other signs and symptoms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Although pericardial effusion is one of the most common cardiac problems in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, haemodynamically significant effusions manifesting as cardiac tamponade are rare and require prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Chronic aseptic meningitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, M E; Mesropian, H; Granillo, R J

    1989-08-01

    Chronic aseptic meningitis is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. It may occur early in the course of the disease and sometimes may be the initial symptom. We report a patient with chronic aseptic meningitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed several ischemic lesions and an appearance which was compatible with chronic inflammation of the ependyma of the lateral ventricles.

  5. Unique Protein Signature of Circulating Microparticles in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer; Iversen, Line V

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases.......To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases....

  6. [Determinant Factors of Morbidity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacinto, Margarida; Silva, Eliana; Riso, Nuno; Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca

    2017-05-31

    Severity in systemic lupus erythematosus may vary from mild to even fatal consequences. There are no biomarkers to predict the disease's prognosis. The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/ Systemic Damage Index defines systemic lupus erythematosus disease severity and is found to predict prognosis. To test damage determinants in a single-centre systemic lupus erythematosus cohort. Retrospectively followed systemic lupus erythematosus female patients (defined by the identification of at least four systemic lupus erythematosus American College of Rheumatology criteria - fulfillment 100%, n = 76) over the past five years. Age of onset, ethnicity, disease duration, number of American College of Rheumatology criteria at the end of follow-up, cumulative: renal, neuropsychiatric and articular phenotypes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, smoking and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2K were correlated to the presence and degree of irreversible damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index). Accumulation of American College of Rheumatology criteria was measured in a sub-group of patients followed from disease onset (within a year of the first symptom ascribed to systemic lupus erythematosus) (n = 39 - 51%); Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index were performed. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney tests and Spearman correlation rho (Sig. 2-tailed p Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/Systemic Damage Index > 0 was present in 56.6% and significantly associated to a longer duration, a higher number of American College of Rheumatology criteria and a neuropsychiatric phenotype when compared with those with no damage. The final number of American College of Rheumatology criteria accrued was positively correlated to a higher disease activity over the past five years of follow-up (Spearman´s rho

  7. Psychiatric disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, G A; Nehall, J E; Simeon, D T

    1996-06-01

    The symptoms of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) may include altered mental function. The present study sought to determine whether the psychiatric disorders are due to the disease itself or to the stress of having a chronic disease. Forty-five SLE patients attending outpatient clinics at the Port-of-Spain General Hospital in Trinidad were compared with two control groups: patients with chronic debilitating diseases similar to SLE in terms of chronicity and treatment (n = 44) and non-diseased individuals (n = 48). The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM III-R was used to identify psychiatric disorders. Both the SLE and the chronic illness groups had more psychiatric illness (44% and 39%, respectively) when compared with the non-diseased controls (2%) (p < 0.001). Major depression was the most common diagnosis among both diseased groups. However, psychotic illnesses (schizophrenic-type psychosis and bipolar disorders) were more prevalent in the SLE group (11.1% vs 0%, p = 0.02). These results indicate that major depression in SLE may be related more to the effects of a chronic illness than to SLE itself. However, the occurrence of psychotic symptoms may be related to SLE disease and needs further study.

  8. Quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Елена Александровна Асеева; V. N. Amirdzhanova; ЛИСИЦЫНА Т.А.; M V Zavalskaya

    2013-01-01

    The recent rise in survival rates and therefore in the degree of organ damages due to both disease itself and performed therapy increasingly gives a reason to think about health-related quality of life (QL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Numerous studies initiated in the 1980s to asses QL in patients with SLE have revealed considerable impairments in physical, emotional functioning in this category of patients. SLE leads to social dysadaptation, chronic stress, anxiety, ...

  9. Quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Елена Александровна Асеева; V N Amirdzhanova; Т А Лисицына; M V Zavalskaya

    2013-01-01

    The recent rise in survival rates and therefore in the degree of organ damages due to both disease itself and performed therapy increasingly gives a reason to think about health-related quality of life (QL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Numerous studies initiated in the 1980s to asses QL in patients with SLE have revealed considerable impairments in physical, emotional functioning in this category of patients. SLE leads to social dysadaptation, chronic stress, anxiety, ...

  10. Psoriatic Alopecia in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Wimolsiri Iamsumang; Tueboon Sriphojanart; Poonkiat Suchonwanit

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, recurrent, and relatively common inflammatory dermatologic condition, which demonstrates various clinical manifestations including hair loss. It was once believed that alopecia was not a presentation of scalp psoriasis, but it is now widely accepted that psoriatic alopecia exists. Although the majority of patients get hair regrowth, it can potentially lead to permanent hair loss. Herein, we report a case of 26-year-old female patient with systemic lupus erythematosus w...

  11. Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miziara, Ivan Dieb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE is an autoantibody-mediated disease with subepidermal blisters. It is a rare form of presentation of SLE that occurs in less than 5% of cases of lupus. Case Report: A 27-year-old, female, FRS patient reported the appearance of painful bullous lesions in the left nasal wing and left buccal mucosa that displayed sudden and rapid growth. She sought advice from emergency dermatology staff 15 days after onset and was hospitalized with suspected bullous disease. Intravenous antibiotics and steroids were administered initially, but the patient showed no improvement during hospitalization. She displayed further extensive injuries to the trunk, axillae, and vulva as well as disruption of the bullous lesions, which remained as hyperemic scars. Incisional biopsy of a lesion in the left buccal mucosa was performed, and pathological results indicated mucositis with extensive erosion and the presence of a predominantly neutrophilic infiltrate with degeneration of basal cells and apoptotic keratinocytes. Under direct immunofluorescence, the skin showed anti-IgA, anti-IgM, and anti-IgG linear fluorescence on the continuous dermal side of the cleavage. Indirect immunofluorescence of the skin showed conjugated anti-IgA, was anti-IgM negative, and displayed pemphigus in conjunction with anti-IgG fluorescence in the nucleus of keratinocytes, consistent with a diagnosis of bullous lupus erythematosus. Discussion: BSLE is an acquired autoimmune bullous disease caused by autoantibodies against type VII collagen or other components of the junctional zone, epidermis, and dermis. It must be differentiated from the secondary bubbles and vacuolar degeneration of the basement membrane that may occur in acute and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

  12. Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miziara, Ivan Dieb; Mahmoud, Ali; Chagury, Azis Arruda; Alves, Ricardo Dourado

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE) is an autoantibody-mediated disease with subepidermal blisters. It is a rare form of presentation of SLE that occurs in less than 5% of cases of lupus. Case Report: A 27-year-old, female, FRS patient reported the appearance of painful bullous lesions in the left nasal wing and left buccal mucosa that displayed sudden and rapid growth. She sought advice from emergency dermatology staff 15 days after onset and was hospitalized with suspected bullous disease. Intravenous antibiotics and steroids were administered initially, but the patient showed no improvement during hospitalization. She displayed further extensive injuries to the trunk, axillae, and vulva as well as disruption of the bullous lesions, which remained as hyperemic scars. Incisional biopsy of a lesion in the left buccal mucosa was performed, and pathological results indicated mucositis with extensive erosion and the presence of a predominantly neutrophilic infiltrate with degeneration of basal cells and apoptotic keratinocytes. Under direct immunofluorescence, the skin showed anti-IgA, anti-IgM, and anti-IgG linear fluorescence on the continuous dermal side of the cleavage. Indirect immunofluorescence of the skin showed conjugated anti-IgA, was anti-IgM negative, and displayed pemphigus in conjunction with anti-IgG fluorescence in the nucleus of keratinocytes, consistent with a diagnosis of bullous lupus erythematosus. Discussion: BSLE is an acquired autoimmune bullous disease caused by autoantibodies against type VII collagen or other components of the junctional zone, epidermis, and dermis. It must be differentiated from the secondary bubbles and vacuolar degeneration of the basement membrane that may occur in acute and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. PMID:25992032

  13. Derivation and validation of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Michelle; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2012-01-01

    The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group revised and validated the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification criteria in order to improve clinical relevance, meet stringent methodology requirements, and incorporate new kno...

  14. Serum interleukin-17 levels are associated with nephritis in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Karina de Oliveira Peliçari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the serum interleukin-17 (IL-17 levels in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and to evaluate the association between IL-17 and clinical manifestations, disease activity, laboratory findings and treatment. METHODS: We included 67 consecutive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients [61 women; median age 18 years (range 11-31], 55 first-degree relatives [50 women; median age 40 years (range 29-52] and 47 age- and sex-matched healthy controls [42 women; median age 19 years (range 6-30]. The childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients were assessed for clinical and laboratory systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, disease activity [Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI], cumulative damage [Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (ACR Damage Index] and current drug use. Serum IL-17 levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using commercial kits. RESULTS: The median serum IL-17 level was 36.3 (range 17.36-105.92 pg/mL in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 29.47 (15.16-62.17 pg/mL in healthy controls (p=0.009. We observed an association between serum IL-17 levels and active nephritis (p=0.01 and migraines (p=0.03. Serum IL-17 levels were not associated with disease activity (p=0.32, cumulative damage (p=0.34, or medication use (p=0.63. CONCLUSION: IL-17 is increased in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric and renal manifestations. Longitudinal studies are necessary to determine the role of IL-17 in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

  15. Clinical, laboratory and health-related quality of life correlates of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Responder Index response: a post hoc analysis of the phase 3 belimumab trials

    OpenAIRE

    Furie, Richard; Petri, Michelle A; Strand, Vibeke; Gladman, Dafna D; Zhong, Z John; Freimuth, William W.; ,

    2014-01-01

    Objective Correlates of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) Responder Index (SRI) response with clinical trial end points were examined using pooled data from the Study of Belimumab in Subjects with SLE (BLISS) trials (N=1684). Methods Changes in clinical, laboratory and health-related quality of life measures from baseline at 52 weeks were compared between SRI responders (n=761) and non-responders (n=923). Results More SRI responders than non-responders had ≥4-point (100% vs 3.8%) and ≥7-poin...

  16. Avoidance of radiotherapy-related, gastrointestinal complications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report and review of literature

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    Alsaeed Eyad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is associated with major gastrointestinal complications due to radiotherapy. A patient with active SLE and grade 4 nephropathy presented with inoperable advanced cancer of the cervix which proved to be contraindicated for chemotherapy. The patient was treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique (IMRT. The patient, however, did not experience severe radiotherapy-related complications as expected with conventional techniques of radiotherapy. The tolerance of SLE patients to radiotherapy can thus be achieved by proper delivery of radiation and the sparing of normal tissues by IMRT although further confirmatory studies are required.

  17. Clinical, laboratory and health-related quality of life correlates of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Responder Index response: a post hoc analysis of the phase 3 belimumab trials

    OpenAIRE

    Furie, Richard; Petri, Michelle A.; Strand, Vibeke; Gladman, Dafna D; ZHONG, Z. JOHN; Freimuth, William W; ,

    2014-01-01

    Objective Correlates of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) Responder Index (SRI) response with clinical trial end points were examined using pooled data from the Study of Belimumab in Subjects with SLE (BLISS) trials (N=1684). Methods Changes in clinical, laboratory and health-related quality of life measures from baseline at 52 weeks were compared between SRI responders (n=761) and non-responders (n=923). Results More SRI responders than non-responders had ≥4-point (100% vs 3.8%) and ≥7-poin...

  18. Outcomes of neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus based on clinical phenotypes; prospective data from the Leiden NP SLE cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro-Checa, C; Beaart-van de Voorde, L J J; Middelkoop, H A M; Dane, M L; van der Wee, N J; van Buchem, M A; Huizinga, T W J; Steup-Beekman, G M

    2017-04-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess whether clinical and patient's reported outcomes are associated with a different pathophysiological origin of neuropsychiatric events presenting in systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods A total of 232 neuropsychiatric events presenting in 131 systemic lupus erythematosus patients were included. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis was established per event by multidisciplinary evaluation. All neuropsychiatric events were divided according to a suspected underlying pathophysiological process into one of the following: non-neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus related, inflammatory and ischaemic neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. The clinical outcome of all neuropsychiatric events was determined by a physician-completed four-point Likert scale. Health-related quality of life was measured with the subscales of the patient-generated Short Form 36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire. The change between scores at paired visits of all domain scores, mental component summary (SF-36 MCS) and physical component summary (SF-36 PCS) scores were retrospectively calculated and used as patient-reported outcome. The association among these outcomes and the different origin of neuropsychiatric events was obtained using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results The clinical status of 26.8% non-neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus events, 15.8% ischaemic neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus and 51.6% inflammatory neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus improved after re-assessment. Almost all SF-36 domains had a positive change at re-assessment in all groups independently of the origin of neuropsychiatric events. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus ( B = 0.502; p < 0.001) and especially inflammatory neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus ( B = 0.827; p < 0.001) had better clinical outcome, with change in disease activity being the

  19. Management of Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Current Approaches and Future Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Magro-Checa, César; Zirkzee, Elisabeth J.; Huizinga, Tom; Steup-Beekman, G

    2016-01-01

    textabstractNeuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is a generic definition referring to a series of neurological and psychiatric symptoms directly related to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). NPSLE includes heterogeneous and rare neuropsychiatric (NP) manifestations involving both the central and peripheral nervous system. Due to the lack of a gold standard, the attribution of NP symptoms to SLE represents a clinical challenge that obligates the strict exclusion of any other ...

  20. The Pathology of T Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Anselm Mak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is characterized by the production of a wide array of autoantibodies. Thus, the condition was traditionally classified as a “B-cell disease”. Compelling evidence has however shown that without the assistance of the helper T lymphocytes, it is indeed difficult for the “helpless” B cells to become functional enough to trigger SLE-related inflammation. T cells have been recognized to be crucial in the pathogenicity of SLE through their capabilities to communicate with and offer enormous help to B cells for driving autoantibody production. Recently, a number of phenotypic and functional alterations which increase the propensity to trigger lupus-related inflammation have been identified in lupus T cells. Here, potential mechanisms involving alterations in T-cell receptor expressions, postreceptor downstream signalling, epigenetics, and oxidative stress which favour activation of lupus T cells will be discussed. Additionally, how regulatory CD4+, CD8+, and γδ T cells tune down lupus-related inflammation will be highlighted. Lastly, while currently available outcomes of clinical trials evaluating therapeutic agents which manipulate the T cells such as calcineurin inhibitors indicate that they are at least as efficacious and safe as conventional immunosuppressants in treating lupus glomerulonephritis, larger clinical trials are undoubtedly required to validate these as-yet favourable findings.

  1. Dengue fever triggering systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: a case report

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    Talib SH

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available SH Talib, SR Bhattu, R Bhattu, SG Deshpande, DB Dahiphale Department of Medicine and Nephrology, MGM Medical College and Hospital, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India Abstract: We report a rare case of dengue fever triggering systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. The patient presented herself during a large outbreak of dengue fever in December 2012 in Maharashtra, India. The diagnosis of dengue fever was confirmed by the presence of NS-1 antigen during the first few days of febrile illness. Eight weeks later, kidney tissue biopsy studies revealed evidence of lupus nephritis on microscopic examination and immunofluorescence. The report interpreted it as focal proliferative glomerulonephritis and segmental sclerosis (Stage IIIC. The case was also found positive for perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay. An active and effective management of a case essentially calls for clear perception of differentiating dengue-induced lupus flare, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related nephropathy, and/or dengue-induced de-novo lupus disease. Dengue viremia may be the trigger for immune complex formation in patients who are predisposed to developing autoimmune diseases. The present case explains the importance of considering the diagnosis of dengue-related lupus nephritis as an atypical occurrence in appropriate situations, as in this case. It would not be improper to regard this escalating disease as an expanded feature of dengue. Keywords: kidney biopsy, glomerulonephritis, segmental sclerosis, lupus flare, dengue viremia, autoimmune, de-novo lupus nephritis

  2. Quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Елена Александровна Асеева

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent rise in survival rates and therefore in the degree of organ damages due to both disease itself and performed therapy increasingly gives a reason to think about health-related quality of life (QL in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Numerous studies initiated in the 1980s to asses QL in patients with SLE have revealed considerable impairments in physical, emotional functioning in this category of patients. SLE leads to social dysadaptation, chronic stress, anxiety, and depression. Timely detection of worse QL in patients and correction of depressive disorders improve patient compliance. Six SLE questionnaires were validated to study health-related QL; these were Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (MOS SF-36 SLE Symptom checklist, SLE QL Questionnaire (SLEQol, Lupus QL Questionnaire (LupusQol, LQol, and Lupus Patient Reported Outcome Tool (LupusPRO. The general MOS SF-36 and specific Lupus Qol that has been developed for SLE patients are available in Russian. To study QL in the patients at the present stage of rheumatology development is an important component of SLE cura-tion both in real clinical practice and during international clinical trials as one of the components of therapy assessment.

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus in pregnancy: Case report

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    Radeka Gordana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic inflammatory connective tissue disease commonly diagnosed after the age of 20, mostly around the age of 30 years. It is more common in women than in men, especially during the fertile period. Women with SLE are at higher risk for spontaneous abortions, intrauterine fetal death, preeclampsia and eclampsia, preterm delivery and intrauterine growth retardation. This paper is a case report of a pregnant woman with SLE complicated with preeclampsia, but it also discusses follow-up of such pregnancies.

  4. Review of treatment for discoid lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Mayers, Anna Cristina; McClurkin, Michael; Smith, Gideon P

    2016-07-01

    Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic cutaneous disease characterized by inflammatory plaques that, in the absence of prompt diagnosis and treatment, may lead to disfiguring scarring and skin atrophy. However, there is limited evidence for which treatments are most effective. Currently, no medications have been approved specifically for the treatment of DLE. Many of the drugs described in the literature were developed for use in other immune disorders. This review will summarize current therapeutic options for DLE and their supporting evidence with discussion of prevention, topical measures, physical modalities, and systemic therapies, including newer potential therapies.

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus : abdominal radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae Cheon; Cho, On Koo; Lee, Yong Joo; Bae, Jae Ik; Kim, Yong Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Ko, Byung Hee [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) is a systemic disease of unknown etiology. Its main pathology is vasculitis and serositis, due to deposition of the immune complex or antibodies. Most findings are nonspecific ; abdominal manifestations include enteritis, hepatomegaly, pancreatic enlargement, serositis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, nephritis, interstitial cystitis, and thrombophlebitis. We described radiologic findings of various organ involvement of SLE; digestive system, serosa, reticuloendothelial system, urinary system, and venous system. Diagnosis of SLE was done according to the criteria of American Rheumatism Association. Understanding of the variable imaging findings in SLE may be helpful for the early detection of abdominal involvement and complications.

  6. Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kee Hyuk; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Pulmonary involvement is more common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in any other connective tissue disease, and more than half of patients with SLE suffer from respiratory dysfunction during the course of their illness. Although sepsis and renal disease are the most common causes of death in SLE, lung disease is the predominant manifestation and is an indicator of overall prognosis. Respiratory disease may be due to direct involvement of the lung or as a secondary consequence of the effect of the disease on other organ systems.

  7. Collapsing glomerulopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadeer, Kerolos; Alsaad, Ali A; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J; Porter, Ivan E

    2017-02-27

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) is a rare disease that can be associated with multiple other disorders. It usually leads to poor prognosis with a high percentage of patients progressing to end-stage renal disease. In this article, we illustrate a clinical case of CG associated with systemic lupus erythematosus that had a prompt response to mycophenolate and prednisone. The condition started after sudden cessation of the already established mycophenolate treatment regimen. The patient then presented with acute kidney injury due to kidney biopsy-proven CG. In that circumstance, we hypothesised that mycophenolate may play a role in prevention and development of CG.

  8. Lichen planus and lupus erythematosus overlap syndrome

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    Chopra Adarsh

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old woman with livid plaques showing central atrophy and erythematous vesicular borders over both dorsa of feet and buttocks, and follicular and papular lesions over buttocks and lumbar area, was difficult to diagnose as either lichen planus (LP or lupus erythematosus (LE. The histological studies from two places showed features of both LE and LP. Laboratory findings were within normal limits first, but follow up studies for two years showed persistent albuminurea, leucopenia, arthritis and erythema over the exposed areas with same histology suggesting that eruption may be an unusual variant of LE.

  9. Novel therapeutic agents for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gescuk, Bryan D; Davis, John C

    2002-09-01

    The last significant breakthrough in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was the use of cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone in the treatment of lupus nephritis. Recent advances in immunology, oncology, and endocrinology have resulted in many potential therapies for SLE. These therapies include new immunosuppressants, biologic medications, tolerizing agents, immunoablation techniques, and hormonal medications. Each of these approaches will be discussed in this review. Some therapies are currently in use in clinical rheumatology practice (mycophenolate mofetil) and others are entering phase I trials (anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody). While some of these new therapies target specific inflammatory mechanisms in SLE (anti-CD40L monoclonal antibody), others work by nonspecific inhibition of the immune system (immunoablation).

  10. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  11. Acquired enophthalmos with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K R; Seo, M R; Ryu, H J; Chi, M J; Baek, H J; Choi, H J

    2016-01-01

    Ocular involvement sometimes occurs with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but enophthalmos with SLE is rare. We report a case of enophthalmos with SLE. A 25-year-old male was admitted for two weeks of fever, sore throat, arthralgia, chest pain and right arm weakness with pain. We diagnosed him with SLE with malar rash, arthritis, pleural effusion, proteinuria, leukopenia, positive antinuclear antibody, anti-dsDNA, and lupus anticoagulant. The patient was prescribed high-dose prednisolone and hydroxychloroquine 400 mg. One week after discharge, he complained about a sensation of a sunken right eye. CT showed right enophthalmos, a post-inflammatory change and chronic inflammation. Proteinuria increased to 3.8 g/day after the patient stopped taking prednisolone. Cyclophosphamide therapy was administered for three months without improvement. We decided to restart prednisolone and change cyclophosphamide to mycophenolate mofetil. Proteinuria decreased but enophthalmos remains as of this reporting.

  12. DEPRESSION--A FELLOW TRAVELER WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Doina-Clementina; Costin, Melania; Bădeanu, Lucia Elena; Negru, R D; Aursulesei, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem inflammatory disorder that occurs primarily in women of childbearing age, immunologic abnormalities being a prominent feature of the disease. Psychiatric disorders frequently coexist, depression being the most common mood disorder in neuropsychiatric lupus. This literature review was performed through searching MEDLINE database for full-text English-language articles--original research, systematic review and updates published in the last five years (2010-2015), using the keywords "depression and systemic lupus erythematosus". The main outcomes identified were prevalence and predictors of depression in various cultural and ethnic groups, depression-related clinical issues (suicidal ideation, cognitive impairment, altered body image, sleep and sexual disturbances, influence of SLE treatment), and influence on quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the polymorphism and individual variability of the SLE clinical manifestations helps to improve early detection of depression, which is responsible for the increased risk of comorbidities, suicidal attempts, decreased treatment adherence, and impaired quality of life. Physicians across all specialties involved in the care for lupus patients should be aware of the major prevalence of this condition, while helping patients to cope with their disabling disease.

  13. Th17-related cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with dilated cardiomyopathies: a possible linkage to parvovirus B19 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Yuan Chen

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM are a major cause of mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Immune responses induced by human parvovirus B19 (B19 are considered an important pathogenic mechanism in myocarditis or DCM. However, little is known about Th17-related cytokines in SLE patients with DCM about the linkage with B19 infection. IgM and IgG against B19 viral protein, and serum levels of Th17-related cytokines were determined using ELISA in eight SLE patients with DCM and six patients with valvular heart disease (VHD. Humoral responses of anti-B19-VP1u and anti-B19-NS1 antibody were assessed using Western blot and B19 DNA was detected by nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Levels of interleukin (IL-17, IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α were significantly higher in SLE patients with DCM (mean ± SEM, 390.99±125.48 pg/ml, 370.24±114.09 pg/ml, 36.01±16.90 pg/ml, and 183.84±82.94 pg/ml, respectively compared to healthy controls (51.32±3.04 pg/ml, p<0.001; 36.88±6.64 pg/ml, p<0.001; 5.39±0.62 pg/ml, p<0.005; and 82.13±2.42 pg/ml, p<0.005, respectively. Levels of IL-17 and IL-6 were higher in SLE patients with DCM versus those with VHD (both p<0.01. Five (62.5% of DCM patients had detectable anti-B19-NS1 IgG and four (50.0% of them had anti-B19-VP1u IgG, whereas only one (16.7% of VHD patients had detectable anti-B19-NS1 IgG and anti-B19-VP1u IgG. Serum levels of IL-17, IL-6 and IL-1β were markedly higher in SLE patients with anti-B19-VP1u IgG and anti-B19-NS1 IgG compared to those without anti-B19-VP1u IgG or anti-B19-NS1 IgG, respectively. These suggest a potential association of B19 with DCM and Th17-related cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of DCM in SLE patients.

  14. Dietary micronutrient intake and atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourdudoss, C; Elkan, A-C; Hafström, I; Jogestrand, T; Gustafsson, T; van Vollenhoven, R; Frostegård, J

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of dietary micronutrient intake in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study included 111 SLE patients and 118 age and gender-matched controls. Data on diet (food frequency questionnaires) were linked with data on Systemic Lupus Activity Measure, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and carotid atherosclerotic/echolucent plaque (B-mode ultrasound). Dietary micronutrient intake were compared between SLE patients and controls and in relation to lupus activity and atherosclerosis in SLE. Associations between micronutrient intake and plaque were analyzed through logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. Micronutrient intake did not differ between patients and controls, and between lower and higher lupus activity, apart from the fact that phosphorus was associated with SLEDAI > 6. In SLE patients, some micronutrients were associated with atherosclerotic plaque, left side. Lower intake of riboflavin and phosphorus was associated with atherosclerotic plaque, left side (odds ratio (OR) 3.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-8.40 and OR 4.36, 95% CI 1.53-12.39, respectively). Higher intake of selenium and thiamin was inversely associated with atherosclerotic plaque, left side (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.09-0.89 and OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.08-0.80, respectively). In addition, higher intake of thiamin was inversely associated with echolucent plaque, left side (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.06-0.84). Lower intake of folate was inversely associated with bilateral echolucent plaque (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.13-0.99). SLE patients did not have different dietary micronutrient intake compared to controls. Phosphorus was associated with lupus activity. Riboflavin, phosphorus, selenium and thiamin were inversely associated with atherosclerotic plaque, left side in SLE patients, but not in controls. Dietary micronutrients may play a role in atherosclerosis in SLE. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Association of genetic variants in complement factor H and factor H-related genes with systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility.

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    Jian Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, a complex polygenic autoimmune disease, is associated with increased complement activation. Variants of genes encoding complement regulator factor H (CFH and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-CFHR5 within the chromosome 1q32 locus linked to SLE, have been associated with multiple human diseases and may contribute to dysregulated complement activation predisposing to SLE. We assessed 60 SNPs covering the CFH-CFHRs region for association with SLE in 15,864 case-control subjects derived from four ethnic groups. Significant allelic associations with SLE were detected in European Americans (EA and African Americans (AA, which could be attributed to an intronic CFH SNP (rs6677604, in intron 11, P(meta = 6.6×10(-8, OR = 1.18 and an intergenic SNP between CFHR1 and CFHR4 (rs16840639, P(meta = 2.9×10(-7, OR = 1.17 rather than to previously identified disease-associated CFH exonic SNPs, including I62V, Y402H, A474A, and D936E. In addition, allelic association of rs6677604 with SLE was subsequently confirmed in Asians (AS. Haplotype analysis revealed that the underlying causal variant, tagged by rs6677604 and rs16840639, was localized to a ~146 kb block extending from intron 9 of CFH to downstream of CFHR1. Within this block, the deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 (CFHR3-1Δ, a likely causal variant measured using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, was tagged by rs6677604 in EA and AS and rs16840639 in AA, respectively. Deduced from genotypic associations of tag SNPs in EA, AA, and AS, homozygous deletion of CFHR3-1Δ (P(meta = 3.2×10(-7, OR = 1.47 conferred a higher risk of SLE than heterozygous deletion (P(meta = 3.5×10(-4, OR = 1.14. These results suggested that the CFHR3-1Δ deletion within the SLE-associated block, but not the previously described exonic SNPs of CFH, might contribute to the development of SLE in EA, AA, and AS, providing new insights into the role of

  16. Catatonia due to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Pinto Cabral Júnior Rabello

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Discuss neuropsychiatric aspects and differential diagnosis of catatonic syndrome secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a pediatric patient. Methods Single case report. Result A 13-year-old male, after two months diagnosed with SLE, started to present psychotic symptoms (behavioral changes, hallucinations and delusions that evolved into intense catatonia. During hospitalization, neuroimaging, biochemical and serological tests for differential diagnosis with metabolic encephalopathy, neurological tumors and neuroinfections, among other tests, were performed. The possibility of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, steroid-induced psychosis and catatonia was also evaluated. A complete reversal of catatonia was achieved after using benzodiazepines in high doses, associated with immunosuppressive therapy for lupus, which speaks in favor of catatonia secondary to autoimmune encephalitis due to lupus. Conclusion Although catatonia rarely is the initial clinical presentation of SLE, the delay in recognizing the syndrome can be risky, having a negative impact on prognosis. Benzodiazepines have an important role in the catatonia resolution, especially when associated with parallel specific organic base cause treatment. The use of neuroleptics should be avoided for the duration of the catatonic syndrome as it may cause clinical deterioration.

  17. CHANGES IN LEVELS OF SOLUBLE T-CELL ACTIVATION MARKERS, SIL-2R, SCD4 AND SCD8, IN RELATION TO DISEASE EXACERBATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS-ERYTHEMATOSUS - A PROSPECTIVE-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPRONK, P.E.; TERBORG, E.J.; HUITEMA, M.G.; Limburg, Piet; Kallenberg, Cees

    1994-01-01

    Objectives-To assess serial activation of T-cell subsets in relation to auto-antibody production and the occurrence of disease exacerbations in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods-To study the possible role of T-cells in the pathophysiology of the disease, 16 consecutive exacer

  18. Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Associated with Esophagitis Dissecans Superficialis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is one of the rare autoantibody mediated skin manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) demonstrating subepidermal blistering with neutrophilic infiltrate histologically. We present a case of a 40-year-old Hispanic female who presented with a several months' history of multiple blistering pruritic skin lesions involving the face and trunk, a photosensitive rash over the face and neck, swelling of the right neck lymph node, and joint pain involving her elbows and wrist. Her malady was diagnosed as bullous systemic lupus erythematosus based on the immunological workup and biopsy of her skin lesions. The patient also complained of odynophagia and endoscopy revealed esophagitis dissecans superficialis which is a rare endoscopic finding characterized by sloughing of the esophageal mucosa. The bullous disorders typically associated with esophagitis dissecans superficialis are pemphigus and rarely bullous pemphigoid. However, this is the first reported case of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus associated with esophagitis dissecans superficialis. PMID:25821624

  19. Case Report: An atypical case of systemic lupus erythematosus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: She had a favorable clinical response and continues to be followed up as an outpatient.Conclusion: Systemic lupus erythematosus can be difficult diagnosis to make as it may present with atypical features.

  20. Central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the clinical, immunological and pathological data of 5 eases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Each of the five cases has typical SLE damages on the skin and multiple organs. Among

  1. Lupus cystitis in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: risk factors and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J H; Lee, J; Jung, S M; Ju, J H; Park, S-H; Kim, H-Y; Kwok, S-K

    2015-10-01

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics of lupus cystitis and determine the risk factors and clinical outcomes of lupus cystitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We retrospectively reviewed 1064 patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital in Seoul, Korea, from 1998 to 2013. Twenty-four patients had lupus cystitis. Lupus cystitis was defined as unexplained ureteritis and/or cystitis as detected by imaging studies, cystoscopy, or bladder histopathology without urinary microorganisms or stones. Three-fourths of patients with lupus cystitis had concurrent lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV). The initial symptoms were gastrointestinal in nature for most patients (79.2%). High-dose methylprednisolone was initially administered to most patients (91.7%) with lupus cystitis. Two patients (8.3%) died of urinary tract infections. Sixty-five age- and sex-matched patients with SLE who were admitted with other manifestations were included as the control group. Patients with lupus cystitis showed a lower C3 level (p = 0.031), higher SLE Disease Activity Index score (p = 0.006), and higher ESR (p = 0.05) upon admission; more frequently had a history of LMV prior to admission (p lupus (p = 0.031) than did patients with SLE but without lupus cystitis. The occurrence of lupus cystitis was associated with a history of LMV (OR, 21.794; 95% CI, 4.061-116.963). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years, and the cumulative one-year mortality rate was 20%. Complications developed in 33.3% of patients with lupus cystitis and were related to survival (log-rank p = 0.021). Our results suggest that the possibility of lupus cystitis should be considered when a patient with SLE and history of LMV presents with gastrointestinal symptoms or lower urinary tract symptoms. Development of complications in patients with lupus cystitis can be fatal. Thus, intensive treatment and follow-up are needed, especially in the presence of

  2. The Physiotherapy in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Alena

    2016-01-01

    Name: Alena Hladíková Supervisor: Mgr. Renáta Muchová Opponent: Title of bachelor thesis: The Physiotherapy in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Abstract: This bachelor thesis concerns physiotherapy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus diagnose. It mainly focuses on physiotherapeutic techniques indicated in this kind of patients. Another task is evaluating the effect of physiotherapy in acute issues caused by this disease. The thesis is divided into theoretical and practical...

  3. Lupus eritematoso discóide na infância Discoid lupus erythematosus in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina de A. Sampaio

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar revisão da literatura sobre o lupus eritematoso discóide (LED na infância. FONTES DE DADOS: Livros-texto e artigos de revistas indexadas pelo Medline e SciELO nos últimos dez anos, usando as seguintes palavras-chave: "discoid lupus erythematosus", "chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus", "lupus erythematosus in childhood", "lupus erythematosus in children", "discoid lupus erythematosus in childhood", "discoid lupus erythematosus in children". SÍNTESEDOS DADOS: A idade de início da doença ocorre predominantemente entre cinco e dez anos e a história familiar de lupus eritematoso está presente em 11 a 35% dos casos. A relação gênero feminino/masculino varia de 1/1 a 2,4/1. Por sua vez, 24 a 27% dos pacientes com LED desenvolvem lupus eritematoso sistêmico (LES. Lesões discóides localizadas (que acometem cabeça e pescoço são observadas em 56 a 75% dos pacientes. A face é o local mais acometido. O LED localizado e o generalizado apresentam evolução semelhante. Os achados histológicos são típicos, mostrando dermatite de interface. IgM e IgG são os depósitos mais freqüentes na zona da membrana basal da epiderme. Os tratamentos geralmente utilizados são: fotoproteção, corticosteróides tópicos e antimaláricos. Imunossupressores, talidomida, dapsona e retinóides podem ser usados nos casos refratários. CONCLUSÕES: O LED da infância parece ter pequeno predomínio no gênero feminino, alta prevalência de história familiar de lupus eritematoso e elevada proporção que evolui para a forma sistêmica da doença, comparada ao LED do adulto. O LED localizado e o generalizado apresentam prognósticos semelhante. Os achados histológicos não foram diferentes daqueles descritos no LED do adulto.OBJECTIVE: To review the literature about discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE in childhood. DATA SOURCES: Textbooks and journals indexed for Medline and SciELO in the last ten years. The following key-words were

  4. Sjögren's syndrome associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Mehmet; Hasan, Chiar; Ağbaş, Ayşe; Kasapçopur, Özgür; Canpolat, Nur; Sever, Lale; Çalışkan, Salim

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome are chronic auto- inflammatory disorders which can lead to serious organ damage. Although systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome were previously considered two forms of the same disease because of presence of clinical coexistence of these two conditions, the view that they are two different conditions with mutual characteristics has become prominent in recent years. In this paper, we reported a 16 year-old girl who was followed up with a diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome for six years and then was observed to have overlap of systemic lupus erythematosus. In the baseline, she did not have any clinical or serological evidence for systemic lupus erythematosus. After six year, massive proteinuria and serological findings developed and systemic lupus erythematosus nephritis was diagnosed by kidney biopsy. Currently, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome cannot be differentiated definetely. We need more valuable diagnostic and classification criteria to differentiate these two important conditions.

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Y

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuriko Yamamoto, Shigeru Aoki Perinatal Center for Maternity and Neonate, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period and also details the neonatal concerns. Keywords: systemic lupus erythematosus, pregnancy outcomes, lupus flare

  6. Autoantibody profiling in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh SC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Song-Chou Hsieh,1 Chia-Li Yu1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Institute of Molecular Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an archetype of systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of a broad spectrum of autoantibodies. More than 100 autoantibodies have been found in the sera of patients with SLE, including antibodies against nuclear, cytoplasmic, surface-membrane, and extracellular antigens. There has been considerable debate as to whether these antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs are merely biomarkers for disease or are responsible for organ/tissue damage in SLE. In recent years, sufficient evidence has supported the hypothesis that many ANAs, such as anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA, antiribosomal P, anti-Sm, antiribonucleoprotein (anti-RNP, and even anti-Sjögren's syndrome (SS-B/La antibodies not only act against specific nuclear antigens but also cross-react with different surface-expressed cognate molecules. The binding of autoantibodies to the cell surface leads to their penetration into the cell's interior to elicit cellular damage. There are at least four conceivable routes for ANAs to penetrate the cytoplasm: (1 nonspecific Fcγ receptor-mediated uptake, (2 cell-surface caveolae-mediated endocytosis, (3 electrostatic interactions between positively charged amino acids of the complementarity-determining regions of the antibody molecule and the negatively charged surface membrane, and (4 the binding of the autoantibody with its cross-reactive cell surface-expressed cognate molecule, and its subsequent endocytosis into the cytoplasm. In this review, we discuss in detail the immunopathogenic mechanisms of the commonly encountered ANAs, such as anti-dsDNA, antiribosomal P, and anti-SSB/La, that are associated with lupus pathogenesis. Additionally, the detrimental thromboembolism-inducing anticardiolipin antibodies in patients with SLE

  7. Correlation of systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity with classical complement (CH50 function and related protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salesi M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The components of the classical complement pathway play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and are reportedly useful biomarkers of disease activity. In this study, we evaluate disease activity, complement function (total hemolytic complement, CH50 and complement protein levels (C3, C4, C3d, C4d, SC5b-9, comparing the results of patients with active disease versus those with inactive disease."n"nMethods: This cross-sectional study included 78 hospitalized women with SLE, 24 of whom were in the active group, with SLE disease activity indexes (SLEDAI.2K of >6, and 54 in the inactive group, with SLEDAI.2K of ≤6. Serum CH50 was measured using a red blood cell hemolytic assay. C3 and C4 levels were determined by nephlometry and plasma levels of C3d, C4d, SC5b-9 by ELISA. The data were statistically analyzed using SPSS."n"nResults: The mean (±standard error C4d levels of the inactive group were significantly higher than those of the active group (23.39±1.1µg/ml and 16.9±1.6µg/ml, respectively; p=0.003. There was also a significant correlation between C3 and C4 levels (p=0.807. The mean values of the other proteins (C3, C4, CH50, SC5b-9, and C3d circulating immune complex concentrations were not significantly different between the inactive group vs. the active group: 89.35±6.8 vs. 85.54±7.6mg/dl, 18.33±2.3 vs. 20.45±2.4mg/dl, 149.03±4.3 vs. 157±4.3U, 1414.4±114.94 vs. 1471.1±216.9ng/ml, 9.43±0.96 vs. 13.31±3.16µgEq/ml, respectively (p>0.05."n"nConclusions: According to our results, C4d levels may be used as a biomarker of disease activity. The significant correlation between C3 and C4 may confirm the activity of the classical pathway in SLE patients."n"nKeywords: Systemic lupus erythematosus, CH50, C3, C4, C3d, C4d, SC5b-9, inactive, flare.

  8. Relationship between health-related quality of life, disease activity and disease damage in a prospective international multicenter cohort of childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moorthy, L N; Baldino, M E; Kurra, V;

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we described associations between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and disease-related factors among childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) patients. Here we determined the relationship between HRQOL, disease activity and damage in a large prospective international...... cohort of cSLE. We compared HRQOL, disease activity and disease damage across different continents and examined the relationship between children's and parents' assessments of HRQOL. Patients with cSLE and their parents completed HRQOL measures at enrollment and ≥4 follow-up visits. Physicians assessed...... disease activity and damage. The multinational cohort ( n = 467) had relatively low disease activity and damage. Patient and parent HRQOL scores were significantly correlated. Asian and European patients had the highest HRQOL, while South and North American patients had lower HRQOL scores. Renal, CNS...

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus--2005 annus mirabilis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, David; Rahman, Anisur

    2006-03-01

    We are about to enter a new era in the treatment of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). For the past 40 years hydroxychloroquine sulfate and corticosteroids, together with varying combinations of immunosuppressive drugs, have been the main treatments for SLE. Although effective for many patients, some patients fail to respond to these drugs and even more suffer from major side effects due to the generalized nature of the immunosuppression. In this article we review the remarkable confluence of new therapies ranging from newer immunosuppressive drugs with fewer side effects, such as mycophenolate mofetil, to the more targeted approaches offered by biological agents. These agents have been designed to block molecules such as CD20, CD22 and interleukin-10 that are thought to have an integral part in the development of SLE. This wolf might not yet be about to become extinct but its survival is increasingly under threat!

  10. [Current diagnosis of cutaneous lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haust, M; Bonsmann, G; Kuhn, A

    2006-07-14

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is a disease with different subtypes and the new classification system includes acute CLE (ACLE), subacute CLE (SCLE), chronic CLE (CCLE), and intermittent CLE (ICLE). The broad spectrum of skin involvement and the possibility of systemic organ manifestations at the beginning and during the course of CLE require specific diagnostic procedures. Clinical assessment of the cutaneous manifestations is necessary along with a detailed patient's history. The diagnosis of CLE is confirmed by histopathology and immunofluorescence microscopy. Selective laboratory screening and additional diagnostic procedures depending on clinical symptoms are recommended. Photoprovocation tests can be performed to assess photosensitivity in patients with CLE and to support the diagnosis. Recently, a scoring system for the activity of the cutaneous manifestations in CLE has been developed and is now evaluated in several clinical studies. In this review, the classification and the characteristic clinical criteria of the different CLE subtypes as well as the current diagnostic possibilities are emphasized.

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus one disease or many?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon-Levin, N; Mosca, M; Petri, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2012-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) characterizes by a variety of clinical manifestations and the presence of a wide profile of autoantibodies. This clinical and serological heterogeneity raised the question: is SLE a single disease with varied phenotypes, or a similar phenotype shared by different diseases with diverse pathogenic mechanisms? Herein we debate the clinical, genetic, hormonal and serological differences typically observed in SLE on the one hand, and the numerous similarities between subtypes of this disease on the other. Leading to the conclusion that SLE may be considered not as a single disease but rather as a single syndrome, which defines by a set of signs, symptoms, or phenomena that occur together and suggest a particular abnormality. Additionally, the accumulated knowledge on gene expression pathways, autoantibodies clusters, hormonal and environmental factors associated with SLE may allow a better classification of this syndrome and updating of SLE criteria. This may further allow targeted biologics and other therapies as well as "personalized medicine" to begin.

  12. Ocular manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silpa-archa, Sukhum; Lee, Joan J; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can involve many parts of the eye, including the eyelid, ocular adnexa, sclera, cornea, uvea, retina and optic nerve. Ocular manifestations of SLE are common and may lead to permanent blindness from the underlying disease or therapeutic side effects. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca is the most common manifestation. However, vision loss may result from involvement of the retina, choroid and optic nerve. Ocular symptoms are correlated to systemic disease activity and can present as an initial manifestation of SLE. The established treatment includes prompt systemic corticosteroids, steroid-sparing immunosuppressive drugs and biological agents. Local ocular therapies are options with promising efficacy. The early recognition of disease and treatment provides reduction of visual morbidity and mortality.

  13. Central nervous system lupus erythematosus in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kimura, Kazue; Yoshida, Naotaka; Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Ibe, Masa-aki; Shimizu, Hiroko (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    Clinical features of central nervous system (CNS) invlvement in childhood systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was investigated. Neuropsychiatric manifestations including seizures, chorea, headache, overt psychosis, tremor, increase of muscle spastisity, and disturbed memory were found in 47% of 15 patients with SLE. There was a well correlatin between CNS abnormalities and SLE disease activity judged by serum complement levels and anti-nuclear antibody and anti-DNA antibody titers. The administration of Prednisolon was effective for the treatment of these CNS abnormalities and steroid psychosis was rare in the present study. EEG abnormalities involving diffuse slowing and slowing bursts were found in 73% of the patients. Cranial CT scan revealed basel ganglia calcifications in 2 patients, and marked brain atrophy in 3 patients. This study indicated that in the long term following of SLE children CNS abnormalities need to be serially checked by EEG and cranial CT scans as well as serological investigations. (author).

  14. Biological Therapy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Postal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototypic inflammatory autoimmune disorder characterized by multisystem involvement and fluctuating disease activity. Symptoms range from rather mild manifestations such as rash or arthritis to life-threatening end-organ manifestations. Despite new and improved therapy having positively impacted the prognosis of SLE, a subgroup of patients do not respond to conventional therapy. Moreover, the risk of fatal outcomes and the damaging side effects of immunosuppressive therapies in SLE call for an improvement in the current therapeutic management. New therapeutic approaches are focused on B-cell targets, T-cell downregulation and costimulatory blockade, cytokine inhibition, and the modulation of complement. Several biological agents have been developed, but this encouraging news is associated with several disappointments in trials and provide a timely moment to reflect on biologic therapy in SLE.

  15. Unmet Needs of Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danoff-Burg, Sharon; Friedberg, Fred

    2009-01-01

    The authors' goal was to assess unmet needs of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Participants (N = 112), who were recruited through the mailing list and support group meetings of a Lupus Alliance of America Affiliate, completed a survey based on prior research. All participants perceived at least 1 unmet need. The most frequently reported unmet needs were in the physical symptoms domain. Older patients were more likely than younger patients to have higher levels of unmet needs related to physical and psychological functioning. African American patients were more likely than white patients to have higher levels of unmet needs related to health services and information. Our findings document the high prevalence and variety of unmet needs among these patients, as well as variations among demographic groups. To address unmet needs of SLE patients, targeted referrals to patient educators, mental health professionals, and support organizations are important adjuncts to medical treatment. PMID:19297299

  16. Management of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight CL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Caroline L Knight, Catherine Nelson-Piercy Division of Women’s Health, Women’s Health Academic Centre, King’s College London and King’s Health Partners, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease predominantly affecting women, particularly those of childbearing age. SLE provides challenges in the prepregnancy, antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods for these women, and for the medical, obstetric, and midwifery teams who provide their care. As with many medical conditions in pregnancy, the best maternal and fetal–neonatal outcomes are obtained with a planned pregnancy and a cohesive multidisciplinary approach. Effective prepregnancy risk assessment and counseling includes exploration of factors for poor pregnancy outcome, discussion of risks, and appropriate planning for pregnancy, with consideration of discussion of relative contraindications to pregnancy. In pregnancy, early referral for hospital-coordinated care, involvement of obstetricians and rheumatologists (and other specialists as required, an individual management plan, regular reviews, and early recognition of flares and complications are all important. Women are at risk of lupus flares, worsening renal impairment, onset of or worsening hypertension, preeclampsia, and/or venous thromboembolism, and miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, and/or neonatal lupus syndrome (congenital heart block or neonatal lupus erythematosus. A cesarean section may be required in certain obstetric contexts (such as urgent preterm delivery for maternal and/or fetal well-being, but vaginal birth should be the aim for the majority of women. Postnatally, an ongoing individual management plan remains important, with neonatal management where necessary and rheumatology follow-up. This article explores the challenges at each stage of pregnancy, discusses the effect of SLE on pregnancy and

  17. Mental health status investigating and related factors analyzing patients with systemic lupus ;erythematosus%系统性红斑狼疮患者心理健康状况调查及相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋芬; 黄爱玲

    2014-01-01

    目的:调查系统性红斑狼疮患者心理健康状况并分析其影响的相关因素。方法采用SAS和SDS量表调查了84例系统性红斑狼疮患者,并对相关因素进行统计学分析。结果系统性红斑狼疮患者的存在抑郁、焦虑心理,其发生与患者文化程度、人年均收入、病程、婚姻状况及社会支持等有关,与年龄无关。结论系统性红斑狼疮患者存在较严重的焦虑抑郁情绪,应重视对系统性红斑狼疮患者的心理干预。%Objective To Investigate mental health status and analyze related factors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus .Methods Surveyed 84 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus by SAS and SDS and related factors were analyzed statistically .Results Depression and anxiety psychology of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were not related with patient education level , annual per capita income , duration, marital status and social support and so on , and regardless of age .Conclusions Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus had severe anxiety and depression , anf should pay attention to the psychological intervention in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus .

  18. Classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, M; Magder, L

    2004-01-01

    The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics, in preparation for revising the ACR classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus, reviewed the current classification criteria. These critical reviews, discussed at the Lund, Sweden, meeting in 2003, will be useful to the clinician and to the researcher. This paper reviews and critiques previous classification attempts.

  19. Lupus erythematosus--a case of facial swelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loescher, A; Edmondson, H D

    1988-04-01

    A case is reported of acute facial swelling following tooth extraction that failed to respond in a normal manner. The patient developed systemic signs and symptoms ultimately revealing the diagnosis of lupus erythematosus. The possibility of soft tissue lesions arising in some forms of lupus is emphasised by this report.

  20. T-cell-directed therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandkumar, P; Furie, R

    2016-09-01

    Drug development for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has largely focused on B-cell therapies. A greater understanding of the immunopathogenesis of SLE coupled with advanced bioengineering has allowed for clinical trials centered on other targets for SLE therapy. The authors discuss the benefits and shortcomings of focusing on T-cell-directed therapies in SLE and lupus nephritis clinical trials.

  1. Vitamin D and systemic lupus erythematosus: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Laiana; Dos Santos, Amanda Senna Pereira; Santos, Marcele; da Silva Chakr, Rafael Mendonça; Monticielo, Odirlei Andre

    2014-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic inflammatory disease associated with genetic, environmental, hormonal, and immunological factors. One of these factors is vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D plays many roles in the immune system. Several studies have suggested a potential role in the development of autoimmune diseases. SLE patients have low serum levels of vitamin D, which increase the possibility of an association between vitamin deficiency and disease onset and evolution. This review of the literature presents an analysis of the aspects related to the immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D and its importance for SLE, as well as the recommendations for vitamin D supplementation in these patients.

  2. Cerebral hypoperfusion detected by SPECT in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is related to clinical activity and cumulative tissue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Longo, F J; Carol, N; Almoguera, M I; Olazarán, J; Alonso-Farto, J C; Ortega, A; Monteagudo, I; González, C Manuel; Carreño, L

    2003-01-01

    Cerebral single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a sensitive technique for the detection of central nervous system (CNS) involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective was to determine whether a relationship exists between cerebral hypoperfusion as detected by cerebral SPECT, cumulative tissue damage and the clinical activity of SLE. Cerebral technetium-99m-L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD) SPECT was performed in two groups of patients: 10 women with SLE (Group A) who had no previous history of major neuropsychiatric (NPS) manifestations and no minor NPS symptoms in the last six months, and 57 unselected women with SLE (Group B). In the same week that SPECT was performed, the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), SLICC/ACR damage index, native anti-DNA antibodies (ELISA) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were determined. In Group A, cerebral SPECT showed moderate or severe hypoperfusion (abnormal SPECT) in five patients without NPS symptoms, unrelated to age (mean 24.8 versus 27.8 years) or disease duration (mean 6.8 versus 9 years). Patients with significant cerebral hypoperfusion had greater clinical disease activity (mean SLEDAI 13.6 versus 7.6) (SLEDAI > 7 in 5/5 versus 1/5; Fisher: 0.023; OR: 33; 95% CI: 2.3-469.8) and ESR (mean 43.6 versus 9.8; P < 0.05). In Group B, the mean age of the 57 unselected women with SLE was 37 years (SD 6.3) and the mean duration of the disease was 9.7 years (SD 6.3). Cerebral SPECT revealed normal perfusion or mild hypoperfusion (normal SPECT) in 30 patients (52.6%), and moderate or severe hypoperfusion in 27 (47.4%). Hypoperfusion was unrelated to age, duration of SLE or concentrations of anti-DNA antibodies and C3 and C4 fractions. Patients with significant cerebral hypoperfusion had more active clinical disease (mean SLEDAI 13.92; SD 8.44 versus 4.56; SD 4.15) (Mann-Whitney, P < 0.005), more cumulative tissue damage (mean SLICC 2.66; SD 2.84 versus 1.03; SD 1.51) (Mann-Whitney, P = 0

  3. Cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients : pooled analysis and systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Wenjie; Chen, Min; Liu, Jia; Hagen, Ferry; Ms, Abdullah; Al-Hatmi, A M S; Zhang, Peilian; Guo, Yun; Boekhout, Teun; Deng, Danqi; Xu, Jianping; Pan, Weihua; Liao, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an important fungal infection among systemic lupus erythematosus patients. We conducted a pooled analysis and systematic review to describe the epidemiological and clinical profile of cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. From two hospitals in C

  4. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with eosinophilic enteritis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kalany Mohammad; Abdollahi Pejman; Asadi Gharabaghi Mehrnaz; Sotoudeh Masoud

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder that may present with various symptoms. It may involve the gastrointestinal tract in a variety of ways; some of the most well-known ones are transaminitis, lupus mesenteric vasculitis, lupus enteritis and mesenteric vascular leakage. We describe a case of a patient with SLE who presented with a five-month history of diarrhea caused by eosinophilic enteritis. To the best of our knowledge, there are few cases rep...

  5. Toe walking as a presenting sign of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiaga, M; Sherry, D

    2015-10-01

    Toe walking is a previously unreported presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We describe a patient who presented with profound multisystem involvement that was preceded by one month of toe walking and multiple flexion contractures without arthritis. Her lupus is now under control after aggressive therapy, yet she continues to struggle with tendinopathy despite continued physical and occupational therapy. Lupus should be considered in the appropriate clinical context in children who have new-onset contractures due to tight tendons.

  6. Lupus erythematosus: considerations about clinical, cutaneous and therapeutic aspects*

    OpenAIRE

    Moura Filho,Jucelio Pereira; Peixoto,Raiza Luna; Martins,Livia Gomes; de Melo, Sillas Duarte; Carvalho,Ligiana Leite de; Pereira,Ana Karine F. da Trindade C.; Freire,Eutilia Andrade Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory disease with multifactorial etiology. Although clinical manifestations are varied, the skin is an important target-organ, which contributes to the inclusion of skin lesions in 4 out of the 17 new criteria for the diagnosis of the disease, according to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics. The cutaneous manifestations of lupus are pleomorphic. Depending on their clinical characteristics, they can be classified into Acute ...

  7. Glaucoma secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jing; Huang Wenbin; Gao Xinbo; Che Huixin; Yu Keming; Zhang Xiulan

    2014-01-01

    Background Glaucoma secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (") an uncommon but serious complication that threatens vision and therefore cannot be neglected.A few cases of secon(ca)ry glaucoma resulting from lupus-induced or iatrogenic ocular impairments have been reported in association with SLE.However,a systematic analysis of the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma secondary to SLE has not been reported in the literature.The aim of this study is to further investigate the relationship between glaucoma and SLE.Methods In this study,we reviewed nine eyes of five patients diagnosed with secondary glaucoma associated with SLE,including one case of neovascular glaucoma and four cases of steroid-induced glaucoma.Results Neovascular glaucoma was successfully treated by Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation surgery with adjunctive ranibizumab intravitreal injection,followed by panretinal photocoagulation (PRP).The steroid-induced glaucoma in eight eyes of four cases were controlled by trabeculectomy along with antiproliferative agents.Conclusion Regular follow-up ocular examinations should be conducted to ensure early diagnosis and treatment of secondary glaucoma in SLE patients to improve the prognosis of vision.

  8. Periorbital discoid lupus: a rare localization in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakici, Ozgur; Karadag, Remzi; Bayramlar, Huseyin; Ozkanli, Seyma; Uzuncakmak, Tugba Kevser; Karadag, Ayse Serap

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old female patient with a 5-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus was referred to our policlinic with complaints of erythema, atrophy, and telangiectasia on the upper eyelids for 8 months. No associated mucocutaneous lesion was present. Biopsy taken by our ophthalmology department revealed discoid lupus erythematosus. Topical tacrolimus was augmented to the systemic therapeutic regimen of the patient, which consisted of continuous antimalarial treatment and intermittent corticosteroid drugs. We observed no remission in spite of the 6-month supervised therapy. Periorbital discoid lupus erythematosus is very unusual and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of erythematous lesions of the periorbital area..

  9. Periorbital discoid lupus: a rare localization in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakici, Ozgur; Karadag, Remzi; Bayramlar, Huseyin; Ozkanli, Seyma; Uzuncakmak, Tugba Kevser; Karadag, Ayse Serap

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old female patient with a 5-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus was referred to our policlinic with complaints of erythema, atrophy, and telangiectasia on the upper eyelids for 8 months. No associated mucocutaneous lesion was present. Biopsy taken by our ophthalmology department revealed discoid lupus erythematosus. Topical tacrolimus was augmented to the systemic therapeutic regimen of the patient, which consisted of continuous antimalarial treatment and intermittent corticosteroid drugs. We observed no remission in spite of the 6-month supervised therapy. Periorbital discoid lupus erythematosus is very unusual and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of erythematous lesions of the periorbital area..

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus flare triggered by a spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Nares, Eduardo; López Iñiguez, Alvaro; Ontiveros Mercado, Heriberto

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with a relapsing and remitting course characterized by disease flares. Flares are a major cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Some triggers for these exacerbations have been identified, including infections, vaccines, pregnancy, environmental factors such as weather, stress and drugs. We report a patient who presented with a lupus flare with predominantly mucocutaneous, serosal and cardiac involvement after being bitten by a spider and we present the possible mechanisms by which the venom elicited such a reaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature.

  11. [Papular mucinosis associated with lupus erythematosus. A case presentation and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revier, J; Kienzler, J L; Blanc, D; Coulon, G; Saint-Hillier, Y; Laurent, R

    1982-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with a widespread papulonodular eruption followed by cutaneous and systemic manifestations of lupus erythematosus. Both conditions, papular mucinosis and lupus erythematosus were investigated by histopathology, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Referring to seven other cases reported in the literature, the possible relationship between lupus erythematosus and cutaneous mucinosis is discussed. It seemed that the cutaneous deposits of mucine were secondary to lupus erythematosus and not a simultaneous occurrence of the two diseases.

  12. Treatment Algorithms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangchan, Chayawee; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Bernatsky, Sasha R; Smith, C Douglas; Hudson, Marie; Inanç, Murat; Rothfield, Naomi F; Nash, Peter T; Furie, Richard A; Senécal, Jean-Luc; Chandran, Vinod; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Pope, Janet E

    2015-09-01

    To establish agreement on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment. SLE experts (n = 69) were e-mailed scenarios and indicated preferred treatments. Algorithms were constructed and agreement determined (≥50% respondents indicating ≥70% agreement). Initially, 54% (n = 37) responded suggesting treatment for scenarios; 13 experts rated agreement with scenarios. Fourteen of 16 scenarios had agreement as follows: discoid lupus: first-line therapy was topical agents and hydroxychloroquine and/or glucocorticoids then azathioprine and subsequently mycophenolate (mofetil); uncomplicated cutaneous vasculitis: initial treatment was glucocorticoids ± hydroxychloroquine ± methotrexate, followed by azathioprine or mycophenolate and then cyclophosphamide; arthritis: initial therapy was hydroxychloroquine and/or glucocorticoids, then methotrexate and subsequently rituximab; pericarditis: first-line therapy was nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, then glucocorticoids with/without hydroxychloroquine, then azathioprine, mycophenolate, or methotrexate and finally belimumab or rituximab, and/or a pericardial window; interstitial lung disease/alveolitis: induction was glucocorticoids and mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide, then rituximab or intravenous gamma globulin (IVIG), and maintenance followed with azathioprine or mycophenolate; pulmonary hypertension: glucocorticoids and mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide and an endothelin receptor antagonist were initial therapies, subsequent treatments were phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and then prostanoids and rituximab; antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: standard anticoagulation with/without hydroxychloroquine, then a thrombin inhibitor for venous thrombosis, versus adding aspirin or platelet inhibition drugs for arterial events; mononeuritis multiplex and central nervous system vasculitis: first-line therapy was glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide followed by maintenance with azathioprine or mycophenolate, and

  13. Hypogammaglobulinemia in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, E; Tao, Y; White, A J; French, A R; Cooper, M A

    2013-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease typically associated with elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG). Hypogammaglobulinemia in SLE patients has been attributed to immunosuppressive treatment or a transient effect associated with nephrotic syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed pediatric SLE patients from a single institution to identify patients with hypogammaglobulinemia and risk factors for hypogammaglobulinemia. A total of 116 pediatric SLE cases from 1997 to 2011 were reviewed and patients with hypogammaglobulinemia (IgG lupus nephritis at SLE diagnosis, disease activity at diagnosis, initial IgG level, and drug treatment. Eighty-six patients were included in our study, with a median age of 15 years and a median follow-up of 39.5 months. Seven percent (six of 86) of patients had hypogammaglobulinemia with a median onset of 27 months (0-72 months) after SLE diagnosis. Significant associations were noted for white race (p value 0.029), male sex (p value 0.009), and the presence of lupus nephritis at SLE diagnosis (p value 0.004). Use of immunosuppressive treatment did not show a statistical association with hypogammaglobulinemia, although two of the patients with hypogammaglobulinemia did receive rituximab. Most patients with hypogammaglobulinemia received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) replacement therapy because of infections and/or concern for infection. Measurement of immunoglobulin levels during treatment in SLE could help identify patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who might require more aggressive follow-up to monitor for increased risk of infection and need for IVIG treatment. A prospective study is needed to validate associated risk factors identified in this study.

  14. Pregnancy and contraception in systemic and cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettrot-Imbert, G; Morel, N; Le Guern, V; Plu-Bureau, G; Frances, C; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2016-10-01

    A causal link has long been described between estrogen and systemic lupus erythematosus activity. Contraceptive and pregnancy management is now common for lupus patients, but pregnancy continues to be associated with higher maternal and fetal mortality/morbidity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients than among the general population. Potential complications include lupus flares, obstetric complications (fetal loss, in utero growth retardation, premature birth) and neonatal lupus syndrome. Association with antiphospholipid antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome increases the risk of obstetric complications. Anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies put fetuses at risk for neonatal lupus. Improving the outcome of such pregnancies depends upon optimal systematic planning of pregnancy at a preconception counseling visit coupled with a multidisciplinary approach. Absence of lupus activity, use of appropriate medication during pregnancy based on the patient's medical history and risk factors, and regular monitoring constitute the best tools for achieving a favorable outcome in such high-risk pregnancies. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the management of contraception and pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus, cutaneous lupus and/or antiphospholipid syndrome in order to reduce the risk of complications and to ensure the best maternal and fetal prognosis.

  15. Effects of acupuncture and massage on pain, quality of sleep and health related quality of life in patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooventhan, A.; Nivethitha, L.

    2014-01-01

    A 41-years-old woman diagnosed of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) in 2006 came to our hospital - outpatient department with the complaint of severe pain and swelling over multiple joints associated with disturbed sleep/sleeplessness and poor quality of life since seven years. She received acupuncture (20 minutes) and massage (20 minutes) daily for the period of 30 days with 7 days of rest period in between after first 15 days. After intervention we observed reduction of pain in Visual Analog Scale score; improvement in day time sleepiness, and quality of sleep in Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, respectively; improvement in health related quality of life in Short Form-36 version 2 (SF-36v2) Health Survey. These results showed that acupuncture and massage can be considered as an integrative approach for symptomatic management of SLE. PMID:25336852

  16. The rate of and risk factors for frequent hospitalization in systemic lupus erythematosus: results from the Korean lupus network registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J W; Park, D J; Kang, J H; Choi, S E; Yim, Y R; Kim, J E; Lee, K E; Wen, L; Kim, T J; Park, Y W; Sung, Y K; Lee, S S

    2016-11-01

    Objectives The survival rate of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus has improved in the last few decades, but the rate of hospitalization and health care costs for these patients remain higher than in the general population. Thus, we evaluated the rate of hospitalization and associated risk factors in an inception cohort of Korean patients with lupus. Methods Of the 507 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus enrolled in the KORean lupus NETwork, we investigated an inception cohort consisting of 196 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus presenting within 6 months of diagnosis based on the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. We evaluated the causes of hospitalization, demographic characteristics, and laboratory and clinical data at the time of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis of hospitalized patients and during a follow-up period. We calculated the hospitalization rate as the number of total hospitalizations divided by the disease duration, and defined "frequent hospitalization" as hospitalization more than once per year. Results Of the 196 patients, 117 (59.6%) were admitted to hospital a total of 257 times during the 8-year follow-up period. Moreover, 22 (11.2%) patients were hospitalized frequently. The most common reasons for hospitalization included disease flares, infection, and pregnancy-related morbidity. In the univariate regression analysis, malar rash, arthritis, pericarditis, renal involvement, fever, systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index > 12, hemoglobin level < 10 mg/dl, albumin level < 3.5 mg/dl, and anti-Sjögren's syndrome A positivity were associated with frequent hospitalization. Finally, multivariate analysis showed that arthritis, pericarditis, and anti-Sjögren's syndrome A antibody positivity at the time of diagnosis were risk factors for frequent hospitalization. Conclusions Our results showed that frequent hospitalization occurred in 11.2% of hospitalized patients and

  17. Vesiculobullous systemic lupus erythematosus. A report of four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camisa, C

    1988-01-01

    A vesiculobullous eruption is now recognized as a specific but rare cutaneous complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. Four additional cases are reported in whom the five previously proposed criteria were met. Increased activity of systemic lupus erythematosus affecting other organ systems was documented in three of four cases. All four patients demonstrated a positive lupus band, and three of four showed granular deposits of IgA along the basement membrane zone (BMZ). Evidence of glomerulonephritis was obtained in three of four cases, which resulted in death in one. The higher than expected incidence of IgA deposits in skin and renal disease in patients with vesiculobullous eruption of systemic lupus erythematosus is again confirmed. The eruption cleared in all four cases with either dapsone, 50 mg daily, or high doses of corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents.

  18. 75 FR 35493 - Guidance for Industry on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing Medical Products for Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products..., therapeutic biological products, and medical devices for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE...

  19. Management of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Caroline L; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease predominantly affecting women, particularly those of childbearing age. SLE provides challenges in the prepregnancy, antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods for these women, and for the medical, obstetric, and midwifery teams who provide their care. As with many medical conditions in pregnancy, the best maternal and fetal-neonatal outcomes are obtained with a planned pregnancy and a cohesive multidisciplinary approach. Effective prepregnancy risk assessment and counseling includes exploration of factors for poor pregnancy outcome, discussion of risks, and appropriate planning for pregnancy, with consideration of discussion of relative contraindications to pregnancy. In pregnancy, early referral for hospital-coordinated care, involvement of obstetricians and rheumatologists (and other specialists as required), an individual management plan, regular reviews, and early recognition of flares and complications are all important. Women are at risk of lupus flares, worsening renal impairment, onset of or worsening hypertension, preeclampsia, and/or venous thromboembolism, and miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, and/or neonatal lupus syndrome (congenital heart block or neonatal lupus erythematosus). A cesarean section may be required in certain obstetric contexts (such as urgent preterm delivery for maternal and/or fetal well-being), but vaginal birth should be the aim for the majority of women. Postnatally, an ongoing individual management plan remains important, with neonatal management where necessary and rheumatology followup. This article explores the challenges at each stage of pregnancy, discusses the effect of SLE on pregnancy and vice versa, and reviews antirheumatic medications with the latest guidance about their use and safety in pregnancy. Such information is required to effectively and safely manage each stage of pregnancy in women with SLE.

  20. Management of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Caroline L; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease predominantly affecting women, particularly those of childbearing age. SLE provides challenges in the prepregnancy, antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods for these women, and for the medical, obstetric, and midwifery teams who provide their care. As with many medical conditions in pregnancy, the best maternal and fetal–neonatal outcomes are obtained with a planned pregnancy and a cohesive multidisciplinary approach. Effective prepregnancy risk assessment and counseling includes exploration of factors for poor pregnancy outcome, discussion of risks, and appropriate planning for pregnancy, with consideration of discussion of relative contraindications to pregnancy. In pregnancy, early referral for hospital-coordinated care, involvement of obstetricians and rheumatologists (and other specialists as required), an individual management plan, regular reviews, and early recognition of flares and complications are all important. Women are at risk of lupus flares, worsening renal impairment, onset of or worsening hypertension, preeclampsia, and/or venous thromboembolism, and miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, and/or neonatal lupus syndrome (congenital heart block or neonatal lupus erythematosus). A cesarean section may be required in certain obstetric contexts (such as urgent preterm delivery for maternal and/or fetal well-being), but vaginal birth should be the aim for the majority of women. Postnatally, an ongoing individual management plan remains important, with neonatal management where necessary and rheumatology followup. This article explores the challenges at each stage of pregnancy, discusses the effect of SLE on pregnancy and vice versa, and reviews antirheumatic medications with the latest guidance about their use and safety in pregnancy. Such information is required to effectively and safely manage each stage of pregnancy in women with SLE

  1. Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can ... vessels, and brain. There are several kinds of lupus Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common ...

  2. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome: How to manage pregnancy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettrot-Imbert, G; Le Guern, V; Morel, N; Vauthier, D; Tsatsaris, V; Pannier, E; Piette, J-C; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus patients is a common situation that remains associated with higher maternal and fetal mortality/morbidity than in the general population. Complications include lupus flares, obstetrical complications (fetal loss, in utero growth retardation, prematurity) and neonatal lupus syndrome. The association with antiphospholipid antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome increases the risk of obstetrical complications. Improving the care of these pregnancies depends upon a systematic pregnancy planning, ideally during a preconception counseling visit and a multidisciplinary approach (internist/rheumatologist, obstetrician and anesthetist). The absence of lupus activity, the use of appropriate medications during pregnancy adjusted to the patient's medical history and risk factors, and a regular monitoring are the best tools for a favorable outcome for these high-risk pregnancies. The aim of this review article is to perform an update on the medical care of pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome to reduce the risk of complications and to ensure the best maternal and fetal prognosis.

  3. Relation between myocardial damage and disease activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus by exercise {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzumoto, Masayuki [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Myocardial damage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was evaluated using exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy, and the relationship between myocardial damage and disease activity of SLE was examined. Twenty-seven patients (26 women and 1 man, mean age 43 years), in whom extramural coronary artery lesions were excluded by coronary angiogram or presumed to be excluded by exercise electrocardiogram, were enrolled in this study. The mean duration of disease and the mean duration of corticosteroid therapy in these patients were 94 and 77 months, respectively. Exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed twice (mean interval, 30 months) to evaluate the progression of myocardial damage. Myocardial ischemia as an index of myocardial damage was evaluated by visual analysis and ischemic score (IS). The changes in myocardial ischemia were categorized into 3 groups: improved, unchanged or worsened. The disease activity of SLE was determined by the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), and the changes in this index were classified into the same three categories, as evaluated every six months between the two scintigraphic examinations. Disease activity was significantly correlated with myocardial ischemia (p<0.05), and with myocardial ischemia as diagnosed by {Delta}IS (difference in ischemic score between the first and second thallium-201 scintigrams: p<0.005). But neither the duration of disease nor the duration of corticosteroid therapy was correlated with IS at the first scintigraphy. These results indicate that control of SLE disease activity may be critical in the treatment of myocardial damage resulting from vascular lesions, especially intramyocardial small-artery disease, in patients with SLE. (author)

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study in African-Americans with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Americans with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Harley, M.D., Ph.D...September 2012 – 31 August 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genome-Wide Association Study in African-Americans with Systemic Lupus ...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus ( lupus ) is a potentially deadly systemic autoimmune disease that disproportionately

  5. Clinical and serological manifestations associated with interferon-α levels in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Postal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the serum levels of interferon alpha in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients, their first-degree relatives and healthy controls and to evaluate the associations between serum interferon alpha and disease activity, laboratory findings and treatment features. METHODS: We screened consecutive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients in a longitudinal cohort at the pediatric rheumatology unit of the State University of Campinas between 2009 and 2010. All patients demonstrated disease onset before the age of 16. Disease status was assessed according to the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI. Interferon alpha levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. RESULTS: We included 57 childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients (mean age 17.33±4.50, 64 firstdegree relatives (mean age 39.95±5.66, and 57 healthy (mean age 19.30±4.97 controls. Serum interferon alpha levels were significantly increased in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to their firstdegree relatives and healthy controls. Interferon alpha levels were significantly increased in patients with positive dsDNA antibodies, patients with cutaneous vasculitis, patients with new malar rash and patients who were not receiving medication. Interferon alpha levels correlated with C3 levels and systemic lupus erythematosus Disease Activity Index scores. In addition, we observed an inverse correlation between patient age and interferon alpha levels. CONCLUSION: Interferon alpha may play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus, especially in cutaneous manifestations and dsDNA antibody formation. The observation that interferon alpha levels are increased in patients who are not taking medication should be investigated in

  6. Experience of living with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhari Azad F

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease. Addition to various clinical manifestations it has spiritual, psycho-social and economic consequences. The present research was conducted aimed to describe the lived experiences of patients living with systemic lupus erythematosus.  Materials and Method: A qualitative study, using phenomenology approach was used. Ten patients with SLE who referred to rheumatology clinic in Bandar Abbas were selected through purposive sampling in 2012. Data generation was done through in-depth unstructured interview. Colaizzi's method of data analysis was used for analysis.  Results: The results of study demonstrated four main themes including Mental-emotional consequences, pain of recurrence of disease, forgotten socio-economic needs and inability to perform duties.  Conclusion: According to results, patients experience the wide range of problems and they need to take care of family and society concerning the physical aspects and receiving psychological support in psychological aspects. Because of the medical expenses and work-related disability, economic pressures propel them to dependence and challenge in meeting the needs of health care. Some of their needs remain unanswered

  7. Bone mineral density in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro T.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated spine bone mineral density (BMD in Brazilian children with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE in order to detect potential predictors of reduction in bone mass. A cross-sectional study of BMD at the lumbar spine level (L2-L4 was conducted on 16 female JSLE patients aged 6-17 years. Thirty-two age-matched healthy girls were used as control. BMD at the lumbar spine was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Weight, height and pubertal Tanner stage were determined in patients and controls. Disease duration, mean daily steroid doses, mean cumulative steroid doses and JSLE activity measured by the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI were determined for all JSLE patients based on their medical charts. All parameters were used as potential determinant factors for bone loss. Lumbar BMD tended to be lower in the JSLE patients, however, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.10. No significant correlation was observed in JSLE girls between BMD and age, height, Tanner stage, disease duration, corticosteroid use or disease activity. We found a weak correlation between BMD and weight (r = 0.672. In the JSLE group we found no significant parameters to correlate with reduced bone mass. Disease activity and mean cumulative steroid doses were not related to BMD values. We did not observe reduced bone mass in female JSLE.

  8. Occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus in a Danish community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustrup, H; Voss, A; Green, A

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and annual incidence of definite systemic lupus erythematosus (D-SLE) and incomplete SLE (I-SLE) in a community-based lupus cohort of predominantly Nordic ancestry in an 8-year prospective study from 1995 to 2003, and also to calculate the annual transition......-years at risk [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.44-7.55]. Conclusions: Denmark is a low-incidence lupus area but lupus prevalence is increasing slowly. I-SLE is a disease variant that may eventually convert into D-SLE....

  9. Novel treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, Mary; Gordon, Caroline

    2010-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is associated with the production of autoantibodies, and with considerable morbidity and mortality. There has been much interest in developing more specific therapies for this disease, which is currently managed with immunosuppressive drugs, predominantly corticosteroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide, in combination with hydroxychloroquine. Mycophenolate mofetil has been demonstrated to be as efficacious as cyclophosphamide in patients with lupus nephritis, and is being used increasingly in the clinic despite not being licensed for this indication. Novel methods of reducing autoantibody formation in SLE include the use of mAbs that modulate and/or deplete B-cells (anti-CD22 and anti-CD20 antibodies, respectively), or that interfere with the stimulatory effects of the soluble factor B-lymphocyte stimulator (anti-BLys antibodies). Alternative approaches include the use of atacicept (Merck Serono), a transmembrane activator and calcium modulator ligand interactor (TACI)-Ig fusion protein, which inhibits B-cell stimulation by binding to BLys and a profileration-inducing ligand (APRIL), or toleragens such as abetimus. Blocking costimulatory molecule interactions, such as the CD40-CD40 ligand interaction with mAbs and the CD28-B7 interaction with a soluble cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4)-IgG1 construct (abatacept), has also been attempted as a therapeutic strategy for SLE. The most promising strategy for a new drug for SLE is belimumab (Human Genome Sciences/GlaxoSmithKline), an anti-BLys antibody, as two phase III clinical trials with this drug recently met their primary endpoints. In this review, these novel approaches to the treatment of SLE, including the potential of targeting cytokine pathways involved in autoimmunity, are discussed.

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus and vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Klyukvina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the data available in the literature on the rate of hypovitaminosis D in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, analyzes the associations between the clinical and laboratory parameters of the disease and the levels of vitamin D, and considers the possibilities of the therapeutic use of its metabolites.Vitamin D deficiency is a very common pathological condition that creates prerequisites for the development of a wide range of diseases. The low serum level of vitamin D may be associated with insufficient solar exposure, genetic predisposition (vitamin D receptor polymorphism, and alimentary factors and may accompany autoimmune diseases. The very recently revealed immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D are of interest with respect to the possible implication of this hormone in the pathogenesis of autoimmune (including rheumatic diseases. A number of investigators propose to regard vitamin D as a modifying environmental factor involved in the development of autoimmune diseases. There is evidence for the association of low serum 25(ОНD levels with a risk for some rheumatic diseases (primarily rheumatoid arthritis and SLE, their activity, severity, and prognosis, which calls for further investigation. The antiresorptive, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D metabolites substantiate that the latter should be used in combination with traditional disease-modifying agents to treatchronic inflammatory diseases.

  11. Biotherapies in systemic lupus erythematosus: New targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaro, Estibaliz; Scherlinger, Marc; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Chiche, Laurent; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Blanco, Patrick; Richez, Christophe

    2016-09-20

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a polymorphic presentation. The variability in the clinical expression and severity of SLE makes new treatments both essential and challenging to develop. Several biotherapies targeting different pathophysiological pathways have been developed over the past 15 years. The results of Phase II trials were encouraging but rarely borne out by Phase III trials. Recent data, which are discussed in detail in this review, allowed belimumab - a monoclonal antibody against BLyS (B-lymphocyte stimulator) - to become the first biotherapy approved for use in SLE. Other molecules targeting B cells include the two anti-BLyS antibodies tabalumab and blisibimod; atacicept, which targets both BLyS and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand); and the monoclonal antibody to CD22 epratuzumab. The rekindling of interest in the B-cell pathway has also driven new clinical research into rituximab, a monoclonal antibody targeting CD20 with evaluations of new strategies. A new and promising approach is the use of inhibitors of the type 1 interferon (IFN) pathway, of which the most promising is anifrolumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the type 1 IFN receptor. In this review, we discuss study findings and their clinical relevance, present the most promising targets, and analyze possible explanations to negative results, such as inappropriate patient selection and treatment response criteria or the erratic use of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy.

  12. Unmet medical needs in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of diverse manifestations, with onset usually in young women in the third to fourth decade of life. The chronic nature of this relapsing remitting disease leads to organ damage accrual over time. Mortality and morbidity are increased in patients with SLE compared with the general population. Therapeutic advances over the last few decades have led to significant improvements in patient outcomes. Five-year survival has improved to over 90% from a low of 50% in the 1950s. However, multiple aspects of the management of SLE patients are still far from optimal. Early diagnosis remains a challenge; diagnostic delays leading to delay in definitive treatment are common. Monitoring treatment remains problematic due to the paucity of sensitive biomarkers. Current treatment regimens rely heavily on corticosteroids, even though corticosteroids are well known to cause organ damage. Treatment of refractory disease manifestations such as nephritis, recalcitrant cutaneous lesions and neurological involvement require new approaches with greater efficacy. Cognitive dysfunction is common in SLE patients, but early recognition and adequate treatment are yet to be established. Premature accelerated atherosclerosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Fatigue is one of the most disabling symptoms, and contributes to the poor quality of life in patients with SLE. Ongoing research in SLE faces many challenges, including enrollment of homogeneous patient populations, use of reliable outcome measures and a standard control arm. The current review will highlight some of the outstanding unmet challenges in the management of this complex disease. PMID:23281889

  13. Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelowo, O O; Olaosebikan, B H; Animashaun, B A; Akintayo, R O

    2017-03-01

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) is a complex multisystemic autoimmune disorder of unknown cause. It accounts for about one in five cases of SLE. The tendency for SLE to run a fulminant course when it starts in childhood has made JSLE a potentially more severe disease than adult SLE. Reports of JSLE from sub-Saharan Africa are scanty in spite of the increasing reports of adult SLE. We conducted a 4-year retrospective study of JSLE cases seen at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital between January 2010 and December 2014. Out of the 12 patients studied, eight were girls and four were boys. All patients had positive antinuclear antibody and extractable nuclear antibody tests. Anti-dsDNA antibody was positive in 10 patients. Eight patients had renal disease while four patients had neuropsychiatric manifestations. Haematological abnormalities and constitutional symptoms were present in all patients. Patients were treated with pulse methylprednisolone, oral prednisolone, hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine. Three patients also received rituximab. In conclusion, JSLE exists in Nigeria and exhibits clinical and immunological characteristics similar to its pattern in other parts of the world. It is, however, diagnosed late and is possibly being underdiagnosed as there is no paediatric rheumatologist in the country.

  14. Achados capilaroscópicos no lúpus eritematoso Capillaroscopy findings in lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria da Silva Facina

    2006-12-01

    and 33 with systemic lupus erythematosus were studied by the technique of capillary microscopy and compared to 32 controls. RESULTS: The presence of ectatic (p=0.027; p=0.001, meandering (p=0.001; p=0.007, corkscrew capillaries (p=0.011; p=0.005 and nailfold bleeding (p=0.004; p=0.001 distinguished between the two groups of patients (chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus from controls. The variable meandering loops could be predictive for systemic lupus erythematosus (OR=8.308. The independent variables ectatic loops (OR=12.164 end nailfold bleedings (OR=5.652 were predictive for chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus. CONCLUSIONS: Capillaroscopy can help in the management of patients, since the presence of typical capillaroscopic abnormalities seems to be related to the development of lupus erythematosus. The independent predictive variables for systemic lupus erythematosus were meandering loops, and, for chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus, ectasic loops and nailfold bleedings.

  15. Pregnancy complications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Helene; Jacobsen, Søren; Tvede, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis had two pregnancies which both resulted in complications known to be associated with SLE, i.e. late abortion, preterm delivery and pre-eclampsia. We conclude that disease quiescence is important for a successful outcome...

  16. [Pregnancy complications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisgaard, Helene; Jacobsen, Søren; Tvede, Niels; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2014-07-14

    A woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis had two pregnancies which both resulted in complications known to be associated with SLE, i.e. late abortion, preterm delivery and pre-eclampsia. We conclude that disease quiescence is important for a successful outcome and that pregnant women with SLE should be followed in a multidisciplinary setting.

  17. Graviditetskomplikationer hos en patient med systemisk lupus erythematosus og lupus nefritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Helene; Jacobsen, Søren; Tvede, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis had two pregnancies which both resulted in complications known to be associated with SLE, i.e. late abortion, preterm delivery and pre-eclampsia. We conclude that disease quiescence is important for a successful outcome...

  18. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Akyol, Lütfi; Önem, Soner; Özgen, Metin; Sayarlıoğlu, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by several immunological abnormalities. We wish to communicate the case of a patient with SLE and lupus nephritis (LN) who developed pseudothrombocytopenia. Pseudothrombocytopenia can occur in patients with SLE and LN and should be considered when diagnosing patients with thrombocytopenia without bleeding.

  19. Lenalidomide for refractory cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, E Y; Schanberg, L E; Wershba, E C; Rabinovich, C E

    2017-05-01

    Objective Cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus cause significant morbidity. Lenalidomide, a thalidomide analogue, has shown promise treating cutaneous lupus erythematosus in adults. Our objective was to evaluate lenalidomide's efficacy and safety in treating refractory cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 10 adolescents who received lenalidomide for recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Information was gathered at drug initiation and 6-month follow-up. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test was used to assess change in quantitative parameters of disease activity. Results Nine subjects were girls and six were African-American. Indications for lenalidomide treatment included alopecia, nasal and oral ulcers, extensive malar rash, discoid lesions, bullous lesions, panniculitis, cutaneous vasculitis, and Raynaud's phenomenon with digital ulcerations. Within 6 months, all patients demonstrated complete or near resolution based on physician report. Prednisone dose decreased from a mean 23.5 mg (SD± 13.3) to 12.25 mg (SD± 9.2) ( P= 0.008). Sedimentation rate decreased from a mean 29 mm/hour (SD± 31.5) to 17 mm/hour (SD± 18.1) ( P= 0.004). Lenalidomide was well tolerated. Conclusion Lenalidomide is an effective and safe treatment for a spectrum of dermatological conditions in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Its use may allow a reduction in prednisone dose and decreased disfigurement. Prospective study is needed to clarify lenalidomide's role in treating cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  20. Netting Neutrophils Are Major Inducers of Type I IFN Production in Pediatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Romo, Gina S; Caielli, Simone; Vega, Barbara; Connolly, John; Allantaz, Florence; Xu, Zhaohui; PUNARO, MARILYNN; Baisch, Jeanine; Guiducci, Cristiana; Coffman, Robert L.; Barrat, Franck J.; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by a breakdown of tolerance to nuclear antigens and the development of immune complexes. Genomic approaches have shown that human SLE leukocytes homogeneously express type I interferon (IFN)–induced and neutrophil-related transcripts. Increased production and/or bioavailability of IFN-α and associated alterations in dendritic cell (DC) homeostasis have been linked to lupus pathogenesis. Although neutrophils have...

  1. Gastrointestinal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus:Insight into pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of a plethora of autoantibodies and immune complex formation. Virtually every system and organ can be affected by SLE. Gastrointestinal symptoms are com-mon in SLE patients, and more than half of them are caused by adverse reactions to medications and viral or bacterial infections. Though not as common as lu-pus nephritis, SLE-related gastrointestinal involvement is clinically important because most cases ...

  2. Suppressor cell hyperactivity relative to allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation as a manifestation of defective T-T-cell interactions in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenina, M.A.; Potapova, A.A.; Biryukov, A.V.; Skripnik, A.Yu.; Cheredeev, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the state of immunoregulatory process in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus at the T-T-cell interaction level and seek to test the possibility of the pharmacological modulation of this process. The proliferative activity of mononuclear lymphocytes, extracted from the blood of ten lupus patients, was assessed by measuring the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into cultures stimulated by phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin, and theophylline. The comparative effects of each of these agents on the immunoregulatory and proliferative activity of the lymphocytes are reported.

  3. Extracellular Vesicles as Biomarkers of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Perez-Hernandez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women and typically manifests in multiple organs. The damage caused by this disorder is characterized by a chronic inflammatory state. Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including microvesicles (also known as microparticles, apoptotic bodies, and exosomes, are recognized vehicles of intercellular communication, carrying autoantigens, cytokines, and surface receptors. Therefore, the evidence of EVs and their cargo as biomarkers of autoimmune disease is rapidly expanding. This review will focus on biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, their pathophysiological roles, and their potential as biomarkers and therapeutics in inflammatory disease, especially in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  5. Gastrointestinal system manifestations in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Hafize Emine; Karhan, Asuman Nur; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Bilginer, Yelda; Gümüş, Ersin; Demir, Hülya; Yüce, Aysel; Özen, Seza

    2017-02-16

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease which may involve gastrointestinal system (GIS). The aim of this study was to present GIS manifestations of pediatric SLE patients. The medical files of 69 children with SLE followed between January 2011 and January 2016 were reviewed. All fulfilled the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics criteria. All patients (≤18 years of age) with GIS manifestations were included. GIS manifestations were observed in 19 (27.5%) out of 69 SLE patients and present at the time of SLE diagnosis in 13 (68.4%). The GIS manifestations due to SLE were autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) (n = 8) and lupus enteritis (n = 1). Manifestations associated with SLE were hepatomegaly and hypertransaminasemia due to macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) (n = 3) and hepatic steatosis (n = 1). GIS manifestations as a result of the adverse events of drugs were as follows: toxic hepatitis (n = 3; associated with methotrexate and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in one, methotrexate in another, and azathioprine in another patient), azathioprine-induced cholestatic hepatitis (n = 1), and gastritis associated with corticosteroid (n = 1). In one patient, acute appendicitis occurred as a coincidence. In this study, one of every five pediatric SLE patients had GIS-related manifestations. GIS involvement may occur as an initial manifestation of the disease.

  6. Post-partum bilateral renal cortical necrosis in antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkat Sainaresh Vellanki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus or related autoimmune disorders, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is termed secondary APS. Pregnancy-related renal failure due to SAPS is rarely reported in the literature. We present the case of a young primgravida woman with bilateral renal cortical necrosis due to secondary APS in late pregnancy.

  7. Review of classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Michelle

    2005-05-01

    The American College of Rheumatology classification criteria were devised in 1982. In 1997, the immunologic disorder criterion was revised by a committee (without validation). All 11 criteria in the American College of Rheumatology criteria set have limitations. One of the most important laboratory tests, hypocomplementemia, was excluded entirely. Other classification criteria, emphasizing weighting or recursive partitioning, exist, but they are more cumbersome. Revised criteria are needed, not just for systemic lupus erythematosus, but also for chronic cutaneous lupus.

  8. B cell depleting therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Jónsdóttir, Thórunn

    2009-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by multiple organ involvement, production of a wide range of autoantibodies and local formation or tissue deposition of immune complexes in the affected organs. Lupus nephritis (LN) is a common and serious organ involvement in patients with SLE. Despite better treatment and care of patients during the last decades there is still a great unmet need in the treatment with many patients...

  9. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have higher prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Pan

    Full Text Available Thyroid autoimmunity is considered the most common type of organ-specific autoimmune disorder and can be associated with other autoimmune endocrine disorders or non-endocrine diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a prototypical autoimmune disorder with multifactorial etiology. The pathogenesis and development of the disease may result from a loss of immune tolerance and the resulting synthesis of autoantibodies against nuclear antigens. Autoimmune factors may be common features of both thyroid autoimmunity and systemic lupus erythematosus, making it likely that both conditions may coexist within some patients.A number of studies have investigated whether an association between thyroid autoimmunity and systemic lupus erythematosus exists. However, the results of these studies have been inconsistent. Furthermore, most of these studies have had relatively small sample sizes, which have rendered them insufficiently powerful to determine whether there is an association between systemic lupus erythematosus and thyroid autoimmunity. The main objective of this meta-analysis is to provide reliable estimates of the extent of any association between thyroid autoimmunity and systemic lupus erythematosus by combining the primary data from all relevant studies. Literature databases were searched, including the Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Chinese Wanfang and CBM databases, from January 1970 to May 2014. A total of 1076 systemic lupus erythematosus cases and 1661 healthy controls were included in this study. From these data, the odds ratio (OR and the corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI were calculated. The meta-analysis results showed that the prevalence of thyroid autoantibody positivity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus was higher than in healthy controls (TgAb: OR = 2.99, 95% CI = 1.83-4.89; TPOAb: OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.27-3.82, respectively.The results of this meta-analysis suggest that thyroid autoimmunity is more prevalent

  10. Validation of the LupusPRO in Chinese patients from Hong Kong with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Chi Chiu; Kosinski, Mark; Ho, Ling Yin; Chan, Kar Li; Jolly, Meenakshi

    2015-02-01

    LupusPRO is a disease-targeted, patient-reported outcome (PRO) measure that was developed and validated for assessment of quality of life in US patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We present results of adapting the LupusPRO into Chinese and testing its psychometric properties in Chinese patients with SLE. LupusPRO was translated into "traditional" Chinese, followed by pretesting among native Cantonese Chinese speakers. The translation version was revised based on the feedback obtained. The Chinese language LupusPRO tool was administered along with a generic PRO tool (the Short Form 36 health survey [SF-36]) to ethnic Chinese SLE patients. At the same time, demographic information, clinical data, disease activity (Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment [SELENA] version of the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index [SLEDAI]), and damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index [SDI]) were obtained. We performed confirmatory factor analysis of the Chinese LupusPRO and evaluated internal consistency reliability, as well as convergent and criterion validity. Among the 463 SLE patients (95% women) with a mean ± SD age of 42.3 ± 13.5 years, the mean ± SD physician global assessment score was 0.48 ± 0.45, the mean ± SD SELENA-SLEDAI score was 2.9 ± 3.0, and the mean ± SD SDI score was 0.7 ± 1.2. Results of factor analysis conformed to the original LupusPRO model with only minor modifications. The reliability of the LupusPRO domains ranged from 0.60-0.94. LupusPRO domains had correlations as expected with the corresponding SF-36 domains. A significant but weak correlation with disease activity was noted for criterion validity as expected. The Chinese language LupusPRO has fair psychometric properties and may be used in SLE clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus associated with Wells' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Geng; Xie, Qibing

    2012-04-01

    Wells' syndrome is a multifaceted dermatosis with a wide morphological spectrum, ranging from characteristic cellulitis-like erythema and papula to an unusual presentation of vesicles and pustules. The most important elements for diagnosis are erythemal plaques and histological picture of eosinophilic infiltration of the dermis with 'flame figures' (Plotz et al., in Hautarzt 51:182-186, 2000). Because of its original description as a distinct entity, it has come to be regarded as an abnormal eosinophilic response to a number of causative agents such as herpes simplex virus 2(HSV-2) and toxocara (Ludwig et al., in J Am Acad Dermatol 48:S60-S61, 2003; Bassukas et al., in Cases J 1:356, 2008). Concurrence of WS and malignant diseases as colon cancer, trachea squamous carcinoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma or angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy has been reported (Hirsch et al., in J Dtsch Dermatol Ges 3:530-531, 2005; Renner et al., in Acta Derm Venereol 87:525-528, 2007). Autoimmune diseases, including Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are multi-system disorders of unknown cause and are commonly characterized by protean cutaneous manifestations. To date, few autoimmne disease was found associated with WS except four previous reports of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) and one case of ulcerative colitis (Fujimoto et al., in Clin Exp Dermatol, 2010; Sakaria et al., in J Gastroenterol 42:250-252, 2007). The coexistence of SLE and WS in one patient was not found in literature and our case is the first. Here we described the rare combination and discussed the treatment strategy for this condition.

  12. Bone Marrow Involvement in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalayer, Emilie; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Ninet, Jacques; Durupt, Stephane; Tebib, Jacques; Asli, Bouchra; Lambotte, Olivier; Ffrench, Martine; Vasselon, Christian; Cathébras, Pascal

    2017-05-19

    Besides peripheral cytopenias, bone marrow abnormalities, such as fibrosis, pure red cell aplasia, and aplastic anemia have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), suggesting that bone marrow may be a target organ in SLE. Our objective was to describe this bone marrow involvement. This registry is a nationwide retrospective study. Centers provided data concerning medical history, SLE manifestations, type of hematologic disorder, treatments and outcome. Bone marrow aspirations and/or biopsies were transferred for centralized review. Thirty patients from 19 centers were included. Central hematologic manifestations comprised bone marrow fibrosis (n=17; 57%), pure red cell aplasia (n=8; 27%), myelodysplastic syndrome (n=3; 10%), aplastic anemia and agranulocytosis (n=1; 3% each). Bone marrow involvement was diagnosed concomitantly with SLE in 12 patients. Bone marrow biopsies showed fibrosis in 19 cases, including one case of pure red cell aplasia and one case of agranulocytosis and variable global marrow cellularity. Treatments included corticosteroids (90%), hydroxychloroquine (87%), rituximab (33%), intravenous immunoglobulins (30%), mycophenolate mofetil (20%) and ciclosporine (20%). After a median follow-up of 27 months (range: 1-142), 24 patients manifested complete improvement. No patient died. This registry comprises the largest series of SLE patients with bone marrow involvement. It demonstrates the strong link between SLE and bone marrow fibrosis. Patients with atypical or refractory cytopenia associated with SLE should undergo bone marrow examination to enable appropriate, and often effective, treatment. Long-term prognosis is good. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Relationship between health-related quality of life, disease activity and disease damage in a prospective international multicenter cohort of childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, L N; Baldino, M E; Kurra, V; Puwar, D; Llanos, A; Peterson, M G E; Hassett, A L; Lehman, T J A

    2017-03-01

    Previously, we described associations between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and disease-related factors among childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) patients. Here we determined the relationship between HRQOL, disease activity and damage in a large prospective international cohort of cSLE. We compared HRQOL, disease activity and disease damage across different continents and examined the relationship between children's and parents' assessments of HRQOL. Patients with cSLE and their parents completed HRQOL measures at enrollment and ≥4 follow-up visits. Physicians assessed disease activity and damage. The multinational cohort ( n = 467) had relatively low disease activity and damage. Patient and parent HRQOL scores were significantly correlated. Asian and European patients had the highest HRQOL, while South and North American patients had lower HRQOL scores. Renal, CNS, skin and musculoskeletal systems exhibited the highest levels of damage. North and South American and Asian patients were more likely to have disease damage and activity scores above median values, compared with Europeans. Asians were more likely to use cyclophosphamide/rituximab. Female gender, high disease activity and damage, non-White ethnicity, and use of cyclophosphamide and/rituximab were related to lower HRQOL. HRQOL domain scores continue to emphasize that SLE has widespread impact on all aspects of children's and parents' lives.

  14. Characteristics related to early secondary amenorrhoea and pregnancy among women diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus: an analysis using the GOAL study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jessica H; Howards, Penelope P; Spencer, Jessica B; Tsagaris, Katina C; Lim, Sam S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disproportionately affects women and often develops during their reproductive years. Research suggests that some women who receive cyclophosphamide as treatment for SLE experience earlier decline in menstrual function, but reproductive health among women with SLE who have not taken this drug is less well understood. This study aims to better understand the relation between SLE and reproduction by assessing early secondary amenorrhoea and pregnancy in women treated with and without cyclophosphamide from a population-based cohort with large numbers of African-Americans. Methods Female patients with SLE, ages 20–40 at time of diagnosis, who were 40 years or older at the time of the survey were included in this analysis (N=147). Participants in the Georgians Organized Against Lupus (GOAL) study were asked about their reproductive histories including early secondary amenorrhoea, defined as loss of menstruation before age 40. Results Women who were cyclophosphamide naïve had an increased prevalence of early secondary amenorrhoea compared with population estimates, 13–17% compared with 1–5%. Factors associated with early secondary amenorrhoea in women not treated with cyclophosphamide were marital status and receipt of a kidney transplant. Treatment with cyclophosphamide doubled the prevalence after adjustment for patient characteristics. Over 88% of women reported being pregnant at least once, and about 83% of these had a child, but the majority of pregnancies occurred before diagnosis. Conclusions SLE diagnosed in early adulthood may affect women's reproductive health even if they are not treated with cyclophosphamide. Better understanding of other factors related to reproductive health in this population will improve clinicians' and patients' abilities to make treatment and family planning decisions. PMID:27752335

  15. Pulmonary arterial hypertension as a manifestation of lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, P.; Sargent, E.N.; Boylen, T.; Jaramillo, D.

    1987-08-01

    We present five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed pulmonary arterial hypertension and cor pulmonale in the course of their disease. The clinical features, as well as, the radiological manifestations of this rare manifestation of SLE are discussed. A vasculitic process is the most likely cause of this complication. Therapy is ineffective and the prognosis is poor.

  16. Influenza vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus : Safe and protective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, Bert; Huckriede, Anke; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show decreased immune responsiveness and are vulnerable for infectious diseases, due to the underlying disease and the frequent use of immunosuppressive drugs. Influenza has a high incidence in the population and is associated with increased morbidity

  17. Aquaporin-4-autoimmunity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, Nasrin; Jarius, Sven; Laustrup, Helle

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum immunoglobulin G targeting the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in the central nervous system (CNS) is a biomarker for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disease (NMOSD). Co-existence of NMOSD with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) putatively suggests susceptibility to ant...

  18. Acute Pancreatitis as the Initial Presentation of Systematic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Jia; Arleen Ortiz; Richard Mccallum; Hasan Salameh; Pedro Serrato

    2014-01-01

    Systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease, including the gastrointestinal system in about half of SLE patients. As a rare complication of SLE, acute pancreatitis presents as generalized flare-ups in most cases of patients previously diagnosed with SLE. Here we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation with later diagnosis of SLE.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis as the Initial Presentation of Systematic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multisystem disease, including the gastrointestinal system in about half of SLE patients. As a rare complication of SLE, acute pancreatitis presents as generalized flare-ups in most cases of patients previously diagnosed with SLE. Here we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation with later diagnosis of SLE.

  20. Transancestral mapping and genetic load in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langefeld, Carl D; Ainsworth, Hannah C; Graham, Deborah S Cunninghame

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with marked gender and ethnic disparities. We report a large transancestral association study of SLE using Immunochip genotype data from 27,574 individuals of European (EA), African (AA) and Hispanic Amerindian (HA) ancestry. We identify...

  1. Circulating surfactant protein D is decreased in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, Silje Vermedal; Voss, Anne; Sorensen, Grith Lykke

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Deficiencies of innate immune molecules like mannan binding lectin (MBL) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Surfactant protein D (SP-D) and MBL belong to the same family of innate immune molecules - the collectins, which share important...

  2. Crusted scabies in a chid with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurimar C.F. Wanke

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available A child with systemic lupus erythematosus who has been treated with prednisone for three years, developed crusted scabies. Scrapings from lesions revealed Sarcoptes scabiei adult mites mad eggs. The patient died with septicemia and renal failure soon after starting topical 20% sulfur. A marked improvement was observed in the cutaneous lesions.

  3. Treat-to-target in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosca, Marta; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-01-01

    on May 8, 2012 to discuss whether a treat-to-target approach could be applied in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (T2T/SLE), define a research agenda, and establish a plan for moving forward. In the present paper, observations raised at the meeting and literature data on potential...

  4. Systemic lupus erythematosus: A possible cause of non-alcoholic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a young woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and an ... The clinical triad of mild confusion, ataxia and ophthalmoplegia also raised ... The diagnosis of WE was further supported by the magnetic resonance imaging features. ... Gastrointestinal manifestations of SLE are described as being common in ...

  5. Treat-to-target in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosca, Marta; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-01-01

    on May 8, 2012 to discuss whether a treat-to-target approach could be applied in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (T2T/SLE), define a research agenda, and establish a plan for moving forward. In the present paper, observations raised at the meeting and literature data on potential...

  6. Transancestral mapping and genetic load in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langefeld, Carl D.; Ainsworth, Hannah C.; Graham, Deborah S. Cunninghame; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; Howard, Timothy D.; Ramos, Paula S.; Croker, Jennifer A.; Morris, David L.; Sandling, Johanna K.; Almlof, Jonas Carlsson; Acevedo-Vasquez, Eduardo M.; Alarcon, Graciela S.; Babini, Alejandra M.; Baca, Vicente; Bengtsson, Anders A.; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; Bijl, Marc; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Brunner, Hermine I.; Cardiel, Mario H.; Catoggio, Luis; Cervera, Ricard; Cucho-Venegas, Jorge M.; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapaa; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Da Silva, Berta Martins; de la Rua Figueroa, Inigo; Doria, Andrea; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Endreffy, Emoke; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A.; Fortin, Paul R.; Freedman, Barry I.; Frostegard, Johan; Garcia, Mercedes A.; Garcia de la Torre, Ignacio; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gunnarsson, Iva; Guthridge, Joel M.; Huggins, Jennifer L.; James, Judith A.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Kamen, Diane L.; Karp, David R.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kottyan, Leah C.; Kovacs, Laszlo; Laustrup, Helle; Lauwerys, Bernard R.; Li, Quan-Zhen; Maradiaga-Cecena, Marco A.; Martin, Javier; McCune, Joseph M.; McWilliams, David R.; Merrill, Joan T.; Miranda, Pedro; Moctezuma, Jose F.; Nath, Swapan K.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Orozco, Lorena; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Petri, Michelle; Pineau, Christian A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Pope, Janet; Raj, Prithvi; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D.; Russell, Laurie P.; Sabio, Jose M.; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Scorza, Raffaella; Seldin, Michael F.; Sjowall, Christopher; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Thompson, Susan D.; Toloza, Sergio M. A.; Truedsson, Lennart; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Vila, Luis M.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Weisman, Michael H.; Wither, Joan E.; Bhangale, Tushar; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Rioux, John D.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Ronnblom, Lars; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Tsao, Betty P.; Schanberg, Laura E.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Silverman, Earl D.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Harley, John B.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Graham, Robert R.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with marked gender and ethnic disparities. We report a large transancestral association study of SLE using Immunochip genotype data from 27,574 individuals of European (EA), African (AA) and Hispanic Amerindian (HA) ancestry. We identify 58

  7. Acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation of systematic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Ortiz, Arleen; Mccallum, Richard; Salameh, Hasan; Serrato, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease, including the gastrointestinal system in about half of SLE patients. As a rare complication of SLE, acute pancreatitis presents as generalized flare-ups in most cases of patients previously diagnosed with SLE. Here we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation with later diagnosis of SLE.

  8. Severity of dry eye syndrome is related to anti-dsDNA autoantibody in systemic lupus erythematosus patients without secondary Sjogren syndrome: A cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alexander; Chen, Hung-Ta; Hwang, Yih-Hsiou; Chen, Yi-Tsun; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2016-07-01

    There are as many as one-third of the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients who suffer from dry eye syndrome. To this date, dry eye syndrome in SLE patients is believed to be caused by secondary Sjogren syndrome (sSS). However, there is increasing evidence for possible independency of dry eye syndrome and sSS in patients suffering from autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this retrospective observational case series was to identify SLE patients without sSS who had dry eye syndrome, examine the correlation of different autoantibodies and dry eye severity, and determine the cause of dry eye in these patients.We included 49 consecutive SLE patients with dry eye who visited our dry eye clinic. In order to rule out sSS, these patients were all negative for anti-Sjogren's-syndrome-related antigen A and B (anti-SSA/SSB) and had no oral symptoms. Each patient's lupus activity was determined by serological tests including antidouble-stranded DNA antibody (anti-dsDNA), complement levels (C3, C4), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and antinuclear antibody (ANA). Severity of dry eye syndrome was determined by corneal sensation (KSen), superficial punctuate keratopathy (SPK), Schirmer-I test (Schirmer), and tear film break-up time (TBUT). The autoantibodies and the dry eye parameters in each group were tested using the χ test or the Mann-Whitney U test for normally distributed or skewed data, respectively.The anti-dsDNA showed significant correlations with KSen (P syndrome in SLE patients without sSS was strongly correlated with anti-dsDNA and C3 but not with C4, ESR, and ANA.

  9. Severity of dry eye syndrome is related to anti-dsDNA autoantibody in systemic lupus erythematosus patients without secondary Sjogren syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alexander; Chen, Hung-Ta; Hwang, Yih-Hsiou; Chen, Yi-Tsun; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There are as many as one-third of the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients who suffer from dry eye syndrome. To this date, dry eye syndrome in SLE patients is believed to be caused by secondary Sjogren syndrome (sSS). However, there is increasing evidence for possible independency of dry eye syndrome and sSS in patients suffering from autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this retrospective observational case series was to identify SLE patients without sSS who had dry eye syndrome, examine the correlation of different autoantibodies and dry eye severity, and determine the cause of dry eye in these patients. We included 49 consecutive SLE patients with dry eye who visited our dry eye clinic. In order to rule out sSS, these patients were all negative for anti-Sjogren's-syndrome-related antigen A and B (anti-SSA/SSB) and had no oral symptoms. Each patient's lupus activity was determined by serological tests including antidouble-stranded DNA antibody (anti-dsDNA), complement levels (C3, C4), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and antinuclear antibody (ANA). Severity of dry eye syndrome was determined by corneal sensation (KSen), superficial punctuate keratopathy (SPK), Schirmer-I test (Schirmer), and tear film break-up time (TBUT). The autoantibodies and the dry eye parameters in each group were tested using the χ2 test or the Mann–Whitney U test for normally distributed or skewed data, respectively. The anti-dsDNA showed significant correlations with KSen (P syndrome in SLE patients without sSS was strongly correlated with anti-dsDNA and C3 but not with C4, ESR, and ANA. PMID:27428227

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus, pregnancy and carcinoma of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Jeffrey David; Baldwin, Andrew; Byrd, Louise

    2013-05-31

    We present a case which describes a 29-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus who was treated aggressively with cytotoxic immunosuppression. Five years later and approximately 12 weeks pregnant, she is confirmed as having carcinoma of the tongue. Not wishing to consider termination of her pregnancy, she underwent surgical resection, which included partial glossectomy with microvascular reconstruction. Good oral function (speech and swallowing) was restored within 2 weeks. The pregnancy proceeded relatively uneventfully to 37 weeks gestation when proteinuric hypertension necessitated induction of labour. She remains well with no evidence of recurrence. This case highlights the options available in the treatment of carcinoma of the tongue during pregnancy together with the ethical considerations required, balanced against optimising maternal outcomes.

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns.

  13. The Real Culprit in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Abnormal Epigenetic Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijing Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease involving multiple organs and the presence of anti-nuclear antibodies. The pathogenesis of SLE has been intensively studied but remains far from clear. B and T lymphocyte abnormalities, dysregulation of apoptosis, defects in the clearance of apoptotic materials, and various genetic and epigenetic factors are attributed to the development of SLE. The latest research findings point to the association between abnormal epigenetic regulation and SLE, which has attracted considerable interest worldwide. It is the purpose of this review to present and discuss the relationship between aberrant epigenetic regulation and SLE, including DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs in patients with SLE, the possible mechanisms of immune dysfunction caused by epigenetic changes, and to better understand the roles of aberrant epigenetic regulation in the initiation and development of SLE and to provide an insight into the related therapeutic options in SLE.

  14. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki and others

    1988-09-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis.

  15. Total lymphoid irradiation in refractory systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Gross, D.J.; Braverman, A.; Weshler, Z.; Fuks, Z.; Slavin, S.; Eliakim, M.

    1986-07-01

    In two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, conventional therapy was considered to have failed because of persistent disease activity and unacceptable side effects. Both were treated with total lymphoid irradiation without clinical benefit, despite adequate immunosuppression as documented by markedly reduced numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte-dependent proliferative responses in vitro. The first patient developed herpes zoster, gram-negative septicemia, neurologic symptoms, and deterioration of lupus nephritis. The second patient developed massive bronchopneumonia, necrotic cutaneous lesions, and progressive nephritis and died 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. These observations, although limited to two patients, indicate that total lymphoid irradiation in patients with severe systemic lupus erythematosus should be regarded as strictly experimental.

  16. Incidence of cervical human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Pinto, C; García-Carrasco, M; Vallejo-Ruiz, V; Méndez-Martínez, S; Taboada-Cole, A; Etchegaray-Morales, I; Muñóz-Guarneros, M; Reyes-Leyva, J; López-Colombo, A

    2017-08-01

    Objectives Our objective was to study the incidence, persistence and clearance of human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women and assess risk factors for persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Methods We carried out a prospective, observational cohort study of 127 systemic lupus erythematosus women. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at three years. Traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus women-related disease risk factors were collected. Gynaecological evaluations and cervical cytology screening were made. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were made by polymerase chain reaction and linear array. Results The cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection increased from 22.8% at baseline to 33.8% at three years; p = systemic lupus erythematosus women, the cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, including high risk-human papillomavirus and multiple human papillomavirus infections, may increase over time. Most persistent infections were low risk-human papillomavirus. The number of lifetime sexual partners and the cumulative cyclophosphamide dose were independently associated with incident human papillomavirus infection.

  17. Childhood systemic lupus erythematosus in Sultanate of Oman: demographics and clinical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdwani, R; Rizvi, S G; El-Nour, I

    2008-07-01

    There is a worldwide variation in the incidence of childhood manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus, which may be related to environmental, genetic and geographical factors. The aim of the study is to describe for the first time the clinical and immunological characteristics of childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus at diagnosis in the Sultanate of Oman. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 50 children with systemic lupus erythematosus fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria between 1990 and 2006. There were 42 girls and eight boys. The mean age of disease onset was low at 8.6 years (SD 3.1). The female:male ratio was 5.3:1. The most frequent clinical manifestations at initial diagnosis were: articular (76%), cutaneous (70%), haematological (68%) and renal (64%) dominated by class IV nephritis, pulmonary (26%), neuropsychiatric (18%) and cardiac (10%). A positive antinuclear antibody (>1:80) was present in 94% at diagnosis. Positive anti-double stranded DNA was present in 82% and low complement levels were present in 84% at diagnosis. This is the first review of childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus in the Sultanate of Oman.

  18. Deranged Bioenergetics and Defective Redox Capacity in T Lymphocytes and Neutrophils Are Related to Cellular Dysfunction and Increased Oxidative Stress in Patients with Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Jen Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary excretion of N-benzoyl-glycyl-Nε-(hexanonyllysine, a biomarker of oxidative stress, was higher in 26 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE than in 11 non-SLE patients with connective tissue diseases and in 14 healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress in active SLE might be attributable to deranged bioenergetics, defective reduction-oxidation (redox capacity, or other factors. We demonstrated that, compared to normal cells, T lymphocytes (T and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN of active SLE showed defective expression of facilitative glucose transporters GLUT-3 and GLUT-6, which led to increased intracellular basal lactate and decreased ATP production. In addition, the redox capacity, including intracellular GSH levels and the enzyme activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT, was decreased in SLE-T. Compared to normal cells, SLE-PMN showed decreased intracellular GSH levels, and GGT enzyme activity was found in SLE-PMN and enhanced expression of CD53, a coprecipitating molecule for GGT. We conclude that deranged cellular bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T and PMN are responsible for cellular immune dysfunction and are related to increased oxidative stress in active SLE patients.

  19. [Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (1st part). Cases definitions and diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system and psychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, G; Zéphir, H; Warembourg, F; Michelin, E; Pruvo, J-P; Hachulla, E; Semah, F; Dubucquoi, S; Lenfant, P; Vermersch, P; Hatron, P-Y; Prin, L; Launay, D

    2012-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease, which primarily affects skin and joints. Peripheral neurologic syndrome and central nervous system (CNS) manifestations are common in lupus patients but are not always attributable to lupus itself. A classification, published in 1999 by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) research committee, described 12 CNS syndromes and seven peripheral neurologic syndromes compatible with "neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus" (NPSLE). Despite this consensus, studies which have been published since 1999 have reported a prevalence of NPSLE varying from 20 to 97 %, which shows the diagnosis difficulty and the heterogeneity of neuropsychiatric manifestations in SLE. In order to understand the limits of this classification, we propose in this first part an exhaustive review of publications describing neuropsychiatric manifestations according to the ACR 1999 classification. We also detail case definitions, prevalence and risk factors, clinical characteristics and diagnosis of each lupus-related psychiatric and CNS manifestation. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiovascular Events in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Rúa-Figueroa, Íñigo; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Galindo-Izquierdo, María; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Olivé-Marqués, Alejandro; Ordóñez-Cañizares, Carmen; Martín-Martínez, María A.; Blanco, Ricardo; Melero-González, Rafael; Ibáñez-Rúan, Jesús; Bernal-Vidal, José Antonio; Tomero-Muriel, Eva; Uriarte-Isacelaya, Esther; Horcada-Rubio, Loreto; Freire-González, Mercedes; Narváez, Javier; Boteanu, Alina L.; Santos-Soler, Gregorio; Andreu, José L.; Pego-Reigosa, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article estimates the frequency of cardiovascular (CV) events that occurred after diagnosis in a large Spanish cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and investigates the main risk factors for atherosclerosis. RELESSER is a nationwide multicenter, hospital-based registry of SLE patients. This is a cross-sectional study. Demographic and clinical variables, the presence of traditional risk factors, and CV events were collected. A CV event was defined as a myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, and/or peripheral artery disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the possible risk factors for atherosclerosis. From 2011 to 2012, 3658 SLE patients were enrolled. Of these, 374 (10.9%) patients suffered at least a CV event. In 269 (7.4%) patients, the CV events occurred after SLE diagnosis (86.2% women, median [interquartile range] age 54.9 years [43.2–66.1], and SLE duration of 212.0 months [120.8–289.0]). Strokes (5.7%) were the most frequent CV event, followed by ischemic heart disease (3.8%) and peripheral artery disease (2.2%). Multivariate analysis identified age (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.03 [1.02–1.04]), hypertension (1.71 [1.20–2.44]), smoking (1.48 [1.06–2.07]), diabetes (2.2 [1.32–3.74]), dyslipidemia (2.18 [1.54–3.09]), neurolupus (2.42 [1.56–3.75]), valvulopathy (2.44 [1.34–4.26]), serositis (1.54 [1.09–2.18]), antiphospholipid antibodies (1.57 [1.13–2.17]), low complement (1.81 [1.12–2.93]), and azathioprine (1.47 [1.04–2.07]) as risk factors for CV events. We have confirmed that SLE patients suffer a high prevalence of premature CV disease. Both traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to this higher prevalence. Although it needs to be verified with future studies, our study also shows—for the first time—an association between diabetes and CV events in SLE patients. PMID:26200625

  1. Cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: pooled analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wenjie; Chen, Min; Liu, Jia; Hagen, Ferry; Ms, Abdullah; Al-Hatmi; Zhang, Peilian; Guo, Yun; Boekhout, Teun; Deng, Danqi; Xu, Jianping; Pan, Weihua; Liao, Wanqing

    2016-09-07

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an important fungal infection among systemic lupus erythematosus patients. We conducted a pooled analysis and systematic review to describe the epidemiological and clinical profile of cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. From two hospitals in China and nine literature databases, cases and prevalence data were collected for pooled analysis and meta-analysis, respectively. Categorical variables of cases were compared using a χ(2)-test on the statistical program of SAS. A multiple regression analysis was performed to ascertain independent predictors significantly correlated with prognosis. Meta-analysis was conducted by the statistical program of R. The prevalence of cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients was 0.5%. Patients were predominantly females and adults. A prednisone equivalent of more than 30 mg/day before infection was associated with higher mortality (odds ratio (OR)=9.69 (1.54, 60.73)). In all, 36.8-38.9% patients showed low lupus activity when they developed the crytococcal infection. Moreover, 38.2% of the patients were misdiagnosed. The estimated case-fatality rate was 23.6%. Our results suggest that more emphasis should be placed to further understand lupus-related cryptococcal meningitis and to develop better prophylaxis and management strategies to combat this condition.

  2. Altered B cell receptor signaling in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Scott A.; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of B cell receptor signaling is essential for the development of specific immunity while retaining tolerance to self. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by a loss of B cell tolerance and the production of anti-self antibodies. Accompanying this break down in tolerance are alterations in B cell receptor signal transduction including elevated induced calcium responses and increased protein phosphorylation. Specific pathways that negatively regulate B cell signaling have been shown to be impaired in some SLE patients. These patients have reduced levels of the kinase Lyn in lipid raft microdomains and this reduction is inversely correlated with increased CD45 in lipid rafts. Function and expression of the inhibitory immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIIB is also reduced in Lupus IgM- CD27+ memory cells. Because the relative contribution of different memory and transitional B cell subsets can be abnormal in SLE patients, we believe studies targeted to well defined B cell subsets will be necessary to further our understanding of signaling abnormalities in SLE. Intracellular flow cytometric analysis of signaling is a useful approach to accomplish this goal. PMID:18723129

  3. Successful Pregnancy Following Assisted Reproduction in Woman With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    de Macedo, José Fernando; de Macedo, Gustavo Capinzaiki; Campos, Luciana Aparecida; Baltatu, Ovidiu Constantin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have a poor prognosis of pregnancy, since it is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity, including spontaneous miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal death and pre-term delivery. We report a case with successful pregnancy in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and hypertension. A 39-year-old nulliparous woman presented with systemic lupus erythematosus with antinuclear and antiphospholipid...

  4. Successful pregnancy in pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streit Michael

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. Mortality in pregnant patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension related to connective tissue disease is as high as 56%. The authors report the first case of a successful maternal-fetal outcome in a pregnant patient with systemic lupus erythematosus-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension treated with sildenafil and inhaled iloprost during pregnancy and until several weeks after caesarean section. Case presentation The case presented is of a 29-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus and associated severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Vasodilator therapy with bosentan and sildenafil, immunosuppressive therapy with prednisone, hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine and oral anticoagulation (phenprocoumon had normalized her right ventricular over right atrial pressure when she was diagnosed in her 5th week of pregnancy. The teratogenic drugs bosentan and phenprocoumon were stopped, the latter replaced by low molecular weight heparin. During the 35th week, a slight increase in pulmonary pressure was found. Therapy with inhaled iloprost was established. A caesarean section was performed in the 37th week and a healthy baby was delivered. The patient remained stable until 11 weeks after delivery, when an increase in right ventricular over right atrial pressure was noted. Bosentan was reintroduced and prednisone and azathioprine doses were increased. The patient has remained stable until the present time. Conclusion Pulmonary arterial hypertension has been considered a contraindication for pregnancy. Novel vasodilator therapy, combined with immunosuppressants in this patient with systemic lupus erythematosus, may "cure" pulmonary arterial hypertension and permit pregnancy with successful outcome. However, postpartum exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus and pulmonary arterial hypertension have to be considered.

  5. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, S; Margiotta, D P; Navarini, L; Pierro, L; Pantano, I; Riccardi, A; Afeltra, A; Valentini, G

    2017-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Low-dose aspirin, hydroxychloroquine and statins have been suggested to play a prophylactic role of cardiovascular events. This study is devoted to reviewing the literature on the topic and assessing the effects of these drugs in preventing a first cardiovascular event in a two-centre Italian series. Methods A PubMed search on cardiovascular prevention in systemic lupus erythematosus was performed. Moreover, systemic lupus erythematosus patients admitted to two centres from 2000-2015, who at admission had not experienced any cardiovascular event, were investigated. Aspirin, hydroxychloroquine and statin use, and the occurrence of any cardiovascular event, were recorded at each visit. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the role of traditional, disease-related cardiovascular risk factors and of each of the three drugs in the occurrence of new cardiovascular events. Results The literature search produced conflicting results. Two hundred and ninety-one systemic lupus erythematosus patients were included in the study and followed for a median of eight years. During follow-up, 16 cardiovascular events occurred. At multivariate analysis, taking aspirin (hazard ratio: 0.24) and hydroxychloroquine for more than five years (hazard ratio: 0.27) reduced, while antiphospholipid antibody positivity (hazard ratio: 4.32) increased, the risk of a first cardiovascular event. No effect of statins emerged. Conclusion Our study confirms an additive role of aspirin and hydroxychloroquine in the primary prophylaxis of cardiovascular events in Italian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The lack of any detected effect in previous reports may depend on the design of studies and their short follow-up period.

  6. Systemic lupus erythematosus in pregnancy - intricate, but wieldy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritin Mohindra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE predominantly afflicts young women in reproductive age. In this context, it is only rational that pregnancy and its outcome becomes an imperative concern for the lupus patients and their health care providers. Queries regarding the risk of disease flares during pregnancy, chance of fetal loss, and the safety of various drugs are often raised. However the present day availability of effective treatment regimens has meant that many patients achieve protracted remissions and better disease control. Indeed, a high proportion of lupus patients, with professional care, can thus look forward to a successful pregnancy.1 This article reviews the contemporary concepts regarding SLE and pregnancy, especially regarding the fertility rate, optimal timing of conception, risk of disease flares during lupus pregnancy, pregnancy course, fetal outcome, safety of various drugs used for disease control during pregnancy and lactation, and contraceptive advice. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 295-300

  7. Postextraction hemorrhage in a young male patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, S; Esseltine, D W

    1984-03-01

    A case of a 13-year-old boy with prolonged bleeding after tooth extraction is reported. This was the first manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus found to be associated with circulating anticoagulants, including the "lupus anticoagulant," and possible hypoprothrombinemia.

  8. Lupus eritematoso neonatal: reporte de cuatro casos Neonatal lupus erythematosus: a report of four cases

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    Maria Fernanda Perez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available El lupus eritematoso neonatal es una enfermedad poco frecuente, caracterizada clínica mente por alteraciones cutáneas semejantes al lupus subagudo o discoide y/o bloqueo cardíaco congénito. Generalmente, cuando los pacientes presentan manifestaciones cutáneas, no tienen anormalidades cardiológicas y viceversa, aunque en un 10% de los casos ambas manifestaciones pueden coexistir. Puede acompañarse también de alteraciones hematológicas, hepáticas y neurológicas. Es causado por el pasaje trasplacentario de anticuerpos maternos anti Ro (95%, anti La y menos frecuentemente anti U1RNP. Presentamos cuatro pacientes con hallazgos clínicos, histopatológicos e inmunológicos compatibles con lupus eritematoso neonatal, su tratamiento y evolución.Neonatal lupus erythematosus is a very rare disease, clinically characterized by skin lesions that resemble those of subacute or discoid lupus erythematosus and/or congenital heart block. Generally, when patients have skin manifestations, they have no cardiac defects and vice-versa; however, in 10% of cases these manifestations may coexist. Other findings may include hematologic, hepatic and neurological abnormalities. This condition is caused by the transplacental passage of maternal autoantibodies against Ro (95%, La and, less frequently, U1-ribonucleoprotein (U1-RNP. The present case report describes four patients with clinical, histopathological and immunological findings compatible with neonatal lupus erythematosus, their treatment and progress.

  9. Caesarean section in a case of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Vyas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease most frequently found in women of child bearing age and may co-exist with pregnancy. Disease exacerbation, increased foetal loss, neonatal lupus and an increased incidence of pre-eclampsia are the major challenges. Its multisystem involvement and therapeutic interventions like anticoagulants, steroids and immunosuppressive agents pose a high risk for both surgery and anaesthesia. We describe successful management of an antinuclear antibody (ANA positive parturient with bad obstetric history who underwent elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia.

  10. Vitamin D and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watad, Abdulla; Neumann, Shana G; Soriano, Alessandra; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the contribution of vitamin D deficiency to autoimmunity. Several studies have shown an association between low levels of vitamin D and autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Vitamin D receptor ligands can mediate immunosuppressive effects. It has been suggested that low levels of this hormone contribute to the immune activation in lupus and other autoimmune diseases. This review updates and summarizes the literature on the association between vitamin D and SLE, and discusses the various correlations between vitamin D and SLE activity, clinical expressions, serology, and gene polymorphisms of vitamin D receptors.

  11. Pregnancies in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, K

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has preponderance in women in their childbearing years; consequently pregnancy has always been an important issue of concern for the patient and the treating physician. Based upon numerous reports on successful pregnancy outcomes in the past decades, the initial advice against pregnancy in the 1950s has been replaced by a common understanding that women with SLE often have successful pregnancy outcomes, and clinicians therefore advise on pregnancy planning, including possible drug adjustments, timing and close surveillance. The recently published Predictors of Pregnancy Outcome: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (PROMISSE) study, so far the largest multicentre cohort study of pregnant women with underlying stable SLE, has given some important answers to long-discussed questions. Future studies on data collected from the PROMISSE cohort will hopefully identify serological biomarkers, possibly genes, and in addition, give valuable information about underlying disease mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome: a mimicker of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Krishnendu; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kumar, Bappaditya; Sarkar, Sumanta

    2013-05-22

    A middle aged female patient presented with generalised palpable purpura associated with intense pruritus along with subconjunctival haemorrhage and orbital inflammation. There was extensive dermographism. Other systemic examinations were within normal limits. Haematological profile was normal except raised D-dimer. Skin biopsy revealed the presence of leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Antinuclear antibody was positive in a titre of 1 : 160, but antidouble-stranded DNA was negative. Urine examination revealed haematuria and proteinuria. Complement C3, C4 and C1q levels were decreased with the presence of anti-C1q antibody. There was a diagnostic dilemma between systemic lupus erythematosus and hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. However, as the patient did not fulfil the American College of Rheumatology criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus, but fulfilled all the criteria for hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, the case was finally diagnosed as hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome and treated accordingly with favourable outcome.

  13. Pregnancies in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has preponderance in women in their childbearing years; consequently pregnancy has always been an important issue of concern for the patient and the treating physician. Based upon numerous reports on successful pregnancy outcomes in the past decades, the initial...... of Pregnancy Outcome: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (PROMISSE) study, so far the largest multicentre cohort study of pregnant women with underlying stable SLE, has given some important answers to long-discussed questions. Future studies on data collected from...... advice against pregnancy in the 1950s has been replaced by a common understanding that women with SLE often have successful pregnancy outcomes, and clinicians therefore advise on pregnancy planning, including possible drug adjustments, timing and close surveillance. The recently published Predictors...

  14. Echolalia as a novel manifestation of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapor, M; Murphy, F T; Enzenauer, R

    2001-01-01

    "That tongue of yours, by which I have been tricked, shall have its power curtailed and enjoy the briefest use of speech." With these words, Hera, of Greek mythology, deprived the nymph Echo of spontaneous speech, constraining her instead to merely repeating the words of others. Echolalia, which derives from the word "echo," is disordered speech in which an individual persistently repeats what is heard. Echolalia has been described in patients with a number of neuropsychiatric illnesses including autism and Tourette's syndrome. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is a heterogeneous disease with protean manifestations that may occur in approximately 25% to 50% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although the most common manifestations include cognitive dysfunction (50%) and seizures (20%), NPSLE may also present as peripheral neuropathy (15%), psychosis (10%), or other central nervous system abnormalities. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with SLE and echolalia.

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, A; Robaina, R; Pérez, G; Cairoli, E

    2016-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive destructive soft tissue infection with high mortality. Streptococcus pneumoniae as etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is extremely unusual. The increased susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is probably a multifactorial phenomenon. We report a case of a patient, a 36-year-old Caucasian female with 8-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus who presented a fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis. The role of computed tomography and the high performance of blood cultures for isolation of the causative microorganism are emphasized. Once diagnosis is suspected, empiric antibiotic treatment must be prescribed and prompt surgical exploration is mandatory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Identification of human cytomegalovirus phosphoprotein 65 in C57BL/6 and BXSB mice as a potential trigger of systemic lupus erythematosus related serum markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan; Zhang; Ting-Ting; Jia; Yang; Pan; Wen-Li; Li; Yu; Sun; Jin-Ming; Li; Lu-Nan; Wang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the potential role of human cytomegalovirus lower matrix phosphoprotein 65(HCMV-pp65) in murine systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE).Methods:The prokaryotic plasmid pET-28b-pp65 was constructed to express the HCMVpp65 protein.BXSB mice and C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with pp65 eukarvotic plasmid pcDNA3.0-pp65 intramuscularly 5 times at 2-week intervals,and then the blood of the mice was subsequently collected via the retro-orbital vein.Indirect ELISAs were used to evaluate the concentration of anti-pp65 immunoglobulin G,anti-double-stranded DNA and antinuclear antibodies.lnterleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α were also determined by competitive ELISA.At the same time,3 major SLE-related circulating microRNAs were examined by quantitative RT-PCR.Results:The early production of autoantibodies was observed in pp65-immunized male BXSB as well as C57BL/6 mice.Overexpression of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-a were detected in pp65-immunized male BXSB mice.Quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed that three SLE related microRNAs(microRNA-126,microRNA-125 a,and microRKA-146a) were dovvnrcgulatcd in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of pp65-immunizcd mice.Conclusions:Our findings indicate that HCMV-pp65 immunization strongly triggers the development and progression of" SLE-like disease in both BXSB and C57BL/6 mice,which indicates that the immune responses induced by HCMV-pp65 may be involved in the development of SLE.

  17. Cognitive functions and autoantibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bogaczewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autoantibodies may occur in the course of various diseases. In the case of systemic lupus erythematosus the presence of specific autoantibodies is included in the classification criteria of the disease. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the presence of the serologic markers of systemic lupus erythematosus, i.e. anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm and anticardiolipin antibodies of the class IgM and IgG are linked with the results of neuropsychological tests evaluating selected cognitive functions in patients without overt neuropsychiatric lupus and without antiphospholipid syndrome. Material and methods: The study included 22 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. For the assessment of anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm and anticardiolipin antibodies the immunoenzymatic method was used. For neuropsychological estimation of the selected cognitive functions the attention switching test and the choice reaction time were applied, in which the results are expressed as the average delay i.e. mean correct latency, using the computer-based Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB. Results: The results of attention switching test in patients with anti-Sm antibodies were lower, but not significantly different from those obtained by the patients without such antibodies: 75.0 (73.12–88.12 vs. 92.5 (85–95. Choice reaction time was significantly longer in patients with anti-Sm antibodies in comparison to the patients without antiSm antibodies: 614.9 (520.6–740.8 vs. 476.7 (396.6–540 (p = 0.01. No significant difference was demonstrated in the results of attention switching test and choice reaction time with regard to the presence of anti-dsDNA antibodies. The results of attention switching test and choice reaction time were not different between the groups of patients with and without anticardiolipin antibodies in the IgM and IgG class. Conclusions: Anti-Sm antibodies seem to contribute to

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto Y; Aoki S

    2016-01-01

    Yuriko Yamamoto, Shigeru Aoki Perinatal Center for Maternity and Neonate, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregn...

  19. Vitamin D and systemic lupus erythematosus: continued evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kristy S; Morand, Eric F

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone that has well-established roles in calcium and bone metabolism. Vitamin D has more recently become recognized for its role in the immune response and its potential immunomodulatory effects in autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This review provides a summary of the recent literature regarding vitamin D and SLE, as well as current recommendations for vitamin D supplementation in patients with SLE.

  20. Antinuclear antibody-negative systemic lupus erythematosus-how common?

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    A review of five years' DNA-binding antibody results in a routine service laboratory revealed 38 patients who had high DNA-binding capacity (DNA-bc) but no antinuclear antibodies (ANA). On retrospective case note analysis, 22 patients (58%) were thought to have systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), although only six (16%) fulfilled the preliminary classification criteria of the American Rheumatism Association (ARA). Our findings indicate that ANA-negative SLE is commoner than generally realised...

  1. Aortic valve replacement in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvnesh Kansara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Valvular heart disease in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Current therapy includes symptomatic measures and valve replacement. SLE can present major challenges because of accrued organ damage, coagulation defects and complex management regimes. The peri-operative goals are to maintain strict asepsis, avoid use of nephrotoxic drugs and thereby renal insult, and to promote early ambulation post-operatively.

  2. Novel molecular targets in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispín, JoséC; Tsokos, George C.

    2009-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of biochemical abnormalities which include altered expression of key signaling molecules, heightened calcium responses, and skewed expression of transcription factors. These defects are involved in the altered behavior of SLE T cells and are probably central in the disease pathogenesis. The aim of this communication is to review the defects that have been consistently documented in SLE T cells, highlighting molecules and pathways that represent therapeutic targets. PMID:18190888

  3. Intracranial Aneurysm with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Treated by Endovascular Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Shrestha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic disease with multiple pathologies that can affect every organ system of the body including central nervous system. Intracerebral aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH are one of comparatively rarer manifestations of central nervous system SLE. Here we present a case of known SLE complicated by the rupture of intra cerebral aneurysm at basilar artery tip which was successfully treated with endovascular coiling. Keywords: cerebral aneurysm, endovascular surgery, SAH, SLE

  4. Multiple keratoacanthomas of hands simulating discoid lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra Adarsh

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old woman presented with multiple, well-defined, erythematous, scaly, slightly pain-ful nodules progressing to plaques on the palms, dorsa of fingers of both hands since 6 years. Healed lesions had well-defined hyperpigmented margins with slight central atrophy. Clinical diagnosis of dis-coid lupus erythematosus was made, but histopatholgoy confirmed the diagnosis of keratoacanthomas

  5. DETECTION OF LUNG INVOLVEMENT BY HRCT IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈加林; 陈克敏; 蒋蕴毅; 丁小龙

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the sensitivity of high-resolution CT (HRCT) in detecting pulmonary involvement attributed to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Plain chest radiography, HRCT, and pulmonary function testing of 36 patients with SLE were analyzed. Results The sensitivity of the pulmonary involvement by HRCT, plain chest radiography and pulmonary function testing were 88.9%,36.1%,and 33.3%, respectively. Conclusion HRCT played an important role in detecting pulmonary involvemen due to SLE, especially in early and mild cases.

  6. Management of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Knight,Caroline; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Caroline L Knight, Catherine Nelson-Piercy Division of Women’s Health, Women’s Health Academic Centre, King’s College London and King’s Health Partners, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease predominantly affecting women, particularly those of childbearing age. SLE provides challenges in the prepregnancy, antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods ...

  7. Management of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Knight CL; Nelson-Piercy C

    2017-01-01

    Caroline L Knight, Catherine Nelson-Piercy Division of Women’s Health, Women’s Health Academic Centre, King’s College London and King’s Health Partners, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease predominantly affecting women, particularly those of childbearing age. SLE provides challenges in the prepregnancy, antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods for these women, and for...

  8. An evaluation of health-related quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus using PROMIS and Neuro-QoL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jin-Shei; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Jensen, Sally E; Kaiser, Karen; Van Brunt, David L; Kao, Amy H; Chen, Shih-Yin

    2017-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-organ chronic autoimmune disease that can negatively affect patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study evaluated HRQOL of SLE patients using questionnaires from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and Quality of Life in Neurological Disorders (Neuro-QoL). Individuals with SLE completed an online survey consisting of the PROMIS-29 health profile, PROMIS Psychosocial Illness Impact-Negative, and Neuro-QoL Applied Cognition. PROMIS and Neuro-QoL scores have a mean of 50 in the US general population. Patients self-rated SLE disease severity as negligible, mild, moderate, or severe. Of the 333 participants (mean age 45 years; 92% female; 26% Black; mean SLE disease duration 12 years, 56% with SLE disease severity as moderate or severe), mean HRQOL scores were worse than those of the general population by ≥0.5 SD with the greatest deficits observed in the domains of fatigue, applied cognition, psychosocial illness impact-negative, pain interference, and physical function. Greater SLE disease severity was associated with worse mean HRQOL scores (all p PROMIS and Neuro-QoL scores. PROMIS-29 and Neuro-QoL are valid tools to assess HRQOL in patients with SLE. These patients reported substantial deficits that correlated with their SLE disease severity, with pain being an important independent contributor. These deficits should be monitored in SLE patients during their routine clinical care and evaluated when investigating new therapies.

  9. Lupus pneumonitis as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus: case series from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, S A; Teh, C L; Jobli, A T

    2016-11-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the clinical features, treatment and outcome of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in our centre who presented with lupus pneumonitis as the initial manifestation. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all patients who presented with lupus pneumonitis during the initial SLE manifestation from March 2006 to March 2015. Results There were a total of five patients in our study who presented with fever and cough as the main clinical features. All patients had pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiographs. High-resolution computed tomography, which was performed in two patients, showed ground glass opacities with patchy consolidations bilaterally. All patients received high-dose steroids, 80% received intravenous cyclophosphamide and 60% received intravenous immunoglobulin. Two patients died from severe lupus pneumonitis within 2 weeks of admission despite treatment with ventilation, steroids, cyclophosphamide and intravenous immunoglobulin. Conclusions Acute lupus pneumonitis is an uncommon presentation of SLE. Mortality in this case series is 40%.

  10. Advances in the treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, A; Landmann, A; Wenzel, J

    2016-07-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease with clinical manifestations of differing severity which may present with skin manifestations as primary sign of the disease (cutaneous lupus erythematosus, CLE) or as part of a disease spectrum (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE). To date, no drugs are approved specifically for the treatment of CLE and only single agents have been applied in randomized controlled trials. Therefore, topical and systemic agents are used "off-label", primarily based on open-label studies, case series, retrospective analyses, and expert opinions. In contrast, several agents, such as hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and belimumab, are approved for the treatment of SLE. Recent approaches in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of LE enabled the development of further new agents, which target molecules such as interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interferon (IFN). Only single trials, however, applied these new agents in patients with cutaneous involvement of the disease and/or included endpoints which evaluated the efficacy of these agents on skin manifestations. This article provides an updated review on new and recent approaches in the treatment of CLE.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a pregnant woman with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-J A; Tseng, J-J; Yang, M-J; Tsao, Y-P; Lin, H-Y

    2014-12-01

    When the disease activity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is controlled appropriately, a pregnant woman who has lupus is able to carry safely to term and deliver a healthy infant. While the physiology of a healthy pregnancy itself influences ventilatory function, acute pulmonary distress may decrease oxygenation and influence both mother and fetus. Though respiratory failure in pregnancy is relatively rare, it remains one of the leading conditions requiring intensive care unit admission in pregnancy and carries a high risk of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, not to mention the complexity caused by lupus flare. We report a case of SLE complicated with lupus pneumonitis and followed by acute respiratory distress during pregnancy. Though there is a high risk of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, maternal respiratory function improved after cesarean section and treatment of the underlying causes. The newborn had an extremely low birth weight but was well at discharge.

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with eosinophilic enteritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalany Mohammad

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multisystem disorder that may present with various symptoms. It may involve the gastrointestinal tract in a variety of ways; some of the most well-known ones are transaminitis, lupus mesenteric vasculitis, lupus enteritis and mesenteric vascular leakage. We describe a case of a patient with SLE who presented with a five-month history of diarrhea caused by eosinophilic enteritis. To the best of our knowledge, there are few cases reported in the literature of patients with SLE who initially present with chronic diarrhea due to eosinophilic enteritis. Case presentation A 38-year-old Persian Iranian woman was admitted with a five-month history of diarrhea and abdominal pain. A physical examination showed nothing abnormal. Initially, she had only lymphopenia and mild eosinophilia. No autoimmune or infectious etiology was detected to justify these abnormalities. A thorough evaluation was not helpful in finding the etiology, until she developed a scalp lesion similar to discoid lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography showed small bowel wall thickening. Briefly, she manifested full-blown SLE, and it was revealed that the diarrhea was caused by eosinophilic enteritis. Conclusion Considering SLE in a patient who presents with chronic diarrhea and lymphopenia may be helpful in earlier diagnosis and therapy. This is an original case report of interest to physicians who practice internal medicine, family medicine and gastroenterology.

  13. Pyomyositis in childhood-systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Gabriela; Ferriani, Mariana P L; Buscatti, Izabel M; França, Camila M P; Campos, Lucia M A; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    Pyomyositis is a pyogenic infection of skeletal muscle that arises from hematogenous spread and usually presents with localized abscess. This muscle infection has been rarely reported in adult-onset systemic lupus erythematous and, to the best of our knowledge, has not been diagnosed in pediatric lupus population. Among our childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematous population, including 289 patients, one presented pyomyositis. This patient was diagnosed with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematous at the age of 10 years-old. After six years, while being treated with prednisone, azathioprine and hydroxychloroquine, she was hospitalized due to a 30-day history of insidious pain in the left thigh and no apparent trauma or fever were reported. Her physical examination showed muscle tenderness and woody induration. Laboratory tests revealed anemia, increased acute phase reactants and normal muscle enzymes. Computer tomography of the left thigh showed collection on the middle third of the vastus intermedius, suggesting purulent stage of pyomyositis. Treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotic was initiated, leading to a complete clinical resolution. In conclusion, we described the first case of pyomyositis during childhood in pediatric lupus population. This report reinforces that the presence of localized muscle pain in immunocompromised patients, even without elevation of muscle enzymes, should raise the suspicion of pyomyositis. A prompt antibiotic therapy is strongly recommended.

  14. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G; Nived, O; Fang, H; Alarcón, G S; Gordon, C; Merrill, Jt; Fortin, P R; Bruce, I N; Isenberg, D A; Wallace, D J; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Bae, S-C; Hanly, J G; Sanchez-Guerrero, J; Clarke, A E; Aranow, C B; Manzi, S; Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Kalunian, K C; Costner, M I; Werth, V P; Zoma, A; Bernatsky, S; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Khamashta, M A; Jacobsen, S; Buyon, J P; Maddison, P; Dooley, M A; Van Vollenhoven, R F; Ginzler, E; Stoll, T; Peschken, C; Jorizzo, J L; Callen, J P; Lim, S S; Fessler, B J; Inanc, M; Kamen, D L; Rahman, A; Steinsson, K; Franks, A G; Sigler, L; Hameed, S; Pham, N; Brey, R; Weisman, M H; McGwin, G; Magder, L S; Petri, M

    2015-01-01

    Anti-C1q has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis in previous studies. We studied anti-C1q specificity for SLE (vs rheumatic disease controls) and the association with SLE manifestations in an international multicenter study. Information and blood samples were obtained in a cross-sectional study from patients with SLE (n = 308) and other rheumatologic diseases (n = 389) from 25 clinical sites (84% female, 68% Caucasian, 17% African descent, 8% Asian, 7% other). IgG anti-C1q against the collagen-like region was measured by ELISA. Prevalence of anti-C1q was 28% (86/308) in patients with SLE and 13% (49/389) in controls (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.8-4, p lupus nephritis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Refractory Angioedema in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Habibagahi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Angioedema secondary to C1 inhibitor deficiency has been rarely reported to be associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. A genetic defect of C1 inhibitor produces hereditary angioedema, which is usually presented with cutaneous painless edema, but edema of the genital area, gastrointestinal and laryngeal tracts have also been reported. In lupus patients, angioedema may be the result of an acquired type of C1 inhibitor deficiency, most probably due to antibody formation directed against the C1 inhibitor molecule. Herein we report a new case of lupus nephritis that developed angioedema and a rapid course of disease progression with acute renal failure and alveolar hemorrhage without response to high dose steroid and plasmapheresis.

  16. Acute macular neuroretinopathy associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D H; Lee, S C; Kim, M

    2016-04-01

    Acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN) is a rare disorder that presents with abrupt visual change with wedge-shaped or flower-like lesions pointing towards the fovea. Ischemic insults to the retinal capillary plexus may be important for development of this disease. While many case reports have been published on AMN, none have described AMN in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we report a case of AMN associated with newly-diagnosed SLE. We speculate that in patients with lupus flares, immune complex-mediated vascular injury and microvascular thrombosis may disrupt the deep retinal capillary network, causing ischemic damages to the outer retina and leading to the development of AMN. AMN can develop in patients with lupus flares, and must be considered as an SLE-associated ophthalmologic complication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of AMN associated with SLE. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Association of Sweet's Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Barton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet's syndrome is an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis which usually presents as an idiopathic disorder but can also be drug induced, associated with hematopoetic malignancies and myelodysplastic disorders, and more, infrequently, observed in autoimmune disorders. Sweet's syndrome has been reported in three cases of neonatal lupus, three cases of hydralazine-induced lupus in adults, and in nine pediatric and adult systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients. We describe three additional adult cases of Sweet's associated with SLE and provide a focused review on nondrug-induced, nonneonatal SLE and Sweet's. In two of three new cases, as in the majority of prior cases, the skin rash of Sweet's paralleled underlying SLE disease activity. The pathogenesis of Sweet's remains elusive, but evidence suggests that cytokine dysregulation may be central to the clinical and pathological changes in this condition, as well as in SLE. Further research is needed to define the exact relationship between the two conditions.

  18. [Thrombopenia as the presenting symptom of acute disseminated lupus erythematosus: Moschcowitz's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrier, P; Cousteau, C; Gounant, C; Grodner, F; Ruf, R; Szpirglas, H; Texier, J; Laufer, J

    1983-01-01

    Possible relationships between Moschcowitz's disease and acute systemic lupus erythematosus are analyzed based on findings in one case. Initial exclusively buccal symptoms suggested a diagnosis of lupus, and then of Moschcowitz's disease leading to a fatal outcome. The main points discussed relate to diagnostic difficulties to enable distinction between the two diseases. A thrombotic thrombopenic purpura during the second phase of the disease showed a characteristic microangiopathy associated with a non-autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a schizocytosis: two forms of the affection are recognized, one with a chronic and one with an acute course. The latter, which has a fulminating progression leading to death, was that described in the case reported.

  19. Experience of long-term belimumab use in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gennadyevna Klyukvina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years considerable progress has been made in the treatment of systemic lupus erythe-matosus; however, not all questions have been answered. The range of medications has substan-tially increased. The paper describes a case of the long-term use of the new genetically engineered agent belimumab in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

  20. Mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms and susceptibility to infection in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, P; Madsen, H O; Halberg, P

    1999-01-01

    To determine whether variant alleles in the coding portion of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene are associated with increased susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and concomitant infections.......To determine whether variant alleles in the coding portion of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene are associated with increased susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and concomitant infections....

  1. T Cell Transcriptomes Describe Patient Subtypes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean J Bradley

    Full Text Available T cells regulate the adaptive immune response and have altered function in autoimmunity. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE has great diversity of presentation and treatment response. Peripheral blood component gene expression affords an efficient platform to investigate SLE immune dysfunction and help guide diagnostic biomarker development for patient stratification.Gene expression in peripheral blood T cell samples for 14 SLE patients and 4 controls was analyzed by high depth sequencing. Unbiased clustering of genes and samples revealed novel patterns related to disease etiology. Functional annotation of these genes highlights pathways and protein domains involved in SLE manifestation.We found transcripts for hundreds of genes consistently altered in SLE T cell samples, for which DAVID analysis highlights induction of pathways related to mitochondria, nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication. Fewer genes had reduced mRNA expression, and these were linked to signaling, splicing and transcriptional activity. Gene signatures associated with the presence of dsDNA antibodies, low complement levels and nephritis were detected. T cell gene expression also indicates the presence of several patient subtypes, such as having only a minimal expression phenotype, male type, or severe with or without induction of genes related to membrane protein production.Unbiased transcriptome analysis of a peripheral blood component provides insight on autoimmune pathophysiology and patient variability. We present an open source workflow and richly annotated dataset to support investigation of T cell biology, develop biomarkers for patient stratification and perhaps help indicate a source of SLE immune dysfunction.

  2. Massive intracranial calcifications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus; Calcificacoes intracranianas macicas em um paciente com lupus eritematoso sistemico

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    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica. Servico de Radiologia Medica]. E-mail: gasparetto@hotmail.com; Ono, Sergio E. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2004-12-01

    Central nervous system involvement is frequently reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies usually show brain atrophy, cerebral infarction and/or intracranial bleeding. Extensive intracranial calcification in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with seizures and massive basal ganglia calcification and mild calcifications in the frontal lobes, seen on the brain computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensity on FLAIR images and hypointense signals on T2{sup *} gradient echo images in the basal ganglia. (author)

  3. Variables associated to fetal microchimerism in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Florim, Greiciane Maria; Caldas, Heloisa Cristina; Pavarino, Erika Cristina; Bertollo, Eny Maria Goloni; Fernandes, Ida Maria Maximina; Abbud-Filho, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we sought to identify the factors during the pregnancy of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients that could be linked to the presence and proliferation of male fetal cells (MFC) and the possible relation between these factors and development of lupus nephritis (LN). We evaluated 18 healthy women (control group) and 28 women affected by SLE. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and quantified using the technique of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for specific Y chromosome sequences. The amount of MFC was significantly higher in the SLE group compared with the controls (SLE 252 ± 654 vs control 2.13 ± 3.7; P = 0.029). A higher amount of MFC was detected among multiparous SLE patients when compared with the control group (SLE 382 ± 924 vs control 0.073 ± 0.045; P = 0.019). LN was associated with reduced amount of MFC (LN 95.5 ± 338 vs control 388 ± 827; P = 0.019) especially when they have delivered their child before age 18 (LN 0.23 ± 0.22 vs control 355 ± 623; P = 0.028). SLE patients present a higher amount of MFC, which may increase with the time since birth of the first male child. LN patients showed an inverse correlation with MFC, suggesting that the role of the cells may be ambiguous during the various stages of development of the disease.

  4. Obesity and Cytokines in Childhood-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nailú Angélica Sinicato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, atherosclerosis is attributed to traditional and lupus related risk factors, including metabolic syndrome (MetS, obesity, and inflammation. Objective. To evaluate the association between obesity, measures of body fat content, serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and interleukin (IL-6 and -10 levels in childhood-onset SLE (cSLE. Methods. We screened consecutive cSLE patients followed up in the Pediatric Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of the State University of Campinas. cSLE patients were assessed for disease and damage. Obesity was definite as body mass index (BMI ≥30 kg/m2. Serum TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to determine total fat mass, lean mass, and percent of body fat. Results. We included 52 cSLE patients and 52 controls. cSLE patients had higher serum TNF-α  (P=0.004, IL-6 (P=0.002, and IL-10 (P<0.001 levels compared to controls. We observed higher serum TNF-α  (P=0.036 levels in cSLE patients with obesity. An association between serum TNF-α levels and body fat percent (P=0.046 and total fat mass on trunk region (P=0.035 was observed. Conclusion. Serum TNF-α levels were associated with obesity and body fat content in cSLE. Our finding suggests that obesity may contribute to the increase of serum TNF-α levels in cSLE.

  5. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, S; Shorer, R; Wollman, J; Dotan, G; Paran, D

    2017-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus. Atrophy of the corpus callosum and hippocampus have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown impaired white matter integrity, suggesting that white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus may underlie the cognitive impairment as well as other neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as assessed by optical coherence tomography, has been suggested as a biomarker for white matter damage in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning may occur early, even in patients with mild clinical symptoms. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the association of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as a biomarker of white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, including cognitive impairment. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus underwent neuropsychological testing using a validated computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test. All 21 patients, as well as 11 healthy, age matched controls, underwent optical coherence tomography testing to assess retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and results in eight cognitive domains assessed by the computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test were assessed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with and without neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus, and compared to retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in healthy controls. Results No statistically significant correlation was found between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as compared to healthy

  6. Complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies distinguish drug-induced lupus from systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Rubin, R L; Teodorescu, M; Beutner, E H; Plunkett, R W

    2004-01-01

    The immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody (ANA) test has been widely used to monitor autoimmune disease, but its value for diagnostic purposes is compromised by low specificity and high prevalence in disease-free individuals. The capacity of autoantibodies to fix serum complement proteins when bound to antigen is an important effector function because this property is associated with acute and chronic inflammatory processes. The current study evaluates the complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies (CANA) in three well-defined and clinically-related patient groups: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), drug-induced lupus (DIL) and drug-induced autoimmunity (DIA). Of 20 patients diagnosed with SLE, 90% displayed complement-fixing ANA while this feature was present in only two of 18 patients with DIL and no patients with DIA without associated disease even though the mean ANA titres were similar among these patient groups. CANA was significantly correlated with anti-Sm activity. Because SLE but not DIL or DIA can be a life-threatening disease associated with complement consumption in vivo, these results demonstrate that measurement of CANA is a diagnostically useful tool and may have immunopathologic implications.

  7. [In vitro fertilization and systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome: An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orquevaux, P; Masseau, A; Le Guern, V; Gayet, V; Vauthier, D; Boutin, D; Wechsler, B; Morel, N; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Pennaforte, J-L; Piette, J-C; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Fertility is not impaired in systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome, but, similarly to the general population, these patients may undergo in vitro fertilization. This type of treatment increases the risk of lupus flare, thrombosis, and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. This review will focus on in vitro fertilization in systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome. Literature data are relatively scant with only 3 reported studies. The first one included 17 patients and 63 cycles of induction ovulation/in vitro fertilization leading to 25 % of lupus flare, no thrombosis, and 3 % of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. The second study included 10 patients and 40 cycles of in vitro fertilization showing 31 % of lupus flare, no thrombosis and no ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. The last one included 34 patients and 83 procedures of in vitro fertilization leading to 8 % of flares, 5 % of thrombosis and no ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Interestingly, in this last study, half of the complications were explained by poor adherence to treatment. These data are reassuring but it is important to remember that in vitro fertilization should be scheduled and carefully supervised in the same way as the high-risk pregnancies occurring in these patients.

  8. Neurodevelopmental disorders in children born to mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinet, É; Pineau, C A; Clarke, A E; Fombonne, É; Platt, R W; Bernatsky, S

    2014-10-01

    Children born to women with systemic lupus erythematosus seem to have a potentially increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders compared to children born to healthy women. Recent experimental data suggest in utero exposure to maternal antibodies and cytokines as important risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders. Interestingly, women with systemic lupus erythematosus display high levels of autoantibodies and cytokines, which have been shown, in animal models, to alter fetal brain development and induce behavioral anomalies in offspring. Furthermore, subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus and neurodevelopmental disorders share a common genetic predisposition, which could impair the fetal immune response to in utero immunologic insults. Moreover, systemic lupus erythematosus pregnancies are at increased risk of adverse obstetrical outcomes and medication exposures, which have been implicated as potential risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge on neurodevelopmental disorders and their potential determinants in systemic lupus erythematosus offspring.

  9. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia Coexisting with Lupus Erythematosus: Poor Response to Hydroxychloroquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, Letícia Arsie; Martins da Costa Marques, Elisa Raquel; Noriega, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus, especially the discoid form, and lichen planopilaris may be associated and can occur in different topographies (coexistence) or in the same lesion (lupus eythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome). Frontal fibrosing alopecia is considered a variant form of lichen planopilaris and is characterized by frontotemporal hairline and eyebrow involvement. Of the association with lupus erythematosus we have only a few descriptions. Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine diphosphate are antimalarial drugs described as viable treatment options for both diseases, due to an antilymphocytic effect. The association between frontal fibrosing alopecia and lupus erythematosus (discoid or systemic) is reported in this article, showing a progressive alopecia in the frontotemporal hairline despite treatment with hydroxychloroquine.

  10. Autoimmune thyroiditis perdating the presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus: Two cases and a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhir Rajeev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are commonly encountered in dermatology practice. While the association of two autoimmune diseases in the same individual is not unknown, it is relatively rare for the second disease to be suspected based on cutaneous manifestations. We present two such cases wherein cutaneous manifestations were the first clue to the development of lupus erythematosus in a setting of autoimmune thyroiditis. Further, we have reviewed literature on this uncommon occurrence and discuss various aspects of this association.

  11. Therapeutic strategies evaluated by the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE) Core Set Questionnaire in more than 1000 patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigges, Johanna; Biazar, Cyrus; Landmann, Aysche

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective, cross-sectional, multicentre study performed by the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE) was to investigate different therapeutic strategies and their efficacies in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) throughout Europe. Using the EUSCLE Core Set...... Questionnaire, topical and systemic treatment options were analysed in a total of 1002 patients (768 females and 234 males) with different CLE subtypes. The data were correlated with the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI) and the criteria of the American College...... of Rheumatology (ACR) for the classification of systemic lupus erythematosus. Sunscreens were applied by 84.0% of the study cohort and showed a high efficacy in preventing skin lesions in all disease subtypes, correlating with a lower CLASI activity score. Topical steroids were used in 81.5% of the patients...

  12. Hydroxychloroquine and pregnancy on lupus flares in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J H; Ko, H S; Kwok, S-K; Ju, J H; Park, S-H

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnancies with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and identified lupus flare predictors during pregnancy. Additionally, we examined lupus activity and pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients who continued, discontinued or underwent no hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) treatment during pregnancy. We retrospectively analyzed 179 pregnancies in 128 SLE patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Korea, between 1998 and 2012 and then assessed the clinical profiles and maternal and fetal outcomes. Overall, 90.5% of pregnancies resulted in a successful delivery and were divided into two groups: those who experienced lupus flares (80 pregnancies, 44.7%) and those who did not (99 pregnancies, 55.3%). Increased preeclampsia, preterm births, low birth weight, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and low 1-minute Apgar scores occurred in pregnancies with lupus flares compared to pregnancies in quiescent disease. Lupus flares were predicted by HCQ discontinuation, a history of lupus nephritis, high pre-pregnancy serum uric acid and low C4 levels. Our study indicates that achieving pre-pregnancy remission and continuing HCQ treatment during pregnancy are important for preventing lupus flares.

  13. Evaluation of epratuzumab as a biologic therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vijay; Gordon, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Some of the current biologic therapies target B cells or B-cell activating factors. Epratuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody, which targets CD22 on B cells. This review focuses on the safety and efficacy of epratuzumab in systemic lupus erythematosus based on the information from various published clinical trials and presentations at international meetings. Epratuzumab acts as a B-cell modulator through inhibition of B-cell receptor signaling. It has been shown to be efficacious in open-label and Phase I and Phase II randomized controlled trials. The drug has steroid-sparing properties and treatment is associated with significant improvements in Health Related Quality of Life and its safety profile is comparable to placebo.

  14. Therapeutic management of evans syndrome in a pregnancy with maternal systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nause, S L; Spiegler, J; Weichert, J; Hartge, D R

    2015-08-01

    A 31-year-old 2 G 1 P was referred to our unit of prenatal medicine at 35+3 weeks of gestation with a spontaneously conceived singleton pregnancy of a female fetus without detectable anomalies. Maternal hematological evaluation revealed an Evans-syndrome-related thrombocytopenia based on a lupus erythematosus. The former delivery was aggravated by a severe hemorrhage several years before. Anti-autoimmunologic therapy was started and maternal platelets count increased to physiological values. Uneventful ceasarean section was performed at 37 weeks of gestation with favourable outcome for mother and child. This case is the first report of a successful therapy in maternal Evans syndrome in pregnancy combined with a lupus erythematosus.

  15. Vitamin D levels in Jamaican patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhie, T K; DeCeulaer, K; Walters, C A; Soyibo, A; Lee, M G

    2014-09-01

    Vitamin D has important effects on the immune system as it has been shown to exert antiproliferative and relative immunosuppressant effects. Low levels of this hormone may contribute to the immune activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases. Serum levels of 25-OH vitamin D were measured in 75 patients with SLE in Jamaica, using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Correlations with clinical data and disease activity as determined by the BILAG index were determined. Of a total of 75 patients, 33 (44%) had vitamin D sufficiency with mean vitamin D level of 39.45 ng/ml (range, 30.35-58.16). Forty-two (56%) patients had either vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency, 30 (40%) had vitamin D insufficiency, mean 26.36 ng/ml (range, 20.26-29.88), and 12 (16%) had vitamin D deficiency, mean 16.07 ng/ml (range, 7.78-19.90). There was an overall negative relationship between the total disease activity score using the BILAG index and vitamin D levels, and this was influenced primarily by the relationship seen among the vitamin D-deficient subgroup. This was also impacted on by a patient population that was significantly skewed toward low disease activity. The negative association trended toward statistical significance. Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent among patients with SLE in Jamaica. A relationship between low serum levels of vitamin D and SLE activity may occur.

  16. Dehydroepiandrosterone for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2002-01-01

    The adrenal steroidal hormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has been studied as a potential pharmacological agent in the treatment of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both the endocrine effects (the ability to be converted peripherally to androgenic and oestrogenic sex steroids) and the immunomodulatory effects of DHEA (the production of the Th(1) cytokines, such as IL-2) suggest that this hormone could be of benefit for patients with SLE. During the past decade, five controlled clinical trials and a number of additional observational studies have been performed investigating these possibilities. The results from these studies suggest that 200 mg/day of DHEA for 7 - 12 months decreases corticosteroid requirement for the patients, the frequency of disease flares, has an anti-osteoporotic effect and has an overall beneficial effect on SLE disease activity in female patients. A small study suggested benefits for cognitive function in such patients. The side effects acne and hirsutism were seen relatively frequently (30 - 40% and 10 - 12% of patients, respectively) but in most instances were deemed mild. DHEA treatment resulted in changes in lipid profile and may have endocrine effects, the consequences of which will need to be ascertained through longer-term follow-up studies.

  17. The complement system in systemic lupus erythematosus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Jonatan; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2014-09-01

    The complement system plays a major role in the autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the role of complement in SLE is complex since it may both prevent and exacerbate the disease. In this review, we explore the latest findings in complement-focused research in SLE. C1q deficiency is the strongest genetic risk factor for SLE, although such deficiency is very rare. Various recently discovered genetic associations include mutations in the complement receptors 2 and 3 as well as complement inhibitors, the latter related to earlier onset of nephritis. Further, autoantibodies are a distinct feature of SLE that are produced as the result of an adaptive immune response and how complement can affect that response is also being reviewed. SLE generates numerous disease manifestations involving contributions from complement such as glomerulonephritis and the increased risk of thrombosis. Furthermore, since most of the complement system is present in plasma, complement is very accessible and may be suitable as biomarker for diagnosis or monitoring of disease activity. This review highlights the many roles of complement for SLE pathogenesis and how research has progressed during recent years.

  18. Epileptic syndrome in systemic lupus erythematosus and neuronal autoantibody associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampylafka, E I; Alexopoulos, H; Fouka, P; Moutsopoulos, H M; Dalakas, M C; Tzioufas, A G

    2016-10-01

    We investigated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with epilepsy, a major and organic neurological symptom. Our aim was to test patients for the autoimmune epilepsy-associated antibodies anti-GAD, anti-NMDAR, anti-AMPAR1/2, anti-GABABR and anti-VGKC. We tested sera from ten SLE patients with current or previous episodes of epileptic seizures. In addition, sera were tested for staining on primary hippocampal neurons. The patients' clinical and neuroimaging profile, disease activity and accumulated damage scores and therapeutic regimens administered were recorded, and correlations were evaluated. Patients were negative for all anti-neuronal autoantibodies tested, and showed no staining on primary hippocampal cells, which suggests the absence of autoantibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens. Epileptic seizures were all tonic-clonic, and all patients had high disease activity (mean SLE Damage Acticity Index score 19.3 ± 7.3). Six patients had minor or no brain magnetic resonance imaging findings, and three had major findings. 9/10 patients received immunosuppression for 5 ± 4 months, while anti-convulsive treatment was administered to all patients (4.2 ± 3 years). Our results suggest that the majority of SLE-related epileptic seizures cannot be attributed to the action of a single antibody against neuronal antigens. Studies with larger neuropsychiatric SLE populations and stricter inclusion criteria are necessary to verify these findings. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus and pemphigus vulgaris: association or coincidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calebotta, A; Cirocco, A; Giansante, E; Reyes, O

    2004-01-01

    Few cases have been published relating systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We describe a patient with this association. A 35-year old woman who started to develop persistent pain and morning stiffness of proximal inter and metacarpo-phalangeal joints. During the following year, the patient recalled the onset of blisters on both legs, face, arms and thorax, as well as erosions appearing on oral mucous membranes. We observed generalized multiple erosions on her trunk and legs, flaccid bullae located on her right thigh and multiple erosions on oral mucous membranes. A skin biopsy reported PV Direct immunofluorescence on the perilesional skin specimen, showed beehive intercellular IgG deposits in the epidermis (+++), suggesting PV; granular discontinuous IgM and C3 deposits in the dermal-epidermal union (+++), suggesting SLE. Direct immunofluorescence of the healthy unexposed skin specimen, reported granular discontinuous IgG deposits in the dermal-epidermal union and beehive intercellular IgG deposits in the lower levels of the epidermis (+++); granular continuous IgM deposits in the dermal-epidermal union (+++). The results of rheumatic studies were obtained as follows: ANA :3 +, Anti-DNA, Anti-Sm, Anti-Ro and Anti-La :4 + . The definite diagnosis was PVand SLE. Treatment with 50 mg of prednisone daily with good evolution.

  20. The clinical significance of antiphospholipid antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünlü, Ozan; Zuily, Stephane; Erkan, Doruk

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the association of thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Thirty to forty percent of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are tested positive for aPL, which may have an impact on the SLE presentation, management, and prognosis. Compared with SLE patients without aPL, those with aPL have a higher prevalence of thrombosis, pregnancy morbidity, valve disease, pulmonary hypertension, livedo reticularis, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, acute/chronic renal vascular lesions, and moderate/severe cognitive impairment; worse quality of life; and higher risk of organ damage. The use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is controversial for primary thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity prevention because of the lack of strong prospective controlled data. Similarly, the use of anticoagulation is controversial for patients with an aPL-related nephropathy. Until further studies are available, physicians should discuss the risk/benefits of LDA or anticoagulation as well as the available literature with patients. PMID:27708976

  1. Development and management of systemic lupus erythematosus in an HIV-infected man with hepatitis C and B co-infection following interferon therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbott Iain J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The association of human immunodeficiency virus and immune dysfunction leading to development of autoimmune markers is well described, but human immunodeficiency virus infection is relatively protective for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. In contrast, development of systemic lupus erythematosus with hepatitis C and with interferon therapy is well described in a number of case reports. We here describe the first case of systemic lupus erythematosus developing in a man infected with human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C and hepatitis B co-infection where the onset seems to have been temporally related to interferon therapy. Case presentation We report the occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus complicating interferon-α therapy for hepatitis C in a 47-year-old asplenic male with haemophilia co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B. He presented with a truncal rash, abdominal pains and headache and later developed grade IV lupus nephritis requiring haemodialysis, mycophenolate mofetil and steroid therapy. We were able to successfully withdraw dialysis and mycophenolate while maintaining stable renal function. Conclusion Interferon-α is critical in antiviral immunity against hepatitis C but also acts as a pathogenic mediator for systemic lupus erythematosus, a condition associated with activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells that are depleted in human immunodeficiency virus infection. The occurrence of auto-antibodies and lupus-like features in the coinfections with hepatitis C require careful assessment. Immunosuppressant therapy for lupus risks exacerbating underlying infections in patients with concurrent human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and C.

  2. Risk factors of systemic lupus erythematosus flares during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Cruz-Dominguez, Pilar; Navarro, Carmen; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Saavedra, Miguel A

    2014-12-01

    This review examines the risk factors for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) flares during pregnancy. In preconception, anti-DNA, hypocomplementemia, previous thrombosis, triple antiphospholipid (aPL) antibody positivity, active lupus nephritis and discontinuation of medications such as hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine are factors associated with pregnancy failure. During pregnancy, SLE flares are associated with aPL antibodies, synergic changes of pregnancy on Th1 and TH2 cytokines, other cytokines and chemokines that interact with hormones such as estrogen and prolactin that amplify the inflammatory effect. From the clinical point of view, SLE activity at pregnancy onset, thrombocytopenia, lupus nephritis, arterial hypertension, aPL syndromes, preeclampsia is associated with lupus flares and fetal complications. In puerperium, the risk factors of flares are similar to pregnancy. Hyperactivity of immune system, autoantibodies, hyperprolactinemia, active lupus nephritis, decrease in TH2 cytokines with increase in TH1 cytokines probably participate in SLE flare. The SLE flares during pregnancy make the difference between an uncomplicated pregnancy and pregnancy with maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors leads the best treatment strategies to reduce flares and fetal complications in SLE patients.

  3. Prolactin has a pathogenic role in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Saavedra, Miguel A; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Torres-Aguilar, Honorio; Navarro, Carmen; Vazquez Del Mercado, Monica; Espinoza, Luis R

    2017-01-28

    Prolactin, a 23-kDa peptide hormone, is produced by the anterior pituitary gland and extrapituitary sites including the immune cells. Prolactin (PRL) participates in innate and adaptive immune response. PRL stimulates the immune cells by binding to receptor (PRL-R). Binding of PRL to its receptor activates the Janus kinase-signal transducer (JAK-STAT). Activation of these cascades results in endpoints such as immunoestimulator and immunosupressor action. Prolactin belongs to the network of immune-neuroendocrine interaction. Hyperprolactinemia has been found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and new evidence has confirmed a significant correlation between serum PRL levels and disease activity. PRL participates in activation of SLE during pregnancy and in pathogenesis of lupus nephritis, neuropsychiatric, serosal, hematologic, articular, and cutaneous involvement. Hyperprolactinemia was associated with increase IgG concentrations, anti-DNA antibodies, immune complex, glomerulonephritis, and accelerated mortality in murine lupus. Bromocriptine, a dopamine analog that suppresses PRL secretion, was associated with decreased lupus activity, prolonged lifespan, and restoration of immune competence in experimental model. In clinical trials, bromocriptine and derivative drugs showed beneficial therapeutic effect in treating human lupus, including pregnancy. Taken together, clinical and experimental results leave little doubt that PRL indeed contributes to the pathogenesis and clinical expression of SLE.

  4. Echocardiographic findings in asymptomatic systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdel GaffarA; Alghamdi, Abdulaziz A; ALjahlan, Mohammad A; Al-Homood, Ibrahim A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to use transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) imaging methods to identify cardiac dysfunction in asymptomatic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and to determine the association between echocardiographic findings and serology. This is a prospective cross-sectional study where 50 patients with confirmed diagnoses of SLE were recruited from rheumatology outpatient clinics. Clinical and serological evaluation to confirm the diagnosis of lupus was done in all patients. Fifty SLE patients, 46 (92%) females and 4 (8%) males, were recruited. Anti-double-stranded DNA (Anti-dsDNA), anticardiolipin, lupus anticoagulant, and anti-β2-glycoproteins were positive in 52.1, 32.6, 13.3, and 15.6%, respectively. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed mitral regurgitation in 16 patients (32%), pericardial effusion in16 patients (32%), aortic regurgitation in five patients (10%), and tricuspid regurgitation in 10 patients (20%). Eleven patients had left ventricular hypertrophy (22%), and eight patients had ventricular systolic dysfunction (16%). Only four patients had ventricular diastolic dysfunction (8%). A significant association between mitral and tricuspid valve regurgitation and positive anti-dsDNA (p lupus anticoagulant, and anti-β 2 glycoprotein antibodies were also associated with mitral valve regurgitation (p values 0.044, 0.006, and 0.023), respectively. Active disease assessed by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) was found to be associated with increased risk of mitral valvular leaflet thickening (p value 0.028). Performing regular transthoracic echocardiogram in asymptomatic SLE patients is important for early detection and appropriate treatment of cardiac lesions. Clinically quiescent but serologically active disease and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies were associated with structural heart abnormalities.

  5. CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS : A STUDY IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purushottam Rao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disorder in which organs and cells undergo damage mediated by tissue - binding auto antibodies and immune complexes 1 . Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is a multigenic disease . 1 People of all sexes, all ages and all ethnic groups are susceptible. Lupus nephrits, infection and thromboembolism contribute for mortality. Cardiac manifestations are not uncommon in systemic lupus erythematosus. It involves all the layers of the heart, pericardium, myocardium and endocardium as well as coronary arteries. AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To find out the prevalence of cardiac manifestations in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. METHODOLOGY: The study was conducted in t he Department of Medicine, Andhra Medical College, King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh. It is a tertiary care hospital. It was a study done on a selected population of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus based on the 1997 update of the 1982 Americ an College of Rheumatology classification criteria for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. RESULTS: In this study consisting of fifty patients, changes suggestive of cardiac disease were seen in 74% of patients. CONCLUSION: Systemic lupus erythematosus is a mult isystem disease. Prevalence of cardiac disease is not uncommon . Pericarditis or pericardial effusion is the most common followed by valvular heart disease

  6. Sensitivity to Change and Minimal Important Differences of the LupusQoL in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhone, Kathleen; Abbott, Janice; Sutton, Chris; Mullen, Montana; Lanyon, Peter; Rahman, Anisur; Yee, Chee‐Seng; Akil, Mohammed; Bruce, Ian N.; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Gordon, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Objective As a health‐related quality of life (HRQOL) measure, the LupusQoL is a reliable and valid measure for adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study evaluates the responsiveness and minimal important differences (MIDs) for the 8 LupusQoL domains. Methods Patients experiencing a flare were recruited from 9 UK centers. At each of the 10 monthly visits, HRQOL (LupusQoL, Short Form 36 health survey [SF‐36]), global rating of change (GRC), and disease activity using the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group 2004 index were assessed. The responsiveness of the LupusQoL and the SF‐36 was evaluated primarily when patients reported an improvement or deterioration on the GRC scale and additionally with changes in physician‐reported disease activity. MIDs were estimated as mean changes when minimal change was reported on the GRC scale. Results A total of 101 patients were recruited. For all LupusQoL domains, mean HRQOL worsened when patients reported deterioration and improved when patients reported an improvement in GRC; SF‐36 domains showed comparable responsiveness. Improvement in some domains of the LupusQoL/SF‐36 was observed with a decrease in disease activity, but when disease activity worsened, there was no significant change. LupusQoL MID estimates for deterioration ranged from −2.4 to −8.7, and for improvement from 3.5 to 7.3; for the SF‐36, the same MID estimates were −2.0 to −11.1 and 2.8 to 10.9, respectively. Conclusion All LupusQoL domains are sensitive to change with patient‐reported deterioration or improvement in health status. For disease activity, some LupusQoL domains showed responsiveness when there was improvement but none for deterioration. LupusQoL items were derived from SLE patients and provide the advantage of disease‐specific domains, important to the patients, not captured by the SF‐36. PMID:26816223

  7. Gestational weight gain in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudy, A M; Siega-Riz, A M; Engel, S M; Franceschini, N; Howard, A G; Clowse, M E B; Petri, M

    2017-05-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to estimate the proportion of pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus meeting Institute of Medicine guidelines for gestational weight gain and determine correlates of adherence to guidelines. Methods Singleton, live births in the Hopkins Lupus Pregnancy Cohort 1987-2015 were included. Pre-pregnancy weight was the weight recorded 12 months prior to pregnancy/first trimester. Final weight was the last weight recorded in the third trimester. Adherence to Institute of Medicine guidelines (inadequate, adequate, or excessive) was based on pre-pregnancy body mass index. Fisher's exact test and analysis of variance determined factors associated with not meeting guidelines. Stepwise selection estimated predictors of gestational weight gain. Results Of the 211 pregnancies, 34%, 24% and 42% had inadequate, adequate and excessive gestational weight gain, respectively. In exploratory analyses, differences in Institute of Medicine adherence were observed by pre-pregnancy body mass index, race, elevated creatinine during pregnancy and pre-pregnancy blood pressure. Odds of inadequate and excessive gestational weight gain increased 12% with each 1 kg/m(2) increase in pre-pregnancy body mass index. Lower maternal education was associated with increased odds of inadequate and excessive gestational weight gain. Conclusions As in the general population, most women with systemic lupus erythematosus did not meet Institute of Medicine guidelines. Our results identified predictors of gestational weight gain to aid in targeted interventions to improve guideline adherence in this population.

  8. [Dyslipidaemia and atherogenic risk in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batún Garrido, José Antonio de Jesús; Radillo Alba, Hugo Alberto; Hernández Núñez, Éufrates; Olán, Francisco

    2016-07-15

    Dyslipidaemia is a common comorbidity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Fifty-one patients were included. Variables associated with the disease and the drugs used were recorded. Atherogenic risk was calculated. Chi square was used for categorical variables. ANOVA was performed and a logistic regression model to determine the association of the variables with the presence of dyslipidaemia. A percentage of 68.6 had dyslipidaemia. A significant difference between the presence of dyslipidaemia and activity index measured by SLEDAI was found, the presence of lupus nephritis, use of prednisone≥20mg/day, evolution of the disease<3 years. Significance between the absence of dyslipidaemia and use of hydroxychloroquine was found. SLEDAI≥4 and the use of prednisone≥20mg/day were independently associated with the presence of dyslipidaemia. The average of Castelli rate was 5.02, the Kannel index was 2.97 and triglyceride/HDL-C ratio was 5.24. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have a high prevalence of dyslipidaemia and a high atherogenic rate, which increases cardiovascular risk significantly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Psoriasis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Konstantinos; Yap, Kristy Su-Ying; Pakchotanon, Rattapol; Polachek, Ari; Su, Jiandong; Urowitz, Murray B; Gladman, Dafna D

    2017-04-01

    The coexistence of psoriasis with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been reported in limited case series, raising hypotheses about shared pathogenetic mechanisms. Nevertheless, important differences regarding treatment do exist. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of psoriasis in a defined cohort of lupus patients. Patients with psoriasis were retrieved from the University of Toronto Lupus Clinic from its inception in 1970 up to 2015. Charts were hand-searched to collect information concerning demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables. Patients were matched with non-psoriasis lupus patients to identify the impact of supervening psoriasis on lupus activity, damage accrual, and venous thromboembolic (VTEs) and cardiovascular events (CVEs). Psoriasis was diagnosed in 63 patients (49 females, 14 males) for a prevalence of 3.46% (63/1823). The male-to-female ratio was significantly higher in non-psoriasis patients (0.286 vs. 0.138, p = 0.017). Plaque psoriasis was the most prominent type (55/63, 87.3%) whereas three patients had pustular disease; one had psoriatic arthritis. Nine patients (14.3%) were administered systemic treatment with methotrexate (n = 5), azathioprine (n = 1), ustekinumab (n = 3), and etanercept (n = 1). Psoriasis was definitely deteriorated by hydroxychloroquine in one patient. There was no significant impact of psoriasis on disease activity, damage accrual, VTEs, and CVEs. The prevalence of psoriasis was twice as high as that of the general Canadian population in this lupus cohort. Plaque psoriasis was the most prominent subtype, and topical treatment was adequate in the majority of patients. Supervening psoriasis had no significant impact on lupus activity and damage accrual.

  10. Ocular Complications in Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus: A Systematic Review with a Meta-Analysis of Reported Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Arrico, L; A. Abbouda; I. Abicca; Malagola, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ocular complications associated with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) are less studied compared with those ones associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The main ocular sites involved in patients affected by discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) are eyelids followed by orbit and periorbit, the least being cornea. The most common complications are blepharitis usually affecting the lower lid and associated with some type of lid lesion such as plaque or erythematosus patches and madaro...

  11. Retrospective analysis of plasma exchange combined with glucocorticosteroids for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus-related acute pancreatitis in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Kai; Yu, Fei; Ye, Cong; Dai, Yu-Jie; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Hu, Shao-Xian

    2016-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus-related acute pancreatitis (SLEAP) has a poor prognosis with a high mortality. We described the clinical features of SLEAP, and discussed the feasibility of plasma exchange (PE) combined with glucocorticosteroids (GC) in short-term prognosis and possible mechanism in reducing serum inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and removing serum lipids. A retrospective study was performed by an independent rheumatologist. Medical records of SLEAP from March 2010 to December 2014 were retrieved from Tongji Hospital information system, and patients were divided into two groups according to whether PE therapy was adopted. Sixteen patients treated with PE in combination with GC were classified as group A, and the other 10 patients who were treated with merely GC were classified as group B. Patients' clinical remission rate and average daily GC dosage after two-week therapy were compared between the two groups. Patients' serum inflammatory cytokines and lipid concentration were compared between baseline and after two-week treatment in both groups. Pearson correlation test was performed to determine association between serum cytokines and Ranson score. SLEDAI score in group A patients at baseline (14.8±3.1) showed no statistical difference from that in group B (14.1±3.3). At baseline serum IL-6 levels had no significant difference between group A [13.14 (11.12, 16.57) mg/L] and group B [14.63 (11.37, 16.37) mg/L]; after two-week therapy IL-6 decreased significantly in group A [9.16 (7.93, 10.75)mg/L] while it did not show decreasing trend in group B [13.62 (9.29,17.63) mg/L]. Serum lipid concentration after two-week therapy in group A [(TC=5.02±0.53, TG=1.46±0.44) mmol/L] decreased significantly compared to baseline [(TC=6.11±0.50, TG=2.14±1.03) mmol/L], while similar tendency was not observed in group B. The remission rate after two-week therapy was higher in group A (70.0%) than in group B (25.0%). Acute pancreatitis (AP) was one of the clinical

  12. Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery in assessment of cognitive parameters in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in relation to autoantibody profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaczewicz, Anna; Sobow, Tomasz; Kowalski, Jan; Ząbek, Jakub; Woźniacka, Anna; Bogaczewicz, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    To relate the cognitive parameters of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in remission to their profile of autoantibodies. The study included 32 patients with SLE in remission, with mild disease activity as indicated by SELENA-SLEDAI Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) was applied, using motor screening (MOT), big little circle (BLC), paired associated learning (PAL), stockings of Cambridge (SOC), and graded naming tests (GNT). Detection of autoantibodies against dsDNA, nucleosome (aNuc), Sm, and anticardiolipin (aCL: IgG and IgM) was performed with immunoassays. The SLE patients demonstrated standard scores below norms, matched according to age and gender, in the following tests: GNT (-0.87 ±0.85), SOC PSMM (-0.47 ±0.97), PAL (-1.88 ±3.58), and BLC (-0.31 ±1.90). GNT scores under -0.5 were found significantly more frequently in SLE patients, seen in roughly 66% of test subjects. Values for PAL and mean subsequent thinking time of stockings of Cambridge (SOC MSTT) were found to be lower than -0.5 in approximately half of the patients. Mean error of motor screening (MOT ME) was found to negatively correlate with mean latency of motor screening (MOT ML) (r = -0.55). PAL significantly correlated with SOC MSTT (r = 0.38) and with GNT (r = 0.36). Anti-dsDNA antibody level correlated negatively with MOT ME (r = -0.46). Anti-Nuc antibodies correlated with MOT ML (r = 0.41) but negatively correlated with MOT ME (r = -0.58). The levels of anti-Sm, anti-CL IgM and IgG did not correlate significantly with the outcomes of CANTAB. The age of the patients correlated negatively with MOT ME (r = -0.36), positively with BLC (r = 0.53) and negatively with SOC MSTT (r = -0.43). The level of anti-Nuc antibodies correlated with anti-dsDNA level (r = 0.62) and of anti-CL IgM with anti-Sm (r = 0.39) and anti-CL IgG (r = 0.87). CANTAB reveals a decrease in selected cognitive functions in patients with SLE. ACL IgG and anti-dsDNA antibodies indicated

  13. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus after treatment with paclitaxel and bevacizumab for metastatic breast cancer: a case report

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    Koulu Leena

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The monoclonal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody bevacizumab is increasingly used in the treatment of several malignant tumors. The usual side effects of this drug are hypertension and proteinuria. Paclitaxel is widely used in the treatment of breast cancer and head and neck carcinomas. Neither of these two drugs typically causes skin disorders. Paclitaxel-related cutaneous lupus erythematosus has been described before, but in earlier cases patients had a history of autoimmune disease. Case presentation We report a case of a 65-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with cutaneous lupus erythematosus after receiving paclitaxel-bevacizumab combination treatment as first-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer. Her cutaneous symptoms and increased serum anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies disappeared shortly after the discontinuation of therapy. Conclusion We conclude that cutaneous lupus erythematosus can also be seen in patients without earlier anamnesis of autoimmune disorders and that, furthermore, bevacizumab might cause atypical cutaneous side effects.

  14. Familial occurrence of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies in a Caucasian population of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corporaal, S.; Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees

    2002-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies in relatives of Caucasian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) we questioned 118 patients for the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in their relatives. Multicase SLE families were selected for further investigation: as

  15. A complicated multisystem flare of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Philip; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Lightstone, Liz

    2017-02-08

    We report a case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a young woman who became pregnant amid a severe flare. She continued to have active disease in the face of aggressive treatments complicated by several side effects of immunosuppressive drugs including recurrent sepsis and gestational diabetes. Her fetus was at risk for congenital heart block during the second and third trimesters. Despite an extremely guarded prognosis, she delivered a healthy baby girl. This case highlights the complexities of SLE management during pregnancy. We discuss the therapeutic options available in pregnancy, and highlight the importance of cross-specialty multidisciplinary care in these women.

  16. [The influence of pregnancy on the systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheva, S; Nikolov, A; Monov, C; Shumnalieva, R; Monova, D; Rashkov, R

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease caused by the interaction between genetic and environment factors which leads to abnormal immune responses. SLE affects more commonly women of childbearing age which raises the following questions--the influence of the disease activity on pregnancy and the influence of pregnancy on disease activity. On the one hand physiological changes occurring during pregnancy could lead to increased SLE activity, on the other hand the latter could mimic SLE activity. Differentiating these manifestations is important for the clinical practice--pregnancy and delivering guidance and SLE therapy.

  17. New onset of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Keisa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic inflammatory disease that frequently affects young women. If SLE is first suspected during pregnancy, the diagnostic criterion is the same as for nonpregnant women and the treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made. This study describes a 31-year-old pregnant woman who was hospitalized with shortness of breath, pain, and stiffness in phalangeal joints. The new onset of SLE was diagnosed. The disease was controlled by medical treatment. The patient had successful pregnancy and a healthy baby was delivered. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(4.000: 1221-1224

  18. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francisca Moraes-Fontes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs.

  19. GLUCOCORTICOIDS IN THE THERAPY OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Reshetnyak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite a more than fifty-year period after the introduction of glucocorticoids (GCs into therapeutic practice; they have headed the list of anti-inflammatory drugs so far. The paper analyzes current views on the terminology of GCs, mechanism of action, standardization of indications for their use in systemic lupus erythematosus, choice of a dose and a regimes of the drugs, as well as the rates of their decrease; the authors also review Russian and foreign literature on this problem and their own data.

  20. Chronic meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: An unusual etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic aseptic meningitis is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Apart from immunological causes and drugs, the aseptic meningitis group can include some unidentified viral infections that cannot be detected by routine microbiological testing. It is imperative to do complete cerebrospinal fluid (CSF workup before implicating the symptoms to disease activity or drugs, as untreated infections cause significant mortality in SLE. We present a case of young female with SLE who presented with chronic meningitis of an uncommon etiology.

  1. GLUCOCORTICOIDS IN THE THERAPY OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Reshetnyak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a more than fifty-year period after the introduction of glucocorticoids (GCs into therapeutic practice; they have headed the list of anti-inflammatory drugs so far. The paper analyzes current views on the terminology of GCs, mechanism of action, standardization of indications for their use in systemic lupus erythematosus, choice of a dose and a regimes of the drugs, as well as the rates of their decrease; the authors also review Russian and foreign literature on this problem and their own data.

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Qualls Clifford R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Methods We used Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI to assess white matter abnormalities in seventeen NPSLE patients, sixteen SLE patients without NPSLE, and twenty age- and gender-matched controls. Results NPSLE patients differed significantly from SLE and control patients in white matter integrity of the body of the corpus callosum, the left arm of the forceps major and the left anterior corona radiata. Conclusions Several possible mechanisms of white matter injury are explored, including vascular injury, medication effects, and platelet or fibrin macro- or microembolism from Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

  3. Acquired hemophilia A in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T; Tsukamoto, N; Suto, M; Uchiumi, H; Mitsuhashi, H; Yokohama, A; Maesawa, A; Nojima, Y; Naruse, T

    2001-06-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed acquired hemophilia A. The patient, a 24-year-old Japanese woman, was referred to our hospital because of uncontrollable bleeding following a tooth extraction. Laboratory examination revealed prolonged APTT (116 seconds), reduced factor VIII activity (2.8 %) and the presence of factor VIII inhibitor at a titer of 46.5 Bethesda units/ml. Transfusion of prothrombin complex concentrate and activated prothrombin complex concentrate followed by administration of prednisolone and cyclophosphamide successfully arrested bleeding and reduced the factor VIII inhibitor level. Acquired hemophilia A is a rare but lethal condition. Rapid diagnosis and introduction of adequate therapies are critical.

  4. Alveolar hemorrhage as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Holanda, Bruna A; Barreto, Isabela G Menna; de Araujo, Isadora S Gomes; de Araujo, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage (AH) is a rare syndrome that can often occur in autoimmune diseases, blood clotting disorders, infection or by acute inhalation injury, presenting rapid evolution and high mortality, especially with late diagnosis and treatment. Among the autoimmune diseases, there are reported cases in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An early diagnosis is an essential tool in the successful management of this complication, requiring aggressive treatment based on vigorous immunosuppression and broad-spectrum antibiotic. We describe here a case of alveolar hemorrhage associated with glomerulonephritis as the open presentation in a patient with SLE.

  5. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca; Antunes, Ana Margarida; Gruner, Heidi; Riso, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS) drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs. PMID:27069477

  6. Disseminated tuberculosis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harikrishna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a systemic autoimmune disorder. Intercurrent infections and nephritis are important causes of mortality in SLE. Among infections, tuberculosis (TB is of particular importance as SLE patients are more susceptible to develop active TB, prior TB can precipitate SLE in genetically susceptible individuals and similar clinical presentations of SLE flare and TB may lead to delayed diagnosis. We report a patient with SLE, who developed disseminated TB. The present case highlights the importance of a high index of suspicion and focussed evaluation in the diagnosis of intercurrent infections, particularly TB in patients with SLE.

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus in the elderly: clinical and immunological characteristics.

    OpenAIRE

    Font, J.; Pallarés, L.; Cervera, R; López-Soto, A; Navarro, M.; Bosch, X.; Ingelmo, M

    1991-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) predominantly affects young women in their 20s. In 40 out of 250 (16%) patients with SLE seen in our hospital disease onset occurred after the age of 50. The interval between the time of onset and diagnosis was five years in this older group compared with three years in the younger group. Arthritis, as a first symptom, was less common in the older onset group. During the follow up a lower incidence of arthritis, malar rash, photosensitivity, and nephropathy ...

  8. Alveolar hemorrhage as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Holanda, Bruna A.; Barreto, Isabela G. Menna; de Araujo, Isadora S. Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage (AH) is a rare syndrome that can often occur in autoimmune diseases, blood clotting disorders, infection or by acute inhalation injury, presenting rapid evolution and high mortality, especially with late diagnosis and treatment. Among the autoimmune diseases, there are reported cases in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An early diagnosis is an essential tool in the successful management of this complication, requiring aggressive treatment based on vigorous immunosuppression and broad-spectrum antibiotic. We describe here a case of alveolar hemorrhage associated with glomerulonephritis as the open presentation in a patient with SLE. PMID:27994272

  9. Genetic Factors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Contribution to Disease Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Borgiani, Paola; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Rufini, Sara; Cipriano, Enrica; Alessandri, Cristiano; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Sili Scavalli, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors exert an important role in determining Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, interplaying with environmental factors. Several genetic studies in various SLE populations have identified numerous susceptibility loci. From a clinical point of view, SLE is characterized by a great heterogeneity in terms of clinical and laboratory manifestations. As widely demonstrated, specific laboratory features are associated with clinical disease subset, with different severity degree. Similarly, in the last years, an association between specific phenotypes and genetic variants has been identified, allowing the possibility to elucidate different mechanisms and pathways accountable for disease manifestations. However, except for Lupus Nephritis (LN), no studies have been designed to identify the genetic variants associated with the development of different phenotypes. In this review, we will report data currently known about this specific association. PMID:26798662

  10. Immunosuppression in pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio; Moroni, Gabriella

    2015-05-01

    Most pregnancies are successful in women with systemic lupus erythematosus, particularly if the disease is quiescent and there are no signs of active nephritis. There is no major impact of immunosuppression on maternal outcome. However, high doses of cyclosporine and glucocorticoids are used which may favor development of hypertension or preeclampsia. Some immunosuppressive drugs may exert toxic effects on the fetus. Glucocorticoids may cause small birth weight, and azathioprine and calcineurin inhibitors may be associated with lower birth weight, gestational age and prematurity. Cyclophosphamide may cause fetal malformation when given in the first trimester. Mycophenolate and leflunomide are teratogenic drugs and should be withdrawn before conception in case of programmed pregnancy or should be rapidly discontinued in case of unexpected pregnancy. Option counseling for pregnancy and correct use of immunosuppressive drugs are prerequisites for a successful pregnancy in women with lupus.

  11. Cardiac tamponade as initial presentation in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawaid, Ambreen; Almas, Aysha

    2014-05-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is one of the many diseases known as 'the great imitators' because it can have diverse presentations and so is misunderstood for other illnesses. This case illustrates a 19 years old girl with SLE who presented as cardiac tamponade which is a rare feature of lupus pericarditis requiring medical and surgical treatment. Even after pericardiocentesis and steroid therapy there was a re-accumulation of the pericardial fluid resulting in cardiac tamponade which led to pericardial window formation. This case draws attention to the need to consider the diagnosis of tamponade in patients with connective tissue disease and dyspnea or hemodynamic compromise. It also outlines the treatment options available so that surgical referral, if needed, can be done timely for this rare but life threatening manifestation of SLE.

  12. Genetically engineered biological agents in therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Aleksandrovna Aseeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototype for chronic autoimmune disease. Its prevalence is 20 to 70 cases per 100,000 women and varies by race and ethnicity. Despite considerable progress in traditional therapy, many problems associated with the management of these patients need to be immediately solved: thus, 50-80% are found to have activity signs and/or frequent exacerbations and about 30% of the patients have to stop work; Class IV lupus nephritis increases the risk of terminalrenal failure. In the past 20 years great progress has been made in studying the pathogenesis of SLE: biological targets to affect drugs have been sought and fundamentally new therapeutic goals defined. Belimumab is the first genetically biological agent specially designed to treat SLE, which is rightly regarded as one of the most important achievements of rheumatology in the past 50 years.

  13. [Tapering and termination of immunosuppressive therapy : Systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aringer, M; Leuchten, N; Fischer-Betz, R

    2017-02-01

    Similar to patients with other rheumatic diseases, patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) nowadays can also have the desire to terminate immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory medications. In order to provide appropriate advice to patients, the two main issues are the risk of severe adverse events under long-term therapy with any drug and the perceived risk of a flare, in particular of severe flares. The risks of long-term therapy vary greatly between drugs, ranging from severe unacceptable risks with cyclophosphamide and higher dose glucocorticoids to low risks usually outweighed by long-term benefits with hydroxychloroquine. The individual risk of flares is often difficult to estimate but clinical remission and at least 3 years of immunosuppression are recommended for lupus nephritis. The duration of remission can also be shorter in cases of milder forms of disease. This review article tries to put the available evidence into a clinical perspective and to derive concrete recommendations.

  14. Mitral Valve Surgery in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnoosh Foroughi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Valvular heart disease is the common cardiac manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with a tendency for mitral valve regurgitation. In this study we report a case of mitral valve replacement for mitral stenosis caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis in the setting of SLE. In addition, we provide a systematic review of the literature on mitral valve surgery in the presence of Libman-Sacks endocarditis because its challenge on surgical options continues. Surgical decision depends on structural involvement of mitral valve and presence of active lupus nephritis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Review of the literature has also shown that outcome is good in most SLE patients who have undergone valvular surgery, but association of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with SLE has negative impact on the outcome.

  15. Targeting BLyS in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaoyang; La Cava, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disabling autoimmune disease that significantly impacts the quality of life of patients, and can associate with several complications including end-stage renal disease and shortened lifespan. A central component in the pathogenesis of SLE is the B-cell production of autoantibodies to multiple self-antigens. Since, B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) plays a key role in the selection, differentiation and survival of most B cells, it has been studied as a therapeutic target in SLE. After a gap of more than fifty years without new drugs being approved for this disease, the human neutralizing anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody belimumab has recently been approved by the FDA for SLE therapy. This review provides an overview on the targeting of BLyS in lupus animal models, the use of belimumab in human SLE, and relevant patents.

  16. Hydrocephalus in an elderly man with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Wu, Tsai-Hung; Chou, Chung-Tei; Tsai, Chang-Youh

    2009-06-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with quadriplegia, seizures, dysarthria, motor aphasia and urinary incontinence lasting for several years. The development of proteinuria and increased susceptibility to infections brought the physician's attention to possible underlying autoimmune diseases. Laboratory investigations revealed evidence for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome. Imaging studies showed obstructive hydrocephalus. Several courses of methylprednisolone therapies followed by maintenance therapy with low-dose steroid, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and antihypertensives improved the proteinuria and dysarthria but not the urinary incontinence or dementia. A thromboembolic event in the central nervous system secondary to phospholipid antibodies or lupus activity may represent a pathogenetic basis for hydrocephalus. When encountering a patient with hydrocephalus but without apparent predisposing factors, it is always important to include SLE as a differential diagnosis.

  17. Aplastic anemia as a feature of systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalayer, Émilie; Ffrench, Martine; Cathébras, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral cytopenias are common in systemic lupus erythematosus, but bone marrow involvement is rarely reported. Aplastic anemia is the result of immune-mediated destruction of hematopoietic stem cells causing pancytopenia and characterized by an empty bone marrow. This rare but serious disease has been described as an unusual manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. We reviewed the 25 cases published in the English language literature and discuss the clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology of aplastic anemia as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. We report here the first case of aplastic anemia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus treated with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Over one half of patients received concomitantly the diagnoses of systemic lupus erythematosus and aplastic anemia. No clinical or histological features can distinguish primary aplastic anemia from aplastic anemia occurring in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The overall mortality is about 15% and corticosteroid-based therapy alone or in combination with other immunomodulatory drugs can restore bone marrow function. Systemic lupus erythematosus may be complicated by bone marrow involvement. The diagnosis of peripheral cytopenias should be confirmed by bone marrow aspiration. All these patients should receive cortisone as a first treatment. Plasma exchanges seem to have some efficacy. Other different immunomodulatory therapies were used with variable results.

  18. Ultraviolet-A1 irradiation therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus, SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies, which bind to antigens and are deposited within tissues to fix complement, resulting in widespread systemic inflammation. The studies presented herein are consistent with hyperpolarized, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-deficient mitochondria being central to the disease process. These hyperpolarized mitochondria resist the depolarization required for activation-induced apoptosis. The mitochondrial ATP deficits add to this resistance to apoptosis and also reduce the macrophage energy that is needed to clear apoptotic bodies. In both cases, necrosis, the alternative pathway of cell death, results. Intracellular constituents spill into the blood and tissues, eliciting inflammatory responses directed at their removal. What results is “autoimmunity.” Ultraviolet (UV)-A1 photons have the capacity to remediate this aberrancy. Exogenous exposure to low-dose, full-body, UV-A1 radiation generates singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen has two major palliative actions in patients with lupus and the UV-A1 photons themselves have several more. Singlet oxygen depolarizes the hyperpolarized mitochondrion, triggering non-ATP-dependent apoptosis that deters necrosis. Next, singlet oxygen activates the gene encoding heme oxygenase (HO-1), a major governor of systemic homeostasis. HO-1 catalyzes the degradation of the oxidant heme into biliverdin (converted to bilirubin), Fe, and carbon monoxide (CO), the first three of these exerting powerful antioxidant effects, and in conjunction with a fourth, CO, protecting against injury to the coronary arteries, the central nervous system, and the lungs. The UV-A1 photons themselves directly attenuate disease in lupus by reducing B cell activity, preventing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity, slowing an epigenetic progression toward SLE, and ameliorating discoid and subacute cutaneous lupus. Finally, a combination of

  19. Mechanisms of Dyslipoproteinemias in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo F. Borba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity and inflammation are associated with marked changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in SLE. Autoantibodies and cytokines are able to modulate lipoprotein lipase (LPL activity, a key enzyme in lipid metabolism, with a consequent “lupus pattern” of dyslipoproteinemia characterized by elevated levels of very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL and triglycerides (TG and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL levels. This pattern favors an enhanced LDL oxidation with a subsequent deleterious foam cell formation. Autoantibodies and immunocomplexes may aggravate this oxidative injury by inducing accumulation and deposition of oxLDL in endothelial cells. Drugs and associated diseases usually magnify the close interaction of these factors and further promote the proatherogenic environment of this disease.

  20. Acute closed lock in a patient with lupus erythematosus: case review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, D M; Lovasko, J H; Montana, J; Waide, F L

    1992-01-01

    Collagen failure has been shown to result in synovitis, joint adhesions, and internal joint derangement. This case report illustrates the similarities between patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and an internally deranged temporomandibular joint and patients with internal derangement with no lupus erythematosus. If abnormalities in intra-articular collagen tissue lead to adhesion formation and restrict normal mobility during translatory movements, joint mechanics would be compromised. Arthritic changes, vasculitis, and synovitis of systemic lupus erythematosus appear to be contributory factors in this pathophysiologic process. Diagnostic and therapeutic arthroscopic surgery was performed. Acute and chronic signs of synovitis were observed during surgery, and tissue samples were obtained for histologic interpretation.

  1. Illness perceptions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and proliferative lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daleboudt, G M N; Broadbent, E; Berger, S P; Kaptein, A A

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the illness perceptions of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and whether perceptions are influenced by type of treatment for proliferative lupus nephritis. In addition, the illness perceptions of SLE patients were compared with those of patients with other chronic illnesses. Thirty-two patients who had experienced at least one episode of proliferative lupus nephritis were included. Patients were treated with either a high or low-dose cyclophosphamide (CYC) regimen (National Institutes of Health [NIH] vs. Euro-Lupus protocol). Illness perceptions were measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and a drawing assignment. The low-dose CYC group perceived their treatment as more helpful than the high-dose CYC group. In comparison with patients with asthma, SLE patients showed more negative illness perceptions on five of the eight illness perception domains. Drawings of the kidney provided additional information about perceptions of treatment effectiveness, kidney function and patients' understanding of their illness. Drawing characteristics showed associations with perceptions of consequences, identity, concern and personal control. These findings suggest that the type of treatment SLE patients with proliferative lupus nephritis receive may influence perceptions of treatment effectiveness. In addition, patients' drawings reveal perceptions of damage caused by lupus nephritis to the kidneys and the extent of relief provided by treatment. The finding that SLE is experienced as a more severe illness than other chronic illnesses supports the need to more frequently assess and aim to improve psychological functioning in SLE patients.

  2. Characteristics of pleural effusions in systemic lupus erythematosus: differential diagnosis of lupus pleuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, B Y; Yoon, M J; Shin, K; Lee, Y J; Song, Y W

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the clinical characteristics of pleural effusion in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A prospective analysis of 17 SLE patients with pleural effusion (seven lupus pleuritis, eight transudative effusions and two parapneumonic effusions) was performed. Thirty non-SLE patients with pleural effusion were recruited as controls. A pleural fluid ANA titer ≥1:160 was found in 8/17 (47.1%) SLE patients and none of the 30 non-SLE patients (p = 0.0001). Pleural fluid to serum C3 ratios were significantly lower in SLE than in non-SLE (median (minimum-maximum) 0.29 (0.03-0.43) versus 0.52 (0.26-0.73), p = 0.0002). Among SLE patients, pleural fluid ANA titers ≥1:160 were more frequently found in patients with lupus pleuritis than in those with pleural effusion from causes other than lupus itself (85.7% versus 20.0%, p = 0.0152). Serum CRP levels were significantly increased in patients with lupus pleuritis compared with SLE patients with transudative pleural effusion (2.30 (0.30-5.66) versus 0.7 (0.12-1.47) mg/dl, p = 0.0062). In conclusion, pleural fluid ANA titer and serum CRP levels are significantly increased in lupus pleuritis. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. The Euro-lupus project: epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, R; Khamashta, M A; Hughes, G R V

    2009-09-01

    The Euro-lupus project provides updated information on the epidemiologic characteristics of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the change of the millennium and defines several clinical and immunological prognostic factors. The Euro-lupus cohort is composed of 1000 patients with SLE who have been followed prospectively since 1991. Among other findings, this project has shown that a) the age at onset of the disease, the gender and the autoantibody pattern, among other factors, modify the disease expression and define some specific SLE subsets; b) most of the SLE inflammatory manifestations are less common after long-term evolution of the disease, thus probably reflecting the effect of therapy as well as the progressive remission of the disease in many patients and c) a more prominent role of thrombotic events is becoming evident affecting both morbidity and mortality in SLE.

  4. Burden of Serious Infections in Adults with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tektonidou, Maria G.; Wang, Zhong; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Ward, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of hospitalizations for serious infections, trends in rates from 1996 to 2011, and in-hospital mortality between patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and those without SLE in a national sample. Methods We analyzed hospitalizations for pneumonia, bacteremia/sepsis, urinary tract infections, skin infections, and opportunistic infections among adults in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. We compared rates of hospitalizations yearly among patients with SLE and the general population. We also computed odds ratios for in-hospital mortality. Results In 1996, the estimated number of hospitalizations for pneumonia in patients with SLE was 4382, followed by sepsis (2305), skin infections (1422), urinary tract infections (643), and opportunistic infections (370). Rates were much higher in SLE than those without SLE, with age-adjusted relative risks ranging from 5.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) 5.5, 6.0) for pneumonia to 9.8 (95% CI 9.1, 10.7) for urinary tract infection in 1996. Risks increased over time, so that by 2011, all relative risks exceeded 12.0. Overall risk of in-hospital mortality was higher in SLE only for opportunistic infections (adjusted odds ratio 1.52; 95% CI 1.12, 2.07). However, in pneumonia and sepsis, mortality risks were higher in SLE among those that required mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Hospitalization rates for serious infections in SLE increased substantially between 1996 and 2011, reaching over 12 times higher than in patients without SLE in 2011. Reasons for this acceleration are unclear. In-hospital mortality was higher among patients with SLE and opportunistic infections, and those with pneumonia or sepsis who required mechanical ventilation. PMID:25732901

  5. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: where are we now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Padovan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available When dealing with neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (NPSLE there are still many controversial topics. In 1999 the American College of Rheumatology gave classification criteria for 19 clinical syndromes. However major problems are still related to low specificity of some of them such as headache, cognitive impairment or mood disorders. Even though a frequency of CNS involvement from 14 to 75% has been described, depending on both the population studied and the methodology of assessment, a lower frequency ranging from 21 to 28 % derived by larger case series seems more realistic. The introduction of the concept of “borderline cases”, proposed by Italian Study Group for NP-SLE, is based both on clinical and instrumental evaluation and could represent a useful tool when dealing with conditions which do not fulfil ACR classification. Also the relationship between SLE activity and NP involvement is a debated issue. Concerning pathogenesis, it seems reasonable to consider multifactorial mechanisms related to antibody-mediated damage, antiphospholipid pro-thrombotic effect, non-inflammatory vasculopathy and cytokines mediated cytotoxycity. However, direct and unequivocal evidence for the implication of any of the above-mentioned mechanisms is still lacking. Although a wide range of neuroimaging tools have been used to evaluate CNS involvement, no single technique has proven to be definitive and, when dealing with a patient with suspected NPSLE, it is important to combine different diagnostic techniques. Due to the lack of effective imaging along with limitation in knowledge of underlying pathogenetic mechanisms and paucity of histopathologic findings, therapeutic approach in NPSLE remains a difficult issue and is currently based on personal experience. Italian Study Group for NP-SLE proposes the creation of a national registry on NPSLE to validate ACR classification criteria. Furthermore, the possibility to collect large series and

  6. Effect of psychological intervention on health-related quality of life in people with systemic lupus erythematosus: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liang

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: The results show that psychological interventions can effectively improve the health-related quality of life in patients with SLE. The full benefit and clinical performance of psychological care requires further investigation by a series of multicenter, large-sample size randomized controlled trails.

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy: clinical evolution, maternal and perinatal outcomes and placental findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Garanhani de Castro Surita

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic disease that is more frequent in women of reproductive age. The relationship between lupus and pregnancy is problematic: maternal and fetal outcomes are worse than in the general population, and the management of flare-ups is difficult during this period. The aim here was to compare the outcomes of 76 pregnancies in 67 women with lupus, according to the occurrence or absence of flare-ups. DESIGN AND SETTING: An observational cohort clinical study evaluating the evolution of pregnant women with lupus who were receiving care at the prenatal outpatient clinic, Centro de Atenção Integral à Saúde da Mulher, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (CAISM/Unicamp, between 1995 and 2002. METHODS: Data were collected on a precoded form. The women were divided into two groups according to the occurrence or absence of flare-ups, as defined by the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI. The presence or absence of flare-ups and renal involvement was considered to be the independent variable and the other results were dependent variables. RESULTS: Flare-ups occurred in 85.3% of cases, and were most significant when there was renal involvement. This was related to greater numbers of women with preeclampsia and poor perinatal outcome. Intrauterine growth restriction was more common in the women with active disease. Placental weight was significantly lower in the women with renal involvement. CONCLUSIONS: Flare-ups and renal involvement in lupus patients during pregnancy are associated with increased maternal and perinatal complications.

  8. Construct and criterion validity of the Euro Qol-5D in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-li Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the construct and criterion validity of the Euro Qol-5D (EQ-5D, which allows quality-adjusted life-years to be calculated, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. METHODS: Consecutive SLE patients who had been followed at the Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University were recruited. Cross-sectional correlations of the EQ-5D with equivalent domains in disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL, LupusQol, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI measures, the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index (SDI, and patient characteristics were tested. Discriminant validity to assess the ability to distinguish between patients of different disease severity was assessed. There also were evaluations of ceiling and floor effects. RESULTS: 240 patients were recruited in total. The EQ-5D correlated moderately to strongly with all domains of the LupusQoL (r: 0.44-0.7 apart from intimate relationships (r = 0.25 and body image (r = 0.18. There was moderate negative correlation between EQ-5D and clinical assessment of disease, SLEDAI (r = -0.589 and SDI (r = -0.509. When compared with equivalent domains on LupusQoL, there was good construct validity in EQ-5D (r: 0.631-0.812. EQ-5D could also discriminate patients with varied disease severity (according SLEDAI and SDI. There was no floor effect in EQ-5D but the ceiling effect remains strong (34%. CONCLUSION: Our results provide sufficient evidence that the EQ-5D displays construct and criterion validity for use in SLE patients. Disease-specific measures of HRQoL used alongside may be a better choice.

  9. Low prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in hospitalized patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: review of a clinical data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, T M; Mahadeshwar, P; Nguyen, S; Li, J; Kapoor, S; Bathon, J; Giles, J; Askanase, A

    2017-01-01

    Objective In the era of powerful immunosuppression, opportunistic infections are an increasing concern in systemic lupus erythematosus. One of the best-studied opportunistic infections is Pneumocystis pneumonia; however, the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in systemic lupus erythematosus is not clearly defined. This study evaluates the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in hospitalized systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with a focus on validating the Pneumocystis pneumonia and systemic lupus erythematosus diagnoses with clinical information. Methods This retrospective cohort study evaluates the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in all systemic lupus erythematosus patients treated at Columbia University Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital between January 2000 and September 2014, using electronic medical record data. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and patients with renal transplants (including both early and late post-transplant patients) represented immunocompromised control groups. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Pneumocystis pneumonia, HIV/AIDS, or renal transplant were identified using diagnostic codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9). Results Out of 2013 hospitalized systemic lupus erythematosus patients, nine had presumed Pneumocystis pneumonia, yielding a low prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in systemic lupus erythematosus of 0.45%. Three of the nine Pneumocystis pneumonia cases were patients with concomitant systemic lupus erythematosus and HIV/AIDS. Only one of these nine cases was histologically confirmed as Pneumocystis pneumonia, in a patient with concomitant systemic lupus erythematosus and HIV/AIDS and a CD4 count of 13 cells/mm(3). The prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in renal transplant patients and HIV/AIDS patients was 0.61% and 5.98%, respectively. Conclusion Given the reported high rate of adverse effects

  10. The Avise Lupus Test and Cell-bound Complement Activation Products Aid the Diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifaceted disease, and its diagnosis may be challenging. A blood test for the diagnosis of SLE, the Avise Lupus test, has been recently commercialized and validated in clinical studies. Objectives: To evaluate the use of the Avise Lupus test by community rheumatologists. Methods: The study is a longitudinal, case-control, retrospective review of medical charts. Cases had a positive test result, and controls had a negative result; all pati...

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology studies of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Lin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NP-SLE is the central nervous system (CNS involvement of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. The diagnosis of NP-SLE may be difficult due to the lack of specific biomarker. CNS cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cytology is diagnostic significant to CNS autoimmune disease. This paper described the characteristics of CSF cytology and evaluated its diagnostic value in NP-SLE. Methods Seventy-six eligible patients with clear diagnosis of NP-SLE were collected for CSF cytological examinations. Results The CSF cytology findings of 25 cases in 76 were abnormal, among which 16 cases showed lymphocytic inflammatory reactions; 8 cases had slight increase of neutrophile granulocyte percent; 9 cases showed lymphocyte-neutrophile inflammation. Activated lymphocytes together with monocytes were present in 24 cases. Among those cases, abnormal endocytosis of monocytes, which presented as monocytes phagocytosing lymphocytes or plasmocytes, was shown in 17 cases; plasmocytes were found in 17 cases. Conclusion The diagnosis of NP-SLE is based on clinical, neuroimaging and CSF studies. Among these methods, the CSF cytology findings are quite useful in practice, since the CSF cytological inflammatory reactions, especially the presentation of abnormal phagocytes in CSF is typical in NP-SLE and indicates its vasculitic mechanism.

  12. [Angina Pectoris in a Young Woman with Lupus Erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braumann, Simon; Bartram, Malte P; Pfister, Roman; Michels, Guido

    2017-09-01

    History and clinical findings We present a 31-year old woman with a 6-year history of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) who presented to the emergency room with typical chest pain. ECG and transthoracic echocardiography were normal. Her working diagnosis of pericarditis was made due to systemic progression of her lupus erythematosus (LE). Treatment with NSAIDs was initiated and her immunosuppressive regimen intensified. The patient was discharged after resolution of her symptoms. A week later, the patient was seen at the rheumatology clinic with recurrence and aggravation of her symptoms. She was found to have elevated troponin and cardiac enzymes and therefore underwent cardiac catheterization, revealing three vessel coronary artery disease. Therapy and course The patient underwent urgent open surgical myocardial revascularization. Despite the immunosuppressive therapy the postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusions The risk for coronary artery disease in LE patients is very high. Particularly in young women presenting with chest pain, regardless of typical cardiopulmonary manifestations of LE such as pericarditis and pleurisy, acute coronary syndrome should always be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. A Patient With Plaque Type Morphea Mimicking Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Wardhana Wardhana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Morphea is an uncommon connective tissue disease with the most prominent feature being thickening or fibrosis of the dermal without internal organ involvement. It is also known as a part of localized scleroderma. Based on clinical presentation and depth of tissue involvement, morphea is classified into several forms, and about two thirds of adults with morphea have plaque type. Overproduction of collagen production by fibroblast is the cause of abnormality in morphea, and the hyperactivity mechanism of fibroblast is still unknown, although there are several mechanisms already proposed. Plaque type morphea is actually a benign and self limited. Plaque type morphea that mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus in clinical appearance, such as alopecia and oral mucosal ulcers, is uncommon. A case of plaque type morphea mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus in a 20 year old woman was discussed. The patient was treated with local and systemic immunosuppressant and antioxydant. The patient’s condition is improved without any significant side effects. Key words: morphea, plaque type.

  14. Does parvovirus infection have a role in systemic lupus erythematosus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Tami; Zandman-Goddard, Giselle; Langevitz, Pnina; Rudnic, Hagit; Grossman, Zehava; Rotman-Pikielny, Pnina; Levy, Yair

    2017-01-23

    We sought to evaluate a possible link between parvovirus B19 infection and the clinical and laboratory expression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE patients were examined to evaluate their clinical status and disease activity. A complete Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score was obtained for each patient. In addition, we determined the level of systemic involvement throughout the course of the disease. Blood levels of IgM and IgG antibodies to parvovirus B19, levels of anti-dsDNA, C3, and C4 were measured. A PCR real-time assay was used to determine the presence of parvovirus B19 genetic material. The viral genome was found in sera of 2 of 51(3.9%) patients with SLE. There was no correlation between viral serology and the clinical and serological parameters of the disease. More SLE patients with secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) had IgG and IgM antibodies to the virus (p < 0.029 and p < 0.018, respectively). These patients also had a higher titer of IgG antibodies to parvovirus B19 compared to SLE patients without APS. In this group of SLE patients, no association was found between parvovirus infection and the presence or activity of SLE. The results of the study suggest an association between parvovirus infection and antibody production directed against phospholipids.

  15. Disease-specific patient reported outcome tools for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Meenakshi; Pickard, A Simon; Block, Joel A; Kumar, Rajan B; Mikolaitis, Rachel A; Wilke, Caitlyn T; Rodby, Roger A; Fogg, Louis; Sequeira, Winston; Utset, Tammy O; Cash, Thomas F; Moldovan, Iona; Katsaros, Emmanuel; Nicassio, Perry; Ishimori, Mariko L; Kosinsky, Mark; Merrill, Joan T; Weisman, Michael H; Wallace, Daniel J

    2012-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can significantly affect both health and non-health-related quality of life (HRQOL and non-HRQOL). However, of the existent published patient-reported outcome (PRO) tools, none were developed from US patients, an ethnically diverse population. Furthermore, these tools do not address men with SLE or assess non-HRQOL issues. Herein, we present the development and validation of the Lupus Patient-Reported Outcome tool (LupusPRO) and discuss its clinical utility and research value compared with other PRO tools currently available for SLE. Beginning with a conceptual framework, items for LupusPRO were generated using feedback from women and men with SLE. The tool underwent iterations based on patient feedback and clinimetric and psychometric analyses. Validity (content, construct, and criterion) and reliability (internal consistency and test-retest) for the 44-item LupusPRO tool are presented. Consistent with the conceptual framework, items were identified that were related to HRQOL and non-HRQOL constructs. HRQOL domains included (1) lupus symptoms; (2) physical health (physical function, role physical); (3) pain-vitality; (4) emotional health (emotional function and role emotional); (5) body image; (6) cognition; (7) procreation; and (8) lupus medications. Non-HRQOL domains were (1) available social support and coping; (2) desires-goals; and (3) satisfaction with medical care. Internal consistency reliability (0.68-0.94), test-retest reliability (0.55-0.92), content, construct (r > 0.50 with SF-36), and criterion (r > -0.35 with disease activity) validity were fair to good. LupusPRO is a valid and reliable disease-targeted patient-reported health outcome tool that is generalizable to SLE patients in the United States of varied ethnic backgrounds and either gender. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Fibromyalgia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and evaluation of SLE activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Frederick; Petri, Michelle; Alarcón, Graciela S; Goldman, John; Chakravarty, Eliza F; Katz, Robert S; Karlson, Elizabeth W

    2009-01-01

    To determine if fibromyalgia (FM) or fibromyalgia-ness (the tendency to respond to illness and psychosocial stress with fatigue, widespread pain, general increase in symptoms, and similar factors) is increased in patients with compared to those without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); to determine whether FM or fibromyalgia-ness biases the SLE Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ); and to determine if the SLAQ is overly sensitive to FM symptoms. We developed a 16-item SLE Symptom Scale (SLESS) modeled on the SLAQ and used that scale to investigate the relation between SLE symptoms and fibromyalgia-ness in 23,321 patients with rheumatic disease. FM was diagnosed by survey FM criteria, and fibromyalgia-ness was measured using the Symptom Intensity (SI) Scale. As comparison groups, we combined patients with rheumatoid arthritis and noninflammatory rheumatic disorders into an "arthritis" group and also utilized a physician-diagnosed group of patients with FM. FM was identified in 22.1% of SLE and 17.0% of those with arthritis. The SI scale was minimally increased in SLE. The correlation between SLAQ and SLESS was 0.738. SLESS/SLAQ scale items (Raynaud's phenomenon, rash, fever, easy bruising, hair loss) were significantly more associated with SLE than FM, while the reverse was true for headache, abdominal pain, paresthesias/stroke, fatigue, cognitive problems, and muscle pain or weakness. There was no evidence of disproportionate symptom-reporting associated with fibromyalgia-ness. Self-reported SLE was associated with an increased prevalence of FM that was unconfirmed by physicians, compared to SLE confirmed by physicians. The prevalence of FM in SLE is minimally increased compared with its prevalence in patients with arthritis. Fibromyalgia-ness does not bias the SLESS and should not bias SLE assessments, including the SLAQ.

  17. A case of "refractory" lupus erythematosus profundus responsive to rituximab [case report].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McArdle, Adrian

    2012-02-01

    Lupus erythematosus profundus is a rare complication of systemic lupus erythematosus characterized by the presence of deep, tender subcutaneous nodules. A 22-year-old African-American female with extensive lupus profundus resistant to conventional therapies was treated with two infusions of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab, at a dosage of 1,000 mg each. The patient demonstrated a remarkable clinical response as indicated by the disappearance of the nodules. B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab used alone or in combination with other therapies may be a viable option in patients with lupus profundus refractory to current therapies.

  18. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus are associated with clinically significant cardiovascular risk: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselvig, J Halskou; Ahlehoff, O; Dreyer, L; Gislason, G; Kofoed, K

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a well-known cardiovascular risk factor. Less is known about cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated the risk of mortality and adverse cardiovascular events in patients diagnosed with SLE and CLE. We conducted a cohort study of the entire Danish population aged ≥ 18 and ≤ 100 years, followed from 1997 to 2011 by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for a composite cardiovascular endpoint and all-cause mortality, for patients with SLE and CLE. A total of 3282 patients with CLE and 3747 patients with SLE were identified and compared with 5,513,739 controls. The overall HR for the composite CVD endpoint was 1.31 (95% CI 1.16-1.49) for CLE and 2.05 (95% CI 1.15-3.44) for SLE. The corresponding HRs for all-cause mortality were 1.32 (95% CI 1.20-1.45) for CLE and 2.21 (95% CI 2.03-2.41) for SLE. CLE and SLE were associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD and all-cause mortality. Local and chronic inflammation may be the driver of low-grade systemic inflammation.

  19. New-onset systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunmei; Zhao, Jijun; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Zilian; Wang, Hongyue; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Hanshi; Yang, Niansheng

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have been published focusing on the clinical features of new-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during pregnancy. This study examined the clinical characteristics of SLE during pregnancy or puerperium. The clinical characteristics and serological parameters of 48 patients with onset of SLE during pregnancy were retrospectively compared with those of age-matched new-onset SLE patients who were diagnosed in a period of more than 12 months without pregnancy (n = 65) and age-matched preeclampsia patients (n = 48). SLE tended to occur during the first and second trimesters (33 and 42 %, respectively). Lupus nephritis (LN) and severe thrombocytopenia were more commonly seen in new-onset SLE during pregnancy than in patients without pregnancy (68.8 vs 35.4 % and 25 vs 9.2 %, respectively, p pregnancy (n = 23), LN patients with pregnancy (n = 33) had more prominent proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome (p pregnancy had early onset of symptoms during gestation and were characterized by presence of fever, malar lesion, autoantibodies, hypocomplementemia, hyperuricemia, active urinary sediment, and multi-organ involvement. In conclusion, patients with their first onset of lupus during pregnancy generally have more severe disease with higher prevalence of renal and platelet involvement.

  20. Risk factors for neuropsychiatric manifestations in children with systemic lupus erythematosus: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga Zambrano, Yenny Carolina; Guevara Ramos, Juan David; Penagos Vargas, Nathalia Elena; Benitez Ramirez, Diana Carol; Ramirez Rodriguez, Sandra Milena; Vargas Niño, Adriana Carolina; Izquierdo Bello, Alvaro Hernando

    2014-09-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms in children with systemic lupus erythematosus cause high morbidity and disability. This study analyzed risk factors associated with neuropsychiatric presentation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus aged information of patients with a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus who were hospitalized with or without neuropsychiatric symptoms was collected between March 2007 and January 2012. Clinical variables, laboratory examinations, neuroimages, and disease activity (Systemic Erythematosus Lupus Disease Activity Index) and damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics) indices were analyzed. A total of 90 patients were selected, 30 with neuropsychiatric symptoms. The patients' average age was 12.2 years. The most common neuropsychiatric symptoms were seizures, migraine, and depression. The average Systemic Erythematosus Lupus Disease Activity Index was 19.86 (S.D. 10.83) and the average Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics index was 2.02 (S.D. 2.43), with higher values in patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms (P = 0.001). The levels of complement C3 and C4 were significantly higher in patients with a neuropsychiatric disorder (P = 0.003). Lupus anticoagulant was found in 51.5% of patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-10.0). Immunosuppression with azathioprine, rituximab, or cyclophosphamide delayed the time to neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus development by 18.5 months (95% confidence interval, 10.6-26.5) compared to patients who did not receive these agents. The presence of lupus anticoagulant was a risk factor in our patients. The use of immunosuppressants, such as cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and azathioprine, delayed the presentation of neuropsychiatric manifestations of lupus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Photoprotective behaviour and sunscreen use: impact on vitamin D levels in cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cusack, Caitriona

    2008-10-01

    Sun exposure of the skin, independent of dietary sources, may provide sufficient vitamin D in healthy individuals. A recent study of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus concluded that over 70% of them restrict their sun exposure.

  2. Successful Pregnancy Following Assisted Reproduction in Woman With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Hypertension: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo, José Fernando; de Macedo, Gustavo Capinzaiki; Campos, Luciana Aparecida; Baltatu, Ovidiu Constantin

    2015-09-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have a poor prognosis of pregnancy, since it is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity, including spontaneous miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal death and pre-term delivery. We report a case with successful pregnancy in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and hypertension. A 39-year-old nulliparous woman presented with systemic lupus erythematosus with antinuclear and antiphospholipid antibodies, hypertension and recurrent pregnancy loss presented for assisted reproduction. The patient responded well to enoxaparin and prednisone during both assisted reproduction and prenatal treatment. This case report indicates that prescription of immunosuppressant and blood thinners can be safely recommended throughout the whole prenatal period in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Enoxaparin and prednisone may be prescribed concurrently during pregnancy.

  3. Systemisk lupus erythematosus i Fyns Amt. En epidemiologisk undersøgelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A B; Green, A; Junker, P

    1999-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has never been investigated in Denmark, whereas international studies have reached divergent results. In the study patients were ascertained from diagnosis-based registers of inpatients and outpatients, notifications from physicians...

  4. Systemic lupus erythematosus and the economic perspective: a systematic literature review and points to consider

    OpenAIRE

    Turchetti, G.; Yazdany, J; Palla, I.; Yelin, E; Mosca, M.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, disabling, progressive disease, with many associated comorbidities, affecting patients during prime working years resulting in a high economic burden on society, producing high direct, indirect and intangible costs.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: current state of the art and novel approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postal, M; Lapa, A Tamires; Reis, F; Rittner, L; Appenzeller, S

    2017-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic, inflammatory, immune-mediated disease affecting 0.1% of the general population. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus have been more frequently recognized and reported in recent years, occurring in up to 75% of patients during the disease course. Magnetic resonance imaging is known to be a useful tool for the detection of structural brain abnormalities in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients because of the excellent soft-tissue contrast observed with MRI and the ability to acquire multiplanar images. In addition to conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques to evaluate the presence of atrophy and white matter lesions, several different magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been used to identify microstructural or functional abnormalities. This review will highlight different magnetic resonance imaging techniques, including the advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods used to determine central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  6. Antibodies to early EBV, CMV, and HHV6 antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, N S; Draborg, A H; Nielsen, C T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We investigated the antibody levels against early antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls, and further correlated these antibodies to haematology...

  7. Thrombocytopenia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Clinical Manifestations, Treatment, and Prognosis in 230 Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jung, Jin-Hee; Soh, Moon-Seung; Ahn, Young-Hwan; Um, Yoo-Jin; Jung, Ju-Yang; Suh, Chang-Hee; Kim, Hyoun-Ah

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the clinical characteristics and prognosis according to severity of thrombocytopenia and response to treatment for thrombocytopenia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE...

  8. In vivo expression of a single viral DNA-binding protein generates systemic lupus erythematosus-related autoimmunity to double-stranded DNA and histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, U; Seternes, O M; Hey, A W; Silsand, Y; Traavik, T; Johansen, B; Rekvig, O P

    1995-01-01

    Although the origin of autoimmune antibodies to double-stranded DNA is not known, the variable-region structures of such antibodies indicate that they are produced in response to antigen-selective stimulation. In accordance with this, results from experiments using artificial complexes of DNA and DNA-binding polypeptides for immunizations have indicated that DNA may induce these antibodies. Hence, the immunogenicity of DNA in vivo may depend upon other structures or processes that may render DNA immunogenic. We report that in vivo expression of a single DNA-binding protein, the polyoma virus T antigen, is sufficient to initiate production of anti-double-stranded DNA and anti-histone antibodies but not a panel of other autoantigens. Expression of a mutant, non-DNA-binding T antigen did result in strong production of antibodies to the T antigen, but only borderline levels of antibodies to DNA and no detectable antibodies to histones. Nonexpressing plasmid DNA containing the complete cDNA sequence for T antigen did not evoke such immune responses, indicating that DNA by itself is not immunogenic in vivo. The results represent a conceptual advance in understanding a potential molecular basis for initiation of autoimmunity in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:8618908

  9. Flares of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy and the puerperium: prevention, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojan, George; Baer, Alan N

    2012-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects women in their reproductive age years. Pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus now has favorable outcomes for the majority of women. However, flares of disease activity, preeclampsia, fetal loss, intrauterine growth retardation and preterm birth are established risks of such pregnancies. Active lupus nephritis at the time of conception poses the greatest risk for disease flares and poor obstetric outcomes. Patients should delay conception until their lupus has been in remission for at least 6 months. In addition, certain lupus medications are potentially teratogenic and need to be stopped before conception. The signs and symptoms of a lupus flare may mimic those of normal pregnancy, impeding its recognition during pregnancy. Hydroxychloroquine, low-dose prednisone, pulse intravenous methylprednisolone and azathioprine are commonly used to treat lupus flares during pregnancy.

  10. Elevated Concentrations of Serum Immunoglobulin Free Light Chains in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients in Relation to Disease Activity, Inflammatory Status, B Cell Activity and Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draborg, Anette H; Lydolph, Magnus; Westergaard, Marie

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, we examined the concentration of serum immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and investigated its association with various disease parameters in order to evaluate the role of FLCs as a potential biomarker in SLE. Furthermore...

  11. Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus Nephritis in a Young Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tooba Momen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE is an autoimmune blistering disease occurring in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. It is a rare disease, especially in children. A 14-year-old girl initially presented with fatigue, generalized vesiculobullous skin lesions, and ulcers over the hard palate and oral mucosa. Clinical investigations revealed hematuria and proteinuria, a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and titer of antinuclear antibody, and anti-double-stranded DNA. Skin biopsy findings were suggestive of BSLE. A renal biopsy confirmed the features of class V lupus nephritis. Based on the clinical features and investigations, a diagnosis of BSLE with nephritis was made. She received methylprednisolone pulse therapy and hydroxychloroquine; however, it did not alleviate the vesiculobullous eruption, so treatment with dapsone started and resulted in the dramatic disappearance of the lesions. Interruption of dapsone due to hemolysis did not aggravate the bullous disease. During follow-up, she had multiple flare-ups of disease and nephritis without rebound of bullous lesions. BSLE is a rare presentation of SLE in children. Differentiating it from other skin bullous diseases and SLE with blister is important for the correct management. The unusual presentation of this disease may delay the diagnosis and therefore requires a high index of clinical suspicion.

  12. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis-Like Lesions and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Possibly Triggered by Sulfasalazine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Gül, Cigdem; Andersen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    elevated ferritin, and muscle wasting. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made, and mycophenolate mofetil and systemic glucocorticoids brought this severe disease under control. Toxic epidermal necrolysis-like lesions and hemophagocytic syndrome have been reported as manifestations of systemic...... lupus erythematosus. This patient possibly had spondyloarthritis or an undifferentiated connective tissue disease at presentation, and we suggest, based on the timing of events, that sulfasalazine may have acted as a trigger of the severe disease manifestations....

  13. Sjögren’s syndrome associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Taşdemir, Mehmet; Hasan, Chiar; Ağbaş, Ayşe; Kasapçopur, Özgür; Canpolat, Nur; Sever, Lale; Çalışkan, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome are chronic auto- inflammatory disorders which can lead to serious organ damage. Although systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome were previously considered two forms of the same disease because of presence of clinical coexistence of these two conditions, the view that they are two different conditions with mutual characteristics has become prominent in recent years. In this paper, we reported a 16 year-old girl who was followed ...

  14. Sjögren’s syndrome associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Mehmet; Hasan, Chiar; Ağbaş, Ayşe; Kasapçopur, Özgür; Canpolat, Nur; Sever, Lale; Çalışkan, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome are chronic auto- inflammatory disorders which can lead to serious organ damage. Although systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome were previously considered two forms of the same disease because of presence of clinical coexistence of these two conditions, the view that they are two different conditions with mutual characteristics has become prominent in recent years. In this paper, we reported a 16 year-old girl who was followed up with a diagnosis of Sjögren’s syndrome for six years and then was observed to have overlap of systemic lupus erythematosus. In the baseline, she did not have any clinical or serological evidence for systemic lupus erythematosus. After six year, massive proteinuria and serological findings developed and systemic lupus erythematosus nephritis was diagnosed by kidney biopsy. Currently, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome cannot be differentiated definetely. We need more valuable diagnostic and classification criteria to differentiate these two important conditions. PMID:27738403

  15. Mitral bioprosthetic valve stenosis in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Akimasa; Hirai, Hidekazu; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hosono, Mitsuharu; Sakaguchi, Masanori; Nakahira, Atsushi; Seo, Hiroyuki; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2012-12-01

    A 45-year-old woman with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus was admitted because of severe dyspnea. She had undergone mitral valve replacement (MVR) using a Mosaic bioprosthesis for infective endocarditis 9 years previously. She developed congestive heart failure secondary to mitral bioprosthetic valve stenosis resulting from relatively early structural valve deterioration. She underwent a second MVR using a mechanical valve prosthesis. The explanted bioprosthesis showed marked pannus formation and mineralization with fibrin thrombus formation, especially on the outflow surfaces of the leaflets. After the second operation, she was discharged without APS-related thromboembolic events under meticulous anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies.

  16. Subacute lupus erythematosus during treatment with golimumab for seronegative rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunasso, A M G; Aberer, W; Massone, C

    2014-02-01

    We report on a 52-year-old woman with a history of severe seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. Several conventional therapies and biological therapy with etanercept and infliximab had been unsuccessful. In 2010 she was given golimumab subcutaneously at a monthly dose of 50 mg. She had a negative ANA titre. After 16 months of uninterrupted therapy and sustained response, she developed skin lesions on the upper trunk, back and upper extremities, which worsened on exposure to the sun. The skin biopsy was compatible with subacute lupus erythematosus. Laboratory findings included an ANA titre 1:640, negative anti-Ro/SSA and anti-DNA antibodies. Topical corticosteroid therapy proved inadequate. The patient's condition improved only after discontinuation of golimumab. The causal relationship between subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus and golimumab is not dose-related and occurs with some delay (a typical feature of immunological adverse reactions). The association is likely, but not confirmed (because re-challenge was not performed). However, a clear improvement was noted after withdrawal. Based on this case, we hypothesized the aetiological role of golimumab-associated immunogenicity. TNF-α antagonist-induced lupus-like syndrome (TAILS) is a well-known side effect of this class of substances. The British Society of Rheumatology recommends discontinuation of the causal anti-TNF-α treatment in patients with TAILS.

  17. Systemic lupus erythematosus following HPV immunization or infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldevilla, H F; Briones, S F R; Navarra, S V

    2012-02-01

    The link between autoimmunity and infectious agents has been strongly suggested by reports of lupus or lupus-like syndromes following immunization. This report describes three patients with either newly diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or SLE flare, following vaccination for human papilloma virus (HPV). CASE 1: A 17-year-old female completed two doses of HPV vaccine uneventfully. Two months later, she developed arthralgias with pruritic rashes on both lower extremities, later accompanied by livedo reticularis, bipedal edema with proteinuria, anemia, leucopenia, hypocomplementemia and high titers of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA). Kidney biopsy showed International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society Class III lupus nephritis. She was started on high dose steroids followed by pulse cyclophosphamide therapy protocol for lupus nephritis, and subsequently went into remission. CASE 2: A 45-year-old housewife, previously managed for 11 years as having rheumatoid arthritis, had been in clinical remission for a year when she received two doses of HPV immunization. Four months later, she developed fever accompanied by arthritis, malar rash, oral ulcers, recurrent ascites with intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and behavioral changes. Cranial MRI showed vasculitic lesions on the frontal and parietal lobes. Laboratory tests showed anemia with leucopenia, hypocomplementemia, proteinuria, ANA positive at 1:320, and antibodies against dsDNA, Ro/SSA, La/SSB and histone. She improved following pulse methylprednisolone with subsequent oral prednisone combined with hydroxychloroquine. CASE 3: A 58-year-old housewife diagnosed with SLE had been in clinical remission for 8 years when she received two doses of HPV immunization. Three months later, she was admitted to emergency because of a 1-week history of fever, malar rash, easy fatigability, cervical lymph nodes, gross hematuria and pallor. Laboratory exams showed severe

  18. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Associated Gastrointestinal System Vasculopathy in a Patient with Lupus Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan ULUTAŞ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal system (GIS manifestations are common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients. The gastrointestinal vasculopathy of SLE is a unique clinical entity and reviewed infrequently but it should be kept in mind to give the necessary treatment with corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive agents and to avoid non-essential surgical interventions. Here we report a 33-yearold SLE patient that presented with surgical acute abdomen symptoms, was followed-up in a Nephrology Department, and was well managed with high doses of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide after the diagnosis of GIS vasculopathy.

  19. Toward new criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus-a standpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aringer, M; Dörner, T; Leuchten, N; Johnson, S R

    2016-07-01

    While clearly different in their aims and means, classification and diagnosis both try to accurately label the disease patients are suffering from. For systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), this is complicated by the multi-organ nature of the disease and by our incomplete understanding of its pathophysiology. Hallmarks of SLE are the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), and multiple immune-mediated organ symptoms that are largely independent. In an attempt to overcome limitations of the current sets of SLE classification criteria, a new four-phase approach is being developed, which is jointly supported by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). This review attempts to delineate the performance of the current sets of criteria, the reasons for the decision for classification, and not diagnostic, criteria, and to provide a background of the current approach taken.

  20. Successful treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus with subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, A; Fonseca Oliveira, J; Pinheiro, S; Paiva-Lopes, M J

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is well established. However, side effects might limit its use and lead to the consideration of therapeutic alternatives, such as the subcutaneous formulation of immunoglobulin, which has been used in some patients with other autoimmune diseases. We report a case of SLE refractory to classical therapies. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin was effective, but gave rise to significant side effects. The patient was successfully treated with subcutaneous human immunoglobulin, achieving and maintaining clinical and laboratory remission. A lower immunoglobulin dose was needed and no side effects were observed, compared to the intravenous administration. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin could be a better-tolerated and cost-saving therapeutic option for select SLE patients.

  1. Cytokine profile in two siblings with neonatal lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozawa, Hironori; Kono, Yumi; Matano, Miyuki; Suzuki, Yume; Koike, Yasunori; Yada, Yukari; Yamagata, Takanori; Takahashi, Naoto

    2015-12-01

    We studied the cytokine profile of two siblings with neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE) born to a mother positive for serum anti-Ro and -La antibodies, who did not receive any medication during the two pregnancies. The first sibling was found to have complete atrioventricular block in utero and became severely ill after birth. He fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis on day 2. The second sibling did not have any fetal symptoms. He was generally stable after birth, but with typical skin rash. Laboratory data suggested that they both had hypercytokinemia during the neonatal period, requiring corticosteroid treatment. Interleukin (IL)-6, interferon-γ, IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were elevated in both cases, while IL-12, IL-13 and IL-17 were elevated only in the second sibling. Comparison of the cytokine profiles suggests the potential roles of different cytokines in the onset and clinical manifestations of NLE.

  2. Contraception in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammaritano, L R

    2014-10-01

    Contraceptive choice in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is challenging but important. Long-acting forms of contraception such as the progesterone intrauterine device (IUD) or subdermal implant are preferable for most patients. Estrogen-containing hormonal contraceptives may be used in stable, inactive SLE patients but are contraindicated in patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). The levonorgestrel IUD is a good alternative for many APS patients and often decreases menstrual blood loss. It is prudent to avoid depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) in corticosteroid-treated or other patients at risk for osteoporosis because of the inhibition of ovulation. Effective and safe contraception in patients with SLE and APS permits planning for pregnancy during inactive disease and while on pregnancy-compatible medications, preventing a poorly timed pregnancy that may jeopardize maternal and/or fetal health.

  3. Regulatory T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Clare; Mathen, Stephy; Crocker, Ian; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disorder that predominantly affects women of reproductive age. As clinical outcomes improve, pregnancy in these women is becoming more common. Although epidemiological data have documented an improvement in the prognosis of pregnancy in these women over recent years, they are still at significantly increased risk of pregnancy complications, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, pre-eclampsia and impaired foetal growth. The pathogenesis of SLE involves marked immune dysfunction, and in particular, the function of immunosuppressive elements of the immune system is impaired, including regulatory T-cell function. Because regulatory T cells are likely to be the key cell-modulating feto-maternal tolerance, this review overviews the possibility that regulatory T-cell impairments contribute to pregnancy pathology in women with SLE and contribute to the clinical challenge of managing these women during pregnancy.

  4. Vitamin D and systemic lupus erythematosus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Chi Chiu

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone that, in addition to its actions on calcium and bone metabolism, exhibits a plethora of regulatory effects on growth, proliferation, apoptosis and function of the cells of the immune system that are relevant to the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Hypovitaminosis D is highly prevalent in SLE as a result of avoidance of sunshine, photoprotection, renal insufficiency and the use of medications such as glucocorticoids, anticonvulsants, antimalarials and the calcineurin inhibitors, which alter the metabolism of vitamin D or downregulate the functions of the vitamin D receptor. Low levels of vitamin D correlate with disease activity, and is associated with osteoporosis, fatigue and certain cardiovascular risk factors in SLE patients. This review updates the recent evidence on the relationship between vitamin D status and the onset, activity and complications of SLE, and summarizes the recommendations for vitamin D supplementation.

  5. Role of Vitamin D in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Miskovic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a steroid hormone that in addition to its well known role in the metabolism of calcium and phosphorus exerts immunoregulatory properties. Data from animal studies and from prospective clinical trials on patients with rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes point to the potential role of vitamin D as important environmental factor in the development of autoimmune diseases. Such role of vitamin D in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE has not yet been sufficiently studied. This review shows the sources, metabolism and mechanism of action of vitamin D, its effect on the cells of the immune system, prevalence and causes of vitamin D deficiency in patients with SLE, the link between vitamin D status and disease activity as well as recommendations for vitamin D supplementation.

  6. A Unique Case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pelvic Vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Traisak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is diverse and vasculitis can be a potential manifestation. Cutaneous lesions involving small vessels are the most frequent presentation. However, medium and large vessel vasculitis may present with life-threatening visceral manifestations. We present a unique case of pelvic vasculitis mimicking a pelvic mass as an initial presentation of SLE. There are case reports of systemic vasculitis involving the female genital tract with giant cell arteritis (GCA, polyarteritis nodosa (PAN, and granulomatous with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis (GPA/MPA, among others, but only a few cases attributed to SLE. Awareness of this condition and a prompt diagnosis are warranted as this is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition.

  7. The in vitro photosensitivity of systemic lupus erythematosus skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamansky, G B; Minka, D F; Deal, C L; Hendricks, K

    1985-03-01

    To investigate the role of DNA damage in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we studied the ability of skin fibroblasts derived from SLE patients to recover from ultraviolet (UV) light radiation of varying wavelengths. Four of five SLE cell strains were more sensitive to UV-C (254 nm), sun lamp, and UV-A (320 to 400 nm) light than were normal cells. SLE cellular recovery was most sensitive to broad spectrum, long wavelength light. This hypersensitivity did not appear to result from the UV light activation of a clastogenic factor. Experiments which examined the DNA repair capacity of irradiated cells indicated that SLE fibroblasts may be able to excise certain DNA lesions as well as normal cells. The mechanisms responsible for the hypersensitivity of SLE cells remain under investigation.

  8. The incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus in North American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, R O; Gershwin, M E; Brady, C; Steinberg, A D

    1976-06-01

    The annual incidence (AI) of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was determined in 75 highly inbred North American Indian tribes, a total of approximately 800,000 people, during the fiscal years 1971-1975. Seventy-two of the Indian tribes had an AI of SLE which was of similar magnitude to previously published studies from Sweden, Rochester (Minn.), Alabama, New York City, and San Francisco. However, Three tribes, the Crow, Arapahoe, and Sioux Indians, had a markedly elevated AI of SLE. These three tribes share common historical, geographic, and cultural characteristics. Further, they all reside in the northern half of the United States, in states that do not receive intense sun exposure, thereby eliminating photosensitivity as a major determinant of this increased prevalence. Finally, the AI of SLE in the Sioux Indians was highest for "full-blooded" members and lowest for genetic admixtures.

  9. Neurocognitive impairment in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Deborah M; Ardoin, Stacy P; Schanberg, Laura E

    2009-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease, in which neuropsychiatric manifestations are a common cause of significant morbidity. The American College of Rheumatology has identified 19 distinct neuropsychiatric syndromes associated with SLE, although the 1982 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for SLE recognize only two: seizures and psychosis. Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) is one of the most common and clinically challenging manifestations of SLE, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. This Review examines the epidemiology and pathophysiology of NCI in children and adolescents with SLE, as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that are available for these patients. As few published studies specifically address NCI in pediatric SLE, new directions for research are also discussed.

  10.  Biological therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Suszek

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available  The prevention of chronic organic damage and complete inhibition of inflammatory activity of the disease are the main goals in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Current therapies of SLE are not effective enough and they may cause various serious side effects. Biological therapies, affecting important pathogenetic disturbances in the immunological system of SLE patients, give hope for the development of a new treatment for SLE. Currently the most advanced clinical trials are being conducted with anti-lymphocyte B drugs, such as rituximab, belimumab and epratuzumab. Belimumab as the first biological agent was registered for treatment of the active, seropositive form of SLE. The advances in immunology and rheumatology nowadays raise the hope of finding effective and safe treatment for SLE. In our article we present an overview of data concerning perspectives of biological treatment in SLE.

  11. Dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide pulse therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhabhai Ravindra

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Therapy systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE has been generally discouraging. Methyl-prednisolone pulse therapy has been used for various connective tissue disorders. We used intravenous dexamethasone cyclophosphamide pulse therapy to treat SLE. METHODS: Fourteen patients (10 females and 4 males between the age of 15-48 years with definite or classical clinical criteria laid by American Rheumatism Association criteria were treated by Dexamethasone-Cyclophosphamide pulse (DCP therapy at our center. RESULTS: It was possible to induce a complete clinical remission with DCP therapy in most of the patients thereby offering them life free from disease and drugs. The side effects commonly observed with conventional daily dose regimen of corticosteroids were not present or were mild. CONCLUSIONS: Almost all patients had good response after 3-4 pulses to allow them a normal life style. Fever, malar rash and oral ulceration responded early but photosensitivity, discoid rash, alopecia and joint pains took some more time.

  12. Tuberculosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Spain's situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Miras, María del Mar; Hidalgo Tenorio, Carmen; Jimenez Alonso, Juan

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been an increase in the incidence of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) due mainly to earlier diagnosis, and increased survival. Tuberculosis in our country is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases, and one of the underlying causes would be HIV infection and increased immigration from areas with high tuberculosis prevalence; this phenomenon is truly important in patients with autoimmune diseases, as clinical presentation, severity and prognosis of tuberculosis are often different to that of immunocompetent patients. Studies of tuberculosis in patients with SLE are scarce and inconclusive, with many doubts existing about the performance or non-tuberculous prophylaxis in this population and the absence of a protocol due to lack of conclusive studies. New techniques for diagnosis of tuberculosis (IGRAs) may be useful in this population due to higher sensitivity than Mantoux, helping avoid false negatives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Hepatosplenic Granuloma: A Rare Case

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    Anju Bharti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease which is known to present with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Case Report. A 15-year-old male presented with complaints of moderate grade fever and generalized body swelling. There was no history of cough, weight loss, joint pain, oral ulcerations, skin rash, photosensitivity, loss of hair, pain abdomen, jaundice, or any significant illness in the past. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography of the abdomen revealed hypodense lesions in both liver and spleen (without contrast enhancement, suggestive of granulomas along with few retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes. On the basis of immunological tests and renal biopsy report, SLE with hepatosplenic granulomatosis diagnosis was made. He was given pulse methylprednisolone 500 mg, for 3 days and he showed dramatic improvement clinically. Conclusion. Hepatic and splenic granulomas are not common in SLE, but this should be kept in differential diagnosis.

  14. The need to define treatment goals for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, Kate; Hoi, Alberta; Nikpour, Mandana; Morand, Eric F

    2014-09-01

    In the current therapeutic climate, mortality rates from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remain unacceptably high. Although new therapies are on the horizon, pending their emergence and availability, optimization of the currently available therapies is potentially achievable. A 'treat-to-target' approach is now considered routine for many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, for which it has substantially improved patient outcomes. The heterogeneity of SLE, as well as lack of universal agreement over methods to measure disease activity and treatment responses, has impeded the development of such an approach for this disease. In this article, the potential benefits of a treatment-target definition are explored, obstacles to the development of a treatment target in SLE are identified, and possible strategies to achieve this goal are discussed.

  15. Systemic lupus erythematosus following total body irradiation for malignant lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinozzi, F; Capodicasa, E; Gerli, R; Bertotto, A; Rambotti, P; Grignani, F

    1986-01-01

    A case of a 63-year old man, who developed systemic lupus erythematosus three years after an initial diagnosis of small-cleaved centrofollicular lymphoma is described. The diagnosis of SLE was made on the basis of the accepted "1982 revised criteria for the classification of SLE". The autoimmune disease arose after a cycle of total body irradiation, despite the treatment with combination chemotherapeutic doses such a CVP or COAP or Cyclophosphamide, Vincristine, VM-26 and Prednisone. Genetic, immunological and exogenous environmental factors may co-exist and might equally be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE and malignant lymphoma. However, the onset of SLE after total body irradiation could have been caused by the inactivation of suppressor T lymphocytes, which are known to be sensitive to radiations in vitro.

  16. Relapsed hydroxychloroquine induced thrombocytopenia in a systemic lupus erythematosus patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón Vázquez, Vanesa; Pascual, Luis; Corominas, Héctor; Giménez Torrecilla, Isabel

    Hydroxychloroquine is used in the long-term therapy of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although considered to be a safe treatment, side effects have been documented. An uncommon side effect is thrombocytopenia. In order to establish the diagnosis of thrombocytopenia secondary to Hydroxychloroquine, non-pharmacological causes must be ruled out and it is necessary to determine a recurrence after re-exposure to the drug. We present one case of severe thrombocytopenia occurring in a patient with SLE undergoing treatment with Hydroxychloroquine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Distinct proteome pathology of circulating microparticles in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Tanassi, Julia Tanas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is poorly understood but has been linked to defective clearance of subcellular particulate material from the circulation. This study investigates the origin, formation, and specificity of circulating microparticles (MPs) in patients...... with SLE based on comprehensive MP proteome profiling using patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and healthy donors (HC) as controls. METHODS: We purified MPs from platelet-poor plasma using differential centrifugation of samples from SLE (n = 45), SSc (n = 38), and two sets of HC (n = 35, n = 25). MP......-MPs (which we propose to call luposomes) are highly specific for SLE, i.e. not found in MP preparations from HC or patients with another autoimmune, systemic disease, SSc. In SLE-MPs platelet proteins and mitochondrial proteins are significantly diminished, cytoskeletal proteins deranged, and glycolytic...

  18. [A case of skin cryptococcosis in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halweg, H; Korzeniewska-Koseła, M; Podsiadło, B; Krakówka, P

    1990-01-01

    Here is presented a case of woman treated by immunosuppressive preparations because of systemic lupus erythematosus with ski manifestations as tubercles and ulcerations on skin of trunk and extremities. On the basis of histological examination of tubercle skin specimens and mycological examinations of material obtained from skin ulcerations cryptococcosis was diagnosed. Disease was limited to skin that was an entry of infection. Patient was treated by Amphotericin B administered intravenously and Flucitosine per os. Amphotericin B was also applied topically. The results of cultures became gradually negative, up to total disappearance of fungus cells in direct specimens, prepared from examined material. After treatment continuing for 5 months only discoloured scars were observed on sick skin.

  19. Management considerations for childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and implications on therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Clovis Artur; Aikawa, Nadia Emi; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Campos, Lucia Maria Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease that may involve various organs and systems. This narrative review focuses on the recent evidence relating to cSLE management. The general management considerations of cSLE patients require the use of validated classification criteria, disease and health-related quality of life tools evaluation, as well as assessments of lupus nephritis biomarkers and cSLE quality indicators. The drug treatment for cSLE patients includes general supportive care and immunosuppressive therapy. Important implications on cSLE therapy are also updated such as infection, vaccination, infertility, pregnancy, contraception, dyslipidemia, physical activity, cancer, bone health, drug pharmacokinetics, adherence, academic outcomes, transition to adult care and cumulative organ damage.

  20. White matter correlates of neuropsychological dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex E Jung

    Full Text Available Patients diagnosed with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus have similar levels of neuropsychological dysfunction (i.e., 20-50% as those with Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (NPSLE. We hypothesized a gradient between cognition and white matter integrity, such that strongest brain-behavior relationships would emerge in NPSLE, intermediate in non-NPSLE, and minimal in controls. We studied thirty-one patients (16 non-NPSLE; 15 NPSLE, ranging in age from 18 to 59 years old (100% female, and eighteen age and gender matched healthy controls. DTI examinations were performed on a 1.5T scanner. A broad neuropsychological battery was administered, tapping attention, memory, processing speed, and executive functioning. The Total z-score consisted of the combined sum of all neuropsychological measures. In control subjects, we found no significant FA-Total z-score correlations. NPSLE, non-NPSLE, and control subjects differed significantly in terms of Total z-score (NPSLE = -2.25+/-1.77, non-NPSLE = -1.22+/-1.03, Controls = -0.10+/-.57; F = 13.2, p<.001. In non-NPSLE subjects, FA within the right external capsule was significantly correlated with Total z-score. In NPSLE subjects, the largest FA-Total z-score clusters were observed within the left anterior thalamic radiation and right superior longitudinal fasciculus. In subsequent analyses the largest number of significant voxels linked FA with the Processing Speed z-score in NPSLE. The current results reflect objective white matter correlates of neuropsychological dysfunction in both NPSLE and (to a lesser degree in non-NPSLE. non-NPSLE and NPSLE subjects did not differ significantly in terms of depression, as measured by the GDI; thus, previous hypotheses suggesting moderating effects of depression upon neuropsychological performance do not impact the current FA results.

  1. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and association with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, T S; Reis, F; Appenzeller, S

    2016-10-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurological complex disorder with many clinical associations and causative factors. It is important to recognize this condition because early diagnosis and treatment usually result in its complete resolution, radiological imaging becoming the key for the correct diagnosis. We retrospectively reviewed charts and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the University of Campinas from January 2005 to July 2015, selecting three cases of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus syndrome who developed PRES, for whom risk factors, characteristics, magnetic resonance imaging findings and neurological resolution were analyzed. We also conducted a review of the English-language literature. The three cases had neurological symptoms like acute onset of headache, altered mental status, cortical blindness and seizures. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated posterior cortical and white matter alterations involving posterior brain territories, which were more conspicuous on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery. Spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging were also important for neuroradiological evaluation. Immunosuppressive drugs were taken in all cases. Partial clinical and radiological recovery was observed in two cases, and complete resolution was observed in the third patient. We found 52 cases of PRES in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Almost all patients were women 94%, ranging from 8 to 62 years old. Posterior brain territory involvements were found in 98% of patients. Hemorrhagic complications involved 26% of patients, becoming a risk factor for clinical sequels. The total percentage of patients with no complete resolution of radiological findings on follow-up images was 27.5%. In patients with autoimmune disorders, endothelial dysfunction may occur secondary to autoimmunity and the use of cytotoxic drugs, supposedly facilitating the occurrence of more

  2. Epidemiological characteristics of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés Izquierdo, J A; Cano Martínez, N; Lázaro Ochaita, P

    2014-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a wide clinical spectrum and variable clinical course. Few studies have analyzed the characteristics of patients with only cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE). The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological, clinical, and immunological characteristics of a series of patients diagnosed with CLE. An analysis was performed of the data from all patients over 18 years of age with a diagnosis of CLE and seen between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011 in a tertiary hospital. One hundred- one patients were included in the study. The mean age at diagnosis was 40 years and 84% were women. Subacute forms of presentation were observed in 94% of patients. The chronic discoid forms were localized to the head and neck in 79% of cases, whereas the subacute forms were on the trunk in 97% of cases. Patients with acute forms were positive for antinuclear, anti-DNA, anti-smooth muscle, and anti-RNP (ribonucleoprotein) antibodies, whereas anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies predominated in patients with subacute forms. Seventeen patients presented more than 1 subtype of CLE. Fifteen (88%) of these patients received immunosuppressor treatment versus 44 (52%) of the other 84 patients with only 1 subtype of CLE. Patients with distinct subtypes of CLE present different clinical and immunological characteristics. Oral immunosuppressants are often needed to control the disease in a large proportion of patients with different subtypes of CLE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. Prognostic implications of active discoid lupus erythematosus and malar rash at the time of diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus: Results from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, A M; Su, J; Mussani, F; Siddha, S K; Gladman, D D; Urowitz, M B

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) may have prognostic implications for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to determine the impact of discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and malar rash on SLE disease activity. Data were analyzed from the Toronto Lupus Clinic prospective cohort study. We compared SLE patients with active DLE or malar rash at SLE diagnosis to SLE patients who never developed CLE. Outcomes were assessed at one and five years, including Adjusted Mean Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (AMS). A total of 524 SLE patients (284 without CLE, 65 with DLE, and 175 with malar rash) were included. Mean AMS scores in patients without CLE at one and five years were 5.96 ± 5.06 and 4.00 ± 3.52, which did not differ significantly from scores at one (6.93 ± 5.31, p = 0.17) and five years (4.29 ± 2.62, p = 0.63) in the DLE group. In patients with malar rash, AMS scores at one (8.30 ± 6.80, p systemic disease over time, while DLE has no significant impact on general SLE disease activity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Persistent scarring, atrophy, and dyspigmentation in a preteen girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, Whitney A; Costner, Melissa I

    2003-04-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus is an uncommon autoimmune disease with distinctive cutaneous findings. Descriptions of chronic cutaneous sequelae are rare. We describe a 12-year-old girl with persistent dyspigmentation, scarring, and atrophy as a result of neonatal lupus occurring during infancy.

  5. Peer Support and Psychosocial Pain Management Strategies for Children with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Nabors

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews information on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE in children. Children with this chronic illness often experience pain related to their condition. They also can experience social isolation. This paper reviews psychosocial information on peer support and cognitive behavioral pain management strategies. The information presented in this paper provides new insights for health professionals assisting children and families in coping with psychological facets of this disease. Research focusing on ways by which peers and friends can support the child’s use of psychological pain management strategies will provide new information for the literature.

  6. Peer Support and Psychosocial Pain Management Strategies for Children with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Laura; Ige, Teminijesu John; Fevrier, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews information on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) in children. Children with this chronic illness often experience pain related to their condition. They also can experience social isolation. This paper reviews psychosocial information on peer support and cognitive behavioral pain management strategies. The information presented in this paper provides new insights for health professionals assisting children and families in coping with psychological facets of this disease. Research focusing on ways by which peers and friends can support the child's use of psychological pain management strategies will provide new information for the literature.

  7. Myocardial infarction in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bo; JIANG Da-ming; ZHOU Xu-chen; QI Guo-xian

    2011-01-01

    This case report we presented aims to report a-31-year-old man with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) who developed myocardial infarction (Ml) and also aims to discuss the possible mechanisms. The results showed that traditional risk factors alone do not cause coronary heart disease with SLE, and SLE-related factors influence the atherogenic process. We found that although SLE patients with acute Ml benefit from percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) therapy, it is very important to choose the reasonable antithrombotic strategies in patients with SLE and APS undergoing PCI who require oral anticoagulant therapy.

  8. The serum levels of connective tissue growth factor in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F-M; Yu, F; Tan, Y; Liu, G; Zhao, M-H

    2014-06-01

    The expression of connective tissue growth factor mRNA in human kidneys may serve as an early marker for lupus nephritis progression. Therefore, we speculated that connective tissue growth factor may be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. In this study, we set out to investigate the associations between serum connective tissue growth factor levels and clinicopathological features of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. Serum samples from patients with non-renal systemic lupus erythematosus, renal biopsy-proven lupus nephritis and healthy control subjects were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serum connective tissue growth factor levels. The associations between connective tissue growth factor levels and clinicopathological features of the patients were further analysed. The levels of serum connective tissue growth factor in patients with non-renal systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis were both significantly higher than those in the normal control group (34.14 ± 12.17 ng/ml vs. 22.8 ± 3.0 ng/ml, psystemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis group (34.14 ± 12.17 ng/ml vs. 44.1 ± 46.8 ng/ml, p = 0.183). Serum connective tissue growth factor levels were significantly higher in lupus nephritis patients with the following clinical manifestations, including anaemia (51.3 ± 51.4 ng/ml vs. 23.4 ± 9.7 ng/ml, plupus nephritis (63.3 ± 63.4 ng/ml vs. 38.3 ± 37.9 ng/ml, p = 0.035, respectively). Serum connective tissue growth factor levels were negatively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = -0.46, plupus nephritis (plupus and correlated with chronic renal interstitial injury and doubling of serum creatinine in patients with lupus nephritis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. An update on childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Julie; Levy, Deborah M; Silverman, Earl D

    2013-09-01

    This manuscript will provide a review of studies published in the last year examining the major disease manifestations, comorbidities, biomarkers and therapeutic trials involving childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) patients. Recent multicenter prospective cohort studies supported previous findings that cSLE patients accrue damage early on their disease. Four studies showed that ethnicity altered disease severity and incidence of both cSLE and lupus nephritis. Description of clinical features and response to therapy in a large group of cSLE patients with neuropsychiatric involvement provided useful information on this feature. Advancement in the field of biomarkers was seen but the new biomarkers are not yet ready for clinical use. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of statins to prevent atherosclerosis progression did not meet its primary endpoint but did show a trend in improvement of carotid intima-media thickness, a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis. No other prospective interventional treatment trials designed specifically for cSLE patients were reported in the past year. There is an urgent need to better characterize the long-term outcome of cSLE patients and identify early on those at risk of a worse outcome. Advances in the field of biologics and small molecules will hopefully allow better targeted therapies of the cSLE population.

  10. Abatacept for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Quiroz, Victor R; Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2016-01-01

    Due to improvements in our understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), several target drugs have been and are being developed. One of the possible targets in SLE is co-stimulation between antigen-presenting cells and T cells. Abatacept is a co-stimulation moderator approved for the treatment of several autoimmune diseases. There is an unmet need for drugs with a better efficacy and safety profile when treating patients with SLE. In this review, the authors discuss the mechanism of action of abatacept including its role in the immune system and glomeruli, and relevant information about its clinical efficacy and safety. Possible explanations for the failure of previous randomized clinical trials are also discussed. Abatacept has demonstrated efficacy in other autoimmune diseases, but in SLE, randomized clinical trials have failed to achieve their primary outcome. Despite these disappointing results and based on its mechanism of action, abatacept seems to have a role in lupus nephritis and arthritis. This should be corroborated with new trials which hopefully will overcome the design pitfalls of the ones conducted to date.

  11. Entheseal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus: are we missing something?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, A; Satulu, I; Di Carlo, M; Lato, V; Filippucci, E; Grassi, W

    2017-03-01

    Background Musculoskeletal involvement is extremely common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Continuing the research initiated in patients with inflammatory arthritis, recent studies have shown the potential role of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) in the evaluation of clinical and subclinical lupus synovitis. The inflammatory process in SLE is traditionally considered to be localized at synovial tissue areas while enthesis is not included among the possible targets of the disease. Patients and methods Entheses included in the Glasgow Ultrasound Enthesitis Scoring System were scanned in a cohort of 20 SLE patients serving as disease controls in an MSUS study aimed at assessing enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis. We describe in detail four cases with unexpected and unequivocal expressions of MSUS enthesitis according to the OMERACT definition. Three out of four patients had no predisposing factors for enthesopathy. Case no. 2 was treated with a variable-dose prednisone regimen. Results In the four cases MSUS examination revealed relevant grey-scale and power Doppler abnormalities at the entheseal level, most commonly at the distal insertion of the patellar tendon. Signs of clinical enthesitis were detected in only one patient. Conclusions This case series shows for the first time the presence of clearly evident MSUS findings indicative of enthesitis in four out of 20 SLE patients (20%), raising the hypothesis that enthesis could be a missing target in the clinical evaluation of SLE patients. Our case series justifies further investigations for a better evaluation of the prevalence, characteristics and clinical relevance of entheseal involvement in SLE.

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedd A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Introduction: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is a systemic disease with multiorgan involvement. In the respiratory system, SLE can involve the lung parenchyma and pleura with intrathoracic manifestations of pleuritis, alveolar hemorrhage and pulmonary fibrosis. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP is a rare complication of SLE. We describe a case of newly diagnosed lupus presenting as COP. Case Report: An 18-year-old woman with no significant past medical history presented to the Emergency Department complaining of generalized malaise, cough and fever for 4 days. Her cough was productive with white to brownish sputum. She complained of chest heaviness/pressure with inability to take deep breaths. Her only reported sick contact was her mother who had the “flu” one week prior to the onset of her illness. She denied any illicit drug use, alcohol or smoking, as well as any recent travel or exotic pet exposure. On admission, her vital signs were: temperature 38.4°C, pulse ...

  13. Imaging Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C. Croca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multisystem, autoimmune disease known to be one of the strongest risk factors for atherosclerosis. Patients with SLE have an excess cardiovascular risk compared with the general population, leading to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although the precise explanation for this is yet to be established, it seems to be associated with the presence of an accelerated atherosclerotic process, arising from the combination of traditional and lupus-specific risk factors. Moreover, cardiovascular-disease associated mortality in patients with SLE has not improved over time. One of the main reasons for this is the poor performance of standard risk stratification tools on assessing the cardiovascular risk of patients with SLE. Therefore, establishing alternative ways to identify patients at increased risk efficiently is essential. With recent developments in several imaging techniques, the ultimate goal of cardiovascular assessment will shift from assessing symptomatic patients to diagnosing early cardiovascular disease in asymptomatic patients which will hopefully help us to prevent its progression. This review will focus on the current status of the imaging tools available to assess cardiac and vascular function in patients with SLE.

  14. Comparison of ethnicity, gender, age of onset and outcome in South Africans with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhoo, A; Mody, G M; Dubula, T; Patel, N; Mody, P G

    2017-04-01

    Ethnicity, gender and age of onset are reported to influence the expression and outcome of systemic lupus erythematosus. We studied a multi-ethnic cohort of 408 South Africans (91.2% females) comprising 237 (58.1%) Indians, 137 (33.6%) African Blacks, 17 (4.2%) Mixed ethnicity and 17 (4.2%) Whites. The most common manifestations were arthritis (80.6%), photosensitivity (67.2%), oral ulcers (50.0%), malar rash (49.0%) and renal (39.2%). The common laboratory findings were positive anti-nuclear factor (96.8%), haematological (74.8%) and anti-dsDNA antibodies (45.3%). Serositis ( p = 0.002), nephritis ( p = 0.039), leucopaenia ( p = 0.001), haemolytic anaemia ( p = 0.026), anti-dsDNA antibodies ( p = 0.028) and anti-Sm antibodies ( p = 0.050) were more common in African Blacks compared to Indians. Males had increased prevalence of discoid rash ( p = 0.006) and anti-Sm antibodies ( p = 0.016). Discoid rash ( p = 0.018), renal involvement ( p systemic lupus erythematosus. On multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of death were renal involvement, anti-dsDNA antibodies and seizures. There were 53 (13%) deaths and the five- and 10-year survival was 90.8% and 85.7% respectively, with no differences related to ethnicity or age of onset. In conclusion, we report on the spectrum and outcome of systemic lupus erythematosus in a large South African multi-ethnic cohort.

  15. Neurological Manifestations in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Single Centre Study from North East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakati, Sanjeeb; Ahmed, Sobur U; Hussain, Masaraf

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Neurological manifestations although common in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), are often not recognized due to their diversed and varied presentation. Therefore, the study was planned to highlight the pattern of neurological involvement in SLE to help in early recognition. Aim To study the pattern of neurological involvement in SLE and its correlation with disease activity and different investigation. Materials and Methods This hospital based prospective observational study was carried out from August 2009 to July 2010. Diagnosed cases of SLE [based upon American Rheumatism Association (ARA) criteria] who presented with neurological manifestations at the time of diagnosis or develop during the course of the disease were included in the study. They were assessed clinically and investigated with neuroimaging and neurophysiological tests as applicable. Results In total, 52 consecutive patients with SLE were evaluated, 92% were female. The most common age group was 21 to 25 years. Nervous system involvement was found in 19 (36.54%) patients. Cognitive impairment was the most frequent manifestation, present in 11 (57.89%) patients followed by seizure disorder in eight patients (42.1%). Peripheral neuropathy was diagnosed in eight (42.1%), acute confusional state in six (31.57%) and headache and depression was diagnosed in five (26.31%) patients each. Less common manifestations were psychosis, movement disorder and aseptic meningitis. Percentage of neurological manifestations directly correlated with disease activity. A significant difference was found in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score between the patients with Neuro Psychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (NPSLE) and those without NPSLE (32.42±16.34 Vs 17.3±10.6). Conclusion Neurological involvement in SLE is seen relatively early in the course of the disease with cognitive impairment being the most common manifestation and correlate with disease activity.

  16. Peripheral Gangrene Complicating Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in a Patient with Spina Bifida: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, S; Imthiaz, V K; Hitesh, S

    2017-03-01

    An adolescent girl, a known case of spina bifida with systemic lupus, presented with bluish discolouration of three toes of the right foot. She had thrombosis of bilateral popliteal arteries. She underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of both legs and Chopart amputation of the right foot. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) occurring in a patient with spina bifida has not been previously reported. Weakness, sensory loss, lack of normal ambulation, endarteritis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome are common contributory factors for peripheral gangrene in patients with spina bifida with systemic lupus erythematosus.

  17. Pharmacological Management of Childhood-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorbinson, Colin; Oni, Louise; Smith, Eve; Midgley, Angela; Beresford, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare, severe, multisystem autoimmune disorder. Childhood-onset SLE (cSLE) follows a more aggressive course with greater associated morbidity and mortality than adult-onset SLE. Its aetiology is yet to be fully elucidated. It is recognised to be the archetypal systemic autoimmune disease, arising from a complex interaction between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Its complexity is reflected by the fact that there has been only one new drug licensed for use in SLE in the last 50 years. However, biologic agents that specifically target aspects of the immune system are emerging. Immunosuppression remains the cornerstone of medical management, with glucocorticoids still playing a leading role. Treatment choices are led by disease severity. Immunosuppressants, including azathioprine and methotrexate, are used in mild to moderate manifestations. Mycophenolate mofetil is widely used for lupus nephritis. Cyclophosphamide remains the first-line treatment for patients with severe organ disease. No biologic therapies have yet been approved for cSLE, although they are being used increasingly as part of routine care of patients with severe lupus nephritis or with neurological and/or haematological involvement. Drugs influencing B cell survival, including belimumab and rituximab, are currently undergoing clinical trials in cSLE. Hydroxychloroquine is indicated for disease manifestations of all severities and can be used as monotherapy in mild disease. However, the management of cSLE is hampered by the lack of a robust evidence base. To date, it has been principally guided by best-practice guidelines, retrospective case series and adapted adult protocols. In this pharmacological review, we provide an overview of current practice for the management of cSLE, together with recent advances in new therapies, including biologic agents.

  18. [Treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: myths, certainties and doubts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Danza, Alvaro; Khamashta, Munther

    2013-12-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease with different clinical forms of presentation, including a wide range of severity and organic involvement. Such circumstance, along with the fact of the uncommon nature of the disease and the absence of clinically representative response criteria, make it difficult to design controlled clinical trials in SLE patients. As a result, observational studies have a special relevance, being a source of valuable information of SLE prognosis and outcome as well as of the efficacy and adverse effects of the different therapies. Herein we update some of the main treatments used in SLE. Steroids may have more risks than benefits if used at high doses. New mechanisms of action have been described, supporting the use of lower doses, possibly with the same efficacy and less adverse effects. Intravenous pulses of cyclophosphamide still have a role in the treatment of proliferative lupus nephritis and other serious SLE manifestations. Mycophenolate mofetil has shown its efficacy both as induction and maintenance therapy of selected cases of lupus nephritis. Biological therapies have emerged as new promising options. Although clinical trials have not confirmed a clear superiority of rituximab in SLE, observational studies have shown good response rates in severe SLE manifestations or refractory forms. Belimumab has recently been added to the therapeutic armamentarium of SLE; although its place in clinical practice is not well-defined, it may be recommended in active patients with no response or good tolerance to standard therapies. Hydroxichloroquine improves survival, decreases the risk of thrombosis and flares and is safe in pregnancy, and should be considered the baseline therapy in most SLE patients.

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus complicated by Crohn’s disease: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE may experience various gastrointestinal disorders, SLE and Crohn’s disease (CD rarely coexist. The diseases may have gastrointestinal (GI manifestations, laboratory results, and radiographic findings that appear similar and consequently differentiating between GI involvement in CD and in SLE may be difficult. We present the case of a patient with SLE and CD who developed continuous GI bleeding and diarrhea that was initially treated as SLE-related colitis to little effect. Case presentation A 55-year-old Japanese woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE developed continuous gastrointestinal bleeding and diarrhea since the patient was aged 30 years that was initially treated as SLE-related colitis. Although a longitudinal ulcer and aphthous ulcers in the colon were observed every examination, biopsy showed only mild inflammation and revealed neither granuloma nor crypt abscess. The patient underwent surgery for anal fistulas twice at 50 and 54 years of age and her symptoms were atypical of lupus enteritis. Colonoscopy was performed again when the patient was 55 years of age because we suspected she had some type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Cobblestone-like inflammatory polyps and many longitudinal ulcers were detected between the descending colon and the cecum. Macroscopic examination strongly suggested CD. Histopathological examination revealed non-caseating granuloma and no evidence of vasculitis, consistent with CD. Introduction of infliximab dramatically relieved the patient’s melena and abdominal symptoms. Conclusion Diagnostic criteria for CD and SLE overlap, making them difficult to diagnose correctly. It is important to consider CD for patients who have SLE with gastrointestinal manifestations. The pathology of lupus enteritis should be clarified through the accumulation of cases of SLE combined with CD.

  20. Lupus Tumidus: underreported variant of lupus erythematosus (a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoryia Kazlouskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lupus erythematosus tumidus (LET is an underreported variant of lupus erythematosus (LE that is characterized by soft urticarial-like elements usually located on the sun exposed skin. LET is featured with high photosensitivity. Lesions of LET resolve without scarring and do not cause disfigurement as seen in the discoid LE variants. Lesions of LET may co-exist with other variants of LE: discoid or systemic. Main observations: The case presents a female patient with LET localized on the lateral infraorbital areas of her face and cheeks. Histopathological evaluation showed a lymphocytic infiltrate in the middle and deeper parts of the dermis. This article also presents a contemporary review of the clinical variants of LET, histopathological features and approaches to the treatment of LET. Conclusions: LET should be considered in urticarial-like lesions on the skin of the face and other skin exposed areas. Histopathological examination is needed to make a definitive diagnosis of the condition and helps in cases when the clinical presentation is subtle or non-specific.

  1. [A case of systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with jaundice and lupus pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takako; Tominaga, Sizuo; Okouchi, Akiko; Kudo, Makoto; Katoh, Kiyoshi; Shoda, Masataka; Fujino, Masayuki A

    2005-02-01

    A 27-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital for acute hepatitis in April 2002. She had been suffering from low grade fever and fatigue for a week. She also presented with dyspnea. On admission, ALT and AST were 857 U/l and 473 U/l respectively. Urine protein was 2 g/day. Chest radiograph showed bilateral infiltrative shadow and pleural effusion. She developed jaundice and her level of total bilirubin was increased to 9.6 mg/dl on May 9. Antibodies to hepatitis viruses were not detected. Testing for antimitochondrial antibodies, antismooth muscle antibodies, and antiribosomal P antibodies showed all negative. However, antinuclear antibodies were positive at titer 1:160 and anti-double stranded DNA antibodies were 130 U/ml. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made and oral administration of 60 mg/day prednisolon was started on May 10. Serum levels of ALT, AST and bilirubin were reduced to within normal range and pulmonary lesions were also improved. We conclude that this is a rare case of systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with acute hepatitis and jaundice.

  2. External Validation of the Lupus Impact Tracker in a Southeastern US Longitudinal Cohort With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Jennifer E; Drenkard, Cristina; Kan, Hong; Bao, Gaobin; Dunlop-Thomas, Charmayne; Pobiner, Bonnie; Chang, David J; Jolly, Meenakshi; Lim, S Sam

    2017-06-01

    To examine the external validity of the Lupus Impact Tracker (LIT), a systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-specific, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) tool in a population-based cohort of patients with SLE in Atlanta, Georgia. We modeled the association of LIT scores with patient-reported measures of SLE activity (Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire [SLAQ]) and organ damage (self-administered Brief Index of Lupus Damage [SA-BILD]). We investigated the association of LIT scores with general HRQoL using the Short Form 12 (SF-12). Correlation, multivariable regression, and longitudinal analyses using general linear modeling with fixed effects were performed to investigate the association between the LIT and patient-reported disease activity (SLAQ); patient-reported disease damage (SA-BILD); mental health (mental component summary [MCS] of the SF-12); and physical health (physical component summary [PCS] of the SF-12). Demographic trends related to the LIT were also assessed using cross-sectional analysis. The LIT was significantly associated with disease activity (SLAQ), organ damage (SA-BILD), MCS scores, and PCS scores in both adjusted and unadjusted regression analysis (P SLAQ), MCS scores, and PCS scores (P < 0.0001), but not organ damage (SA-BILD). The LIT is a simple, patient-centered tool that can be used to assess HRQoL in patients with SLE. This study provides external validity of the LIT in a population-based cohort with a large number of African American patients with a relatively high disease burden. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Lupus eritematoso sistêmico associado a miastenia gravis: relato de caso Systemic lupus erythematosus and myasthenia gravis: case report

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    MARCIO F. DE CARVALHO

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem o caso de uma mulher branca de 24 anos de idade admitida com lupus eritematoso sistêmico (com 4 anos de evolução de doença e início recente de miastenia gravis. São discutidos os principais diagnósticos diferenciais para a fraqueza muscular e a fadiga apresentadas por esta paciente. Uma revisão de literatura abordando a associação de miastenia gravis e lupus eritematoso é feita, com ênfase às características clínicas desses pacientes e ao papel do timoma e timectomia no desenvolvimento de lupus eritematoso em pacientes previamente miastênicos.We report the case of a 24-year-old white woman admitted with a four year diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus and the recent onset of myasthenia gravis discussing the main differential diagnosis of weakness and fatigue in this patient. A review of literature approaching the association of myasthenia gravis and systemic lupus erythematosus is also done with emphasis on the clinical characteristics of these patients and the role of thymoma and thymectomy in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus in myasthenic patients.

  4. Correlation between the Modified Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 and the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, J O; Corrente, J E; Saad-Magalhães, C

    2016-11-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess Modified Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM) disease activity correlation in addition to their respective correlation to Pediatric Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) Damage Index (Ped-SDI), in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE). Methods The activity indices were scored retrospectively and summarized by adjusted means during follow-up. The Ped-SDI was scored during the last visit for those with more than six months follow-up. Pearson correlation between the Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM, as well as Spearman correlations between the Modified SLEDAI-2K, ECLAM, and Ped-SDI were calculated. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated for both activity indices discriminating damage measured by Ped-SDI. Results Thirty-seven patients with mean age at diagnosis 11 ± 2.9 years and mean follow-up time 3.2 ± 2.4 years were studied. The Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM adjusted means were highly correlated ( r = 0.78, p  0.7, p < 0.001), but Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM correlation with Ped-SDI was only moderate. ROC analysis discriminant performance for both activity indices resulted in area under curve (AUC) of 0.74 and 0.73 for Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM, respectively. Conclusion The high correlation found between the Modified SLEDAI-2K and ECLAM adjusted means indicated that both tools can be equally useful for longitudinal estimates of JSLE activity.

  5. HLA-G genotype and HLA-G expression in systemic lupus erythematosus: HLA-G as a putative susceptibility gene in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzo, R; Hviid, T V F; Govoni, M

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease mainly mediated by the deposit of immune complexes and defects in T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells along with a high production of T-helper 2 cytokines. A tolerance-inducible function of nonclassical class Ib human leukocyte...

  6. The lupus impact tracker is responsive to changes in clinical activity measured by the systemic lupus erythematosus responder index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilliers, H; Bonithon-Kopp, C; Jolly, M

    2017-04-01

    Objective The lupus impact tracker (LIT) is a 10-item patient reported outcome tool to measure the impact of systemic lupus erythematosus or its treatment on patients' daily lives. Herein, we describe the responsiveness of the LIT and LupusQoL to changes in disease activity, using the systemic lupus erythematosus responder index (SRI). Methods A total of 325 adult systemic lupus erythematosus patients were enrolled in an observational, longitudinal, multicentre study, conducted across the USA and Canada. Data (demographics, LIT, LupusQoL, BILAG, SELENA-SLEDAI) were obtained three months apart. Modified SRI was defined as: a decrease in SELENA-SLEDAI (4 points); no new BILAG A, and no greater than one new BILAG B; and no increase in the physician global assessment. Standardised response mean and effect size for LIT and LupusQoL domains were calculated among SRI responders and non-responders. Wilcoxon's test was used to compare the LIT and LupusQoL variation by SRI responder status. Results Of the participants 90% were women, 53% were white, 33% were of African descendant and 17% were Hispanic. Mean (SD) age and SELENA-SLEDAI at baseline were 42.3 (16.2) years and 4.3 (3.8), respectively. Mean (SD) LIT score at baseline was 39.4 (22.9). LIT standardised response mean (effect size) among SRI responders and non-responders were -0.69 (-0.36) and -0.20 (-0.12), respectively ( P = 0.02). For LupusQoL, two domains were responsive to SRI: standardised response mean (effect size) for physical health and pain domains were 0.42 (0.23) and 0.65 (0.44), respectively. Conclusions LIT is moderately responsive to SRI in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Inclusion of this tool in clinical care and clinical trials may provide further insights into its responsiveness. This is the first systemic lupus erythematosus patient reported outcome tool to be evaluated against composite responder index (SRI) used in clinical trials.

  7. Drivers of cost and health-related quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): a Swedish nationwide study based on patient reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexelius, C; Wachtmeister, K; Skare, P; Jönsson, L; Vollenhoven, R van

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate drivers of cost and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) related to disease activity and fatigue among patients with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). A questionnaire was sent to members of a patient organization with a self-reported diagnosis of SLE, requesting information on demographics and disease characteristics, medications, resource utilization, informal care, loss of productivity, fatigue and HRQoL in relation to SLE. Mean annual costs per patient were estimated from a societal perspective. HRQoL was measured through EQ-5D and fatigue was measured through a 10 cm VAS scale. Patient-reported disease activity was measured through the Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ) and corticosteroid dose. Drivers of costs and HRQoL were analyzed through regression analysis. A total of 339 patients out of 737 returned the questionnaire. Mean age was 55; 94% were female. The mean HRQoL measured through the five-item EQ-5D instrument was 0.64 and total costs were estimated at €22,594 (direct costs €7818; indirect costs €14,776). Disease activity, fatigue and corticosteroid doses had a statistically significant impact on costs and HRQoL. This study demonstrates that Swedish patients with SLE have low HRQoL and incur high societal costs and that are both associated with and most likely driven by disease activity, fatigue and corticosteroid use.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse (EBV-EA/D)-directed immunoglobulin A antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draborg, A H; Jørgensen, J M; Müller, H

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine whether the serological response towards lytic cycle antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is altered in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients.......We sought to determine whether the serological response towards lytic cycle antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is altered in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients....

  9. Early discoid lupus erythematosus protects against renal disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: longitudinal data from a large Latin American cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Estel, G J; Aspey, L D; Bao, G; Pons-Estel, B A; Wojdyla, D; Saurit, V; Alvarellos, A; Caeiro, F; Haye Salinas, M J; Sato, E I; Soriano, E R; Costallat, L T L; Neira, O; Iglesias-Gamarra, A; Reyes-Llerena, G; Cardiel, M H; Acevedo-Vásquez, E M; Chacón-Díaz, R; Drenkard, C

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether early discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) would be a protective factor for further lupus nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We studied SLE patients from GLADEL, an inception longitudinal cohort from nine Latin American countries. The main predictor was DLE onset, which was defined as physician-documented DLE at SLE diagnosis. The outcome was time from the diagnosis of SLE to new lupus nephritis. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were conducted to examine the association of DLE onset with time to lupus nephritis. Among 845 GLADEL patients, 204 (24.1%) developed lupus nephritis after SLE diagnosis. Of them, 10 (4.9%) had DLE onset, compared to 83 (12.9%) in the group of 641 patients that remained free of lupus nephritis (hazard ratio 0.39; P = 0.0033). The cumulative proportion of lupus nephritis at 1 and 5 years since SLE diagnosis was 6% and 14%, respectively, in the DLE onset group, compared to 14% and 29% in those without DLE (P = 0.0023). DLE onset was independently associated with a lower risk of lupus nephritis, after controlling for sociodemographic factors and disease severity at diagnosis (hazard ratio 0.38; 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.71). Our data indicate that DLE onset reduces the risk of further lupus nephritis in patients with SLE, independently of other factors such as age, ethnicity, disease activity, and organ damage. These findings have relevant prognosis implications for SLE patients and their clinicians. Further studies are warranted to unravel the biological and environmental pathways associated with the protective role of DLE against renal disease in patients with SLE. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Neonatal lupus in triplet pregnancy of a patient with undifferentiated connective tissue disease evolving to systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaestri, M; Sciascia, S; Kuzenko, A; Bergia, R; Barberis, L; Lanza, M G; Bertero, M T

    2009-04-01

    Pregnancy in patients suffering from undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) represents a risk situation for both the mother and the child. SSA/SSB autoantibodies can determine neonatal lupus (NL) in the foetus, regardless of the maternal disease. Furthermore, pregnancy increases the risk of flares and evolution to differentiated connective tissue disease (CTD). We report an uncommon case in which these complications occurred in a mother and in her foetuses. A 37-year-old woman affected by UCTD developed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) after her triplet pregnancy. The only manifestation of neonatal lupus we observed in the three newborns was SSA positivity associated with asymptomatic transient neutropenia.

  11. Aplastic anemia associated to systemic lupus erythematosus in an AIDS patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Leonardo Rodrigues; Ferreira, Thaís Camargos; Neves, Fernando de Freitas; Meneses, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by peripheral cytopenias and hypocellular bone marrow. Although aplastic anemia is idiopathic in most cases, rheumatic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus are recognized as causes of aplastic anemia, with their possible etiological mechanisms being T and B lymphocyte dysfunction and pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoantibody production directed against bone marrow components. In the course of the human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, the identification of autoantibodies and the occurrence of rheumatic events, in addition to the natural course of systemic lupus erythematosus which is modified by immune changes that are characteristic of human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, make the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus challenging. This study reports the case of a woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome treated with a highly active antiretroviral therapy, who had prolonged cytopenias and hypocellular bone marrow consistent with aplastic anemia. The clinical picture, high autoantibodies titers, and sustained remission of the patient's hematological status through immunosuppression supported the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus-associated aplastic anemia. This is the first report of aplastic anemia concurrent with systemic lupus erythematosus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, providing additional evidence that immune dysfunction is a key part of the pathophysiological mechanism of aplastic anemia.

  12. Management of cardiovascular risk in systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrades, C; Fuego, C; Manrique-Arija, S; Fernández-Nebro, A

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular complications. The aim of this study was to review the effectiveness of interventions for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality and to review the effectiveness of interventions for cardiovascular risk factor reduction in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. A systematic review was conducted. Electronic databases Medline and Embase (1961-2015) were searched. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria and were selected. Low-calorie and/or low glycaemic index calories may be a useful option for secondary prevention in obese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and exercise would be useful in improving the endothelial function measured by flow-mediated dilation in this group of patients. The use of lipid-lowering drugs may improve the lipid profile in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and hyperlipidaemia, but the effect of this treatment on overall cardiovascular mortality remains unknown. Antiplatelets, anticoagulants, antimalarials and lipid-lowering drugs may be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of major cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Similarly, lipid-lowering drugs and antimalarial drugs appear to reduce the serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, glucose, diastolic blood pressure and calcium deposition at the coronary arteries. They may also improve insulin resistance and the level of high-density lipoproteins. It appears that treatment with antihypertensive drugs reduces blood pressure in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, but the available studies are of low quality.

  13. Significant Reductions in Mortality in Hospitalized Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Washington State from 2003 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Louisa B; Ortiz, Justin R; Okamura, Daryl M; Hayward, Kristen; Goss, Christopher H

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus) is an autoimmune multisystem disease. While a complete understanding of lupus' origins, mechanisms, and progression is not yet available, a number of studies have demonstrated correlations between disease prevalence and severity, gender, and race. There have been few population based studies in the United States. To assess temporal changes in demographics and hospital mortality of patients with lupus in Washington State from 2003 to 2011. This study used data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), a patient information database, and data from the Washington State census to study a group of patients in the state. Lupus hospitalizations were defined as any hospitalization with an ICD-9-CM diagnosis code for systemic lupus erythematosus. Regression analysis was used to assess the effect of calendar time on demographics and hospital outcomes. There were a total of 18,905 patients in this study with a diagnostic code for lupus. The mean age of the group was 51.5 years (95% CI: 50.6-52.3) in 2003 and 51.3 years (95% CI: 50.6-52.0) in 2011. The population was 88.6% female. Blacks were 2.8 times more likely to have a lupus hospitalization than whites when compared to the Washington population. While hospital mortality decreased during this eight year period (3.12% in 2003 to 1.28% in 2011, p=0.001) hospital length of stay remained statistically unchanged at an average of 4.9 days during that eight year period. We found a significant decrease in annual hospital mortality over the study period [odds ratio(OR): 0.92 per year, 95% CI 0.88-0.96, Plupus patients in Washington, hospital length of stay remained relatively stable over time but hospital mortality decreased by over 50% over the eight year study period.

  14. Are There Various Forms of Lupus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lupus Understanding lupus Are there various forms of lupus? Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Systemic lupus is the most common form ... and tissues at “ Lupus and the Body ”. Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus This form of lupus is limited to ...

  15. Noma management in a child with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irna Sufiawati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noma, also known as cancrum oris, is an orofacial gangrene, which during its fulminating stage causes progressive and mutilating destruction of the infected tissues. The disease occurs mainly in children with malnutrition, poor oral hygiene and debilitating concurrent illness. Purpose: The aim of this paper was to report a unique case of noma associated with systemic lupus erythematosus in an 8-year-old boy. Case: An 8-year-old boy referred to Oral Medicine Department complaining about an ulcer at the left corner of his mouth for 1 month, painful and difficulty in opening the mouth. The patient was diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus since 14 months before and had been given immunosuppressive therapy. The patient was also diagnosed severe malnutrition. Haematologic investigations revealed anemia. Case management: Panoramic radiography was performed to check for dental or periodontal foci of infection, but no abnormalities were present. The microbiology examination revelaed Fusobacterium necrophorum, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klabsiella. The patient has been treated with oral irrigation using hydrogen peroxide, saline and 0.2% chlorhexidine, thus helped to slough the necrotic tissue. Oral antibiotics and analgesics were prescribed. The patient was admitted to hospital under the care of a pediatrician, allergy and immunology specialist, and a nutritionist. The result of the comprehensive disease management showed that the lesion healed completely, but leaving a scar on his corner of the mouth. Its physical effects are permanent and may require reconstructive surgery to be repaired by oral surgeon. Conclusion: Noma is not a primary disease, there are various predisposing factors usually precede its occurrence. The management of noma requires a multidisciplinary approach.Latar Belakang: Noma, dikenal sebagai cancrum oris, adalah gangren pada daerah orofasial, yang menyebabkan kerusakan progresif dari jaringan yang terinfeksi

  16. Venous and Arterial Thrombotic Events in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Azaola, Andrea; Romero-Diaz, Juanita; Vargas-Ruiz, Angel Gabriel; Nuñez-Alvarez, Carlos A; Cicero-Casarrubias, Alba; Ocampo-Torres, Mario C; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of thrombosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is 25 to 50-fold higher than in the general population; we aimed to define the characteristics of venous thrombotic events (VTE) and arterial thrombotic events (ATE) to identify the patients at highest risk. The study included 219 patients with recent-onset SLE. At baseline, standardized medical history and laboratory tests were done. Followup visits occurred quarterly, and information about damage accrual, comorbidities, and cardiovascular risk factors was updated annually. Main outcome was development of TE after SLE diagnosis. Thirty-five patients (16%) developed TE (27 VTE, 8 ATE) during 5.21 years of followup; incidence rate 31/1000 patient-years. Most events (57%) developed within the first year of diagnosis, and 69% were not associated with lupus anticoagulant (LAC), determined with 1 method. VTE developed earlier than ATE (2.0 vs 57.5 mos, p = 0.02). In the multivariate analysis, variables preceding VTE included cutaneous vasculitis, nephrotic syndrome, dose of prednisone, and LAC in combination with anti-RNP/Sm antibodies (p < 0.03). Patients with ATE were older (median age 44 vs 29 yrs, p = 0.04), smokers, and had hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, at least 2 traditional risk factors, nephrotic syndrome, chronic damage, and a higher cumulative dose of prednisone (p < 0.05). LAC in combination with anti-RNP/Sm antibodies was associated with VTE and improved the accuracy for predicting it. Our study suggests that in SLE, VTE and ATE have different risk factors. Understanding these differences is helpful for identifying patients at highest risk. The use of LAC plus anti-RNP/Sm for predicting VTE deserves further study.

  17. Pregnancy implications for systemic lupus erythematosus and the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Laura; Fredi, Micaela; Nalli, Cecilia; Reggia, Rossella; Lojacono, Andrea; Motta, Mario; Tincani, Angela

    2012-05-01

    Multidisciplinary approach and patient counselling have been the key points in the improvement of the management of pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Most of these women can have successful pregnancy when thoroughly informed and instructed on several different issues. Disease activity should be in stable remission prior to pregnancy in order to reduce the chance for flare during pregnancy. To this purpose, medications must be modulated: "safe" drugs should be continued throughout pregnancy, embryotoxic/foetotoxic drugs should be withdrawn timely, and beneficial drugs such as low dose aspirin and heparin should be added for prophylaxis of maternal and foetal outcome, especially in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. The safety profile of anti-rheumatic drugs during pregnancy and breastfeeding should be kept constantly updated, as new data from inadvertent exposure accumulates and new drugs (especially biological agents) are available. Patients may carry autoantibodies that can negatively affect the baby, being neonatal lupus the prototypical case of passively acquired autoimmunity. Research has been greatly active in this field and more information on risk stratification and management are now available for counselling. The effect of both autoantibodies and drug exposure has been evaluated in the offspring: some concerns about learning disabilities have been raised, but these are treatable conditions that are likely to be overcome. To counsel a woman with SLE/APS during childbearing age means also to deal with contraception. Despite the "preferred choice" - combined oral contraceptive - may not be suitable for most of the patients, other options are available and should be offered and discussed with the patient. Fertility is not generally affected in SLE/APS patients, but those cases who require assisted reproduction techniques should be carefully evaluated and managed.

  18. Immunogenetics of systemic lupus erythematosus: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodke-Puranik, Yogita; Niewold, Timothy B

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of the genetic basis of systemic lupus erythematosus has progressed rapidly in recent years. While many genetic polymorphisms have been associated with disease susceptibility, the next major step involves integrating these genetic polymorphisms into the molecular mechanisms and cellular immunology of the human disease. In this review, we summarize some recent work in this area, including the genetics of the type I IFN response in SLE, including polygenic and monogenic factors, as well as epigenetic influences. Contributions of both HLA and non-HLA polymorphisms to the complex genetics of SLE are reviewed. We also review recent reports of specific gene deficits leading to monogenic SLE-like syndromes. The molecular functions of common SLE-risk variants are reviewed in depth, including regulatory variations in promoter and enhancer elements and coding-change polymorphisms, and studies which are beginning to define the molecular and cellular functions of these polymorphisms in the immune system. We discuss epigenetic influences on lupus, with an emphasis on micro-RNA expression and binding, as well as epigenetic modifications that regulate the expression levels of various genes involved in SLE pathogenesis and the ways epigenetic marks modify SLE susceptibility genes. The work summarized in this review provides a fascinating window into the biology and molecular mechanisms of human SLE. Understanding the functional mechanisms of causal genetic variants underlying the human disease greatly facilitates our ability to translate genetic associations toward personalized care, and may identify new therapeutic targets relevant to human SLE disease mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pathogenic inflammation and its therapeutic targeting in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Andrew Gottschalk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, lupus is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues including skin, kidneys and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B and T lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as Belimumab which targets the B cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immuno-suppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and

  20. Borderline tuberculoid leprosy in childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, V A P; Lourenço, D M R; Guariento, A; Trindade, M A; Avancini, J; Silva, C A

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is a contagious and chronic systemic granulomatous disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. To our knowledge, no case of leprosy in a childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (c-SLE) patient has been reported. For a period of 31 years, 312 c-SLE patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of our University Hospital. One of them (0.3%) had tuberculoid leprosy skin lesions during the disease course and is here reported. A 10-year-old boy from Northwest of Brazil was diagnosed with c-SLE based on malar rash, photosensitivity, oral ulcers, lymphopenia, proteinuria, positive antinuclear antibodies, anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-Sm and anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies. He was treated with prednisone, hydroxychloroquine and intravenous cyclophosphamide, followed by mycophenolate mofetil. At 12-years-old, he presented asymmetric skin lesions characterized by erythematous plaques with elevated external borders and hypochromic center with sensory loss. Peripheral nerve involvement was not evidenced. No history of familial cases of leprosy was reported, although the region where the patient resides is considered to be endemic for leprosy. Skin biopsy revealed a well-defined tuberculoid form. A marked thickening of nerves was observed, often destroyed by granulomas, without evidence of Mycobacterium leprae bacilli. At that time, the SLEDAI-2K score was 4 and he had been receiving prednisone 15 mg/day, hydroxychloroquine 200 mg/day and mycophenolate mofetil 3 g/day. Paucibacillary treatment for leprosy with dapsone and rifampicine was also introduced. In conclusion, we have reported a rare case of leprosy in the course of c-SLE. Leprosy should always be considered in children and adolescents with lupus who present skin abnormalities, particularly with hypoesthesic or anesthesic cutaneous lesions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Modified Framingham Risk Factor Score for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urowitz, Murray B; Ibañez, Dominique; Su, Jiandong; Gladman, Dafna D

    2016-05-01

    The traditional Framingham Risk Factor Score (FRS) underestimates the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to determine whether an adjustment to the FRS would more accurately reflect the higher prevalence of CAD among patients with SLE. Patients with SLE without a previous history of CAD or diabetes followed regularly at the University of Toronto Lupus Clinic were included. A modified FRS (mFRS) was calculated by multiplying the items by 1.5, 2, 3, or 4. In the first part of the study, using one-third of all eligible patients, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the FRS and the different multipliers for the mFRS. In the second part of the study, using the remaining 2/3 of the eligible patients, we compared the predictive ability of the FRS to the mFRS. In the third part of the study, we assessed the prediction for CAD in a time-dependent analysis of the FRS and mFRS. There were 905 women (89.3%) with a total of 95 CAD events included. In part 1, we determined that a multiplier of 2 provided the best combination of sensitivity and specificity. In part 2, 2.4% of the patients were classified as moderate/high risk based on the classic FRS and 17.3% using the 2FRS (the FRS with a multiplier of 2). In part 3, a time-dependent covariate analysis for the prediction of the first CAD event revealed an HR of 3.22 (p = 0.07) for the classic FRS and 4.37 (p mFRS in which each item is multiplied by 2 more accurately predicts CAD in patients with SLE.

  2. Pathogenic Inflammation and Its Therapeutic Targeting in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Timothy A.; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Hibbs, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues, including skin, kidneys, and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B- and T-lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as belimumab which targets the B-cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B-cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and review the known

  3. 124 cases of systemic lupus erythematosus drug-related clinical cases stasis heat index analysis%124例系统性红斑狼疮瘀热毒相关指标分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周腊梅; 汪悦; 王艳艳

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Clinical studies of toxic heat stasis in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus important role. Methods: The clinical cases of 124 patients with SLE stasis toxic heat -related symptoms, signs, laboratory indicators, statistics, and for correlation analysis. Results: The literature and clinical studies, we believe that with the stasis, heat, drugsrelated symptoms and signs include: facial rash / erythema, oral ulcers, skin vasculitis / thrombosis, a week of erythema / frostbite, Raynaud's phenomenon, purpura, fever, abdominal pain, irritability, seizures, liver / spleen large, swollen lymph nodes and so on. Laboratory and stasis-related indicators are: platelets, coagulation, D2 polymers, lipids, anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Correlation with drug indicators are: self-specific antibody-related indicators, such as the IGG, C3, anti-ENA, etc. 8. Heatrelated indicators: such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C -reactive protein. Drug treatment, the blood circulation drugs, antiplatelet / anticoagulant drugs, hormones, antibiotics are the main drug. Conclusion: stasis heat toxin as the major pathological factors of systemic lupus erythematosus, toxic heat flaming, in -depth business of blood, blood stasis network, systemic lupus erythematosus is often the basic pathogenesis of living in the pathogenesis of this disease has played an extremely important role, and stasis throughout the course of the disease has always been.%目的:从临床研究探讨瘀热毒在系统性红斑狼疮发病中的重要作用.方法:对124例SLE临床病例瘀热毒相关症状、体征、实验室指标进行统计,并作相关性分析.结果:通过文献研究及临床研究,我们认为与瘀、热、毒相关的症状、体征有:面部皮疹/红斑、口腔溃疡、皮肤血管炎/血栓、甲周红斑/冻疮、雷诺现象、紫癜、发热、腹痛、烦躁、癫痫、肝/脾大、淋巴结肿等.实验室与瘀相关的指标有:血小板、凝血功能、D2

  4. 系统性红斑狼疮并发带状疱疹的相关危险因素分析%Analysis of related risk factors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with herpes zoster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白云静; 申洪波; 陈竹; 姜德训; 安娜

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨系统性红斑狼疮( systemic lupus erythematosus,SLE)并发带状疱疹( herpes zoster,HZ)的相关危险因素,指导临床预防和控制HZ的发生。方法选取于北京军区总医院住院的SLE并发HZ患者26例作为观察组,选取同期住院的SLE患者35例作为对照组,采用单因素分析和多因素非条件Logistic回归对两组患者进行比较分析。结果单因素分析显示:患者病程、淋巴细胞绝对值、激素治疗时间、激素冲击例数、免疫抑制剂治疗时间、1个月内环磷酰胺冲击与否以及T淋巴细胞亚群中分化簇抗原3阳性细胞(cluster of differentiation 3,CD+3)、分化簇抗原4阳性细胞(cluster of differentiation 4,CD+4)、分化簇抗原8阳性细胞(cluster of differentiation 8,CD+8)数值、CD+4/ CD+8比值等指标差异均有显著性(P<0.05)。多因素Logistic回归分析显示:激素治疗时间和激素冲击例数与并发HZ呈显著正相关,淋巴细胞绝对值与HZ呈显著负相关(P<0.05)。结论 SLE患者激素使用时间延长、激素冲击治疗以及淋巴细胞绝对值减少是HZ发生的主要危险因素;而患者的病程延长、免疫抑制剂治疗时间延长、1个月内环磷酰胺冲击治疗以及CD+3、CD+4数值下降、CD+8数值升高、CD+4/ CD+8比值下降等是次要的危险因素,临床医生应早期给予关注并积极预防HZ的发生。%Objective Exploring the related risk factors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with herpes zoster,to prevent and control herpes zoster. Method Enrolled 26 cases of systemic lupus erythematosus patients with herpes zoster as the observation group from inpatients of Department of Rheumatism of General Hospital of Beijing Military Region,35 cases of systemic lupus erythematosus patients hospitalized in the same period as the control group. The clinical data of two groups of successively by single factor analysis and multi factor non condition-al Logistic

  5. The role of neighborhood and individual socioeconomic status in outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trupin, Laura; Tonner, M Christine; Yazdany, Jinoos; Julian, Laura J; Criswell, Lindsey A; Katz, Patricia P; Yelin, Edward

    2008-09-01

    To determine if neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) is independently related to physical and mental health outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Data derived from the first 3 waves of the Lupus Outcomes Study, a telephone survey of 957 patients with confirmed SLE diagnoses, recruited from clinical and non-clinical sources. Residential addresses were geocoded to U.S. Census block groups. Outcome measures included the Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ) score, a self-reported assessment of SLE symptoms; the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Health Survey physical functioning score; and Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) score of > or = 19 points. Multivariate analyses adjusted for race/ethnicity and other demographic and health-related covariates. After adjustment, lower individual SES, measured by education, household income, or poverty status, was associated with all outcomes. In models that did not include individual SES, low neighborhood SES (> 30% of residents in poverty) was also associated with poor outcomes. After adjustment for individual SES, demographic, and health-related covariates, only CES-D > or = 19 remained associated with neighborhood SES: 47% [95% confidence interval (CI) 38-56%] versus 35% (95% CI 32-37%). Individual SES is associated with physical and mental health outcomes in persons with SLE. Low neighborhood SES contributes independently to high levels of depressive symptoms. Future research should focus on mechanisms underlying these differences.

  6. Efficacy of plasma exchange and immunoadsorption in systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronbichler, Andreas; Brezina, Biljana; Quintana, Luis F; Jayne, David R W

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal treatments have been used since the 1970s in the management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A randomised controlled trial comparing the efficacy of standard of care (SOC) combined with plasma exchange against SOC alone in patients with lupus nephritis revealed no difference in terms of renal outcome. Subsequently, initial expectations have been dampened and further experience with plasma exchange is mainly limited to observational studies and single case reports. Beneficial effects have been reported in patients with refractory disease course or in pregnancy with prior complications due to SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome. A more specific form of extracorporeal treatment, immunoadsorption (IAS), has emerged as a valuable option in the treatment of SLE. In line with the plasma exchange experience, IAS seems to have beneficial effects in patients with refractory disease, contraindications to standard immunosuppression or during pregnancy. The mechanism IAS relates to autoantibody removal but for plasma exchange removal of activated complement components, coagulation factors, cytokines and microparticles may also be relevant. Both treatment forms have good safety profiles although reactions to blood product replacement in plasma exchange and procedure related complications such as bleeding or catheter-related infections have occurred. There is a need to more clearly define the clinical utility of plasma exchange and IAS in refractory lupus and APS subgroups.

  7. Alcohol, smoking and illicit drug use in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon van Weelden

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate alcohol, smoking and/or illicit drug use, and history of bullying in adolescent childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus and healthy controls. Methods 174 adolescents with pediatric rheumatic diseases were selected. All of the 34 childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 35 healthy controls participated in this study. A cross-sectional study included demographic/anthropometric data and puberty markers assessments; structured questionnaire and CRAFFT screening interview. Results McNemar tests indicated an excellent test–retest reliability of the structured questionnaire (p = 1.0. The median current age was similar between childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and controls [15 (12–18 vs. 15 (12–18 years, p = 0.563]. The median of menarche age was significantly higher in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to controls [12 (10–15 vs. 11.5 (9–15 years, p = 0.041], particularly in those that lupus had occurred before first menstruation [13 (12–15 vs. 11.5(9–15 years, p = 0.007]. The other puberty marker and sexual function parameters were similar in both groups (p > 0.05. Alcohol use was similar in both childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and controls (38% vs. 46%, p = 0.628. A trend of lower frequency of CRAFFT score ≥2 (high risk for substance abuse/dependence was evidenced in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to controls (0% vs. 15%, p = 0.053. Bullying was reported similarly for the two groups (43% vs. 44%, p = 0.950. Further analysis in lupus patients regarding alcohol/smoking/illicit drug use showed no differences in demographic data, puberty markers, history of bullying, sexual function, contraceptive use, disease activity/damage scores, clinical/laboratorial features and treatments (p > 0.05. Conclusion This study showed high frequencies of early alcohol use in lupus adolescents and

  8. Lupus erythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome: successful treatment with acitretin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lospinoso, D J; Fernelius, C; Edhegard, K D; Finger, D R; Arora, N S

    2013-07-01

    Lupus erythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome is a rare disorder combining the clinical, histological and immunopathological features of both lupus erythematosus (LE) and lichen planus (LP). Cutaneous lesions mostly affect the distal arms, legs, face and trunk. Palmoplantar involvement is felt to be characteristic of this condition. Plaques are often painful, centrally atrophic, bluish-red to hypopigmented in color, large, and scaly. On biopsy of clinically ambiguous lesions, histopathological features of one or both processes can be found, obscuring the diagnosis and complicating prognosis and treatment. Thus, direct immunofluorescence has become an essential tool in helping to diagnose this condition. In this report we describe the unique clinical and immunohistopathological manifestations of lupus erythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome along with a successful response to treatment with acitretin.

  9. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as a presenting feature of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawki, Sylvain; Aouizerate, Jessie; Trad, Selim; Prinseau, Jacques; Hanslik, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is an unusual presenting clinical feature of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case report: We report the case of a young woman who was admitted to hospital for sudden sensorineural hearing loss and hemophagocytic syndrome which was attributed to systemic lupus erythematosus on the basis of specific renal involvement, thrombocytopenia, and consistent autoantibodies. Favorable outcome was obtained on high-dose corticosteroids, and the hearing fully recovered. Discussion: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss in systemic lupus erythematosus is seemingly more frequently associated with severe systemic involvement and antiphospholipid antibodies may be present. Although management remains empirical, the high risk of permanent hearing impairment seems to justify emergency treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. When the clinical and laboratory criteria of antiphospholipid syndrome are met, antiplatelets agents or anticoagulation therapy shall be considered. PMID:27603334

  10. Influence of smoking on disease severity and antimalarial therapy in cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, A; Sigges, J; Biazar, C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years it has been controversially discussed in the literature if smoking is associated with the activity of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and the efficacy of antimalarial agents. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the influence of smoking on disease severity and antimalarial...... treatment in patients with CLE using the Core Set Questionnaire of the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE). METHODS: A total of 1002 patients (768 female, 234 male) with different CLE subtypes were included in this cross-sectional study, which was performed in 14 different countries....... Smoking behaviour was assessed by the EUSCLE Core Set Questionnaire in 838 patients and statistically analysed using an SPSS database. The results were correlated with the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI) and the efficacy of antimalarial treatment. RESULTS: A high...

  11. Neglect leads to extremes: maggots and malignancy in a case of discoid lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhari, N; Khaitan, B K; Gupta, P; Kumar, T; Srivastava, A

    2016-01-01

    Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic form of cutaneous lupus erythematosus that runs an indolent course. The rare complications of DLE include scarring, mutilation, non-healing ulceration, cicatricial alopecia and malignancy. DLE progresses to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in around 5% of localized cases and 22% of generalized cases. We report a case of DLE, presenting with a six-month history of ulcerated fungating plaques and small crusted nodules superimposed on DLE plaques over both the forearms. Two weeks prior to the presentation, maggots were also noticed on these plaques. Skin biopsies from these lesions were suggestive of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and keratoacanthoma. A wide surgical excision of the tumor followed by partial split-thickness skin grafting was performed with complete healing of the lesions. No recurrence has been noted 18 months from follow-up.

  12. Specific cutaneous histologic and immunologic features in a case of early lupus erythematosus scarring alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Immunoreactants detected by direct immunofluorescence (DIF in the skin of patients with lupus erythematosus represent an important tool in the diagnosis of this disorder. Case report: A 46 year old African American female presented complaining of hair loss and scarring in her scalp.Methods: Biopsies for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E examination, as well as for direct immunofluorescence (DIF were performed.Results: The histologic features were representative of early lupus erythematosus. DIF demonstrated immune deposits of several immunoglobulins and complement, primarily around skin appendageal structures(hair follicles and sweat glands. Deposits of immunoglobulin D were seen in several areas of the epidermis.Conclusion: In lupus erythematosus, evaluation of immune reactions against cutaneous appendageal structures may be crucial in differentiating this disorder from other autoimmune and non-autoimmune diseases.

  13. Comparison of estimates of body fat content in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinicato, N A; Peres, F A; de Oliveira Peliçari, K; de Oliveira Santos, A; Ramos, C D; Marini, R; Appenzeller, S

    2017-04-01

    Objective We aimed to compare estimates of body fat content with respect to their ability to predict the percentage of body fat, confirmed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We included 64 consecutive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 64 healthy age and sex-matched controls in a cross-sectional study. Anthropometric data, body mass index and body adiposity index were calculated for all subjects. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients were further assessed for clinical and laboratory childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations and fat mass, lean mass and percentage of body fat evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Elevated waist/hip ratio was observed in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients when compared to controls ( p systemic lupus erythematosus patients and controls. Using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry as gold standard we observed that all indirect estimates of body fat were correlated with whole body fat mass. We observed a correlation between height and cumulative corticosteroid dose adjusted by weight ( r = 0.429, p = 0.005) in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus. On whole body analysis we observed a correlation between lean mass and ACR Damage Index scores ( r = -0.395; p = 0.019); percentage of body fat and adjusted Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index ( r = 0.402; p = 0.008), disease duration ( r = -0.370; p = 0.012). On trunk analysis we observed a correlation between lean mass and ACR Damage Index ( r = -0.319; p = 0.042); percentage of body fat with adjusted Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index ( r = 0.402; p = 0.005), disease duration ( r = -0.408; p = 0.005). Conclusions This is the first study analyzing body adiposity index in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients. We observed that all

  14. Glial and axonal changes in systemic lupus erythematosus measured with diffusion of intracellular metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Ece; Magro-Checa, Cesar; Valabregue, Romain; Branzoli, Francesca; Wood, Emily T; Steup-Beekman, Gerda M; Webb, Andrew G; Huizinga, Tom W J; van Buchem, Mark A; Ronen, Itamar

    2016-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an inflammatory autoimmune disease with multi-organ involvement. Central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus is common and results in several neurological and psychiatric symptoms that are poorly linked to standard magnetic resonance imaging outcome. Magnetic resonance imaging methods sensitive to tissue microstructural changes, such as diffusion tensor imaging and magnetization transfer imaging, show some correlation with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) symptoms. Histological examination of NPSLE brains reveals presence of cerebral oedema, loss of neurons and myelinated axons, microglial proliferation and reactive astrocytosis, microinfacrts and diffuse ischaemic changes, all of which can affect both diffusion tensor imaging and magnetization transfer imaging in a non-specific manner. Here we investigated the underlying cell-type specific microstructural alterations in the brain of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with and without a history of central nervous system involvement. We did so combining diffusion tensor imaging with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a powerful tool capable of characterizing cell-specific cytomorphological changes based on diffusion of intracellular metabolites. We used a 7 T magnetic resonance imaging scanner to acquire T1-weighted images, diffusion tensor imaging datasets, and single volume diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance spectroscopy data from the anterior body of the corpus callosum of 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with past NPSLE, 16 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without past NPSLE, and 19 healthy control subjects. Group comparisons were made between patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with/without past NPSLE and healthy controls on diffusion tensor imaging metrics and on diffusion coefficients of three brain metabolites: the exclusively neuronal/axonal N-acetylaspartate, and the

  15. Therapeutic interventions of tissue specific autoimmune onset in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Subhajit; Dasgupta, Shaoni

    2016-06-10

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) is a female predominant autoimmune disease. The auto reactive B cells and T helper cells together are known to develop self-reactive immune responses in different tissues like kidney, bone, cardiovascular and central nervous system. Progression of disease is associated with deposition of immune complex which initiates tissue damage. The therapy for lupus still includes corticosteroids to reduce allergic manifestations and inflammatory immune responses. Recent observations suggested that, mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide treatment in combination with corticosteroids have benefit in lupus therapy. The prospect of B cell depletion by CD20 targeted monoclonal antibody Rituximab has been demonstrated in lupus patients. The CD52 specific monoclonal antibody Alemtuzumab is another proposition for lupus therapy. The drug Belimumab inhibits B cell activation by altering BAFF/APRIL signal cascade. Recent discovery of the CD22 targeted Epratuzumab also shows therapeutic prospect. The researches on new generation drugs for autoimmune lupus include search for inhibitors of CD40-CD40Ligand interactions, CD86 activation, selective modulation of complement cascades. The choice of inhibitors of transcription factor NF-κBp65 and selective modulators for estrogen receptor alpha are proposed areas of lupus drug discovery research. Keeping a close eye on the mechanisms of disease onset, a comprehensive view is provided on recent therapy of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Current views on etiopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Klonowska-Szymczyk

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is a review of information concerning etiopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Due to the risk of serious complications, including death, the clarification of etiology could result in substantial improvement or even complete cure of the disease. Progress in scientific research of observed disorder mechanisms together with implementation of appropriate therapies contributed to a higher detection rate, improved course and decreased mortality in SLE. However, there are still many doubts, which legitimate the need of further research. A significant role in development of the disease and further exacerbations is played by environmental factors. Therefore, decreased exposure to UV light, female sex hormone and microbial antigens is associated with improved course and decreased frequency of exacerbations. Less is known about the genetic basis of SLE, which results from a multigene disease background and complex hereditary mechanisms. It is estimated that the disease may be conditioned by around 100 genes, that only in part are functionally determined. Only part of them is already functionally characterized. The role played by most of them is still unknown. Research currently being conducted is aimed at detecting genetic polymorphism in large and genetically diverse populations. It will allow evaluation of the role of a particular gene in protein biosynthesis, which is responsible for development of regulatory process disturbances, commonly observed in the course of SLE. The article presents current directions of research and the latest advances in epidemiology as well as environmental and genetic risk factors of SLE.

  17. Genetics and novel aspects of therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relle, Manfred; Weinmann-Menke, Julia; Scorletti, Eva; Cavagna, Lorenzo; Schwarting, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, autoimmune hepatitis and inflammatory bowel disease, have complex pathogeneses and the factors which cause these disorders are not well understood. But all have in common that they arise from a dysfunction of the immune system, interpreting self components as foreign antigens. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is one of these complex inflammatory disorders that mainly affects women and can lead to inflammation and severe damage of virtually any tissue and organ. Recently, the application of advanced techniques of genome-wide scanning revealed more genetic information about SLE than previously possible. These case-control or family-based studies have provided evidence that SLE susceptibility is based (with a few exceptions) on an individual accumulation of various risk alleles triggered by environmental factors and also help to explain the discrepancies in SLE susceptibility between different populations or ethnicities. Moreover, during the past years new therapies (autologous stem cell transplantation, B cell depletion) and improved conventional treatment options (corticosteroids, traditional and new immune-suppressants like mycophenolate mofetile) changed the perspective in SLE therapeutic approaches. Thus, this article reviews genetic aspects of this autoimmune disease, summarizes clinical aspects of SLE and provides a general overview of conventional and new therapeutic approaches in SLE. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Competitive endogenous RNA network: potential implication for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Zhao, Wei; Tao, Sha-Sha; Leng, Rui-Xue; Fan, Yin-Guang; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2017-06-01

    Competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) hypothesis proposes that RNA transcripts, both coding and non-coding, crosstalk with and coregulate each other using microRNA response elements (MREs). CeRNA analysis tremendously expands functional information of coding and non-coding RNAs. Mounting evidence have shown that various types of RNAs, including pseudogenes, long non-coding RNAs, circular RNAs, and messenger RNAs, can function as ceRNAs in distinct physiological and pathophysiological states. Many validated ceRNA pairs participate in the initiation and progression of cancers, and systemic ceRNA network analyses revealing potential of ceRNAs in diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of cancers have also been performed. Areas covered: This review concisely introduces ceRNA hypothesis and characteristics of ceRNA regulations. The major sections focus on representative examples of both protein coding and non-coding RNA transcripts acting as ceRNAs. CeRNA prediction programs and databases and implications of ceRNA network in cancers are then discussed. In the end, we surmise potential implications of ceRNA network for SLE. Expert opinion: The role of ceRNA network in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains undefined. We speculate that dissecting ceRNA network in SLE may help expand our comprehension of roles of transcriptome, particularly non-coding transcripts, and richen our knowledge of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy of SLE.

  19. Outcomes in hospitalized pediatric patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Son, Mary Beth F; Johnson, Victor M; Hersh, Aimee O; Lo, Mindy S; Costenbader, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    Disparities in outcomes among adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been documented. We investigated associations between sociodemographic factors and volume of annual inpatient hospital admissions with hospitalization characteristics and poor outcomes among patients with childhood-onset SLE. By using the Pediatric Health Information System, we analyzed admissions for patients aged 3 to <18 years at index admission with ≥ 1 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code for SLE from January 2006 to September 2011. Summary statistics and univariable analyses were used to examine demographic characteristics of hospital admissions, readmissions, and lengths of stay. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses, controlling for patient gender, age, race, ethnicity, insurance type, hospital volume, US census region, and severity of illness, to examine risk factors for poor outcomes. A total of 10,724 admissions occurred among 2775 patients over the study period. Hispanic patients had longer lengths of stay, more readmissions, and higher in-hospital mortality. In multivariable analysis, African American race was significantly associated with ICU admission. African American race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with end-stage renal disease and death. Volume of patients with SLE per hospital and hospital location were not significantly associated with outcomes. In this cohort of hospitalized children with SLE, race and ethnicity were associated with outcomes. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between sociodemographic factors and poor outcomes in patients with childhood-onset SLE.

  20. The sense of smell in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Shoenfeld, Netta; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Flitman-Katzevman, Iveta; Paran, Daphna; Katz, Bat-sheva Porat; Kivity, Shaye; Langevitz, Pnina; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-05-01

    To assess the olfactory functions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls, and to examine the association between the sense of smell and disease activity and central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Olfactory functions in 50 SLE patients and 50 age- and sex-matched controls were evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks test, the 3 stages of which are threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) of different odors. TDI scores were analyzed according to SLE disease activity and CNS involvement. In both the SLE and control groups, smell deficit correlated with male sex and older age. A decrease in the sense of smell was observed in SLE patients (46%) and controls (25%) (Psmell (anosmia) was documented only in SLE patients (10%). Total TDI scores and individual stages of smell correlated with SLE Disease Activity Index (Psmell in SLE patients compared with healthy subjects and that the decrease in the sense of smell among SLE patients correlates with disease activity and CNS involvement.

  1. Periodontal disease in Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Feng, Guijaun; Fu, Ting; Yin, Rulan; Zhang, Lijuan; Feng, Xingmei; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2017-08-01

    Disease of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and periodontal disease (PD) shares the common multiple characteristics. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease in Chinese SLE patients and to determine the association between SLE features and periodontal parameters. A cross-sectional study of 108 SLE patients together with 108 age- and sex-matched healthy controls was made. Periodontal status was conducted by two dentists independently. Sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, medication use, and clinical parameters were also assessed. The periodontal status was significantly worse in SLE patients compared to controls. In univariate logistic regression, SLE had a significant 2.78-fold [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.60-4.82] increase in odds of periodontitis compared to healthy controls. Adjusted for potential risk factors, patients with SLE had 13.98-fold (95% CI 5.10-38.33) increased odds against controls. In multiple linear regression model, the independent variable negatively and significantly associated with gingival index was education (P = 0.005); conversely, disease activity (P periodontitis of SLE in multivariate logistic regression (OR 1.348; 95% CI: 1.183-1.536, P < 0.001). Chinese SLE patients were likely to suffer from higher odds of PD. These findings confirmed the importance of early interventions in combination with medical therapy. It is necessary for a close collaboration between dentists and clinicians when treating those patients.

  2. The pathophysiology of hypertension in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Ryan, Michael J

    2009-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorder that predominantly affects women during their reproductive years. Although SLE can affect any organ system, the kidneys are prominently involved in the form of immune complex glomerulonephritis. In addition, in women with SLE, risk for the development of cardiovascular disease is dramatically increased. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is highly prevalent in women with SLE. Nevertheless, there has been little exploration of the pathophysiological mechanisms that promote SLE hypertension. This review discusses the role of several mechanisms, with an emphasis on the kidney, in SLE hypertension. These mechanisms include the renin-angiotensin system, endothelin, oxidative stress, sex steroids, metabolic changes, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, and, perhaps most importantly, chronic inflammation and cytokines. Growing evidence suggests a link between chronic inflammation and hypertension. Therefore, elucidation of mechanisms that promote SLE hypertension may be of significant value not only for patients with SLE, but also for a better understanding of the basis for essential hypertension.

  3. Degos-Like Lesions Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Jang, Min Soo; Park, Jong Bin; Yang, Myeong Hyeon; Jang, Ji Yun; Kim, Joon Hee; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Geun Tae; Hwangbo, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Degos disease, also referred to as malignant atrophic papulosis, was first described in 1941 by Köhlmeier and was independently described by Degos in 1942. Degos disease is characterized by diffuse, papular skin eruptions with porcelain-white centers and slightly raised erythematous telangiectatic rims associated with bowel infarction. Although the etiology of Degos disease is unknown, autoimmune diseases, coagulation disorders, and vasculitis have all been considered as underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Approximately 15% of Degos disease have a benign course limited to the skin and no history of gastrointestinal or central nervous system (CNS) involvement. A 29-year-old female with history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with a 2-year history of asymptomatic lesions on the dorsum of all fingers and both knees. The patient had only skin lesions and no gastrointestinal or CNS vasculitis symptoms. Her skin lesions were umbilicated, atrophic porcelain-white lesions with a rim of erythema. On the basis of clinical, histologic, and laboratory findings, a diagnosis of Degos-like lesions associated with SLE was made. The patient had been treated for SLE for 7 years. Her treatment regimen was maintained over a 2 month follow-up period, and the skin lesions improved slightly with no development of new lesions. PMID:28392651

  4. MEFV gene variations in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Erer, Burak; Cosan, Fulya; Oku, Basar; Ustek, Duran; Inanc, Murat; Aral, Orhan; Gul, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF)-associated MEFV gene variations in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The study group comprised 190 SLE patients and 101 healthy controls of Turkish origin with no clinical features of FMF. All individuals were genotyped for the four most common MEFV gene variations (M694V, M680I, V726A and E148Q) by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The frequency of carrying any of the four MEFV gene variations under study was 15 % in patients with SLE and 10 % in the healthy controls (p = 0.23). After the exclusion of the less penetrant E148Q variation, re-analysis for the three penetrant mutations revealed a significant association between exon 10 variations and pericarditis [p = 0.038, odds ratio (OR) 3.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0-12.1], and pleural effusion (p = 0.043, OR 5.2, 95 % CI 0.8-30.9). No significant association was detected between the MEFV gene variations and a higher acute phase response. The MEFV gene variations analyzed in our study do not seem to increase the overall susceptibility to SLE and do not have any strong association with its clinical manifestations. The possibility of a modest effect of penetrant exon 10 MEFV variants on the development of serosal effusions needs to be explored in a larger series of patients.

  5. Variants of psychiatric disorders in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

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    T A Lisitsyna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze prevalence and structure of psychiatric disorders in pts with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE examining in the Institute of rheumatology of RAMS. Material and methods. 115 pts with SLE with median age 34 [24; 45] years and median disease duration 8 [4; 17] years were included. SLE activity was assessed with SLEDAI. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed by a psychiatrist according to ICD-10 using some psychiatric and psychological scales. Results. Psychiatric disorders were revealed in 76 from 115 (66% pts. Anxiety-depressive spectrum disorders prevailed (83%: depressive episode (40%, adjustment disorders (24%, generalized anxiety disorder (10%, dysthymia (9%. Severe cognitive dysfunction was revealed in 7% of pts. Pts with and without psychiatric disorders did not significantly differ in age, sex, duration and activity of the disease, duration of treatment and cumulative dose of prednisolone and cytotoxic drugs. Conclusion. Psychiatric disorders are frequent in pts with SLE (66%. Anxiety-depressive disorders prevail among them (83%. Relationship between SLE and psychiatric disorders requires further examination.

  6. Genital Mycoplasma infection among Mexican women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Méndez-Martínez, Socorro; García-Carrasco, Mario; Cedillo-Ramírez, María L; Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Etchegaray-Morales, Ivet; Gil-Juárez, Constantino; Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro J; Taboada-Cole, Alejandro; Jiménez-Herrera, Erick A; Muñóz-Guarneros, Margarita; Cervera, Ricard

    2017-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of genital Mycoplasma spp. among women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to identify factors associated with such infection. A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with SLE and healthy women who attended a hospital in Puebla, Mexico, between July 29, 2014, and January 4, 2015. All participants were aged 18 years or older and sexually active. A structured interview assessed sociodemographic, obstetric, gynecologic, and clinical characteristics. Disease activity was evaluated using the Mexican SLE Disease Activity Index. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the presence of Mycoplasma spp. in genital samples. Ureaplasma urealyticum was the only genital mycoplasma detected; it was present in 32 (24.6%) of 130 patients with SLE and 12 (12.8%) of 94 healthy women. Patients with SLE had increased odds of infection (odds ratio 2.120, 95% confidence interval 1.046-4.296). Among patients with SLE, multiparity was more common in those with U. urealyticum infection (P=0.043). One-quarter of women with SLE had genital infection with U. urealyticum. An association was found between infection and multiparity among women with SLE. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  7. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Focus on Etiology

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    Shala Ghaderi Berntsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML caused by reactivation of the JC virus (JCV, a human polyomavirus, occurs in autoimmune disorders, most frequently in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. We describe a HIV-negative 34-year-old female with SLE who had been treated with immunosuppressant therapy (IST; steroids and azathioprine since 2004. In 2011, she developed decreased sensation and weakness of the right hand, followed by vertigo and gait instability. The diagnosis of PML was made on the basis of brain MRI findings (posterior fossa lesions and JCV isolation from the cerebrospinal fluid (700 copies/ml. IST was immediately discontinued. Cidofovir, mirtazapine, mefloquine and cycles of cytarabine were sequentially added, but there was progressive deterioration with a fatal outcome 1 year after disease onset. This report discusses current therapeutic choices for PML and the importance of early infection screening when SLE patients present with neurological symptoms. In the light of recent reports of PML in SLE patients treated with rituximab or belimumab, we highlight that other IST may just as well be implicated. We conclude that severe lymphopenia was most likely responsible for JCV reactivation in this patient and discuss how effective management of lymphopenia in SLE and PML therapy remains an unmet need.

  8. Macrophage Polarization Modulates Development of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Feng Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Macrophages have recently been shown to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Methods: Here, we used an activated lymphocyte-derived DNA (ALD-DNA method to induce SLE in mice. We used a macrophage-specific eliminator clodronate to selectively deplete macrophages in mice. We isolated macrophages from bone marrow of the mice and used cytokines to differentiate M1 and M2 macrophages, respectively. Adoptive transplantation of M1 or M2 macrophages was performed in clodronate-treated mice. The effects on SLE were evaluated by serum anti-dsDNA autoantibody, by renal pathological changes, and by urine protein levels. Results: ALD-DNA induced SLE-like features in mice, manifested by induction of serum anti-dsDNA autoantibody, by renal pathological changes, and by increases in urine protein levels. Clodronate significantly decreased macrophages in mice, which significantly increased SLE severity. Adoptive transplantation of M2, but not M1 macrophages significantly reduced SLE severity in clodronate- and ALD-DNA-treated mice. Conclusion: M1 and M2 macrophages play different roles in development of SLE. M1 macrophages increase the severity of SLE, while M2 macrophages reduce it. Modulation of macrophage polarity may be an attractive therapy for SLE.

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus and the Crithidia luciliae immunofluorescent test

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    Whitehouse, I.J.; Fehr, K.; Wagenhaeuser, F.J.

    A comparative study of the Crithidia luciliae immunofluorescence (CL-IF) assay and an adapted Farr radioimmunoassay (RIA), for the measurement of antibodies to native deoxyribonucleic acid, was performed using forty-two sera from patients with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and another forty-two from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Both assays were specific for SLE. The CL-IF assay was statistically significantly more sensitive than the adapted RIA assay. This significant difference was due to greater sensitivity of the CL-IF assay in the cases of sera from patients with SLE of slight activity. Additional advantages of the CL-IF assay were its use to classify the immunoglobulin types of the antibodies (most commonly IgG or IgM) and to measure complement-fixing antibodies to native deoxyribonucleic acid; it affords a simple method of selecting and following SLE patients at risk of developing severe renal disease. These advantages plus the simplicity and inexpensiveness of the CL-IF assay make it a useful tool, especially for use in small laboratories, for the study of antibodies to native deoxyribonucleic acid in patients with SLE.

  10. The Association of the GABRP Polymorphisms with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Hun-Soo Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit pi (GABRP is involved in inhibitory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. This gene encodes multisubunit chloride channels and is also expressed in numerous nonneuronal tissues such as the uterus and the ovaries. This study was aimed to validate whether the polymorphisms in the GABRP gene are associated with the susceptibility to systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE. The genotype frequencies of the rs929763, rs732157, and rs3805455 of the GABRP gene in SLE patients were significantly different from those of the control group (P<0.0001, P=0.05 and 0.002, resp.. Additional analysis showed that the genotype of the rs929763 and rs3805455 of the GABRP gene were also significantly associated with female SLE patients (P<0.0001, P=0.005, resp.. Two haplotype frequencies including a major haplotype of GABRP SNPs were more significantly different between the SLE patients and the healthy controls (P=0.038 and 4.2E-24, resp.. These results suggest that the polymorphisms in the GABRP gene might be associated with the susceptibility to SLE and the haplotype of GABRP SNPs is useful genetic marker for SLE.

  11. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Systematic Review

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    John W. Kennedy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE has greatly improved in recent years, resulting in an increased number of patients reporting musculoskeletal complications such as osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Total hip arthroplasty (THA can be utilised to alleviate the pain associated with this; however postoperative outcomes in patients with SLE are uncertain. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify articles presenting results of THA in SLE, and nine suitable papers were found. All papers were level IV evidence. Pooling the results, a total of 162 patients underwent 214 total hip arthroplasties. Mean follow-up was 72.5 months. The mean Harris Hip Score improved from 45.5 preoperatively to 88.6 and last follow-up. Seventeen percent of patients experienced at least one complication. Superficial wound infection occurred in 3.3%. Revision was required in 2.8% of cases. The mortality rate was 18.5% however no deaths were attributable to undergoing THA. Given the paucity of data present in the literature, more studies are required to adequately assess the postoperative outcomes of THA in patients with SLE, particularly complication rates.

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus activity and beta two microglobulin levels

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    Thelma Larocca Skare

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with a cyclical clinical course. Evaluation of the clinical activity of this disease is important for choosing the correct treatment. The objective of this study was to analyze the value of beta-2 microglobulin (β2M serum levels in determining SLE clinical activity.DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional analytical study conducted at the rheumatology outpatient clinic of a private university hospital.METHODS: 129 SLE patients were studied regarding disease activity using SLEDAI (SLE Disease Activity Index and cumulative damage using SLICC ACR (SLE International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index for SLE. At the same time, the β2M serum level, ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anti-dsDNA (anti-double-stranded DNA and C3 and C4 complement fractions were determined.RESULTS: β2M levels correlated positively with SLEDAI (P = 0.02 and ESR (P = 0.0009 and negatively with C3 (P = 0.007. Patients who were positive for anti-dsDNA had higher β2M serum levels (P = 0.009.CONCLUSION: β2M levels are elevated in SLE patients with active disease.

  13. Prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 infection in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Sun Shipeng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For decades, scientists have tried to understand the environmental factors involved in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, in which viral infections was included. Previous studies have identified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV to incite SLE. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, another member of the gammaherpesvirus family, shares a lot in common with EBV. The characteristics of HHV-8 make it a well-suited candidate to trigger SLE. Results In the present study, serum samples from patients (n = 108 with diagnosed SLE and matched controls (n = 122 were collected, and the prevalence of HHV-8 was compared by a virus-specific nested PCR and a whole virus enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA. There was significant difference in the prevalence of HHV-8 DNA between SLE patients and healthy controls (11 of 107 vs 1 of 122, p = 0.001; significant difference was also found in the detection of HHV-8 antibodies (19 of 107 vs 2 of 122, p We also detected the antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1. Both patients and controls showed high seroprevalence with no significant difference (106 of 107 vs 119 of 122, p = 0.625. Conclusion Our finding indicated that there might be an association between HHV-8 and the development of SLE.

  14. Renal histology and pregnancy performance in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Devoe, L D; Loy, G L; Spargo, B H

    1983-01-01

    Previous reports indicate that maternal and fetal outcome in pregnancies complicated by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may be strongly influenced by the presence of renal disease. As the relationship between renal histology and clinical function in SLE is not consistent, prospective data on the outcomes of such pregnancies would aid patient counselling. Fifteen women with SLE had 18 pregnancies subsequent to renal biopsies, performed from 3 months to 8 years prior to conception. Their renal function was evaluated before, during and after pregnancy. Fourteen of 15 patients had evidence of renal involvement, based on by light and electron microscopic sections: 7 had mesangial involvement (WHO Class II); 5 had active focal or diffuse glomerulonephritis (Classes III and IV); two had membranous involvement (Class V); 1, no evident disease. Perinatal outcome was similar whether lesions were milder (8 continuing pregnancies, 4 term deliveries) or more severe (6 continuing pregnancies, 3 term deliveries). Clinical renal function was normal in all but 3 cases at the beginning of pregnancy; 2 additional patients experienced moderate deteriorations in renal function during pregnancy but recovered normal function in the puerperium. Fetal outcome was abnormal (3 premature deliveries, 1 neonatal death, 1 spontaneous abortion) in all cases where renal function was decreased, while 10 of 13 pregnancies in patients with normal renal function ended in term deliveries. The data suggest that currently preconceptual renal histology provides a less accurate basis for perinatal counselling than does the assessment of clinical renal function.

  15. Healthcare Utilization and Costs of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Medicaid

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    Hong J. Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Healthcare utilization and costs associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a US Medicaid population were examined. Methods. Patients ≥ 18 years old with SLE diagnosis (ICD-9-CM 710.0x were extracted from a large Medicaid database 2002–2009. Index date was date of the first SLE diagnosis. Patients with and without SLE were matched. All patients had a variable length of followup with a minimum of 12 months. Annualized healthcare utilization and costs associated with SLE and costs of SLE flares were assessed during the followup period. Multivariate regressions were conducted to estimate incremental healthcare utilization and costs associated with SLE. Results. A total of 14,777 SLE patients met the study criteria, and 14,262 were matched to non-SLE patients. SLE patients had significantly higher healthcare utilization per year than their matched controls. The estimated incremental annual cost associated with SLE was $10,984, with the highest increase in inpatient costs (P<0.001. Cost per flare was $11,716 for severe flares, $562 for moderate flares, and $129 for mild flares. Annual total costs for patients with severe flares were $49,754. Conclusions. SLE patients had significantly higher healthcare resource utilization and costs than non-SLE patients. Patients with severe flares had the highest costs.

  16. A Case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Confused with Infective Endocarditis

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    Sibel Serin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multisystemic autoimmune disease resulting from immune system-mediated tissue damage. Clinical findings of SLE can involve skin, kidney, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, serosal membranes, and the hematologic and immune systems. In the differential diagnosis, other connective tissue diseases, infective endocarditis, infections such as viral hepatitis, endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism, sarcoidosis, and some malignant tumors should be considered. Infective endocarditis can imitate all the symptoms of SLE depending on immune complex accumulation glomerulonephritis. Hemolytic anemia, skin lesions, arthralgia, arthritis, decreased complement levels, and autoantibody positivity, including antinuclear autoantibody (ANA, positivity can be seen. Therefore, high fever, blood cultures, eye examination, and echocardiographic findings are of particular value. Here, we present a case of SLE that was confused with infective endocarditis (IE due to the presence of high fever associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AHA and proteinuria as well as increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, cardiac murmur, and Roth’s spots. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 212-15

  17. The Importance of an Early Diagnosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

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    Sebastiani, Gian D; Prevete, Immacolata; Iuliano, Annamaria; Minisola, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a high degree of variability at onset, making it difficult to reach a correct and prompt diagnosis. To present the difficulties faced by the clinician in making a SLE diagnosis, based on the characteristics at study entry of an Italian cohort of SLE patients with recent onset as compared to two similar cohorts. Beginning on 1 January 2012 all patients with a diagnosis of SLE (1997 ACR criteria) and disease duration of less than 12 months were consecutively enrolled in a multicenter prospective study. Information on clinical and serological characteristics was collected at study entry and every 6 months thereafter. Our cohort consisted of 122 patients, of whom 103 were females. Among the manifestations included in the 1997 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, cutaneous, articular and hematologic symptoms were the most prevalent symptoms at study entry. Data from the literature confirm that the diagnosis of SLE is challenging, and that SLE is a severe disease even at onset when a prompt diagnosis is necessary for initiating the appropriate therapy.

  18. Alveolar hemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus: a cohort review.

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    Andrade, C; Mendonça, T; Farinha, F; Correia, J; Marinho, A; Almeida, I; Vasconcelos, C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare but potentially catastrophic manifestation with a high mortality. Among rheumatologic diseases, it occurs most frequently in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic vasculitis. Despite new diagnostic tools and therapies, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this work was to characterize the SLE patients with an episode of alveolar hemorrhage followed in our Clinical Immunology Unit (CIU). A retrospective chart review was carried out for all patients with SLE followed in CIU between 1984 and the end of 2013. We reviewed the following data: demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory data, radiologic investigations, histologic studies, treatment, and outcome. We identified 10 episodes of DAH, corresponding to seven patients, all female. These represent 1.6% of SLE patients followed in our Unit. The age at DAH attack was 42.75 ± 18.9 years. The average time between diagnosis of SLE and the onset of DAH was 7.1 years. Three patients had the diagnosis of SLE and the DAH attack at the same time. Disease activity according to SLEDAI was high, ranging from 15 to 41. All patients were treated with methylprednisolone, 37.5% cyclophosphamide and 28.6% plasmapheresis. The overall mortality rate was 28.6%.

  19. [Rare cutaneous manifestaions of lupus erythematosus. A clinical overview].

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    Kuhn, A; Schuppe, H C; Ruzicka, T; Lehmann, P

    2000-11-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is a disease with a wide spectrum of cutaneous and systemic manifestations and has been the subject of many studies over several decades. Clinical features of patients with LE show a great variation, and for this reason it is difficult to develop a unifying concept of this disease. Consequently, this has led to the identification of subsets which have been defined by constellations of clinical and photobiological features, histological changes as well as laboratory abnormalities. Besides the characteristic classical forms such as systemic LE (SLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE), and discoid LE (DLE), there are uncommon variants of LE which often lead to diagnostic difficulties. Bullous LE (BLE) and urticarial vasculitis are listed as characteristic but non-specific manifestations of systemic LE. LE tumidus (LET), LE hypertrophic/verrucous (LEHV), chilblain LE, and LE profundus (LEP) are uncommon subtypes of chronic cutaneous LE. Annular erythema and papulonodular mucinosis are further uncommon cutaneous manifestations of LE. This clinical review summarizes the typical features of the uncommon forms of LE in order to improve clinical diagnostic precision and to achieve a better differentiation of the subtypes.

  20. Cardiac autonomic profile in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Aydemir, M; Yazisiz, V; Basarici, I; Avci, A B; Erbasan, F; Belgi, A; Terzioglu, E

    2010-03-01

    Neurological involvement is a well-documented issue in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, little is known about the involvement of the autonomic nervous system. This study was conducted to investigate autonomic nervous system dysfunction in patients with RA and SLE. Twenty-six RA patients, 38 SLE patients and 40 healthy controls were recruited from our in- and out-patient departments. Heart rate variability (HRV) parameters (the power of the high- [HF] and low-frequency [LF] band of haemodynamic time series, the ratio between low- and high-frequency components [LF/HF ratio], the power spectral density), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and beat-to-beat blood pressures were assessed by a novel non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring tool (Task Force Monitor [TFM], CNSystems Medizintechnik GmbH, Graz, Austria). Autonomic nervous system dysfunction was determined according to classical Ewing autonomic test battery. Furthermore, we implemented a secondary autonomic test score by modifying the Ewing test battery with additional criteria. Both the classical and modified Ewing test batteries have revealed that the frequencies of autonomic neuropathy were significantly higher in patient groups compared with controls (p disease duration, disease activity and autoantibody positivity. Consequently, we believe that further large-scale studies investigating cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in rheumatic diseases should be carried out to verify our findings and manifest clinical consequences beyond these results.